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Sample records for celastrol potentiates radiotherapy

  1. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of C(6-Modified Celastrol Derivatives as Potential Antitumor Agents

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    Kaiyong Tang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New six C6-celastrol derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activities against nine human cancer cell lines (BGC-823, H4, Bel7402, H522, Colo 205, HepG2 and MDA-MB-468. The results showed that most of the compounds displayed potent inhibition against BGC823, H4, and Bel7402, with IC50s of 1.84–0.39 μM. The best compound NST001A was tested in an in vivo antitumor assay on nude mice bearing Colo 205 xenografts, and showed significant inhibition of tumor growth at low concentrations. Therefore, celastrol C-6 derivatives are potential drug candidates for treating cancer.

  2. Celastrol Attenuates Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain Mediated by Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2

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    Longhe Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Celastrol, a major active ingredient of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (thunder god vine, has exhibited a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer and immunosuppression. In the present study, we used animal models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, generated by carrageenan injection and spared nerve injury (SNI, respectively, to evaluate the effect of celastrol and to address the mechanisms underlying pain processing. Intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of celastrol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced edema and allodynia. Real-time PCR analysis showed that celastrol (0.3 mg/kg, i.p. significantly reduced mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, in carrageenan-injected mice. In SNI mice, pain behavior studies showed that celastrol (1 mg/kg, i.p. effectively prevented the hypersensitivity of mechanical nociceptive response on the third day post-surgery and the seventh day post-surgery. Furthermore, the anti-hyperalgesic effects of celastrol in carrageenan-injected mice and SNI mice were reversed by SR144528 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2 receptor antagonist, but not by SR141716 (1 mg/kg, i.p., a specific cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1 receptor antagonist. Taken together, our results demonstrate the analgesia effects of celastrol through CB2 signaling and propose the potential of exploiting celastrol as a novel candidate for pain relief.

  3. Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition by inhibiting Snail and regulating E-cadherin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •We investigated the effects of celastrol on TGF-β1-induced EMT in epithelial cells. •Celastrol regulates TGF-β1-induced morphological changes and E-cadherin expression. •Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced Snail expression. •Celastrol strongly suppresses TGF-β1-induced invasion in MDCK and A549 cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasive and metastatic potentials of cancer progression. Celastrol inhibits the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells including leukemia, glioma, prostate, and breast cancer; however, the possible role of celastrol in the EMT is unclear. We investigated the effect of celastrol on the EMT. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT-like morphologic changes and upregulation of Snail expression. The downregulation of E-cadherin expression and upregulation of Snail in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and A549 cell lines show that TGF-β1-mediated the EMT in epithelial cells; however, celastrol markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced morphologic changes, Snail upregulation, and E-cadherin expression. Migration and invasion assays revealed that celastrol completely inhibited TGF-β1-mediated cellular migration in both cell lines. These findings indicate that celastrol downregulates Snail expression, thereby inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT in MDCK and A549 cells. Thus, our findings provide new evidence that celastrol suppresses lung cancer invasion and migration by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT

  4. Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition by inhibiting Snail and regulating E-cadherin expression

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    Kang, Hyereen; Lee, Minjae [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Sung-Wuk, E-mail: swjang@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •We investigated the effects of celastrol on TGF-β1-induced EMT in epithelial cells. •Celastrol regulates TGF-β1-induced morphological changes and E-cadherin expression. •Celastrol inhibits TGF-β1-induced Snail expression. •Celastrol strongly suppresses TGF-β1-induced invasion in MDCK and A549 cells. -- Abstract: The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasive and metastatic potentials of cancer progression. Celastrol inhibits the proliferation of a variety of tumor cells including leukemia, glioma, prostate, and breast cancer; however, the possible role of celastrol in the EMT is unclear. We investigated the effect of celastrol on the EMT. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) induced EMT-like morphologic changes and upregulation of Snail expression. The downregulation of E-cadherin expression and upregulation of Snail in Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and A549 cell lines show that TGF-β1-mediated the EMT in epithelial cells; however, celastrol markedly inhibited TGF-β1-induced morphologic changes, Snail upregulation, and E-cadherin expression. Migration and invasion assays revealed that celastrol completely inhibited TGF-β1-mediated cellular migration in both cell lines. These findings indicate that celastrol downregulates Snail expression, thereby inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT in MDCK and A549 cells. Thus, our findings provide new evidence that celastrol suppresses lung cancer invasion and migration by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced EMT.

  5. Celastrol prevents cadmium-induced neuronal cell death via targeting JNK and PTEN-Akt/mTOR network.

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    Chen, Sujuan; Gu, Chenjian; Xu, Chong; Zhang, Jinfei; Xu, Yijiao; Ren, Qian; Guo, Min; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a toxic environmental contaminant, induces neurodegenerative diseases. Celastrol, a plant-derived triterpene, has shown neuroprotective effects in various disease models. However, little is known regarding the effect of celastrol on Cd-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we show that celastrol protected against Cd-induced apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells. This is supported by the findings that celastrol strikingly attenuated Cd-induced viability reduction, morphological change, nuclear fragmentation, and condensation, as well as activation of caspase-3 in neuronal cells. Concurrently, celastrol remarkably blocked Cd-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and p38, in neuronal cells. Inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or over-expression of dominant negative c-Jun potentiated celastrol protection against Cd-induced cell death. Furthermore, pre-treatment with celastrol prevented Cd down-regulation of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and activation of phosphoinositide 3'-kinase/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in neuronal cells. Over-expression of wild-type PTEN enhanced celastrol inhibition of Cd-activated Akt/mTOR signaling and cell death in neuronal cells. The findings indicate that celastrol prevents Cd-induced neuronal cell death via targeting JNK and PTEN-Akt/mTOR network. Our results strongly suggest that celastrol may be exploited for the prevention of Cd-induced neurodegenerative disorders. Celastrol, a plant-derived triterpene, has shown neuroprotective effects. However, little is known regarding the effect of celastrol on cadmium (Cd) neurotoxicity. This study underscores that celastrol prevents Cd-induced neuronal apoptosis via inhibiting activation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and Akt/mTOR network. Celastrol suppresses Cd-activated Akt/mTOR pathway by elevating PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog). The

  6. Celastrol targets mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I to induce reactive oxygen species-dependent cytotoxicity in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celastrol is an active ingredient of the traditional Chinese medicinal plant Tripterygium Wilfordii, which exhibits significant antitumor activity in different cancer models in vitro and in vivo; however, the lack of information on the target and mechanism of action of this compound have impeded its clinical application. In this study, we sought to determine the mode of action of celastrol by focusing on the processes that mediate its anticancer activity. The downregulation of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) client proteins, phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and cleavage of PARP, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were detected by western blotting. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Cell cycle progression, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes. Celastrol induced ROS accumulation, G2-M phase blockage, apoptosis and necrosis in H1299 and HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidative agent, inhibited celastrol-induced ROS accumulation and cytotoxicity. JNK phosphorylation induced by celastrol was suppressed by NAC and JNK inhibitor SP600125 (SP). Moreover, SP significantly inhibited celastrol-induced loss of MMP, cleavage of PARP, caspase 9 and caspase 3, mitochondrial translocation of Bad, cytoplasmic release of cytochrome c, and cell death. However, SP did not inhibit celastrol-induced ROS accumulation. Celastrol downregulated HSP90 client proteins but did not disrupt the interaction between HSP90 and cdc37. NAC completely inhibited celastrol-induced decrease of HSP90 client proteins, catalase and thioredoxin. The activity of MRC complex I was completely inhibited in H1299 cells treated with 6 μM celastrol in the absence and presence of NAC. Moreover, the inhibition of MRC complex I activity

  7. Treatment of obesity with celastrol.

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    Liu, Junli; Lee, Jaemin; Salazar Hernandez, Mario Andres; Mazitschek, Ralph; Ozcan, Umut

    2015-05-21

    Despite all modern advances in medicine, an effective drug treatment of obesity has not been found yet. Discovery of leptin two decades ago created hopes for treatment of obesity. However, development of leptin resistance has been a big obstacle, mitigating a leptin-centric treatment of obesity. Here, by using in silico drug-screening methods, we discovered that Celastrol, a pentacyclic triterpene extracted from the roots of Tripterygium Wilfordi (thunder god vine) plant, is a powerful anti-obesity agent. Celastrol suppresses food intake, blocks reduction of energy expenditure, and leads to up to 45% weight loss in hyperleptinemic diet-induced obese (DIO) mice by increasing leptin sensitivity, but it is ineffective in leptin-deficient (ob/ob) and leptin receptor-deficient (db/db) mouse models. These results indicate that Celastrol is a leptin sensitizer and a promising agent for the pharmacological treatment of obesity. PMID:26000480

  8. Solid self-microemulsifying dispersible tablets of celastrol: formulation development, charaterization and bioavailability evaluation.

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    Qi, Xiaole; Qin, Jiayi; Ma, Ning; Chou, Xiaohua; Wu, Zhenghong

    2014-09-10

    The aims of this study were to choose a suitable adsorbent of self-microemulsion and to develop a fine solid self-microemulsifying dispersible tablets for promoting the dissolution and oral bioavailability of celastrol. Solubility test, self-emulsifying grading test, droplet size analysis and ternary phase diagrams test were performed to screen and optimize the composition of liquid celastrol self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS). Then microcrystalline cellulose KG 802 was added as a suitable adsorbent into the optimized liquid celastrol-SMEDDS formulation to prepare the dispersible tablets by wet granulation compression method. The optimized formulation of celastrol-SMEDDS dispersible tablets was finally determinated by the feasibility of the preparing process and redispersibility. The in vitro study showed that the dispersible tablets could disperse in the dispersion medium within 3 min with the average particle size of 25.32 ± 3.26 nm. In vivo pharmacokinetic experiments of rats, the relative bioavailability of celastrol SMEDDS and SMEDDS dispersible tablets compared to the 0.4% CMC-Na suspension was 569 ± 7.07% and 558 ± 6.77%, respectively, while there were no significant difference between the SMEDDS and SMEDDS dispersible tablets. The results suggest the potential use of SMEDDS dispersible tablets for the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble terpenes drugs, such as celastrol. PMID:24929011

  9. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

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    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathways, with significant enhancement of mitochondrial activities. Furthermore, celastrol prevented increased levels of cellular oxidative damage where the production of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultures cells was greatly reduced. Celastrol significantly increased protein phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades with amplified expression of AMPK protein and attenuated NF-κB and PKC θ activation in human skeletal muscle treated with AMA. The improvement of insulin signaling pathways by celastrol was also accompanied by augmented GLUT4 protein expression. Taken together, these results suggest that celastrol may be advocated for use as a potential therapeutic molecule to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle cells.

  10. Development of B cells and erythrocytes is specifically impaired by the drug celastrol in mice.

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    Sophie Kusy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Celastrol, an active compound extracted from the root of the Chinese medicine "Thunder of God Vine" (Tripterygium wilfordii, exhibits anticancer, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and interest in the therapeutic potential of celastrol is increasing. However, described side effects following treatment are significant and require investigation prior to initiating clinical trials. Here, we investigated the effects of celastrol on the adult murine hematopoietic system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Animals were treated daily with celastrol over a four-day period and peripheral blood, bone marrow, spleen, and peritoneal cavity were harvested for cell phenotyping. Treated mice showed specific impairment of the development of B cells and erythrocytes in all tested organs. In bone marrow, these alterations were accompanied by decreases in populations of common lymphoid progenitors (CLP, common myeloid progenitors (CMP and megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors (MEP. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that celastrol acts through regulators of adult hematopoiesis and could be used as a modulator of the hematopoietic system. These observations provide valuable information for further assessment prior to clinical trials.

  11. New strategy of photodynamic treatment of TiO2 nanofibers combined with celastrol for HepG2 proliferation in vitro

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    Li, Jingyuan; Wang, Xuemei; Jiang, Hui; Lu, Xiaohua; Zhu, Yudan; Chen, Baoan

    2011-08-01

    As one of the best biocompatible semiconductor nanomaterials, TiO2 nanofibers can act as a good photosensitizer material and show potential application in the field of drug carriers and photodynamic therapy to cure diseases. Celastrol, one of the active components extracted from T. wilfordii Hook F., was widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for many diseases. In this study, the cytotoxicity of celastrol for HepG2 cancer cells was firstly explored. The results showed that celastrol could inhibit cancer cell proliferation in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in HepG2 cells. After the TiO2 nanofibers were introduced into the system of celastrol, the cooperation effect showed that the nanocomposites between TiO2 nanofibers and celastrol could enhance the cytotoxicity of celastrol for HepG2 cells and cut down the drug consumption so as to reduce the side-effect of the related drug. Associated with the photodynamic effect, it is evident that TiO2 nanofibers could readily facilitate the potential application of the active compounds from natural products like celastrol. Turning to the advantages of nanotechnology, the combination of nanomaterials with the related monomer active compounds of promising Chinese medicine could play an important role to explore the relevant mechanism of the drug cellular interaction and promote the potential application of TiO2 nanofibers in the clinical treatment.As one of the best biocompatible semiconductor nanomaterials, TiO2 nanofibers can act as a good photosensitizer material and show potential application in the field of drug carriers and photodynamic therapy to cure diseases. Celastrol, one of the active components extracted from T. wilfordii Hook F., was widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for many diseases. In this study, the cytotoxicity of celastrol for HepG2 cancer cells was firstly explored. The results showed that celastrol could inhibit cancer cell

  12. Antitumor activity of celastrol nanoparticles in a xenograft retinoblastoma tumor model

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    Li ZR

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhanrong Li,1,* Xianghua Wu,1,* Jingguo Li,2 Lin Yao,1 Limei Sun,1 Yingying Shi,1 Wenxin Zhang,1 Jianxian Lin,1 Dan Liang,1 Yongping Li1 1State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, 2School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Celastrol, a Chinese herbal medicine, has shown antitumor activity against various tumor cell lines. However, the effect of celastrol on retinoblastoma has not yet been analyzed. Additionally, the poor water solubility of celastrol restricts further therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of celastrol nanoparticles (CNPs on retinoblastoma and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved.Methods: Celastrol-loaded poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(ε-caprolactone nanopolymeric micelles were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of celastrol. The 2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl-3-(4-nitrophenyl-5-(2,4-disulf-ophenyl-2H tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-8 assay was used to determine the inhibitory effect of CNPs on SO-Rb 50 cell proliferation in vitro. Immunofluorescence was used to evaluate the apoptotic effect of CNPs on nuclear morphology, and flow cytometry was used to quantify cellular apoptosis. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax, NF-κB p65, and phospo-NF-κB p65 proteins was assessed by Western blotting. A human retinoblastoma xenograft model was used to evaluate the inhibitory effects of CNPs on retinoblastoma in NOD-SCID mice. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to assess the apoptotic effects of CNPs on retinoblastoma.Results: CNPs inhibit the proliferation of SO-Rb 50 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC50 of 17.733 µg/mL (celastrol-loading content: 7.36% after exposure to CNPs for 48 hours. CNPs induce apoptosis in SO-Rb 50 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of Bcl-2, NF-κB p65, and phospo-NF-κB p65

  13. Elucidation of the Intestinal Absorption Mechanism of Celastrol Using the Caco-2 Cell Transwell Model.

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    Li, Hong; Li, Jie; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Yichuan; Luo, Yili; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Manna; Yu, Weifeng; Qu, Shen

    2016-08-01

    Celastrol, a triterpenoid isolated from stem (caulis) of Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. (Celastraceae), has been known to have various pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antioxidant activities. However, the mechanism of the intestinal absorption of celastrol is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal absorption of celastrol using the Caco-2 cell transwell model. First, the bidirectional transport of celastrol in Caco-2 cell monolayers was observed. Then, the effects of time, concentration, temperature, paracellular pathway, and efflux transport inhibition on the transport of celastrol across the Caco-2 cell monolayers were investigated. The P-glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil and cyclosporin A, the multidrug resistance protein 2 inhibitor MK571, and the breast cancer resistance protein inhibitor reserpine were used. Additionally, the effects of celastrol on the activity of P-glycoprotein were evaluated using the rhodamine 123 uptake assay. In this study, we found that the intestinal transport of celastrol was a time- and concentration-dependent active transport. The paracellular pathway was not involved in the transport of celastrol, and the efflux of celastrol was energy dependent. The results indicated that celastrol is a substrate of P-glycoprotein but not multidrug resistance protein 2 or the breast cancer resistance protein. In addition, celastrol could not affect the uptake of rhodamine 123 in Caco-2 cells, which indicated that celastrol could not inhibit or induce the activity of P-glycoprotein. PMID:27159672

  14. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  15. Review of potential improvements using MRI in the radiotherapy workflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a lethal amount of dose to tissue volumes that contain a significant amount of tumour cells while sparing surrounding unaffected or healthy tissue. Online image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound, fiducial-based planar X-ray imaging or helical/conebeam CT has dramatically improved the precision of radiotherapy, with moving targets still posing some methodical problems regarding positioning. Therefore, requirements for precise target delineation and identification of functional body structures to be spared by high doses become more evident. The identification of areas of relatively radioresistant cells or areas of high tumor cell density is currently under development. This review outlines the state of the art of MRI integration into treatment planning and its importance in follow up and the quantification of biological effects. Finally the current state of the art of online imaging for patient positioning will be outlined and indications will be given what the potential of integrated radiotherapy/online MRI systems is.

  16. Review of potential improvements using MRI in the radiotherapy workflow

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    Torresin, Alberto; Brambilla, Maria Grazia; Monti, Angelo F.; Moscato, Alessio [Azienda Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Dept. of Medical Physics, Milano (Italy); Brockmann, Marc A. [University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology; University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Schad, Lothar [University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Attenberger, Ulrike I. [University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Lohr, Frank [University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2015-07-01

    The goal of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a lethal amount of dose to tissue volumes that contain a significant amount of tumour cells while sparing surrounding unaffected or healthy tissue. Online image guided radiotherapy with stereotactic ultrasound, fiducial-based planar X-ray imaging or helical/conebeam CT has dramatically improved the precision of radiotherapy, with moving targets still posing some methodical problems regarding positioning. Therefore, requirements for precise target delineation and identification of functional body structures to be spared by high doses become more evident. The identification of areas of relatively radioresistant cells or areas of high tumor cell density is currently under development. This review outlines the state of the art of MRI integration into treatment planning and its importance in follow up and the quantification of biological effects. Finally the current state of the art of online imaging for patient positioning will be outlined and indications will be given what the potential of integrated radiotherapy/online MRI systems is.

  17. NF-kappa B modulation is involved in celastrol induced human multiple myeloma cell apoptosis.

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    Haiwen Ni

    Full Text Available Celastrol is an active compound extracted from the root bark of the traditional Chinese medicine Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. To investigate the effect of celastrol on human multiple myeloma cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and explore its molecular mechanism of action. The activity of celastrol on LP-1 cell proliferation was detected by WST-8 assay. The celastrol-induced cell cycle arrest was analyzed by flow cytometry after propidium iodide staining. Nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB was observed by fluorescence microscope. Celastrol inhibited cell proliferation of LP-1 myeloma cell in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values of 0.8817 µM, which was mediated through G1 cell cycle arrest and p27 induction. Celastrol induced apoptosis in LP-1 and RPMI 8226 myeloma cells in a time and dose dependent manner, and it involved Caspase-3 activation and NF-κB pathway. Celastrol down-modulated antiapoptotic proteins including Bcl-2 and survivin expression. The expression of NF-κB and IKKa were decreased after celastrol treatment. Celastrol effectively blocked the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit and induced human multiple myeloma cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by p27 upregulation and NF-kB modulation. It has been demonstrated that the effect of celastrol on NF-kB was HO-1-independent by using zinc protoporphyrin-9 (ZnPPIX, a selective heme oxygenase inhibitor. From the results, it could be inferred that celastrol may be used as a NF-kB inhibitor to inhibit myeloma cell proliferation.

  18. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  19. Hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for second cancer reduction

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    Besserer Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose A model for carcinoma and sarcoma induction was used to study the dependence of carcinogenesis after radiotherapy on fractionation. Materials and methods A cancer induction model for radiotherapy doses including fractionation was used to model carcinoma and sarcoma induction after a radiation treatment. For different fractionation schemes the dose response relationships were obtained. Tumor induction was studied as a function of dose per fraction. Results If it is assumed that the tumor is treated up to the same biologically equivalent dose it was found that large dose fractions could decrease second cancer induction. The risk decreases approximately linear with increasing fraction size and is more pronounced for sarcoma induction. Carcinoma induction decreases by around 10% per 1 Gy increase in fraction dose. Sarcoma risk is decreased by about 15% per 1 Gy increase in fractionation. It is also found that tissue which is irradiated using large dose fractions to dose levels lower than 10% of the target dose potentially develop less sarcomas when compared to tissues irradiated to all dose levels. This is not observed for carcinoma induction. Conclusions It was found that carcinoma as well as sarcoma risk decreases with increasing fractionation dose. The reduction of sarcoma risk is even more pronounced than carcinoma risk. Hypofractionation is potentially beneficial with regard to second cancer induction.

  20. 雷公藤红素醇质体的制备及体外透皮性能研究%Study on Preparation of Celastrol Ethosome and Its Skin Penetration Properties in Vitro

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    吴军; 吴明; 刘荻; 马卓

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prepare celastrol ethosomes and to observe the permeability characteristics of the ethosomes which act as the transdermal delivery carriers of celastrol in vitro. Methods Celastrol ethosomes were prepared by ethanol injection method, and then the encapsulation efficiency, particle size, polydispersity index ( PDI) and zeta potential of the ethosomes were analyzed. TP2A intelligent percutaneous penetration instrument was used to compare the skin penetration properties of celastrol ethosomes, celastrol solution and the mixture of blank ethosomes with celastrol solution. Results The prepared celastrol ethosomes were spherical, and the average particle size was (401.3 ± 5.5) nm, PDI was 0.21± 0.02, steady zeta potential was (-2.75 ± 0.1) mV, and average encapsulation efficiency was ( 80.6 ± 0.7) %. The amount of accumulative penetration of celastrol ethosomes at 48 h was 76.86 μg·cm -2 and the permeation rate was 1.640 9 μg·cm -2·h -1, which were significantly higher than the celastrol solution and the mixture of blank ethosomes with celastrol solution. Conclusion The prepared ethosomes have high encapsulation efficiency, uniform particle size and stable quality, and are beneficial to the transdermal absorption of celastrol.%【目的】制备雷公藤红素(Cel)醇质体,并考察醇质体作为雷公藤红素经皮给药载体的渗透特性。【方法】采用乙醇注入法制备雷公藤红素醇质体,并对其包封率、粒径、多分散指数(PDI)及Zeta电位进行分析;采用TP2A型智能透皮试验仪进行体外透皮试验,比较雷公藤红素醇质体、空白醇质体/Cel溶液和Cel溶液的透皮行为。【结果】此方法制备的雷公藤红素醇质体为类球形结构,平均粒径为(401.3±5.5) nm, PDI为(0.21±0.02), Zeta电位为(-2.75±0.1) mV,平均包封率为(80.6±0.7)%;醇质体48 h的累积透过量76.86μg·cm-2,渗透速率为1.6409μg·cm-2·h-1,与空白

  1. The potential of radiotherapy of lymphoma infiltrations of the CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a very important element in the complex therapy of lymphomas of the central nervous system, significantly improving the results of the aggressive system chemotherapy. Irradiation of considerable tissue volumes and the application of rather high total doses are recommended. In view of the unfavorable prognosis and biological behavior of the tumor, the total treatment (including chemotherapy and radiotherapy) should be aggressive. (author)

  2. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  3. Celastrol Protects against Antimycin A-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells

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    Mohamad Hafizi Abu Bakar; Kian-Kai Cheng; Mohamad Roji Sarmidi; Harisun Yaakob; Hasniza Zaman Huri

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation are widely accepted as key hallmarks of obesity-induced skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional roles of an anti-inflammatory compound, celastrol, in mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance induced by antimycin A (AMA) in human skeletal muscle cells. We found that celastrol treatment improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake activity of AMA-treated cells, apparently via PI3K/Akt pathwa...

  4. Natural proteasome inhibitor celastrol suppresses androgen-independent prostate cancer progression by modulating apoptotic proteins and NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Dai

    Full Text Available Celastrol is a natural proteasome inhibitor that exhibits promising anti-tumor effects in human malignancies, especially the androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC with constitutive NF-κB activation. Celastrol induces apoptosis by means of proteasome inhibition and suppresses prostate tumor growth. However, the detailed mechanism of action remains elusive. In the current study, we aim to test the hypothesis that celastrol suppresses AIPC progression via inhibiting the constitutive NF-κB activity as well as modulating the Bcl-2 family proteins.We examined the efficacy of celastrol both in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the role of NF-κB in celastrol-mediated AIPC regression. We found that celastrol inhibited cell proliferation in all three AIPC cell lines (PC-3, DU145 and CL1, with IC₅₀ in the range of 1-2 µM. Celastrol also suppressed cell migration and invasion. Celastrol significantly induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased sub-G1 population, caspase activation and PARP cleavage. Moreover, celastrol promoted cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and activated the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa. In addition, celastrol rapidly blocked cytosolic IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of RelA. Likewise, celastrol inhibited the expression of multiple NF-κB target genes that are involved in proliferation, invasion and anti-apoptosis. Celastrol suppressed AIPC tumor progression by inhibiting proliferation, increasing apoptosis and decreasing angiogenesis, in PC-3 xenograft model in nude mouse. Furthermore, increased cellular IκBα and inhibited expression of various NF-κB target genes were observed in tumor tissues.Our data suggest that, via targeting the proteasome, celastrol suppresses proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis by inducing the apoptotic machinery and attenuating constitutive NF-κB activity in AIPC both in vitro and in vivo. Celastrol as an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine could thus be

  5. Potential benefits of π meson beams for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a brief survey of the history of the discovery and production of mesons, their main characteristics and the principle of their production are summarized. The interactions with matter of the positive, negative and neutral forms are pointed out at the levels of target, beams transfer and biological tissues. The attention is especially drawn on the characteristics of energy deposition by particles issued from disintegrations produced by negative pions at the end of their tracks; these characteristics materialize the interest for radiotherapy by negative pions

  6. Potentiation of radiotherapy by a localized antiangiogenic gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We hypothesized that electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding an antiangiogenic factor, the recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM-15, (pRDD) could modify the tumor microenvironment and radiosensitize tumor. Materials and methods: pRDD was injected in the TLT tumor or FSaII fibrosarcomas before electroporation. pO2 in tumors and oxygen consumption in vitro were measured by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry. Tumor perfusion was assessed by laser doppler imaging and patent blue assay. Results: pRDD electrotransfer caused a significant delay in TLT growth and an anti-angiogenic effect. It significantly increased tumor pO2 in TLT and FSaII for at least 4 days. pRDD electrotransfer and radiotherapy were more effective than either treatment alone. Modifications of tumor microenvironment were evaluated: tumor perfusion and interstitial fluid pressure were not modified. Oxygen consumption by the cells was decreased resulting both from a decrease in oxygen consumption rate and from a decrease in cell viability. Conclusion: The combination of localized antiangiogenic gene therapy and radiotherapy applied in the time of maximal oxygenation could be a promising alternative for cancer treatment

  7. Survey of potential improvements during the course of the radiotherapy treatment. A patient questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of quality assurance, increasing demands are placed on the whole radiotherapy treatment process. The patients directly concerned generally do not realize most aspects of the quality assurance program (e.g., additional safety checks) during their daily therapy. It was the aim of this study to systematically ask patients about potential improvements during the course of radiotherapy treatment from their own perspective. In the defined time span (1 month), 624 radiotherapy patients (600 questionnaires were returned, 96.2%) were interviewed using a questionnaire newly developed to inquire about several aspects of their treatment. Furthermore, they were asked for their specific needs and suggestions for improvements that could be made during the course of radiotherapy treatment. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the course of their radiotherapy treatment and with patient care. As an example, about 90% agreed with the statement: ''My first contact with the radiation oncology unit proceeded with kindness and competence so that I was given the impression that I will be well cared for in this clinic.'' Considering the organization of the course of radiotherapy, a large majority of patients attached great value to set appointments for the therapy fractions. A main point of criticism was waiting times or delays caused by servicing or machine failures. Small, low cost improvements as music in the therapy room were considered as important as expensive measures (e.g., daylight in the therapy room). The patients emphasized the importance of staff friendliness. The situation of radiotherapy patients was, in general, satisfactory. Future improvements can be mainly expected from smooth organisation of both planning and treatment which can be achieved by electronic scheduling systems. Many results of the survey could be easily implemented in daily practice. In matters of organization radiation oncology with its complex procedures can be used as a model for

  8. Radioprotectors in radiotherapy - advances in the potential application of phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szejk, Magdalena; Kołodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Żbikowska, Halina Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy, in addition to chemotherapy, is currently the primary method of cancer treatment based on destruction of malignant cells by ionizing radiation. Unfortunately, it also affects normal cells, which is associated with negative consequences for a patient. Radioprotectors are compounds used to prevent/protect the non-tumor cells from the harmful effects of radiation. To play their role these compounds should meet several criteria; among others, they should significantly protect normal cells from radiation without changing the tumor cell radiosensitivity. In general, agents used to alter normal tissue toxicity from radiation can be broadly divided into three categories based on timing of delivery in relation to radiation: chemical radioprotectors, mitigators, and treatment. These groups include a diverse range of synthetic compounds in terms of their structure and protective mechanisms. The aminoradiothiol amifostine is the only radioprotectant approved in clinical application. However, its use is limited due to toxicity concerns (it may cause hypotension). Natural compounds, derived from plants, meet all criteria of the ideal radioprotector. They exert their protective actions against adverse effects of ionizing radiation by several mechanisms. Plant compounds that show radioprotective activity include flavonoids and phenolic acids, stilbenes, lycopene, alkaloids, peptides, polysaccharides, and phytohormones. Garlic, green tea, apples, citrus, and ginger are examples of constituents of the human diet that contain radioprotective substances. PMID:27356603

  9. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Gi Soo; Kwon, Dong-Joo; Ju, Sung Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyangshuk [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Medical Life Sciences, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Yong Soo [Department of Biological Science, College of Natural Sciences, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseu, E-mail: jinpark@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction.

  10. Celastrol ameliorates HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via NF-kappaB and AP-1 inhibition and heme oxygenase-1 induction in astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 Tat causes extensive neuroinflammation that may progress to AIDS-related encephalitis and dementia. Celastrol possesses various biological activities such as anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the modulatory effects of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms underlying its action in astrocytes. Pre-treatment of CRT-MG human astroglioma cells with celastrol significantly inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of ICAM-1/VCAM-1 and subsequent monocyte adhesiveness in CRT-MG cells. In addition, celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CXCL10, IL-8, and MCP-1. Celastrol decreased HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of JNK MAPK, AP-1, and NF-κB. Furthermore, celastrol induced mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 as well as Nrf2 activation. Blockage of HO-1 expression using siRNA reversed the inhibitory effect of celastrol on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses. These results suggest that celastrol has regulatory effects on HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses by blocking the JNK MAPK-AP-1/NF-κB signaling pathways and inducing HO-1 expression in astrocytes. - Highlights: • Celastrol suppressed HIV-1 Tat-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat -induced activation of JNK MAPK. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced activation of both NF-κB and AP-1. • Celastrol inhibited HIV-1 Tat-induced inflammatory responses via HO-1 induction

  11. Celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, ameliorates hypercalciuria and articular cartilage lesions in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Anli; Liu, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Notwithstanding compelling contribution of NF-κB to the progression of osteoporosis has been reported, little is known regarding direct inhibition of NF-κB benefiting osteoporosis. In this study, therefore, we evaluated the role of celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis. Animals were divided into three groups as Sham (control), SO (secondary osteoporosis) and SO + CA (secondary osteoporosis treated with celastrol). Significant decreases in body weight and body fat were observed following celastrol treatment in SO group, but leptin levels were much higher. Celastrol also exhibited a significant decrease in urinary calcium excretion. Moreover, other important events were observed after celastrol treatment, covering substantial decrements in serum concentrations of PTH, TRAP-5b, CTX and DPD, improved structure of articular cartilage and cancellous bone (revealed by H&E and safranin-O staining), and significant decline in levels of NF-κB (P65), MMP-1, and MMP-9. These findings demonstrated that celastrol treatment not only improved abnormal lipid metabolism and hypercalciuria in mice subjected to secondary osteoporosis, but also ameliorated articular cartilage lesions. Our results provided evidence of targeted therapy for NF-κB in the clinical treatment of secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26980429

  12. A contemporary review of stereotactic radiotherapy: Inherent dosimetric complexities and the potential for detriment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The advantages of highly localised, conformal treatments achievable with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are increasingly being extended to extracranial sites as stereotactic body radiotherapy with advancements in imaging and beam collimation. One of the challenges in stereotactic treatment lies in the significant complexities associated with small field dosimetry and dose calculation. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the complexities associated with stereotactic radiotherapy and the potential for detriment. Methods. This study is based on a comprehensive review of literature accessible via PubMed and other sources, covering stereotactic radiotherapy, small-field dosimetry and dose calculation. Findings. Several key issues were identified in the literature. They pertain to dose prescription, dose measurement and dose calculation within and beyond the treatment field. Field-edge regions and penumbrae occupy a significant portion of the total field size. Spectral and dosimetric characteristics are difficult to determine and are compounded by effects of tissue inhomogeneity. Measurement of small-fields is made difficult by detector volume averaging and energy response. Available dosimeters are compared, and emphasis is given to gel dosimetry which offers the greatest potential for three-dimensional small-field dosimetry. The limitations of treatment planning system algorithms as applied to small-fields (particularly in the presence of heterogeneities) is explained, and a review of Monte Carlo dose calculation is provided, including simplified treatment planning implementations. Not incorporated into treatment planning, there is evidence that far from the primary field, doses to patients (and corresponding risks of radio carcinogenesis) from leakage/scatter in SRT are similar to large fields. Conclusions. Improved knowledge of dosimetric issues is essential to the accurate measurement and calculation of dose as well as the interpretation and

  13. Celastrol inhibits IL-1β-induced inflammation in orbital fibroblasts through the suppression of NF-κB activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yuan, Yifei; Zhang, Yali; He, Qianwen; Xu, Rongjuan; Ge, Fangfang; Wu, Chen

    2016-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland, which is characterized by hyperthyroidism, diffuse goiter and Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Although several therapeutic strategies for the treatment of GO have been developed, the effectiveness and the safety profile of these therapies remain to be fully elucidated. Therefore, examination of novel GO therapies remains an urgent requirement. Celastrol, a triterpenoid isolated from traditional Chinese medicine, is a promising drug for the treatment of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. CCK‑8 and apoptosis assays were performed to investigate cytotoxicity of celastrol and effect on apoptosis on orbital fibroblasts. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and ELISAs were performed to examine the effect of celastrol on interleukin (IL)‑1β‑induced inflammation in orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO. The results demonstrated that celastrol significantly attenuated the expression of IL‑6, IL‑8, cyclooxygenase (COX)‑2 and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1), and inhibited IL‑1β‑induced increases in the expression of IL‑6, IL‑8, ICAM‑1 and COX‑2. The levels of prostaglandin E2 in orbital fibroblasts induced by IL‑1β were also suppressed by celastrol. Further investigation revealed that celastrol suppressed the IL‑1β‑induced inflammatory responses in orbital fibroblasts through inhibiting the activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB. Taken together, these results suggested that celastrol attenuated the IL‑1β‑induced pro‑inflammatory pathway in orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO, which was associated with the suppression of NF-κB activation. PMID:27484716

  14. Celastrol enhances Nrf2 mediated antioxidant enzymes and exhibits anti-fibrotic effect through regulation of collagen production against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Thomas; Dineshbabu, Vadivel; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sureshkumar, Anandasadagopan; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2016-02-25

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components in the alveolar region which distorts the normal lung architecture and impairs the respiratory function. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-fibrotic effect of celastrol, a quinine-methide tri-terpenoid mainly found in Thunder God Vine root extracts against bleomycin (BLM)-induced PF through the enhancement of antioxidant defense system. A single intratracheal instillation of BLM (3 U/kg.bw) was administered in rats to induce PF. Celastrol (5 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally, twice a week for a period of 28 days. BLM-induced rats exhibits declined activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants which were restored upon treatment with celastrol. BLM-induced rats show increased total and differential cell counts as compared to control and celastrol treated rats. Histopathological analysis shows increased inflammation and alveolar damage; while assay of hydroxyproline and Masson's trichrome staining shows an increased collagen deposition in BLM-challenged rats that were decreased upon celastrol treatment. Celastrol also reduces inflammation in BLM-induced rats as evidenced by decrease in the expressions of mast cells, Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- α) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9. Further, Western blot analysis shows that celastrol is a potent inducer of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and it restores the activities of Phase II enzymes such as hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione-S-transferase (GSTs) and NADP(H): quinine oxidoreductase (NQO1) which were declined upon BLM administration. The results of this study show evidence on the protective effect of celastrol against BLM-induced PF through its antioxidant and anti-fibrotic effects. PMID:26768587

  15. Potential clinical predictors of outcome after postoperative radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on local control and survival after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with special focus on waiting and overall treatment times. For 100 NSCLC patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy, overall, relapse-free and metastases-free survival was retrospectively analysed using Kaplan-Meier methods. The impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on treatment outcome was evaluated in uni- and multivariate Cox regression analysis. No statistically significant difference between the survival curves of the groups with a short versus a long time interval between surgery and radiotherapy could be shown in uni- or multivariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in overall survival times for patients with prolonged overall radiotherapy treatment times exceeding 42 days (16 vs. 36 months) and for patients with radiation-induced pneumonitis (8 vs. 29 months). Radiation-induced pneumonitis and prolonged radiation treatment times significantly reduced overall survival after adjuvant radiotherapy in NSCLC patients. The negative impact of a longer radiotherapy treatment time could be shown for the first time in an adjuvant setting. The hypothesis of a negative impact of longer waiting times prior to commencement of adjuvant radiotherapy could not be confirmed. (orig.)

  16. Potential uncertainty about image registration in thoracic image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is widely used to determine and correct daily setup errors, the additional interpretation for image registration would provide another error. We evaluated the uncertainty in image registration in IGRT. The subjects consisted of 12 consecutive patients treated with IGRT for thoracic esophageal cancer. Two radiation therapists had consensually achieved daily 3D registration between planning computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT). The original data sets of image registration in all fractions except for boost irradiations with a change in the isocenter positions were selected for evaluation. There were 20 to 32 data sets for each patient: a total of 318 data sets. To evaluate daily setup errors, the mean 3D displacement vector was calculated for each patient. To assess the reproducibility of image registration, two other radiation therapists reviewed the data sets and recorded geometric difference as uncertainty in the image registration. The mean 3D displacement vector for each patient ranged from 4.9 to 15.5 mm for setup errors and 0.7 to 2.2 mm for uncertainty in image registration. There was a positive correlation between the 3D vectors for setup error and uncertainty in image registration (r=0.487, p=0.016). Although IGRT can correct the setup errors, potential uncertainty exists in image registration. The setup error would disturb the image registration in IGRT. (author)

  17. Targeting EGFR and COX-2 as a potential treatment improvement strategy in cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular targeting, i.e. use of agents that counteract molecular processes that are dysregulated in cancer cells, which may be responsible for tumor radio-or chemoresistance, is a recently extensively investigated approach to further improve radiotherapy, chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Many potential targets for augmentation of radio (or chemo) response have been identified including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, mutated ras and angiogenic molecules. Agents that selectively inhibit these molecules are becoming available at a rapid rate, and many of them have been shown in preclinical testing to be highly effective in improving tumor radioresponse or chemoresponse, without significantly affecting normal tissues. The interaction of EGFR and COX-2 inhibitors with radiation has attracted a flare of investigational interest, and is over-viewed here. EGFR is frequently overexpressed or mutated in many types of cancer, which is associated with more aggressive tumor behavior and poorer tumor response to cytotoxic agents, including radiation. Blockade of EGFR or interference with its downstream signaling processes can improve tumor treatment. Our own studies, using human tumor xenografts, demonstrated that blocking EGFR with C225 anti-EGFR antibody produces a dramatic enhancement of tumor radioresponse, and even more dramatic response when radiation is combined with chemotherapeutic agents. C225 acts by a number of mechanisms including inhibition of DNA repair from radiation damage, enhancement of apoptosis and tumor necrosis, and by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activation by small molecule agents, such as Iressa or Tarceva, is another approach in interfering with EGFR-signaling, which also showed potent enhancing effect on tumor radioresponse. There are two COX enzymes: COX-1 and COX-2. While COX-1 is a ubiquitous constitutive enzyme having housekeeping physiological function, COX-2 is an

  18. Small animal image-guided radiotherapy: status, considerations and potential for translational impact

    OpenAIRE

    Butterworth, K. T.; Prise, K M; Verhaegen, F

    2014-01-01

    Radiation biology is being transformed by the implementation of small animal image-guided precision radiotherapy into pre-clinical research programmes worldwide. We report on the current status and developments of the small animal radiotherapy field, suggest criteria for the design and execution of effective studies and contend that this powerful emerging technology, used in combination with relevant small animal models, holds much promise for translational impact in radiation oncology.

  19. Postal TLD audits in radiotherapy in the Czech Republic: current status, experience and potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with practice and performance of postal TLD audits in radiotherapy with emphasis on the possibilities of application of the advanced versions that were developed following up technological progress in radiotherapy. The new methodologies of the TLD audit are focused specifically on up-to-date linear accelerators, equipped with multileaf collimators, and modern treatment planning systems. The dose is checked by the TLD not only for reference conditions but also in conditions of radiation fields influenced by presence of inhomogeneities in the irradiated volume. As regards small radiation fields, the check also includes dose profile verification using gafchromic films. The methodologies were tested within pilot studies performed in collaboration with some Czech radiotherapy centers. The results and experience gave evidence of the usefulness and appropriateness of the new TLD audit methodologies. (orig.)

  20. Potential clinical predictors of outcome after postoperative radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buetof, R. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Kirchner, K.; Appold, S. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Loeck, S. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Rolle, A. [Lungenfachklinik Coswig, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Coswig (Germany); Hoeffken, G. [Lungenfachklinik Coswig, Department of Pneumology, Coswig (Germany); Krause, M.; Baumann, M. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on local control and survival after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with special focus on waiting and overall treatment times. For 100 NSCLC patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy, overall, relapse-free and metastases-free survival was retrospectively analysed using Kaplan-Meier methods. The impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on treatment outcome was evaluated in uni- and multivariate Cox regression analysis. No statistically significant difference between the survival curves of the groups with a short versus a long time interval between surgery and radiotherapy could be shown in uni- or multivariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in overall survival times for patients with prolonged overall radiotherapy treatment times exceeding 42 days (16 vs. 36 months) and for patients with radiation-induced pneumonitis (8 vs. 29 months). Radiation-induced pneumonitis and prolonged radiation treatment times significantly reduced overall survival after adjuvant radiotherapy in NSCLC patients. The negative impact of a longer radiotherapy treatment time could be shown for the first time in an adjuvant setting. The hypothesis of a negative impact of longer waiting times prior to commencement of adjuvant radiotherapy could not be confirmed. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel der vorliegenden Analyse war, den Einfluss von tumor-, patienten- und therapieabhaengigen Kofaktoren auf die lokoregionale Tumorkontrolle und das Ueberleben nach postoperativer adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patienten mit einem nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) zu untersuchen. Ein spezieller Fokus lag dabei auf der Wartezeit zwischen Operation und Beginn der Strahlentherapie sowie der Gesamtbehandlungszeit der Strahlentherapie. Fuer 100 Patienten, die eine postoperative

  1. The NF-kappa B inhibitor, celastrol, could enhance the anti-cancer effect of gambogic acid on oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambogic acid (GA) is a major active ingredient of gamboge, a widely used traditional Chinese medicine that has been reported to be a potent cytotoxic agent against some malignant tumors. Many studies have shown that the NF-kappa B signaling pathway plays an important role in anti-apoptosis and the drug resistance of tumor cells during chemotherapy. In this study, the effects and mechanisms of GA and the NF-kappa B inhibitor celastrol on oral cancer cells were investigated. Three human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, Tca8113, TSCC and NT, were treated with GA alone, celastrol alone or GA plus celastrol. Cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assay. The rate of apoptosis was examined with annexin V/PI staining as well as transmission electronic microscopy in Tca8113 cells. The level of constitutive NF-kappa B activity in oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines was determined by immunofluorescence assays and nuclear extracts and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) in vitro. To further investigate the role of NF-kappa B activity in GA and celastrol treatment in oral squamous cell carcinoma, we used the dominant negative mutant SR-IκBα to inhibit NF-kappa B activity and to observe its influence on the effect of GA. The results showed that GA could inhibit the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of the oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and that the NF-kappa B pathway was simultaneously activated by GA treatment. The minimal cytotoxic dose of celastrol was able to effectively suppress the GA-induced NF-kappa B pathway activation. Following the combined treatment with GA and the minimal cytotoxic dose of celastrol or the dominant negative mutant SR-IκBα, proliferation was significantly inhibited, and the apoptotic rate of Tca8113 cells was significantly increased. The combination of GA and celastrol has a synergistic antitumor effect. The effect can be primarily attributed to apoptosis induced by a decrease in NF-kappa B pathway activation. The

  2. Normal tissue dosimetric comparison between hdr prostate implant boost and conformal external beam radiotherapy boost: potential for dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the dose and volume of bladder and rectum treated using high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate implant boost versus conformal external beam radiotherapy boost, and to use the dose-volume information to perform a critical volume tolerance (CVT) analysis and then estimate the potential for further dose escalation using HDR brachytherapy boost. Methods and Materials: Using CT scan data collected before and after patients underwent HDR prostate implant, a 7-field conformal prostate-only external beam treatment plan and HDR brachytherapy treatment plan were constructed for each patient. Doses to the normal structures were calculated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were plotted for comparison of the two techniques. Wilcoxon signed rank test was performed at four dose levels to compare the dose to normal structures between the two treatment techniques. The acute and late effects of HDR brachytherapy were calculated based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model. CVT analyses were performed to calculate the potential dose gain (PDG) using HDR brachytherapy boost. Results: The volume of bladder and rectum receiving high dose was significantly less from implant boost. On the average, 0.19 cc of the bladder received 100% of the brachytherapy prescription dose, compared with 5.1 cc of the bladder receiving 100% of the prescription dose in the 7-field conformal external beam radiotherapy boost. Similarly, 0.25 cc of the rectum received 100% of the dose with the implant boost, as compared to 2.9 cc in the conformal external beam treatment. The implant also delivered higher doses inside the prostate volume. On average, 47% of the prostate received ≥150% of the prescription dose. The CVT analysis revealed a range of PDG using the HDR brachytherapy boost which depended on the following variables: critical volume (CV), critical volume tolerance dose (CVTD), number of HDR fractions (N), and the dose of external beam radiotherapy (XRT) delivered with brachytherapy boost. The PDG

  3. Potential applications of image-guided radiotherapy for brain metastases and glioblastoma to improve patient quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NamPhongNguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and brain metastasis remains a challenge because of the poor survival and the potential for brain damage following radiation. Despite concurrent chemotherapy and radiation dose escalation, local recurrence remains the predominant pattern of failure in GBM most likely secondary to repopulation of cancer stem cells. Even though radiotherapy is highly effective for local control of radio-resistant tumors such as melanoma and renal cell cancer, systemic disease progression is the cause of death in most patients with brain metastasis. Preservation of quality of life of cancer survivors is the main issue for patients with brain metastasis. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT by virtue of precise radiation dose delivery may reduce treatment time of patients with GBM without excessive toxicity and potentially improve neurocognitive function with preservation of local control in patients with brain metastasis. Future prospective trials for primary brain tumors or brain metastasis should include IGRT to assess its efficacy to improve patient quality of life.

  4. A study on the potential of cell kinetically directed fractionation schemes in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis, the phenomenon of radiation-induced synchronization of cells into the radiosensitive G2 phase of the cell cycle and the exploitation of this phenomenon to enhance the efficacy of frationated radiotherapy was investigated. A nude mouse model was used to investigate the cell kinetics of 6 human xenotransplanted tumours before and after irradiation. In the second part of the investigation it was tested whether split dose irradiation intervals, based on cell kinetic data of the tumours (i.e. timing of maximal accumulation of cells in G2) would result in an enhanced response compared with those at non optimal intervals (author), 297 refs.; 35 figs.; 25 tabs

  5. Potential of {sup 18}F-FDG PET toward personalized radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Noah C.; Chun, Tristen T.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States); Fidias, Panos M. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Kradin, Richard L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Mathisen, Douglas J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Lynch, Thomas J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT (United States); Fischman, Alan J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Shriner' s Burns Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We investigated the metabolic response of lung cancer to radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy by {sup 18}F-FDG PET and its utility in guiding timely supplementary therapy. Glucose metabolic rate (MRglc) was measured in primary lung cancers during the 3 weeks before, and 10-12 days (S2), 3 months (S3), 6 months (S4), and 12 months (S5) after radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. The association between the lowest residual MRglc representing the maximum metabolic response (MRglc-MMR) and tumor control probability (TCP) at 12 months was modeled using logistic regression. We accrued 106 patients, of whom 61 completed the serial {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans. The median values of MRglc at S2, S3 and S4 determined using a simplified kinetic method (SKM) were, respectively, 0.05, 0.06 and 0.07 {mu}mol/min/g for tumors with local control and 0.12, 0.16 and 0.19 {mu}mol/min/g for tumors with local failure, and the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) were 1.16, 1.33 and 1.45 for tumors with local control and 2.74, 2.74 and 4.07 for tumors with local failure (p < 0.0001). MRglc-MMR was realized at S2 (MRglc-S2) and the values corresponding to TCP 95 %, 90 % and 50 % were 0.036, 0.050 and 0.134 {mu}mol/min/g using the SKM and 0.70, 0.91 and 1.95 using SUVmax, respectively. Probability cut-off values were generated for a given level of MRglc-S2 based on its predicted TCP, sensitivity and specificity, and MRglc {<=}0.071 {mu}mol/min/g and SUVmax {<=}1.45 were determined as the optimum cut-off values for predicted TCP 80 %, sensitivity 100 % and specificity 63 %. The cut-off values (MRglc {<=}0.071 {mu}mol/min/g using the SKM and SUVmax {<=}1.45) need to be tested for their utility in identifying patients with a high risk of residual cancer after standard dose radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy and in guiding a timely supplementary dose of radiation or other means of salvage therapy. (orig.)

  6. Potential of HSV-TK gene in gene-radiotherapy for human bladder carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the killing effect of retrovirus-mediated HSV-TK/GCV system combined with radiotherapy on human bladder carcinoma cells. Methods: By using retrovirus-mediated gene transfer technique, hygromycin phosphotransferase-thymidine kinase fusion gene (HyTK) was transferred into EJ bladder carcinoma cells. Antitumor effects were observed after irradiation with 60Co γ-rays as well as gancyclovir treatment. Results: EJ bladder carcinoma cells transduced with HyTK gene and treated with low concentrations of gancyclovir, which alone showed little cytotoxicity, were highly sensitive to radiation. The sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) was 1.36. Conclusion: The combination of retrovirus-mediated HyTK/GCV gene therapy with standard radiation therapy might improve the therapeutic effectiveness for bladder carcinoma in clinical practice

  7. Radiotherapy for age-related macular degeneration: preliminary results of a potentially new treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Neovascular macular degeneration is the leading cause of severe blindness in North America today. Limited treatments are available for this disease process. A Phase I/II study was performed to determine the toxicity and efficacy of external beam radiotherapy in patients with age-related subfoveal neovascularization. Methods and Materials: Between March 1994 and June 1995, 52 patients with a mean age of 80 (60-92) were enrolled. These patients were either not eligible or were poor candidates for laser photocoagulation, primarily because of the subfoveal location of the neovascularization. Initial visual acuities ranged from 20 out of 32 to finger counting at 3 feet. All patients underwent fluorescein angiographic evaluation and documentation of their neovascular disease prior to irradiation. Patients were treated with a single lateral 4- or 6-MV photon beam, to a dose of 14-15 Gy in eight fractions over 10 days. The field size averaged 5 x 3 cm. Results: No significant acute morbidity was noted. All patients underwent ophthalmic examinations and repeat angiography at 1 and 3 months posttreatment and then at 3-month intervals. With a mean follow-up of 7 months (3-18 months), 41 patients (79%) are within two lines of their pretreatment visual acuity. On angiographic imaging, there was stabilization of subfoveal neovascular membranes in 34 patients (65%). New neovascular membranes have been noted in five patients. Conclusions: It appears that radiotherapy can affect active subretinal neovascularization, but it is unlikely to prevent new neovascular events produced by this chronic disease. Further investigation is warranted

  8. Close or Positive Margins After Mastectomy for DCIS: Pattern of Relapse and Potential Indications for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Mastectomies result in very high local control rates for pure ductal carcinoma in situ; however, close or involved tumor margins are occasionally encountered. Data regarding the patterns of relapse in this setting are limited. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, the pathology reports of 574 patients who had undergone mastectomy at our institution for pure ductal carcinoma in situ were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 574 patients, 84 were found to have margins of <10 mm. Of the 84 patients, 4 underwent postoperative radiotherapy and were excluded, leaving 80 patients for this analysis. Of the 80 patients, 31 had margins <2 mm and 49 had margins of 2.1-10 mm. High-grade disease was observed in 47 patients; 45 patients had comedonecrosis; and 30 had multifocal disease. Of the 80 patients, 51 were <60 years of age. Results: With a median follow-up of 61 months, 6 (7.5%) of the 80 patients developed local recurrence. Of the 31 patients with a margin of ≤2 mm, 5 (16%) developed local recurrence vs. only 1 (2%) of 49 patients with a margin of 2.1-10 mm (p = 0.0356). Of the 6 patients with local recurrence, 5 had high-grade disease and/or comedonecrosis. All six recurrences were noted in patients <60 years old. Conclusion: The findings of this review suggest that patients with pure ductal carcinoma in situ who undergo mastectomy with a margin of <2 mm have a greater-than-expected incidence of local recurrence. Patients with additional unfavorable features such as high-grade disease, comedonecrosis, and age <60 years are particularly at risk of local recurrence. These patients might benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy

  9. Celastrol stimulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1 activity in tumor cells by initiating the ROS/Akt/p70S6K signaling pathway and enhancing hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein synthesis.

