WorldWideScience

Sample records for cedar computers

  1. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  2. The Cedar system and an initial performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuck, D.; Davidson, E.; Lawrie, D.; Sameh, A.; Zhu, C.Q.; Veidenbaum, A.; Konicek, J.; Yew, P.; Gallivan, K.; Jalby, W.; Wijshoff, H.; Bramley, R.; Yang, U.M.; Emrath, P.; Padua, D.; Eigenmann, R.; Hoeflinger, J.; Jaxon, G.; Li, Z.; Murphy, T.; Andrews, J.; Turner, S. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Center for Supercomputing Research and Development)

    1993-05-01

    In this paper, the authors give an overview of the Cedar multiprocessor and present recent performance results. These include the performance of some computational kernels and the Perfect Benchmark[reg sign]. The authors also present a methodology for judging parallel system performance and apply this methodology to Cedar, Cray YMP-8, and Thinking Machines CM-5.

  3. Numerical Linear Algebra On The CEDAR Multiprocessor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ulrike; Sameh, Ahmed

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we describe in some detail the architectural features of the CEDAR. multiprocessor. We also discuss strategies for implementation of dense matrix computations, and present performance results on one cluster for a variety of linear system solvers, eigenvalue problem solvers, as well as algorithms for solving linear least squares problems.

  4. The first CEDAR counter

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The first differential Cerenkov counter with chromatic corrections (called CEDAR) successfully tested at the PS in July 75. These counters were used in the SPS hadronic beams for particle identification. Some of the eight photomultipliers can be seen: they receive the light reflected back through the annular diaphragm. René Maleyran stands on the left.

  5. Supercomputing tradeoffs and the Cedar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, E.; Kuck, D.; Lawrie, D.; Sameh, A.

    1986-05-01

    A number of tradeoffs made in supercomputer and minisupercomputer designs are discussed. The Cedar System is discussed in this context. Applications and software work on the Cedar System are presented. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Parallel supercomputing today and the cedar approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuck, D.J.; Davidson, E.S.; Lawrie, D.H.; Sameh, A.H.

    1986-02-28

    More and more scientists and engineers are becoming interested in using supercomputers. Earlier barriers to using these machines are disappearing as software for their use improves. Meanwhile, new parallel supercomputer architectures are emerging that may provide rapid growth in performance. These systems may use a large number of processors with an intricate memory system that is both parallel and hierarchical; they will require even more advanced software. Compilers that restructure user programs to exploit the machine organization seem to be essential. A wide range of algorithms and applications is being developed in an effort to provide high parallel processing performance in many fields. The Cedar supercomputer, presently operating with eight processors in parallel, uses advanced system and applications software developed at the University of Illinois during the past 12 years. This software should allow the number of processors in Cedar to be doubled annually, providing rapid performance advances in the next decade. 43 references, 4 figures.

  7. Parallel supercomputing today and the cedar approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, D J; Davidson, E S; Lawrie, D H; Sameh, A H

    1986-02-28

    More and more scientists and engineers are becoming interested in using supercomputers. Earlier barriers to using these machines are disappearing as software for their use improves. Meanwhile, new parallel supercomputer architectures are emerging that may provide rapid growth in performance. These systems may use a large number of processors with an intricate memory system that is both parallel and hierarchical; they will require even more advanced software. Compilers that restructure user programs to exploit the machine organization seem to be essential. A wide range of algorithms and applications is being developed in an effort to provide high parallel processing performance in many fields. The Cedar supercomputer, presently operating with eight processors in parallel, uses advanced system and applications software developed at the University of Illinois during the past 12 years. This software should allow the number of processors in Cedar to be doubled annually, providing rapid performance advances in the next decade. PMID:17740294

  8. Cedar-a large scale multiprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajski, D.; Kuck, D.; Lawrie, D.; Sameh, A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of Cedar, a large scale multiprocessor being designed at the University of Illinois. This machine is designed to accommodate several thousand high performance processors which are capable of working together on a single job, or they can be partitioned into groups of processors where each group of one or more processors can work on separate jobs. Various aspects of the machine are described including the control methodology, communication network, optimizing compiler and plans for construction. 13 references.

  9. Parallel algorithms on the CEDAR system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, M.; Gallivan, K.; Harrod, W.; Jalby, W.; Lo, Sy-Shin; Meier, U.; Philippe, B.; Sameh, A.

    1986-10-21

    While significant progress has been made in developing efficient algorithms for vector machines, the same cannot be said of parallel processors which provide concurrency and vectorization along with a complex memory system. The three aspects of these architectures must be addressed simultaneously and are often contradictory; increasing vector length may destroy data locality and thereby lead to inefficient use of the hierarchical memory system. In this paper, we consider the tradeoffs involved in designing algorithms for such architectures and present some results for a single cluster of the CEDAR machine. 22 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Inventory of Atlantic White Cedar Remnant Stands in North Carolina.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This inventory was commissioned by the U.S. Air Force to identify the location and condition of extant remnant Atlantic white cedar groves and stands in North...

  11. Parking Areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (prkareas)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This polygon dataset locates the parking areas within Cedar Breaks National Monument. The parking areas were digitized from the 2002 Color aerial photographs and...

  12. Transportation Signs at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (trspsign)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains the starting point for the collection of transportation signs at Cedar Breaks National Monument. There are over 400 signs (transportation and...

  13. Footprints of Buildings at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (footprints)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/INFO coverage consisting of 10 polygons representing the buildings' footprints at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The footprints were collected...

  14. Designated Overlook Areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (ovrareas)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains three polygons that represent areas of designated overlooks at Cedar Breaks National Monument. Note: Point Supreme needs an FMSS number - it...

  15. Service Areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (srvcarea)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains service areas at Cedar Breaks National Monument. The service areas were collected by a Trimble GeoXT GPS unit and post processed for...

  16. Final wilderness proposal : Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter from the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife announcing the completion of the wilderness study concerning the Cedar Island National...

  17. Utilities at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (utilpnt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents various types of utilities, including water- and power-related utilities, at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The utilities were...

  18. Cedar Keys Wilderness Character Monitoring Back-end Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Back-end data file for the Cedar Keys Wilderness Character Monitoring Application. User interface and lookup databases are required for use.The Wilderness Act of...

  19. 78 FR 44090 - Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa AGENCY: Federal Communications... freeze on the acceptance of full power television rulemaking petitions requesting channel substitutions... 73 Television, Television broadcasting. Federal Communications Commission. Hossein...