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    Xiaoxi Han

    Full Text Available Celastrol, a tripterine derived from the traditional Chinese medicine plant Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. ("Thunder of God Vine", has been reported to have multiple effects, such as anti-inflammation, suppression of tumor angiogenesis, inhibition of tumor growth, induction of apoptosis and protection of cells against human neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms that underlie these functions are not well defined. In this study, we reported for the first time that Celastrol could induce HIF-1α protein accumulation in multiple cancer cell lines in an oxygen-independent manner and that the enhanced HIF-1α protein entered the nucleus and promoted the transcription of the HIF-1 target genes VEGF and Glut-1. Celastrol did not influence HIF-1α transcription. Instead, Celastrol induced the accumulation of the HIF-1α protein by inducing ROS and activating Akt/p70S6K signaling to promote HIF-1α translation. In addition, we found that the activation of Akt by Celastrol was transient. With increased exposure time, inhibition of Hsp90 chaperone function by Celastrol led to the subsequent depletion of the Akt protein and thus to the suppression of Akt activity. Moreover, in HepG2 cells, the accumulation of HIF-1α increased the expression of BNIP3, which induced autophagy. However, HIF-1α and BNIP3 did not influence the cytotoxicity of Celastrol because the main mechanism by which Celastrol kills cancer cells is through stimulating ROS-mediated JNK activation and inducing apoptosis. Furthermore, our data showed that the dose required for Celastrol to induce HIF-1α protein accumulation and enhance HIF-1α transcriptional activation was below its cytotoxic threshold. A cytotoxic dose of Celastrol for cancer cells did not display cytotoxicity in LO2 normal human liver cells, which indicated that the novel functions of Celastrol in regulating HIF-1 signaling and inducing autophagy might be used in new applications, such as in anti

  10. Dental status, dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and oncological data as potential risk factors for infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw after radiotherapy for oral neoplasms: a retrospective evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospective evaluation of the dental status of patients with oral cancer before radiotherapy, the extent of dental rehabilitation procedures, demographic and radiotherapy data as potential risk factors for development of infected osteoradionecrosis of the lower jaw. A total of 90 patients who had undergone radiotherapy for oral cancer were included into this retrospective evaluation. None of them had distant metastases. After tumour surgery the patients were referred to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for dental examination and the necessary dental rehabilitation procedures inclusive potential tooth extraction combined with primary soft tissue closure. Adjuvant radiotherapy was started after complete healing of the gingiva (> 7 days after potential extraction). The majority of patients (n = 74) was treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses ranging from 50-70Gy whereas further 16 patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy up to 72Gy. The records of the clinical data were reviewed. Furthermore, questionnaires were mailed to the patients’ general practitioners and dentists in order to get more data concerning tumour status and osteoradionecrosis during follow-up. The patients’ dental status before radiotherapy was generally poor. On average 10 teeth were present, six of them were regarded to remain conservable. Extensive dental rehabilitation procedures included a mean of 3.7 tooth extractions. Chronic periodontitis with severe attachment loss was found in 40%, dental biofilm in 56%. An infected osteoradionecrosis (IORN) grade II according to (Schwartz et al., Am J Clin Oncol 25:168-171, 2002) was diagnosed in 11 of the 90 patients (12%), mostly within the first 4 years after radiotherapy. We could not find significant prognostic factors for the occurrence of IORN, but a trendwise correlation with impaired dental status, rehabilitation procedures, fraction size and tumour outcome. The occurrence of IORN is an important long

  11. Intensity-Modulated vs. Conformal Radiotherapy of Parotid Gland Tumors: Potential Impact on Hearing Loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy of parotid gland tumors, little effort is made to avoid the auditory system or the oral cavity. Damage may occur when the ear is located inside the treatment field. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate an intensity-modulation radiotherapy (IMRT) class solution, and to compare this technique to a 3D conformal approach with respect to hearing loss. Twenty patients with parotid gland cancer were retrospectively planned with 2 different techniques using the original planning target volume (PTV). First, a conventional technique using a wedged beam pair was applied, yielding a dose distribution conformal to the shape of the PTV. Next, an IMRT technique using a fluence map optimization with predefined constraints was designed. A dose of 66 Gy in the PTV was given at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measures (ICRU) dose prescription point. Dose-volume histograms of the PTV and organs at risk (OARs), such as auditory system, oral cavity, and spinal cord, were compared. The dose in the OARs was lower in the IMRT plans. The mean volume of the middle ear receiving a dose higher than 50 Gy decreased from 66.5% to 33.4%. The mean dose in the oral cavity decreased from 19.4 Gy to 16.6 Gy. The auditory system can be spared if the distance between the inner ear and the PTV is 0.6 cm or larger, and if the overlap between the middle ear and the PTV is smaller than 10%. The maximum dose in the spinal cord was below 40 Gy in all treatment plans. The mean volume of the PTV receiving less than 95% of the prescribed dose increased in the IMRT plan slightly from 3.3% to 4.3 % (p = 0.01). The mean volume receiving more than 107% increased from 0.9% to 2.5% (p = 0.02). It can be concluded that the auditory system, as well as the oral cavity, can be spared with IMRT, but at the cost of a slightly larger dose inhomogeneity in the PTV. The IMRT technique can therefore, in most cases, be recommended as the treatment

  12. Survey of potential improvements during the course of the radiotherapy treatment. A patient questionnaire; Erfassung moeglicher Verbesserungen im Ablauf der Strahlentherapie. Eine Patientenbefragung

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    Momm, Felix; Jooss, David; Adebahr, Sonja; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Heinemann, Felix; Kirste, Simon; Messmer, Marc-Benjamin; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Xander, Carola J.; Becker, Gerhild [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Palliativeinheit

    2011-11-15

    In the context of quality assurance, increasing demands are placed on the whole radiotherapy treatment process. The patients directly concerned generally do not realize most aspects of the quality assurance program (e.g., additional safety checks) during their daily therapy. It was the aim of this study to systematically ask patients about potential improvements during the course of radiotherapy treatment from their own perspective. In the defined time span (1 month), 624 radiotherapy patients (600 questionnaires were returned, 96.2%) were interviewed using a questionnaire newly developed to inquire about several aspects of their treatment. Furthermore, they were asked for their specific needs and suggestions for improvements that could be made during the course of radiotherapy treatment. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the course of their radiotherapy treatment and with patient care. As an example, about 90% agreed with the statement: ''My first contact with the radiation oncology unit proceeded with kindness and competence so that I was given the impression that I will be well cared for in this clinic.'' Considering the organization of the course of radiotherapy, a large majority of patients attached great value to set appointments for the therapy fractions. A main point of criticism was waiting times or delays caused by servicing or machine failures. Small, low cost improvements as music in the therapy room were considered as important as expensive measures (e.g., daylight in the therapy room). The patients emphasized the importance of staff friendliness. The situation of radiotherapy patients was, in general, satisfactory. Future improvements can be mainly expected from smooth organisation of both planning and treatment which can be achieved by electronic scheduling systems. Many results of the survey could be easily implemented in daily practice. In matters of organization radiation oncology with its complex procedures can be used

  13. 188Re-microspheres of albumin - the potential preparation for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper author describe preparation the albumin microspheres labelled with rhenium-188. We undertake an attempt to develop kits to the generator of rhenium-188 on the basis of albumin microspheres for radiotherapy of both oncological and non-oncological diseases. Microspheres, rhenium-188 with sizes 1 0-20 micron for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (damage of large and intermediate joints), intraperitoneal administration and intrapleural administration at metastases covering a cavity. Microspheres, Re-188 with sizes 40-60 micron for treatment of disseminated kidney cancer (intraarterial, selectively), intratumoral administration to damaged nodules less than 2-3 cm. Microspheres, Re-188 with sizes 80-100 micron for large neoplasms and metastases of liver (intraarterial, selectively), intratumoral administration to damaged nodules with sizes over 3 cm. Preparation of albumin microspheres is carried out by thermal denaturation of protein in vegetable oil. Microspheres are obtained with the necessary range of sizes by ultrasonic fractionation. At our laboratory the method of preparation of albumin microspheres with any sizes of particles (from 5 -10 up to 800 -1000 microns) has been developed. (authors)

  14. Perinatal subglottic and hepatic hemangiomas as potential emergencies: effect of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    5 cases are analysed of perinatal hemangiomas in internal localizations representing relative or immediate emergencies. Three cases were subglottic proliferating hemangiomas with threatening suffocation, the other two were large hemangiomas of the liver causing significant hepatomegaly. In 3 children there were also hemangiomas of the skin and'or in the oral cavity seen as important signs in the diagnostic reflections on the nature of the urgent clinical pictures. Moreover one child with subglottic hemangioma suffered from hematological disorders characterizing the Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. In all the children transcutaneous radiotherapy was performed (ranging from 12 Gy in two weeks up to an exceptional dose of 25 Gy over 3 months). This resulted in recession of subjective complaints and, eventually, in complete regression of the irradiated angiomatous lesions, both subglottic and hepatic. The disorders of hemocoagulation also disappeared quickly and completely. At present, i.e., after 3 to 21 years, there are no adverse post-irradiattion changes in any of the patients. Nevertheless, in view of possible post-irradiation effects particularly on the thyroid gland, all the patients continue to be regularly followed up at the respective clinical departments. (author)

  15. The potential benefit of swallowing sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy to reduce swallowing dysfunction: An in silico planning comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To apply recently developed predictive models for swallowing dysfunction to compare the predicted probabilities of swallowing dysfunction for standard intensity modulated radiotherapy (ST-IMRT) and swallowing sparing IMRT (SW-IMRT). Materials and methods: Thirty head and neck cancer patients who previously underwent radiotherapy for the bilateral neck were selected for this study. For each patient, ST-IMRT and SW-IMRT simultaneous integrated boost treatment plans were created. ST-IMRT treatment plan optimisation aimed at obtaining adequate target volume coverage and sparing of the parotid and submandibular glands as much as possible. Objectives for SW-IMRT were similar, with additional objectives to spare the organs at risk related to swallowing dysfunction (SWOARs). Dose-volume data with ST-IMRT and SW-IMRT and normal tissue complication probabilities for physician-rated and patient-rated swallowing dysfunction were calculated with recently developed predictive models. Results: All plans had adequate target volume coverage and dose to critical organs was within accepted limits. Sparing of parotid glands was similar for ST-IMRT and SW-IMRT. With SW-IMRT, the mean dose to the various SWOARs was reduced. Absolute dose values and dose reductions with SW-IMRT differed per patient and per SWOAR and depended on N stage and tumour location. The mean reduction in predicted physician-rated Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 2–4 swallowing dysfunction was 9% (range, 3–20%). Mean reductions of the probability of patient-rated moderate to severe complaints with regard to the swallowing of solid food, soft food, liquid food and choking when swallowing were 8%, 2%, 1% and 1%, respectively. Conclusions: New predictive models for swallowing dysfunction were applied to show potential reductions in physician and patient-rated swallowing dysfunction with IMRT that was specifically optimised to spare SWOARs.

  16. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of ≥3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0–5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325–332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were

  17. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  18. Galectin-7 as a potential predictive marker of chemo-and/or radio-therapy resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) requires the integration of multimodal approaches. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of tumor sensitivity to preoperative radiotherapy/chemotherapy for OSCC in order to allow oncologists to determine optimum therapeutic strategies without the associated adverse effects. Here, the protein expression profiles of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from 18 OSCC patients, termed learning cases, who received preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy followed by surgery were analyzed by quantitative proteomics and validated by immunohistochemistry in 68 test cases as well as in the 18 learning cases. We identified galectin-7 as a potential predictive marker of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance, and the sensitivity and specificity of the galectin-7 prediction score (G7PS) in predicting this resistance was of 96.0% and 39.5%, respectively, in the 68 test cases. The cumulative 5-year disease-specific survival rate was 75.2% in patients with resistant prediction using G7PS and 100% in patients with sensitive prediction. In vitro overexpression of galectin-7 significantly decreased cell viability in OSCC cell line. Therefore, our findings suggest that galectin-7 is a potential predictive marker of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance in patients with OSCC. Identification of proteins differentially expressed in OSSC samples from patients sensitive or resistant. The samples were processed by LC-MS and analyzed with 2DICAL

  19. Potential of image-guidance, gating and real-time tracking to improve accuracy in pulmonary stereotactic body radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of image-guidance, gating and real-time tumor tracking to improve accuracy in pulmonary stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and methods: Safety margins for compensation of inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties of the target position were calculated based on SBRT treatments of 43 patients with pre- and post-treatment cone-beam CT imaging. Safety margins for compensation of breathing motion were evaluated for 17 pulmonary tumors using respiratory correlated CT, model-based segmentation of 4D-CT images and voxel-based dose accumulation; the target in the mid-ventilation position was the reference. Results: Because of large inter-fractional base-line shifts of the tumor, stereotactic patient positioning and image-guidance based on the bony anatomy required safety margins of 12 mm and 9 mm, respectively. Four-dimensional image-guidance targeting the tumor itself and intra-fractional tumor tracking reduced margins to <5 mm and <3 mm, respectively. Additional safety margins are required to compensate for breathing motion. A quadratic relationship between tumor motion and margins for motion compensation was observed: safety margins of 2.4 mm and 6 mm were calculated for compensation of 10 mm and 20 mm motion amplitudes in cranio-caudal direction, respectively. Conclusion: Four-dimensional image-guidance with pre-treatment verification of the target position and online correction of errors reduced safety margins most effectively in pulmonary SBRT.

  20. Reducing the Risk of Xerostomia and Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis: The Potential Benefits of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Advanced Oral Cavity Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 ± 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 ± 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 ± 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 ± 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 ± 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 ± 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 ± 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 ± 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 ± 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 ± 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  1. Reducing the risk of xerostomia and mandibular osteoradionecrosis: the potential benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy in advanced oral cavity carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 +/- 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 +/- 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 +/- 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 +/- 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 +/- 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 +/- 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 +/- 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 +/- 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC. PMID:19647632

  2. Intraoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential benefit of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was originally recognized years ago and has recently attracted renewed interest. Modern radiotherapeutic approaches may be more successful as a result of technical innovation, particularly in the use of electron beam accelerators. Preliminary studies, mainly uncontrolled and nonrandomized, have assessed the role of IORT for treatment of a variety of deep seated abdominal, retroperitoneal, and pelvic cancers. The results of some studies show much promise, but prospective trials are needed to scientifically validate these favorable initial observations. (Auth.)

  3. Lipiodol: A Potential Direct Surrogate for Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance in Radiotherapy of Liver Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using lipiodol as a direct surrogate for target localization using cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance in radiotherapy (RT) of patients with unresectable liver tumors after transarterial chemoembolization. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with an unresectable solitary liver tumor were enrolled for RT using active breathing control (ABC) and CBCT image guidance after transarterial chemoembolization. Each patient had pre- and posttreatment CBCT in the first 10 fractions of treatment. Lipiodol retention was evaluated using daily CBCT scans, and volume of lipiodol retention in the liver was calculated and compared between planning CT and post-RT CT. Influence of lipiodol on dosimetry was evaluated by measuring doses using an ion chamber with and without the presence of lipiodol. Margin analysis was performed on the basis of both inter- and intrafractional target localization errors. Results: Twenty-eight patients successfully completed the study. The shape and size of lipiodol retention did not vary substantially during the course of treatment. The mean Dice similarity coefficient for the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT and that in posttreatment CT was 0.836 (range, 0.817–0.885). The maximum change (ratio of the lipiodol volume in pretreatment CT to that in posttreatment CT) was 1.045. The mean dose changes with the presence of <10 mL lipiodol were −1.44% and 0.13% for 6 MV and 15 MV, respectively. With ABC and online CBCT image guidance, clinical target volume–planning target volume margins were determined to be 2.5 mm in the mediolateral direction, 2.9 mm in the anteroposterior direction, and 4.0 mm in the craniocaudal direction. Conclusions: Lipiodol could be used as a direct surrogate for CBCT image guidance to improve the localization accuracy for RT of liver tumors. Combination of ABC and CBCT image guidance with lipiodol can potentially reduce the clinical target volume–planning target volume margin.

  4. The potential benefit of swallowing sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy to reduce swallowing dysfunction : An in silico planning comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Christianen, Miranda E M C; Bijl, Hendrik P; Schilstra, C; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To apply recently developed predictive models for swallowing dysfunction to compare the predicted probabilities of swallowing dysfunction for standard intensity modulated radiotherapy (ST-IMRT) and swallowing sparing IMRT (SW-IMRT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty head and neck cancer patient

  5. Effect of Celastrol on AGS Cell Migration%雷公藤红素对 AGS 细胞迁移的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜娜; 李健; 刘福生; 刘泽洲; 许可嘉; 张寅; 刘婷; 苏泽琦; 丁霞

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察不同浓度雷公藤红素在不同时间对 AGS 细胞形态及细胞迁移的影响,探索雷公藤红素对 AGS 细胞迁移较佳抑制作用浓度及时间。方法将 AGS 细胞铺于6孔板并培养,待贴壁细胞密度达到70%~80%后,采用划痕法制造细胞迁移模型,分为 DMSO 及雷公藤红素5μM、1μM、0.5μM、0.1μM、0.01μM 浓度组,并分别于0 h、6 h、12 h、24 h 观察细胞的形态及细胞的迁移情况,且拍照记录,计算细胞迁移速度及细胞迁移抑制率并进行各组之间的比较。结果高浓度雷公藤红素使 AGS 细胞形态发生改变;雷公藤红素能够抑制 AGS 细胞迁移,且终浓度为1μM 时抑制作用最明显。同一浓度不同作用时间其对 AGS 细胞迁移的抑制作用差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05);同一时间不同浓度雷公藤红素对 AGS 细胞迁移的抑制作用差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05)。结论高浓度雷公藤红素能够使 AGS 细胞形态发生改变并凋亡;雷公藤红素抑制了 AGS 细胞的迁移,且该抑制作用与浓度、时间相关,且在终浓度为1μM 作用于 AGS 细胞12 h 时,其对 AGS 细胞迁移的抑制作用最明显。%Objective To observe the effects of different concentration of celastrol on cellular mor-phology and migration of AGS cells at different time points;to explore a better inhibitory effect of concentra-tion and time of celastrol on migration of AGS cells. Methods AGS cells were planted and cultured in 6 -well plate. When the adherent cell density reached 70 ~ 80% ,cell migration was manufactured by scratch ex-periment. Thereafter,cell morphology and cell migration were observed under microscope with different con-centration of celastrol of 5 μM、1 μM、0. 5 μM、0. 1 μM、0. 01 μM at indicated time points. Results 1. High concentration of celastrol cause severe changed in the cell morphology. 2. Celastrol inhibited AGS cell migra-tion,and its

  6. Phase I trial of Orzel (UFT plus leucovorin), cisplatin, and radiotherapy in the treatment of potentially resectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Fluorinated pyrimidines have been established as radiosensitizers in the combined modality therapy of esophageal cancer. UFT, an oral combination of a 5-fluorouracil pro-drug (uracil) and a dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase inhibitor (ftorafur), may provide improvement in the ease of administration with equal efficacy. This Phase I study was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of UFT, leucovorin, and cisplatin when given with radiotherapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of resectable esophageal cancer. Methods: Chemotherapy consisted of i.v. cisplatin 80 mg/m2 (Days 1 and 22) and UFT with leucovorin orally on Days 1-35. UFT was escalated in 50-mg/m2 increments, starting at 200 mg/m2/d. Radiotherapy consisted of 4500 cGy in 25 fractions. Patients underwent resection 4-6 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. Results: Ten patients with resectable esophageal cancer were enrolled. Of the 7 patients entered at dose level 1, 1 developed a dose-limiting toxicity of nausea. All 3 patients entered at dose level 2 developed dose-limiting toxicity. The maximal tolerated dose for UFT was the starting level, 200 mg/m2/d. Of the 10 patients enrolled, 8 underwent esophagectomy and 2 developed progressive disease and did not undergo surgery. The disease of 6 of the 8 patients was downstaged at surgery. Conclusion: The recommended UFT dose for Phase II studies is 200 mg/m2/d given orally in two divided doses when given with leucovorin, cisplatin, and radiotherapy

  7. Potential for enhancing external beam radiotherapy for lung cancer using high-Z nanoparticles administered via inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yao; Altundal, Yucel; Moreau, Michele; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-09-21

    Nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy is emerging as a promising modality to enhance radiotherapy via the radiosensitizing action of high atomic number (Z) nanoparticles. However, the delivery of sufficiently potent concentrations of such nanoparticles to the tumor remain a challenge. This study investigates the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to high-Z nanoparticles (NPs) administered via inhalation during external beam radiotherapy. Here NPs investigated include: cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs), carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs), and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Using Monte Carlo-generated megavoltage energy spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumors due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from the NPs administered via inhalation route (IR) in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5-14.6 times higher concentrations of NPs can reach the lung by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the radiotherapy dose with and without nanoparticles was calculated for a range of NPs concentrations and tumor sizes. The DEF for IR was then compared with that for IV. For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of up to 1.19, 1.26, and 1.51 were obtained for CNPs, CBNPs and GNPs. In comparison values of 1.06, 1.08, and 1.15 were obtained via IV administration. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, even higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81 for CNPs. Results also showed that the DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor volume, as expected. The results of this work indicate that IR administration of targeted high-Z CNPs/CBNPs/GNPs could enable clinically significant DEF to lung tumors compared to IV

  8. Potential for enhancing external beam radiotherapy for lung cancer using high-Z nanoparticles administered via inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy is emerging as a promising modality to enhance radiotherapy via the radiosensitizing action of high atomic number (Z) nanoparticles. However, the delivery of sufficiently potent concentrations of such nanoparticles to the tumor remain a challenge. This study investigates the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to high-Z nanoparticles (NPs) administered via inhalation during external beam radiotherapy. Here NPs investigated include: cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs), carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs), and gold nanoparticles (GNPs).Using Monte Carlo–generated megavoltage energy spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumors due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from the NPs administered via inhalation route (IR) in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5–14.6 times higher concentrations of NPs can reach the lung by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the radiotherapy dose with and without nanoparticles was calculated for a range of NPs concentrations and tumor sizes. The DEF for IR was then compared with that for IV.For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of up to 1.19, 1.26, and 1.51 were obtained for CNPs, CBNPs and GNPs. In comparison values of 1.06, 1.08, and 1.15 were obtained via IV administration. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, even higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81 for CNPs. Results also showed that the DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor volume, as expected.The results of this work indicate that IR administration of targeted high-Z CNPs/CBNPs/GNPs could enable clinically significant DEF to lung tumors compared to IV

  9. Potential for enhancing external beam radiotherapy for lung cancer using high-Z nanoparticles administered via inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yao; Altundal, Yucel; Moreau, Michele; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy is emerging as a promising modality to enhance radiotherapy via the radiosensitizing action of high atomic number (Z) nanoparticles. However, the delivery of sufficiently potent concentrations of such nanoparticles to the tumor remain a challenge. This study investigates the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to high-Z nanoparticles (NPs) administered via inhalation during external beam radiotherapy. Here NPs investigated include: cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs), carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs), and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Using Monte Carlo-generated megavoltage energy spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumors due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from the NPs administered via inhalation route (IR) in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5-14.6 times higher concentrations of NPs can reach the lung by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the radiotherapy dose with and without nanoparticles was calculated for a range of NPs concentrations and tumor sizes. The DEF for IR was then compared with that for IV. For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of up to 1.19, 1.26, and 1.51 were obtained for CNPs, CBNPs and GNPs. In comparison values of 1.06, 1.08, and 1.15 were obtained via IV administration. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, even higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81 for CNPs. Results also showed that the DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor volume, as expected. The results of this work indicate that IR administration of targeted high-Z CNPs/CBNPs/GNPs could enable clinically significant DEF to lung tumors compared to IV

  10. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Underdose the Microscopic Disease and has the Potential to Increase Tumor Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate doses to the microscopic disease (MD) in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to model tumor control probability (TCP). Methods and Materials: In a retrospective planning study, three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were adapted to shape and volume changes of the gross tumor volume (GTV) once or twice during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses of 66 Gy; doses in the ART plans were escalated using an iso-mean lung dose (MLD) approach compared to non-adapted treatment. Dose distributions to the volumes of suspect MD were simulated for a scenario with synchronous shrinkage of the MD and GTV and for a scenario of a stationary MD despite GTV shrinkage; simulations were performed using deformable image registration. TCP calculations considering doses to the GTV and MD were performed using three different models. Results: Coverage of the MD at 50 Gy was not compromised by ART. Coverage at 60 Gy in the scenario of a stationary MD was significantly reduced from 92% ± 10% to 73% ± 19% using ART; however, the coverage was restored by iso-MLD dose escalation. Dose distributions in the MD were sufficient to achieve a TCP >80% on average in all simulation experiments, with the clonogenic cell density the major factor influencing TCP. The combined TCP for the GTV and MD was 19.9% averaged over all patients and TCP models in non-adaptive treatment with 66 Gy. Iso-MLD dose escalation achieved by ART increased the overall TCP by absolute 6% (adapting plan once) and by 8.7% (adapting plan twice) on average. Absolute TCP values were significantly different between the TCP models; however, all TCP models suggested very similar TCP increase by using ART. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to the shrinking GTV did not compromise dose coverage of volumes of suspect microscopic disease and has the potential to increase TCP by >40% compared

  11. Radiotherapy; Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannenmacher, M. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Abt. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Debus, J. [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Wenz, F. (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2006-07-01

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy.

  12. WE-G-BRE-06: New Potential for Enhancing External Beam Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Using FDA-Approved Concentrations of Cisplatin Or Carboplatin Nanoparticles Administered Via Inhalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Y; Altundal, Y; Sajo, E [University Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Detappe, A [Brigham ' Woman' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University of Lyon, Lyon (France); Makrigiorgos, G; Berbeco, R [Brigham ' Woman' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ngwa, W [University Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Brigham ' Woman' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates, for the first time, the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs) and carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs) administered via inhalation route (IR) during external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using Monte Carlo generated 6 MV energy fluence spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumor due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from CNPs administered via IR in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung tumor via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5–14.6 times higher concentrations of CNPs can reach the lung tumors by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the dose with and without CNPs was calculated for field size of 10 cm × 10 cm (sweeping gap), for a range of tumor depths and tumor sizes. Similar calculations were done for CBNPs. Results: For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of 1.19–1.30 were obtained for CNPs at 3–10 cm depth, respectively, in comparison to 1.06–1.09 for IV. For CBNPs, DEF values of 1.26–1.41 were obtained in comparison to 1.07–1.12 for IV. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81–2.27 for CNPs. DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor size. Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that major dose enhancement to lung tumors can be achieved using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR, in contrast to IV administration during external beam radiotherapy. These findings highlight a potential new approach for radiation boosting to lung tumors using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR. This would, especially, be applicable during concomitant chemoradiotherapy, potentially allowing for dose enhancement while

  13. WE-G-BRE-06: New Potential for Enhancing External Beam Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Using FDA-Approved Concentrations of Cisplatin Or Carboplatin Nanoparticles Administered Via Inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study investigates, for the first time, the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs) and carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs) administered via inhalation route (IR) during external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using Monte Carlo generated 6 MV energy fluence spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumor due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from CNPs administered via IR in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung tumor via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5–14.6 times higher concentrations of CNPs can reach the lung tumors by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the dose with and without CNPs was calculated for field size of 10 cm × 10 cm (sweeping gap), for a range of tumor depths and tumor sizes. Similar calculations were done for CBNPs. Results: For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of 1.19–1.30 were obtained for CNPs at 3–10 cm depth, respectively, in comparison to 1.06–1.09 for IV. For CBNPs, DEF values of 1.26–1.41 were obtained in comparison to 1.07–1.12 for IV. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81–2.27 for CNPs. DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor size. Conclusions: Our preliminary results indicate that major dose enhancement to lung tumors can be achieved using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR, in contrast to IV administration during external beam radiotherapy. These findings highlight a potential new approach for radiation boosting to lung tumors using CNPs/CBNPs administered via IR. This would, especially, be applicable during concomitant chemoradiotherapy, potentially allowing for dose enhancement while

  14. Unilateral radiotherapy for tonsil cancer: Potential dose distribution optimization with a simple two-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy beam arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and dosimetric optimization potential of a unilateral two-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique in the curative treatment of lateralized tonsil cancer. Materials and methods: Six patients with lateralized tonsillar carcinoma were treated unilaterally with a two-field IMRT technique (oblique-anterior and oblique-posterior fields, with or without collimator and couch rotation). Alternative IMRT plans using seven non-opposed coplanar fields were compared with the two-field plans for each patient. Results: Planning target volume (PTV) coverage was excellent with the two-field technique, using a relatively low number of monitor units (MU) (median, 441; range, 309-550). Dose constraints were respected for all organs at risk (OAR). Mean doses to contralateral parotid and submandibular glands were 3.9 and 17.7 Gy, respectively. Seven-field IMRT provided similar PTV coverage, with statistically significant better dose homogeneity and conformality. However, the mean delivered dose to the contralateral parotid (3.9 vs. 9.0 Gy, p = 0.001) as well as the mean number of MU (437 vs. 814, p = 0.002) and consequently machine time were lower with two-field IMRT. Conclusions: Unilateral two-field IMRT is a simple and feasible technique providing excellent tumor coverage and optimal OAR sparing while reducing the number of MU and treatment time.

  15. Palliative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palliative care does not attempt to prolong survival but to the achieve the highest quality of life both for the patient and their family covering their physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Radiotherapy (RT), one of the most important therapeutic modalities, has a great significance in palliative medicine for cancer since it attempts to reduce as much as possible the acute reaction associated with the treatment for the patient. (Author)

  16. The potential of MRI-guided online adaptive re-optimisation in radiotherapy of urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne; Hafeez, Shaista; Muren, Ludvig;

    2016-01-01

    : MRIGARTanIso reduced the course-averaged PTV by median 304. cc compared to plan selection. Bladder shifts affected target coverage in individual fractions for all strategies. Two patients had a v95% of the bladder below 98% for MRIGARTiso. MRIGARTiso decreased the bowel V25 with 15-46. cc compared to...... MRIGARTpop. Conclusion: Online re-optimised ART has a considerable normal tissue sparing potential. MRIGART with online corrections for target shift during a treatment fraction should be considered in ART for bladder cancer....

  17. 应用新型立式逆流色谱制备分离南蛇藤中的南蛇藤素%Preparative isolation and purification of celastrol from Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. by a new countercurrent chromatography with upright coil planet centrifuge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙翠荣; 吴世华; 王奎武; 潘远江

    2003-01-01

    A versatile countercurrent chromatography with upright multilayer coil planet centrifuge, named upright countercurrent chromatography (UCCC), was applied to the isolation and purification of celastrol from the roots of Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. The crude celastrol was obtained by elution with petroleum ether from ethanol extracts using a 15 cm length and 5 cm I.D. of silica gel flash chromatography. Preparative UCCC (Fig. 1) with a two-phase system composed of petroleum ether (b. p. 60 ~ 90 ℃ )-ethyl acetate-tetrachloromethanemethanol-water ( 1:1:8:6: 1, v/v) was successfully performed, yielding 705 mg celastrol at 99.5 % purity from 1020 rng of the crude extract in one step separation.

  18. Targeting IAP proteins in combination with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of radiotherapy critically depends on the activation of intrinsic cell death programs in cancer cells. This implies that evasion of cell death, a hallmark of human cancers, can contribute to radioresistance. Therefore, novel strategies to reactivate cell death programs in cancer cells are required in order to overcome resistance to radiotherapy. Since Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are expressed at high levels in multiple cancers and block cell death induction at a central point, therapeutic targeting of IAP proteins represents a promising approach to potentiate the efficacy of radiotherapy. The current review discusses the concept of targeting IAP proteins in combination with radiotherapy

  19. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  20. The potential impact of the tension of the pelvic muscles on set-up errors in radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study reported here was to evaluate the potential impact of the tension of pelvic muscles on set-up errors. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with rectal cancer were included. The treatment simulation of the lateral beam in prone position was performed twice-with relaxed and next with maximally tense pelvic muscles. During the second simulation, the couch was moved so as to align the centre of the beam with the actual position of the skin mark tattooed during the first simulation. The bony landmarks on both images of corresponding lateral fields were matched. The beam's centre displacement and the rotation were measured using the beam image taken in relaxed position as a reference. The absolute values were used in calculation of the mean. For the anterior-posterior direction, the mean value of displacements was 15.3 mm, standard deviation (SD) 6.9 mm and the maximal value 37 mm. For the cranial-caudal direction, the mean value was 4.4 mm, SD 4 mm and the maximal value 17 mm. The mean rotation of the pelvis was 5.3 degrees, SD 2.4 degrees and maximal rotation 11 degrees. The majority of displacements were in the posterior (86%) and caudal (55%) directions. The majority of rotations were clockwise (76%). It was shown that pelvic muscle tension was the reason for anal verge displacements and mispositionings of the shielding block. This results in set-up inaccuracy, especially in the anterior-posterior direction, shielding block mispositioning and anal verge displacement

  1. Celastrol's Anticancer Mechanism Revealed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Thunder of God Vine (Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F.), or Lei Gong Teng in Chinese, is a plant that has been used for ages by traditional Chinese medicine to treat inflammatory conditions. In recent years it has aroused attention of scientists around the world because of its proved efficacies in treating such diseases as rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Dose calculation of Acuros XB and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment with flattening filter free beams and the potential role of calculation grid size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study aimed to appraise the dose differences between Acuros XB (AXB) and Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for lung cancer with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Additionally, the potential role of the calculation grid size (CGS) on the dose differences between the two algorithms was also investigated. SBRT plans with 6X and 10X FFF beams produced from the CT scan data of 10 patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Clinically acceptable treatment plans with AAA were recalculated using AXB with the same monitor units (MU) and identical multileaf collimator (MLC) settings. Furthermore, different CGS (2.5 mm and 1 mm) in the two algorithms was also employed to investigate their dosimetric impact. Dose to planning target volumes (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) between the two algorithms were compared. PTV was separated into PTV-soft (density in soft-tissue range) and PTV-lung (density in lung range) for comparison. The dose to PTV-lung predicted by AXB was found to be 1.33 ± 1.12% (6XFFF beam with 2.5 mm CGS), 2.33 ± 1.37% (6XFFF beam with 1 mm CGS), 2.81 ± 2.33% (10XFFF beam with 2.5 mm CGS) and 3.34 ± 1.76% (10XFFF beam with 1 mm CGS) lower compared with that by AAA, respectively. However, the dose directed to PTV-soft was comparable. For OARs, AXB predicted a slightly lower dose to the aorta, chest wall, spinal cord and esophagus, regardless of whether the 6XFFF or 10XFFF beam was utilized. Exceptionally, dose to the ipsilateral lung was significantly higher with AXB. AXB principally predicts lower dose to PTV-lung compared to AAA and the CGS contributes to the relative dose difference between the two algorithms

  3. POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY FOR RADIATION DOSE ESCALATION IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY STAGE HIGH-RISK PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with early stage high-risk prostate cancer (PSA >20, Gleason score >7 are at high risk of recurrence following prostate cancer irradiation. Radiation dose escalation to the prostate may improve biochemical free survival for these patients. However, high rectal and bladder dose with conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT may lead to excessive gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT, by virtue of combining the steep dose gradient of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and daily pretreatment imaging, may allow for radiation dose escalation and decreased treatment morbidity. Reduced treatment time is feasible with hypofractionated IGRT and it may improve patient quality of life.

  4. 不同促渗剂对雷公藤红素醇质体体外透皮吸收的研究%Effects of Several Kinds of Penetration Enhancers on Percutaneous Absorption of Celastrol Ethosomes in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军; 刘荻; 马卓

    2015-01-01

    以离体小鼠皮肤为屏障,采用 TP2A 型智能透皮试验仪进行体外透皮试验,用 HPLC 法测定不同促渗剂对雷公藤红素醇质体的累积渗透量和渗透速率的影响。研究发现,不同促渗剂对雷公藤红素醇质体的累积渗透量和渗透速率的影响大小依次为:丙二醇>氮酮>甘油>薄荷脑,而15%丙二醇的促渗效果最佳,可以作为雷公藤红素醇质体的最佳促渗剂。%The paper studied the effects of several kinds of penetration enhancers on percutaneous absorp-tion of Celastrol ethosomes in vitro.TP2A-type intelligent transdermal test instrument was adopted as the apparatus for in vitro mouse skin permeation.The cumulative permeation quantity and penetration rate of different penetration enhancers on Celastrol ethosomes waere determined by HPLC.Results shuggest tha the ordering of the effects of penetration enhancers was propylene glycol > azone > glycerol > menthol. The effect of 15% propylene glycol was the most influencing enhancer.The conclusion can be arrived at that 15% propylene glycol can be the best penetration enhancers for Celastrol ethosomes.

  5. Heterogeneity in the properties of NEFL mutants causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease results in differential effects on neurofilament assembly and susceptibility to intervention by the chaperone-inducer, celastrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Benoit J; Mushynski, Walter E; Durham, Heather D

    2013-07-01

    Aberrant aggregation of neurofilament proteins is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases. For example, neurofilament light protein (NEFL) mutants causing Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease induce misassembly of neurofilaments. This study demonstrated that mutations in different functional domains of NEFL have different effects on filament assembly and susceptibility to interventions to restore function. The mouse NEFL mutants, NEFL(Q333P) and NEFL(P8R), exhibited different assembly properties in SW13-cells, cells lacking endogenous intermediate filaments, indicating different consequences of these mutations on the biochemical properties of NEFL. The p.Q333P mutation caused reversible misfolding of the protein. NEFL(Q333P) could be refolded and form coil-coiled dimers, in vitro using chaotropic agent, and in cultured cells by induction of HSPA1 and HSPB1. Celastrol, an inducer of chaperone proteins, induced HSPA1 expression in motor neurons and prevented the formation of neurofilament inclusions and mitochondrial shortening induced by expression of NEFL(Q333P), but not in sensory neurons. Conversely, celastrol had a protective effect against the toxicity of NEFL(P8R), a mutant which is sensitive to HSBP1 but not HSPA1 chaperoning, only in large-sized sensory neurons, not in motor neurons. Importantly, sensory and motor neurons do not respond identically to celastrol and different chaperones are upregulated by the same treatment. Thus, effective therapy of CMT not only depends on the identity of the mutated gene, but the consequences of the specific mutation on the properties of the protein and the neuronal population targeted. PMID:23618875

  6. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research. (topical review)

  7. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  8. Galectin-7 as a potential predictive marker of chemo-and/or radio-therapy resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukawa, Sho; Morita, Kei-ichi; Negishi, Ayako; Harada, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yusuke; Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Tomioka, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Kae; Ono, Masaya; Yamada, Tesshi; Omura, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) requires the integration of multimodal approaches. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of tumor sensitivity to preoperative radiotherapy/chemotherapy for OSCC in order to allow oncologists to determine optimum therapeutic strategies without the associated adverse effects. Here, the protein expression profiles of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from 18 OSCC patients, termed learning cases, who receive...

  9. Dose-Guided Radiotherapy: Potential Benefit of Online Dose Recalculation for Stereotactic Lung Irradiation in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether dose-guided radiotherapy (i.e., online recalculation and evaluation of the actual dose distribution) can improve decision making for lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: For this study 108 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans of 10 non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. The treatment plans were recalculated on the CBCT scans. The V100% of the internal target volume (ITV) and Dmax of the organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed. Results from the recalculated data were compared with dose estimates for target and OARs by superposition of the originally planned dose distribution on CBCT geometry (i.e., the original dose distribution was assumed to be spatially invariant). Results: Before position correction was applied the V100% of the ITV was 100% in 65% of the cases when an ITV–PTV margin of 5 mm was used and 52% of the cases when a margin of 3 mm was used. After position correction, the difference of Dmax in the OARs with respect to the treatment plan was within 5% in the majority of the cases. When the dose was not recalculated but estimated assuming an invariant dose distribution, clinically relevant errors occurred in both the ITV and the OARs. Conclusion: Dose-guided radiotherapy can be used to determine the actual dose in OARs when the target has moved with respect to the OARs. When the workflow is optimized for speed, it can be used to prevent unnecessary position corrections. Estimating the dose by assuming an invariant dose instead of recalculation of the dose gives clinically relevant errors.

  10. Direct costs of radiotherapy for rectal cancer: a microcosting study

    OpenAIRE

    Hanly, Paul; Céilleachair, Alan Ó; Skally, Máiréad; O’Neill, Ciaran; Sharp, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer and model the impact of a range of potential efficiency improvements. Methods Microcosting methods were used to estimate total direct r...

  11. A pilot study on potential plasma hypoxia markers in the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, C.; Bache, M.; Guettler, A.; Vordermark, D. [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kotzsch, M. [Technical University Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Hypoxic radioresistance plays a critical role in the radiotherapy of cancer and adversely impacts prognosis and treatment response. This prospective study investigated the interrelationship and the prognostic significance of several hypoxia-related proteins in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Pretreatment osteopontin (OPN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) plasma levels were determined by ELISA in 55 NSCLC (M0) patients receiving 66 Gy curative-intent radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Marker correlation, association with clinicopathological parameters and the prognostic value of a biomarker combination was evaluated. All biomarkers were linearly correlated and linked to different clinical parameters including lung function, weight loss (OPN), gross tumor volume (VEGF) and T stage (CA IX). High OPN (p = 0.03), VEGF (p = 0.02) and CA IX (p = 0.04) values were significantly associated with poor survival. Double marker combination additively increased the risk of death by a factor of 2 and high plasma levels of the triple combination OPN/VEGF/CA IX yielded a 5.9-fold risk of death (p = 0.009). The combined assessment of OPN/VEGF/CA IX correlated independently with prognosis (p = 0.03) in a multivariate Cox regression model including N stage, T stage and GTV. This pilot study suggests that a co-detection augments the prognostic value of single markers and that the integration of OPN, VEGF and CA IX into a hypoxic biomarker profile for the identification of patients with largely hypoxic and radioresistant tumors should be further evaluated. (orig.) [German] Hypoxische Radioresistenz spielt eine kritische Rolle in der Radiotherapie maligner Tumoren und beeinflusst Prognose und Therapieansprechen negativ. Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte den Zusammenhang und die prognostische Bedeutung einiger hypoxieassoziierter Proteine bei Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom

  12. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Depts. of Oncology and Haematology; Yahalom, Joachim (eds.) [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  13. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  14. IDH1 mutation as a potential novel biomarker for distinguishing pseudoprogression from true progression in patients with glioblastoma treated with temozolomide and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to distinguish pseudoprogression (PP) from early true progression in patients with glioblastoma (GBM) based on the presence of a mutation in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1). We retrospectively surveyed 32 patients with GBM or GBM with oligodendroglioma component (GBMO) who underwent biopsy or maximal tumor resection followed by concurrent radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). We then selected patients with early radiological progression in magnetic resonance imaging within 6 months after concurrent radiotherapy and TMZ treatment. DNA was extracted from their tumor blocks. The IDH1 mutation was analyzed in the genomic region by direct sequencing as a biomarker for PP. Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with GBM and four with GBMO. Eleven patients were discovered to have early radiological progression. PP was detected in two patients (6.3%) diagnosed with GBMO and one patient with GBM. Both of the GBMO patients with PP had the IDH1 mutation, the one GBM patient with PP and the other eight patients with early true progression with wild type. The sensitivity and specificity of the IDH1 mutation for detecting PP were 66.7 and 100%, respectively. This study suggests the IDH1 mutation may become a novel molecular biomarker for PP. Analyzing the IDH1 mutation, in the case of recognizing early radiological progression, may enable distinction of PP from early true progression, and we could determine the need for second-look surgery. (author)

  15. Palliative radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. [n many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Whilst there is an obvious need for palliative radiotherapy, simple curative treatments could also be managed. C060 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both C060 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose and approach: to summarize the current knowledge on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The results of meta-analyses, phase III-studies, and phase II-studies using chemoradiation (CRT) and chemotherapy for resectable and non-resectable PDAC are reviewed. Results and conclusion: the role of CRT is undefined in the adjuvant setting but there may be a role as additive treatment after R1 resection. Locally advanced borderline resectable tumors may shrink down and be subject to potentially curative resections. In locally advanced clearly unresectable cancers the effect of CRT as well as chemotherapy is poorly defined and the sequence of chemotherapy and CRT should be re-evaluated. Patients with PDAC should always be treated within studies to identify optimal treatment results. (orig.)

  17. The potential advantages of 18FDG PET/CT-based target volume delineation in radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study investigated two fixed threshold methods to delineate the target volume using 18FDG PET/CT before and during a course of radical radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Materials and methods: Patients were enrolled into the study between March 2006 and May 2008. 18FDG PET/CT scans were carried out 72 h prior to the start of radiotherapy and then at 10, 44 and 66 Gy. Functional volumes were delineated according to the SUV Cut Off (SUVCO) (2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 bwg/ml) and percentage of the SUVmax (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) thresholds. The background 18FDG uptake and the SUVmax within the volumes were also assessed. Results: Primary and lymph node volumes for the eight patients significantly reduced with each increase in the delineation threshold (for example 2.5-3.0 bwg/ml SUVCO) compared to the baseline threshold at each imaging point. There was a significant reduction in the volume (p ≤ 0.0001-0.01) after 36 Gy compared to the 0 Gy by the SUVCO method. There was a negative correlation between the SUVmax within the primary and lymph node volumes and delivered radiation dose (p ≤ 0.0001-0.011) but no difference in the SUV within the background reference region. The volumes delineated by the PTSUVmax method increased with the increase in the delivered radiation dose after 36 Gy because the SUVmax within the region of interest used to define the edge of the volume was equal or less than the background 18FDG uptake and the software was unable to effectively differentiate between tumour and background uptake. Conclusions: The changes in the target volumes delineated by the SUVCO method were less susceptible to background 18FDG uptake compared to those delineated by the PTSUVmax and may be more helpful in radiotherapy planning. The best method and threshold have still to be determined within institutions, both nationally and internationally.

  18. A potential to reduce pulmonary toxicity: The use of perfusion SPECT with IMRT for functional lung avoidance in radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The study aimed to examine specific avoidance of functional lung (FL) defined by a single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion scan, using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Patients with NSCLC underwent planning computerized tomography (CT) and lung perfusion SPECT scan in the treatment position using fiducial markers to allow co-registration in the treatment planning system. Radiotherapy (RT) volumes were delineated on the CT scan. FL was defined using co-registered SPECT images. Two inverse coplanar RT plans were generated for each patient: 4-field 3-DCRT and 5-field step-and-shoot IMRT. 3-DCRT plans were created using automated AutoPlan optimisation software, and IMRT plans were generated employing Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems). All plans were prescribed to 64 Gy in 32 fractions using data for the 6 MV beam from an Elekta linear accelerator. The objectives for both plans were to minimize the volume of FL irradiated to 20 Gy (fV20) and dose variation within the planning target volume (PTV). A spinal cord dose was constrained to 46 Gy. Volume of PTV receiving 90% of the prescribed dose (PTV90), fV20, and functional mean lung dose (fMLD) were recorded. The PTV90/fV20 ratio was used to account for variations in both measures, where a higher value represented a better plan. Results: Thirty-four RT plans of 17 patients with stage I-IIIB NSCLC suitable for radical RT were analysed. In 6 patients with stage I-II disease there was no improvement in PTV90, fV20, PTV/fV20 ratio and fMLD using IMRT compared to 3-DCRT. In 11 patients with stage IIIA-B disease, the PTV was equally well covered with IMRT and 3-DCRT plans, with IMRT producing better PTV90/fV20 ratio (mean ratio - 7.2 vs. 5.3, respectively, p = 0.001) and reduced fMLD figures compared to

  19. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging of Residual Skull Base Chordoma Before Radiotherapy Using Fluoromisonidazole and Fluorodeoxyglucose: Potential Consequences for Dose Painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammar, Hamid, E-mail: hamid.mammar@unice.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Antoine Lacassagne Center, Nice (France); CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Kerrou, Khaldoun; Nataf, Valerie [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Pontvert, Dominique [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Clemenceau, Stephane [Department of Neurosurgery, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Lot, Guillaume [Department of Neurosurgery, Adolph De Rothschild Foundation, Paris (France); George, Bernard [Department of Neurosurgery, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Polivka, Marc [Department of Pathology, Lariboisiere Hospital, Paris (France); Mokhtari, Karima [Department of Pathology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris (France); Ferrand, Regis; Feuvret, Loiec; Habrand, Jean-louis [Proton Therapy Center of Orsay, Curie Institute, Paris (France); Pouyssegur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie [CNRS-UMR 6543, Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Talbot, Jean-Noeel [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy, Tenon Hospital, and University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To detect the presence of hypoxic tissue, which is known to increase the radioresistant phenotype, by its uptake of fluoromisonidazole (18F) (FMISO) using hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, and to compare it with the glucose-avid tumor tissue imaged with fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) (FDG), in residual postsurgical skull base chordoma scheduled for radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seven patients with incompletely resected skull base chordomas were planned for high-dose radiotherapy (dose {>=}70 Gy). All 7 patients underwent FDG and FMISO PET/CT. Images were analyzed qualitatively by visual examination and semiquantitatively by computing the ratio of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumor and cerebellum (T/C R), with delineation of lesions on conventional imaging. Results: Of the eight lesion sites imaged with FDG PET/CT, only one was visible, whereas seven of nine lesions were visible on FMISO PET/CT. The median SUVmax in the tumor area was 2.8 g/mL (minimum 2.1; maximum 3.5) for FDG and 0.83 g/mL (minimum 0.3; maximum 1.2) for FMISO. The T/C R values ranged between 0.30 and 0.63 for FDG (median, 0.41) and between 0.75 and 2.20 for FMISO (median,1.59). FMISO T/C R >1 in six lesions suggested the presence of hypoxic tissue. There was no correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake in individual chordomas (r = 0.18, p = 0.7). Conclusion: FMISO PET/CT enables imaging of the hypoxic component in residual chordomas. In the future, it could help to better define boosted volumes for irradiation and to overcome the radioresistance of these lesions. No relationship was founded between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in these tumors after initial surgery.

  20. Radiotherapy of anal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report is given on radiotherapy of anal carcinomas. Own experiences and a review of the recent literature are presented. Prior to surgery radiotherapy with high energy electrons in combination with chemotherapy is in the foreground. Especially in cloacogenous carcinoma no residual tumor was found after preliminary irradiation. Our recommended conception of post-operative radiotherapy of the regional lymphatic draining vessels is outlined. (orig./MG)

  1. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  2. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  3. Radiotherapy in paediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiation therapy has always been one of the most powerful tools in the fight against childhood cancer. Since the middle of the last century, we have known that most paediatric tumours are exquisitely sensitive to radiation. The early application of radiotherapy alone led to the first cures of retinoblastoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, as well as certain sarcomas and brain tumours. The generous application of radiation in conjunction with chemotherapy led to further extraordinary increases in survival rates for leukemias, Wilms tumour, sarcomas, and other paediatric malignancies. Over the past 40 years, the overall cure rate for childhood cancer has climbed from 25% to 75% in the USA. With this success, however, came the knowledge that radiation can be associated with significant late effects. We now have a much better understanding of both the benefits and risks of using radiation to treat children as we seek to optimize and refine its role in curative therapy. Leukemias constitute approximately one third of paediatric cancer diagnoses and most of these patients are successfully treated with chemotherapy alone. Central nervous system (CNS) radiation is still recommended for patients at highest risk of CNS failure and total body radiation is useful for the small percentage of patients who require bone marrow transplant. Brain tumours also make up almost one-third of paediatric neoplasms and children with most kinds of brain tumours will require high dose radiotherapy. Many of the other types of paediatric tumours (Wilms, neuroblastoma, sarcomas, etc.) also require radiotherapy as part of curative treatment. There have been considerable advances in radiation technology including three dimensional planning, intensity modulated radiation therapy, and protons. Individual paediatric patients may or may not benefit from advanced technologies based on numerous patient and disease related factors. Examples will be illustrated. We must also be mindful of economic and

  4. Radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    shapes and sizes while sparing normal tissue. The situation is further complicated if the normal tissues are critical organs or are particularly sensitive to radiation. Radiotherapy techniques employed to obtain a closer conformation of the dose distribution to the tumour volume are referred to as conformal radiotherapy techniques. The clinical implementation of conformal therapy has been delayed by limitations in the verification of conformal dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems prior to the irradiation of the patient and the verification of complex treatments during its delivery to the patient. There are several aspects of conformal therapy that complicate dose verification. To achieve the dose distributions conforming to complex 3D volumes, high dose gradients arise in the treatment volume. Further, overdose or underdose regions can exist when separate radiation fields are used to deliver additional radiation. These aspects require that practical dose measurement (dosimetry) techniques be able to integrate dose over time and easily measure dose distributions in 3D with high spatial resolution. Traditional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiographic film do not fulfil these requirements. Novel gel dosimetry techniques are being developed in which dose distributions can potentially be determined in vitro in 3D using anthropomorphic phantoms to simulate a clinically irradiated situation. As long ago as the 1950's, radiation-induced colour change in dyes was used to investigate radiation doses in gels. It was subsequently shown that radiation induced changes in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties of gels infused with conventional Fricke dosimetry solutions could be measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Fricke gels, Fe2+ ions in ferrous sulphate solutions are usually dispersed throughout a gelatin, agarose or PVA matrix. Radiation-induced changes in the dosimeters are considered to

  5. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  6. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  7. Training logbook for radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunter, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Leer, J.W.H.; Kinay, M.; Heeren, G.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To develop a structured logbook for trainees in the medical specialty of radiotherapy with Europe that records the increasing experience throughout their training period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A working party appointed by the European Board of Radiotherapy developed a draft version of a Europea

  8. Antitumor radiotherapy in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The philosophy is outlined of the therapy of malignant tumors in children, including Hodgkin type lymphomas and non-Hodgkin tumors, such as Wilm's tumor. The role of radiotherapy is defined and discussed in the comprehensive management of children using a combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy system. (L.O.). 5 refs

  9. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  10. Optimisation in radiotherapy I. Defining the problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimisation in radiotherapy should incorporate a very wide set of variables, including the combinations of dose due to external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, internally administered radionuclides and the effects of chemotherapy, surgery, hyperthermia, other biological and chemical defenses, alternative treatment techniques, lifestyle and mental state of the patient, the economics of cancer treatment and consideration of tolerable levels of adverse effects and palliation. A full treatment optimisation would consider the influence and covariance of all these variables and any future techniques, as well as the complex constraints imposed by the biological systems being irradiated. This series of reviews concentrates on optimisation of radiotherapy through the treatment planning component of the treatment process - an area of radiotherapy research that has received a great deal of attention as the attached lists of references will testify. It hopes to provide the medical physics and engineering community (and hopefully the clinical community) with a background into the mathematical bases for the manipulation of radiation for clinical benefit. It also examines the potential benefits of research into these techniques in the light of recent approaches to optimisation in radiotherapy, and provides pointers to more concise accounts in the literature. In this first article, the incentive for radiotherapy optimisation research is established, and the actual radiotherapy optimisation problem (in terms of the manipulation of degrees of freedom in radiation delivery) is defined. The degrees of freedom associated with radiotherapy treatment are identified, and it is shown how these degrees of freedom translate into the mathematical parameters of the problem, including the dose distributions they produce. The constraints and objectives of the problem are also discussed from both physical and radiobiological perspectives. (author)

  11. To understand radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dealing with the use of radiotherapy for adults, this guide indicates when a radiotherapy is suggested, how it acts, how the treatment is chosen, which are the professionals involved. It describes how an external radiotherapy takes place and its various techniques, the different types of side effects (general, specific to the treated zone, late effects). It indicates which organs can be treated by curie-therapy, the different curie-therapy treatment modalities, how a curie-therapy takes place and which are its side effects. It outlines how to better cope with radiotherapy (how to be supported, the important role of relatives, everyday life questions, rights). It indicates and comments the different measures adopted for the safety and quality of radiotherapy

  12. Using Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography to Assess Tumor Volume During Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Its Potential Impact on Adaptive Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Sparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-avid tumor volume on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) during the course of radiation therapy and examine its potential use in adaptive radiotherapy for tumor dose escalation or normal tissue sparing in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: As part of a pilot study, patients with Stage I-III NSCLC underwent FDG-PET/CT before radiotherapy (RT) and in mid-RT (after 40-50 Gy). Gross tumor volumes were contoured on CT and PET scans obtained before and during RT. Three-dimensional conformal RT plans were generated for each patient, first using only pretreatment CT scans. Mid-RT PET volumes were then used to design boost fields. Results: Fourteen patients with FDG-avid tumors were assessed. Two patients had a complete metabolic response, and 2 patients had slightly increased FDG uptake in the adjacent lung tissue. Mid-RT PET scans were useful in the 10 remaining patients. Mean decreases in CT and PET tumor volumes were 26% (range, +15% to -75%) and 44% (range, +10% to -100%), respectively. Designing boosts based on mid-RT PET allowed for a meaningful dose escalation of 30-102 Gy (mean, 58 Gy) or a reduction in normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of 0.4-3% (mean, 2%) in 5 of 6 patients with smaller yet residual tumor volumes. Conclusions: Tumor metabolic activity and volume can change significantly after 40-50 Gy of RT. Using mid-RT PET volumes, tumor dose can be significantly escalated or NTCP reduced. Clinical studies evaluating patient outcome after PET-based adaptive RT are ongoing

  13. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin WANG; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescrip...

  14. Unintended exposure in radiotherapy: Identification of prominent causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Unintended exposures in radiotherapy are likely to occur when certain conditions that favour such exposures exist. Based on the frequency of occurrence of various causes of 100 events of unintended exposures in radiotherapy as derived from the analysis of published reports, a checklist for assessing the vulnerability of radiotherapy facilities for potential accidents has been prepared. The list presents items to be considered for safety critical assessments of a radiotherapy department for the improvement of patient safety and the entire radiotherapy processes. Materials and methods: The resources used for this paper consist of 100 unintended radiotherapy exposures and were derived from existing published reports. The analysis was performed by forming two templates: one consisting of 10 initiating events and another of 35 contributing factors. Results: Four most prominent initiating events were identified and together accounted for about 70% of all the unintended exposure events. Ten most prominent contributing factors were also identified and together accounted for about 70% of all the radiotherapy unintended exposure events covered under this study. Conclusion: With this knowledge of high frequency of occurrences, the identified four prominent initiating events and the 10 most prominent contributing factors must be checked and dealt with as a matter of priority when assessing the safety of a radiotherapy facility. A simple checklist for checking the quality assurance programmes of a radiotherapy department for every aspect of the design and delivery of radiation have been provided.

  15. Localized Dose Enhancement to Tumor Blood Vessel Endothelial Cells via Megavoltage X-rays and Targeted Gold Nanoparticles: New Potential for External Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Tumor endothelial cell damage during radiation therapy may contribute significantly to tumor eradication and treatment efficacy. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) delivered preferentially to the walls of tumor blood vessels produce low-energy, short-range photoelectrons during external beam radiotherapy, boosting dose to the tumor microvasculature. In this study dosimetry at the single-cell level is used to estimate the anticipated AuNP-mediated dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells during 6-MV X-ray irradiation. Methods and Materials: Endothelial cells are modeled as thin slabs with 100-nm-diameter AuNPs attached within the blood vessel. The number of photoelectrons emitted per AuNP per gray of X-rays is computed at multiple points along the external beam central axis by use of a Monte Carlo-generated energy fluence spectrum. The energy deposited from AuNP emissions to the endothelium is calculated based on an analytic method incorporating the energy-loss formula of Cole. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF) is the ratio of the overall (externally plus internally generated) dose to endothelial cells in the presence of AuNPs to the dose without AuNPs (from the external beam only). Results: At 20-cm depth, the EDEF is 1.7 (70% dose increase) for an intravascular AuNP concentration of 30 mg/g. Most of this dose enhancement arises from the low-energy (approximately 100 keV) portion of the linear accelerator X-ray spectrum. Furthermore, for AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, EDEF values of 1.2 to 4.4 (20-340% dose increase) are calculated. Conclusions: In contrast to calculations assuming that AuNPs distributed homogeneously throughout the target volume (macrodosimetry), our cellular microdosimetry calculations predict a major dose enhancement to tumor microvasculature from conventional linear accelerator X-rays. This effect may enable the delivery of ablative therapeutic doses to these sensitive microstructures while maintaining

  16. N-Terminal Pro-B–Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B–type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7–333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0–172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V3Gy(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D15cm3(Gy)/Dmean(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D15cm3/D50% (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V2Gy (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D1cm3(Gy)/Dmean(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D0.5cm3(Gy)/D50%(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non–RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small percentage of organ volumes (heart or ventricle) receiving high dose levels

  17. DICOM in Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nikfarjam

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Noticeable development in achieving data from patients is acquired by means of designing a system that connects these systems: imaging, archive and monitoring systems. When several imaging devices work based on DICOM standard; they can connect to each other without any interface. There are many applications for DICOM standard in radiotherapy; however its main usage is in imaging. It has other applications such as RT Structure Set, RT Dose, RT Plan and RT Brachy Treatment. "nNow DICOM is a complete and widespread standard to use in radiotherapy. Most of the radiotherapy machines have ability to use DICOM. Before installing a new Linac, it is necessary to predict all aspects of DICOM standard in this device. Therefore, as regards to entrance of 12 Linac to Iran, it is important to have enough knowledge about it. This article is a review about development of DICOM in radiotherapy. We try to stress on DICOM applications and abstain from technological agenda.

  18. Radiotherapy cure: safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiotherapy, a precisely measured dose of ionising radiation is directed at a limited tumour area so as not to damage healthy tissues. The most important form of therapy is external radiation therapy given by means of radiotherapy equipment. The bigger the tumour, the more cancer cells it contains and the higher the radiation dose that is needed to destroy the tumour. Different cancer types respond differently to radiation. Healthy tissues also respond in different ways to radiotherapy, e.g. the reaction may come during the treatment or later. The growth of some cancer types accelerates in two to four weeks after the initiation of the therapy. This information has brought about a reduction in treatment times so as to avoid cell growth that might endanger the treatment result. The radiotherapy that is given today by specialist doctors is safe because the side effects of the treatment are well under control. (orig.)

  19. All delays before radiotherapy risk progression of Merkel cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prolonged waiting times for radiotherapy have resulted in many centres assigning priorities to various patient or diagnostic groups. A high risk of progression on a waiting list is one factor that would reasonably influence the priority. The present descriptive study of 27 patients with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) found that a median wait of 24 days for radiotherapy is associated with a high risk of progression. Eleven (41%) of 27 patients developed progressive disease, including five (45%) of 11 patients waiting for adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients treated adjuvantly also had longer waiting times prior to their initial radiotherapy consultation (median 41 days), which may have contributed to the rate of progression. Merkel cell carcinoma is an aggressive but curable malignancy and appropriate management should include efforts to minimize all potential delays prior to the commencement of radiotherapy. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Role of tumor size in radiotherapy using modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is given to present-day knowledge about changes, taking place in malignant tumor tissues during their growth, important for results of radiotherapy, using modifiers, from a radiobiological viewpoint. It is shown that hypertermia (HT) is the most effective adjuvant of radiotherapy for medium - and large-size tumors. The combined application of artificial hyperglycemia (AH) and HT is investigated as the method for increasing efficiency of radiotherapy. Efficiency of using radioprotectors and electron-acceptor compounds (metronidazole, misonidazole) for large-size malignant tumors in combinations-metronidazole with AH and misonidazole with HT-is noted. Analysis of these data on radiotherapy efficiency depending on size of irradiated tumors will enable an evaluation of radiotherapy potential in different cases in determining the advisability of modifier application

  1. IMAGE-GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY AND -BRACHYTHERAPY FOR CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh eDutta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy.Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT, allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  2. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  3. An evaluation of the utilisation of the virtual environment for radiotherapy training (VERT) in clinical radiotherapy centres across the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The purpose of the survey was to evaluate the utilisation of the Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training (VERT) in clinical radiotherapy centres across the UK. Methods: A survey questionnaire was constructed using the Survey Monkey™ tool to evaluate the utilisation of the Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training. Once constructed, an online link to the survey questionnaire was emailed to all radiotherapy centre managers in the UK (n = 67) who were invited to provide one response per centre. The survey comprised forty-five questions which were grouped into eleven sections. Key results: The results indicate that 61% of UK radiotherapy centres have VERT installed, twenty centres are currently without a VERT installation and only 1 centre is intending to install a system in the near future. The results also indicate that the use of VERT varies considerably in differing radiotherapy centres with the most frequent use of VERT being for the training of staff, specifically for the training of pre-registration therapeutic radiographers and preparation time for trainers. The majority of centres using VERT for any of the purposes investigated feel it provides benefits. Conclusions and recommendations: The survey highlighted the varied use of VERT in radiotherapy centres across the UK and indicated that when VERT is used in clinical radiotherapy centres, a wide variety of benefits are experienced. Because of the variation in use, it is concluded that the benefits of the VERT installations in radiotherapy centres across the UK are not being fully realised. It is recommended that all radiotherapy service managers commit adequate resources to develop and implement VERT fully and effectively so that its full potential is realised in all radiotherapy centres across the UK

  4. Advice concerning radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutch National cancer incidence figures were calculated by using the reliable data on cancer incidence in the Eindhoven area and population forecasts and information obtained from the Central Bureau of Statistics. Several radiotherapy departments suffer from under capacity (a lack of resources and understaffing). Data have also shown that 35% of cancer patients receive radiotherapy, instead of 50%. Calculations have been made by the committee on the present and future needs with regard to equipment and staff. In 1983, the number of megavoltage therapy units amounted to 38, but should have been 65. It should be 80 in 1990 and 90 in 2000. Since building and installing such equipment is a lengthy process a considerable effort is needed to make up for the arrears. The committee advocates the extension of the system of regional cooperation in cancer care (comprehensive cancer centres), in which radiotherapy departments play a crucial role. Working parties from the committee provided a comprehensive description of current radiotherapy practice with reference to physical, technical, clinical and management aspects. Another working party assessed the results of cancer treatment with regard to many different tumour sites. Recent and expected developments were analysed or indicated. The Radiotherapy Committee commissioned an external team to conduct a project to achieve a picture of future developments using methods different to those of the committee's. An interim advice has been added on this subject. (Auth.)

  5. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  6. Chemical modifiers of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only two groups, anticancer drugs and radiosensitizers are discussed among many groups of chemical modifiers. In combined radiotherapy (RT) with chemotherapy (CT), sequential administration seems to be superior to concomitant administration, because simultaneous use enhances intensively normal tissue damage. In sequential administration, interruption of CT during RT causes growth of distant metastases. So, alternating scheme of RT and CT is proposed and evaluated clinically. Hypoxic cell sensitizers including well-known misonidazole and PLDR inhibitors (Ara-A etc.) are promising in radiotherapy. They should be used intermittently two or three times during RT in order to avoid neurotoxicity of misonidazole. (author) 70 refs

  7. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  8. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-Wei; Guo, Wei-Hua; Qi, Ya-Fei; Wang, Jian-Zhen; Ma, Xiang-Xing; Yu, De-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect. PMID:27255899

  9. Synergistic Effects of Gold Nanocages in Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai-wei; Guo, Wei-hua; Qi, Ya-fei; Wang, Jian-zhen; Ma, Xiang-xing; Yu, De-xin

    2016-06-01

    Gold nanocages (GNCs) are a promising material that not only converts near infrared (NIR) light to heat for the ablation of tumors but also acts as a radiosensitizer. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy has a synergistic effect that can lead to significant tumor cell necrosis. In the current study, we synthesized GNCs that offered the combined effects of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. This combination strategy resulted in increased tumor cell apoptosis and significant tumor tissue necrosis. We propose that GNCs can be used for clinical treatment and to potentially overcome resistance to radiotherapy by clearly increasing the antitumor effect.

  10. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin WANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescription and reporting, arrangement of beams, controlling of dose volume and treatment delivering.

  11. ORO dental complications of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation and radioactivity were discovered more than 100 years ago. Since then, radiation has become important in cancer treatment. Approximately one million people will develop invasive cancer each year. Of these, 40% will receive curative benefit from surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination modality. Normal body tissues vary in their response to radiation. As with tumors, normal tissues in which cells are quickly dividing may be affected. This causes some of the side effects of radiation treatment. Since radiation is a local treatment, side effects depend on the area of the body being treated. The early effects of radiation may be seen a few days or weeks after treatments have started and may go on for several weeks after treatments have ended. Other effects may not show up until months, or even years, later. As radiotherapy is a viable treatment modality for head and neck cancer, however a wide range of potentially debilitating dental complications may accompany this treatment. The orofacial tissues of dental significance that may be affected by head and neck radiotherapy are the salivary glands, mucous membranes, taste buds, bone and teeth. (author)

  12. Erythropoietin and radiotherapy; Erythropoietine et radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Fur, E.; Albarghach, M.N.; Pradier, O. [CHU de Morvan, Dept. de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-01-15

    Erythropoietin (E.P.O.) is a glycoprotein hormone. This hormone is a growth factor for red blood cells precursors in the bone marrow. The decrease of oxygen partial pressure, a reduced number of erythrocytes caused by bleeding or excessive destruction, or increased tissues oxygen requirements lead to increased secretion of E.P.O.. Its action takes place on bone marrow erythroblastic cells through specific receptors. E.P.O. stimulates the proliferation of red cell precursors stem cells in the bone marrow, thus increasing their production in one to two weeks. The effectiveness of E.P.O. at increasing haemoglobin and improving patients quality of life has been demonstrated by several studies. However, its use in radiotherapy remains controversial. While tumour hypoxia caused by anaemia is a factor of radio resistance and thus a source of local failure, tumour expression of E.P.O. receptors presents a significant risk for tumour progression and neo-angiogenesis, which would be increased during the administration of E.P.O.. The purpose of this article is to answer the question: is there a place for E.P.O. in combination with radiotherapy in the management of cancer?

  13. Quality indicators in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: There is a widespread and increasing tendency to develop hospital performance indicators in the field of accreditation/certification systems and quality benchmarking. A study has been undertaken to develop a set of performance indicators for a typical radiotherapy Centre and to evaluate their ability to provide a continuous quality improvement. Materials and methods: A working group consisting of radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation technologists under the coordination of experts in health technology assessment has elaborated a set of general indicators able to monitor performances and the quality level of a typical radiotherapy Centre. The work has been carried out through four steps: a preliminary set of indicators was selected; data on these indicators were collected in a number of Italian radiotherapy Centres and medical physics Services; problems in collection and analysis of data were discussed; a final set of indicators was developed. Results: A final set of 13 indicators is here presented. They concern general structural and/or operational features, health physics activities and accuracy and technical complexity of the treatment. Conclusions: The indicators tested in a few Italian Centres of radiotherapy and medical physics Services are now ready to be utilized by a larger community

  14. Bowel disease after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical presentation, operative findings and outcome in 40 patients who required surgery for bowel disease after radiotherapy are presented. The type of presentation varied according to the time after radiotherapy. In the first month, many patients had a proctitis but none required surgery. Five patients were operated on within one month, 2 for radiation-induced acute ileitis and 3 for exacerbations of pre-existing disease (diverticular disease 2, ulcerative colitis 1). The commonest time of presentation was between 3 and 18 months after radiotherapy, when 20 patients needed surgery for bowel disease caused by radiation-induced local ischaemia. Twelve of these patients had chronic perforation, 6 had severe rectal bleeding and 2 had painful anorectal ulceration. Fifteen patients presented between 2 and 24 years after radiotherapy, usually with incomplete intestinal obstruction due to a fibrous stricture, but 2 patients had rectal carcinoma. Wide resection of the involved bowel was the principal method of treatment but any anastomosis was protected by a proximal defunctioning stoma. There was no operative mortality but 10 patients have died subsequently. The danger of dismissing these patients as having incurable malignancy is stressed because, although the condition is infrequent, it is usually amenable to adequate surgery. (author)

  15. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult...

  16. Radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A teaching text on external beam radiotherapy treatment planning is presented. Chapters are included on machines, radiation units, the physics of a single radiation field, the multiple-field isodose curve pattern, electron beam therapy, manual addition of isodose curves and dose calculation methods. (U.K.)

  17. Quality assurance in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good radiotherapy results and safety of treatment require the radiation to be optimally applied to a specified target area and the correct dose. According to international recommendations, the average uncertainty in therapeutic dose should not exceed 5%. The need for high precision in therapeutic dose requires quality assurance covering the entire radiotherapy process. Besides the physical and technical characteristics of the therapy equipment, quality assurance must include all radiotherapy equipment and procedures that are significant for the correct magnitude and precision of application of the therapeutic dose. The duties and responsibilities pertaining to various stages of treatment must also be precisely defined. These requirements may be best implemented through a quality system. The general requirements for supervision and quality assurance of medical radiation apparatus are prescribed in section 40 of the Radiation Act (592/1991, amendment 1142/1998) and in sections 18 and 32 of the Decree of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health on the medical use of radiation (423/2000). Guide ST 2.2 imposes requirements on structural radiation shielding of radiotherapy equipment and the premises in which it is used, and on warning and safety arrangements. Guide ST 1.1 sets out the general safety principles for radiation practices and regulatory control procedure for the use of radiation. Guide ST 1.6 provides general requirements for operational measures in the use of radiation. This Guide sets out the duties of responsible parties (the party running a radiation practice) in respect of arranging and maintaining radiotherapy quality assurance. The principles set out in this Guide and Guide ST 6.3 may be applied to radionuclide therapy

  18. Errors in Radiotherapy: Motivation for Development of New Radiotherapy Quality Assurance Paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern radiotherapy practice has rapidly evolved during the past decade, making use of many highly complex and/or automated processes for planning and delivery, including new techniques, like intensity-modulated radiotherapy driven by inverse planning optimization methods, or near real-time image-guided adaptive therapy based on fluoroscopic or tomographic imaging on the treatment machine. In spite of the modern technology, or potentially because of it in some instances, errors and other problems continue to have a significant impact on the field. This report reviews example errors and problems, discusses some of the quality assurance issues that these types of problems raise, and motivates the development of more modern and sophisticated approaches to assure quality for our clinical radiotherapy treatment methods

  19. The Role of Radiotherapy in Acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Mark J; Barkan, Ariel L; Drake, William M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy has, historically, played a central role in the management of acromegaly, and the last 30 years have seen substantial improvements in the technology used in the delivery of radiation therapy. More recently, the introduction of highly targeted radiotherapy, or 'radiosurgery', has further increased the therapeutic options available in the management of secretory pituitary tumors. Despite these developments, improvements in primary surgical outcomes, an increase in the range and effectiveness of medical therapy options, and long-term safety concerns have combined to dictate that, although still deployed in selected cases, the use of radiotherapy in the management of acromegaly has declined steadily over the past 2 decades. In this article, we review some of the main studies that have documented the efficacy of pituitary radiotherapy on growth hormone hypersecretion and summarize the data around its potential deleterious effects, including hypopituitarism, cranial nerve damage, and the development of radiation-related intracerebral tumors. We also give practical recommendations to guide its future use in patients with acromegaly, generally, as a third-line intervention after neurosurgical intervention in combination with various medical therapy options. PMID:26088716

  20. Radiotherapy of bronco-pulmonary cancer; Radiotherapie des cancers brochopulmonaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourry, N.; Millardet, C.; Lapeyre, M.; Verrelle, P.; Gross, E.; Champeaux-Orange, E.; Lahbabi, K.; Galland, S.; Chomy, F.; Lagarde, P.; Blanchard, P

    2007-11-15

    Six oral communications as follow: tomography by positron emission with {sup 18}F-FDG and target volume determination in the non at small cells bronchi cancers: interest and limit; adjuvant radiotherapy in the non at small cells pulmonary cancers; pulmonary stereotaxic radiotherapy; the chemoradiotherapy of locally evolved bronco-pulmonary cancers; the mesothelioma: place of radiotherapy; predictive factors of the toxicity and the care of complications of thorax irradiation. (N.C.)

  1. A review of stereotactic body radiotherapy – is volumetric modulated arc therapy the answer?

    OpenAIRE

    Sapkaroski, Daniel; Osborne, Catherine; Knight, Kellie A

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a high precision radiotherapy technique used for the treatment of small to moderate extra-cranial tumours. Early studies utilising SBRT have shown favourable outcomes. However, major disadvantages of static field SBRT include long treatment times and toxicity complications. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may potentially mitigate these disadvantages. This review aims to assess the feasibility of emerg...

  2. External audit in radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality audit forms an essential part of any comprehensive quality assurance programme. This is true in radiotherapy generally and in specific areas such as radiotherapy dosimetry. Quality audit can independently test the effectiveness of the quality system and in so doing can identify problem areas and minimize their possible consequences. Some general points concerning quality audit applied to radiotherapy are followed by specific discussion of its practical role in radiotherapy dosimetry, following its evolution from dosimetric intercomparison exercises to routine measurement-based on-going audit in the various developing audit networks both in the UK and internationally. Specific examples of methods and results are given from some of these, including the Scottish+ audit group. Quality audit in radiotherapy dosimetry is now well proven and participation by individual centres is strongly recommended. Similar audit approaches are to be encouraged in other areas of the radiotherapy process. (author)

  3. Radiotherapy of hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauwerky, F.

    1982-10-11

    The findings about the regular, spontaneous and complete regression of cavernous skin hemangiomas occurring in infants and those findings about the damaging effects due to ionising radiation - here particularly local growth disturbances - led to the development of very cautious diagnostic methods and to a considerate individual dosage and radiotherapy, which always takes into consideration the spontaneous regression tendency of the hemangiomas. However, a function-impairing localisation at the orifices, fulminant macrosomia, tendency to hemorrhages and poly-infection with superficial ulceration and even thrombopenic syndromes of the Kasabach-Merritt type may become necessary, urgent and also vital indications for a particular radiotherapy. For the sake of the patients, irradiation methods, which do not provoke any risk of radiation hazards, have to be preserved and applied in practice. Certainly further research and the nosologic nature of hemangiomas is required. A general non-treatment of hemangiomas is refused.

  4. Nutrition and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiation is a common method of treating large tumours, however one of the major problems in radiation therapy is the severe side effects that may limit its efficacy. Utilising nutrients can assist in the control of these side effects which will greatly enhance the quality of life of the patient plus improve the effectiveness of the radiation. Another controversial point regarding radiation and nutrition is the concurrent use of antioxidants and radiotherapy. The science literature is in agreement that supplementing with antioxidants after radiation is essential. In addition, most studies now show that antioxidants do not interfere with the efficacy of radiotherapy. These issues and suggestions for nutrients to assist during and after radiation will be discussed

  5. Radiotherapy for aggressive fibromatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate local control with radiotherapy for aggressive fibromatosis. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed aggressive fibromatosis were treated with radiotherapy at the University of Florida between March 1975 and June 1992. The minimum length of follow-up was 2 years; 88% of patients had follow-up for at least 5 years. Thirty-nine patients had lesions in an extremity and 14 patients had lesions in the trunk. Twenty-nine patients were treated for gross disease. Patients were treated with total doses between 35 Gy and 70 Gy; 83% of patients received 50 Gy to 60 Gy. Results: Local control was achieved in 23 of 29 patients (79%) treated for postoperative microscopic residual disease. Local control was achieved in 21 of 24 patients (88%) treated for gross disease; gross disease was controlled in 8 of 8 patients with previously untreated lesions, and in 13 of 16 patients treated for postoperative gross residual and recurrent disease. Overall, aggressive fibromatosis was locally controlled in 83% of treated patients. All 9 treatment failures occurred with extremity lesions 4 to 68 months after initiation of treatment. Of the 9 recurrences, 4 were out-of-field, 3 were in-field, and 4 occurred at the margin of the irradiated field. Salvage was successful in 8 of 9 patients in whom salvage was attempted with surgery alone or combined with postoperative radiotherapy. A functional limb was maintained in 38 of 39 patients with extremity or limb girdle lesions. The most serious complication of treatment was pathologic fracture, which occurred in 3 of 53 treated patients; all 3 fractures healed with conservative management. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a valuable adjunct to surgery in the management of aggressive fibromatosis and can be used alone in patients with unresectable or inoperable disease

  6. Conformal radiotherapy: a glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the concepts and terms related to conformal radiotherapy were produced by English-speaking authors and eventually validated by international groups of experts, whose working language was also English. Therefore, a significant part of this literature is poorly accessible to the French-speaking radiation oncology community. The present paper gathers the 'official' definitions already published in French, along with propositions for the remaining terms which should be submitted to a more formal and representative validation process. (author)

  7. DICOM in Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nikfarjam; E Ganjalikhan Hakemi; E. Negahbani; MR. Khajeaminian

    2007-01-01

    Noticeable development in achieving data from patients is acquired by means of designing a system that connects these systems: imaging, archive and monitoring systems. When several imaging devices work based on DICOM standard; they can connect to each other without any interface. There are many applications for DICOM standard in radiotherapy; however its main usage is in imaging. It has other applications such as RT Structure Set, RT Dose, RT Plan and RT Brachy Treatment. "nNow DICOM is ...

  8. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alimi, David

    2015-01-01

    David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have resi...

  9. Ga-66 labeled somatostatin analogue DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide as a potential agent for positron emission tomography imaging and receptor mediated internal radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide labeled somatostatin analogues selectively target somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-expressing tumors as a basis for diagnosis and treatment of these tumors. Recently, a DOTA-functionalized somatostatin analogue, DOTATOC (DOTA-DPhe1-Tyr3-octreotide) has been developed. This compound has been shown to be superior to the other somatostatin analogues as indicated by its uniquely high tumor-to-non-target tissue ratio. DOTATOC can be labeled with a variety of radiometals including gallium radioisotopes. Gallium-66 is a positron emitting radionuclide (T1/2 =9.5 hr; β+=56%), that can be produced in carrier free form by a low-beam energy cyclotron. In this study we investigated SSTR targeting characteristics of 66Ga-DOTATOC in AR42J rat pancreas tumor implanted nude mice as a potential agent for diagnosis and receptor-mediated internal radiotherapy of SSTR-expressing tumors. We compared our results with 67Ga- and 68Ga- labeled DOTATOC. The radiolabeling procedure gave labeling yield ranged from 85-95% and radiochemical and chemical purity was >95%. In-vitro competitive binding curves and in-vivo competitive displacement studies with an excess of unlabeled peptide indicates that there is specific binding of the radioligand to SSTR. Animal biodistribution data and serial microPETTM images demonstrated rapid tumor uptake and rapid clearance from the blood and all tissues except kidney. Maximum % ID/g values for tumor were 10.0±0.7, 13.2±2.1 and 9.8±1.5 for 66Ga-, 67Ga-, and 68Ga-DOTATOC, respectively. Calculated tumor, kidney and bone marrow doses for 66Ga-DOTATOC based on biodistribution data were 178, 109 and 1.2 cGy/MBq, respectively. We conclude that 66Ga labeled DOTATOC can be used for PET diagnosis and quantitative imaging-based dosimetry of SSTR positive tumors. 66Ga-DOTATOC may also be used in higher doses for ablation of these tumors. However, kidney is the critical organ for toxicity (tumor/kidney ratio 1.64), and high kidney uptake must be eliminated

  10. 腺相关病毒介导重组血管抑素联合雷公藤红素对大鼠颅内C6胶质瘤的抗血管生成作用%Anti-angiogenesis effect of adeno-associated virus-mediated recombinant angiostatin combined with celastrol on intracranial C6 glioma in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冠; 周洁; 冯珂珂; 田麒

    2011-01-01

    目的:腺相关病毒(adeno-associated virus,AAV)介导的重组血管抑素(angiostatin,AS)联合应用雷公藤红素( celastrol)治疗大鼠颅内C6胶质瘤,观察其对肿瘤体积、新生血管密度及肿瘤细胞凋亡的影响,探讨抗血管生成重组基因联合雷公藤红素对胶质瘤治疗的前景.方法:建立颅内原位荷C6脑胶质瘤大鼠模型,7d后随机分为4组,分别给予0.9%氯化钠溶液(作为对照)、AAV-AS、雷公藤红素及两者联合用药.每隔7d行头部强化MRI检查,计算肿瘤体积.于22 d后处死动物,检测AS蛋白表达、血管密度及肿瘤细胞凋亡情况.结果:联合治疗组及AAV-AS治疗组均检测到AS蛋白表达,证实基因转导成功.联合治疗组第22天时肿瘤体积、血管密度和凋亡指数均与对照组、雷公藤红素组及AAV-AS治疗组相比差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),联合治疗可以抑制肿瘤生长,降低新生血管密度,促进肿瘤细胞凋亡.结论:基因治疗联合雷公藤红素可通过抑制胶质瘤血管生成而抑制肿瘤生长;两者联合应用具有协同作用,可弥补两者单独应用的不足之处.%Objective: To examine the effects of therapeutic alliance of adeno-associated virus-mediated recombinant angiostatin (AAV-AS) combined with celastrol on tumor growth, microvessel density and apoptosis of intracranial glioma in rats, and to give a prospective of this therapeutic alliance. Methods: A rat intracranial C6 glioma model was established, and then the rats (n=40) were randomly assigned into four groups after 7 days, which were saline control group, AAV-AS group, celastrol group and therapeutic alliance group. The tumor growth was examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) every 7 days, and the volume of tumor was calculated. The rats were killed after 22 days, and the expression of AS protein, the microvessel density and the apoptosis of tumor cells were detected. Results: The expression of AS protein was detectable in AAV

  11. Radical radiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slevin, N.J.; Pointon, R.C.S.

    1989-02-01

    A study was made of 58 patients with carcinoma of the vulva treated by radical radiotherapy between 1965 and 1982. The choice of treatment technique was influenced by site and extent of disease as well as the general condition of the patient. The crude 5-year survival was 26% (15/58). Local control was achieved in 40% of cases and was associated with tumour size of 4 cm or less. Radionecrosis occurred in nine cases but none of these required surgical intervention. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for carcinoma of the vulva. This report emphasizes that radical radiotherapy has a curative potential in those cases considered unsuitable for surgery and that the necrosis type and rate are within the limits of acceptable morbidity.

  12. Radical radiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of 58 patients with carcinoma of the vulva treated by radical radiotherapy between 1965 and 1982. The choice of treatment technique was influenced by site and extent of disease as well as the general condition of the patient. The crude 5-year survival was 26% (15/58). Local control was achieved in 40% of cases and was associated with tumour size of 4 cm or less. Radionecrosis occurred in nine cases but none of these required surgical intervention. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for carcinoma of the vulva. This report emphasizes that radical radiotherapy has a curative potential in those cases considered unsuitable for surgery and that the necrosis type and rate are within the limits of acceptable morbidity. (author)

  13. Carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) is the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. Carbon ion therapy offers the potential advantages of improved dose localization and enhanced biological effects. It has been suggested that carbon ion therapy is effective against radioresistant pancreatic cancer. In April 2000, clinical studies examining the treatment of pancreatic cancer with carbon ions were begun at the HIMAC. As of February 2010, 48 patients treated with preoperative carbon ion radiotherapy and 89 patients treated for locally advanced pancreatic cancer were enrolled into the clinical trials. Both protocols are still ongoing. The interim results of these clinical trials suggest that carbon ion radiotherapy provides good local control and offers a survival advantage for patients with otherwise hard to cure pancreatic cancer, without unacceptable morbidity. (author)

  14. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual dysfunction in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Tine; Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of...... life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. METHODS: An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and...... gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. RESULTS: The...

  15. Palliative radiotherapy for advanced malignancies in a changing oncologic landscape: guiding principles and practice implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joshua A; Simone, Charles B

    2014-07-01

    Radiotherapy can provide safe, cost-effective, efficient palliation of various symptoms of advanced cancer with minimal side effects. Radiotherapy can palliate pain related to bone metastases and growing visceral metastases or primary cancers, neurologic symptoms related to brain and spine metastases, other symptoms including cough and dyspnea from advanced cancers in the lung, bleeding from various internal and external tumors, and obstructive symptoms. Palliative radiotherapy should be offered in the context of a multidisciplinary oncology team including medical oncologists, palliative care clinicians and various surgical and interventional subspecialists. The prescription of radiotherapy should balance the convenience and fewer side effects associated with short, hypofractionated courses of radiotherapy with the potential greater durability associated with longer courses of radiotherapy in patients with more prolonged life expectancies. The judicious use of advanced techniques in radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), may be warranted in select patients, and they can potentially improve symptom control and durability but are associated with increased technical and economic costs. PMID:25841695

  16. Monte Carlo role in radiobiological modelling of radiotherapy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Radiobiological models are essential components of modern radiotherapy. They are increasingly applied to optimize and evaluate the quality of different treatment planning modalities. They are frequently used in designing new radiotherapy clinical trials by estimating the expected therapeutic ratio of new protocols. In radiobiology, the therapeutic ratio is estimated from the expected gain in tumour control probability (TCP) to the risk of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). However, estimates of TCP/NTCP are currently based on the deterministic and simplistic linear-quadratic formalism with limited prediction power when applied prospectively. Given the complex and stochastic nature of the physical, chemical and biological interactions associated with spatial and temporal radiation induced effects in living tissues, it is conjectured that methods based on Monte Carlo (MC) analysis may provide better estimates of TCP/NTCP for radiotherapy treatment planning and trial design. Indeed, over the past few decades, methods based on MC have demonstrated superior performance for accurate simulation of radiation transport, tumour growth and particle track structures; however, successful application of modelling radiobiological response and outcomes in radiotherapy is still hampered with several challenges. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the main techniques used in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy, with focus on the MC role as a promising computational vehicle. We highlight the current challenges, issues and future potentials of the MC approach towards a comprehensive systems-based framework in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy.

  17. Cardiac dose sparing and avoidance techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer radiotherapy represents an essential component in the overall management of both early stage and locally advanced breast cancer. As the number of breast cancer survivors has increased, chronic sequelae of breast cancer radiotherapy become more important. While recently published data suggest a potential for an increase in cardiac events with radiotherapy, these studies do not consider the impact of newer radiotherapy techniques commonly utilized. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate cardiac dose sparing techniques in breast cancer radiotherapy. Current options for cardiac protection/avoidance include (1) maneuvers that displace the heart from the field such as coordinating the breathing cycle or through prone patient positioning, (2) technological advances such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam therapy (PBT), and (3) techniques that treat a smaller volume around the lumpectomy cavity such as accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), or intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). While these techniques have shown promise dosimetrically, limited data on late cardiac events exist due to the difficulties of long-term follow up. Future studies are required to validate the efficacy of cardiac dose sparing techniques and may use surrogates for cardiac events such as biomarkers or perfusion imaging

  18. Use of 'sham' radiotherapy in randomized clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify quality trials that use sham radiotherapy in their design and review them to determine its potential value. The Cochrane Library, Pubmed and a Reference Search served as data sources. Trials were included if they met a minimum quality score of 3 on a validated assessment instrument (which assesses randomization, control and blinding) and if they compared sham radiotherapy to active treatment. External beam therapy and brachytherapy trials were considered. Twenty-six trials were identified, collectively including 2663 participants in the period of 1970-2004. All the trials studied the value of radiotherapy for treatment or prevention of benign diseases, including multiple sclerosis, coronary artery restenosis, age-related macular degeneration and Graves' ophthalmopathy. There were no trials relating to the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignancy. This review showed that it is possible to carry out sham radiotherapy with due regard for ethical concerns, with effective blinding and high levels of patient acceptance. Large sample sizes with multicentre trial designs were achievable. Although the statistical philosophy for using sham radiotherapy in trials is legitimate, it is no longer routinely used.

  19. Radiotherapy of presenile spinal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painfull conditions of presenile spinal osteoporosis may no longer respond to medication or physical therapy. Analgesic radiotherapy coupled with mild physical therapy and if necessary supported by orthopedic measures frequently results in pain relief and physical stability. Fifty-two cases of osteoporosis and osteoporotic spinal fractures illustrate how better longterm results are achieved by increasing the customary dosage and speeding up radiotherapy. (orig.)

  20. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saika, Kazumi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-05-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  1. Radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma: long-term outcome and sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review outcome and treatment sequelae in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas. Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-one patients with pituitary adenomas received radiotherapy at the University of Florida and had 2-year minimum potential follow-up. One hundred twenty-one had newly diagnosed adenomas, and 20 had recurrent tumors. Newly diagnosed tumors were treated with surgery and radiotherapy (n = 98) or radiotherapy alone (n = 23). Patients with recurrent tumors received salvage treatment with surgery and radiotherapy (n = 10) or radiotherapy alone (n = 10). The impact of age, sex, presenting symptoms, tumor extent, surgery type, degree of resection, hormonal activity, primary or salvage therapy, and radiotherapy dose on tumor control was analyzed. Tumor control is defined by the absence of radiographic progression and stable or decreased hormone level (in hormonally active tumors) after treatment. Effect of therapy on vision, hormonal function, neurocognitive function, life satisfaction, and affective symptoms were examined. A Likert categorical scale survey was used for assessment of neurocognitive, life satisfaction, and affective symptom status. Survey results from the radiotherapy patients were compared with a control group treated with transsphenoidal surgery alone. Multivariate analysis used the forward step-wise sequence of chi squares for the log rank test. Results: At 10 years, tumor control for the surgery and radiotherapy group (S + RT) was 95% and not statistically different (p = 0.58) than for patients treated with radiotherapy alone (RT) (90%). Patients with prolactin- and ACTH-secreting tumors had significantly worse tumor control, as did patients treated for recurrent tumors. Multivariate analysis for tumor control revealed that only young age was predictive of worse outcome (p = 0.0354). Visual function was either unaffected or improved in most patients, although four patients developed visual

  2. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent sudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. synringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine. (MG)

  3. Breast cancer radiotherapy: controversies and prospectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Jin-ming; WANG Yong-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Despite consensus on breast cancer radiotherapy, there are still some controversies over post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI), appropriate sequence of radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment, and radiotherapy after preoperative systemic therapy.

  4. Transverse tomography and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was intended to delineate the indications for radiotherapy treatment-planning with the help of computerized axial tomography (C.T.) and transverse analog tomography (T.A.T.). Radiotherapy localisation procedures with the conventional method (simulator), with the CT-scanner and with the transverse analog tomograph (T.A.T., Simtomix, Oldelft) were compared. As criterium for evaluation differences in reconstruction drawing based on these methods were used. A certain method was judged ''superior'' to another if the delineation of the target volume was more accurate, if a better impression was gained of the site of (for irradiation) organs at risk, or if the localisation could only be performed with that method. The selected group of patients consisted of 120 patients for whom a reconstruction drawing in the transverse plane was made according to the treatment philosophy. In this group CT-assisted localisation was judged on 68 occasions superior to the conventional method. In a number of cases it was found that a ''standard'' change in a standard target volume, on the base of augmented anatomical knowledge, made the conventional method sufficient. The use of CT-scanner for treatment planning was estimated. For ca. 270/1000 new patients a CT-scan is helpful (diagnostic scan), for 140 of them the scan is necessary (planning scan). The quality of the anatomical information obtained with the T.A.T. does not yet fall within acceptable limits, but progress has been made. (Auth.)

  5. Imaging in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  6. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazioglou, M; Theodorou, K; Kappas, C

    1999-01-01

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is one of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding high costs of computer-based training systems and database development). PMID:10394345

  7. Complications after radiotherapy in the ENT area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiesa-Estomba, CM, Araujo-daCosta, AS, Rivera-Schmitz, T

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Radiotherapy is part of the treatment of oncological pathology of head and neck, being useful as therapeutic and supplementary strategy. It is possible associate to chemotherapeutic or radiosensitizing to enhance their effectiveness as well as radiation protection measures used to prevent overexposure of tissues. However, despite all this there are multiple potential complications secondary to the use of radiotherapy.Materials and Methods: Here we present a series of complications that occurred in the late phase of radiation therapy in 4 patients.Results: A total of 4 patients of which 3 presented the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and one vocal cord carcinoma, which presented complications: critical stenosis of left carotid artery in the cervical cutaneous fistula more radionecrosis of vertebrae C5 and C6, radionecrosis of pre-vertebral muscles and C1 and C2 vertebrae and left carotid artery pseudoaneurysm.Conclusions: In our series the hyperbaric chamber favored the improvement in terms of tissue necrosis, in terms of critical stenosis the patient required anticoagulation, while the pseudoaneurysm required embolization by interventional radiology. So unquestionably the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy in the field of head and neck oncology, but complications because of this should be taken into account when assessing the patient successively.

  8. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:26617212

  9. Recent innovations in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last few years, hospital-based facilities for carbon-ion radiotherapy are being constructed and proposed in Europe and Asia. During the next few years, several new facilities will be opened for carbon-ion radiotherapy in the world. These facilities in operation or under construction are categorized in two types by the beam shaping method used. One is the passive beam shaping method that is mainly improved and systematized for routine clinical use at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. The other method is active beam shaping which is also known as beam scanning adopted at Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI)/Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), Germany. In this paper an overview of some technical aspects for beam shaping is reported. The technique of passive beam shaping is established for stable clinical application and has clinical result of over 4000 patients in HIMAC. In contrast, clinical experience of active beam shaping is about 400 patients, and there is no clinical experience to respiratory moving target. A great advantage of the active beam shaping method is patient-specific collimator-less and compensator-less treatment. This may be an interesting potential for adaptive radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: When compared with radiosurgery, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuroma (AN) offers escalation of the tumor dose and potential sparing of auditory and facial nerve functions. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 249 consecutive patients have received fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for AN. One hundred twenty-five patients had follow-up >1 year and were the subject of this report. A noninvasive, repeat-fixation mask allowed simulation by way of spiral CT. Two distinct schedules for total dose and fractionation were used. For an AN 3), patients received 25 Gy given in 5 consecutive daily fractions of 5 Gy (111 patients), and for ANs ≥3.0 cm (volume 8.1 ± 1.2 cm3), patients received 30 Gy given in 10 fractions of 3 Gy (14 patients). Results: The percentage of decrease in tumor size was 12% ± 2% (range 0-100%) vs. 13% ± 3% (range 0-38%) for the 25 Gy vs. 30 Gy regimens, respectively. No patient had growth of the AN or developed facial weakness. Two patients developed transient decreases in facial sensation. The rates of hearing preservation were similar for the larger and smaller tumors. Conclusion: Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy may preserve normal function and control both small and large ANs

  11. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is more of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding and database development. (authors)

  12. Advances in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is in the midst of a rebirth largely driven by the use of computers for treatment planning and beam delivery. The first edge of this renaissance was the advent of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT). This was enabled by the widespread availability and utilization of three-dimensional imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance scanning, themselves products of the computer revolution. For the first time this allowed radiation oncologists to segment and visualize the tumor in association with it neighboring sensitive soft-tissue structures. Software tools to visualize the beam paths through the body enabled the beam directions and beam shapes to be manually optimized. Simultaneously, improved dose calculations utilizing the CT images of the patient anatomy produced more accurate distributions of dose. The dose was delivered with custom-shaped blocks or recently collimators with multiple leaves that allow complex shaped fields to be delivered without the need for block fabrication. In the last couple of decades new treatment delivery methodologies have emerged. The first has been stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which is the purview of neurosurgeons (who call it SRS) as well as radiation oncologists (who usually call it SRT). SRS and SRT are premised on multiple beams focusing on one location typically with circular aperture collimators but increasingly with fields shaped by multi-leaved collimators. Often only a single treatment session (the usual for SRS) is used when the treatment volume is small, but for larger lesions several treatment sessions, or fractions, are used (most often for SRT) to allow for normal tissue repair. The new equipment market for SRS and SRT is about 10% of the total for radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the latest treatment methodology and its adoption has been extremely rapid, particularly in the United States. IMRT uses

  13. Practices of Radiotherapy Equipment Quality Control in Radiotherapy Centres in Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Švabić, Manda; Jurković, Slaven; Faj, Dario; Kasabašić, Mladen; Smilović Radojčić, Djeni; Ivković, Ana

    2008-01-01

    From the prescription to the delivery of a radiotherapy treatment, a team of professionals from a number of disciplines is involved. In this way significant potential for errors leading to an accidental exposure becomes apparent. Comprehensive quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program to minimize such errors is, therefore, required. One aspect of QA/QC program is quality control of the equipment. In this paper we present experiences in establishing QC procedures in our cen...

  14. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Methods and materials Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall de...