  20. Diet - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  1. Isotopes - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  2. Lower Suwannee & Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuges: Comprehensive Conservation Plans

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Cedar Keys NWR and Lower Suwannee NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  3. Springs at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (allsprgs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/Info coverage consisting of 151 points representing spring locations in and surrounding Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. This data originates...

  4. Inventory of Atlantic White-Cedar Remnant Stands in North Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report addresses Atlantic white cedar swamp restoration in North Carolina refuges. The ecology, use, and historical distribution of Atlantic white-cedar (AWC)...

  5. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 754 - Unprocessed Western Red Cedar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unprocessed Western Red Cedar No... SUPPLY CONTROLS Pt. 754, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 754—Unprocessed Western Red Cedar This... 1C988. Schedule B No. 1 1 Commodity description Unit of quantity 2 200.3516 Western red cedar...

  6. 75 FR 68780 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing November 2, 2010. Take notice that on October 27, 2010, Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC (Cedar Creek) filed an appeal with the...

  7. 78 FR 58470 - Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Cedar Rapids, Iowa AGENCY: Federal Communications... review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television....

  8. Police Station and Court House, Cedar Valley, Jamaica

    OpenAIRE

    Young Brothers

    2004-01-01

    161 x 116 mm. Showing a small group of Jamaican men and women standing in front of the stone courthouse. With hills in the background. Cedar Valley lies about ten miles east of Kingston at the foot of the Blue Mountains. The photograph was taken circa 1900-1910.

  9. The White Cedar of the Dismal Swamp 1923

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a report that discusses the various uses, yields and properties of the White Cedar in the Great Dismal Swamp area in the early 1920s. It also discusses the...

  10. Center for supercomputing research and development (Cedar). Progress report, January 25, 1985-January 24, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuck, D.J.; Davidson, E.S.; Lawrie, D.H.; Sameh, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Center for Supercomputing Research and Development (CSRD) is building the Cedar System, a prototype multiprocessor. Clusters of 8 tightly-coupled processors are being bought from Alliant Computer Systems, which based its system design on earlier University of Illinois work by the CSRD group. CSRD efforts span the hardware, software, and applications areas. The hardware group is designing and building a global network and shared global memory, as well as an Alliant interface. This will allow 8 clusters (of 8 processors) to operate together in 1986 and up to 64 clusters in 1987. Synchronization and data sharing are allowed by powerful hardware primitives. The software group is developing a Unix-based multiprocessor operating system and a Parafrase (KAP)-based restructuring compiler. The compiler will transform serial as well as parallel Fortran constructs to exploit the system, dealing with vector as well as multiprocessing parallelism. The applications group is developing parallel algorithms and using them in a number of engineering and scientific applications. Thus, CSRD is working for a rapid architectural increase in speed across a number of applications. If Cedar can be exploited as planned on single jobs, speedup factors of one thousand per decade will be possible, as constrained by current budgets.

  11. Center for Supercomputing Research and Development (CEDAR). Progress report, January 25-December 24, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuck, D.J.; Davidson, E.S.; Lawrie, D.H.; Sameh, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Center for Supercomputing Research and Development (CSRD) is building the Cedar System, a prototype multiprocessor. Clusters of 8 tightly-coupled processors are being bought from Alliant Computer Systems, which based its system design on earlier University of Illinois work by the CSRD group. CSRD efforts span the hardware, software, and applications areas. The hardwware group is designing and building a global network and shared global memory, as well as an Alliant interface. This will allow 4 clusters (of 8 processors) to operate together in 1987 and up to 8 clusters in the future. Synchronization and data sharing are allowed by powerful hardware primitives. The software group is developing a Unix-based multiprocessor operating system and a Parafrase (KAP)-based restructuring compiler. The compiler will transform serial as well as parallel Fortran constructs to exploit the system, dealing with vector as well as multiprocessing parallelism. The applications group is developing parallel algorithms and using them in a number of engineering and scientific applications. Thus, CSRD is working for a rapid architectural increase in speed across a number of applications. If Cedar can be exploited as planned on single jobs, speedup factors of one thousand per decade will be possible. 29 refs.

  12. TREATMENTS TO MINIMIZE EXTRACTIVES STAIN IN WESTERN RED CEDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Stirling,

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Under certain conditions involving uneven exposure to weather, stains related to the extractives can reduce the aesthetic appeal of western red cedar in exterior applications such as fence boards, siding, and sidewall shingles. Selected chemical treatments were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the formation of extractives stain. DDACarbonate, alkyl amine oxide, and combinations thereof delayed extractives stain formation in an accelerated field test, with higher loadings having greater effect.

  13. 75 FR 53321 - Prospective Grant of a Co-Exclusive License: Natural Plant Extracts From Incense Cedar as Pest...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ...: Natural Plant Extracts From Incense Cedar as Pest Control Agents and Methods for Their Use AGENCY: Centers... . Additional rights to be licensed are: ``Natural Plant Extracts from Incense Cedar as Pest Control Agents...

  14. The ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) fauna of the cedar glades and xeric limestone prairies of the Central Basin of Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ants may be the most thoroughly documented group of insects inhabiting the cedar glades of the Central Basin of Tennessee with two studies conducted in the late 1930s reporting ants found in cedar glades of the region. To compare the ant fauna of modern cedar glades with the lists produced in earlie...

  15. Hanford Reach - Control of Salt Cedar Plants in an Isolated Zone

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Target Invasive Species: salt cedar (Tamarix sp.; a Class “B” noxious weed in WA, “B” designated weed in OR) minimum of 32 acres within ~760 acres. Salt cedar...

  16. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of the Terpene "[beta]"-Thujone from Cedar Leaf Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Larry G.

    2011-01-01

    Western red cedar leaf affords an essential oil characterized by high thujone content. Students in an advanced organic chemistry lab course isolate a single thujone diastereoisomer from commercially available cedar leaf oil. Treatment of crude oil, containing roughly 70% thujone, predominately as [alpha]-thujone (6.5:1), with ethanolic sodium…