  15. Radiotherapy in a public health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our publication is to evaluate the state of radiotherapy, its role and place in oncology and in the public health system, in order to plan necessities. The cost and economical effectiveness are objectives of the current evaluation. Radiotherapy is strongly dependant of introducing new technologies and the need of gross capital investments. However, their relative cost is reduced due to their long-term use. Because of the serious delay of Bulgaria from the world standards in radiotherapy, the analysis is based on the data published in the scientific literature. The main tendencies and ideas for development are based on the analysis of The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) and the ESTRO QUARTS project. We use Swedish model for estimating the expenses, having in mind the conditions in Bulgaria (salary, management, patient cares). The main conclusions are: 1) Radiotherapy is basic curative and palliative method in oncology; 2) Bulgarian radiotherapy is at one of the last places in Europe (therapeutic units are 30 years old average, despite their recommended exploitation of 12-20 years); 3) In contradiction to the world tendencies delay grows during the last 10 years; 4) In countries with low or average GDP radiotherapy should be prioritized, due to its low cost in comparison to the other treatment methods in oncology; 5) The need of radiotherapy will continue to grow, this necessitate not only replacement of the old machines but increasing their number 3 times during the next few years; 6) It is necessary to form a modern radiotherapy centers, equipped with at least two compatible units, based on the currently existing radiotherapy departments. (authors)

  16. Norwegian Oncologists' Expectations of Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may increase the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy for a range of malignancies, only a few IMRT treatments have yet been performed in the Nordic countries. The scores derived from a national survey to assess Norwegian oncologists' expectations of IMRT are presented. A questionnaire was distributed to all consultants in oncology at Norwegian radiotherapy clinics. Summary scores of daily general radiotherapy workload (DGRTW), acquaintance with IMRT (AI) and expectations of IMRT (EI) were derived. Thirty-nine questionnaires (67%) were returned from a total of 58 oncologists. The oncologists' scores on the AI scale (mean score: 7.5 out of 21) were rather low. Their AI scores were found to be positively correlated with their DGRTW. Higher scores on the EI scale were documented (mean score: 6.2 out of 14): 15 oncologists (39%) rated IMRT as one of the three major contributors to potentially increased cancer survival. Oncologists treating patients with prostate, head and neck, gastrointestinal and CNS tumours had higher EI scores than the other oncologists (7.7 vs. 5.1; p=0.01). The Norwegian radiation oncologists' expectations of IMRT are high in terms of both the potential clinical benefit and the rate of implementation. This should encourage the radiotherapy communities to continue (or rapidly initiate) their efforts in providing the routines required for safe implementation of IMRT

  17. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  18. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry

  19. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  20. Radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between December 1986 and January 1978, 68 patients with bone metastases were analyzed to evaluate the effect of radiation for the relief of pain. The 68 patients, who had a total of 97 lesions, complained of pain caused by their bone metastasis. The good, fair, and poor responses were found to be 18%, 60%, and 22%, respectively. With reference to the primary neoplasms, the effective response rate was 73% in lung cancer, 100% in breast cancer, 75% in gastric cancer, 100% in hepatic cancer, 100% in bladder cancer, 25% in epipharyngeal cancer, and 70% in the other neoplasms. Depending on the cell types of the lung cancer, the effective response rate was 80% for small cell carcinomas, 72% for adenocarcinomas and 40% for squamous cell carcinomas. Our results suggest that radiotherapy for bone metastases is to be recommended, since the effective response rate was 78% for the relief of pain. (author)

  1. Tumours following retinoblastoma radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioinduced tumours in young patients irradiated in childhood for retinoblastoma take on a particularly deadly aspect. The onset of this true clinical entity characterized by a long post-irradiation latency period induced by a dose above 6000 rads is a real tragedy. The vast majority of patients then enter into a long martyrdom ending in death. The only cure is surgical, but seldom possible. Treatment is limited to palliative radiotherapy, effective for a while, and chemiotherapy as a last resort but often difficult to prescribe. Prevention alone is the answer. The quality and reliability of the radiotherapeutic treatment depend not only on the personal talent of the radiotherapist but above all on the standard of the equipment. A strong reduction in the doses employed as well as recent technological progress improving the material, its precision and reproducibility appear already to have lowered the frequency curve of these fatal radioinduced tumours

  2. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Philip M [Joint Physics Department, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: phil.evans@icr.ac.uk

    2008-06-21

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  3. MRI assisted radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain the optimal radiation field, an MR simulation system (MRSS) has been developed. The system consists of an MR unit, a work station and a laser marking system. Phantom study concerned geographic distortion and the total accuracy of MRSS, the former revealed the result lesser than 1 mm within 90 mm-distance between MR slices and Center of magnetic field, the latter showed maximal errors 2 mm in the field size, and 3 mm in the iso-center. This system was applied to 15 patients with intracranial or head and neck lesions and all procedures were smoothly performed. To evaluate the usefulness of MRSS, 6 radiation oncologists compared the difference between MRSS and CT simulation system in setting radiation field. The results were satisfactory especially in cases with lesions the extent of which was unclear on CT images. It was considered that this system could support the radiotherapy planning for intracranial or head and neck lesions. (author)

  4. Image guided multibeam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an outlook of the status of the first development stages for an updated design of radiotherapy conformal system based on tumor 3D images obtained as an output the last generation imaging machines as PET, CT and MR which offer a very valuable output in cancer diagnosis. Prospective evaluation of current software codes and acquisition of useful experience in surgical planning involves a multidisciplinary process as an initial and unavoidable stage to develop an expert software and user skills which assures the delivery of the radiation dose is done correctly in geometry and value in each voxel as a radiation protection basic condition. The validation of the images obtained has been done by the production of anatomical models of interest regions by rapid prototyping of the 3D segmented images and its evaluation by contrasting with the real regions during surgical procedures. (author)

  5. Image guided multibeam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an outlook of the status of the first development stages for an updated design of radiotherapy conformal system based on tumor 3D images obtained as an output the last generation imaging machines as PET, CT and MR which offer a very valuable output in cancer diagnosis. Prospective evaluation of current software codes and acquisition of useful experience in surgical planning involves a multidisciplinary process as an initial and unavoidable stage to develop an expert software and user skills which assures the delivery of the radiation dose is done correctly in geometry and value in each voxel as a radiation protection basic condition. The validation of the images obtained has been done by the production of anatomical models of interest regions by rapid proto typing of the 3D segmented images and its evaluation by contrasting with the real regions during surgical procedures. (author)

  6. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of radiation therapy is to achieve maximal therapeutic benefit expressed in terms of a high probability of local control of disease with minimal side effects. Physically this often equates to the delivery of a high dose of radiation to the tumour or target region whilst maintaining an acceptably low dose to other tissues, particularly those adjacent to the target. Techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery and computer planned brachytherapy provide the means to calculate the radiation dose delivery to achieve the desired dose distribution. Imaging is an essential tool in all state of the art planning and delivery techniques: (i) to enable planning of the desired treatment, (ii) to verify the treatment is delivered as planned and (iii) to follow-up treatment outcome to monitor that the treatment has had the desired effect. Clinical imaging techniques can be loosely classified into anatomic methods which measure the basic physical characteristics of tissue such as their density and biological imaging techniques which measure functional characteristics such as metabolism. In this review we consider anatomical imaging techniques. Biological imaging is considered in another article. Anatomical imaging is generally used for goals (i) and (ii) above. Computed tomography (CT) has been the mainstay of anatomical treatment planning for many years, enabling some delineation of soft tissue as well as radiation attenuation estimation for dose prediction. Magnetic resonance imaging is fast becoming widespread alongside CT, enabling superior soft-tissue visualization. Traditionally scanning for treatment planning has relied on the use of a single snapshot scan. Recent years have seen the development of techniques such as 4D CT and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). In 4D CT raw data are encoded with phase information and reconstructed to yield a set of scans detailing motion through the breathing, or cardiac, cycle. In ART a set of

  7. Post Pelvic Radiotherapy Bony Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    There has been recent interest in radiation-induced bone injury in clinical conditions, especially for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF). A PIF is caused by the effect of normal or physiological stress on bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) can also contribute to the development of a PIF. A PIF has been regarded as a rare complication with the use of megavoltage equipment. However, recent studies have reported the incidence of PIFs as 8.2{approx}20% after pelvic RT in gynecological patients, an incidence that was higher than previously believed. The importance of understanding a PIF lies in the potential for misdiagnosis as a bony metastasis. If patients complain of pelvic pain after whole-pelvis radiation therapy, the presence of a PIF must be considered in the differential diagnosis. The use of multibeam arrangements and conformal RT to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture. In addition to a PIF, osteonecrosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head can develop after radiation therapy. Osteoradionecrosis of the pelvic bone is a clinical diagnostic challenge that must be differentiated from an osseous metastasis. A post-radiation bone sarcoma can result as a long-term sequela of pelvic irradiation for uterine cervical cancer.

  8. Further Radiobiologic Modeling of Palliative Radiotherapy: Use of Virtual Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study duration of response in palliative radiotherapy in a population of tumors. Methods and Materials: Models of dynamic changes in cell number with time were used to develop a function for the remission time (Trem) after palliative radiotherapy: Trem=(BED)/K -t1(1+(α.K)/z ), where BED is the biologically effective dose, t1 the duration of symptoms (i.e., the time between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of radiotherapy), K the daily BED repopulation equivalent, α the linear radiosensitivity parameter in the linear-quadratic model, and z the tumor regression rate. Results: Simulations of clinical trials show marked variations in remission statistics depending on the tumor characteristics and are highly compatible with the results of clinical trials. Dose escalation produces both a higher proportion and extended duration of remissions, especially in tumors with high α/β ratios and K values, but the predicted dose responses of acute and late side effects show that caution is necessary. The prospect of using particle beam therapy to reduce normal tissue radiation exposures or using hypoxic sensitizers to improve the tumor cell kill might significantly improve the results of palliative radiotherapy in carefully selected patients and could also be used for safer palliative re-treatments in patients with the potential for prolonged survival. The effect of tumor heterogeneity in determining palliative responses probably exceeds that in radical radiotherapy; as few as 100 patients in each treatment arm produce statistically unreliable results. Conclusions: Virtual trials of palliative radiotherapy can be useful to test the effects of competing schedules and better determine future strategies, including improved design of clinical trials as well as combinations of radiotherapy with other anticancer modalities

  9. Radiotherapy in the Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An up-to-date summary of Hodgkin's disease is presented taking into account its natural history, dissemination patterns, history, staging and therapeutic sugestions, with special regard to radiotherapy. (Author)

  10. Radiotherapy versus combined modality in early stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Carde, P; Mauch, P; Magrini, S M; Santarelli, M T

    metaanalysis of these trials indicate that we still do not definitively know whether or not the addition of prophylactic chemotherapy up front improves survival. Arguments in favour of the addition of chemotherapy up front are: that laparotomy may be avoided, that radiation fields and doses may perhaps be...... reduced, and that the stress of experiencing a relapse is avoided in many patients. The major argument against the use of chemotherapy up front is: that by careful staging and selection of patients and by careful radiotherapy techniques the number of patients exposed to potentially toxic chemotherapy may...

  11. Radiotherapy: yesterday, today and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inaugural lecture starts with a brief history of the discovery of x-rays and the development of radiotherapy. In a modern radiotherapy department, cancer is diagnosed and mostly treated non-surgically. The modern treatment of many cancers is complex and involves a choice between at least 3 modalities; namely surgery, radiotherapy and cancer chemotherapy. One or a combination of these can be used. A discussion is given of a radiotherapy department as it functions at the University of Cape Town. At the University, cancer is not managed by any one treatment modality, but by a group of specialists who have a major intersest in a particular field. The personnel of the radiotherapy department consists of various people such as a radiographer, radiotherapist, radiobiologist and others, who are all experts in a particular area. Together they form the radiotherapy team. An individual treatment plan is drawn up for each patient. An indication is given of the cost of a major linear accelerator and the patient treatment cost on such an accelerator. Cancer chemotherapy comprises an important part in any radiotherapy department and is used to prevent the appearance of microscopic disease or to reduce and even cure established disease. A summary is given of the cost attached to chemotherapy. An indication of cure rates with the present methods of treatment is given. The reason why oxygen is necessary in the radiation of tumours is discussed. The radiobiologist plays an important role in this respect. A look is also taken at the future prospects of radiotherapy

  12. Contact radiotherapy. Report of technological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report aims at assessing safety, indications, the role in therapeutic strategy, and efficiency of contact radiotherapy. It also aims at answering questions like: is the contact radiotherapy technique validated? What are the indications for contact radiotherapy? What about the efficiency and safety of contact radiotherapy? After a presentation of preliminary notions on radiotherapy (radiation types, dose, and irradiation techniques), the report presents this specific technique of contact radiotherapy: definition, devices, use recommendations, issues of radiation protection, modalities of performance of a contact radiotherapy session, and concerned pathologies. Then, based on a literature survey, this report addresses the various concerned tumours (skin, rectum, brain, breast), indicates some general information about these tumours (epidemiological data, anatomy and classification, therapeutic options, radiotherapy), and proposes an assessment of the efficiency and safety of contact radiotherapy

  13. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2014-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published fin...

  14. Curative radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma in localized stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reported results of curative radiotherapy in carcinoma of the prostate are equal to radical surgical techniques. In stage C or T 3 where radical surgical procedures are not possible, radiation therapy alone may achieve remarkable survival rates. The side effects and complication rates of radiation therapy are acceptable considering the potential cure. Hormone therapy should be reserved primarily for palliative treatment. (orig.)

  15. Indications for Salivary Gland Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David J; Slevin, Nick J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-01-01

    There is an established role for post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. For benign disease, the addition of radiotherapy improves local tumour control in cases with incomplete excision, involved surgical margins or multi-focal disease recurrence. After capsule rupture or spillage alone, surveillance should usually be advised. For malignant disease, post-operative radiotherapy is recommended for an advanced tumour stage, high-grade tumour, perineural or lympho-vascular invasion, close or positive resection margins, extra-parotid extension or lymph node involvement. The main benefit is increased loco-regional tumour control, although this may translate into a modest improvement in survival. The possible late side effects of parotid bed irradiation include skin changes, chronic otitis externa, sensorineural hearing loss, osteoradionecrosis and secondary malignancy. Severe complications are rare, but patients should be counselled carefully about the risks. Primary radiotherapy is unlikely to be curative and is reserved to cases in which resection would cause unacceptable functional or cosmetic morbidity or would likely result in subtotal resection (R2) or to patients with distant metastases to gain local tumour control. There are provisional data on the use of charged particle radiotherapy in this setting. Some patients may benefit from synchronous chemotherapy with radiotherapy, but this group is not defined, and data from comparative prospective studies are required before routine clinical use of this treatment. PMID:27093301

  16. Education in physics of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is the clinical application which requires the highest precision in dose delivery because of the very high doses administrated to patients, taking into account that new diagnostic methods and new modalities and treatment machines give greater possibilities of dose escalation. These higher doses may also produce serious side effects if not accurately administered. High qualified personnel is therefore needed for dealing with these new complex modalities, assuring that dose prescribed is correctly administered and providing adequate radiation protection to patients, public and staff. Education in Physics of Radiotherapy aims to provide students with solid theoretical and practical basis in order to be able to work with great responsibility and understanding in a Radiotherapy Department and assure that appropriate radiation protection to patients, public and staff. Since 1964 the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) gives course related to Radiotherapy and since 2002, due to a collaborative project, these courses are given at the Oncology Institute 'Angel H. Roffo' (IOAR) which belongs to the University of Buenos Aires (UBA). The IOAR is well equipped in Radiotherapy and new techniques are continuously introduced. That is why, being a University Institution and having highly specialized staff, it is the ideal hospital for teaching Radiotherapy in Buenos Aires, not only for regular courses but also for implementing workshops, seminars and updating courses as well. Continuous education helps to create and increase awareness of the importance of radiation protection in patients as well as in public and staff. (author)

  17. Saliva in relation to dental erosion before and after radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensdottir, Thorbjorg; von Buchwald, Christian; Nauntofte, Birgitte;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Low saliva flow and abnormal saliva composition are common conditions after radiotherapy for oral cavity and pharyngeal cancer. Both conditions increase the susceptibility to dental caries and erosion, which may be further accelerated by changes in food preferences. The aim of...... this study was to determine changes in saliva flow and susceptibility to erosive challenges in pharyngeal cancer patients before and after radiotherapy to the head and neck. Materials and methods: The erosive potential of sucking acidic candies with and without calcium was determined in nine patients...

  18. Applying usability heuristics to radiotherapy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Heuristic evaluations have been used to evaluate safety of medical devices by identifying and assessing usability issues. Since radiotherapy treatment delivery systems often consist of multiple complex user-interfaces, a heuristic evaluation was conducted to assess the potential safety issues of such a system. Material and methods: A heuristic evaluation was conducted to evaluate the treatment delivery system at Princess Margaret Hospital (Toronto, Canada). Two independent evaluators identified usability issues with the user-interfaces and rated the severity of each issue. Results: The evaluators identified 75 usability issues in total. Eighteen of them were rated as high severity, indicating the potential to have a major impact on patient safety. A majority of issues were found on the record and verify system, and many were associated with the patient setup process. While the hospital has processes in place to ensure patient safety, recommendations were developed to further mitigate the risks of potential consequences. Conclusions: Heuristic evaluation is an efficient and inexpensive method that can be successfully applied to radiotherapy delivery systems to identify usability issues and improve patient safety. Although this study was conducted only at one site, the findings may have broad implications for the design of these systems.

  19. Avoidance of treatment interruption: an unrecognized benefit of accelerated radiotherapy in oropharyngeal carcinomas?

    OpenAIRE

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; De Pree, Christian; Dulguerov, Pavel; Bieri, Sabine; Maire, Daphne Isabel; Kurtz, John

    1999-01-01

    To assess the impact of treatment interruption on the potential gain in locoregional control obtained with accelerated radiotherapy (RT) compared with conventionally fractionated RT in patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas.

  20. Location of radiotherapy centers: An exploratory geographic analysis for Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - The distance between the patient's home and a radiotherapy department may represent a hurdle for the patient and influence treatment choice. Therefore, it is necessary to check whether the geographical distribution of radiotherapy centers is in accordance with cancer incidence, taking also into account the cost of travelling to the radiotherapy department. The objective of this study is double; first, to map the current locations of radiotherapy centers across the country and second, to evaluate the observed spatial disparities with appropriate tools. Materials and methods. - A model of operational research (P-median) is used to suggest the optimal locations and allocations and to compare them with the current situation. This is an exploratory study with simple inputs. It helps to better understand the current geographical distribution of radiotherapy centers in Belgium as well as its possible limitations. Results-conclusion. - It appears that the current situation is on the average acceptable in terms of accessibility to the service and that the method presents huge potentialities for decision making so as to yield a spatial system that is both efficient and equitable. (authors)

  1. Radiotherapy of inguinal lymphorrhea after vascular surgery. A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: the formation of inguinal lymphorrhea following vascular surgery is a rare but potentially serious problem with an incidence of about 2%. There is no consensus on the most effective treatment for groin lymphorrhea. In a retrospective analysis the usefulness of irradiation in the treatment of inguinal lymph fistulas was investigated. Patients and methods: from 08/1997 to 12/2000, 28 patients with inguinal lymph fistulas were irradiated postoperatively (4th-19th day) with a single dose of 3 Gy up to a total dose of 9 Gy on 3 consecutive days using 120- to 300-kV photons. Three further patients received 2 x 4 Gy and 3 x 5 Gy, respectively, due to an interposed weekend. Results: secretion volume at the beginning of radiotherapy varied between 50 and 650 ml daily (mean 203 ml, median 175 ml), at the end of radiotherapy between 0 and 350 ml (mean 126 ml, median 120 ml). 3/28 lymph fistulas had resolved during radiotherapy. In 17/28 patients (60.7%) the drains could be removed within 10 days, in further 10/28 patients (35.7%) within 10-20 days after the end of radiotherapy. Conclusion: overall, irradiation of inguinal lymph fistulas proved to be an effective and well-tolerated treatment, facilitating removal of fistula drains within 10-20 days (mean 10.5, median 7 days) after the completion of radiotherapy, thus appearing a good alternative to other conservative treatment modalities. (orig.)

  2. Treatment assessment of radiotherapy using MR functional quantitative imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng; Chang; Chunhao; Wang

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in magnetic resonance(MR) functional quantitative imaging have made it a potentially powerful tool to assess treatment response in radiation therapy. With its abilities to capture functional information on underlying tissue characteristics, MR functional quantitative imaging can be valuable in assessing treatment response and as such to optimize therapeutic outcome. Various MR quantitative imaging techniques, including diffusion weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy and dynamic contrastenhanced imaging, have been investigated and found useful for assessment of radiotherapy. However, various aspects including data reproducibility, interpretation of biomarkers, image quality and data analysis impose challenges on applications of MR functional quantitative imaging in radiotherapy assessment. All of these challenging issues shall be addressed to help us understand whether MR functional quantitative imaging is truly beneficial and contributes to future development of radiotherapy. It is evident that individualized therapy is the future direction of patient care. MR functional quantitative imaging might serves as an indispensable tool towards this promising direction.

  3. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  4. Radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma--transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes the clinical background that underlies the transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional (3D) planning techniques in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A systematic search of the Medline was performed using 'nasopharyngeal carcinoma', 'radiotherapy', '3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy', 'stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy' and 'intensity-modulated radiotherapy' as keywords. Citing evidence from the published literature and their own institutional experience, the authors critically examined the positive impact of 3D methods - with emphasis on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) - on target coverage and geometric accuracy, sparing of normal organs, and dosimetric homogeneity. Potential problems related to the widespread practice of IMRT such as quality assurance, utilization of medical resources and the risk of developing radiation-induced secondary cancers were highlighted. Application of IMRT within the context of altered fractionation, dose escalation and concurrent chemotherapy were discussed. The article concluded with a suggested treatment approach and research direction for different stages of NPC

  5. Radioprotectors in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, C.K.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Parida, D.K.; Nomura, Taisei

    2001-03-01

    This review article focuses on clinically relevant radioprotectors and their mechanisms of radioprotection. Radiotherapy is the most common modality of human cancer therapy. Obtaining optimal results requires a judicious balance between the total dose of radiotherapy delivered and the threshold limit of critical surrounding normal tissues, and the normal tissues need to be protected against radiation injury to obtain better tumor control by using a higher dose. For this reason, radiation-protective agents play an important role in clinical radiotherapy. Radiation-protective agents can be classified into three groups: radioprotectors, adaptogens, and absorbents. The first group generally consists of sulfhydryl compounds and other antioxidants. They include several myelo-, entero-, and cerebro-protectors. Adaptogens act as promotors of radioresistance. They are natural protectors that offer chemical protection against low levels of ionizing radiation. Absorbents protect organs from internal radiation and chemicals. They include drugs that prevent incorporation of radioiodine by the thyroid gland and absorption of radionuclides. This article thoroughly describes the properties, mechanisms of action, and perspectives on clinical application of the following categories of radioprotectors: sulfhydryl compounds (e.g., cysteine, cysteamine, glutathione, AET, WR 2127, and other WR-compounds), antioxidants (e.g., tempace, Hoechst 33342, vitamin A, E, and C, TMG, melatonin), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., captopril, elanopril, penicillamine, pentoxifylline, L-158, 809), cytoprotective agents (mesna, dexrazoxane, and amifostin), metalloelements (e.g., manganese chloride, cadmium salts, bismuth subnitrate), immunomodulators (gamma-interferon, polysaccharides AM5, AM218, heat-killed lactobacillus cells, broncho-vaxom, trehalose dicorynomycolate, and AS101), lipopolysaccharides and prostaglandins, plant extracts and compounds isolated from plants (curcmin

  6. Effect of pelvic radiotherapy for prostrate cancer on bowel, bladder and sexual functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effects of pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer on sexual, bowel and urinary functions. Study Design: a prospective cohort study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital, Lahore from July 1998 to January 2000. Patients and Method: This study included 52 patients with diagnosis of prostate cancer who were given external beam pelvic radiotherapy. The effects of pelvic radiotherapy on their sexual, bowel and bladder functions were calculated at 6, 12 and 18 months and mean composite scores for each entity were examined. Results: Decrease in sexual function (up to 35%) was most significant observation followed by bowel dysfunction (10-12%). Bladder function deranged early during radiotherapy but there was no remarkable bladder dysfunction, overall a good proportion of patients (70 - 72%) felt satisfied with their treatment by external beam radiotherapy. By lapse of time there was gradual worsening of erectile function especially after a couple of months of pelvic radiotherapy, while bowel and bladder functions improved 8-12 months post radiotherapy. Conclusion: Proper counselling of patients regarding potential side effects of pelvic radiotherapy can make them understand the outcome of treatment. (author)

  7. Voice following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to provide information on the voice of patients following radiotherapy for glottic cancer. Part I presents findings from questionnaires returned by 227 of 235 patients successfully irradiated for glottic cancer from 1960 through 1971. Part II presents preliminary findings on the speaking fundamental frequencies of 22 irradiated patients. Normal to near-normal voice was reported by 83 percent of the 227 patients; however, 80 percent did indicate persisting vocal difficulties such as fatiguing of voice with much usage, inability to sing, reduced loudness, hoarse voice quality and inability to shout. Amount of talking during treatments appeared to affect length of time for voice to recover following treatments in those cases where it took from nine to 26 weeks; also, with increasing years since treatment, patients rated their voices more favorably. Smoking habits following treatments improved significantly with only 27 percent smoking heavily as compared with 65 percent prior to radiation therapy. No correlation was found between smoking (during or after treatments) and vocal ratings or between smoking and length of time for voice to recover. There was no relationship found between reported vocal ratings and stage of the disease

  8. Margins in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the treatment prescription procedure, one has to prescribe in anatomical terms any GTV (Gross Tumor Volume) according to the general TNM-rules as well as any other tissues that are to be treated for presumed subclinical diseases. These prescriptions of one or several Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) are based on general oncological principles, and are not related to the treatment modality. If external beam radiotherapy is being used, one has to consider special problems related to different geometric inaccuracies and uncertainties, which can be both intrafractional and interfractional. Such inaccuracies and uncertainties are due to either the position, shape and size of the patient/tissues in relation to a fix point, or to variations in beam geometry. The two different types of variations may or may not co-variate. A margin or margins for these uncertainties has to be included in the dose planning procedure, which then will evaluate a static situation, representing the CTV(s) plus geometric ''safety'' margin(s) (Planning Target Volume, PTV) and in fact not the true clinical situation. The dose distribution arrived at for this static representation will however have to be considered as representative for the CTV. This presents of course a dilemma, but one has to accept a reasonable compromise. There is no general rule on the size of the different geometric uncertainties or how they should be added up. Individual evaluations are needed. (author)

  9. Automatization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data-processing in external radiotherapy has to be adapted to each local situation, taking into account the patients to be treated, the irradiation equipment, the data-processing centers available locally, regionally, and nationally, and the rentability of the data-processing system required. It should be recalled that most dosimetric methods used today can be treated manually, and the question of rentability has to be kept in mind when deciding to buy a data-processing system. The radiotherapist should, therefore, prepare a list of costs for each situation, and verify the validity of each programme proposed by the supplier. It is difficult to make a definite choice between the presently available systems. The radiotherapist has to choose in relation to his activity, his availability and the systems available to him. It can sometimes be more advantageous to have a terminal linked to a large computer, rather than to readapt a series of programmes for a data-processing system available locally: many such solutions, though original, cannot be 'exported'. It should be recalled that a large number of dosimetries can be obtained manually, and on the rare occasions when the aid of a computer is essential, the assistance of better equipped neighbouring centers can be obtained. The decision as to whether a data-processing system needs to be acquired has to take all these imperatives into account

  10. Special procedures and techniques in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the routine conventional radiotherapy techniques used in standard radiotherapy departments and clinics, several specialized techniques are known and used for special procedures, be it in dose delivery or target localization. These techniques deal with specific problems that usually require equipment modifications, special quality assurance procedures and heavy involvement and support from clinical physicists. Owing to their increased complexity, these specialized techniques are usually available only in larger, regional centres. The radiotherapy techniques that currently fall into the specialized category are listed below; the first six are special dose delivery techniques, the last three are special target localization techniques: Stereotactic irradiation; Total body irradiation (TBI) with photon beams; Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI); Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT); Endorectal irradiation; Conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT); Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT); Respiratory gated radiotherapy; Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) fused images

  11. Practices of Radiotherapy Equipment Quality Control in Radiotherapy Centers in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the prescription to the delivery of a radiotherapy treatment, a team of professionals from a number of disciplines is involved. In this way significant potential for errors leading to an accidental exposure becomes apparent. Comprehensive quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) programme to minimize such errors is, therefore, required. One aspect of QA/QC programme is quality control of the equipment. In this paper we present experiences in establishing QC procedures in our centers. Also differences in QC practices in Croatian radiotherapy centers are reviewed in the light of recommendations given by international reports and publications To obtain insight into the current employed protocols a questionnaire based on our QC protocols was made and it was sent to all radiotherapy institutions in Croatia. QC procedures and tools used, professionals involved, performance frequencies of the tests and tolerance/action levels are compared. All centers perform the great majority of QC tests, but some variations in the performance frequencies of QC tests and in personnel responsible for performing particular tests are found. Reviewing of QC practices and exchanging experience could help in evolving uniform protocol for QC procedures at national level.(author)

  12. Protection of patient In radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is to clarify some aspects about protection of patient in radiotherapy. Therefore, some basic information about how the use of ionizing radiation in medicine has brought tremendous health benefits to the population globally, the requirement of radiation protection (Justification of practices, Dose limitation and Optimization of protection), and the deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation are presented. The aim of radiotherapy is to use ionizing radiation to cure diseases or make the symptoms of a disease less severe. Also presented are layout of a radiotherapy facility (controlled areas, supervised areas, mazes, door and interlocks, patient observation and communication, and warning sign and lights), radionuclides commonly used for radiation therapy and their main emissions, equipment and devices used in radiotherapy, aspect of protection of patient in radiotherapy such as: leakage test, source on/off, emergency buttons, radiation oncology team, treatment planning, room monitoring, equipment or for protection and Cobalt-60 unit stuck source. The advantages of brachytherapy, leakage from the treatment head and radiation incidents resulting from incorrect dose calibration are discussed. The importance of minimization dose exposure, by considering the basic principles of: time, distance and shielding are also stated. These principles prevent deterministic effects and limit stochastic effects of radiation. (author)

  13. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  14. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  15. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  16. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Computerised tomography in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of computed tomography as an adjunct to radiotherapy planning. Until recently, acquisition of accurate data concerning tumour anatomy lagged behind other developments in radiotherapy. With the advent of computer-tomography (CT), these data can be displayed and transmitted to a treatment planning computer. It is concluded that the greatest inaccuracies in the radiation treatment of patients are to be found in both the inadequate delineation of the target volume within the patient and changes in body outline relative to the target volume over the length of the irradiated volume. The technique was useful in various subgroups (pelvic, intra-thoracic and chest-wall tumours) and for those patients being treated palliatively. With an estimated improvement in cure rate of 4.5% and cost-effective factors of between 3.3 and 5, CT-assisted radiotherapy planning appears to be a worthwhile procedure. (orig.)

  18. Dosimetry in radiotherapy. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of symposia on dosimetry in medicine and biology have been held by the IAEA in co-operation with WHO. The present symposium was the first one focusing on ''Dosimetry in Radiotherapy''. The papers presented reflected the different steps in the calibration chain such as the calibration standards established by the National Standards Laboratories and the conversion of the reading of calibrated instruments to the desired quantity, i.e. absorbed dose to water at a reference point in the user's beam at the radiotherapy clinic. The programme further examined the procedures necessary for optimization of the treatment of the patient, such as treatment planning methods, dose distribution studies, new techniques of dose measurement, improvements in the physical dose distributions/conformation therapy and special problems involved in total body treatments. Results of quality assurance in radiotherapy were presented from local hospitals as well as from national and international studies. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined hyperthermia (HT 45 min once or twice per week) and low dose radiotherapy (LDRT 30-34.5 Gy in 2-3 weeks) have been given to 182 locally recurrent or metastatic superficial tumours in 133 patients. Tumour response was analysed in 137 tumours in 100 patients. The overall complete response (CR) was 50% with a median duration (DCR) of 13±3 months. When mammary carcinoma, representing 62% of the treated tumours, were analysed, CR was 62% with a DCR of 14±4 months. In a comparative, non-randomized study, on 34 matched tumour pairs in 24 patients, treatment was given with LDRT+HT to the larger and the same LDRT to the smaller tumour, the patients acting as their own control. A significant difference in CR was obtained in favour of the combined treatment (p=0.0013 all diagnosis and p=0.0027 mammary carcinoma). There was no significant difference in DCR between the two modalities. No significant difference in CR was seen when tumours were randomely treated with HT once (CR 56%) or twice (CR 69%) per week combined with the same LDRT. Predictive factors for CR, multivariately analysed (15 parameters), in mammary carcinoma recurring in earlier irradiated regions, were; the present LDRT absorbed dose (p=0.02) and the average minimum temperature in the best HT session (p=0.03). Significant skin toxicity was seen in 28% of all the 182 heated regions. Prognostic factors for skin damage, multivariately analysed, were; the extension of the heated region (p=0.007) and the highest average maximum temperature in any of the HT sessions (p=0.04). Pain was in some way correlated to severe toxicity but was not considered to be an optimal monitor for HT as many patients with severe and moderate pain were without any serious skin reactions, while slight or no pain sometimes were associated with severe reactions. 401 refs

  20. Mucosal regeneration during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Regeneration of the aerodigestive mucosa is known to occur during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. The circumstances surrounding its time of onset and magnitude are not well understood, however. Material and methods: Mucosal reactions were observed in 100 patients undergoing conventionally fractionated treatment at 2 Gy/day over 7 weeks and 88 receiving accelerated treatment at 1.8 Gy twice daily over 3(1(2)) weeks on the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group head and neck cancer trials. Similar observations in 61 patients treated palliatively at dose rates between 0.8 and 240 Gy/h using ten 3.0-4.2 Gy fractions over 2 weeks are compared. Results: Several findings emerged from these studies: 1. Reactions evolved more quickly at oropharyngeal sites than in the hypopharynx. 2. Reactions at both sites evolved more rapidly at greater rates of dose accumulation. 3. The timing of reactions suggested the presence of a strong regenerative mucosal response that started before the manifestation of 'patchy' (grade II) mucosal reactions. 4. The regenerative response was strong enough to 'make good' damage accumulated at a rate of 2 Gy/day in over a third of cases. 5. The linear quadratic model without time correction failed to provide an adequate prediction of the frequency or intensity of mucosal reactions produced by any of the regimes. A simple model of the regenerative response is presented. Conclusions: This study suggests that the timing and magnitude of the regenerative response vary between sites and individuals but are linked to the amount of epithelial cellular depletion occurring during treatment

  1. Baseline Utilization of Breast Radiotherapy Before Institution of the Medicare Practice Quality Reporting Initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In 2007, Medicare implemented the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative (PQRI), which provides financial incentives to physicians who report their performance on certain quality measures. PQRI measure no. 74 recommends radiotherapy for patients treated with conservative surgery (CS) for invasive breast cancer. As a first step in evaluating the potential impact of this measure, we assessed baseline use of radiotherapy among women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before implementation of PQRI. Methods and Materials: Using the SEER-Medicare data set, we identified women aged 66-70 diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and treated with CS between 2000 and 2002. Treatment with radiotherapy was determined using SEER and claims data. Multivariate logistic regression tested whether receipt of radiotherapy varied significantly across clinical, pathologic, and treatment covariates. Results: Of 3,674 patients, 94% (3,445) received radiotherapy. In adjusted analysis, the presence of comorbid illness (odds ratio [OR] 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.42) and unmarried marital status were associated with omission of radiotherapy (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.20). In contrast, receipt of chemotherapy was protective against omission of radiotherapy (OR 0.25; 95% CI, 0.16-0.38). Race and geographic region did not correlate with radiotherapy utilization. Conclusions: Utilization of radiotherapy following CS was high for patients treated before institution of PQRI, suggesting that at most 6% of patients could benefit from measure no. 74. Further research is needed to determine whether institution of PQRI will affect radiotherapy utilization.

  2. Who risk profile in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different steps of a treatment in radiotherapy are: patient evaluation, decision to treat, prescription of the treatment protocol, positioning and immobilization, simulation, imaging and volume determination, planning and implementation of materials and software, transfer of treatment data, patient positioning, treatment realisation, treatment checking and follow-up. It exist processes of safety for any step of a radiotherapy realisation: patient identification, accreditation of equipment and processes, evaluation of the personnel competencies, quality assurance of equipment and management of the processes quality, redundancy during the data transfer, control of processes, errors reports and quality improvement, external controls, appropriateness of the workforce. (N.C.)

  3. Radiotherapy for recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinico-radiobiological characteristics of radiotherapy for relapsed breast cancer were studied. Adequate choice of tissue mass to be exposed appeared much more important than any change in focal dose within 50-80 Gy, to achieve higher frequency of locoregional therapeutic effect. However, recurrent tumors more than 3 large lower radiosensitivity involving a sharp rise in the likelihood of dissemination. Radiotherapy for primary tumor did not affect the radiosensitivity of recurrent malignancies but slowed down the rate of its growth. Also, it might promote the dissemination acceleration

  4. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy: Cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to the other chemotherapeutic preparations discussed today, cyclophosphamide in combination with radiotherapy is a relatively unproblematic substance. Despite the great number of experimental and clinical data, the evaluation does not prove an advantage of the combined therapy with cyclophosphamide and irradiation as against radiotherapy alone in local tumor treatment. This should give occasion to further experimental investigations in adequate models. On the other hand, the practice of combined treatment with irradiation and preparations containing cyclophosphamide should be reconsidered for those cases where local control of a tumor is the principal therapeutic aim. (orig.)

  5. TRS 398 dosimetry protocol for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In recent years, international codes of practice based on absorbed dose to water standards have been published for the clinical reference dosimetry of external beams. It has become widely accepted that dosimetry of radiotherapeutic beams should be based on these standards. These codes of practice are a major improvement over earlier ones that used air kerma calibration factors as they are based on a calibration directly in a phantom in terms of the quantity of interest. The previous codes begin with calibration in air in terms of air kerma, then use theoretical and generic conversion factors to obtain dose to water that do not take account of chamber-to-chamber variation. Other good reasons for implementing the new codes are that they are conceptually simpler, include improved physical data and improve the consistency for various ionisation chamber types as well as between different beam types. TRS-3982,3 is a new Code of Practice (CoP) for reference dosimetry of external radiotherapy beams based on absorbed dose to, water calibrations and was published by the IAEA in a joint effort with the WHO, PAHO and ESTRO. It is the first CoP of its kind comprehensively covering all external radiotherapy beams except neutrons. The Radiotherapy Interest Group (RJG) of the ACPSEM has recommended that radiotherapy centres in Australia and New Zealand implement this CoP by the end of 2004. In this workshop, the general philosophy of the CoP will be outlined which will provide a framework for each of the individual subcodes. Although it represents just one of the potential implementations of the CoP, this workshop will deal only with dosimetry based on a cylindrical ionisation chamber with an absorbed dose calibration factor in 60Co from the standards laboratory. With the framework of the code in mind, it is straightforward to identify the basic steps that are required for measuring absorbed dose under reference conditions in a high-energy photon beam. The same is true

  6. Curent requirements for image management in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment techniques of increasing complexity such as dynamic/rotational techniques mandate digital management and increasingly image guidance. This constantly increases requirements for image management and archiving. This article discusses the current status of these requirements and will present potential image administration strategies. Fundamentals of image administration and storage/archiving are presented (DICOM Standard, radiotherapy-specific issues) along the typical patient pathway (demographic data, radiotherapy treatment planning, signatures/approval of plan and image data, archiving of plan and image data). Different strategies for image management are presented (archiving centered on individual application vs. integral approach with central archiving in a DICOM-RT-PACS governed by a radiation oncology information system (ROCIS)). Infrastructural requirements depending on the amount of image data generated in the department are discussed. Application-centered image management provides access to image data including all relevant RT-specific elements. This approach, however, is not migration-safe, requires significant administrative work to ensure a redundancy level that protects against data loss and does not provide datasets that are linked to respective therapeutic interventions. Therefore, centralized image management and archiving that links images to patients and individual steps in the treatment pathway within a standardized DICOM(-RT) environment is preferable despite occasional problems with visualization of specific data elements. (orig.)

  7. Construction of a remote radiotherapy planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We constructed a remote radiotherapy planning system, and we examined the usefulness of and faults in our system in this study. Two identical radiotherapy planning systems, one installed at our institution and the other installed at an affiliated hospital, were used for radiotherapy planning. The two systems were connected by a wide area network (WAN), using a leased line. Beam data for the linear accelerator at the affiliated hospital were installed in the two systems. During the period from December 2001 to December 2002, 43 remote radiotherapy plans were made using this system. Data were transmitted using a file transfer protocol (FTP) software program. The 43 radiotherapy plans examined in this study consisted of 13 ordinary radiotherapy plans, 28 radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents, and 2 radiotherapy plans for emergency cases. There were ten minor planning changes made in radiotherapy plans sent to provide assistance for medical residents. Our remote radiotherapy planning system based on WAN using a leased line is useful for remote radiotherapy, with advantages for both radiation oncologists and medical residents. (author)

  8. Radiotherapy - past present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beginnings of therapeutic applications of x-rays are far less known and surrounded by acrimonious controversy. The past, present and future of radiotherapy are briefly reviewed. The major challenges for hospital physicists is in educating staff members and monitoring the ever broadening use of ionising radiation

  9. Radiotherapy of bile duct carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-six patients with cholangiocarcinoma and nineteen patients with carcinoma of the gallbladder treated with external radiotherapy were analyzed. Of the twenty-six patients, eighteen had cancer of the hepatic hilus (Klatskin), four intrahepatic and the remaining four extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. All but two of the patients had advanced disease. Thirty-three patients received primary irradiation for unresectable tumors, ten patients adjuvant irradiation after non-curative gross tumor resection, and two patients preoperative radiotherapy. Patients with cholangiocarcinoma who underwent radiotherapy with relatively small radiation field tolerated the treatment well, but there was no significant difference in survival according to field size or radiation doses (TDF). On the other hand, patients with carcinoma of gallbladder were treated with larger field size and lower dose. In the patients without gross tumor resection, those receiving radiation doses≥90 TDF had significantly longer survival than 2) had longer survival (p=0.07). The patients with gross tumor resection had significantly longer survival than that without resection in both cholangiocarcinoma and carcinoma of gallbladder. Postmortem examination revealed tumor recurrence even in the patients with gross tumor resection, but widespread distant metastases were present simultaneously. Cholangitis and liver abscess were special and lethal conditions related to these carcinomas, and intensive therapy must be developed for these conditions. External radiotherapy may be effective in the treatment of bile duct carcinoma in terms of palliation and survival. (author)

  10. Radiotherapy T1 glottic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zablow, A.I.; Erba, P.S.; Sanfillippo, L.J.

    1989-11-01

    From 1970 to 1985, curative radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients with stage I carcinoma of the true vocal cords. Precision radiotherapeutic technique yields cure rates comparable to surgical results. Good voice quality was preserved in a high percentage of patients.

  11. Thalassaemic osteoarthropathy treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.N. (King' s Coll. Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-11-01

    Patients with beta thalassaemia may develop a specific osteoarthropathy involving the feet. A number of different treatments for this condition have been tried, including rest, analgesia and hypertransfusion. We report a case of a patient with thalassaemic osteoarthropathy who responded to radiotherapy after failing conventional treatment. (author).

  12. Computerised tomography in radiotherapy planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Badcock (Peter)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractSuccessful radiotherapy practice depends on the irradiation of tumours such that their destruction follows without unacceptable damage of the surrounding normal tissues. Until recently the accurate acquisition of data concerning the tumour anatomy lagged behind other developments in radi

  13. Prototype Development of an Electrical Impedance Based Simultaneous Respiratory and Cardiac Monitoring System for Gated Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kohli, Kirpal; Liu, Jeff; Schellenberg, Devin; Karvat, Anand; Parameswaran, Ash; Grewal, Parvind; Thomas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background In radiotherapy, temporary translocations of the internal organs and tumor induced by respiratory and cardiac activities can undesirably lead to significantly lower radiation dose on the targeted tumor but more harmful radiation on surrounding healthy tissues. Respiratory and cardiac gated radiotherapy offers a potential solution for the treatment of tumors located in the upper thorax. The present study focuses on the design and development of simultaneous acquisition of respira...

  14. Quo Vadis Radiotherapy? Technological Advances and the Rising Problems in Cancer Management

    OpenAIRE

    Barry J Allen; Eva Bezak; Loredana G. Marcu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions t...

  15. The Evolving Role of Radiotherapy in Early Stage Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardi, Umberto; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Franco, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy has a key role in the combined modality treatment of early-stage Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL). Nevertheless, late toxicity still remains an issue. A modern approach in HL radiotherapy includes lower doses and smaller fields, together with the implementation of sophisticated and dedicated delivery techniques. Aim of the present review is to discuss the current role of radiotherapy and its potential future developments, with a focus on major clinical trials, technological advances ...

  16. Exploration of the clinical interaction between vascular targeting agents and radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mandeville, H. C.

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies of vascular disruptive and anti-angiogenic agents, combined with radiation, have demonstrated the potential for enhanced anti-tumour activity. However, the optimal strategy and scheduling for combining these treatments with radiotherapy remains uncertain. In this thesis, combretastatin-A4-phosphate (CA4P) given concurrently with fractionated radiotherapy has been studied using preclinical models, in addition to assessing the impacts of adding the nitric oxid...

  17. Risk factors for radiotherapy incidents and impact of an online electronic reporting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To ascertain the rate, type, significance, trends and the potential risk factors associated with radiotherapy incidents in a large academic department. Materials and methods: Data for all radiotherapy activities from July 2001 to January 2011 were reviewed from radiotherapy incident reporting forms. Patient and treatment data were obtained from the radiotherapy record and verification database (MOSAIQ) and the patient database (HOSPRO). Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine variables associated with radiotherapy incidents. Results: In that time, 65,376 courses of radiotherapy were delivered with a reported incident rate of 2.64 per 100 courses. The rate of incidents per course increased (1.96 per 100 courses to 3.52 per 100 courses, p < 0.001) whereas the proportion of reported incidents resulting in >5% deviation in dose (10.50 to 2.75%, p < 0.001) had decreased after the introduction of an online electronic reporting system. The following variables were associated with an increased rate of incidents: afternoon treatment time, paediatric patients, males, inpatients, palliative plans, head-and-neck, skin, sarcoma and haematological malignancies. In general, complex plans were associated with higher incidence rates. Conclusion: Radiotherapy incidents were infrequent and most did not result in significant dose deviation. A number of risk factors were identified and these could be used to highlight high-risk cases in the future. Introduction of an online electronic reporting system resulted in a significant increase in the number of incidents being reported

  18. Chronic fatigue in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue is one of the most prevalent and profound symptoms related to both malignancy and anti-neoplastic treatment. It is being reported in 60% to 80% of cancer patients. We review the correlation between the cancer-related fatigue syndrome and radiotherapy. In patients undergoing radiotherapy, fatigue is often cumulative and may reach its peak during the last weeks of treatment. The presence of fatigue prior to therapy initiation is the most important predictive factor of the occurrence of radiotherapy-related cancer fatigue syndrome. Occasionally, fatigue persists for a prolonged period of months and even years beyond radiotherapy. Anemia may be one of major causative factors responsible for the development of the cancer-related fatigue syndrome. Fatigue has an enormous physical, mental, emotional, and economic impact on cancer patients, their families and care-providers. The treatment of radiation-related fatigue remains unknown. The initial approach should cover efforts aimed at the correction of potential etiologies, especially anemia. Education concerning fatigue greatly benefits some patients. It seems that exercise may be beneficial in relieving fatigue, bearing in mind that the exercise program for cancer patients should be initiated gradually and significantly individualized. (author)

  19. A Mathematical Model of Tumor Volume Changes during Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a clinically viable mathematical model that quantitatively predicts tumor volume change during radiotherapy in order to provide treatment response assessment for prognosis, treatment plan optimization, and adaptation. Method and Materials. The correction factors containing hypoxia, DNA single strand breaks, potentially lethal damage, and other factors were used to develop an improved cell survival model based on the popular linear-quadratic model of cell survival in radiotherapy. The four-level cell population model proposed by Chvetsov et al. was further simplified by removing the initial hypoxic fraction and reoxygenation parameter, which are hard to obtain in routine clinics, such that an easy-to-use model can be developed for clinical applications. The new model was validated with data of nine lung and cervical cancer patients. Results. Out of the nine cases, the new model can predict tumor volume change in six cases with a correlation index R2 greater than 0.9 and the rest of three with R2 greater than 0.85. Conclusion. Based on a four-level cell population model, a more practical and simplified cell survival curve was proposed to model the tumor volume changes during radiotherapy. Validation study with patient data demonstrated feasibility and clinical usefulness of the new model in predicting tumor volume change in radiotherapy.

  20. Functional and molecular image guidance in radiotherapy treatment planning optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shiva K; Ten Haken, Randall K

    2011-04-01

    Functional and molecular imaging techniques are increasingly being developed and used to quantitatively map the spatial distribution of parameters, such as metabolism, proliferation, hypoxia, perfusion, and ventilation, onto anatomically imaged normal organs and tumor. In radiotherapy optimization, these imaging modalities offer the promise of increased dose sparing to high-functioning subregions of normal organs or dose escalation to selected subregions of the tumor as well as the potential to adapt radiotherapy to functional changes that occur during the course of treatment. The practical use of functional/molecular imaging in radiotherapy optimization must take into cautious consideration several factors whose influences are still not clearly quantified or well understood including patient positioning differences between the planning computed tomography and functional/molecular imaging sessions, image reconstruction parameters and techniques, image registration, target/normal organ functional segmentation, the relationship governing the dose escalation/sparing warranted by the functional/molecular image intensity map, and radiotherapy-induced changes in the image intensity map over the course of treatment. The clinical benefit of functional/molecular image guidance in the form of improved local control or decreased normal organ toxicity has yet to be shown and awaits prospective clinical trials addressing this issue. PMID:21356479

  1. Complete remission of localised gastric plasmacytomas following definitive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary gastric extramedullary plasmacytoma is an extremely rare condition and there is scant information in the literature concerning its natural history or therapy. There have been anecdotal reports of surgical resection, with or without Helicobacter pylori eradication, but there are no useful reports of the role of radiotherapy. We report the clinicopathologic outcome of radical radiotherapy as a primary treatment modality. We identified two patients with biopsy-proven primary gastric extramedullary plasmacytoma. Routine staging investigations were performed and H. pylori status was determined. Radical radiotherapy to 41.4 Gy in 23 fractions was delivered using conformal techniques. The target volume was the stomach with a 1-cm margin. Prophylactic anti-emetic was administered prior to each fraction. Post-treatment endoscopies and biopsies were performed at 3-monthly intervals to assess clinicopathological response. Treatment-related toxicities were documented. Both patients achieved durable (>12 months) pathologically confirmed complete remissions without significant toxicities. Radical radiotherapy offers the potential for cure and organ preservation with low toxicity. It should be considered a favourable alternative to surgery in the management of this rare disease entity.

  2. Palliative and low cost radiotherapy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicts that cancer incidence in developing countries will increase dramatically in the first two decades of this millennium. Already some 80% of cancer patients in developing countries present with incurable disease. In many cases pain is a severe problem and palliation is needed to improve quality of life as well as extending survival. This paper will consider the physical and clinical aspects of palliative radiotherapy (PRT), choice of radiation modality, alternative approaches to imaging and therapy and cost-benefit considerations. The potential benefits of a dedicated palliative care centre include lower cost and therefore more centres, enabling more patients access to regional palliative care. Simple curative treatments could also be managed. Co60 radiotherapy has important advantages in developing countries, because of the higher initial cost of a linear accelerator, as well as the need for reliable power supply and the level of skill required by linac technicians and physicists. The beam characteristics of both Co60 units and low energy linacs are compared and both are found to be acceptable for palliation. The role of palliative and low cost radiotherapy in Bangladesh is reviewed. The concept of telemedicine is also discussed, using mobile phones and internet communication to allow rural clinics to receive support from specialists based in the cities, to send images for remote diagnosis and remote dose planning for radiotherapy.

  3. Effects of hyperthermia, radiotherapy and thermoradiotherapy on tumor microvasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The therapeutic effects of hyperthermia (immersion of tumor-bearing leg in a water bath at 46 deg C for 60 min), radiotherapy (500 rad or 1000 rad) and thermoradiotherapy on VX-2 tumors of the rabbits were studied morphologically. Especially, vascular morphological changes and vascular permeability to ferritin after treatment were investigated by electron microscopy. As assessed by decrease in tumor volume, local hyperthermia potentiated the destructive effect of radiotherapy. The light microscopic pictures invariably suggested prolonged necrotic tendency of tumor cells following thermoradiotherapy. Electron microscopically, 1 day and 3 days after thermoradiotherapy, small blood vessels in the tumors showed swelling and protrusion of endothelial cells in the lumen. Similar morphological changes were obtained only at 3 days after radiotherapy. When vascular permeability to ferritin was examined by electron microscopy, an increase in tumor vascular permeability was occured at 1 day after hyperthermia or thermoradiotherapy, while at 3 days after radiotherapy. These results suggest that the early reaction of tumor microvasculature may be a contributing factor to delayed cell death in tumors after hyperthermia or thermoradiotherapy. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy for ''non-small-cell'' cancer of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy serves a very important role in the palliation of distressing symptoms caused by an intrathoracic tumor or its distant manifestations. When the tumor is confined to the thorax, irradiation can eradicate or control the cranial-regional disease, prolonging survival and offering the possibility of cure. In addition, there is a role for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to surgery in a subset the patients with resectable cancinoma of the lung. The following review sill put us on radiotherapy as a surgical adjuvant; the use of radiotherapy in the palliative treatment, life prolongation, and cure of patients with unresectable tumors; the characteristics of patient who live 3 or more years after irradiation; the special problems of superior sulcus tumors and malignant superoir vena cranial obstruction. The treatment of patients with brain metastases from carcinoma of the lung and the potential for prophylactic cranial irradiation is explored. Prognostic factors are noted for patients with unresectable tumors. Finally, the status of current investigations and prospects for future studies are surveyed

  5. Palliative radiotherapy: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonam; Hertan, Lauren; Jones, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    For nearly 100 years, palliative radiotherapy has been a time-efficient, effective treatment for patients with metastatic or advanced cancer in any area where local tumors are causing symptoms. Short courses including a single fraction of radiotherapy may be effective for symptom relief with minimal side effects and maximization of convenience for patient and family. With recent advances in imaging, surgery, and other local therapies as well as systemic cancer therapies, palliative radiotherapy has been used frequently in patients who may not yet have symptoms of advanced or metastatic cancer. In this setting, more prolonged radiotherapy courses and advanced radiotherapy techniques including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be useful in obtaining local control and durable palliative responses. This review will explore the use of radiotherapy across the spectrum of patients with advanced and metastatic cancer and delineate an updated, rational approach for the use of palliative radiotherapy that incorporates symptoms, prognosis, and other factors into the delivery of palliative radiotherapy. PMID:25499634

  6. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. conventional radiotherapy in the treatment of anal squamous cell carcinoma: A propensity score analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Definitive chemoradiation is the standard management for anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC); more conformal pelvic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) minimizes toxicity but may increase locoregional recurrences (LRR). We compared IMRT and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) outcomes in ASCC patients. Material and methods: We retrospectively reviewed records of 223 ASCC patients treated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center from 1991 to 2010. Forty-five patients received IMRT and 178 CRT. We determined locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival (OS) for each radiation modality. A propensity score analysis was performed using potentially confounding variables. Locoregional and distant patterns of failure for CRT and IMRT were compared. Results: Patients treated with IMRT had significantly higher N stage (P < .01), and were less likely to be treated with induction chemotherapy (P = .01). The 2-year LRFS, DMFS, and OS were 87%, 86%, and 93%, respectively, for IMRT; and 82%, 88%, 90%, respectively, for CRT; with no significant difference in outcomes by univariate analysis or in a propensity score analysis adjusted for disparity between the groups. Conclusions: This large, single-institution experience of definitive chemoradiation for ASCC using CRT vs. IMRT demonstrates that outcomes are not compromised by more conformal radiotherapy. In the absence of prospective, multi-institutional, randomized trials of IMRT in ASCC, these retrospective data, using methods to minimize bias, can help to establish the role of IMRT in the definitive therapy of ASCC

  7. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjostedt, Svetlana; Bezak, Eva

    2010-09-01

    Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RIBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summarises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RIBE. The main emphasis of this article is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy. PMID:20857259

  8. Non-Targeted effects of ionising radiation and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Modern radiobiology is undergoing rapid change due to new discoveries contradicting the target concept which is currently used to predict dose-response relationships. Thus relatively recently discovered radiation induced bystander effects (RlBEs), that include additional death, mutation and radio-adaptation in non-irradiated cells, change our understanding of the target concept and broadens its boundaries. This can be significant from a radioprotection point of view and also has the potential to reassess radiation damage models currently used in radiotherapy. This article reviews briefly the general concepts of RlBEs such as the proposed underlying mechanisms of signal induction and propagation, experimental approaches and biological end points used to investigate these phenomena. It also summ rises several mathematical models currently proposed in an attempt to quantify RlBE. The main emphasis of this al1icle is to review and highlight the potential impact of the bystander phenomena in radiotherapy.

  9. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin ≥12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin ≥12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p 1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results

  10. Solid Mesh Registration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for solid organ registration of pre-segmented data represented as tetrahedral meshes. Registration of the organ surface is driven by force terms based on a distance field representation of the source and reference shapes. Registration of internal morphology is achieved using...... a non-linear elastic finite element model. A key feature of the method is that the user does not need to specify boundary conditions (surface point correspondences) prior to the finite element analysis. Instead the boundary matches are found as an integrated part of the analysis. The method is...... seconds to complete. The proposed method has many potential uses in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) which relies on registration to account for organ deformation between treatment sessions....

  11. The influence of radiotherapy on cardiac disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiological disturbances are one of the late complications of radiotherapy of the area of the chest and usually appear over 10 years after the end of treatment. It is an essential problem in patients with breast cancer or Hodgkins lymphoma due to long-term survival in this group. Described disturbances were located mostly in the pericardium and coronary vessels, but can also involve the myocardium, the conducting system or valves of the heart. During the use of older techniques of irradiation the percentage of cardiological complications after the treatment was significant. Nowadays the dose which the heart receives is significantly reduced, but radiation damage of the heart is still common. It could be connected with the use of new, more cardiotoxic agents during chemotherapy, or result from potential hypersensitivity of the endothelial cells to low radiation doses. The aim of the study is to review the accessible literature about cardiological complications after the use of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  12. Respiratory Gating for Radiotherapy: Main Technical Aspects and Clinical Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, Philippe; Houle, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast, and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complication rates of organs at risk is expected. Five main strategies are used to reduce respiratory motion effects: integration of respiratory movements into treatment planning, forced shallow breathing with abdominal compression, breath-hold ...

  13. Cerebral control and survival after stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective study, including 275 patients who underwent stereotactic radiotherapy due to brain metastases between 2003 and 2008, investigates influencing factors regarding cerebral control and survival, symptomatic effects and a potential benefit for patients older than 70 years. We were able to identify risk factors for remote brain failure which leads to a therapeutic recommendation. Furthermore we confirm a positive symptomatic effect and a benefit of stereotactic readiotherapy for patients over 70 years.

  14. Lessons learned from accidental exposures in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical use of radiation is unique in that patients are intentionally exposed to radiation. The aim in radiation therapy is twofold: to deliver a dose and dose distribution that is adequate for tumour control, but which also minimizes complications in normal tissues. In therapeutic applications, the doses are high and a deviation from the prescribed dose may have severe or even fatal consequences. There is therefore a great need to ensure adequate radiation protection and safety in radiotherapy by verifying that all personnel involved are appropriately trained for their duties, that the equipment used meets relevant international specifications for radiation safety and that safety culture is embedded in routine activities in radiotherapy departments. Many individuals must interact and work together on highly technical measurements and calculations, and therefore the potential for mistakes is great. A review of the mistakes shows that most are due to human error. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and the Safety of Radiation Sources (IAEA Safety Series No. 115) require that a prompt investigation be conducted whenever an accidental medical exposure of patients occurs. The report of the investigation is to be disseminated to the appropriate parties so that lessons can be learned to prevent similar accidents or mitigate their consequences in the future. This Safety Report is a collection of a large number of events that may serve as a checklist against which to test the vulnerability of a facility to potential accidents, and to provide a basis for improving safety in the use of radiation in medical applications. A further purpose of this report is to encourage readers to develop a questioning and learning attitude, adopt measures for the prevention of accidents, and prepare for mitigation of the consequences of accidents if they occur

  15. Exploration of the Protection of Riboflavin Laurate on Oral Mucositis Induced by Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy at the Cellular Level: What Is the Leading Contributor?

    OpenAIRE

    Shanshan Wang; Qishou Xu; Dexuan Yang; Zixue Xuan; Yinghong An; Shoujun Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Oral or gastrointestinal mucositis is a frequent phenomenon in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In addition, several clinical investigations have demonstrated in recent years that riboflavin laurate has the potential to protect the patients from the disease induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In our studies, it is observed that riboflavin laurate can ameliorate either chemotherapy- or radiotherapy-induced toxicities on Helf cells, and the effect is greater than tha...

  16. How PET is changing the management of cancer with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information from PET scanning is transforming the management of many malignancies and the impact of PET is likely to increase further as new indications are recognised. PET is of particular value in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. These patients rarely undergo invasive surgical staging and therefore imaging is crucial in determining the extent of disease before treatment. More accurate staging with PET means that futile aggressive RT or chcmoRT can be avoided in patients with incurable extensive disease. FDG-PET is of proven value in the staging of common metabolically-active malignancies treated with radiotherapy. These include lung cancer, head and neck cancer, lymphomas and oesophageal carcinoma. It has been shown that PET can improve the selection of patients for radical surgery or radiotherapy in lung cancer and that PET-based staging more accurately predicts survival than conventional staging. For those patients that remain eligible for definitive RT after PET. treatment can be more accurately targeted at the tumour and involved regional nodes. The value of PET for treatment planning is enhanced significantly when PET and CT scans are acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner. Fused PET-CT images can be imported into the radiotherapy planning computer and used to accurately target tumour with the best beam arrangement. After treatment, response may be hard to assess with structural imaging. PET-rcsponse to chemotherapy or radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicts survival in NSCLC more accurately than CT response. However, PET has much more potential than imaging with FDG alone can realise. Markers such as FLT can be used to image proliferation in tumours, misonidazole or FAZA can be used to image hypoxia and labeled metabolites of anti-cancer drugs such as 5-FU can be used to study pharmacokinetics. New combinations of radiation and drugs may emerge that can be selected based on biological characteristics of

  17. Spinal Cord Doses in Palliative Lung Radiotherapy Schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: We aim to check the safety of the standard palliative radiotherapy techniques by using the Linear quadratic model for a careful estimation of the doses received by the spinal cord, in all standard palliative lung radiotherapy fields and fractionation. Material and Methods: All patients surveyed at this prospective audit were treated with palliative chest radio-therapy for lung cancer over a period from January to June 2005 by different clinical oncology specialists within the department. Radiotherapy field criteria were recorded and compared with the recommended limits of the MRC trial protocols for the dose and fractionation prescribed. Doses delivered to structures off the field central axis were estimated using a standard CT scan of the chest. Dose estimates were made using an SLPLAN planning system. As unexpected spinal cord toxicity has been reported after hypo fractionated chest radiotherapy, a sagittal view was used to calculate the isodoses along the length of the spinal cord that could lie within the RT field. Equivalent dose estimates are made using the Linear Quadratic Equivalent Dose formula (LQED). The relative radiation sensitivity of spinal cord for myelopathy (the a/b dose) cord has been estimated as a/b = 1 Gy. Results: 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocols have spinal cord equivalent doses (using the linear-quadratic model) that lie within the conventional safe limits of 50 Gy in 25 fractions for the 100% isodose. However when the dosimetry is modelled for a 6 MV 100 cm isocentric linac in 3 dimensions, and altered separations and air space inhomogeneity are considered, the D-Max doses consistently fall above this limit on our 3 model patients. Conclusion: The 17 Gy in 2 fraction and 39 Gy in 13 fraction protocol would risk spinal cord damage if the radio therapist was unaware of the potential spinal cord doses. Alterative doses are suggested below 15.5 Gy/ 2 fractions (7 days apart) would be most acceptable

  18. Bayesian network models for error detection in radiotherapy plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalet, Alan M.; Gennari, John H.; Ford, Eric C.; Phillips, Mark H.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to design and develop a probabilistic network for detecting errors in radiotherapy plans for use at the time of initial plan verification. Our group has initiated a multi-pronged approach to reduce these errors. We report on our development of Bayesian models of radiotherapy plans. Bayesian networks consist of joint probability distributions that define the probability of one event, given some set of other known information. Using the networks, we find the probability of obtaining certain radiotherapy parameters, given a set of initial clinical information. A low probability in a propagated network then corresponds to potential errors to be flagged for investigation. To build our networks we first interviewed medical physicists and other domain experts to identify the relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies and to construct a network topology. Next, to populate the network’s conditional probability tables, we used the Hugin Expert software to learn parameter distributions from a subset of de-identified data derived from a radiation oncology based clinical information database system. These data represent 4990 unique prescription cases over a 5 year period. Under test case scenarios with approximately 1.5% introduced error rates, network performance produced areas under the ROC curve of 0.88, 0.98, and 0.89 for the lung, brain and female breast cancer error detection networks, respectively. Comparison of the brain network to human experts performance (AUC of 0.90 ± 0.01) shows the Bayes network model performs better than domain experts under the same test conditions. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of comprehensive probabilistic models as part of decision support systems for improved detection of errors in initial radiotherapy plan verification procedures.

  19. Decommissioning of Radiotherapy Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy units containing high activity sealed radioactive sources of 60Co or 137Cs are mainly use for medical, research or calibration applications. After several half-lives of decay, the radionuclide source has to be changed or the unit is decommissioned if no longer required. Before starting a decommissioning project it is very important to look for documents relating to any sources held or installed in equipment. In general this should be no problem because the recommended working life of such sealed radioactive sources is limited to 10 or a maximum of 15 years. These time periods are short in comparison with other facilities like research laboratories or small reactors. These documents (source certificates) will be very helpful to plan the decommissioning because they say everything about the original activity of the source at a reference date, the type of the source and the manufacturer. The next step may be to contact the machine supplier or the source manufacturer, but be aware that neither may still be in existence or may have changed their type of business. In such cases, it is recommended to contact national or international sealed source manufacturers or suppliers for help. Sometimes it is also helpful to contact colleagues in other hospitals or research centres to ask for information about specialists in this topic. In general it is not useful, and even very dangerous, to try to decommission such a unit without expert help It is essential to have specialist tools and shielded containers to recover the source out of the unit. It is strongly recommended to invite the source removal specialist for a site visit to review the situation before starting any decommissioning process. A further problem can occur, if the source must be transported to a national storage centre or even an international storage facility, as the source must be packaged to meet international transport requirements. The end state of such a project should be an empty room where the

  20. Psychosocial effects of radiotherapy after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psychosocial morbidity was measured in 47 patients who received postoperative radiotherapy and in 38 who received no further treatment after mastectomy. Roughly one third of all patients experienced depression or anxiety. One month after operation, before radiotherapy, there were no significant differences between the two groups in any of the measures of psychosocial morbidity. Knowledge of impending treatment did not seem to influence morbidity. At three months patients who had completed radiotherapy had significantly more somatic symptoms and social dysfunction than those not so treated. At six months the radiotherapy group continued to show more somatic symptoms, but a year after operation there were no significant differences between the groups. Although several patients who received radiotherapy were upset by their treatment, the study failed to confirm that depression and anxiety were commoner among those given radiotherapy than among patients given no further treatment. (author)

  1. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  2. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas

  3. Radiotherapy for symptomatic vertebral hemangioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Assessment of treatment results of symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas and review of the literature. Patients and Methods: Ten patients treated between 1974 to 1997 were retrospectively analyzed. Efficacy of treatment was determined according to improvement of pain and/or neurological symptoms. Results: Improvement was achieved in 8 of 10 patients. The initially existing neurological symptoms of 3 patients disappeared completely in 2 cases and improved in 1 case. Acute side effects were slight. Late side effects were not seen. A dose-effect relationship could not be assessed. There was no relapse. Conclusion: Radiotherapy with 30 Gy for symptomatic vertebral angioma as primary therapy is indicated. In case of neurological symptoms a radiotherapy after operative therapy is recommendable even if the patient is free of symptoms to prevent progress or relapse. (orig.)

  4. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL...... resection or any other possible treatment or combination of treatments in patients with a cerebellopontine angle tumour up to 3 cm in diameter, presumed to be a vestibular schwannoma. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. MAIN...

  5. Radiotherapy in osseous metastasizing carcinoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an 51-year old patient with a disseminately metastasizing bronchus carcinoid, percutaneous radiotherapy was employed as a palliative measure against most severe pain in the region of bone metastases. In all irradiated regions (entire vertebral column and both shoulders) good pain relief was achieved in 2 weeks, lasting until the end of the follow-up period (18 months after irradiation), by application of 30 Gy photon radiation. Correlated with the subjective pain relief was a reduction of the required quantity of analgesics, a reduction of the greatly increased activity of alkaline phosphatase in the serum, and roentgenological sclerosing of the metastatic bone lesions. This case report is intended to point to the possibility of employing radiotherapy in similar cases where medication has finally proved futile, since the rare reports in literature are mostly negative. (orig.)

  6. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  7. Fingerprints identification of radiotherapy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of patient plays a key role in the quality and safety of radiotherapy. It does impact on all professional staff and on patients. After the regulatory authority approval (Cnil), a pilot study has been performed on 1901 patients. Acceptance has been very high (> 93%) with a low risk of mis-identification (< 0.1%). The next step will be to implement and test a bimodal system in order to improve registration capacity and sensitivity. (authors)

  8. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Experiment on radiotherapy of postnatal mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of radiotherapy of postnatal mastitis in 78 women are presented. It is shown that the radiotherapy is the method of choice. Application of radiotherapy at different stages of disease promotes either complete resolution of infiltration (1-2 irradiations) or stipulates the decrease in temperature, abatement of pains and improvement of general state (at the presence of purulent fusion of mammary tissue). X-ray therapy of postnatal mastitis has does not affect the lactational function of mammary gland

  10. Single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients: comparative effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is an effective treatment for symptomatic bone metastases from a variety of primary malignancies. Previous meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported on the efficacy of EBRT on bone metastases from multiple primaries. This review is focused on the comparative effectiveness of single fraction radiotherapy versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for bone metastases in prostate cancer patients

  11. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max;

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  12. Cerenkov emission in radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Helo, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A new potential quality assurance (QA) method is explored for clinical electron beams and clinical proton beams based on imaging and measuring Cerenkov light. A simulation was performed of the deposited energy and of Cerenkov production in water using Geant4. Monte Carlo simulation was used to predict the measured light distribution around the water phantom, to reproduce Cerenkov images and to find the relation between deposited energy and Cerenkov production. The camera was modelled as a pin...

  13. Patient Radiation Protection in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Role of Radiotherapy is treatment modalities for cancer which is generally assumed that 50 to 60% of cancer patients will benefit from radiotherapy. It constitutes a peaceful application of ionizing radiation and an essential part of cancer management. The two aims of radiation protection Prevention is of deterministic effect and Reduction of the probability of stochastic effects. The Shielding fundamentals is to limit radiation exposure of staff, patients, visitors and the public to acceptable levels it also optimize protection of patients, staff and the public. Diagnosis is important for target design and the dose required for cure or palliation while Simulator is often used twice in the radiotherapy process where Patient data acquisition - target localization, contours, outlines and Verification. The Prescription is the responsibility of individual clinicians, depending on the patient’s condition, equipment available, experience and training. An ultimate check of the actual treatment given can only be made by using in vivo dosimetry. Treatment records must be kept of all relevant aspects of the treatment – including Session and Summary Record information, Records all treatment parameters, Dose Calculations and Dose Measurements

  14. Treatment of portal vein tumor thrombosis of hepatoma patients with either stereotactic radiotherapy or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) often have unresectable tumors. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is one of the limited alternative treatments that can prolong these patients' survival. However, the presence of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a contraindication for TACE and, therefore, HCC patients with PVTT would be depleted of the advantage of TACE. The purpose of this study was to analyze the recanalization rate of thrombosed portal vein and treatment toxicities after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). From March 2002 to November 2004, 43 patients were enrolled in this prospective study. Twenty-two patients were in the SRT group and 21 in the 3DCRT group. For SRT, 3 Gy per fraction, 3 fractions per week, was given to a total dose of 45 Gy. For 3DCRT, a daily dose of 1.8 Gy, 5 fractions per week, was given to a total dose of 45 Gy. Of the 43 patients, 16 completed the planned radiotherapy. Eventually, 14 patients received evaluation for portal vein recanalization, 8 in the SRT and 6 in the 3DCRT group, respectively. For all patients, the crude response rate was 26%. For 14 evaluable patients, the crude response rate was 79%. It was 75% in the SRT group and 83% in the 3DCRT group (P=0.71). The median survival time was 6.0 and 6.7 months for the SRT and 3DCRT group, respectively (P=0.911). Image-based radiotherapy, either SRT or 3DCRT, can recanalize the PVTT in unresectable HCC patients. Responders also had better 1 year and 2 year survivals. A more strict patient selection criterion may maximize the potential benefits of radiotherapy for hepatoma patients with PVTT. (author)

  15. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    irradiation strategies as well as WBI hypofractionation schedules. The potential of both in replacing normofractionated WBI has not yet been finally clarified. Conclusion: After breast conserving surgery, no subgroup even in low risk patients has yet been identified for whom radiotherapy can be safely omitted without compromising local control and, hence, cancer-specific survival. In most patients, this translates into an overall survival benefit. (orig.)

  16. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Hospital, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinium Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    research lies in partial breast irradiation strategies as well as WBI hypofractionation schedules. The potential of both in replacing normofractionated WBI has not yet been finally clarified. Conclusion: After breast conserving surgery, no subgroup even in low risk patients has yet been identified for whom radiotherapy can be safely omitted without compromising local control and, hence, cancer-specific survival. In most patients, this translates into an overall survival benefit. (orig.)

  17. Immediate side effects of large fraction radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereux, S.; Hatton, M.Q.F.; Macbeth, F.R. [Glasgow Western Infirmary (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    The use of hypofractionated radiotherapy regiments is becoming more widely recognized in the palliation of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Anecdoctal reports of chest pain, rigors and fevers in the hours that follow radiotherapy led us to perform a survey estimating the frequency and severity of these symptoms following treatment to the thorax. We conclude that patients receiving palliative radiotherapy for bronchial carcinoma often develop significant symptoms in the hours following treatment. The timing and duration suggest a relationship with the radiotherapy, and we feel that patients should be warned of the possible occurrence of these symptoms. (author).

  18. Otologic disorders following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is widely accepted as the first choice for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Delayed otitis of both external and middle ears is sometimes seen as a complication after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, especially for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. They are usually hard to manage and some produces cochlear damages, finally resulting in a sensorineural hearing loss. However, these otologic disorders are tends to be overlooked, because physicians pay less attention to them than the concerning for cancer recurrence. Therefore, studies on the otologic disorders following radiotherapy are lacking. In this study, we analyzed 24 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cases retrospectively to clarify the incidence of otologic disorders induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  19. Guide of external radiotherapy procedures 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims at participating in the permanent optimization of the returned medical service and the ratio profit-risk. This first version of the guide of external radiotherapy procedures 2007 processes only techniques of external radiotherapy, by opposition to the techniques of brachytherapy which use radioactive sources (iridium192, iodine125, cesium137) placed in the contact of the tumor to be irradiated. Only, also, will be considered the irradiations of the most frequent cunning(malignant) tumors with the exception of the radiotherapy of the mild pathologies and the re-irradiations after a first radiotherapy. The first part is shared in eight chapters as follow: introduction, the steps of a treatment by radiotherapy, infrastructure, equipment and human resources, radiobiology mechanism of action of ionising radiations in radiotherapy, dose in radiotherapy, quality of treatment and radiation protection of patients in radiotherapy, prevention and risk management in radiotherapy, quality assurance and radiation protection for the pediatrics cancers and the case of pregnant women. The second part gives the tumoral localizations and the procedures; the third part is a glossary and different annexes such regulations and legislative texts. (N.C.)

  20. The role of radiotherapy in hospice care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of palliative radiotherapy for the terminally ill is to improve the quality of the remaining span of life. From November 1982 to September 1987, 69 patients in the Seirei Hospice have been treated with such radiotherapy, and symptomatic relief was obtained in 64% of these patients. Radiotherapy also proved useful in achieving an improvement in their performance status. While the aim of hospice care is not directed towards treatment of the underlying disease, the use of radiotherapy is considered to have an important role in hospice care. (author)

  1. Role of radiotherapy in hospice care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Akira; Shimizu, Teppei; Ichinohe, Kenji; Teshima, Takeshi; Kaneko, Masao; Hara, Yoshio; Chihara, Satoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of palliative radiotherapy for the terminally ill is to improve the quality of the remaining span of life. From November 1982 to September 1987, 69 patients in the Seirei Hospice have been treated with such radiotherapy, and symptomatic relief was obtained in 64% of these patients. Radiotherapy also proved useful in achieving an improvement in their performance status. While the aim of hospice care is not directed towards treatment of the underlying disease, the use of radiotherapy is considered to have an important role in hospice care.

  2. Every second cancer patient receives radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy to treat cancer was given for the first time exactly one hundred years ago. Today, radiotherapy and surgery are the two main modes of treating cancer. One in two cancer patients receives radiotherapy at some point during the course of treatment for the disease. Radiotherapy is applied most commonly in cases where surgery is not possible. Moreover, these two modes of treatment are often used together to supplement each other. About half of new cancer cases detected today can be ordered. The estimate given by the EU for cancers cured is 45 per cent, which is divided between the various treatment modes as follows: surgery 22 %, radiotherapy 12 %, surgery plus radiotherapy 6 %, and drug therapy 6 %. In addition to curative treatment, radiotherapy plays a crucial role in palliative treatment, i.e. treatment that alleviates symptoms. The sensitivity of malignant tumours to radiotherapy varies over a wide range; the same is true for healthy tissues. Radiotherapy can only be used to cure a tumour that is more sensitive to radiation than the surrounding healthy tissue. The tumour must also be sufficiently small in size and limited to a relatively small area. (orig.)

  3. Radiotherapy and receptor of epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expression level of the receptor of the epidermal growth factor is in correlation with the tumor cells radiosensitivity. An overexpression of the E.G.F.R. is often present in the bronchi cancer, epidermoid carcinomas of the O.R.L. sphere, esophagus, uterine cervix, and anal duct but also in the rectum cancers and glioblastomas. At the clinical level, the E.G.F.R. expression is in correlation with an unfavourable prognosis after radiotherapy in numerous tumoral localizations. In the rectum cancers it is an independent prognosis factor found in multifactorial analysis: increase of the rate of nodes and local recurrence when the E.G.F.R. is over expressed. In the uterine cervix cancers, the survival is is negatively affected in multifactorial analysis by the E.G.F.R. membranes expression level. At the therapy level, the development of anti E.G.F.R. targeted therapies (tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies) opens a new therapy field at radio-sensitivity potentiality. The irradiation makes an activation of the E.G.F.R. way that would be partially responsible of the post irradiation tumoral repopulation. This activation leads the phosphorylation of the PI3 kinase ways and M.A.P. kinase ones, then the Akt protein one that acts an apoptotic modulator part. It has been shown that blocking the E.G.F.R. way acts on three levels: accumulation of ells in phase G1, reduction of the cell repair and increasing of apoptosis. he inhibition of post irradiation action of the E.G.F.R. signal way is a factor explaining the ionizing radiation - anti E.G.F.R. synergy. The preclinical data suggest that the E.G.F.R. blocking by the monoclonal antibodies is more important than the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. A first positive randomized study with the cetuximab, published in 2006 in the epidermoid carcinomas of the O.R.L. sphere lead to its authorization on the market with the radiotherapy for this localization. The use of cetuximab in other indication with or in

  4. Conformal radiotherapy by intensity modulation of pediatrics tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to take stock on the validated and potential indications of the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation ( intensity modulated radiotherapy I.M.R.T.) in pediatrics and to propose recommendations for its use as well as the adapted dose constraints. About 40 to 50% of children treated for a cancer are irradiated. The I.M.R.T., by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy has for aim to give a homogenous dose to the target volume and to save organs at risk. Its use in pediatrics seems particularly interesting because of the complexity of target volumes and the closeness of organs at risk. In compensation for these positive elements, the importance of low doses irradiation given in big volumes makes fear event consequences on growth and an increased incidence of secondary cancers in children suffering from tumors with high cure rates and long life expectancy. (N.C.)

  5. Radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation using cloud computing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloud computing allows for vast computational resources to be leveraged quickly and easily in bursts as and when required. Here we describe a technique that allows for Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculations to be performed using GEANT4 and executed in the cloud, with relative simulation cost and completion time evaluated as a function of machine count. As expected, simulation completion time decreases as 1/n for n parallel machines, and relative simulation cost is found to be optimal where n is a factor of the total simulation time in hours. Using the technique, we demonstrate the potential usefulness of cloud computing as a solution for rapid Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation without the need for dedicated local computer hardware as a proof of principal.

  6. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  7. Potencial terapêutico da fenitoína na cicatrização de radiodermites Potencial terapéutico de la fenitoína en la cicatrización de radiodermitis Therapeutical potential of the phenytoin in the cicatrisation of radiotherapy lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Firmino

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A fenitoína é um anticonvulsivante cujo potencial cicatrizante norteou investigações clínicas em relação à alta incidência de hiperplasia gengival em pacientes epiléticos. O texto seguinte traz o relato de seu uso em lesão causada pela radioterapia empregada em um paciente portador de câncer de laringe. Obteve-se epitelização após cerca de 14 dias de aplicação tópica da solução endovenosa de fenitoína. Este resultado pode ser um dado relevante para o desenvolvimento de produtos e formas de cuidado no tratamento das radiodermites.La fenitoína es un anticonvulsivo cuya alta incidencia de hiperplasia gingival en pacientes epilépticos orientó investigaciones clínicas del potencial cicatrizante de esta droga. El siguiente texto trae el relato de su uso en lesión causada por radioterapia empleada en un paciente portador de cáncer de laringe. Se obtuvo epitelización después de aproximadamente 14 días de aplicación tópica de la solución endovenosa de fenitoína. Este resultado puede ser un dato relevante para el desarrollo de productos e formas de cuidado en el tratamiento das radiodermitis.The phenytoin is an anticonvulsant whose high incidence of gingival hyperplasia in epileptic patient orientated clinical investigations of the healing potential of this drug. The following text brings the report of his use in lesion caused by radiotherapy used in a patient carrier of larynx cancer. Get epithelium was obtained after approximately 14 days of topical application of the phenytoin endovenous solution. This result can be a relevant die for the development of products and care forms in the treatment of the lesions in radiotherapy.

  8. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  9. Development of online quality assurance automation tool "SmartQC" for radiotherapy clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaks, Daniel

    Radiotherapy has existed as a clinical medical procedure since as early as 1900, and has become an essential component of modern hospitals. It is predicted that, sometime between the years 2010 and 2020, the number of patients receiving radiation therapy during their initial treatment is expected to rise by 22% from 470,000 per year to 575,000 per year Due to the potential for harm in radiotherapy, quality assurance is an essential element at every stage of modern clinical workflow. The quality and use of time in QA procedures and checks is an important issue that has significant impact on both practice and research in the field of radiotherapy. This thesis documents the results of development and results of tools addressing that question. While the motivation for radiotherapy QA is principally about improving quality of patient care, and developing radiotherapy research tools, we also discuss the relevance of QA to radiotherapy malpractice lawsuits and related financial costs. We show that in the treatment plan check performed by the medical physicist---also known as the second check or physics check---a substantial fraction (~33%) of the average time is spent on non-physics related analysis. We also demonstrate the development and implementation of a web-based system, referred to as PlanTracker within this thesis, to track the status of the plan. This thesis concludes with further developments being considered as an outgrowth of this system.

  10. Radiotherapy versus combined modality in early stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.; Magrini, S.M.; Santarelli, M.T.

    In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment for the individual patient is still an unresolved issue. So far, twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out worldwide. The preliminary results of a glob...

  11. Treatment machines for external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the inception of radiotherapy soon after the discovery of X rays by Roentgen in 1895, the technology of X ray production has first been aimed towards ever higher photon and electron beam energies and intensities, and more recently towards computerization and intensity modulated beam delivery. During the first 50 years of radiotherapy the technological progress was relatively slow and mainly based on X ray tubes, van de Graaff generators and betatrons. The invention of the 60Co teletherapy unit by H.E. Johns in Canada in the early 1950s provided a tremendous boost in the quest for higher photon energies and placed the cobalt unit at the forefront of radiotherapy for a number of years. The concurrently developed medical linacs, however, soon eclipsed cobalt units, moved through five increasingly sophisticated generations and became the most widely used radiation source in modern radiotherapy. With its compact and efficient design, the linac offers excellent versatility for use in radiotherapy through isocentric mounting and provides either electron or megavoltage X ray therapy with a wide range of energies. In addition to linacs, electron and X ray radiotherapy is also carried out with other types of accelerator, such as betatrons and microtrons. More exotic particles, such as protons, neutrons, heavy ions and negative p mesons, all produced by special accelerators, are also sometimes used for radiotherapy; however, most contemporary radiotherapy is carried out with linacs or teletherapy cobalt units

  12. Radiological protection of the radiotherapy patient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose that the system and concepts of radiation protection should not be used with reference to radiotherapy patients. We justify this on conceptual grounds. The patient undergoing radiotherapy procedures, as prescribed by the medical practitioner, is protected by the quality assurance system legally required for medical exposures. (author)

  13. Radiological concepts in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki made the name radiation itself become a nightmare. Notwithstanding this, radiation continued to serve the mankind specially in diagnosis of several human diseases and in the treatment of intractable malignancies. With their latest research tools biologists have now shown a significant shift in the earlier paradigm; even the concept that radiation initiates cancer appears to be no longer tenable. On the contrary, selective radiation doses inhibit growth of cancer cells and radiation in combination with many chemotherapeutic drugs, radiosensitizing chemicals and/or hyperthermia, is emerging as a new modality for cancer treatment which offers high therapeutic advantages. In addition, the deleterious effects of radiation can now be strategically counter poised by the use of many drugs and chemicals. This has been possible by the newer insights gained in the mechanism of biological effects of radiation. The fate of radiation-induced free radicals which are the prime cause of biological consequences following radiation exposure can now be suitably modified by drugs and chemicals. Of late, controversies have also arisen on the beneficial effects of very low dose of radiation and biological dosimetry has gained considerable importance in the assessment of potential risk under such circumstances. All these and related topics are incorporated in the book. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  14. Regression and local control rates after radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary treatment goal of radiotherapy for paragangliomas of the head and neck region (HNPGLs) is local control of the tumor, i.e. stabilization of tumor volume. Interestingly, regression of tumor volume has also been reported. Up to the present, no meta-analysis has been performed giving an overview of regression rates after radiotherapy in HNPGLs. The main objective was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess regression of tumor volume in HNPGL-patients after radiotherapy. A second outcome was local tumor control. Design of the study is systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier and references of key articles were searched in March 2012 to identify potentially relevant studies. Considering the indolent course of HNPGLs, only studies with ⩾12 months follow-up were eligible. Main outcomes were the pooled proportions of regression and local control after radiotherapy as initial, combined (i.e. directly post-operatively or post-embolization) or salvage treatment (i.e. after initial treatment has failed) for HNPGLs. A meta-analysis was performed with an exact likelihood approach using a logistic regression with a random effect at the study level. Pooled proportions with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Fifteen studies were included, concerning a total of 283 jugulotympanic HNPGLs in 276 patients. Pooled regression proportions for initial, combined and salvage treatment were respectively 21%, 33% and 52% in radiosurgery studies and 4%, 0% and 64% in external beam radiotherapy studies. Pooled local control proportions for radiotherapy as initial, combined and salvage treatment ranged from 79% to 100%. Radiotherapy for jugulotympanic paragangliomas results in excellent local tumor control and therefore is a valuable treatment for these types of tumors. The effects of radiotherapy on regression of tumor volume remain ambiguous, although the data suggest that regression can

  15. Radiotherapy to the chest wall following mastectomy for node-negative breast cancer: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Although nodal status is the major determinant of risk of locoregional relapse (LRR), other factors also contribute, and these assume a greater significance for those with node-negative breast cancer. Previous reviews of post-mastectomy radiotherapy have included studies using radiotherapy techniques or doses no longer considered clinically appropriate. Objectives. To determine the effectiveness of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in women with node-negative breast cancer with particular reference to those patient and tumour factors which contribute to an increased risk of LRR. Methods. A systematic literature review was conducted. Trials using inadequate or orthovoltage radiotherapy were excluded. Data linking potential risk factors, either individually or in combination, to the occurrence of LRR were handled qualitatively. Data from randomised trials of post-mastectomy radiotherapy were included in a meta-analysis. Results. Baseline risk of LRR is increased in the presence of lymphovascular invasion, a grade 3 tumour, tumours greater than 2 cm or a close resection margin and in patients who are pre-menopausal or aged less than 50. Those with no risk factors have a baseline risk of LRR of approximately 5% or less rising to a risk of 15% or more for those with two or more risk factors. In the meta-analysis of three randomised trials of mastectomy and axillary clearance (667 patients), the addition of radiotherapy resulted in an 83% reduction in the risk of LRR (P < 0.00001) and in a 14% improvement in survival (P = 0.16). Conclusion. The use of post-mastectomy radiotherapy for women with node-negative breast cancer requires re-evaluation. Radiotherapy should be considered for those with two or more risk factors.

  16. Comparison of transcriptomic signature of post-Chernobyl and post radiotherapy thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously identified two highly discriminating and predictive radiation-induced transcriptomic signatures by comparing series of sporadic and post radiotherapy thyroid tumors (322-gene signature), and by reanalyzing a previously published data set of sporadic and post-Chernobyl thyroid tumors (106-gene signature). The aim of the present work was (i) to compare the two signatures in terms of gene expression de-regulations and molecular features/pathways, and (ii) to test the capacity of the post radiotherapy signature in classifying the post-Chernobyl series of tumors and reciprocally of the post-Chernobyl signature in classifying the post radiotherapy-induced tumors. We now explored if post radiotherapy and post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) display common molecular features by comparing molecular pathways deregulated in the two tumor series, and tested the potential of gene subsets of the post radiotherapy signature to classify the post-Chernobyl series (14 sporadic and 12 post-Chernobyl PTC), and reciprocally of gene subsets of the post-Chernobyl signature to classify the post radiotherapy series (15 sporadic and 12 post radiotherapy PTC), by using conventional principal component analysis. We found that the five genes common to the two signatures classified the learning/training tumors (used to search these signatures) of both the post radiotherapy (seven PTC) and the post-Chernobyl (six PTC) thyroid tumor series as compared with the sporadic tumors (seven sporadic PTC in each series). Importantly, these five genes were also effective for classifying independent series of post radiotherapy (five PTC) and post-Chernobyl (six PTC) tumors compared to independent series of sporadic tumors (eight PTC and six PTC respectively; testing tumors). Moreover, part of each post radiotherapy (32 genes) and post-Chernobyl signature (16 genes) cross-classified the respective series of thyroid tumors. Finally, several molecular pathways deregulated in post

  17. Conformal radiotherapy: revolution or evolution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage the most clearly known of a conformal approach takes place in the protection of sane tissues. A randomized study comparing classical radiotherapy and conformal (defined with the use of masks) has noticed a significant reduction of the delayed rectal toxicity after conformal irradiation for patients suffering of prostate tumor. This benefit has been observed with a simple technique (three beams) and a dose not really high (66 Gy). It could bring a safety margin in the case of increasing of the tumor dose. (N.C.)

  18. Quality and safety in radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The first text to focus solely on quality and safety in radiotherapy, this work encompasses not only traditional, more technically oriented, quality assurance activities, but also general approaches of quality and safety. It includes contributions from experts both inside and outside the field to present a global view. The task of assuring quality is no longer viewed solely as a technical, equipment-dependent endeavor. Instead, it is now recognized as depending on both the processes and the people delivering the service. Divided into seven broad categories, the text covers: Quality Management

  19. Successful radiotherapy of facial angiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkalpakiotis, S; Arenberger, P; Vohradnikova, O; Arenbergerova, M

    2008-11-01

    Cutaneous angiosarcoma of the face and scalp is a rare malignant vascular tumor that affects mostly Caucasian elderly males. At present, connections concerning the etiology of this neoplasm with radiation therapy, exposure to environmental carcinogens and chronic lymphedema have been described. Due to the difficult histologic evaluation, high local recurrence and tendency to early metastasing, angiosarcoma poses generally a very poor prognosis. We report the case of an 80-year-old patient who experienced successful removal of large, exophytic growing angiosarcoma of the face achieved with radiotherapy with long-term relapse-free survival. PMID:18986458

  20. Basic radiotherapy physics and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, David S; Das, Indra J; Mendonca, Marc S; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    This book is a concise and well-illustrated review of the physics and biology of radiation therapy intended for radiation oncology residents, radiation therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. It presents topics that are included on the Radiation Therapy Physics and Biology examinations and is designed with the intent of presenting information in an easily digestible format with maximum retention in mind. The inclusion of mnemonics, rules of thumb, and reader-friendly illustrations throughout the book help to make difficult concepts easier to grasp. Basic Radiotherapy Physics and Biology is a

  1. Family physicians' perspectives regarding palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess family physicians' views on common indications for palliative radiotherapy and to determine whether this influences patient referral. Methods and materials: A 30-item questionnaire evaluating radiotherapy knowledge and training developed at the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre (ORCC) was mailed to a random sample of 400 family physicians in eastern Ontario, Canada. The completed surveys were collected and analyzed, and form the basis of this study. Results: A total of 172 completed surveys were received for a net response rate of 50% among practicing family physicians. Almost all of the physicians (97%) had recently seen cancer patients in their offices, with 85% regularly caring for patient with advanced cancer. Fifty-four percent had referred patients in the past for radiotherapy and 53% had contacted a radiation oncologist for advice. Physicians who were more knowledgeable about the common indications for palliative radiotherapy were significantly more likely to refer patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Inability to contact a radiation oncologist was correlated with not having referred patients for radiotherapy (P<0.01). Only 10% of the physicians had received radiotherapy education during their formal medical training. Conclusions: Many of the family physicians surveyed were unaware of the effectiveness of radiotherapy in a variety of common palliative situations, and radiotherapy referral was correlated with knowledge about the indications for palliative radiotherapy. This was not surprising given the limited education they received in this area and the limited contact they have had with radiation oncologists. Strategies need to be developed to improve continuing medical education opportunities for family physicians and to facilitate more interaction between these physicians and radiation oncologists

  2. Quality control programme for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3 years pilot programme started in January 2000 with 33 philanthropic cancer institutions that provides medical services to 60% of the patients from the national social security system. Brazil has today 161 radiotherapy services (144 operating with megavoltage equipment). These 33 institutions are distributed over 19 Brazilian states. The aim of this programme is: To create conditions to allow the participants to apply the radiotherapy with quality and efficacy; To promote up dating courses for the physicians, physicists and technicians of these 33 Institutions. With the following objectives: To recommend dosimetric and radiological protection procedures in order to guarantee the tumor prescribed dose and safe working conditions; To help in establishing and implementing these procedures. The main activities are: local quality control evaluations, postal TLD audits in reference conditions, postal TLD audits in off axis conditions and training. The local quality control program has already evaluated 22 institutions with 43 machines (25 Co-60 and 18 linear accelerators). In these visits we perform dosimetric, electrical, mechanical and safety tests. As foreseen, we found more problems among the old Co-60 machines i.e., field flatness, size, symmetry and relative output factors; lasers positioning system alignment; optical distance indicator; radiation and light field coincidence; optical and mechanical distance indicators agreement, than among the linear accelerators i.e., field flatness and size; lasers positioning system alignment; tray interlocking and wedge filter factors

  3. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  4. Craniospinal radiotherapy in adult medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selek, U.; Zorlu, F.; Hurmuz, P.; Cengiz, M.; Gurkaynak, M. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Turker, A. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Soylemezoglu, F. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Pathology

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and prognostic factors of adult patients with medulloblastoma. Patients and Methods: 26 adult medulloblastoma patients with a median age of 27 were subjected to craniospinal radiotherapy. A dose of 30.6 Gy with 1.8 Gy/fraction/day was prescribed to M0 patients, while 36 Gy were to be applied in patients with positive cerebrospinal liquor findings. The posterior fossa was boosted to 54 Gy. While 20 patients underwent external-beam radiotherapy alone, only six received sequential adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Male/female ratio was 1.2. Preradiotherapy Karnofsky performance status was recorded as median 100%. 50% were classified as poor risk (n = 10, subtotal resection; n = 3, M+). The median follow-up time was 46.5 months. The 5-year actuarial survival rates for recurrence-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were 82.5%, 90.8%, 73.5%, and 89.7%, respectively. Patient characteristics, treatment factors and tumor characteristics failed to show any significance in univariate analysis. Grade 3 or 4 late morbidities were not observed. Conclusion: Yet, the current standard of care seems to remain craniospinal irradiation after maximal surgical resection of the primary neoplasm without clear indications for adjuvant chemotherapy. (orig.)

  5. Second cancers in children treated with modern radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: The scattered radiation from the treatment volume might be more significant for children than for adults and, as a consequence, modern radiotherapy treatment techniques such as IMRT and passive proton therapy could potentially increase the number of secondary cancers. In this report, secondary cancer risk resulting from new treatment technologies was estimated for an adult prostate patient and a child. Material and methods: The organ equivalent dose (OED) concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau and a linear dose-response curve was applied to dose distributions of an adult prostate patient and a child with a rhabdomyosarcoma of the prostate. Conformal radiotherapy, IMRT with 6 MV photons and proton therapy were planned. OED (cancer risk) was estimated for the whole body, the rectum and the bladder. In addition, relative cumulative risk was calculated. Results: Secondary cancer risk in the adult is not more than 15% it increased when IMRT or passive proton therapy was compared to conventional treatment planning. In the child, risk remains practically constant or was even reduced for proton therapy. The cumulative risk in the child relative to that in the adult can be as large as 10-15. Conclusions: By a comparison between an adult patient and a child treated for a disease of the prostate, it was shown that modern radiotherapy techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy (active and passive) do not increase the risk for secondary cancers

  6. Limited-data image registration for radiotherapy positioning and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: One benefit to having on-line CT imaging integrated into a radiotherapy system is that images can be collected with the patient in the treatment position. These images can then be automatically registered to planning images for improved positioning and verification. However, many such on-line imaging systems have a limited field of view (LFOV) that could potentially impair registration. Thus, the viability of automatic registration was investigated in the context of collecting on-line LFOV and also limited-slice CT images for radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Mutual information and two new voxel-based registration algorithms were tested to align LFOV and limited-slice prostate and breast images given known displacements. Success rates were tallied for different field-of-view sizes, slice distributions, and initial displacements. Results: Most of the automatic registration algorithms tested were useful for solving these LFOV and limited-slice problems. Registration of LFOV images was generally successful, especially for fields of view of at least half the patient's size. For limited-slice images, success was more closely correlated to the slice spacing than to the number of slices used, with sparse slice spacing being preferable. Conclusions: Mutual information and other automatic registration algorithms have been identified as useful methods for registering LFOV and limited-slice radiotherapy images with planning CT images

  7. Embracing service user involvement in radiotherapy education: A discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: There is currently a drive within cancer services to incorporate user involvement in delivery and education, as such the aim of this article is to investigate the potential role of service users in pre-registration education and how this could impact on radiotherapy programmes. Method: Key databases were searched for terms: patient participation, service user involvement, health care education, student assessment, patient involvement, pre-registration education and training. Suitable literature was reviewed and references within all articles and documents were investigated to ensure as broad and an inclusive search possible. Results: There is little published literature indicating user involvement in radiotherapy education but many studies in nursing, medicine and other allied health professions indicate a rationale for user involvement. Discussion: There are benefits of involving service users, i.e. gaining insight from patients and carers perspectives, challenges stereotypes and assumptions. Disadvantages include the quality of the feedback from users in assessment, resources required, and the ethical considerations. Conclusion: Inclusion of service users in radiotherapy education is recommended in line with cancer care policy, they provide a unique perspective to learning and involvement should be encouraged

  8. QA of conformal radiotherapy for multi-centre radiotherapy trials in Australasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    delivery; Treatment reporting. The pelvic phantom was designed from a patient's CT data set and includes radiographically equivalent prostate and seminal vesicles, bladder, rectum, muscle and bony anatomy. Positions for 25 TLDs were established as well as for a small ionization chamber to be placed at the centre of the prostate volume. The phantom was taken to each participating centre by two team members who supervised its CT, planning and treatment delivery and who independently performed an absolute measurement of accelerator output. Digital planning data was extracted for subsequent analysis on an independent DICOM/RTOG data viewer. Twenty-four separate radiotherapy departments have been visited and have treated the phantom. In-phantom measurements have revealed substantial consistency in dose delivery, with several discrepancies occurring as a result of protocol mis-interpretation, phantom design issues and treatment setup errors. Results for absolute output of the 30 beams surveyed in this study are presented. The logistics of undertaking the study shall be discussed in the context of other international QA studies of this nature. This project will potentially lead into an ongoing service to radiotherapy centres and trial groups for ensuring treatment quality for current and emerging treatment techniques

  9. Customized mold radiotherapy with prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients (6 males, 2 females; median age, 78 years; age range, 31-94 years) were treated by mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic apparatus for oral cancers between October 2006 and March 2013. The primary sites were the tongue in 3 cases, hard palate and buccal mucosa in 2 cases each, and oral floor in 1 case. The type of treatment consisted of radical radiotherapy and palliative radiotherapy in 2 cases each, and preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, additional radiotherapy after external beam radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy in 1 case each. Patients received 40-50 Gy in 8-10 fractions with mold radiotherapy. Two patients who received radical radiotherapy showed no signs of recurrence or metastasis. The present therapy contributed to patients' palliative, postoperative, and preoperative therapy. Mold radiotherapy with a prosthetic appliance was performed safely and was a useful treatment for several types of oral cancer. (author)

  10. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    König, A

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is...

  11. Radiation Oncology In Vitro: Trends to Improve Radiotherapy through Molecular Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Feofanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Much has been investigated to improve the beneficial effects of radiotherapy especially in that case where radioresistant behavior is observed. Beyond simple identification of resistant phenotype the discovery and development of specific molecular targets have demonstrated therapeutic potential in cancer treatment including radiotherapy. Alterations on transduction signaling pathway related with MAPK cascade are the main axis in cancer cellular proliferation even as cell migration and invasiveness in irradiated tumor cell lines; then, for that reason, more studies are in course focusing on, among others, DNA damage enhancement, apoptosis stimulation, and growth factors receptor blockages, showing promising in vitro results highlighting molecular targets associated with ionizing radiation as a new radiotherapy strategy to improve clinical outcome. In this review we discuss some of the main molecular targets related with tumor cell proliferation and migration as well as their potential contributions to radiation oncology improvements.

  12. Renal artery stenosis after radiotherapy for Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: the fact that therapeutic irradiation can induce significant stenosis in the arteries of the head, neck, and chest, as welt as in the aorta and the iliac arteries, is familiar in daily practice and well documented in the literature. By contrast, radiation-induced renal artery stenosis seems to be a less widely known complication. Patients and methods: the sudden onset of medically refractory arterial hypertension and coma in a 27-year-old man is reported, who had been treated at age 20 with chemotherapy and radiotherapy for Ewing's sarcoma in the lumbar region. This treatment had been performed at the hospital of Sion, Switzerland in 2001. Also, the relevant literature from 1965 to 2007 is reviewed to underscore various aspects of this problem and to demonstrate the clinical relevance of renal artery stenosis as a potential long-term sequela of radiotherapy. Conclusion: radiation-induced renal artery stenosis has only rarely been described in the literature, but arterial hypertension due to radiation-induced renal artery stenosis is a serious long-term sequela that can appear at a latency of up to 20 years after treatment. The paucity of reports presumably reflects the lesser frequency of radiotherapy for retroperitoneal tumors as compared to head-and-neck cancers, as well as lower awareness of the problem due to diagnostic bias in the era before CT and MRI were in routine use: at that time, carotid artery stenosis was easy to diagnose by ultrasonography, while radiation-induced renal artery stenosis, whose real incidence may well be higher, probably often went undetected. Thus, when a patient with a history of abdominal or retroperitoneal radiotherapy unexpectedly develops intractable hypertension, radiation-induced renal artery stenosis must be included in the differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. The development of radiotherapy in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical data on the development of radiotherapy in Slovenia are presented from its first use in this county in 1902 until the present. The Institute of Oncology in Ljubljana was established in 1938 with the intention of providing a sound development of radium and roentgen cancer treatment. After World War II, the development of radiotherapy was dynamic, which is evident from the data on new radiation sources in external beam therapy (accelerators, telecobalt units), in brachytherapy (various sealed radioisotopes) as well as in the introduction of therapy with unsealed radioisotopes. In 1947, a Chair of Oncology and Radiotherapy was instituted at the Medical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana (with the seat at the Institute of Oncology). In 1955, radiotherapy and oncology were officially recognized as separate branches of medicine requiring special obligatory postgraduate residency training. Within the Medical Society of Slovenia, the Section for Radiotherapy was established in 1987. The following year, the Section for Radiotherapy of Slovenia became a member of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Considering the size of population of Slovenia (nearly 2 million), it was reasonable that by this time radiotherapy became almost completely concentrated in one central institution, the Institute of Oncology, whose core and cohesive activity were represented in the multidisciplinary cancer treatment approach

  14. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials—Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  15. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies tha...

  16. Role of radiotherapy in melanoma management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In melanoma, radiotherapy has generally been considered as a palliative treatment option indicated only for advanced cases or disseminated disease. In the 70s of the previous century, the technological advances in radiotherapy, linked to rapid development of computer sciences, resulted in restored interest for radiotherapy in melanoma management. Although a fundamental lack of well designed prospective and/or randomized clinical trials critically influenced the integration of radiotherapy into treatment strategies in melanoma, radiotherapy was recently recognized as an indispensable part in the multidisciplinary management of patients with melanoma. Altogether, approximately 23% of melanoma patients should receive at least one course of radiotherapy during the course of the disease. In this review, radiobiological properties of melanoma that govern the decisions for the fractionation patterns used in the treatment of this disease are described. Moreover, the indications for irradiation and the results of pertinent clinical studies from the literature, creating a rationale for the use of radiotherapy in the management of this disease, are reviewed and a brief description of radiotherapy techniques is given. Basic treatment modality in melanoma is surgery. However, whenever surgery is not radical or there are adverse prognostic factors identified on histopathological examination of resected tissue specimen, it needs to be supplemented. Also, in patients with unresectable disease or in those not being suitable for major surgery or who refuse proposed surgical intervention, other effective mode(s) of therapy need to be implemented. From this perspective, supported by clinical experiences and literature results, radiotherapy is a valuable option: it is effective and safe, in curative and palliative setting

  17. Hormone levels in radiotherapy treatment related fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is known to cause debilitating treatment related fatigue. Fatigue in general is a conglomeration of psychological, physical, hematological and unknown factors influencing the internal milieu of the cancer patient. Radiotherapy can add stress at the cellular and somatic level to aggravate further fatigue in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Stress related hormones might be mediating in the development of fatigue. This is an ongoing prospective study to evaluate if the hormonal profile related to stress is influenced by radiotherapy treatment related fatigue. The study was conducted from September 2002 onwards in the division of Radiotherapy and Oncology of our Medical School. Previously untreated patients with histopathology proof of malignancy requiring external beam radiotherapy were considered for this study. Selection criteria were applied to exclude other causes of fatigue. Initial fatigue score was obtained using Pipers Fatigue Score questionnaire containing 23 questions, subsequently final fatigue score was obtained at the end of radiotherapy. Blood samples were obtained to estimate the levels of ACTH, TSH, HGH, and cortisol on the final assessment. The hormone levels were compared with resultant post radiotherapy fatigue score. At the time of reporting 50 patients were evaluable for the study. The total significant fatigue score was observed among 12 (24%) patients. The individual debilitating fatigue score were behavioral severity 14 (28%), affective meaning 14(28%), Sensory 13 (26%) and cognitive mood 10 (20%) respectively. From the analysis of hormonal profile, growth hormone level > 1 ng/mL and TSH <0.03 appears to be associated with high fatigue score (though statistically not significant); whereas there was no correlation with ACTH and serum cortisol level. In our prospective study severe radiotherapy treatment related fatigue was found among our patient population. Low levels of TSH and high levels of GH appear to be associated

  18. Why and how to spare the hippocampus during brain radiotherapy: the developing role of hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this review is to summarize the rationale for and feasibility of hippocampal sparing techniques during brain irradiation. Radiotherapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of brain tumors and with the improvement in overall survival for these patients over the last few decades, there is an effort to minimize potential adverse effects leading to possible worsening in quality of life, especially worsening of neurocognitive function. The hippocampus and associated limbic system have long been known to be important in memory formation and pre-clinical models show loss of hippocampal stem cells with radiation as well as changes in architecture and function of mature neurons. Cognitive outcomes in clinical studies are beginning to provide evidence of cognitive effects associated with hippocampal dose and the cognitive benefits of hippocampal sparing. Numerous feasibility planning studies support the feasibility of using modern radiotherapy systems for hippocampal sparing during brain irradiation. Although results of the ongoing phase II and phase III studies are needed to confirm the benefit of hippocampal sparing brain radiotherapy on neurocognitive function, it is now technically and dosimetrically feasible to create hippocampal sparing treatment plans with appropriate irradiation of target volumes. The purpose of this review is to provide a brief overview of studies that provide a rationale for hippocampal avoidance and provide summary of published feasibility studies in order to help clinicians prepare for clinical usage of these complex and challenging techniques

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  20. Of the good usage of the radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the surgery the radiotherapy is one of the most treatments used in cancers. It consists in irradiating cancer cells to prevent their reproduction and lead to their destruction. after the Epinal accident, the professor jean-Marc Cosset recounts the radiotherapy history, its efficiency in the cancers treatment but also its risks. Two examples are given, this one of Epinal with its overexposure about 20-30% for 24 patients and the case of patients having a breast cancer, developed cardiac problems after their radiotherapy because of the heart irradiation. (N.C.)