  17. Sediment Transport and Water Quality Model of Cedar Lake, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. C.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J. D.; Ahlmann, M.; Bucaro, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The EPA-supported Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code, EFDC, is used to model hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality in coastal regions, estuaries, rivers, and lakes. However, the empirical formulations used for sediment transport are not always adequate to accurately characterize cohesive sediment erosion and transport. New sediment transport subroutines have been incorporated into EFDC and the new model is called SNL-EFDC. The updated model provides an improved, coupled hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality framework. The newly incorporated sediment transport subroutines facilitate direct use of measured erosion rate data from the Sediment Erosion with Depth Flume (SEDflume). Erosion rates are included as functions of both depth within the sediment bed and applied shear stresses. This bypasses problems associated with empirical erosion formulations often based on disaggregated particle size. Restoration alternatives are under consideration for Cedar Lake in Indiana and SNL-EFDC models its hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and water quality. The water quality model as implemented on Cedar Lake tracks algae, oxygen, temperature, carbon, phosphorous, and nitrogen kinetics, as well as, sediment bed diagenesis. Environmental conditions, wind, temperature, rainfall, and sunlight, were based on data collected in 2005. Tributary loading was modeled using L-THIA and provided influxes of water, nutrients (phosphorous, nitrogen, etc.), and sediments. The calibrated model was used to simulate a nine month period from March to November 2005. Results suggest that the model simulates sediments transport and associated water quality correctly. The calibrated model is being used to evaluate several restoration measures throughout the lake and watershed and their effect on water quality. Because Cedar Lake is a nitrogen limited lake, changes in the level of eutrophication from each measure are being tracked by calculating the Carlson trophic state index

  18. Center for Supercomputing Research and Development (CEDAR): Progress report for period December 25, 1986-January 24, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuck, D.J.; Davidson, E.S.; Lawrie, D.H.; Sameh, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Center for Supercomputing Research and Development (CSRD) is pushing the frontiers of computational technology while building the Cedar System, a prototype multiprocessor. Clusters of 8 tightly-coupled processors are being bought from Alliant Computer Systems, which based its system design on earlier University of Illinois work by the CSRD group. CSRD efforts span the hardware, software, and applications areas. The hardware group is designing and building a global network and shared global memory, as well as an Alliant interface. This will allow 4 clusters (of 8 processors) to operate together in 1988 and up to 8 clusters in the future. Synchronization and data sharing are allowed by powerful hardware primitives. The software group is developing a Unix-based multiprocessor operating system and a Parafrase (KAP)-based restructuring compiler. The compiler will transform serial as well as parallel Fortran constructs to exploit the system, dealing with vector as well as multiprocessing parallelism. The applications group is developing parallel algorithms and using them in a number of engineering and scientific applications. Thus, CSRD is working for a rapid architectural increase in speed across a number of applications. If Cedar can be exploited as planned on single jobs, speedup factors of one thousand per decade will be possible in future implementations.

  19. Provenances and fertilizer on early growth cedar seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Carlos Navroski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the initial development of different provenances and the influence of base fertilizer and coverage on growth of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Provenances of seeds were collected in Lapa, PR, Fernandes Pinheiro, PR and Itaara, RS. After germination, the seedlings were transplanted to plastic bags of 500 cm³, filled with commercial substrate. Total height (h, stem diameter (sd, and ratio h/sd seedlings were measured after 150 days of transplanting. Seedlings of Fernandes Pinheiro received basic fertilization after transplantation (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g dm-3  Osmocote® and cover (3 and 6 g L-1, respectively, of Peter’s® and urea. The provenance and doses of controlled-release fertilizer influenced early development of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Itaara provenance showed better seedlings growth. Cedar seedlings showed good growth when incorporated into the substrate 5 g dm-3 Osmocote® and, in addition, applied in topdressing 3 g L-1 of Peter’s®. Urea topdressing is rarely recommended for cedar seedlings.

  20. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Keys NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  1. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Island NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  2. Picnic Tables within the Designated Picnic Area at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (pcnctbl)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains the individual picnic areas (as points where the picnic tables are generally located) within the only designated picnic area at Cedar Breaks...

  3. Fishing Plan : Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Fishing Plan for Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs. The Plan provides an introduction and history of the refuges, information about program relation to refuge...

  4. Environmental Action Memorandum : [Ottawa and Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuges Fishery Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Environmental Action memorandum for the Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs Fishery Management Plan states that the Plan is found not to have significant environmental...

  5. Endangered Species Consultation Request : Opening to Sports & Commercial Fishing Ottawa and Cedar Point NWR’s

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Endangered Species Consultation Request states that the Ottawa and Cedar Point NWRs Fishery Management Plan will not affect bald eagles on the Refuge.

  6. Cedar Breaks National Monument Vegetation Mapping Project - Field Plot, Observation Points and Accuracy Assessment Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This point file contains 282 point locations of field plot and observation data used by, and collected for, the vegetation mapping project for Cedar Breaks National...

  7. Growth, movement and survival - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  8. Experimental streams - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  9. Fish abundance, composition, distribution - Recolonization of the Cedar River, WA by Pacific salmon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of this study is to quantify population, community, and ecosystem level changes as a result of salmon recolonization of the Cedar River, WA above...

  10. Overhead Utility Lines at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (cebr_powerln)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains 49 arcs and 50 nodes representing power lines at Cedar Breaks National Monument. The power lines supply electricity and telephone services to...

  11. Relationships among Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Airborne Japanese Cedar Pollen Counts

    OpenAIRE

    Naomichi Yamamoto; Yuuki Matsuki; Hiromichi Yokoyama; Hideaki Matsuki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, ...

  12. Development of Northern White-Cedar Regeneration Following Partial Cutting, with and without Deer Browsing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Larouche

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis L. is an important commercial species with a high wildlife value, both as a food source and habitat for many bird and mammal species. Concerns have been expressed about its decreasing abundance across its range, and especially in mixedwood stands, where it has to compete with several other species and can suffer from heavy browsing. In this study, we quantified the development of natural northern white-cedar seedlings and saplings under various partial cutting regimes, with and without white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virgianus Zimmerman browsing, in three selected sites in Quebec (Canada and in Maine (USA. Our data show that northern white-cedar regeneration was present in all studied stands, but that only a few stems were taller than 30 cm on the two sites with high densities of deer. In the absence of heavy browsing, stems reached a height of 30 cm in 11 years, and 130 cm in 28 years. Height growth of northern white-cedar regeneration increased with canopy light transmittance, while ground-level diameter increment increased after partial cutting. This suggests that partial cutting can be used in mixedwood stands to release natural northern white-cedar regeneration, but also that the recruitment of northern white-cedar seedlings to larger size classes constitutes a major challenge in stands subject to heavy deer browsing.