  1. Radiotherapy for solitary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solitary plasmacytoma and multiple myeloma require a differentiated radiotherapy. The irradiation for plasmacytoma with an adequate total dose (medullary 40-50 Gy or extramedullary 50-60 Gy) leads to a high degree of local control with a low rate of side effects. In cases of multiple myeloma radiotherapy will achieve effective palliation, both in terms of recalcification as well as reduction of neurological symptoms and analgesia. In terms of analgesia the rule is the higher the single dose fraction the faster the reduction of pain. As part of a conditioning treatment prior to stem cell transplantation radiotherapy contributes to the establishment of a graft versus myeloma effect (GVM). (orig.)

  2. Radiotherapy for unilesional mycosis fungoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and natural history of patients with the diagnosis of unilesional mycosis fungoides, treated according to a prospective radiotherapy protocol in our institution since July 1975. Methods and Materials: A total of 325 patients with the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides have been referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology at Allegheny University of Health Sciences from July 1975 through September 1996. Of these, 18 patients (5%) were classified as having unilesional mycosis fungoides and were irradiated with a curative intent using local electron fields. One patient received 22 Gy; 1 patient received 40 Gy, and the rest of the patients 30.6 Gy. Daily fractions ranged from 1.8 to 2.0 Gy. Treatments prior to radiation consisted of topical steroids and/or antifungal creams in the majority of patients, with temporary partial responses. One patient had received 2 years of topical mechlorethamine (HN2) and another patient had received topical carmustine solution (BCNU) without response prior to irradiation. Results: The responses were measured clinically; posttreatment skin biopsy was not performed routinely unless there was clinical evidence of disease persistence. Complete response rate was 100%; all treated lesions cleared completely within 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of radiation. With a median follow-up of 43 months (range 12 to 240 months), 2 relapses have occurred, 2 and 71 months after the completion of radiation. Both relapses were confined to the skin and were remote from the original site. Both relapses responded to topical application of HN2. There have been no recurrences in the irradiated field nor systemic dissemination. No long-term side effects were found related to treatment, and all the patients are currently alive and without evidence of disease. Actuarial relapse-free and overall survival at 10 years are, respectively, 86.2% and 100%. Conclusion: Unilesional mycosis fungoides has a long natural history

  3. Fiber-optic, real-time dosimeter based on optically stimulated luminescence of Al2O3:C and KBr:Eu for potential use in the radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes a single-fiber dosimetry system based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of artificially grown single crystals of Al2O3:C and KBr:Eu, with potential application in the medical field, especially in radio oncology. Small fiber-shaped dosimeters with dimensions (diameter/length) on the order of 500 μm/5 mm are attached to one end of an optical fiber, resulting in fiber probes with diameters of less than 1 mm and lengths of up to 15 m. The opposite end of the fiber is connected to an OSL reader that contains a stimulation light source (laser) and a photomultiplier tube that is used for luminescence detection. During irradiation, an optomechanical shutter periodically allows laser light to be transmitted down the optical fiber, to stimulate the luminescence response from the dosimeter being irradiated at a remote location. The luminescence measured during each interval of laser stimulation is indicative of the radiation dose absorbed in the dosimeter since the previous stimulation. The integral absorbed dose is obtained via a summation procedure from the measured dose fractions. Several operating procedures and data processing algorithms were developed in order to increase the speed and accuracy of the measurements, and integrated into the software that controls automated operation of the OSL readers. Periodic modulation of the stimulation also allows the OSL signal to be discriminated from background fluorescence, and thus yields measurements that are unaffected by Cerenkov light (the so-called 'stem effect'). Depending on the type of material used, the speed of the measurements, expressed as the time required to estimate an individual dose fraction, can be as short as 67 ms. Integral dose estimates from real-time OSL of Al2O3:C and KBr:Eu were obtained for water-phantom irradiations performed with medical teletherapy sources, and were found to agree within 3.7% and 2.8%, respectively, with reference measurements from ionization chambers

  4. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Ashok Kinhikar; Ghadi, Yogesh G.; Priyadarshini Sahoo; Sarbani Ghosh Laskar; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Jaiprakash Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription d...

  5. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures. (orig.)

  6. External radiotherapy in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the management of thyroid carcinoma (TC) of any histological type, surgery is the primary mode of treatment. The second modality for the management is treatment with radioactive iodine (131I), especially, when the tumor has the ability to concentrate 131I. External radiotherapy has a limited use in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). It is useful in the management of bulky residual tissue which is not completely resected, metastatic disease which does not concentrated radioiodine and as a palliative treatment for reliving pain in patients with distant metastases. The ER as an adjuvant treatment in both anaplastic and medullary carcinoma has a significant role to play and should be used more frequently than is presently being advocated and practiced

  7. Tomodensitometry images: integration in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessy, F.; Hoornaert, M.T. [Jolimont Hospital, Haine Saint Paul (France). Cancer and Nuclear Medicine Dept.; Malchair, F. [Biomed Engineering, Boncelles (France)

    1995-12-01

    With a view to utilization of CT scan images in radiotherapy, the effective energy and the linearity of four different scanners (Siemens somatom CR, HiQS, Plus and Picker PQ 2000) and two non standard scanners, simulators with CT option (Webb 1990) (Varian Ximatron and Oldelft Simulx CT) has been measured using the method described by White and Speller in 1980. When the linearity relation in presented using the density or the electron density as the abscissa, a blurred area where two different components of equal density or electron density can have two different Hounsfield`s numbers. Using the linearity relation, the density of Rando`s lung heterogeneity is determined. We calculated a treatment planning (TP) using this value and made a comparison between the TP and the real absorbed dose with was measured using diodes. The comparison between the TP and the relative Absorbed doses showed a difference of up to 4.5%.

  8. Palliative radiotherapy for multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews the experience of palliative radiotherapy to patients with multiple myeloma to define the optimal dose for pain relief. The records of 31 patients (66 sites) with multiple myeloma irradiated for palliation at Kumamoto University hospital between 1985 and 1994 were reviewed. Total dose ranged from 8 to 50 Gy, with a mean of 32.2 Gy. Symptoms included pain (78.1%), neurological abnormalities (28.1%), and palpable masses (34.3%). Symptomatic remission was obtained in 45 of 46 evaluable sites (97.8%). Complete remission of symptoms were obtained in 28.3%, and partial remission in 69.6%. According to fraction size, there was no significant difference between 3-5 Gy and 1.8-2 Gy. The incidence of complete remission increased when a total dose of more than 20 Gy was given. When the quality of life is considered, hypofractionation was recommended for the palliative radiation therapy of multiple myeloma. (author)

  9. Radiotherapy: an interactive learning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program is primarily intended for radiological medical technicians, student nurses, students of medicine and physics, and doctors. It is designed as a tool for vocational training and further training and gives comprehensive insight into the daily routines of a radiotherapy unit. The chapters deal with: fundamental biological aspects - fundamental physical aspects - radiation sources and irradiation systems - preparatory examinations - therapies and concepts - irradiation planning - irradiation performance - termination of irradiation treatment. For every page displayed, spoken texts and written, on-screen keywords, illustrations, animated sequences and a large number of videos have been combined in a way easy to digest. The software of the program permits handling also by learners less familiar with computer-based learning. (orig./)

  10. Irradiation Accidents in Radiotherapy Analyze, Manage, Prevent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Why do errors occur? How to minimize them? In a context of widely publicized major incidents, of accelerated technological advances in radiotherapy planning and delivery, and of global communication and information resources, this critical issue had to be addressed by the professionals of the field, and so did most national and international organizations. The ISMP, aware of its responsibility, decided as well to put an emphasis on the topic at the occasion of its annual meeting. In this frame, potential errors in terms of scenarios, pathways of occurrence, and dosimetry, will first be examined. The goal being to prioritize error prevention according to likelihood of events and their dosimetric impact. Then, case study of three incidents will be detailed: Epinal, Glasgow and Detroit. For each one, a description of the incident and the way it was reported, its investigation, and the lessons that can be learnt will be presented. Finally, the implementation of practical measures at different levels, intra- and inter institutions, like teaching, QA procedures enforcement or voluntary incident reporting, will be discussed

  11. Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present guidance for patients and physicians regarding the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone metastases according to current published evidence and complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials: A systematic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database between 1998 and 2009 yielded 4,287 candidate original research articles potentially applicable to radiotherapy for bone metastases. A Task Force composed of all authors synthesized the published evidence and reached a consensus regarding the recommendations contained herein. Results: The Task Force concluded that external beam radiotherapy continues to be the mainstay for the treatment of pain and/or prevention of the morbidity caused by bone metastases. Various fractionation schedules can provide significant palliation of symptoms and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. The evidence for the safety and efficacy of repeat treatment to previously irradiated areas of peripheral bone metastases for pain was derived from both prospective studies and retrospective data, and it can be safe and effective. The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy holds theoretical promise in the treatment of new or recurrent spine lesions, although the Task Force recommended that its use be limited to highly selected patients and preferably within a prospective trial. Surgical decompression and postoperative radiotherapy is recommended for spinal cord compression or spinal instability in highly selected patients with sufficient performance status and life expectancy. The use of bisphosphonates, radionuclides, vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty for the treatment or prevention of cancer-related symptoms does not obviate the need for external beam radiotherapy in appropriate patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a successful and time efficient method by which to palliate pain and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. This Guideline reviews the available data to define its proper use

  12. To boost or not boost in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper it to analyse and discuss standard definition of the 'boost' procedure in relation to clinical results and new forms of the boost designed on physical and radiobiological bases. Seventeen sets of clinical data including over 5000 cases cancer with different tumour stages and locations and treated with various forms of 'boost' method have been subtracted from literature. Effectiveness of boost is analyzed regarding its place in combined treatment, timing and subvolume involved. Radiobiological parameter of D10 and normalization method for biologically equivalent doses and dose intensity are used to simulated cold and not subvolumes (hills and dales) and its influence of effectiveness on the boost delivery. Sequential and concomitant boost using external irradiation, although commonly used, offers LTC benefit lower than expected. Brachytherapy, intraoperative irradiation and concurrent chemotherapy boost methods appear more effective. Conformal radiotherapy, with or without dose-intensity modulation, allows heterogeneous increase in dose intensity within the target volume and can be used to integrate the 'boost dose' into baseline treatment (Simultaneous Integrated Boost and SIB). Analysis of interrelationships between boost-dose; boost volume and its timing shows that a TCP benefit from boosting can be expected when a relatively large part of the target volume is involved. Increase in boost dose above 1.2-1.3 of baseline dose using 'standard' methods does not substantially further increase the achieved TCP benefit unless hypoxic cells are a problem. Any small uncertainties in treatment planning can ruin all potential beneficial effect of the boost. For example, a 50% dose deficit in a very small (e.g. 1%) volume of target can decrease TCP to zero. Therefore boost benefits should be carefully weighed against any risk of cold spots in the target volume. Pros and cons in discussion of the role of boost in radiotherapy lead to the important

  13. Geographic delivery models for radiotherapy services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study described here was undertaken to quantify the societal cost of radiotherapy in idealized urban and rural populations and, hence, to generate a measure of impediment to access. The costs of centralized, distributed comprehensive and satellite radiotherapy delivery formats were examined by decomposing them into institutional, productivity and geographical components. Our results indicate that centralized radiotherapy imposes the greatest financial burden on the patient population in both urban and rural scenarios. The financial burden faced by patients who must travel for radiotherapy can be interpreted as one component of the overall impediment to access. With advances in remote-monitoring systems, it is possible to maintain technical quality while enhancing patient access. However, the maintenance of professional competence will remain a challenge with a distributed service-delivery format. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. The IAEA quality audits for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA, jointly with the World Health Organization (WHO), for over 40 years has operated a dosimetry audit service for radiotherapy using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The service is known as the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose audits and it is one of the oldest dosimetry services in the world. To-date, the calibration of approximately 8000 radiotherapy beams in 1700 cancer centres in 120 countries have been audited through this service. An integral part of the auditing process is resolving discrepancies in the beam calibrations that are discovered. The discrepancies are followed-up by the IAEA and local experts, and their causes are traced, understood and corrected. Significant improvements have been observed in dosimetry practices in radiotherapy centres worldwide. In its early years, the IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose audit service recorded approximately 50% audited centres had the adequate beam calibration used for cancer treatment. The provision of regular auditing programme over long time enables the IAEA to document that several radiotherapy centres have improved their abilities to accurately deliver the radiation dose. The percentage of acceptable results has reached 96% at present. However, 4% of the poor results remain uncorrected either due to a failure to respond to the IAEA/WHO efforts or due to local problems that could not be resolved without allocation of appropriate resources. Some centres work within practical limitations such as insufficient availability of qualified medical physicists or lack of adequate dosimetry equipment, which compromises quality. These inadequacies have to be addressed locally. Another dosimetry audit programme for treatment planning in external beam radiotherapy, which has been developed by the IAEA, called TPS audit, is based on a semi-anthropomorphic phantom. It assesses the radiotherapy workflow for conformal techniques, from patient data acquisition and computerized treatment planning to dose delivery. The IAEA is

  15. Worldwide quality assurance networks for radiotherapy dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several national and international organizations have developed various types and levels of external audit systems for radiotherapy dosimetry, either based on on-site review visits or using mailed dosimetry systems.Three major TLD (thermoluminescence dosimetry) networks make available postal dose audits to a large number of radiotherapy centres on a regular basis. These are the IAEA/WHO (World Health Organization) TLD postal dose audit service, which operates worldwide; the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) network, known as EQUAL, which operates in the European Union; and the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) network in North America. Other external audit programmes are either associated with national and international clinical trial groups or perform national dosimetry comparisons that check radiotherapy dosimetry at various levels. The paper discusses the present status of the worldwide quality assurance networks in radiotherapy dosimetry and reviews the activities of the three main TLD networks: the IAEA/WHO, EQUAL and RPC networks. (author)

  16. Review of cranial radiotherapy-induced vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Erin S; Xie, Hao; Merchant, Thomas E; Yu, Jennifer S; Chao, Samuel T; Suh, John H

    2015-05-01

    Cranial radiation can impact the cerebral vasculature in many ways, with a wide range of clinical manifestations. The incidence of these late effects including cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs), lacunar lesions, vascular occlusive disease including moyamoya syndrome, vascular malformations, and hemorrhage is not well known. This article reviews the preclinical findings regarding the pathophysiology of late radiation-induced vascular damage, and discusses the clinical incidence and risk factors for each type of vasculopathy. The pathophysiology is complex and dependent on the targeted blood vessels, and upregulation of pro-inflammatory and hypoxia-related genes. The risk factors for adult CVAs are similar to those for patients not exposed to cranial radiotherapy. For children, risks for late vascular complications include young age at radiotherapy, radiotherapy dose, NF1, tumor location, chemotherapy, and endocrine abnormalities. The incidence of late vascular complications of radiotherapy may be impacted by improved technology, therapeutic interventions, and appropriate follow up. PMID:25670390

  17. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in bilateral retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for retinoblastoma has traditionally been done with conventional radiotherapy techniques which resulted high doses to the surrounding normal tissues. A 20 month-old girl with group D bilateral retinoblastoma underwent intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to both eyes after failing chemoreduction and focal therapies including cryotherapy and transpupillary thermotherapy. In this report, we discuss the use of IMRT as a method for reducing doses to adjacent normal tissues while delivering therapeutic doses to the tumour tissues compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). At one year follow-up, the patient remained free of any obvious radiation complications. Image guided IMRT provides better dose distribution than 3DCRT in retinoblastoma eyes, delivering the therapeutic dose to the tumours and minimizing adjacent tissue damage

  18. Radiological protection and its organization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of a research carried out in Radiotherapy Centers in Mexico City, divided in 7 public institutions and 5 private, aspects related to the radiological safety and its organization in radiotherapy were evaluated. The population being studied was: medical and technical personnel, that works in the selected radiotherapy centers. The survey was made with 36 dichotomic variables, being obtained 90 surveys. The personnel characteristics are: 76% works for more than 3 years in radiotherapy, 93% has updated information about radiological protection, 67% knows the general radiological safety regulations, 93% knows the radiological emergency project and 95% makes use of personal dosemeter. As result of this research we found that the main problems that the radiological protection have are: lack of personnel training in radiological protection, although the 93% states to have updated information, the few number of persons that takes part in clinical meetings and professional associations. (authors). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  19. Pregnancy and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer in pregnancy is relatively uncommon but breast cancer is one of the most common malignancy occur with pregnancy. Prescribed doses of radiotherapy are significantly higher than those of diagnostic procedures. Fetal exposure and damage can occur during radiotherapy within target area. Because of those risks, radiotherapy during pregnancy is basically has to avoid. Even though, feral damage depends on fetal dose and has some threshold dose. Practically, even in stochastic effect, there are some minimal doses. A most important point is careful estimation of fetal dose before radiation. The physician has to inform the patient about risk and benefit of radiotherapy to fetus and to mother and have an ethical balance to help the mother and family to make a final decision. (author)

  20. The radiotherapy affects the cognitive processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Researchers from the medical center of the free university of Amsterdam report that the radiotherapy can hinder the cognitive functions of patients affected by cerebral tumors treated after a surgery. Even low dose radiation could contribute in their opinion, to the progressive cognitive decline of patients suffering of low grade gliomas, the most commune cerebral tumor. To get these conclusions, 65 patients, whom half of them received a radiotherapy, had a neurological and psychological evaluation twelve years after their treatment. Results: 53% of patients treated by radiotherapy present disorders of attention, memory, execution and speed of information treatment against 27% of these ones that received an only surgery. The researchers conclude to the necessity to take into account this risk in the choice of treatment, or even to avoid radiotherapy in this precise case. (N.C.)

  1. Implementation of patients radiation protection in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current status of quality assurance programmes in the Czech Republic is highlighted and the structure of quality audits is explained. The results of radiotherapy department auditing are given in a tabular form. It is shown that deviations from tolerable levels are mostly due to obsolete equipment and lack of health physicists at radiotherapy departments. The audits can help rectify the situation in part at least. (P.A.)

  2. Acute myocardial infarction after mediastinal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediastinal radiotherapy can affect the heart and great vessels to different degrees. It may turn up as coronary heart disease and less frequently as acute myocardial infarction. We report the case of a patient without coronary risk factors and an antecedent of mediastinal radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. Considerations about mediastinal radiation as a risk factor for early development of coronary heart diseases are exposed. (author)

  3. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author)

  4. Radiotherapy and immune reaction of oncologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Represented is a review of data accumulated in literature (1970-1976) on oppression of protection of oncologic patients and more oppression of immune reactions during radiotherapy. Underlined is the significance of studying immune homeostasis in a clinic of radiotherapy to evaluate total resistance of patients before the beginning and in the process of treatment. The prognostic significance of immunodepressive disturbances in patients with malignant tumors is elucidated

  5. Atomic and molecular data for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the summary report of the First Research Co-ordination Meeting of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Atomic and Molecular Data for Radiotherapy, convened by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in Vienna, from 30 January to 2 February 1989. The main objectives of the CRP are to generate, compile and evaluate the important atomic and molecular data relevant to radiotherapy. (author). 38 refs, 7 figs, 10 tabs

  6. Present status of radiotherapy in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work was to discover the conditions obtaining in the practice of radiotherapy in Venezuela; 15 public radiotherapy centres were visited, evaluated and information obtained on physical environment, treatment units, intracavitary radiotherapy groups, medical and para-medical personnel, recording of clinical data and number of patients. In the groups it was observed that: only one of 17 voltage stabilizing units was operating; the four linear accelerators can only be operated irregularly and there are 17 60Co units operating, but the majority of those are antiquated and worn out. One centre has a simulator and another has a computer. In intracavitary radiotherapy, approximately 50% of the centres do not carry out utero-vaginal implants in proper conditions. There are sufficient radiotherapists, but their working conditions cannot be compared with those in developed countries. There is a lack of auxiliary personnel, radiation physicists and dosimetrists. There is no training for radiotherapy technicians and there are not enough of them. In 50% of the centres, no treatment plans are made; one-third do not have any devices for immobilization. Four hospitals do not use radiotherapy histories or treatment graphics, and in four institutions no tumour record is used. The conclusion is that oncological radiotherapy is not adequate in most of the centres and it is recommended that: the damaged equipment should be repaired; the 60Co units with inadequate source-axis distances should be replaced; new sources should be acquired for the equipment with source-axis distances of 80 cm; maintenance should be constant; simulators should be provided; damaged intracavitary radiotherapy equipment and sources should be replaced; the numbers and training of technical personnel should be increased; physicists and dosimetrists should be trained; a national radiation physics centre should be set up, and the recording of clinical information should be improved. (author)

  7. Possibilities and limits of radiotherapy in larynx carcinoma. Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen der Radiotherapie des Larynxkarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1992-01-01

    Early stage glottic carcinoma can be treated with primary radiotherapy reaching equally good results compared to primary surgery; for supraglottic carcinoma surgery offers only slight advantages over primary radiotherapy. Tumor control for recurrences is considerably improved by salvage surgery. The use of primary radiotherapy allows improved or at least preserved voice and reduced rated of acute complications and late treatment sequelae. However, treatment duration is longer and probably more expensive compared to function preservation microlaryngoscopic surgery. Which treatment approach is chosen, depends in individual patient factors and specific conditions in the clinical setting. In any case, primary radiotherapy deserves a stronger say in the early stage tumor situation. In our institution early stage supraglottic carcinoma undergo primary surgery. Advanced carcinomas (T2b and more) are rarely suited for primary radiotherapy with the exception of some very confined T3 tumors. Surgical approaches should be favoured, since they provide a detailed pathological tumor staging including R-classification, which would be lacking using primary radiotherapy. There are clear reasons to treat the lymph nodes for glottic carcinomas stage T2b and more and for all supraglottic carcinomas with radiotherapy. Specific risk factors are: tumor at the margins of the incision (R1), infiltration of the cartilage and pre-epiglottic space, paratracheal and subglottic extension more than 1 cm, perineural invasion, grade III and IV as well as emergency tracheostomy. Postoperative radiotherapy should be given to the lymph nodes for all positive neck-dissections. New therapeutic approaches are on the horizon, which may improve thee results of radiotherapy even for advanced larynx carcinomas, like hyperfractionation radiotherapy and simultaneous radio-chemotherapy combined enoral resection and postoperative radiotherapy may yield larynx preservation even for advanced stages. (orig./MG).

  8. Sorafenib and radiotherapy association for hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conformal radiotherapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), producing local control rates above 90% within the radiation beam. However, survival after radiotherapy remains limited by the high frequency of intra- and extra-hepatic recurrences, which occurs in 40-50 and 20-30% of cases, respectively. Sorafenib (BAY43-9006, Nexavar; Bayer, West Haven, CT) is a small molecule inhibitor that demonstrated potent activity to target v-raf murine sarcoma oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) and VEGFR tyrosine kinases. Sorafenib is the only drug that demonstrated effectiveness to increase overall survival in advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. The rationale to combine radiotherapy with sorafenib is the following: (1) targeting RAS-RAF-MAPK and VEGFR signaling pathways, which are specifically activated after exposure to radiation, and responsible for radio-resistance phenomenon; (2) enhancing the oxygen effect through normalization of the surviving tumor vasculature; and (3) synchronization of the cell cycle. Sorafenib and radiotherapy represent complementary strategies, as radiotherapy may be useful to prolong the effect of sorafenib through control of the macroscopic disease, when sorafenib may target latent microscopic disease. Sorafenib and radiotherapy associations are thus based on a relevant biological and clinical rationale and are being evaluated in ongoing phase I-II trials. (authors)

  9. A quality management system for radiotherapy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of quality in Radiotherapy Physics cannot be overemphasized and the need for having controlled, written procedures for all tasks is increasing in importance. There are a number of quality standards currently in use such as ISO 9000. In the UK, the Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy (QART) Standard has been produced based on ISO9000 and recommended for implementation in all Radiotherapy Departments. A Quality Management System has been implemented in the Radiotherapy Physics Section at the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital, England, to fulfil the QART and ISO9000 recommendations. This Poster will illustrate the system used at the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital. The system offers a standardised document format and allows the issue and re-issue of all written procedures and proforma. It has enhanced the quality and consistency of tasks, when the task is performed by varying members of staff and thereby improving the quality of the service offered from the safety and organisational perspectives. It is believed that the Quality Management System used in the Radiotherapy Physics Section at the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital would be simple to implement in the majority of Radiotherapy Physics Departments

  10. Radiotherapy of adult nodal non Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has been modified by the introduction of efficient chemotherapy and the development of different pathological classifications. The recommended treatment of early-stage aggressive lymphomas is primarily a combination chemotherapy. The interest of adjuvant radiotherapy remains unclear and has to be established through large prospective trials. If radiation therapy has to be delivered, the historical results of exclusive radiation therapy showed that involved-fields and a dose of 35-40 Gy (daily fraction of 1.8 Gy, 5 days a week) are the optimal schedule. The interest of radiotherapy in the treatment of advanced-stage aggressive lymphoma is yet to be proven. Further studies had to stratify localized stages according to the factors of the International Prognostic Index. For easy-stage low-grade lymphoma, radiotherapy remains the standard treatment. However, the appropriate technique to use is controversial. Involved-field irradiation at a dose of 35 Gy seems to be the optimal schedule, providing a 10 year disease-free survival rate of 50 % and no major toxicity. There is no standard indication of radiotherapy in the treatment advanced-stage low-grade lymphoma. For 'new' nodal lymphoma's types, the indication of radiotherapy cannot be established (mantle-zone lymphoma, marginal zone B-cell lymphoma) or must take into account the natural history (Burkitt's lymphoma, peripheral T-cell lymphoma) and the sensibility to others therapeutic methods. (authors)

  11. THE EVOLVING ROLE OF RADIOTHERAPY IN EARLY STAGE HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Umberto Ricardi; Andrea Riccardo Filippi; Cristina Piva; Pierfrancesco Franco

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy has a key role in the combined modality treatment of early-stage Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL). Nevertheless, late toxicity still remains an issue. A modern approach in HL radiotherapy includes lower doses and smaller fields, together with the implementation of sophisticated and dedicated delivery techniques. Aim of the present review is to discuss the current role of radiotherapy and its potential future developments, with a focus on major clinical trials, technological advances ...

  12. The pitfalls of treating anorectal conditions after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thornhill, J A

    2012-03-01

    We present a salutary lesson learned from three cases with significant complications that followed anorectal intervention in the presence of radiation proctitis due to prior radiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. After apparent routine rubber band ligation for painful haemorrhoids, one patient developed a colo-cutaneous fistula. Following laser coagulation for radiation proctitis, one patient required a pelvic exenteration for a fistula, while another developed a rectal stenosis. Those diagnosing and treating colonic conditions should be mindful of the increased prevalence of patients who have had radiotherapy for prostate cancer and the potential for complications in treating these patients.

  13. Diffusion Weighted MRI as a predictive tool for effect of radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars;

    Diffusion weighted MRI has shown great potential in diagnostic cancer imaging and may also have value for monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy. Patients with advanced cervical cancer are treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. This study evaluates the value of DW......-MRI for predicting outcome of patients with advanced cervical cancer at time of brachytherapy. Volume of hyper-intensity on highly diffusion sensitive images and resulting ADC value for treatment responders and non-responders is compared. The change of ADC and volume of hyper-intensity over time of BT is also...

  14. Selenium supplementation in radiotherapy patients: do we need to measure selenium levels in serum or blood regularly prior radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the review by Puspitasari and colleagues, an additional discussion of the endpoints of the Se supplementation studies described would be helpful. In our view, selenium can safely be given to selenium-deficient cancer patients prior to and during radiotherapy. Therefore, in order to help the radiation oncologist in decision making, we strongly advocate to determine the selenium status prior to and during a potential adjuvant selenium supplementation, e.g. when trying to ease the side-effects of radiation treatment or in the aftercare situation when the selenium status may become insufficient

  15. Technical Note: DIRART- A software suite for deformable image registration and adaptive radiotherapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in image guide radiotherapy technology and a growing interest in the possibilities for adapting treatment planning and delivery over the course of treatment. One obstacle faced by the research community has been the lack of a comprehensive open-source software toolkit dedicated for adaptive radiotherapy (ART). To address this need, the authors have developed a software suite called the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART). Methods: DIRART is an open-source toolkit developed in MATLAB. It is designed in an object-oriented style with focus on user-friendliness, features, and flexibility. It contains four classes of DIR algorithms, including the newer inverse consistency algorithms to provide consistent displacement vector field in both directions. It also contains common ART functions, an integrated graphical user interface, a variety of visualization and image-processing features, dose metric analysis functions, and interface routines. These interface routines make DIRART a powerful complement to the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) and popular image-processing toolkits such as ITK. Results: DIRART provides a set of image processing/registration algorithms and postprocessing functions to facilitate the development and testing of DIR algorithms. It also offers a good amount of options for DIR results visualization, evaluation, and validation. Conclusions: By exchanging data with treatment planning systems via DICOM-RT files and CERR, and by bringing image registration algorithms closer to radiotherapy applications, DIRART is potentially a convenient and flexible platform that may facilitate ART and DIR research.

  16. Modern radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: what developments for which benefits?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new techniques of radiotherapy (IMRT, tomo-therapy, dynamic arc therapy, CyberKnifeR...) are based on modern imaging techniques, efficient 3D treatment planning systems, and sophisticated immobilization systems. The central objective of modern radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of healthy tissues. These techniques would then allow a further tumor dose escalation. Head-and-neck tumors are some of the most attractive localizations to test conformal radiotherapy. They combine ballistic difficulties due to particularly complex shapes with problems due to the number and low tolerance of neighbouring anatomical structures or healthy tissues. The therapeutic irradiation of head-and-neck tumors thus remains a challenge for the radiation oncologist. New techniques of radiotherapy do have a significant potential for improving local control and reducing toxicity when compared to standard radiotherapy. Recently, a few publications have emphasized the clinical experience of several precursor teams, particularly when it comes to preservation of salivary gland function, with a suitable follow-up period. This article is a reprint of a paper published in 'La Lettre du Cancerologue, Vol. XX - no. 2 - feb 2011'

  17. Low early ototoxicity rates for pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with proton radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearing loss is common following chemoradiotherapy for children with medulloblastoma. Compared to photons, proton radiotherapy reduces radiation dose to the cochlea for these patients. Here we examine whether this dosimetric advantage leads to a clinical benefit in audiometric outcomes. From 2006-2009, 23 children treated with proton radiotherapy for medulloblastoma were enrolled on a prospective observational study, through which they underwent pre- and 1 year post-radiotherapy pure-tone audiometric testing. Ears with moderate to severe hearing loss prior to therapy were censored, leaving 35 ears in 19 patients available for analysis. The predicted mean cochlear radiation dose was 30 60Co-Gy Equivalents (range 19-43), and the mean cumulative cisplatin dose was 303 mg/m2 (range 298-330). Hearing sensitivity significantly declined following radiotherapy across all frequencies analyzed (P < 0.05). There was partial sparing of mean post-radiation hearing thresholds at low-to-midrange frequencies and, consequently, the rate of high-grade (grade 3 or 4) ototoxicity at 1 year was favorable (5%). Ototoxicity did not correlate with predicted dose to the auditory apparatus for proton-treated patients, potentially reflecting a lower-limit threshold for radiation effect on the cochlea. Rates of high-grade early post-radiation ototoxicity following proton radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma are low. Preservation of hearing in the audible speech range, as observed here, may improve both quality of life and cognitive functioning for these patients

  18. Clinical study and numerical simulation of brain cancer dynamics under radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, S.; Zubik-Kowal, B.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a clinical and numerical study of the progression of brain cancer tumor growth dynamics coupled with the effects of radiotherapy. We obtained clinical data from a sample of brain cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and compare it to our numerical simulations to a mathematical model of brain tumor cell population growth influenced by radiation treatment. We model how the body biologically receives a physically delivered dose of radiation to the affected tumorous area in the form of a generalized LQ model, modified to account for the conversion process of sublethal lesions into lethal lesions at high radiation doses. We obtain good agreement between our clinical data and our numerical simulations of brain cancer progression given by the mathematical model, which couples tumor growth dynamics and the effect of irradiation. The correlation, spanning a wide dataset, demonstrates the potential of the mathematical model to describe the dynamics of brain tumor growth influenced by radiotherapy.

  19. Recommendations of the publication ICRP-84: pregnancy and medical irradiation for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The malignant diseases in the pregnant women are relatively not much frequent, and some of these cases can be applied radiotherapy for the tumours treatment. The doses involved in the radio therapeutics procedures can produce a significant foetal damage, and the patient or worker has the right to know the magnitude and the potential effects that can be results of the radiotherapy exposure. The publication ICRP-84 of the International Commission of Radiological Protection approaches specific aspect of the individual justification of the medical exposure of the patient pregnant woman, and recommends work procedures for the dose optimization that will receive the fetus. In this communication is commented the content of the radiotherapy section of the mentioned publication

  20. The place radiotherapy alone with respect to surgery and radiotherapy in locally advanced vulva cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author report a study which aimed at evaluating the place or radiotherapy associated with surgery and of radiotherapy without surgery when taking into care locally advanced vulva cancers. The study is based on 46 cases. After 24 months, different aspects, such as recurrence and survival, have been assessed. It appears that there is no survival difference without recurrences between both sets. Short communication

  1. Bisbenzimidazole - DMA: a potential radioprotector mitigates DNA damage in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation causes radiolysis of cellular water, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing DNA damage. Radioprotectors protect the normal cells from the unwanted radiation damage. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, despite extensive research on the development of radioprotectors from natural and synthetic compounds, success has been limited. The only clinically acceptable radioprotector, amifostine, has inherent dose-limiting toxicities and has therefore stimulated extensive search for nontoxic, effective, and alternative radioprotectors. We have developed a cytoprotective radioprotector DMA, having a bisbenzimidazole nucleus. Relative quantitation of gene expression of the identified proteins and their interacting partners led to the identification of MAP3K14 (NFB inducing kinase) as one of the plausible target. Subsequently, over expression and knock down of MAP3K14 suggested that DMA affects NFB inducing kinase mediated phosphorylation of IKKα and IKK both alone and in the presence of ionizing radiation. Our results demonstrated 3.62 fold increase in NFB activation in DMA treated cells as compared to control cells. This activation was further increased by 5.8 fold in drug + radiation (50 μM + 8.5 Gy) treated cells in comparison to control. We observed 51% radioprotection in untreated cells that attenuated to 17% in siRNA NIK treated U87 cells at 24h. In addition we studied the effects of DMA on the radiation and transcriptional response of HEK293 cell lines also. Our results, suggested that the treatment of DMA increased the level of phosphorylated AKT in HEK cells in presence of radiation, and this was consistent with the alteration of DNA-PKcs. Our findings were further confirmed by the increased phosphorylation levels of GSK3, a substrate of activated AKT in DMA treated cells. (author)

  2. Novel bisbenzimidazole a potential radioprotector mitigates DNA damage in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations cause radiolysis of cellular water, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing DNA damage. Radioprotectors protect the normal cells from the unwanted radiation damage. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, despite extensive research on the development of radioprotectors from natural and synthetic compounds, success has been limited. We have developed a cytoprotective radioprotector DMA, having a bisbenzimidazole nucleus. It has been observed 51% radioprotection in untreated cells that attenuated to 17% in siRNA NIK treated U87 cells at 24h. In addition the work has studied the effects of DMA on the radiation and transcriptional response of HEK293 cell lines also. The results suggested that the treatment of DMA increased the level of phosphorylated AKT in HEK cells in presence of radiation, and this was consistent with the alteration of DNA-PKcs

  3. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Hope, Andrew J.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  4. Predicting radiotherapy outcomes using statistical learning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy outcomes are determined by complex interactions between treatment, anatomical and patient-related variables. A common obstacle to building maximally predictive outcome models for clinical practice is the failure to capture potential complexity of heterogeneous variable interactions and applicability beyond institutional data. We describe a statistical learning methodology that can automatically screen for nonlinear relations among prognostic variables and generalize to unseen data before. In this work, several types of linear and nonlinear kernels to generate interaction terms and approximate the treatment-response function are evaluated. Examples of institutional datasets of esophagitis, pneumonitis and xerostomia endpoints were used. Furthermore, an independent RTOG dataset was used for 'generalizabilty' validation. We formulated the discrimination between risk groups as a supervised learning problem. The distribution of patient groups was initially analyzed using principle components analysis (PCA) to uncover potential nonlinear behavior. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate correlations and actuarial analysis. Over-fitting was controlled via cross-validation resampling. Our results suggest that a modified support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression and neural networks in cases where the data exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA. For instance, in prediction of esophagitis and pneumonitis endpoints, which exhibited nonlinear behavior on PCA, the method provided 21% and 60% improvements, respectively. Furthermore, evaluation on the independent pneumonitis RTOG dataset demonstrated good generalizabilty beyond institutional data in contrast with other models. This indicates that the prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing nonlinear kernel methods for discovering important nonlinear interactions among model

  5. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  6. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano, E-mail: rezende.med@terra.com.br [Radioterapia do Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  7. Isodose-based methodology for minimizing the morbidity and mortality of thoracic hypofractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Help identify and define potential normal tissue dose constraints to minimize the mortality and morbidity of hypofractionated lung radiotherapy. Materials and methods: A method to generate isodose-based constraints and visually evaluate treatment plans, based on the published peer reviewed literature and the linear quadratic model, is presented. The radiobiological analysis assumes that the linear quadratic model is valid up to 28 Gy per fraction, the α/β ratio is 2 for the spinal cord and brachial plexus, 4 for pneumonitis, 4 or 10 for acute skin reactions depending on treatment length, and 3 for late complications in other normal tissues. A review of the literature was necessary to identify possible endpoints and normal tissue constraints for thoracic hypofractionated lung radiotherapy. Results: Preliminary normal tissue constraints to reduce mortality and morbidity were defined for organs at risk based upon hypofractionated lung radiotherapy publications. A modified dose nomenclature was introduced to facilitate the comparison of hypofractionated doses. Potential side effects from hypofractionated lung radiotherapy such as aortic dissection, neuropathy, and fatal organ perforation rarely seen in conventional treatments were identified. The isodose-based method for treatment plan analysis and normal tissue dose constraint simplification was illustrated. Conclusions: The radiobiological analysis based on the LQ method, biologically equivalent dose nomenclature, and isodose-based method proposed in this study simplifies normal tissue dose constraints and treatment plan evaluation. This may also be applied to extrathoracic hypofractionated radiotherapy. Prospective validation of these preliminary thoracic normal tissue dose constraints for hypofractionated lung radiotherapy is necessary.

  8. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  9. Radiotherapy of adenomyosarcomas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy is necessary for children with adenomyosarcomas. In order to reduce the side effects of the treatment, it seems reasonable to establish a therapy plan taking into consideration the risk of recurrences. Besides the classification of stages according to the N.W.T.S., the following factors should be considered: histologic findings, manifestations of the lymph nodes, number of tumor nodes, sizes of the adenomyosarcoma, and a rupture of the adenomyosarcoma. A postoperative polychemotherapy is sufficient for children of stage I presenting favorable histological foundings. For the stages II and III, an irradiation of the tumor and the lymph outflow regions or the total abdomen with 24 Gy is recommendable in addition to chemotherapy. For stage IV, an irradiation of the lung up to 12 Gy in addition to chemotherapy has proved to be useful. A pre-operative radio- or chemotherapy is indicated especially in case of a great tumor volume and stage III and IV. (orig.)

  10. Post prostatectomy radiotherapy: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Background: Between 2000 and 2005, at Vidt Medical Center, 85 patients were treated with 3D and IMRT radiotherapy after undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate adenocarcinoma. Objective: To evaluate biochemical recurrence and specific disease free survival and global survival. Materials and method: These patients were divided into two groups: those who engaged in what is called adjuvant therapy (20 patients), who after surgery had increased risk factors and / or persistence of the disease. These risk factors were positive margins, seminal vesicles involvement, capsule infiltration or persistent PSA. The other group were 65 patients referred to as rescue therapy: they were those that presented PSA increase after having undetectable levels as observed nadir after surgery, understanding > 0.2 ng / ml as a high value or palpable nodule on rectal touch with or without positive biopsy. Follow up was between 24 and 84 months, the dose delivered was between 6500 - 7000 cGy. Also evaluated the early and late toxicity, urinary and rectal, according to RTOG criteria. Conclusion: The results obtained confirm the benefits of postoperative radiation therapy for both groups of patients, showing a more favorable trend on those treated with adjuvant therapy. (authors)

  11. Radiotherapy alone in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This retrospective analysis was conducted on breast cancer patients treated by radiotherapy alone at The Princess Margaret Hospital and at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. These patients had either operable tumours, but were unfit for general anesthesia, or had inoperable tumors due to local contraindications to surgery. Previous results showed that a radiation dose increase of 15 Gy can decrease the relative risk of tumour or lymph node recurrence twofold. In this third report, the same data were analyzed to determine the treatment-related complication rates and to correlate these to the radiation dose levels. Overall results were analyzed on 453 patients, but detailed analyses on complications were conducted on 372 patients not developing local recurrence in the first 6 months of follow-up. Each complication was graded on a 3-level previously defined scale. Most frequent complications were skin changes of different degrees, which were usually asymptomatic. More disabling complications were arm edema, impaired shoulder mobility, rib fractures and brachial plexopathy. The incidence of disabling complications was low. The only factor significantly increasing the risk of complications was the radiation dose level to the tumour and axilla. Technical factors such as overlapping fields should also be taken into account. As the more effective control of tumour and lymph nodes obtained in patients treated with higher radiation doses is counterbalanced by an increase in the complication rate, the dose to be delivered for each patient should be carefully chosen according to individual risk factors. (author). figs

  12. Radiotherapy for the vulvar cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen patients who had primary vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy as an initial treatment at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults and Hyogo Cancer Center from January 1971 to December 1990 are presented. Two patients were stage 0, one stage I, three stage II and nine stage III. Nine patients received electron irradiation with or without interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. Five patients received megavoltage X-ray irradiation using AP/PA parallel opposed fields including the pelvic nodes and perineum followed by boost irradiation of electrons, interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. The total dose delivered to the primary tumor ranged from 50 to 100 Gy (73 Gy on average). The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients was 43.6%. Complete regression (CR) was achieved in 60% of the patients. However, CR was not achieved in any of five patients with palpable inguinal nodes. In contrast, all the patients who had tumors of less than 2 cm in diameter achieved CR. Five of nine CR cases relapsed. First sites of failure were vagina, groin and vulvar region. Recurrence occurred more than four years after treatment in three cases. Necrosis occurred in five of nine CR cases. (author)

  13. Radiotherapy for the vulvar cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Motohara, Tomofumi (Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-03-01

    Fifteen patients who had primary vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy as an initial treatment at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults and Hyogo Cancer Center from January 1971 to December 1990 are presented. Two patients were stage 0, one stage I, three stage II and nine stage III. Nine patients received electron irradiation with or without interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. Five patients received megavoltage X-ray irradiation using AP/PA parallel opposed fields including the pelvic nodes and perineum followed by boost irradiation of electrons, interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. The total dose delivered to the primary tumor ranged from 50 to 100 Gy (73 Gy on average). The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients was 43.6%. Complete regression (CR) was achieved in 60% of the patients. However, CR was not achieved in any of five patients with palpable inguinal nodes. In contrast, all the patients who had tumors of less than 2 cm in diameter achieved CR. Five of nine CR cases relapsed. First sites of failure were vagina, groin and vulvar region. Recurrence occurred more than four years after treatment in three cases. Necrosis occurred in five of nine CR cases. (author).

  14. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  15. Optimal radiotherapy utilisation rate in developing countries: An IAEA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimal radiotherapy utilisation rate (RTU) is the proportion of all cancer cases that should receive radiotherapy. Optimal RTU was estimated for 9 Middle Income Countries as part of a larger IAEA project to better understand RTU and stage distribution

  16. Volumes and doses for external radiotherapy - Definitions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains definitions of volume and dose parameters for external radiotherapy. In addition the report contains recommendations for use, documentation and minimum reporting for radiotherapy of the individual patient.(Author)

  17. Correlative study on anemia and radiotherapy effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of oxygen-carrying ability of blood efficacy of radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Altogether 161 cases of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were classified according to severity of anemia, and Hb, RBC, MCH, HCT, MCV, MCHC and RDW were tested before, during and after radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up for up to 5 years, the relationship and mechanism among anemia, radiotherapy effects and survival rate was discussed. Results: The survival rate between anemia group and non-anemia group was different significantly (P<0.05). Anemia before radiotherapy, anemia appearance or anemia deterioration during radiotherapy were sensitive factors affecting radiotherapy results. The anemia more severe, the radiotherapy worse. Conclusion: Anemia-hypohemoglobinemia leads to decrease of oxygen-carrying capacity of blood, resulting in oxygen deficiency of tumor cells and their radiotherapy resistance. Therefore this method is worthy of further studies

  18. Chemo-radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gliomas: Randomized clinical trials conducted in the USA showed that radiotherapy plus chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered a long-term survival advantage to patients younger than 60 years old with malignant gliomas. Combination chemotherapy, such as procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine (PCV) must be tested further, and intra-arterial chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered no survival advantage. Combination chemotherapy with PCV showed efficacy for patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Medulloblastoma: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy improved the survival of patients with poor risk medulloblastoma, and may reduce the required craniospinal radiation dose in patients with good risk medulloblastoma. Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL): Combination of chemotherapy with high-dose MTX and radiotherapy improved survival of patients with PCNSL; however, the neurotoxicity produced by this treatment modality is a serious problem in older patients. Intracranial germ cell tumors: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy may produce long term survival with good quality of life in patients with germinoma. Neoadjuvant therapy consisting of chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by complete surgical excision improved survival of patients with intracranial nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. (author)

  19. Image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account anatomical variations occurring during irradiation by visualization of anatomical structures. It may consist of a rigid registration of the tumour by moving the patient, in case of prostatic irradiation for example. IGRT associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is strongly recommended when high-dose is delivered in the prostate, where it seems to reduce rectal and bladder toxicity. In case of significant anatomical deformations, as in head and neck tumours (tumour shrinking and decrease in volume of the salivary glands), re-planning appears to be necessary, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy. This should ideally be 'monitored' and possibly triggered based on a calculation of cumulative dose, session after session, compared to the initial planning dose, corresponding to the concept of dose-guided adaptive radiotherapy. The creation of 'planning libraries' based on predictable organ positions (as in cervical cancer) is another way of adaptive radiotherapy. All of these strategies still appear very complex and expensive and therefore require stringent validation before being routinely applied. (authors)

  20. Chemo-radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochi, Masato; Ushio, Yukitaka [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-05-01

    Malignant gliomas: Randomized clinical trials conducted in the USA showed that radiotherapy plus chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered a long-term survival advantage to patients younger than 60 years old with malignant gliomas. Combination chemotherapy, such as procarbazine/CCNU/vincristine (PCV) must be tested further, and intra-arterial chemotherapy with nitrosoureas offered no survival advantage. Combination chemotherapy with PCV showed efficacy for patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. Medulloblastoma: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy improved the survival of patients with poor risk medulloblastoma, and may reduce the required craniospinal radiation dose in patients with good risk medulloblastoma. Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL): Combination of chemotherapy with high-dose MTX and radiotherapy improved survival of patients with PCNSL; however, the neurotoxicity produced by this treatment modality is a serious problem in older patients. Intracranial germ cell tumors: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy may produce long term survival with good quality of life in patients with germinoma. Neoadjuvant therapy consisting of chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by complete surgical excision improved survival of patients with intracranial nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. (author)

  1. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33–5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94–0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88–0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19–2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  2. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstedt, Dan, E-mail: dan.lundstedt@vgregion.se [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Magnus [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Steineck, Gunnar [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology-Pathology, the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Malmstroem, Per [Skane Department of Oncology, Skane University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Alsadius, David [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sundberg, Agnetha [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wilderaeng, Ulrica [Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Holmberg, Erik [Oncologic Centre, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johansson, Karl-Axel [Department of Therapeutic Radiation Physics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  3. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0–III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8–2 Gy per f...

  4. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm3) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6–36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44–99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  5. Pulmonary function following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for breast cancer and the issue of three-dimensional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The frequency and grade of pulmonary complications following adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer are still debated. This study focuses on loss of pulmonary function. Materials and methods: We have measured the reduction of pulmonary function 5 months following radiotherapy in 144 node-positive stage II breast cancer patients by using pulmonary function tests. Results: No deterioration of pulmonary function was detected among the patients who were treated with local radiotherapy. On the contrary, there was a mean increase in diffusion capacity by 7% (P=0.004) following radiotherapy, which most likely was explained by the adjuvant chemotherapy administered prior to the baseline pulmonary function tests. Patients undergoing loco-regional radiotherapy showed a mean reduction in diffusion capacity by 5% (P<0.001) and in vital capacity by 3% (P=0.001). The subset of patients (9%) who were diagnosed with severe pulmonary complications needing cortisone treatment had significantly larger mean paired differences in vital capacity (-0.446 L, -15% (equivalent to 15 years of normal ageing or the loss of 3/4 of a lung lobe)) compared to the patients who were asymptomatic (-0.084 L) (P<0.05). When the effects of potential confounding factors and different radiotherapy techniques were tested on the reduction of pulmonary function by stepwise multiple regression analysis, a significant correlation was found only to loco-regional radiotherapy including the lower internal mammary lymph nodes. Conclusions: We conclude that a clinically important reduction of pulmonary function is seen in the subset of patients who are diagnosed with severe pulmonary complication following loco-regional radiotherapy for breast cancer. The results of this study warrant further studies based on individual lung dose volume histograms. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Minimal requirements for quality controls in radiotherapy with external beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical dosimetric guidelines have been developed by the Italian National Institute of Health study group on quality assurance in radiotherapy to define protocols for quality controls in external beam radiotherapy. While the document does not determine strict rules or firm recommendations, it suggests minimal requirements for quality controls necessary to guarantee an adequate degree of accuracy in external beam radiotherapy

  7. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy;

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology...

  8. Concepts of radiotherapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) relies heavily on medical imaging. Until recently, the most important planning tool was the treatment simulator. The kilovoltage radiographic capabilities in a treatment simulator enabled the boundaries of treatment fields to be visualized with respect to bony anatomic landmarks. Perhaps the most important advance in treatment planning in recent years is the ability to visualize the passage of the beams with respect to a more accurate geometrical representation of the tumor and other soft tissue structures. This 'virtual simulation' uses a computer-based representation of a patient to determine the extent of the disease and the location of radiation sensitive normal tissue. Computer tomographic (CT) imaging produces a high-resolution three-dimensional representation of anatomy that can be correlated with other image sets such as magnetic resonance images (MRI) of function. Positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging is beginning to be used to determine tumor proliferation and the presence of distant disease. It is likely that accurate RTP in conjunction with CT simulators will eliminate traditional treatment simulators in the future. Traditionally, patient dose calculation algorithms have been based on correcting measured dose in water phantoms to take into account beam modifiers, patient surface contours and internal tissue inhomogeneities. Recently, model-based algorithms have been computing the dose directly in the patient representation using the CT to obtain a voxel-by-voxel density map. The convolution/superposition method, which uses a Monte Carlo-derived transport kernel, is the current state-of-the-art algorithm for dose computation. Soon direct Monte Carlo simulation will be used in model-based dose computation. Model-based dose computations enable a simpler monitor unit calculation formulation. The other major breakthrough in RTP is computer-based optimization. The goals of the treatment are specified as

  9. Radiotherapy evolution in Spain (1896-1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show radiotherapy evolution in Spain, from the introduction of the Roentgenology till the consolidation of the radiation therapy. We analyze the development of the roentgenology and the contribution of the dermatologist in it. We should emphasize the importance of the V International Congress of Electrology and Medical Radiology wich took place in December of 1910 in Barcelona in the development of the deep radiotherapy in the treatment of gynecological neoplasms. The sanitary struggle campaigns cancer influenced a lot the development of Spanish radiotherapy. the development of the Cancer's Pavilion of the ''Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau'' was the most important radiotherapic event in the previous period to the Spanish civil war. After the late introduction of cobaltotherapy in Spain, the birth of the ''Asociacion Espanola de Radioterapia y Oncologia (AERO) helped to consolidate the speciality. (Author) 36 refs

  10. Operations experience at the Bevalac radiotherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the first years of Bevalac operation the biomedical effort concentrated on radiobiology work, laying the foundation for patient radiotherapy. A dedicated radiotherapy area was created in 1978, and in 1979 full-scale patient treatment was begun. As of now over 500 treatments with carbon, neon and argon beams have been delivered to about 50 patients, some as boosts from other modalities and some as complete heavy ion treatments. Up to 12 patients per day have been treated in this facility. Continuing efforts in refining techniques and operating procedures are increasing efficiency and accuracy of treatments, and are contributing to the alleviation of scheduling difficulties caused by the unique requirements of radiotherapy with human patients

  11. Radiation caries - an evil eye of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of patients with head and neck cancer, it is also associated with several undesired side effects such as radiation caries which is a common, yet serious, complication. The radiotherapy field of exposure frequently includes the salivary glands, oral mucosa, and jaws, thus, leading to various side effects including hyposalivation, mucositis, and taste loss. Irradiated patients are also at increased risk for the development of a rapid, rampant carious process known as radiation caries. Lesions tend to develop four weeks after completion of radiotherapy and affect atypical areas of teeth, such as the lingual surface, incisal edges, and cusp tips. The aim of this paper is to review the clinical features, prevention and management of radiation caries. (author)

  12. Radiotherapy care experience: an anthropological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anthropological study has been carried out in order to evaluate the need expressed by patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The study was mostly qualitative and based on the radiotherapy experiences of 13 women with breast cancer and six men with head and neck cancer. A 24-year-old female anthropologist spent one year in the department of radiotherapy at the Bergonie Institute in Bordeaux. She collected data on patients' needs through the observation of their experience of treatment and personal interviews. These were put in context, analyzed both by qualitative and quantitative methods. The results pointed out the need for more information on the different steps of treatment and the patient's need 'for a smile'front the medical team; in other words, emphatic support. (author)

  13. Quality control guarantees the safety of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While radiotherapy equipment has seen some decisive improvements in the last few decades, the technology has also become more complicated. The advanced equipment produces increasingly good treatment results, but the condition of the equipment must be controlled efficiently so as to eliminate any defects that might jeopardise patient safety. The quality assurance measures that are taken to show that certain equipment functions as required are known as quality control. The advanced equipment and stricter requirements set for the precision of radiotherapy have meant that more attention must be paid to quality control. The present radiation legislation stipulates that radiotherapy equipment must undergo regular quality control. The implementation of the quality control is supervised by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Hospitals carry out quality control in accordance with a programme approved by STUK, and STUK inspectors periodically visit hospitals to check the results of quality control. (orig.)

  14. Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest terms, doctoral dissertation entitled "Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy" is part of the supporting research background in the development of the ambitious proton radiotherapy project currently under way at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Krak\\'ow. Another broad motivation was the desire to become directly involved in research on a topical and challenging subject of possibly developing a therapy planning system for carbon beam radiotherapy, based in its radiobiological part on the Track Structure model developed by prof. Robert Katz over 50 years ago. Thus, the general aim of this work was, firstly, to recapitulate the Track Structure model and to propose an updated and complete formulation of this model by incorporating advances made by several authors who had contributed to its development in the past. Secondly, the updated and amended (if necessary) formulation of the model was presented in a form applicable for use in computer codes which would constitute the "radiobio...

  15. External radiotherapy in a pleural mesothelioma tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleural mesothelioma is an uncommon tumor compared with other thoracic malignancies and a 80% of the cases have asbestos exposure. From 1983 to 1992 we have examined patients suffering from malignant pleural mesothelioma treated with external radiotherapy. We treated 11 patients of which 9 were males and 2 were females. The most frequent symptom was the chest pain and all these patients underwent a torascoscopy followed by a pleasured. Of the 11 cases: 10 were malignant epithelial mesothelioma and 1 was a mixed pleural case. Afterwards, they were treated with external radiotherapy between 30 and 55 Gy, with few complications. At the moment, 5 patients are still alive and there is a survival rate of 50% at 24 and 60 months and of 25% at 120 months. We think that external radiotherapy is a good palliative treatment with few complications. (Author) 28 refs

  16. Radiotherapy: what are the patients' needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there is a substantial body of research into the impact of cancer therapies such as surgery and chemotherapy, little is known about the experiences of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Serial interviews with 39 patients undergoing radical radiotherapy to the oral cavity revealed that misunderstandings and groundless fears about this form of treatment were widespread. A majority were unprepared for the severity and duration of their side-effects. These results suggest that written information for patients about radiotherapy and its side-effects should be made available routinely. There is also scope for nutritional support. Finally, as a supplement to out-patient attendance, informal contact with the hospital in the immediate post-treatment phase would provide invaluable reassurance to patients. (author)

  17. Radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease in patients with spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla; Dunst, Juergen; Rades, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Bajrovic, Amira [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Basic, Hiba [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Karstens, Johann H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Adamietz, Irenaeus A. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ruhr Univ. of Bochum (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Saad Specialist Hospital, Al-Khobar (Saudi Arabia); Schild, Steven E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Background: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Patients with relatively radioresistant tumors and oligometastatic disease may benefit from more intensive therapies (surgery, high-precision radiotherapy). If such therapies are not available, one can speculate whether patients benefit from dose escalation beyond the standard regimen 30 Gy in ten fractions. Patients and methods: Of 206 patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors (renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, malignant melanoma), 51 had oligometastatic disease (no visceral or other bone metastases, involvement of only one to three vertebrae). In this subset, 21 patients receiving 30 Gy in ten fractions were retrospectively compared to 30 patients receiving higher doses. Seven further potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy of MSCC, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 52% of patients after 30 Gy and 40% after higher doses (p = 0.44). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.020). 1-year local control rates were 84% after 30 Gy and 82% after higher doses (p = 0.75). No factor was associated with local control. 1-year survival rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 63% after higher doses (p = 0.52). On multivariate analysis, survival was associated with performance status (p = 0.022) and interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.039), and almost with pretreatment ambulatory status (p = 0.069). Conclusion: Dose escalation beyond 30 Gy in ten fractions did not improve motor function, local control, and survival in MSCC patients with oligometastatic disease from relatively radioresistant tumors. (orig.)

  18. A national survey of supportive practices for patients undergoing radiotherapy for oral cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Xerostomia and mucositis are two of the main radiation induced toxicities experienced by patients undergoing radiotherapy to the oral cavity. These toxicities can lead to significant weight loss with the potential to cause complications with radiotherapy treatment. Literature has shown that nutritional intervention can help to minimise these side effects. The aim of the survey was to explore current practice across the UK in nutritional intervention for these patients. Method: Postal questionnaires were sent to all 63 radiotherapy departments in the UK in November 2009. Results: 29 responses (43%) were received. 90% (n = 26) of the departments used 3D-Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) as the main technique for treatment of these patients, with 48% (n = 14) of departments having implemented Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). All departments referred their patients to a dietician. 93% (n = 27) of departments placed percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy or radiologically-inserted gastrostomy tubes. 55% (n = 16) departments administered nasogastric tubes. Conclusion: This survey verified many common practices regarding dietary care and advice, some variation was evident in the use of feeding tubes. All responding centres referred patients to a dietician with the aim to maintain nutritional status and prevent weight loss that could contribute to uncertainty in treatment setup. This survey also demonstrated that since Macknelly and Day's (2009) study, a greater number of centres have implemented IMRT for patients undergoing radiotherapy to the head and neck. Although IMRT has been shown to reduce xerostomia, this audit found no changes in the dietary care and advice given to these patients

  19. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  20. Usefulness of a guide book for patients to self-help during radiotherapy for anxiety before radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From May through August 1993, 'a guide book for patients to self-help during radiotherapy' prepared at our department was given 80 patients before radiotherapy and the usefulness of this book for understanding of radiotherapy and reduction of anxiety for radiotherapy was investigated. In 83% of patients could read it through, and in 67% of these patients anxiety for treatment reduced. It is necessary that medical staffs make it clear more often, to let them understand this book more correctly. (author)

  1. Radiotherapy in the management of Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Koh-ichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Morita, Kazuo; Osanai, Hajime; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Hinoda, Yuji [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    To report the results of radiotherapy for patients with failure, adverse reactions or relative contraindications to the use of steroids or immunosuppressants, by using newly developed quantitative indexes. Fourteen female and six male patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with radiotherapy between 1989 and 1996. Prior to radiotherapy, eight patients received treatment with prednisone, four received immunosuppressants and four received a combination of both. Four patients with contraindications to steroids were initially managed with radiotherapy. Most of the patients received a dose of 24-28 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. We used the newly developed motility limitation index to assess extraocular motility. Treatment was well tolerated. There have been no late complications. All 12 patients with soft tissue signs such as edema, irritation, tearing and pain were improved. Proptosis did not improve or improved only slightly, 3 mm at best. However, proptosis in all but two has been stabilized and has not deteriorated in the follow-up period. Most of the patients have experienced an improvement of eye-muscle motility. Extraocular muscles that work for elevation were impaired more severely than the other muscles and this tended to remain. Of the 16 patients using steroids before or when radiotherapy was initiated, 15 were tapered off and only one patient required additional steroids, thus sparing the majority from steroid adverse reactions. Radiotherapy was effective in preventing exacerbations of active inflammatory ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves` disease with minimal morbidity and thus eliminated the adverse reactions associated with protracted corticosteroid use. The newly developed motility limitation index was useful in detecting delicate changes in motility of individual extraocular muscles. (author)

  2. Transition from 2-D radiotherapy to 3-D conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death globally and radiotherapy is currently an essential component in the management of cancer patients, either alone or in combination with surgery or chemotherapy, both for cure or palliation. It is now recognized that safe and effective radiotherapy service needs not only substantial capital investment in radiotherapy equipment and specially designed facilities but also continuous investment in maintenance and upgrading of the equipment to comply with the technical progress, but also in training the staff. The recent IAEA-TECDOC publication 'Setting up a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects' provides general guidelines for designing and implementing radiotherapy services in Member States. Advances in computer technology have enabled the possibility of transitioning from basic 2- dimensional treatment planning and delivery (2-D radiotherapy) to a more sophisticated approach with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT). Whereas 2-D radiotherapy can be applied with simple equipment, infrastructure and training, transfer to 3-D conformal treatments requires more resources in technology, equipment, staff and training. A novel radiation treatment approach using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) that optimizes the delivery of radiation to irregularly shaped tumour volumes demands even more sophisticated equipment and seamless teamwork, and consequentially more resources, advanced training and more time for treatment planning and verification of dose delivery than 3-D CRT. Whereas 3-D CRT can be considered as a standard, IMRT is still evolving. Due to the increased interest of Member States to the modern application of radiotherapy the IAEA has received a number of requests for guidance coming from radiotherapy departments that wish to upgrade their facilities to 3-D CRT and IMRT through Technical Cooperation programme. These requests are expected to increase

  3. Melanoma vectorized radiotherapy: preclinical evaluation of a new marker labelled by iodine 131; Radiotherapie vectorisee du melanome: evaluation preclinique d un nouveau vecteur marque par l iode 131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, M.; Papon, J.; Miot-Noirault, E.; Madelmont, J.C.; Chezal, J.M.; Moins, N. [INSERM/UdA, EA4231, UMR 990, 63 - Clermont Ferrand (France); Mishellany, F.; Penault-Llorca, F.; Cayre, A. [laboratoire d anatomopathologie, CJP, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2010-05-15

    A significant anti tumoral effect of the internal vectorized radiotherapy using the compound {sup 131}I-ICF01012 is demonstrated on different models of melanomas, whatever be their aggressive potential, the quantity and localisation of the melanoma target. this effect is associated to an inhibition of the tumors cells dissemination towards lungs. The optimization of the protocol therapy is underway to get a maximum therapy efficiency associated to a toxicity controlled on non target-organs. (N.C.)

  4. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  5. Concomitant boost radiotherapy in oropharynx carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Bieri, Sabine; Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Dulguerov, Pavel; Lehmann, Willy; Kurtz, John

    1998-01-01

    Fifty-five patients with resectable and unresectable oropharynx carcinomas were treated with concomitant boost radiotherapy. Forty-two of the patients (76%) had stages III-IV disease. Although none of the patients had undergone major surgery to the primary tumor, 11 had neck dissections prior to radiotherapy, and 19 (35%) received chemotherapy. The planned total tumor dose was 69.9 Gy, delivered over 5.5 weeks. During the last 3.5 weeks, a boost to the initial gross disease was delivered in 1...

  6. Radiotherapy-induced pemphigus: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 61-year-old male patient suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip developed pemphigus vulgaris two months after exposure to radiotherapy. Skin lesions were initially localised to the face and neck and later extended over other skin areas. The eruption are improved with gluco-steroid therapy, which were stopped after six months. Pemphigus induced by radiotherapy is rare, latency before the onset of the vesiculo-bullous eruption is variable. Clinical, histological and immunological characteristics are similar to those of other types of pemphigus. (author)

  7. Effects of radiotherapy on central venous ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During radiotherapy of patients with implant able central venous ports we are often afraid of complications resulting from ports damage on the one hand and their interaction with surrounding tissues on the other hand. In experimental conditions venous ports were exposed to radiation. It was found that radiation reflected from a port is negligible and should not put patients at risk. Radiotherapy does not cause any changes within a port chamber, however it substantially affects elasticity of a polyurethane port catheter and to a minimal extent affects silicone catheter. (authors)

  8. Fatigue and radiotherapy. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue is a common complaint for the cancer patient during and after radiotherapy, according to the published studies. Fatigue is a subjective symptom mostly underestimated by oncologists and other care givers. Etiology is complex, poorly understood in spite of obvious causes like insomnia, nausea, pain, depression, psychological distress, anemia, hypothyroidism, menopause disturbances, treatment adverse effects. Fatigue presents multi-factorial and multidimensional aspects. To evaluate it, many tools can be used as single-item, unidimensional and multidimensional instruments. Practically, the open discussion with the patient throughout radiotherapy is essential to define it. Taking charge fatigue requires its acknowledgement by radiotherapist, treatment of associated symptoms with a multidisciplinary approach. (authors)

  9. Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma is a rare tumor of infancy, sometimes associated with cutaneous hemangiomatosis. It is clinically evident within the first six months after birth and can be life threatening because of heart failure, intraperitoneal hemorrhage or thrombocytopenia. In less severe forms spontaneous regression has been described. Current treatment may be surgical ligation of the hepatic artery, or pharmacological therapy with corticosteroids or radiotherapy. A 4-month infant is described, admitted with acute heart failure and huge hepatomegaly. Since a surgical approach was not possible and corticosteroid therapy failed to achieve the expected effect, radiotherapy was given with excellent results. (orig.)

  10. Care of patients undergoing external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anxiety and associated depression suffered by most patients undergoing radiotherapy is discussed and the possibilities open to the nurse to encourage and reassure patients thus facilitating physical care are considered. The general symptoms of anorexia, nausea, tiredness, skin problems, alopecia, bonemarrow depresssion and rapid tumour destruction are described and nursing care prescribed. The side-effects which may occur following radiation of the brain, head and neck region, eyes, oesophagus, lung, abdomen, pelvis, bones, skin, spine, and spinal cord are considered from the nursing standpoint. The specialised subject of radiotherapy in children is discussed briefly. (U.K.)

  11. Some dosimetry problems in negative pion radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Baarli, Johan

    1973-01-01

    Momentum beams of negative pions are considered for radiotherapy. It is shown that the measurement of dose in this respect presents problems which are different from those encountered when using the more usual type of radiation. This difference arises principally from the nuclear interaction processes produced when the negative pion comes to rest. These processes, which are superimposed on the Bragg peak of the beam, produce a complex mixture of charged particles together with a beam contamination of muons and electrons. Some experimental studies of depth dose distributions, dose estimates, and other parameters to be considered for radiotherapy of cancer with beams of negative pions are discussed.

  12. Exploration of the Protection of Riboflavin Laurate on Oral Mucositis Induced by Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy at the Cellular Level: What Is the Leading Contributor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral or gastrointestinal mucositis is a frequent phenomenon in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In addition, several clinical investigations have demonstrated in recent years that riboflavin laurate has the potential to protect the patients from the disease induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In our studies, it is observed that riboflavin laurate can ameliorate either chemotherapy- or radiotherapy-induced toxicities on Helf cells, and the effect is greater than that of riboflavin. In addition, riboflavin laurate is able to transport through the Caco-2 cell monolayer as the prototype, indicating the protective effects may be produced by the prototype of riboflavin laurate, rather than simply by the released riboflavin.

  13. Radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy as combined treatment in rectal cancer. Final results of a phase III study of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is controversy whether adjuvant radiotherapy should be given before or after surgery for locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy substantially reduces local recurrence rates but may increase postoperative complications. In addition, patients found to have early cancers are treated unnecessarily. This study is a randomized trial of postoperative radiotherapy in patients who had a potentially curative resection for locally advanced rectal carcinoma. This trial failed to demonstrate any importance in overall survival or local control when postoperative irradiation was given following resection of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. (author)

  14. Spinal radiosurgery - efficacy and safety after prior conventional radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolajek Katharina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional external beam radiotherapy is a standard procedure for treatment of spinal metastases. In case of progression spinal cord tolerance limits further radiotherapy in pre-irradiated areas. Spinal stereotactic radiotherapy is a non-invasive option to re-treat pre-irradiated patients. Nevertheless, spinal radiosurgery results in relevant dose deposition within the myelon with potential toxicity. Aim of the study was to retrospectively analyse the efficacy and feasibility for salvage radiosurgery of spinal metastases. Methods During a period of 4 years (2005-2009 70 lesions in 54 patients were treated in 60 radiosurgery sessions and retrospectively analysed. Clinical (pain, sensory and motor deficit and radiological (CT/MRI follow-up data were collected prospectively after radiosurgery. Pain - as main symptom - was classified by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score. Every patient received single session radiosurgery after having been treated first-line with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. Kaplan-Meier method and life tables were used to analyse freedom from local failure and overall survival. Results At a median follow-up of 14.5 months the actuarial rates of freedom from local failure at 6/12/18 months were 93%, 88% and 85%, respectively. The median radiosurgery dose was 1 × 18 Gy (range 10-28 Gy to the median 70% isodose. The VAS score of patients with pain (median 6 dropped significantly (median 4, p = 0.002. In 6 out of 7 patients worse sensory or motor deficit after SRS was caused by local or distant failures (diagnosed by CT/MRI. One patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma developed a progressive complete paraparesis one year after the last treatment at lumbar level L3. Due to multiple surgery and radiosurgery treatments at the lumbar region and further local progression, the exact reason remained unclear. Apart from that, no CTC grade III or higher toxicity has been observed. Conclusions By

  15. Dosimetric quality control in radiotherapy using TLD methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project 'Development of a Quality Assurance Program for Radiation Therapy Dosimetry in Developing Countries' a Dosimetric Quality Control Group was set up in Argentina in 1996, to develop a program in order to improve radiotherapy in the country. Nowadays, this Group, briefly called External Audit Group (EAG), is composed by the national Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), which has the responsibility for dose determinations, traceability to international dosimetry chain and TLD measurements, and two Medical Physicists from CNEA who are working at the Oncology Hospital 'Marie Curie' in Buenos Aires. The present paper reports the activities performed by the EAG with external high energy photon beams in reference conditions and the results of two pilot studies on cobalt 60 beams in non-reference conditions. The first step of the program was to update the existing data base about the radiotherapy centres operating in the country. A form was sent to each of them in order to obtain basic information about their staff, number and type of treatment machines, brachytherapy sources, measuring devices, beam calibration, treatment planning system, simulator and other relevant data. 90 radiotherapy centres were registered in the EAG data base. Forms were completed by 75/90 centres. There are nowadays 69 cobalt 60 units and 42 LINACs operating in the country (18/42 LINACs producing high energy X ray and electron beams). EAG deals with measurements performed with mailed TLD irradiated at radiotherapy centres. Internal quality control on our TLD system is made during each audit by means of reference capsules irradiated by IAEA; external controls consist in blind tests performed by IAEA once a year. The correction factor, Ken, determined at our SSDL for high energy X-rays was checked with the collaboration of IAEA and Prague National Radiation Protection Institute (PNRPI) by means of a blind test. Results for 4 MV, 6 MV

  16. Optimization approaches for planning external beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozbasi, Halil Ozan

    Cancer begins when cells grow out of control as a result of damage to their DNA. These abnormal cells can invade healthy tissue and form tumors in various parts of the body. Chemotherapy, immunotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy are the most common treatment methods for cancer. According to American Cancer Society about half of the cancer patients receive a form of radiation therapy at some stage. External beam radiotherapy is delivered from outside the body and aimed at cancer cells to damage their DNA making them unable to divide and reproduce. The beams travel through the body and may damage nearby healthy tissue unless carefully planned. Therefore, the goal of treatment plan optimization is to find the best system parameters to deliver sufficient dose to target structures while avoiding damage to healthy tissue. This thesis investigates optimization approaches for two external beam radiation therapy techniques: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). We develop automated treatment planning technology for IMRT that produces several high-quality treatment plans satisfying provided clinical requirements in a single invocation and without human guidance. A novel bi-criteria scoring based beam selection algorithm is part of the planning system and produces better plans compared to those produced using a well-known scoring-based algorithm. Our algorithm is very efficient and finds the beam configuration at least ten times faster than an exact integer programming approach. Solution times range from 2 minutes to 15 minutes which is clinically acceptable. With certain cancers, especially lung cancer, a patient's anatomy changes during treatment. These anatomical changes need to be considered in treatment planning. Fortunately, recent advances in imaging technology can provide multiple images of the treatment region taken at different points of the breathing cycle, and deformable image registration algorithms can

  17. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Westmead Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Westmead Hospital, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  18. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  19. The significance and impact of dosimetry audits in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overall, dosimetry audit has improved consistency in radiotherapy results and outcomes for patients and provided confidence to clinicians in the dosimetry supporting their practice. Its importance and impact is clearly recognised and its encouragement of and links to other wider radiotherapy audit has been significant. As it is estimated that a large number of the existing radiotherapy facilities world-wide have not yet participated in some level of independent external dose quality audit, the breadth of uptake of audit is to be encouraged. As the complexity of radiotherapy develops, the scope of what can be included in dosimetry and wider radiotherapy quality audits also needs to continue to increase

  20. The Significance and Impact of Dosimetry Audits in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overall, dosimetry audit has improved consistency in radiotherapy results and outcomes for patients and provided confidence to clinicians in the dosimetry supporting their practice. Its importance and impact is clearly recognised and its encouragement of and links to other wider radiotherapy audit has been significant. As it is estimated that a large number of the existing radiotherapy facilities world-wide have not yet participated in some level of independent external dose quality audit, the breadth of uptake of audit is to be encouraged. As the complexity of radiotherapy develops, the scope of what can be included in dosimetry and wider radiotherapy quality audits also needs to continue to increase

  1. A prospective study of urinary tract infection during pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of urinary tract infection before and during pelvic radiotherapy was studied prospectively in 172 patients who were not catherised and had not had instrumentation for at least 4 weeks prior to radiotherapy. The incidence of urinary tract infection prior to radiotherapy was 17% and a further 17% of patients develped a urinary tract infection during radiotherapy. Mid-stream specimens of urine (MSU) should be examined for infection on a weekly basis during pelvic radiotherapy not only to identify this additional 17% of patients but also to detect those patients who have persistent urinary tract infection in spite of treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (author). 6 refs.; 1 fig.; 4 tabs

  2. SU-E-J-206: Adaptive Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies with MRIGuided Cobolt-60 Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Kamrava, M; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Even in the IMRT era, bowel toxicity and bone marrow irradiation remain concerns with pelvic irradiation. We examine the potential gain from an adaptive radiotherapy workflow for post-operative gynecological patients treated to pelvic targets including lymph nodes using MRI-guided Co-60 radiation therapy. Methods: An adaptive workflow was developed with the intent of minimizing time overhead of adaptive planning. A pilot study was performed using retrospectively analyzed images from one patient’s treatment. The patient’s treated plan was created using conventional PTV margins. Adaptive treatment was simulated on the patient’s first three fractions. The daily PTV was created by removing non-target tissue, including bone, muscle and bowel, from the initial PTV based on the daily MRI. The number of beams, beam angles, and optimization parameters were kept constant, and the plan was re-optimized. Normal tissue contours were not adjusted for the re-optimization, but were adjusted for evaluation of plan quality. Plan quality was evaluated based on PTV coverage and normal tissue DVH points per treatment protocol. Bowel was contoured as the entire bowel bag per protocol at our institution. Pelvic bone marrow was contoured per RTOG protocol 1203. Results: For the clinically treated plan, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 380 cc, 53% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 35% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 28% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. For the adaptive plans, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 175–201 cc, 55–62% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 21– 27% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 13–17% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. Conclusion: Adaptive planning led to a large reduction of bowel and bone marrow dose in this pilot study. Further study of on-line adaptive techniques for the radiotherapy of pelvic lymph nodes is warranted. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.

  3. Biological planning of treatment that combines local external radiotherapy with molecular systemic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of different therapy modalities for cancer treatment has been often used in order to enhance the outcomes. Therapeutic schemes that combines external beam irradiation ('eLRT') and systemic molecular radiotherapy (sMRT) could be an alternative in those patients with multiple lesions or when the constrains for OARs will difficult the planning. The formulation could be used for biological evaluation of prescriptions in treatment that combines external beam radiotherapy with systemic molecular radiotherapy. The advantage of ccRT v.s. scRT depends of treatment prescription (administered activity and dose fractioning) and tissue response. Treatment planning and optimization it is possible to be done in those cases where highly conformed dose boost using systemic molecular radiotherapy could be an option (author)

  4. Mammographic Findings after Intraoperative Radiotherapy of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT) is a form of accelerated partial breast radiation that has been shown to be equivalent to conventional whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of local cancer control. However, questions have been raised about the potential of f IORT to produce breast parenchymal changes that could interfere with mammographic surveillance of cancer recurrence. The purpose of this study was to identify, quantify, and compare the mammographic findings of patients who received IORT and EBRT in a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial of women with early stage invasive breast cancer undergoing breast conserving therapy between July 2005 and December 2009. Treatment groups were compared with regard to the 1, 2 and 4-year incidence of 6 post-operative mammographic findings: architectural distortion, skin thickening, skin retraction, calcifications, fat necrosis, and mass density. Blinded review of 90 sets of mammograms of 15 IORT and 16 EBRT patients demonstrated a higher incidence of fat necrosis among IORT recipients at years 1, 2, and 4. However, none of the subjects were judged to have suspicious mammogram findings and fat necrosis did not interfere with mammographic interpretation.

  5. Radiotherapy of the cephalic segment in patients with advanced neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the treatment results have significantly improved for several pediatric malignant neoplasms, particularly Wilms's tumor, lymphomas and leukemia, in the last decade, the prognosis of the INSS, stage 4 neuroblastoma over one year one old patients remains poor. Even for the more advanced centers, using the more aggressive treatment schedules, such as bone marrow transplantation, the probability of a 2 year progression free interval varies from 6 to 50% and at 3 to 6 years, from 13 to 54%. Thereby, at least, 46 to 94% of these patients are expected to die due to the merciless neoplasm progression. The hypothesis here to be tested is regarding the impact of the cephalic irradiation on the outcome of stage 4 patients with skull metastasis at diagnosis. The end point was to establish, under the NEURO-III-85 protocol chemotherapy schedule, the possible benefit of this radiotherapy in preventing the cephalic recurrence, and its reflex on these patients total and diseases free survival. These results disclosed that the cephalic segment irradiation may prevent recurrences at this site. Unfortunately, the decrease in the cranial recurrence frequency did not affect either the disease free interval, or the total survival. The conclusion was that cephalic irradiation have the potential of avoiding these recurrences, without modifying the final outcome. This modality of radiotherapy must be reevaluated under more effective systemic treatments. (author)

  6. Film dosimetry in conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danciu, C.; Proimos, B.S. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1995-12-01

    Dosimetry, through a film sandwiched in a transverse cross-section of a solid phantom, is a method of choice in Conformal Radiotherapy because: (a) the blackness (density) of the film at each point offers a measure of the total dose received at that point, and (b) the film is easily calibrated by exposing a film strip in the same cross-section, through a stationary field. The film must therefore have the following properties: (a) it must be slow, in order not to be overexposed, even at a therapeutic dose of 200 cGy, and (b) the response of the film (density versus dose curve) must be independent of the photon energy spectrum. A few slow films were compared. It was found that the Kodak X-Omat V for therapy verification was the best choice. To investigate whether the film response was independent of the photon energy, response curves for six depths, starting from the depth of maximum dose to the depth of 25 cm, in solid phantom were derived. The vertical beam was perpendicular to the anterior surface of the phantom, which was at the distance of 100 cm from the source and the field was 15x15 cm at that distance. This procedure was repeated for photon beams emitted by a Cobalt-60 unit, two 6 MV and 15 MV Linear Accelerators, as well as a 45 MV Betatron. For each of those four different beams the film response was the same for all six depths. The results, as shown in the diagrams, are very satisfactory. The response curve under a geometry similar to that actually applied, when the film is irradiated in a transverse cross-section of the phantom, was derived. The horizontal beam was almost parallel (angle of 85) to the plane of the film. The same was repeated with the central ray parallel to the film (angle 90) and at a distance of 1.5 cm from the horizontal film. The field size was again 15x15 at the lateral entrance surface of the beam. The response curves remained the same, as when the beam was perpendicular to the films.

  7. Similar Outcomes of Standard Radiotherapy and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Following Breast-Conserving Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Hai-Ling; Song, Yong-Chun; Li, Rui-Ying; Zhu, Li; Zhao, Lu-Jun; Yuan, Zhi-yong; You, Jin-Qiang; Chen, Zhong-Jie; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant radiation therapy is commonly administered to breast cancer patients who received breast-conserving surgery. However, lengthy treatment times of standard radiotherapy pose certain challenges. Here, we performed a prospective controlled study comparing standard radiation to hypofractionated radiotherapy in terms of efficacy and outcome. Material/Methods Eighty breast cancer patients (tumor stage pT1-2N0-1M0) who had undergone breast-conservation surgery were randomly divide...

  8. Dosimetric absorption of intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy in breast-conserving surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yang; WANG, BENZHONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits between intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CR) among patients receiving breast-conserving surgery. A dosimetric comparison of IMRT and CR was evaluated in 20 patients with early-stage breast cancer using a three-dimensional treatment planning system. The prescribed mammary gland dose was completed in 25 fractions with a total dose of 5,000 cGy. Homogeneity of the planning target volume (PTV), ...

  9. Locoregional post-mastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postoperative radiotherapy is controversial after radical mastectomy. Recent clinical trials have shown an increase in survival with this irradiation and conclusions of previous meta-analyses should be reconsidered and conclusions of previous meta-analyses should be reconsidered. The results of a large number of randomized clinical trials in which women received post-mastectomy radiotherapy or not have been renewed. These trials showed a decrease in locoregional failure with the use of postoperative radiotherapy but survival advantages have not been clearly identified. A large number of randomized clinical trials compared postoperative radiotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone and the association of the two treatments. They showed that chemotherapy was less active locally than radiotherapy and that radiotherapy and chemotherapy significantly increased both disease-free and overall survival rates in the groups which received postoperative radiotherapy. These favourable results were, however, obtained with optimal radiotherapy techniques and a relative sparing of lung tissue and cardiac muscle. Many retrospective clinical analyses concluded that results obtained in locoregional failure rate were poor and that these failures led to an increase in future risks. Both radiotherapy and systemic treatment should be delivered after mastectomy, reserved for patients with a high risk of with a diameter ≥ 5 cm. However, radiotherapy could produce secondary effects, and techniques of radiotherapy should be optimal. (author)

  10. Barriers to palliative radiotherapy referral: A Canadian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samant, Rajiv S.; Fitzgibbon, Edward; Meng, Joanne; Graham, Ian D. [Univ. of Ottawa. Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-15

    Radiotherapy is an effective but underutilized treatment modality for cancer patients. We decided to investigate the factors influencing radiotherapy referral among family physicians in our region. A 30-item survey was developed to determine palliative radiotherapy knowledge and factors influencing referral. It was sent to 400 physicians in eastern Ontario (Canada) and the completed surveys were evaluated. The overall response rate was 50% with almost all physicians seeing cancer patients recently (97%) and the majority (80%) providing palliative care. Approximately 56% had referred patients for radiotherapy previously and 59% were aware of the regional community oncology program. Factors influencing radiotherapy referral included the following: waiting times for radiotherapy consultation and treatment, uncertainty about the benefits of radiotherapy, patient age, and perceived patient inconvenience. Physicians who referred patients for radiotherapy were more than likely to provide palliative care, work outside of urban centres, have hospital privileges and had sought advice from a radiation oncologist in the past. A variety of factors influence the referral of cancer patients for radiotherapy by family physicians and addressing issues such as long waiting times, lack of palliative radiotherapy knowledge and awareness of Cancer Centre services could increase the rate of appropriate radiotherapy patient referral.

  11. Barriers to palliative radiotherapy referral: A Canadian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is an effective but underutilized treatment modality for cancer patients. We decided to investigate the factors influencing radiotherapy referral among family physicians in our region. A 30-item survey was developed to determine palliative radiotherapy knowledge and factors influencing referral. It was sent to 400 physicians in eastern Ontario (Canada) and the completed surveys were evaluated. The overall response rate was 50% with almost all physicians seeing cancer patients recently (97%) and the majority (80%) providing palliative care. Approximately 56% had referred patients for radiotherapy previously and 59% were aware of the regional community oncology program. Factors influencing radiotherapy referral included the following: waiting times for radiotherapy consultation and treatment, uncertainty about the benefits of radiotherapy, patient age, and perceived patient inconvenience. Physicians who referred patients for radiotherapy were more than likely to provide palliative care, work outside of urban centres, have hospital privileges and had sought advice from a radiation oncologist in the past. A variety of factors influence the referral of cancer patients for radiotherapy by family physicians and addressing issues such as long waiting times, lack of palliative radiotherapy knowledge and awareness of Cancer Centre services could increase the rate of appropriate radiotherapy patient referral

  12. A prospective longitudinal study of voice characteristics and health-related quality of life outcomes following laryngeal cancer treatment with radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Therese; Bergström, Liza; Ward, Elizabeth; Finizia, Caterina

    2016-06-01

    Background To investigate potential changes in perceptual, acoustic and patient-reported outcomes over 12 months for laryngeal cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Material and methods A total of 40 patients with Tis-T3 laryngeal cancer treated with curative intent by radiotherapy were included in this prospective longitudinal descriptive study. Patients were followed pre-radiotherapy, one month, six months and 12 months post-radiotherapy, where voice recordings and patient-reported outcome instruments (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire Core30, Head and Neck35, Swedish Self-Evaluation of Communication Experiences after Laryngeal Cancer) were completed at each appointment. Perceptual analysis, using the Grade-Roughness-Breathiness-Asthenia-Strain scale and vocal fry parameters, and acoustic measures including harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), jitter, shimmer and mean spoken fundamental frequency (MSFF) were produced from voice recordings. Results All patients presented with dysphonic voices pre-radiotherapy, where 95% demonstrated some degree of vocal roughness. This variable improved significantly immediately post-radiotherapy, however, then deteriorated again between six and 12 months. Vocal fry also increased significantly at 12 months. Acoustic measures were abnormal pre- and post-treatment with no significant change noted except for MSFF, which lowered significantly by 12 months. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) deteriorated post-radiotherapy but returned to pretreatment levels by 12 months. Conclusion By 12 months, most perceptual, acoustic, patient-reported voice and HRQL outcomes for laryngeal cancer patients treated by radiotherapy had showed no significant improvements compared to pretreatment function. Further studies are required to investigate potential benefits of voice rehabilitation following radiotherapy. PMID:27056401

  13. Sorafenib and radiotherapy association for hepatocellular carcinoma; Sorafenib et radiotherapie dans le carcinome hepatocellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. [Service de pneumologie, hopital Louis-Pradel, hospices Civils de Lyon, 28, avenue du Doyen-Jean-Lepine, 69500 Bron (France); UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Mornex, F. [UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Conformal radiotherapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), producing local control rates above 90% within the radiation beam. However, survival after radiotherapy remains limited by the high frequency of intra- and extra-hepatic recurrences, which occurs in 40-50 and 20-30% of cases, respectively. Sorafenib (BAY43-9006, Nexavar; Bayer, West Haven, CT) is a small molecule inhibitor that demonstrated potent activity to target v-raf murine sarcoma oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) and VEGFR tyrosine kinases. Sorafenib is the only drug that demonstrated effectiveness to increase overall survival in advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma. The rationale to combine radiotherapy with sorafenib is the following: (1) targeting RAS-RAF-MAPK and VEGFR signaling pathways, which are specifically activated after exposure to radiation, and responsible for radio-resistance phenomenon; (2) enhancing the oxygen effect through normalization of the surviving tumor vasculature; and (3) synchronization of the cell cycle. Sorafenib and radiotherapy represent complementary strategies, as radiotherapy may be useful to prolong the effect of sorafenib through control of the macroscopic disease, when sorafenib may target latent microscopic disease. Sorafenib and radiotherapy associations are thus based on a relevant biological and clinical rationale and are being evaluated in ongoing phase I-II trials. (authors)

  14. Comparison of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and sequential chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Prospective comparison was done on concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and sequential chemo-radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate three different regimens of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Methods: Ninety-six such patients were randomized into four groups: 1. sequential chemo-radiotherapy group received two cycles of induction chemotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of cisplatin on D 1-3, 29-31 and 100 mg/m2 of etoposide on D 1-3, 29-31 before conventional radiotherapy, 2. concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 1 received 100 mg/m2 etoposide on D 1-3 and DDP 40 mg/m2 on D 1-3, D 29-31, iv. drip, 3. concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 2 received concurrent chemotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of paclitaxel every Monday during conventional radiotherapy, 4. concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 3 received concurrent chemotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of paclitaxel every Monday during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. All patients were irradiated with 2.0 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week, to a total dose of 60 -64 Gy. They all received two cycles of consolidation themotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of cisplatin on D 1-3 and 100 mg/m2 of etoposide on D 1-3. Results: The overall response rate was 67%, 71%, 71% and 79% for sequential chemo-radiotherapy group, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and sequential chemo-radiotherapy(P0.05) also was the difference of toxicity (P>0.05), but the severe toxicity of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy groups 1 and 2 were higher than the sequential chemo-radio-therapy group and concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 3. Conclusions: Better locoregional progression-free survival and overall survival of unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer could be achieved by concurrent chemo-radiotherapy as compared with sequential chemo-radiotherapy though at the expense of in- crease in toxicity. With the combination of

  15. The IAEA Quality Audits for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA/WHO thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) postal dose audit programme has been used for over 8000 radiotherapy beams throughout the world in over four decades of its operation. Records have been kept of the results of TLD audits since the inception of the programme. Analysis of these data has yielded much interesting information. In the early years, the TLD service recorded approximately 50% audited beams having adequate calibration. This percentage of acceptable results has now increased to 96%. Obviously, regular participation in dosimetry audit stimulates an improvement in dosimetry practices in radiation therapy in many hospitals worldwide. Another dosimetry audit programme for treatment planning (TPS audit) in external beam radiotherapy, which has been developed by the IAEA, assesses the radiotherapy workflow for conformal techniques, from patient data acquisition and computerized treatment planning to dose delivery. The IAEA supports national and subregional TPS audit activities to improve the quality and safety of dose calculation in radiotherapy. The third audit modality operated by the IAEA within the framework of the Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology (QUATRO) is a comprehensive audit that reviews radiation oncology practices with the aim to improve quality. To date, over 50 QUATRO audits have been organized by the IAEA in radiation oncology centres in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America. QUATRO audits indicate and document areas for improvement and provide advice for further development of the audited centres. (author)

  16. Tumour-host dynamics under radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placeres Jimenez, Rolando, E-mail: rpjcu@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fi' sica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos - SP (Brazil); Ortiz Hernandez, Eloy [Centre of Medicine and Complexity, Medical University Carlos J. Finlay, Carretera Central s/n, Camagueey (Cuba)

    2011-09-15

    Highlight: > Tumour-host interaction is modelled by Lotka-Volterra equations. > A brief review of the motion integral and analysis of linear stability is presented. > Radiotherapy is introduced into the model, using a periodic Dirac delta function. > A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model. > It is shown that tumour can be controlled by a correct selection of therapy strategy. - Abstract: Tumour-host interaction is modelled by the Lotka-Volterra equations. Qualitative analysis and simulations show that this model reproduces all known states of development for tumours. Radiotherapy effect is introduced into the model by means of the linear-quadratic model and the periodic Dirac delta function. The evolution of the system under the action of radiotherapy is simulated and parameter space is obtained, from which certain threshold of effectiveness values for the frequency and applied doses are derived. A two-dimensional logistic map is derived from the modified Lotka-Volterra model and used to simulate the effectiveness of radiotherapy in different regimens of tumour development. The results show the possibility of achieving a successful treatment in each individual case by employing the correct therapeutic strategy.

  17. Late toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study is to describe and classify chronic complications due to radiotherapy in breast cancer. Also the impact of radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients is evaluated. Materials and methods: 50 patients with breast cancer at early stages (78% in situ, 22% I and II) treated with radiotherapy in breast volume plus boost (45/50 Gy + 18/20 Gy) with a follow up over 5 years. Acute toxicities were found retrospectively and chronic toxicities were assessed though physical examination and review of complementary studies. To facilitate data collection, pre printed forms were used. Bibliographic searches were made. Results: 10% received chemotherapy and 64% tamoxifen. The predominant chronic toxicity were found in skin (66%), although grade I and II (hyperpigmentation 26%, dryness 22%, telangiectasia 10% fibrosis, 4%, other 4%). A 50% of the patients showed hypoesthesia in ipsilateral upper limb. The other toxicities were presented in low rate and magnitude: mastodynia 16%; actinic pneumonitis 4%, pyrosis 4%, Tachycardia 2%, among others. Of the patients with acute toxicity, only 30% were grade III. The 70% of the patients had a positive impact of radiotherapy on quality of life. Conclusions: We found low rates and degrees of late toxicity. It was noticed a relationship between acute and chronic toxicity, because those who presented adverse effects during treatment developed late effects. It reflects the importance of integrating monitoring as part of radiation treatment. It should be adopted a single score of late toxicity measurement to unify data from different series. (authors)

  18. Clinical results in heavy particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter presents an overview of the use of heavy particles in human cancer radiotherapy. The biophysical characteristics and rationale for using heavy charged particle therapy are explored. The clinical experience with carbon, neon, argon and helium are summarized for various types of tumors including carcinomas of the uterine cervix and lung, skin melanomas and metastatic sarcomas. No obvious normal tissue complications have appeared

  19. Symptomatic vertebral hemangioma: Treatment with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aich Ranen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vertebrae are the second commonest site among skeletal locations affected by hemangioma, but only about one per cent becomes symptomatic throughout the life. Though surgery, intra vertebral injection of various sclerosing agents have been tried in treating this benign process, no general consensus regarding management has been reached. Radiotherapy is emerging as a low cost, simple, non-invasive but very effective modality of treatment of symptomatic vertebral hemangioma. Aim: This study aims to find out the role of external beam radiotherapy in alleviating the symptoms of symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas without compromising the quality of life. Materials and Methods: Seven consecutive patients with symptomatic vertebral hemangioma were treated with a fixed dose of external beam radiotherapy; and muscle power was assessed before, after treatment and during follow-up. Results: All patients showed improvement of muscle power, which increased with the passage of time. Pain relief with improvement of quality of life was obtained in all the patients. Conclusion: Effect of radiotherapy on vertebral hemangioma is dose-dependent and the dose limiting factor is the spinal cord tolerance. In the present era of IMRT, greater dose can be delivered to the parts of vertebra affected by the hemangioma without compromising the spinal cord tolerance and expected to give better results.

  20. Results of the national audit in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy in Cuba working for 8 years regularly visiting each country's radiotherapy service at least once every two years, during the visit involving two medical physicists and radiation oncologist. This paper presents the main features of the program and its main results. Early detection deficiencies in the work of the Radiation Therapy Services that may cause radiological risk situations for both patients and workers and the general public. Help with their comments to the continuous improvement of quality of care. During audit visits is reviewed the whole process of radiotherapy, since the patient comes to the monitoring service. This is done by dividing the audits into three groups or aspects: Clinical Aspects, Aspects of Safety and Quality Control Aspects of the equipment. Methodological guidelines have been established for conducting audits and they serve as standards of quality in radiation therapy, these guidelines also allow the quantification of results. It has identified the main gaps in services that affect the quality of care. After each visit, leave recommendations may be directed to the service itself, to the direction of the provincial hospital or health. Conclusions. We believe that the National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy is an effective tool in controlling the quality of the treatments offered and at the same time with its recommendations helps services to continually improve quality. (Author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, Marinus Adriaan

    2001-01-01

    From its inception in the early 1970's up to the present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into a sophisticated technique, which has aroused considerable interest in var- ious subelds of medicine including radiotherapy. MRI is capable of imaging in any plane and does not use ionizing rad

  2. Post-external radiotherapy hypothyroidism: 15 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-external radiotherapy hypothyroidism: 15 cases. Hypothyroidism frequency is estimated to be between 10 and 45% after radiotherapy alone, and 40 to 67% after radiotherapy associated with thyroidectomy. This hypothyroidism is infra-clinical in 60% of the cases. Our study concerned 15 cases of hypothyroidism after external radiotherapy delivered between and 1991 and 1999. An irradiation of the cervical, cerebral and thorax regions was indicated for different types of cancers. Larynx carcinoma epidermoid was the most frequent cancer (seven cases); the radiation treatment used cobalt 60 with conventional fractionation, i.e., 2 Gy per treatment, five treatments a week. In nine cases, the hypothyroidism was discovered during a systematic examination; it was clinically evident in the six remaining cases. Hypothyroidism appeared after an irradiation dose average of 50 Gy (extremes 30-65 Gy). The average duration of the irradiation was about 7 weeks and the hypothyroidism appeared in a mean 22 months. In all cases, the substituting treatment was initiated with a favorable progression. Faced with the risk of hypothyroidism, it is necessary to check patients who have undergone external irradiation of the neck. (authors)

  3. Radiotherapy for breast cancer and erythrokeratodermia variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernin, V; Kirova, Y; Campana, F

    2014-12-01

    We report the first case report indicating that locoregional radiotherapy provide acceptable early and late toxicities in patient with erythrokeratodermia variabilis after 2 years of follow-up. However, preclinical data showing radiation-induced tumor genesis in case of deficiency of some connexins point out the need of a careful surveillance of these patients. PMID:25306447

  4. Linac based radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were discussed: Definition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT); Stereo market; Indications for SRS/SRT; History of linac-based SRS/SRT; Variety of systems; QA for SRS; Localization; and Imaging. (P.A.)

  5. Radiotherapy for prostate cancer and sexual health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Incrocci (Luca)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSexual dysfunction is very common after treatment of prostate cancer. Radiation therapy together with radical prostatectomy is the most effective treatment for localized disease. Percentages of erectile dysfunction (ED) reported in prospective studies after external-beam radiotherapy (RT

  6. Radiotherapy for Peyronie's Disease: A European survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. Peyronie's Disease (PD) is a benign condition characterized by penile nodules, pain and curvature. Radiotherapy has been used for many years with positive outcomes, however all studies published were non-randomized or non-controlled. The purpose of this survey was to understand which treatment policy is followed in Europe before setting up a randomized trial. Materials and methods. A questionnaire was sent out to 908 European radiotherapy institutions, 402 questionnaires were sent back and filled out correctly (44.5%). The questionnaire consisted of different items, regarding number of patients referred, fraction dose, total dose and technique used, and eventually treatment outcome of clinical trials. Results. Seventy-three institutions irradiate PD (19%), 304 do not (81%). Reasons for not treating were insufficient referrals from urologists or no interest in treating benign diseases. The most common fraction dose is 2 (range 0.5-8) Gy and the total radiation dose 20 (range 3-30) Gy. Most of the institutions use electrons (n = 44) or orthovoltage (n = 32). Decreased pain is reported in about 80% of the cases, and side effects by eight institutions. Conclusions. So far, a large variation of treatment schedules for radiotherapy of PD has been detected in European countries. Although the results are good and side effects minimal, there is still a need to set up a European randomized trial to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy for PD

  7. The spanish radiotherapy park: past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article has as objective to provide a general overview on the spanish radiotherapy park, presenting how was its start and evolution until the current state. Considering only the units of teletherapy and the accelerators. Actually in Spain there is 28 units of Cobalt therapy, in functioning during the last two decades, being advised a rapid substitution to accelerators

  8. Secondary cancers after radiotherapy: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being intentional, delivering high radiation doses in well-defined volumes for cancer patients, radiotherapy poses a specific problem in terms of radio-induced secondary neoplasias. Actually, second cancers after radiotherapy have been almost ignored for decades, mostly because oncologists had not available large series of patients cured of cancer with more than 10-15 years of follow-up. Only anecdotal cases were reported (skin carcinomas, thyroid cancers, soft tissue sarcomas, osteosarcomas after retinoblastoma irradiation...). The picture changed in the 80's, in particular when large series of Hodgkin's disease patients were analyzed after a long follow-up. Second solid tumours were found to be significantly related to irradiation, and more precisely to dose and extend of radiation. In parallel, data from breast radiotherapy (for cancer or benign diseases), from fluoroscopy and atomic explosions, also suggested a small but increase in risk of breast cancer after a few Gy. Although the risk/benefit ratio remains usually exceedingly small, radiotherapy should help to answer two additional basic questions: In a group of irradiated patients, can we individualize those cancers induced by radiation from those which were not? and is there within the cancer patient population a subgroup of individuals more prone to cancer radio-induction (and for whom strategy should be possibly readapted)? (author)

  9. Quality assurance for image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics discussed include, among others, the following: Quality assurance program; Image guided radiotherapy; Commissioning and quality assurance; Check of agreement between visual and displayed scales; quality controls: electronic portal imaging device (EPID), MV-kV and kV-kV, cone-beam CT (CBCT), patient doses. (P.A.)