  13. Assessment of processes affecting low-flow water quality of Cedar Creek, west-central Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur R.; Freeman, W.O.; McFarlane, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Water quality and the processes that affect dissolved oxygen, nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus species), and algal concentrations were evaluated for a 23.8-mile reach of Cedar Creek near Galesburg, west-central Illinois, during periods of warm-weather, low-flow conditions. Water quality samples were collected and stream conditions were measured over a diel (24 hour) period on three occasions during July and August 1985. Analysis of data from the diel-sampling periods indicates that concentrations of iron, copper, manganese, phenols, and total dissolved-solids exceeded Illinois ' general-use water quality standards in some locations. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations were less than the State minimum standard throughout much of the study reach. These data were used to calibrate and verify a one-dimensional, steady-state, water quality model. The computer model was used to assess the relative effects on low-flow water quality of processes such as algal photosynthesis and respiration, ammonia oxidation, biochemical oxygen demand, sediment oxygen demand, and stream reaeration. Results from model simulations and sensitivity analysis indicate that sediment oxygen demand is the principal cause of low dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the creek. (USGS)

  14. Herpetofauna of the cedar glades and associated habitats of the Inner Central Basin of middle Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiller, M.L.; Graham, Reynolds R.; Glorioso, B.M.; Spiess, J.; Miller, B.T.

    2011-01-01

    The cedar glades and barrens of the Inner Central Basin (ICB) of middle Tennessee support a unique and diverse flora and fauna and represent some of the state's most valued natural areas. We conducted herpetofaunal inventories of the cedar glades, associated barrens, cedar-hardwood forest, and adjacent aquatic habitats of the Stones River drainage of Middle Tennessee, focusing our sampling effort primarily at seven state- or federally owned properties in Rutherford and Wilson counties. These properties included Stones River National Battlefield (SRNB), Flat Rock State Natural Area (FRSNA), Vesta Cedar Glade State Natural Area (VSNA), Fall Creek Recreation Area (FCRA) on J. Percy Priest Wildlife Management Area, Cedars of Lebanon State Forest (CLSF), Cedars of Lebanon State Forest Natural Area (CLSNA), and Cedars of Lebanon State Park (CLSP). We used a variety of inventory techniques in terrestrial, aquatic, and subterranean habitats to survey these properties periodically from 1989 to 2010. We documented 49 species (22 amphibian and 27 reptile) accounting for 75.4% of the 65 herpetofaunal species thought to occur in the ICB, including records for Cemophora coccinea, Aneides aeneus, Gyrinophilus palleucus, Ambystoma barbouri, and Pseudotriton montanus. We found differences in alpha and beta diversity between sites, with the CLSF complex containing a high of 41 herpetofaunal species and FRSNA containing a low of 23 species. Beta diversity comparisons indicated similarity in amphibian species composition between FRSNA and CLSF and between SRNB and CLSF (9 shared species), and in reptile species composition between VSNA and the CLSF complex (16 shared species). We compare the results of our inventory with two previous studies conducted in the area and discuss the relative abundance, conservation, and threats to the herpetofaunal community of these habitats.

  15. 76 FR 78641 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of...'s (Commission) June 16, 2011 Order.\\1\\ \\1\\ Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC and Milford Wind...

  16. Valencene oxidase CYP706M1 from Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Katarina; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Goedbloed, Miriam; Renirie, Rokus; de Jong, René M; Bouwmeester, Harro; Bosch, Dirk; Sonke, Theo; Beekwilder, Jules

    2014-03-18

    (+)-Nootkatone is a natural sesquiterpene ketone used in grapefruit and citrus flavour compositions. It occurs in small amounts in grapefruit and is a major component of Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) heartwood essential oil. Upon co-expression of candidate cytochrome P450 enzymes from Alaska cedar in yeast with a valencene synthase, a C. nootkatensis valencene oxidase (CnVO) was identified to produce trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. Formation of (+)-nootkatone was detected at 144±10μg/L yeast culture. CnVO belongs to a new subfamily of the CYP706 family of cytochrome P450 oxidases. PMID:24530525

  17. Rainfall Runoff Modelling for Cedar Creek using HEC-HMS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Kalra, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rainfall-runoff modelling studies are carried out for the purpose of basin and river management. Different models have been effectively used to examine relationships between rainfall and runoff. Cedar Creek Watershed Basin, the largest tributary of St. Josephs River, located in northeastern Indiana, was selected as a study area. The HEC-HMS model developed by US Army Corps of Engineers was used for the hydrological modelling. The national elevation and national hydrography data was obtained from United States Geological Survey National Map Viewer and the SSURGO soil data was obtained from United States Department of Agriculture. The watershed received hypothetical uniform rainfall for a duration of 13 hours. The Soil Conservation Service Curve Number and Unit Hydrograph methods were used for simulating surface runoff. The simulation provided hydrological details about the quantity and variability of runoff in the watershed. The runoff for different curve numbers was computed for the same basin and rainfall, and it was found that outflow peaked at an earlier time with a higher value for higher curve numbers than for smaller curve numbers. It was also noticed that the impact on outflow values nearly doubled with an increase of curve number of 10 for each subbasin in the watershed. The results from the current analysis may aid water managers in effectively managing the water resources within the basin. 1 Graduate Student, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603 2 Development Review Division, Clark County Public Works, 500 S. Grand Central Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89155, USA

  18. 75 FR 13668 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cedar Rapids, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ..., Cedar Rapids, IA (74 FR 67141) Docket No. FAA-2009-0916. Interested parties were invited to participate... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  19. New canker disease of Incense-cedar in Oregon caused by Phaeobotryon cupressi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incense-cedar (Calocedrus decurrens) is a native tree occurring in Oregon and California. Since the early 2000’s, a new canker disease has been observed with increasing frequency on ornamental and windbreak trees planted in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. Symptoms appear as dead, flagging, small-di...

  20. The effects of using ground water to maintain water levels of Cedar Lake, Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Cedar Lake, a kettle lake with no surface inlet or outlet, was studied to evaluate the feasibility of maintaining water levels of lakes in the glaciated kettle moraine area of eastern Wisconsin by pumping ground water into them. The general hydrogeology of the area around the lake was defined and the hydrology of the lake was studied in detail.