  10. Palliative radiotherapy for symptomatic osseous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone matastases are one of the most common and serious conditions requiring radiotherapy, but there is still a considerable lack of agreement on optimal radiation schedule. We analyzed patients with symptomatic osseous matastases from lung (72 patients) and breast (63 patients) carcinoma treated by palliative radiotherapy between 1983 and 1992. In this series, the incidences of symptomatic bone metastases appearing within 2 years after the first diagnosis of the primary lesion were 96% and 36% for lung and breast carcinomas, respectively. Thirty percent of bone metastases from breast carcinoma were diagnosed more than 5 years after the first diagnosis. Thus careful follow-up must be carried out for a prolonged period. Pain relief was achieved at almost the same rate for bone metastases from lung and breast carcinomas (81% and 85%, respectively), an the rapid onset of pain relief (15 Gy or less) was obtained in about half the patients for both diseases. The rapid onset of pain relief and the lack of association between the onset of pain relief and primary tumor argued against the conventional theory that tumor shrinkage is a component of the initial response. In contrast to the fact that almost all lung carcinoma patients had very poor prognoses, one third of the breast carcinoma patients were alive more than 2 years after palliative radiotherapy. Thust, the late effects of radiation, such as radiation myelopathy, must be always considered especially in breast carcinoma patients even when it is 'just' palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. (author)

  11. Simple dose verification system for radiotherapy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to investigate an accurate and convenient quality assurance programme that should be included in the dosimetry system of the radiotherapy level radiation. We designed a mailed solid phantom and used TLD-100 chips and a Rexon UL320 reader for the purpose of dosimetry quality assurance in Taiwanese radiotherapy centers. After being assembled, the solid polystyrene phantom weighted only 375 g which was suitable for mailing. The Monte Carlo BEAMnrc code was applied in calculations of the dose conversion factor of water and polystyrene phantom: the dose conversion factor measurements were obtained by switching the TLDs at the same calibration depth of water and the solid phantom to measure the absorbed dose and verify the accuracy of the theoretical calculation results. The experimental results showed that the dose conversion factors from TLD measurements and the calculation values from the BEAMnrc were in good agreement with a difference within 0.5%. Ten radiotherapy centers were instructed to deliver to the TLDs on central beam axis absorbed dose of 2 Gy. The measured doses were compared with the planned ones. A total of 21 beams were checked. The dose verification differences under reference conditions for 60Co, high energy X-rays of 6, 10 and 15 MV were truly within 4% and that proved the feasibility of applying the method suggested in this work in radiotherapy dose verification

  12. Progress of cervical cancer genetic-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although cervical cancer gene therapy has a distance to clinical use due to some problems, the combinating of irradiation and gene therapy holds much promise in cancer therapy based on the traditional radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. This review focuses on the group of radiogenic therapy that are either. (authors)

  13. Clinical research of teeth damage from radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze various factors inducing teeth damage from radiotherapy and the preventive and treatment methods. Methods: One hundred cases of patients treated by radiotherapy were divided into two groups. In group one there were 60 cases whose teeth were irradiated during treatment; in group two there were 40 cases whose teeth were not irradiated during treatment. Results: The caries incidence was 60% for group one and 15% for group two (P<0.01). By auto-control in 15 patients, the caries incidence on the sick side was obviously higher than that of the healthy side. Hundred percent caries incidence was found in 6 cases who received a dosage of 70 Gy. Conclusion: The authors believe that radiation damage to the teeth is associated with the following factors: 1. The dosage and location of irradiation are closely related to caries incidence; 2. The active dentinoblasts are very sensitive to radiation; 3. Damage to the salivary glands from radiotherapy can result in reduction of salvia and pH value, leading to a high growth rate of Streptococcus mutans. Following preventive measures could be considered in future cases: to apply a caries prevention coating or protective dental crown and TPS, to adjust the dose and time of irradiation, to select conformal radiotherapy technique. The key points for protecting the teeth and salivary gland from caries and damage are protection of the proliferation ability of pulp cells, anti-inflammation, promotion of microcirculation, and strengthening body resistance

  14. Carbonic anhydrase IX and response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: a subgroup analysis of the DBCG82 b and c trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, M.; Sorensen, F.B.; Alsner, J.;

    2008-01-01

    studies included 3,083 high-risk Danish breast cancer patients. The women were randomly assigned to postmastectomy radiotherapy plus systemic therapy (cyclophosfamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil in premenopausal women; and tamoxifen in postmenopausal women) or to systemic therapy alone. Cores from......Introduction A significant survival improvement after postmastectomy radiotherapy was identified in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG82) b and c studies and in the British Columbia Randomized Radiation Trial. Recently, potential predictive value regarding response to postmastectomy...

  15. Carbonic anhydrase IX and response to postmastectomy radiotherapy in high-risk breast cancer: a subgroup analysis of the DBCG82 b and c trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyndi, Marianne; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Knudsen, Helle;

    2008-01-01

    studies included 3,083 high-risk Danish breast cancer patients. The women were randomly assigned to postmastectomy radiotherapy plus systemic therapy (cyclophosfamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil in premenopausal women; and tamoxifen in postmenopausal women) or to systemic therapy alone. Cores from......INTRODUCTION: A significant survival improvement after postmastectomy radiotherapy was identified in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG82) b and c studies and in the British Columbia Randomized Radiation Trial. Recently, potential predictive value regarding response to postmastectomy...

  16. Radiotherapy for the primary ocular adnexal lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the pathological and clinical characteristics of primary lymphoma of ocular adnexae, analyze the treatment results and discuss the methods to prevent radiation complications. Methods: From Feb. 1995 to Feb. 2004, 25 patients with primary ocular adnexal lymphoma were treated in the second hospital and the forth hospital of Xuzhou, including 11 males and 14 females. The diagnosis was confirmed pathologically by biopsy in 19 patients and lumpectomy in 6 patients, including 22 mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and 3 non-MALT lymphoma. According to the Ann Arbor Staging System, there were 21 patients with tumor in stage I E, 3 in stage II E and 1 in stage III E. The primary tumor was found in the eyelid or conjunctiva in 19 eyes and orbit in 9 eyes. Radiotherapy were given to 22 patients (25 eyes) by deep X-rays, 60Co γ-rays or mixed beams. The total irradiation dose ranged from 30.0 to 57.6 Gy. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate and Logrank test was used to detect the difference between the different groups. Results: The 5-, 10-year accumulated survival rates (SR) of the whole group were 90% and 82%. The 10-year SR of patients with primary, eyelid or conjunctiva tumor and orbit tumor were 100% and 58% (P=0.032). The local control rates of the radiotherapy group and non-radiotherapy group were 92% and 33 % (P=0.006). The 10-year SR of patients with tumor completely removed and those with residues were 83% and 82% (P=0.907). The 10-year SR of MALT lymphoma and non-MALT lymphoma were 90.0% and 33.3% (P=0.009). After radiotherapy, 8 eyes (36%) had cataract formation and 7 eyes (28%) had xerophalmic symptoms. Conclusions: The results of radiothera- py for the primary ocular adnexal lymphoma are satisactory. The prognosis of patients with primary, eyelid or conjunctiva tumor is better than those with orbit tumor. The vast majority of the primary ocular adnexal lymphomas are MALT lymphomas. The survival rate of

  17. Planning national radiotherapy services: A practical tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a leading cause of death globally. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 7.6 million people died of cancer in 2005 and 84 million people will die of the disease in the next ten years if action is not taken. More than 70% of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries (LMCs), where resources available for prevention, diagnosis and treatment are limited or non-existent. In high income countries, about 50% of new cases of cancer require radiotherapy at least once. Because of the types of cancer, the advanced nature of the cases at diagnosis and the lack of other resources, the proportion of new cases requiring radiotherapy is likely to be much higher in LMCs. During the last few years, there has been an increased demand from Member States for the IAEA to provide assistance, including the provision of radiation sources and equipment in establishing radiotherapy programmes for the treatment of cancer. The IAEA is the United Nations system organization with a mandate in nuclear technology transfer for nuclear applications in human health. Through its human health programme, the IAEA coordinates research projects, produces and publishes teaching materials and clinical guidelines, maintains databases, and delivers laboratory services to Member States worldwide. The Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) was established by the IAEA in 2004 in response to the developing world's growing cancer crisis. It builds on previous IAEA experience in radiation medicine and technology - essential in cancer diagnosis and treatment - to assist LMCs cope with cancer by integrating radiotherapy into sustainable comprehensive cancer control programmes. An earlier IAEA publication, 'Setting Up a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects', describes how a radiotherapy centre should be developed, implemented and managed to establish a common and consistent framework in which all steps and procedures

  18. Radiotherapy for cutaneous cancers with xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To analyze the therapeutic results of cutaneous cancers on xeroderma pigmentosum through a series of 15 patients treated by radiotherapy. Patients and methods. - Between 1993 and 2006, 15 patients with xeroderma pigmentosum and having cutaneous cancers were treated in the Radiotherapy Department of university hospital Habib-Bourguiba of Sfax in Tunisia. Seventy-three percent of the cases occurred in male patients and the mean age of appearance of the first tumour was 18.2 years. Tumour histology was squamous cell carcinoma in 74% of the cases. The total number of cutaneous tumours was 84. Ten patients had a surgical resection. Four patients did not respond to chemotherapy. The modality of irradiation was decided according to the size, thickness and localization of the tumour. The dose of radiotherapy was 60 Gy or equivalent with classic irradiation. Results. - The total number of lesions treated with radiotherapy was 64. Forty-three lesions were treated with contact-therapy, ten with brachytherapy and 11 with cobalt-therapy. The following acute complications were observed: cutaneous infection (53.3% of patients), radio-epithelitis (80% of patients) and necroses (33.3% of patients). Evaluation after treatment showed a clinical complete remission in 73% of the cases. Late effects were noted in seven cases: telangiectasia and cutaneous atrophy. A recurrence in the irradiated zone was observed in one case. A nodal metastasis was observed in two cases. Another patient presented lung metastases. After a median follow up of 37.2 months, four patients died, seven are alive with cutaneous cancer and four are alive with complete remission. Conclusion. - Radiotherapy is a possible and effective therapeutic alternative. Dose and methods are not defined for xeroderma pigmentosum. (authors)

  19. Experimental and clinical studies with intraoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of normal tissue tolerance to intraoperative radiotherapy were done upon 65 dogs subjected to laparotomy and 11 million electron volt electron irradiation in doses ranging from zero to 5,000 rads. Results of studies indicated that intact aorta and vena cava tolerate up to 5,000 rads without loss of structural integrity. Ureteral fibrosis and stenosis develop at doses of 3,000 rads or more. Arterial anastomoses heal after doses of 4,500 rads, but fibrosis can lead to occlusion. Intestinal suture lines heal after doses of 4,500 rads. Bile duct fibrosis and stenosis develop at doses of 2,000 rads or more. Biliary-enteric anastomoses fail to heal at any dose level. A clinical trial of intraoperative radiotherapy combined with radical surgery was performed upon 20 patients with advanced malignant tumors which were considered unlikely to be cured by conventional therapies and which included carcinomas of the stomach, carcinomas of the pancreas, carcinomas involving the hilus of the liver, retroperitoneal sarcomas and osteosarcomas of the pelvis. All patients underwent resection of gross tumor, followed by intraoperative irradiation of the tumor bed and regional nodal basins. Some patients received additional postoperative external beam radiotherapy. Treatment mortality for combined operation and radiotherapy occurred in four of 20 patients. Postoperative complications occurred in four of the 16 surviving patients. Local tumor control was achieved in 11 of the 16 surviving patients, with an over-all median follow-up period of 18 months. The clinical trial suggested that intraoperative radiotherapy is a feasible adjunct to resection in locally advanced tumors, that the resulting mortality and morbidity is similar to that expected from operation alone and that local tumor control may be improved

  20. Radical radiotherapy for T3 laryngeal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, T. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Itami, J. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Kotaka, K. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Therapy; Toriyama, M. [International Medical Center of Japan, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    1996-08-01

    From 1974 through 1992, 37 previously untreated patients with T3 laryngeal cancer (supraglottic 15, glottic 22) were treated with initial radical radiotherapy and surgery for salvage. Two-year local control rate with radiotherapy alone, ultimate voice preservation rate, and ultimate local control rate for T3 supraglottic cancer were 33%, 33%, and 60%, respectively. Corresponding figures for T3 glottic cancer were 32%, 23%, and 77%, respecitvely. Five-year cause-specific survival rate for T3 supraglottic cancer and glottic cancer were 47% and 77%, respectively. In T3 supraglottic cancer, none of the 4 patients with subglottic tumor extension attained local control by radiotherapy alone, and local-regional recurrence-free time were significantly shorter in patients with subglottic tumor extension or tracheostomy before radiotherapy. There were no serious late complications such as chondronecrosis, rupture of carotid artery attributed to radical radiotherapy, while 3 patients had severe laryngeal edema requiring total laryngectomy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Von 1974 bis 1992 wurden 37 zuvor nicht behandelte Patienten mit T3-Larynxkarzinomen (15 supraglottisch, 22 glottisch) primaer kurativ bestrahlt und, wenn erforderlich, einer Salvage-Operation unterzogen. Die Zwei-Jahres-Kontrollrate bei alleiniger Strahlentherapie, die Rate der Stimmerhaltung sowie die unter Einschluss der Operation erreichbare lokale Kontrollrate bei supraglottischen T3-Larynxkarzinomen betrugen 33%, 33% und 60%. Bei glottischen T3-Karzinomen wurden jeweils 32%, 23% und 77% erreicht. Die Fuenf-Jahres-Ueberlebensrate betrug 47% bei supraglottischen T3-Karzinomen und 77% bei den glottischen Karzinomen. Im Fall von supraglottischen Karzinomen erreichte keiner der vier Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung eine lokale Kontrolle durch alleinige Strahlentherapie. Die lokoregionale rezidivfreie Zeit war bei den Patienten mit subglottischer Tumorausdehnung oder Tracheostomie vor Einleitung der

  1. Present status of radiotherapy in Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy departments are one of the most expensive health facilities to equip, maintain and run efficiently. In Zimbabwe, there are two radiotherapy centres, at Parirenyatwa Central Hospital in Harare and at Mpilo Central Hospital in Bulawayo. Both these centres have nuclear imaging facilities. The radiotherapy services also cater for patients from neighbouring states. A referral system for consultation and prescription by the radiotherapist is in use. Administration of most cytotoxics is done in the radiotherapy department. Zimbabwe's population is over 8 million. Of this, yearly averages of 400 to 500 and over 700 new patients are seen at the Bulawayo and Harare centres respectively. So far 159 new cervical cancer patients have been seen this year at the Bulawayo centre. To cater for this and other malignancies, facilities ranging from the supervoltage therapy to a linear accelerator are available as well as limited brachytherapy facilities. The funding of these has been from the government, charity organisations and international aid agreements. Servicing and maintenance of the units is done by the private sector. Treatment planning is done mostly by radiographers but the more complex techniques are not done due to lack of qualified medical physicists. This shortage also affects the calibration of and other routine checks of the equipment. Progress in these services has been hampered by the lack of local radiotherapists. Improvements are expected with the WHO radiotherapist training programme due to start in 1990. If the cancer awareness programme is stepped up, the demands on the radiotherapy services will increase, necessitating review and updating of the present facilities and staffing levels. (author). 1 fig., 5 tabs

  2. The role of radiotherapy for thymic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate retrospectively the role of radiotherapy for thymic carcinoma. Between 1973 and 1998, 14 patients with thymic carcinoma were treated at Gunma Prefectural Cancer Center. Two patients who had hematogenous metastasis were excluded from this study, therefore 12 patients were analyzed. The Masaoka staging system was used; four patients were diagnosed with stage III disease and eight patients with stage IV disease. The pathological subtype according to the World Health Organization histological criteria for thymic tumors was squamous cell carcinoma (low-grade histology) in six cases and undifferentiated carcinoma (high-grade histology) in six. Ten patients underwent thoracotomy, and two patients underwent excisional biopsy without thoracotomy. Ten patients (83%) received radiotherapy as a curative intent, and the median dose was 60 Gy. Systemic chemotherapy was administered to four patients (33%), and the majority (75%) of the regimens contained cisplatin. The 3-year overall survival rate was 25%. Histological subtype (low-grade versus high-grade), surgical resection (complete versus incomplete), radiotherapy and chemotherapy were evaluated as prognostic factors in a univariate analysis. Low-grade histology and complete resection were good prognostic factors, although these were not statistically significant. Patients who received radiotherapy had a better outcome than those who did not. The major sites of recurrence were the pleura and pericardium. Recurrence within the radiation field was observed in one of seven patients in whom failure patterns could be evaluated. Complete resection is mandatory if possible. Radiotherapy plays an important role in treating thymic carcinoma in terms of reducing local recurrence and prolonging survival time. Establishment of an innovative treatment protocol that includes chemotherapy is necessary to control intrathoracic relapse and distant metastasis. (authors)

  3. Predictive value of hypoxia, proliferation and tyrosine kinase receptors for EGFR-inhibition and radiotherapy sensitivity in head and neck cancer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: EGFR-inhibitor Cetuximab (C225) improves the efficacy of radiotherapy in only a subgroup of HNSCC patients. Identification of predictive tumor characteristics is essential to improve patient selection. Material and methods: Response to C225 and/or radiotherapy was assessed with tumor growth delay assays in 4 HNSCC xenograft models with varying EGFR-expression levels. Hypoxia and proliferation were quantified with immunohistochemistry and the expression of proteins involved in C225-resistance with Western blot. Results: EGFR-expression did not predict response to C225 and/or radiotherapy. Reduction of hypoxia by C225 was only observed in SCCNij202, which was highly sensitive to C225. Proliferation changes correlated with response to C225 and C225 combined with radiotherapy, as proliferation decreased after C225 treatment in C225-sensitive SCCNij202 and after combined treatment in SCCNij185, which showed a synergistic effect to combined C225-radiotherapy. Furthermore, C225-resistant SCCNij153 tumors expressed high levels of (activated) HER3 and MET. Conclusions: EGFR-expression is needed for C225-response, but is not sufficient to predict response to C225 with or without radiotherapy. However, basal expression of additional growth factor receptors and effects on proliferation, but not hypoxia, correlated with response to combined C225-radiotherapy treatment and are potential clinically relevant predictive biomarkers

  4. DCEMRI of spontaneous canine tumors during fractionated radiotherapy: A pharmacokinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate pharmacokinetic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCEMR) images of spontaneous canine tumors taken during the course of fractionated radiotherapy, and to quantify treatment-induced changes in these parameters. Materials and methods: Six dogs with tumors in the oral or nasal cavity received fractionated conformal radiotherapy with 54 Gy given in 18 fractions. T1-weighted DCEMR imaging was performed prior to each treatment fraction. Time-intensity curves in the tumor were extracted voxel-by-voxel, and were fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. The dependence of the pharmacokinetic parameters on the accumulated radiation dose was calculated. Results: The Brix model reproduced the time-intensity curves well. A reduction in the kep parameter with accumulated radiation dose was found for five (three significant) out of six cases, while the results for the A parameter were less consistent. Both pre-treatment kep and the change in kep with accumulated dose correlated significantly with tumor regression. Conclusions: Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCEMR images taken during fractionated radiotherapy may predict response to radiotherapy. This may potentially impact on patient stratification and monitoring of treatment response for image-guided treatment strategies.

  5. Intraoperative radiotherapy as a protocol for the treatment of initial breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report on preliminary outcomes of single-dose intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer based on local recurrence rates and complications. Methods: fifty postmenopausal women with ≤2.5cm breast tumors and clinically normal axillary lymph nodes were submitted to quadrantectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and intraoperative radiotherapy and studied. Mean follow-up time was 52.1 months. Results: mean patient age was 65.5 years; mean tumor diameter was 1.41cm 82% of nodules were hormonal receptor positive and HER-2negative. All patients received a 21 Gy radiation dose for a mean time of 8.97 minutes. Distant metastases were not observed. Local recurrence was documented in three cases, with identical histological diagnosis as the primary tumors. Thirty-five (70%) patients had local fibrosis, with gradual improvement and complete resolution over 18 months. Postoperative infection and seroma formation were not observed. Conclusion: partial radiotherapy is a potentially feasible and promising technique. Careful patient selection is recommended before a longer follow-up period has elapsed to confirm intraoperative radiotherapy safety and efficacy. (author)

  6. Testicular dose in prostate cancer radiotherapy. Impact on impairment of fertility and hormonal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Budach, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Charite - Univ. Clinic - Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Kuschke, W.; Bohsung, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Charite - Univ. Clinic - Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: to determine the dose received by the unshielded testicles during a course of 20-MV conventional external-beam radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Critical evaluation of the potential impact on fertility and hormonal impairment in these patients according to the literature. Patients and methods: the absolute dose received by the testicles of 20 randomly selected patients undergoing radiotherapy of prostate cancer was measured by on-line thermoluminescence dosimetry. Patients were treated in supine position with an immobilization cushion under their knees. A flexible tube, containing three calibrated thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) was placed on top or underneath the testicle closest to the perineal region with a day-to-day alternation. The single dose to the planning target volume was 1.8 Gy. Ten subsequent testicle measurements were performed on each patient. The individual TLDs were then read out and the total absorbed dose was calculated. Results: the mean total dose ({+-} standard deviation) measured in a series of 10 subsequent treatment days in all patients was 49 cGy ({+-} 36 cGy). The calculated projected doses made on a standard series of 40 fractions of external-beam radiotherapy were 196 cGy ({+-} 145 cGy). The results of this study are appraised with the available data in the literature. Conclusion: the dose received by the unshielded testes can be assessed as a risk for permanent infertility and impairment of hormonal function in prostate cancer patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy. (orig.)

  7. Data-driven Markov models and their application in the evaluation of adverse events in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decision-making processes in medicine rely increasingly on modelling and simulation techniques; they are especially useful when combining evidence from multiple sources. Markov models are frequently used to synthesize the available evidence for such simulation studies, by describing disease and treatment progress, as well as associated factors such as the treatment's effects on a patient's life and the costs to society. When the same decision problem is investigated by multiple stakeholders, differing modelling assumptions are often applied, making synthesis and interpretation of the results difficult. This paper proposes a standardized approach towards the creation of Markov models. It introduces the notion of 'general Markov models', providing a common definition of the Markov models that underlie many similar decision problems, and develops a language for their specification. We demonstrate the application of this language by developing a general Markov model for adverse event analysis in radiotherapy and argue that the proposed method can automate the creation of Markov models from existing data. The approach has the potential to support the radiotherapy community in conducting systematic analyses involving predictive modelling of existing and upcoming radiotherapy data. We expect it to facilitate the application of modelling techniques in medical decision problems beyond the field of radiotherapy, and to improve the comparability of their results. (author)

  8. A Review of Radiotherapy for Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justin; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck (MCCHN) presents a clinical challenge due to its aggressive natural history, unpredictable lymphatic drainage, and high degree of treatment related morbidity. Histological examination of the regional lymph nodes is very important in determining the optimal treatment and is usually achieved by sentinel lymph node biopsy. Radiotherapy plays a critical role in the treatment of most patients with MCCHN. Surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy to the primary tumour site is associated with high local control rates. If lymph nodes are clinically or microscopically positive, adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated to decrease the risk of regional recurrence. The majority of locoregional recurrences occur at the edge or just outside of the radiation field, reflecting both the inherent radiosensitivity of MCC and the importance of relatively large volumes to include “in-transit” dermal lymphatic pathways. When surgical excision of the primary or nodal disease is not feasible, primary radiotherapy alone should be considered as a potentially curative modality and confers good loco-regional control. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is well tolerated and may further improve outcomes. PMID:23213534

  9. Randomised trial of standard 2D radiotherapy (RT) versus intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients prescribed breast radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radiation dose distributions created by two dimensional (2D) treatment planning are responsible for partial volumes receiving >107% of the prescribed dose in a proportion of patients prescribed whole breast radiotherapy after tumour excision of early breast cancer. These may contribute to clinically significant late radiation adverse effects. Aim: To test three dimensional (3D) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) against 2D dosimetry using standard wedge compensators in terms of late adverse effects after whole breast radiotherapy. Methods: Three hundred and six women prescribed whole breast radiotherapy after tumour excision for early stage cancer were randomised to 3D IMRT (test arm) or 2D radiotherapy delivered using standard wedge compensators (control arm). All patients were treated with 6 or 10 MV photons to a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions to 100% in 5 weeks followed by an electron boost to the tumour bed of 11.1 Gy in 5 fractions to 100%. The primary endpoint was change in breast appearance scored from serial photographs taken before radiotherapy and at 1, 2 and 5 years follow up. Secondary endpoints included patient self-assessments of breast discomfort, breast hardness, quality of life and physician assessments of breast induration. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results: 240 (79%) patients with 5-year photographs were available for analysis. Change in breast appearance was identified in 71/122 (58%) allocated standard 2D treatment compared to only 47/118 (40%) patients allocated 3D IMRT. The control arm patients were 1.7 times more likely to have a change in breast appearance than the IMRT arm patients after adjustment for year of photographic assessment (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.5, p = 0.008). Significantly fewer patients in the 3D IMRT group developed palpable induration assessed clinically in the centre of the breast, pectoral fold, infra-mammary fold and at the boost site. No significant differences between treatment groups

  10. Trans-arterial chemo-embolization and conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma; Chimioembolisation et radiotherapie de conformation dans le traitement du carcinome hepatocellulaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merle, P. [Service d' hepatogastroenterologie, hopital de l' Hotel-dieu, 1, place de l' Hopital, 69002 Lyon (France); Inserm U871, equipe ' Oncogenese hepatique et hepatites virales' , 151, cours Albert-Thomas, 69003 Lyon (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, IFR62 Lyon-Est, 8, avenue Rockefeller, 69008 Lyon (France); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69310 Pierre-Benite (France); equipe ' Ciblage therapeutique par les agents physiques' , EA 37-38, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-Novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a poor prognosis tumour. The potential curative therapeutic options are ortho-topic liver transplantation, surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation. Unfortunately, only a minority of patients (around 20%) are eligible for these techniques. Thus, patients can benefit from palliative options, such as trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) or sorafenib that bring only modest benefit on survival. Conformal radiotherapy allows delivering high dose radiation within a precise tumour volume while sparing the surrounding liver parenchyma. As employed in mono-therapy, conformal radiotherapy is highly efficient for small size hepatocellular carcinoma (< 5 cm). Above 5 cm, its efficacy is more limited but its association with TACE gives spectacular rates of complete responses. Controlled phase 2 or 3 trials are urgently warranted to define its indications in the therapeutic algorithm of hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  11. Overview of radiotherapy resources in Beijing in 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the resources of radiotherapy in Beijing, in order to provide reference for the subject development, resources allocation and professional training of radiotherapy. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted by on-site inspection, supplemented by telephone or e-mail investigation among the 33 hospitals with radiotherapy facilities to know the current status of distribution of radiotherapy institutions, radiotherapy facilities, human resources and number of patients treated. Results: There were 52 linear accelerators, 1 spiral CT machine, and 2 intraoperative radiotherapy machines in these 33 hospitals up to June 2010. Three-dimensional conformal or stereotactic radiotherapy was carried out in 31 hospitals, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in 19, image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) in 6, and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMRT) in 2. The number of professional personnel (except nurses) was 495, including 214 radiation oncologists, 78 radiotherapy physicists, and 203 radiotherapy technologists, and those with senior professional titles accounted for 52.3%, 17.9%, and 1.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Compared to the national level, the radiotherapy resources level is higher in Beijing, but the distribution of resources is imbalanced. The resource allocation should be optimized and training of the personnel should be strengthened so as to meet the growing needs of patients. (authors)

  12. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is decreasing, while therapy-related symptoms are increasing in the course of radiotherapy. Even after the end of the therapy these symptoms keep on causing distress, sometimes in a higher amount than before. A correlation between sex, sort of cancer and curative or palliative treatment and the amount of distress was found. Conclusion: the results stress the importance of adequate emotional support for patients undergoing radiotherapy especially in the first week of treatment and after the treatment. There is a need for the development of a valid radiotherapy - questionnaire in order to be able to measure the distress of these patients. (author)

  13. Error prevention in radiotherapy treatments using a record and verify system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerized record-and-verify systems (RVS) are being used increasingly to improve the precision of radiotherapy treatments. With the introduction of new treatment devices, such as multileaf or asymmetric collimators and virtual wedges, the responsibility to ensure correct treatment has increased. The purpose of this paper is to present the method that we are following to prevent some potential radiotherapy errors and to point out some errors that can be easily detected using a RVS, through a check of the daily recorded treatment information. We conclude that a RVS prevents the occurrence of many errors, when the settings of the treatment machine do not match the intended parameters within some maximal authorized deviation, and allows to detect easily other potential errors related with a incorrect selection of the treatment patient data. A quality assurance program, including a check of all beam data and a weekly control of the manual and electronic chart, has helped reduce errors. (author)

  14. Combined Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is used to treat approximately 50% of all cancer patients, with varying success. Radiation therapy has become an integral part of modern treatment strategies for many types of cancer in recent decades, but is associated with a risk of long-term adverse effects. Of these side effects, cardiac complications are particularly relevant since they not only adversely affect quality of life but can also be potentially life-threatening. The dose of ionizing radiation that can be given to the tumor is determined by the sensitivity of the surrounding normal tissues. Strategies to improve radiotherapy therefore aim to increase the effect on the tumor or to decrease the effects on normal tissues, which must be achieved without sensitizing the normal tissues in the first approach and without protecting the tumor in the second approach. Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR), which can be attributed to the fact that heat is a pleiotropic damaging agent, affecting multiple cell components to varying degrees by altering protein structures, thus influencing the DNA damage response. Hyperthermia induces heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; HSPA1A) synthesis and enhances telomerase activity. HSPA1A expression is associated with radioresistance. Inactivation of HSPA1A and telomerase increases residual DNA DSBs post IR exposure, which correlates with increased cell killing, supporting the role of HSPA1A and telomerase in IR-induced DNA damage repair. Thus, hyperthermia influences several molecular parameters involved in sensitizing tumor cells to radiation and can enhance the potential of targeted radiotherapy. Therapy-inducible vectors are useful for conditional expression of therapeutic genes in gene therapy, which is based on the control of gene expression by conventional treatment modalities. The understanding of the molecular response of cells and tissues to ionizing radiation has lead to a new appreciation of the exploitable genetic

  15. Combined Hyperthermia and Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Punit [Department of Pathology, Scott & White Hospital and the Texas A& M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX 76504 (United States); Hurwitz, Mark D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Medical Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Asea, Alexzander, E-mail: asea@medicine.tamhsc.edu [Department of Pathology, Scott & White Hospital and the Texas A& M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple, TX 76504 (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Radiotherapy is used to treat approximately 50% of all cancer patients, with varying success. Radiation therapy has become an integral part of modern treatment strategies for many types of cancer in recent decades, but is associated with a risk of long-term adverse effects. Of these side effects, cardiac complications are particularly relevant since they not only adversely affect quality of life but can also be potentially life-threatening. The dose of ionizing radiation that can be given to the tumor is determined by the sensitivity of the surrounding normal tissues. Strategies to improve radiotherapy therefore aim to increase the effect on the tumor or to decrease the effects on normal tissues, which must be achieved without sensitizing the normal tissues in the first approach and without protecting the tumor in the second approach. Hyperthermia is a potent sensitizer of cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR), which can be attributed to the fact that heat is a pleiotropic damaging agent, affecting multiple cell components to varying degrees by altering protein structures, thus influencing the DNA damage response. Hyperthermia induces heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; HSPA1A) synthesis and enhances telomerase activity. HSPA1A expression is associated with radioresistance. Inactivation of HSPA1A and telomerase increases residual DNA DSBs post IR exposure, which correlates with increased cell killing, supporting the role of HSPA1A and telomerase in IR-induced DNA damage repair. Thus, hyperthermia influences several molecular parameters involved in sensitizing tumor cells to radiation and can enhance the potential of targeted radiotherapy. Therapy-inducible vectors are useful for conditional expression of therapeutic genes in gene therapy, which is based on the control of gene expression by conventional treatment modalities. The understanding of the molecular response of cells and tissues to ionizing radiation has lead to a new appreciation of the exploitable genetic

  16. Mild soaps and radiotherapy: a survey of the UK public to identify brands of soap considered mild and analysis of these to ascertain suitability for recommendation in radiotherapy departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Brown, P

    2011-05-01

    Cancer agencies recommend that patients use mild soap when undergoing external beam radiotherapy to minimise skin reactions. They define 'mild soap' as non-alkaline, lanolin free, unperfumed soap with a neutral pH. This study aimed to identify which soaps the UK public perceive as mild and ascertain if these were clinically mild and could potentially be recommended within radiotherapy departments. A survey of 237 participants identified eight top brands of mild soap, which were then tested for pH and analysed for potential irritants. All soaps were lanolin free and non-alkaline, with Simple and Johnson's the closest to pH 5.5. All contained fragrances except Simple and E45. Dove, Pears and Imperial Leather contained the highest concentration of fragrances. All soaps except E45 contained potential irritants. Only Simple and E45 fit the cancer agencies' definition of mild soap and could therefore be recommended for radiotherapy patients. Future research should identify current practices and recommendations in the UK as anecdotal evidence suggests large variations in skin care advice. Further scientific analysis could potentially identify cheaper brands that fit the definition of 'mild'. UK recommendations should be standardised and consistent with best practice to reduce skin reaction severity in radiotherapy patients. PMID:20477858

  17. A review of split-course radiotherapy: advantages and disadvantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although a rest period during radiotherapy will alleviate early reactions it will not spare late-reacting tissues, and in addition tumour cells may proliferate rapidly in the rest interval. The potential doubling time of tumours is always much faster than the volume doubling time, and is often < 5 days. Giving such fast growing tumours a 2 week rest period could prove fatal for the patients. Since late effects are not spared by introducing the rest period, it is not possible to increase the total dose to compensate for tumour proliferation. Thus, theoretically, the therapeutic ratio is decreased if split courses are used on rapidly proliferative tumours. Clinical data from split-course studies on head and neck cancer give conflicting results, with one group showing the rest period to be disadvantageous and two other groups showing no detriment. (author)

  18. Preoperative radiotherapy of maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in maxillary sinus cancer. A retrospective analysis was done for 42 patients with maxillary sinus cancer who were treated with radiation with or without surgery from April 1986 to September 1996. There were 27 male and 15 female patients. Patients' age ranged from 24 to 75 years (median 56 years). Stage distribution showed 2 in T2, 19 in T3, and 21 in T4 lesions. The histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma in 38, undifferentiated carcinoma in 1, transitional cell carcinoma in 1, and adenoid cystic carcinoma in 2 patients, All patients were treated with radiation initially with a dosage range of 50.4-70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy) before further evaluation of remnant disease. Eleven patients were given induction chemotherapy (2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) concurrently with radiotherapy. Six to eight weeks after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy, computerized tomography (CT) of paranasal sinus was taken to evaluate remnant disease. If the CT finding showed remnant disease, a Caldwell-Luc procedure was done to get the specimen of suspicious lesions. A radical maxillectomy was done if the specimen was proven to contain malignancy. In contrast periodic follow-up examination was done without any radical surgery if the tissue showed only granulation tissue. Follow-up period ranged from 3 to 92 months with a median 16 months. Nine (21.4%) patients showed complete response (CR) and 33 patients (78.6%) showed persistent disease (PER) to initial radiotherapy. Among the 9 CR patients, 7 patients had no evidence of disease (NED), 1 patient had local failure, and 1 patient had regional failure. Among 33 PER patients, salvage total maxillectomy was done in 10 patients, and the surgery was not feasible or refused in 23 patients. Following the salvage radical surgery, 2 patients were NED and 8 patients were PER status. Overall and disease- free survival rate at 5 years was 23.1% and 16

  19. Dosimetric and clinical advantages of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) during radiotherapy of breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Abate, Armando; Pinnarò, Paola; D’Andrea, Marco; Infusino, Erminia; Landoni, Valeria; Soriani, Antonella; Giordano, Carolina; Ferraro, Anna Maria; Strigari, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the potential dosimetric and clinical benefits of Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) technique during radiotherapy of breast cancer compared with Free Breathing (FB). Methods Eight left-sided breast cancer patients underwent a supervised breath hold during treatment. For each patient, two CT scans were acquired with and without breath hold, and virtual simulation was performed for conventional tangential fields, utilizing 6 or 15 MV photon fields. The resulting dose...

  20. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR): a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to other radiation therapy modalities, clinical electron beam therapy has remained practically unchanged for the past few decades even though electron beams with multiple energies are widely available on most linacs. In this paper, we present the concept of dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR), a new conformal electron therapy technique with synchronized couch motion. DEAR utilizes combination of gantry rotation, couch motion, and dose rate modulation to achieve desirable dose distributions in patient. The electron applicator is kept to minimize scatter and maintain narrow penumbra. The couch motion is synchronized with the gantry rotation to avoid collision between patient and the electron cone. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of DEAR delivery and demonstrate the potential of DEAR to improve dose distributions on simple cylindrical phantoms. DEAR was delivered on Varian's TrueBeam linac in Research Mode. In conjunction with the recorded trajectory log files, mechanical motion accuracies and dose rate modulation precision were analyzed. Experimental and calculated dose distributions were investigated for different energies (6 and 9 MeV) and cut-out sizes (1×10 cm2 and 3×10 cm2 for a 15×15 cm2 applicator). Our findings show that DEAR delivery is feasible and has the potential to deliver radiation dose with high accuracy (root mean square error, or RMSE of <0.1 MU, <0.1° gantry, and <0.1 cm couch positions) and good dose rate precision (1.6 MU min−1). Dose homogeneity within ±2% in large and curved targets can be achieved while maintaining penumbra comparable to a standard electron beam on a flat surface. Further, DEAR does not require fabrication of patient-specific shields. These benefits make DEAR a promising technique for conformal radiotherapy of superficial tumors. (paper)

  1. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and four dimensional radiotherapy (4DRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the development of conformation radiotherapy in the 1960s by Takahashi, et al., diagnostic and localization accuracy have been the main concerns. With increasing improvement in imaging techniques and multileaf collimators, three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have prevailed to produce highly conformal dose distribution. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT), in which diagnostic imaging techniques are equipped in the treatment room, has been paid more attention than before to increase localization accuracy in the use of complex fields in clinical radiotherapy. Setup error has been shown to be reduced by using stereotactic frames for intracranial diseases, diagnostic X ray imagers, ultrasound, or computed tomography in the treatment room for relatively static organs. Planning target volume (PTV) margin for the clinical target volume (CTV) can be reduced by using these IGRT techniques. However, for mobile tumours such as those in the liver or lung, it is still difficult to use a 'tight' margin because of difficulty focusing radiation beams exactly on the moving tumour. Planning target volume for these mobile or moving tumours has generally been determined with a large PTV margin in the direction of tumour movement. A respiration gated radiotherapy system was developed in an attempt to reduce the PTV margin. However, it remained impossible to neglect the possibility that the tumour might be dislocated by depth of breath or setup error. A more accurate method is required to determine the 3D coordinates of a moving tumour during radiotherapy. The relative relationship between the tumour and the surrounding normal structure may change due to tumour mobility, thus a more accurate treatment planning method is also required accounting for temporal changes of anatomy. We have developed a linear accelerator synchronized with a fluoroscopic real time tumour tracking radiotherapy system (RTRT) by which the 3D location of

  2. Efficacy of gamma knife stereotactic radiotherapy and whole-brain radiotherapy in treatment of brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the efficacy and prognosis of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in treatment of brain metastases, and to observe the influence of temozolomide (TMZ) on survival rate during the period of radiotherapy. Methods: A total of 52 patients with brain metastases were divided into two groups according to treatment methods,including 35 patients treated with WBRT plus SRT and 17 patients treated with SRT alone. WBRT dose was 1.8 - 3.0 Gy per fraction, one fraction a day, five fractions per week, with total dose of 30 - 40 Gy. After WBRT, gamma knife was performed with prescription isodose line of 45%-70% surrounding the planned target volume in WBRT + SRT group. The marginal dose was 12-15 Gy and the center dose was 20-30 Gy. In SRT group, the prescription isodose line was 45%-70% and the marginal dose was 36-40 Gy while the center up to 70-80 Gy. The follow up time was 1-2 years. Besides 20 patients in this study took temozolomide capsule during and after radiotherapy. The schedule of concomitant chemotherapy was temozolomide of 75 mg/m2 by oral administration every day until radiotherapy was over, and then temozolomide of 150 mg/m2 was taken for 3-6 months after radiotherapy. Results: The efficiency during 1-3 months after treatment was 84.62% in this study. In the WBRT + SRT group, the efficiency was 88.57% and declined to 76.47% in the SRT group. The six month-and one year-local control rate were 92.10% and 85.20%, respectively. The average survival time of WBRT + SRT was 13.2 months and median survival time was 11 months.Six month-, one year- and eighteen months-survival rate were 71.40%, 54.30% and 14.30%, respectively. In the SRT group, the average survival time was 10.2 months and median survival time was 9 months. Six month-, one year- and eighteen month-survival rate were 41.20%, 23.50% and 5.88%, respectively, while those for RT + TMZ group were 80.00%, 60.00% and 10.00%. In comparison, those in RT group were

  3. Minimising contralateral breast dose in post-mastectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy by incorporating conformal electron irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Korevaar, Erik W; Dolsma, Willemtje; Maduro, John H; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the potential benefit of incorporating conformal electron irradiation in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for loco-regional post-mastectomy RT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ten consecutive patients that underwent left-sided mastectomy were selected for this comparative planning st

  4. Radiation-induced sarcoma of the retained breast after conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, A.; Barr, L.C.; Serpell, J.W.; Baum, M. (Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-08-01

    The combination of breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy has become established as an alternative to mastectomy in the treatment of primary operable breast cancer. A number of reports of late complications of this approach have appeared in the literature, including radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy and myocardial damage. The potential for radiation-induced secondary tumours is also a cause for concern. (author).

  5. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy based on MRI only (MRI-only RT) shows a promising potential for the brain. Much research focuses on creating a pseudo computed tomography (pCT) from MRI for treatment planning while little attention is often paid to the treatment delivery. Here, we investigate if cone beam...

  6. Investigation of anxiety about radiotherapy and development of the Categorical Anxiety Scale about Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many patients with anxiety for radiotherapy though it is one of most important treatments for cancer, to which attention has not been fully paid. Authors investigated this anxiety to classify and quantitatively evaluate the problems. Firstly they asked 48 patients with various cancers about the concrete anxiety items related with radiotherapy, and the items were examined by the expert doctor of consultation-liaison psychiatry and of radiology to make up questions of 25 items about radiotherapy. Then those questions together with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) were asked to in-(52 subjects) and out-(133) patients (106 males and 79 females of the mean age 62.58 years) to classify anxiety and to see the reliability and validity of items included. Factor analysis of the results revealed that three kinds of anxiety, i.e., adverse effects of radiation, environments at irradiation and effect of radiotherapy, were significant. Based on this, authors arranged the Categorical Anxiety Scale about Radiotherapy composed from 17 items, of which reliability and validity in contents and in parallelism with HAD had been assured. (T.I.)

  7. Contribution of radiotherapy to the treatment of malignant tumors, 3. Combined drugs and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niibe, Hideo; Takahashi, Iku; Tamaki, Yoshio (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of cytotoxic agent, hormone, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protector combined with radiation therapy in cancer management were analysed. The results were as follows: 1) An increase in response was seen in 25% or more of tumor nodules given radiotherapy combined with misonidazole, anoxic cell sensitizer, compared with radiotherpy alone. But the drug was also found to be neurotoxic and peripheral neuropathy. 2) Evidence has been given that Amifostine may protect the mucosal damage from radiation when Amifostine prior to irradiation was administrated to patients with tumor in the head and neck or in the pelvis. 3) There were no difference between five year survival of radiotherapy alone and with chemotherapy for patients with stage I Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Chemotherapy following radiotherapy for patients with stage II was more effective treatment method than radiotherapy alone. 4) Radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer was performed to control only primary site. The success rates of local control were over 80%. The near future holds extensive promise for a combination of radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, hormone therapy, hypoxic cell sensitizer, and radiation protectors. All of these when used in the appropriate circumstances may yield significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio and in the long-tern control of tumors.

  8. Radiation safety assessment of cobalt 60 external beam radiotherapy using the risk-matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy is the only practice in which humans are placed directly in a radiation beam with the intention to deliver a very high dose. This is why safety in radiotherapy is very critical, and is a matter of interest to both radiotherapy departments and regulatory bodies. Accidental exposures have occurred throughout the world, thus showing the need for systematic safety assessments, capable to identify preventive measures and to minimize consequences of accidental exposure. Risk-matrix is a systematic approach which combines the relevant event features to assess the overall risk of each particular event. Once an event sequence is identified, questions such as how frequent the event, how severe the potential consequences and how reliable the existing safety measures are answered in a risk-matrix table. The ultimate goal is to achieve that the overall risk for events with severe consequences should always be low o very low. In the present study, the risk-matrix method has been applied to an hypothetical radiotherapy department, which could be equivalent to an upper level hospital of the Ibero American region, in terms of safety checks and preventive measures. The application of the method has identified 76 event sequences and revealed that the hypothetical radiotherapy department is sufficiently protected (low risk) against them, including 23 event sequences with severe consequences. The method has revealed that the risk of these sequences could grow to high level if certain specific preventive measures were degraded with time. This study has identified these preventive measures, thus facilitating a rational allocation of resources in regular controls to detect any loss of reliability. The method has proven to have an important practical value and is affordable at hospital level. The elaborated risk-matrix can be easily adapted to local circumstances, in terms of existing controls and safety measures. This approach can help hospitals to identify

  9. Management of anemia in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy. Erythropoietin, transfusions, or better nothing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    Background and results: anemia is a well-known risk factor for decreased local control and survival in patients undergoing curative radiotherapy. There is clear evidence from recent clinical investigations that anemia is an independent risk factor and hemoglobin (Hb) levels during radiotherapy are important (and not pretreatment Hb levels). The most likely explanation for the prognostic impact is the association with tumor hypoxia. An ''optimal'' Hb range with regard to tumor oxygenation seems to exist, and Hb levels < 11 g/dl and > {proportional_to}15 g/dl impair tumor oxygenation but have (over a broader range) no significant impact on normal tissue oxygenation. There is some evidence from retrospective and prospective studies that the response to radiotherapy and the prognosis, especially in cervical cancers, might be improved if the Hb levels during radiotherapy can be maintained in the optimal range, either by transfusions or by erythropoietin. The effect of any antianemic therapy should be analyzed according to whether or not treatment was successful with regard to achieving optimal Hb levels during irradiation. Erythropoietin is probably more effective in steadily increasing and stabilizing Hb levels, but bears the risk of overcorrection of Hb levels. The clinical relevance of erythropoietin receptors on tumor cells remains questionable. Conclusions: treatment of anemia with the objective of improving local control and survival in radiotherapy patients is probably more difficult and sophisticated than coping with symptoms of anemia or improving quality of life. Nevertheless, the potential of antianemic treatment is high on the basis of experimental and clinical data, and further clinical trials are warranted. (orig.)

  10. Pulse-resolved radiotherapy dosimetry using fiber-coupled organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravnsborg Beierholm, A.

    2011-05-15

    This PhD project pertains to the development and adaptation of a dosimetry system that can be used to verify the delivery of radiation in modern radiotherapy modalities involving small radiation fields and dynamic radiation delivery. The dosimetry system is based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators and can be perceived as a well characterized, independent alternative to the methods that are in clinical use today. The dosimeter itself does not require a voltage supply, and is composed of water equivalent materials. The dosimeter can be fabricated with a sensitive volume smaller than a cubic millimeter, which is small enough to resolve the small radiation fields encountered in modern radiotherapy. The fast readout of the dosimeter enables measurements on the same time scale as the pulsed radiation delivery from the medical linear accelerators used for treatment. The dosimetry system, comprising fiber-coupled organic scintillators and data acquisition hardware, was developed at the Radiation Research Division at Risoe DTU and tested using clinical x-ray beams at hospitals in Denmark and abroad. Measurements of output factors and percentage depth dose were performed and compared with reference values and Monte Carlo simulations for static square radiation fields for standard (4 cm x 4 cm to 20 cm x 20 cm) and small (down to 0.6 cm x 0.6 cm) field sizes. The accuracy of most of the obtained measurements was good, agreeing with reference and simulated dose values to within 2 % standard deviation for both standard and small fields. This thesis concludes that the new pulse-resolved dosimetry system holds great potential for modern radiotherapy applications, such as stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. (Author)

  11. Pulse-resolved radiotherapy dosimetry using fiber-coupled organic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This PhD project pertains to the development and adaptation of a dosimetry system that can be used to verify the delivery of radiation in modern radiotherapy modalities involving small radiation fields and dynamic radiation delivery. The dosimetry system is based on fibre-coupled organic scintillators and can be perceived as a well characterized, independent alternative to the methods that are in clinical use today. The dosimeter itself does not require a voltage supply, and is composed of water equivalent materials. The dosimeter can be fabricated with a sensitive volume smaller than a cubic millimeter, which is small enough to resolve the small radiation fields encountered in modern radiotherapy. The fast readout of the dosimeter enables measurements on the same time scale as the pulsed radiation delivery from the medical linear accelerators used for treatment. The dosimetry system, comprising fiber-coupled organic scintillators and data acquisition hardware, was developed at the Radiation Research Division at Risoe DTU and tested using clinical x-ray beams at hospitals in Denmark and abroad. Measurements of output factors and percentage depth dose were performed and compared with reference values and Monte Carlo simulations for static square radiation fields for standard (4 cm x 4 cm to 20 cm x 20 cm) and small (down to 0.6 cm x 0.6 cm) field sizes. The accuracy of most of the obtained measurements was good, agreeing with reference and simulated dose values to within 2 % standard deviation for both standard and small fields. This thesis concludes that the new pulse-resolved dosimetry system holds great potential for modern radiotherapy applications, such as stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. (Author)

  12. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Segal, M.N. [Univ. of New Mexico Medical School, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Otolaryngology; Hamm, R.W. [Accsys Technology Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Adler, R.J. [North Star Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Glatstein, E. [Univ. of Texas Southwest Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.

  13. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d(3He,p)4He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction's production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in 'nested'-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output 3He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment

  14. Telemedicine in radiotherapy treatment planning: requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telemedicine facilitates decentralized radiotherapy services by allowing remote treatment planning and quality assurance of treatment delivery. A prerequisite is digital storage of relevant data and an efficient and reliable telecommunication system between satellite units and the main radiotherapy clinic. The requirements of a telemedicine system in radiotherapy is influenced by the level of support needed. In this paper we differentiate between three categories of telemedicine support in radiotherapy. Level 1 features video conferencing and display of radiotherapy images and dose plans. Level 2 involves replication of selected data from the radiotherapy database - facilitating remote treatment planning and evaluation. Level 3 includes real-time, remote operations, e.g. target volume delineation and treatment planning performed by the team at the satellite unit under supervision and guidance from more experienced colleagues at the main clinic. (author)

  15. [How to maximize skin care during radiotherapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromantin, I; Lesport, G; Le Mée, M

    2015-10-01

    No consensual guidelines exist regarding the management of early effects of radiotherapy. But preventive and curative care strategies could be adapted in the aim to delay erythema, limit complications and improve patients' comfort. Prevention involves encouraging patients to take care of their skin, avoid moisture, frictions, sun exposition and dry soap. When these rules seem insufficient, products (dressings, solution, or cream) could be prescribed, according to the individual risk of each patient. Preventive measures are accentuated when radiodermatitis appears and/or topics indicated for wound healing could be applied. Care (education, dressing, observation) needs a multidisciplinary approach. Improvements of radiotherapy treatments (methods, techniques) have been the most effective evolution on radiodermatitis. PMID:26344433

  16. Voice change after radiotherapy: some preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, R.H.; Sagerman, R.H.; Chung, C.T.; Yu, Y.W.; Reed, G.F.

    1978-06-01

    A one-third octave spectral analysis was performed on two sentences spoken by 5 patients with laryngeal cancer, 5 with head/neck cancer not involving the vocal cords, and 12 normal subjects. Recordings were made prior to and at weekly intervals during radiotherapy as well as at periodic intervals post-treatment. Patients with laryngeal cancer exhibited lower spectral levels than normal throughout radiotherapy as well as several months post-treatment. By one year after treatment, the spectral levels of these patients were largely in the normal range. Patients with head/neck cancer not involving the vocal cords exhibited greater than normal sound pressure levels throughout most of the spectrum. These levels remained high even at one month post-treatment. Irradiation of normal vocal cord tissue also seems to result in higher spectral levels.

  17. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design

  18. [Personalized medicine in radiotherapy: practitioners' perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britel, Manon; Foray, Nicolas; Préau, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to investigate the representations of radiotherapists in relation to personalized medicine. On the basis of current?>' available radiotherapy predictive tests, we tried to understand how these tests could be used in routine radiotherapy practice and in what way this possible change of practices could affect the role of radiotherapists in treatment protocols. In the absence of any available data allowing the construction of a quantitative tool, qualitative data were recorded by individual interviews with radiotherapists. Based on textual data analysis, a second national quantitative phase was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. Crossover analysis of the two datasets highlighted the interest of radiotherapists in personalized medicine and the use of predictive tests, while indicating certain limitations and concerns in relation to ethical issues related to personalized medicine in oncology and the physician's position. PMID:26752033

  19. Staffing in Radiotherapy: An Activity Based Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy requires competent professional staff to ensure safe and effective patient treatment and management. There is a need to provide guidelines that recommend appropriate staffing levels to support the initiation of new services as well as the expansion or upgrade of existing services as even simple upgrades or replacement of existing equipment may have a significant impact on staffing needs. Similarly, the introduction of education and training programmes will require staffing adjustments. A calculation algorithm was developed to predict staffing levels based on the inputs that are known or can be easily estimated. This publication complements other IAEA publications used to support the initiation of basic radiation medicine services including Setting up a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects, published in 2008

  20. Some new physical data for magnetic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic radiotherapy consisting of three subsystems - the beam, the irradiation medium, and the electromagnetic field - offers some advantages as compared to the standard radiotherapy consisting of two subsystems - the beam and irradiation medium. These advantages refer to: the movement of the absorbed dose longitudinal distribution to the entrance surfaces, the increase of the absorbed dose gradient, the increase of the absorbed dose in the target volume, the decrease of the beam penetration depth and others. The electron path or the penetration depth into the absorbing medium is equivalent to the actual electron effective range in the standard electron therapy (without a magnetic field). This paper presents some new physical data referring to the penetration depth. These data are obtained for electron energies between 1 MeV and 50 MeV and magnetic induction ranging between 1 V s m-2 and 5 V s m-2. (Author)