  1. Valencene oxidase CYP706M1 from Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cankar, K.; Houwelingen, van A.M.M.L.; Goedbloed, M.A.; Renirie, R.; Jong, de R.M.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Bosch, H.J.; Sonke, Th.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    (+)-Nootkatone is a natural sesquiterpene ketone used in grapefruit and citrus flavour compositions. It occurs in small amounts in grapefruit and is a major component of Alaska cedar (Callitropsis nootkatensis) heartwood essential oil. Upon co-expression of candidate cytochrome P450 enzymes from Ala

  2. Features of the rheological properties of dough with sunflower and cedar flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gaysina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Promising directions of development of assortment of flour confectionery products are currently creating new combinations, more extraordinary and interesting, the reduction in calories, increase the nutritional value, development of formulations of functional products. As enriching additives in the manufacture of pastry products can be used flour sunflower flour and cedar. Sunflower meal – one of the possible sources of increase of food value. The only raw material component of this product are sunflower seeds that have passed the purification from impurities and shell of the particles, with the subsequent removal of oil from them and grinding. In this torment, to the maximum extent maintained all the valuable biological active substances and vitamins. Sunflower flour is a complex product: it is good recommendation system of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, including fiber, vitamins, phospholipids and mineral substances. Cedar flour is characterized by high protein content (up to 48 % is well balanced in amino acids resultant composition contains b vitamins, food fibers, micro - and macroelements, necessary for life of the human body. Cedar flour has a good functional and technological properties In this paper we study the effect of cedar flour and sunflower meal on the rheological characteristics of dough. Effect of formulation components on the rheological properties of the test is evaluated in terms of water absorption of the flour, the duration of doughing, degree of its dilution and stability when mixing. It was found that the addition of 17% sunflower meal increases the viscosity of the dough and has a strengthening effect on the structure of the dough. Adding cedar flour in the amount of 20% caused the decrease in viscosity and getting more flexible dough.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the adhesion time of Penicillium spores to cedar wood surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumya, Elabed [Laboratoire de Biotechnologie Microbienne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Fès-Saïs (Morocco); Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Centre Universitaire Régional d' Interface-Fès (Morocco); Saad, Ibnsouda Koraichi, E-mail: ibnsouda@hotmail.com [Laboratoire de Biotechnologie Microbienne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Fès-Saïs (Morocco); Université Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Centre Universitaire Régional d' Interface-Fès (Morocco); Abdellah, Houari [Laboratoire de Biotechnologie Microbienne, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Fès-Saïs (Morocco); Hassan, Latrache [Laboratoire de Valorisation et de Sécurité des Produits Agroalimentaires, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques de Beni Mellal (Morocco)

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the adhesion of 4 Penicillium strains (Penicillium granulatum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium commune and Penicillium chrysogenum) on cedar wood was examined qualitatively and quantitatively by using the extended DLVO (XDLVO) approach and the environmental scanning electronic microscopy (ESEM) technique. A comparison between the XDLVO theories and the ESEM technique was also investigated. The adhesion tests revealed that P. chrysogenum was not able to adhere on the cedar wood substrata, as predicted by the XDLVO approach. We have also found by ESEM that the three Penicillium strains (P. granulatum, P. crustosum, P. commune) adhered on wood, as not predicted theoretically. Moreover, the time of adhesion (3 h and 24 h) was used not only to compare the capacity of adhesion according to contact time but also to explain the discrepancies between the XDLVO approach prediction and the adhesion experiments. A positive relationship between the XDLVO approach and adhesion experiments has been observed after 3 h of adhesion. In contrast, a contradiction between the XDLVO predictions and the adhesion test results has been noted after 24 h of adhesion of Penicillium strains to the wood surface. Highlights: ► Calculation of free energy of adhesion to cedar wood of Penicillium by XDLVO approach ► Adhesion is not favorable for all Penicillium spores–cedar wood combinations. ► Adhesion tests demonstrated the ability of Penicillium spores to adhere to cedar wood. ► XDLVO approach correlated well with the results obtained after 3 h of adhesion. ► Discrepancy between XDLVO predictions and experimental observations at 24 h of adhesion.

  4. Road and Street Centerlines, Cedar Roads, Published in 2005, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2005. It is described as 'Cedar Roads'. The extent of these data...

  5. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report...

  6. Application of the Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM 6) to Cedar Keys NWR : Revised report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Sea-Level Affecting Marshes Model (SLAMM) report presents a model for projecting the effects of sea-level rise on coastal marshes and related habitats on Cedar...

  7. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar...

  8. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1987 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. Ottawa NWR, Cedar...

  9. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1988 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. Ottawa NWR, Cedar...

  10. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report...

  11. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1989 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. Ottawa NWR, Cedar...

  12. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, West Sister Island NWR, Navarre Marsh, and Darby Marsh outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979...

  13. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1973 Annual Narrative Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Unit,...

  14. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, Darby Division, Navarre Division) : 1992 Annual Water Management Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. Ottawa NWR, Cedar...

  15. Cultural Resources, Cedar Breaks events, Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Iron County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cultural Resources dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2007. It is described as 'Cedar...

  16. Department of the Interior : Draft Environmental Statement : DES 74-19 : Proposed Mattamuskeet - Swanquarter - Cedar Island - Pea Island Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a draft of an analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Mattamuskeet - Swanquarter - Cedar Island - Pea Island...

  17. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report...

  18. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, West Sister Island NWR, Navarre Marsh, and Darby Marsh outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1980...

  19. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Ottawa, Cedar Point, West Sister Island NWR's): Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa NWR, Cedar Point NWR, and West Sister Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1981 calendar year. The report...

  20. Produce of seedlings of cedar in function of types of container and fertilization sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Henrique de Castro Pias

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of cedar seedlings according to the size of containers and nutrient sources. It was tested three types of containers (Root trainers, plastic bag and plastic vase, three sources of fertilization (Conventional, Kimcoat® and Osmocote® in seven evaluations. The cedar seedlings in root trainers, fertilized with source Osmocote® presented the greatest increments in height and stem diameter when compared to another sources of fertilization. The plastic bag and plastic vase containers promoted similar seedlings height growth. However the seedlings grown in plastic vase presented greatest growth in stem diameter when compared with the ones in plastic bag.

  1. Beneficial Effects of Citrus Juice Fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum YIT 0132 on Japanese Cedar Pollinosis

    OpenAIRE

    HARIMA-MIZUSAWA, Naomi; Iino, Tohru; ONODERA-MASUOKA, Norie; KATO-NAGAOKA, Noriko; Kiyoshima-Shibata, Junko; GOMI, Atsushi; SHIBAHARA-SONE, Harue; KANO, Mitsuyoshi; Shida, Kan; Sakai, Masashi; Miyazaki, Kouji; ISHIKAWA, Fumiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the prevalence of allergies in Japan has been increasing. Certain types of fruit juice and lactic acid bacteria are known to alleviate allergic symptoms. Therefore, we examined whether citrus juice fermented by a specific lactic acid bacteria can improve the symptoms of Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis). Lactobacillus plantarum YIT 0132 (LP0132) was selected based on its high proliferative activity in citrus juice and anti-inflammatory interleukin-10-inducing activity. Dietary admi...

  2. Biologically Important Eremophilane Sesquiterpenes from Alaska Cedar Heartwood Essential Oil and Their Semi-Synthetic Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Karchesy, Joe J.; Javier Peralta-Cruz; Mohammad A. Khasawneh; Yeping Xiong

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil of Alaska cedar heartwood is known to contain compounds which contribute to the remarkable durability of this species. While previous research has identified several compounds, a complete description of this oil has not been undertaken. In this research a profile of the oil is given in which the major components are identified by GC, isolation and spectroscopic techniques. The major components of the steam distilled essential oil were identified as nootkatin, nootkatone, val...

  3. Relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Matsuki, Yuuki; Yokoyama, Hiromichi; Matsuki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples) were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89) than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71), suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation), in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy. PMID:26110813

  4. Relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomichi Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89 than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71, suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation, in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy.

  5. Biomass accumulation and radiation use efficiency of honey mesquite and eastern red cedar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangeland models that simulate hydrology, soil erosion and nutrient balance can be used to select management systems which maximize profits for producers while they minimize adverse impacts on water quality. Values are needed for parameters that describe the growth of invading woody species in order to allow simulation of their competition with grasses. Three attributes useful for describing and quantifying plant growth are: the potential leaf area index (LAI) or ratio of leaf area divided by ground area; the light extinction coefficient (k) that is used to calculate the fraction of light intercepted by leaves, applying Beer’s law; and the radiation-use efficiency (RUE) or amount of dry biomass produced per unit of intercepted light. Objectives in this study were to measure LAI, k, and RUE for eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) and honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr. var. glandulosa), without competing plants, as a first step toward simulating their growth. Seedlings were planted in the field at Temple, Texas, USA in early 1992 and kept free of competition from herbaceous plants. During 1993, 1994 and 1995 data were collected on biomass, leaf area and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for individual trees. Both tree species showed exponential biomass increases. At the end of the 1995 growing season, mean LAI values were 1.16 for cedar and 1.25 for mesquite. Mean k values were 0.34 for mesquite and 0.37 for cedar. Radiation use efficiency for aboveground biomass was 1.60±0.17 (mean±standard deviation) g per MJ of intercepted PAR for cedar and 1.61±0.26 for mesquite. The rapid growth in 1995 was accompanied by greater leaf area and thus greater summed intercepted PAR. These values are critical for quantifying growth of these two species. (author)

  6. Evaluating the Invasion of Red Cedar (Juniperus viriginiana) Downstream of Gavins Point Dam, Missouri National Recreational River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S.; Knox, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Gavins Point Dam, the final dam on the main-stem Missouri River, alters downstream river form and function. Throughout a 59-mile downstream reach, the dam reduces overbank flooding and lowers the water surface by 1-3 meters. Under the dam-created hydro-geomorphic conditions, native cottonwood trees are unable to regenerate. The limited regeneration of native riparian cottonwoods, the lowered water surface, and the reduced overbank flooding creates a terrace environment within the riparian habitat. Consequently, red cedars, a native upland tree, are invading this new terrace-like riparian environment. To this end, we apply Bayesian statistical models to investigate patterns of red cedar riparian invasion and assess ecosystem function patterns along this flow-regulated reach. We set up plots within cottonwood stands along a 59-km reach downstream of Gavins Point Dam. Within each plot, we collected soil samples, litter samples, stem densities of trees, and collected cores of the largest cottonwood and largest red cedar in each plot. To assess influences of red cedar on soil indicators of ecosystem function and general patterns of ecosystem function within the study area, we measured organic carbon, nitrogen, pH, electrical conductivity, and hydrophobicity. To determine drivers and patterns of invasion and ecosystem function we conducted Bayesian linear regressions and means comparison tests. Red cedars existed along the floodplain prior to regulation. However, according to our tree age data and stem density data red cedars existed at a lower population than today. We found that 2 out of 565 red cedars established before the dam was completed. Also, we found no significant difference in soil properties between soils with established red cedar and soils with established cottonwood. By studying soil texture data, and interpreting fluvial geomorphic surfaces in the field and via aerial photography, we found soil texture generally reflects the type of fluvial surface

  7. Breeding for a low pollen variety of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of sufferers of Japanese cedar pollinosis has been increasing recently and this type of pollinosis is a serious allergic disease in Japan, where one of ten persons is suffering it to some extent. Breeding of Japanese cedar trees was attempted to produce less pollen and set fewer male flowers. Because the degree of male flower setting was varied among plus trees, it was thought possible to select the plus trees that set fewer than normal male flowers for use as low pollen varieties. The degree of male flower setting was evaluated under natural conditions and the conditions of gibberellic acid treatment. Since a spontaneous male sterile mutant was previously identified, it was thought possible to induce such mutation. Therefore, the cedars cultivars growing in the γ-field of Institute of Radiation Breeding were examined in respect of male fertility and some abnormal male flowers were obtained. The changes after transplanting these varieties from the γ-field remain to be resolved. Further, it is necessary to monitor the volume and the number of male flowers, and also the allergen content. (M.N.)

  8. Twentieth-century warming and the dendroclimatology of declining yellow-cedar forests in southeastern Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beier, C.M. [Alaska Fairbanks Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Biology and Wildlife; Sink, S.E.; Juday, G.P. [Alaska Fairbanks Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States). School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences; Hennon, P.E.; D' Amore, D.V. [United States Dept. of Agriculture Forest Service, Juneau, AK (United States). Pacific Northwest Research Station, Forestry Sciences Laboratory

    2008-06-15

    The decline of yellow cedar in temperate rainforests in southeastern Alaska was investigated. Dieback of the species has been observed as early as 1909. The dehardening process for the species is highly temperature-dependent. Declining stands have been found in open-canopy forests on poorly drained sites. Historical climate data sets were compiled suing extensive tree-ring chronologies. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that a specific suite of microclimatic conditions that occur during late winter involving early dehardening, reduced snowpack, and freezing injury are responsible. The assumption was tested by examining regional climatic trends and growth responses of declining cedar populations. Results of the study showed increasing winter temperatures in the region which have resulted in the frequent occurrence of severe thaw-freeze events. Late winter weather was the best predictor of annual growth for surviving trees. Results of the study also verified the impact of elevational gradients of temperature and snow cover on the exposure of the trees to climatic stressors. It was concluded that yellow cedars may continue to decline with continued climatic warming. 36 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs.

  9. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of Japanese cedar pollens and total suspended particulates: A case study at a kindergarten in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Naomichi [Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Tokai University, Bohseidai, Isehara-shi, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Ichiban-cho 8, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Nishikawa, Junko; Sakamoto, Miho; Shimizu, Tomomi; Matsuki, Hideaki [Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Tokai University, Bohseidai, Isehara-shi, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan)

    2010-03-15

    Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP) caused by allergenic cedar and cypress pollens is one of major economic and health issues in Japan. The present study reported here aimed to provide basic data to understand the status of early life exposures to airborne cedar and cypress pollens in school settings. In particular, the study investigated relationships between indoor and outdoor concentrations of airborne cedar and cypress pollens and total suspended particulates (TSP) in a kindergarten in Japan. Overall, outdoor concentrations of the airborne pollens and TSP were higher than the indoor concentrations, i.e., indoor to outdoor (I/O) ratios of 0.043-0.055 and 0.545 for the airborne pollens and TSP, respectively. The smaller I/O ratios for the pollens were expected because the larger pollen grains (20-30 {mu}m in diameter) were less likely penetrated to indoor environment than for smaller airborne particulates. The present study also found increased TSP concentrations during the pollen season was likely attributed to increased airborne pollen concentrations. By understanding the status of indoor and outdoor concentrations of airborne cedar and cypress pollens in school settings, early life exposures to these allergenic pollens should be effectively minimized to prevent subsequent progression to JCP symptoms. (author)

  10. Biodeterioration of products made from australian cedar (Toona ciliata M. Roem. var. australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Amarante Almeida

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the natural resistance of composite and solid wood panels from Toona ciliata to fungal attack through accelerated laboratory testing, to characterize the anatomical components of the wood according to IAWA, to quantify the soluble and insoluble lignin contents by acid hydrolysis and to determine the colorimetric parameters before and after fungal attack by using the CIE-L*a*b*(1976 system. Solid wood was classified as moderately and highly resistant to white-rot fungus (Trametes versicolor and to brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum. OSB panels were found to be resistant and moderately resistant to white-rot fungus and highly resistant to brown-rot fungus. Variation in species and particle type did not have a positive effect on the treatments. As regards the wood, both fungi were inhibited by the presence of phenolic resin. Particleboard panels were classified as moderately resistant to white-rot fungus. Treatments T2 (cedar and T4 (cedar-eucalyptus were resistant while treatment T3 (cedar-pine was not resistant to attack by brown-rot fungus. The urea-formaldehyde resin failed to inhibit attack in the same way the phenolic resin did. Anatomically, the species was found to have medium texture, straight vessel lines, pleasant smell after incision and poor luster on the radial surface. Its anatomical structure favored colonization by the threadlike filaments of the fungi. All treatments caused wood darkening after attack by the G. trabeum fungus, with total variation in color. It was observed that with weight loss an increase followed in insoluble lignin contents, in all treatments, indicating that this chemical property is a determining factor in wood resistance to the attack of the fungi being evaluated.

  11. The Influence of Salmon Recolonization on Riparian Communities in the Cedar River, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravek, J.; Clipp, H.; Kiffney, P.

    2015-12-01

    Salmon are a valuable cultural and economic resource throughout the Pacific Northwest, but increasing human activity is degrading coastal ecosystems and threatening local salmon populations. Salmon conservation efforts often focus on habitat restoration, including the re-colonization of salmon into historically obstructed areas such as the Cedar River in Washington, USA. However, to assess the implications of salmon re-colonization on a landscape scale, it is critical to consider not only the river ecosystem but also the surrounding riparian habitat. Although prior studies suggest that salmon alter riparian food web dynamics, the riparian community on the Cedar River has not yet been characterized. To investigate possible connections between salmon and the riparian habitat, we surveyed riparian spider communities along a gradient of salmon inputs (g/m2). In 10-m transects along the banks of the river, we identified spiders and spider webs, collected prey from webs, and characterized nearby aquatic macroinvertebrate communities. We found that the density of aquatic macroinvertebrates, as well as the density of spider prey, both had significant positive relationships with salmon inputs, supporting the hypothesis that salmon provide energy and nutrients for both aquatic and riparian food webs. We also found that spider diversity significantly decreased with salmon inputs, potentially due to confounding factors such as stream gradient or vegetation structure. Although additional information is needed to fully understand this relationship, the significant connection between salmon inputs and spider diversity is compelling motivation for further studies regarding the link between aquatic and riparian systems on the Cedar River. Understanding the connections between salmon and the riparian community is critical to characterizing the landscape-scale implications of sustainable salmon management in the Pacific Northwest.

  12. Throughfall and stemflow dynamics in a riparian cedar swamp: possible ecohydrological feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, T. P.

    2012-12-01

    Partitioning of rainfall through forest canopies as throughfall and stemflow have deservedly been the subject of much research in the past; however, very little is known about the fluxes of water and solutes through forested wetland communities. Temperate swamps are characterized by intermittent canopy coverage, with areas that are denser than upland forests of similar species, but also contain canopy gaps of meadow and marsh communities,. Understanding the role of vegetation on the distribution of precipitation in these ecosystems is necessary to effectively constrain water balance estimates and predict possible community responses to shifting climate regimes. This study examines throughfall, stemflow, and interception dynamics in a riparian cedar swamp in Alliston, Ontario, Canada over the 2012 growing season. Throughfall averaged 76 % of above-canopy rainfall; however, there were spatial-magnitude interaction variations within the swamp. For events less than 20 mm, between 17 and 75 % of the measured swamp floor received greater depth of rain than above the canopy, whereas for events greater than 20 mm only between 2 and 23 % of the sampled swamp floor received more water than the actual event. The observed spatial variability in throughfall was not related to leaf area index, suggesting remote sensing modelling efforts may not be an accurate method for quantification of wetland precipitation dynamics. Stemflow along the predominantly cedar trees averaged 5 %; therefore, net precipitation on a seasonal basis in this cedar swamp was 81 % of above canopy rainfall. Throughfall DOC and total nitrogen concentrations averaged 31 and 2.2 mg/L, respectively, with stemflow DOC and TN concentrations averaging 109 and 6.5 mg/L, respectively. These values are much higher than reported for upland forest species. In general, throughfall magnitudes increased and solute concentrations decreased with increasing distance from the existing forest boles. The delivery of high

  13. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Akazawa, Minami; Kojima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased sig...

  14. Carbon, cesium and iodine isotopes in Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Sheng; Cook, Gordon T.; Cresswell, Alan J.;

    2016-01-01

    Japanese cedar leaves from Iwaki, Fukushima were analyzed for carbon, cesium and iodine isotopic compositions before and after the 2011 nuclear accident. The Δ14C values reflect ambient atmospheric 14C concentrations during the year the leaves were sampled/defoliated, and also previous year......(s). The elevated 129I and 134,137Cs concentrations are attributed to direct exposure to the radioactive fallout for the pre-fallout-expended leaves and to internal translocation from older parts of the tree for post-fallout-expended leaves. 134Cs/137Cs and 129I/137Cs activity ratios suggest insignificant isotopic...

  15. Pyrolysis reactions of Japanese cedar and Japanese beech woods in a closed ampoule reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Asmadi, Mohd; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    The chemical structures of hemicellulose and lignin are different for two distinct types of wood, i.e., softwood and hardwood. Such differences are expected to affect pyrolysis behavior. In this article, the differences are discussed for Japanese cedar wood (a softwood) and Japanese beech wood (a hardwood) pyrolyzed in a closed ampoule reactor (N2/600°C/40–600 s). Oven-dried samples were used to eliminate the influence of initial water. Demineralized samples (prepared by acid washing) were al...

  16. Physics and roller coasters-The Blue Streak at Cedar Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Robert R.

    1991-06-01

    The use of a roller coaster for external classroom studies of kinematics, forces, dynamics, and energy conservation is discussed. Experimental accelerometer measurements of the vertical forces acting on riders of the Blue Streak at Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio are presented. Theoretically, the track profile is used to calculate/predict the vertical forces acting on a rider at the hilltops, valley bottoms, and several other points of interest along the track. Finally the experimental results and theoretical predictions are compared in the context of a rider's experiences.

  17. Multicomponent, three-dimensional seismic characterization of a fractured coalbed methane reservoir, Cedar Hill Field, San Juan County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuck, E.L.

    1993-01-01

    Methane is produced from fractured coalbed reservoirs at Cedar Hill field in the San Juan basin. Fracturing and local stress are critical to production due to the absence of matrix permeability in the coals. Knowledge of the direction of open fractures, the degree of fracturing, reservoir pressure and compartmentalization is required to understand the flow of fluids through the reservoir. A multicomponent 3-D seismic survey was acquired to aid in coalbed methane reservoir characterization. Coalbed reservoir heterogeneities, including isolated pressure cells, zones of increased fracture density, and variable fracture directions, have been identified through the analysis of the multicomponent data and integration with petro-physical and reservoir engineering studies. Strike-slip faults, which compartmentalize the reservoir, have been identified by structural interpretation of the 3-D P-wave seismic data. These faults form boundaries for pressure cells which have been identified by P-wave reflection amplitude anomalies. The analysis of polarizations, traveltimes, and reflection amplitudes from the shear-wave seismic data has allowed the identification of zones of variable fracture direction and fracture density. There is good agreement between stresses inferred from the structural interpretation and those indicated by the shear-wave polarizations. Reflection amplitudes have been calibrated to seismic velocities and reservoir pressures through the use of petrophysical data taken from core samples. Shear-wave anisotropy has been quantified over the reservoir zone using both traveltime and thin-bed reflection response with excellent agreement between the two methods. Crack densities computed from the anisotropy show two regions of high crack density, one coinciding with a sealed overpressured cell, and the other partially drained by a producing well. This indicates potential for monitoring the production of coalbed methane reservoirs using multicomponent seismology.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the adhesion time of Penicillium spores to cedar wood surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumya, Elabed; Ibnsouda, Saad Koraichi; Abdellah, Houari; Hassan, Latrache

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the adhesion of 4 Penicillium strains (Penicillium granulatum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium commune and Penicillium chrysogenum) on cedar wood was examined qualitatively and quantitatively by using the extended DLVO (XDLVO) approach and the environmental scanning electronic microscopy (ESEM) technique. A comparison between the XDLVO theories and the ESEM technique was also investigated. The adhesion tests revealed that P. chrysogenum was not able to adhere on the cedar wood substrata, as predicted by the XDLVO approach. We have also found by ESEM that the three Penicillium strains (P. granulatum, P. crustosum, P. commune) adhered on wood, as not predicted theoretically. Moreover, the time of adhesion (3 h and 24 h) was used not only to compare the capacity of adhesion according to contact time but also to explain the discrepancies between the XDLVO approach prediction and the adhesion experiments. A positive relationship between the XDLVO approach and adhesion experiments has been observed after 3h of adhesion. In contrast, a contradiction between the XDLVO predictions and the adhesion test results has been noted after 24h of adhesion of Penicillium strains to the wood surface.

  19. Flood-inundation maps for Grand River, Red Cedar River, and Sycamore Creek near Lansing, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Matthew; Ostheimer, Chad J.

    2015-08-26

    Digital flood-inundation maps for a total of 19.7 miles of the Grand River, the Red Cedar River, and Sycamore Creek were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Lansing, Michigan, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/, show estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at three USGS streamgages: Grand River at Lansing, MI (04113000), Red Cedar River at East Lansing, MI (04112500), and Sycamore Creek at Holt Road near Holt, MI (04112850). Near-real-time stages at these streamgages can be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ or the National Weather Service (NWS) Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service at http:/water.weather.gov/ahps/, which also forecasts flood hydrographs at all of these sites.

  20. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Akazawa, Minami; Kojima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased significantly with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while it increased following analytical pyrolysis. The same results were obtained for 4-vinylguaiacol and E-isoeugenol, which were the major secondary products produced in the present study. Compared to the yields of these major products obtained via analytical pyrolysis, the yields from the auger reactor were very low, indicating that the auger reactor process had a longer vapor residence time than the analytical pyrolysis process, resulting in the acceleration of secondary reactions of the pyrolysates. The pH values and densities of the bio-oils produced in the auger reactor were similar to those reported by researchers using woody biomass, despite their lower viscosities. From these results, it was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature and residence time of the pyrolysates played a significant role in determining the characteristics of the cedar bio-oil. PMID:27047705

  1. Recombinant pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) catalyze opposite enantiospecific conversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-01-01

    Although the heartwood of woody plants represents the main source of fiber and solid wood products, essentially nothing is known about how the biological processes leading to its formation are initiated and regulated. Accordingly, a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-guided cloning strategy was employed to obtain genes encoding pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) as a means to initiate the study of its heartwood formation. (+)-Pinoresinol-(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia was used as a template for primer construction for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplifications, which, when followed by homologous hybridization cloning, resulted in the isolation of two distinct classes of putative pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase cDNA clones from western red cedar. A representative of each class was expressed as a fusion protein with beta-galactosidase and assayed for enzymatic activity. Using both deuterated and radiolabeled (+/-)-pinoresinols as substrates, it was established that each class of cDNA encoded a pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase of different (opposite) enantiospecificity. Significantly, the protein from one class converted (+)-pinoresinol into (-)-secoisolariciresinol, whereas the other utilized the opposite (-)-enantiomer to give the corresponding (+)-form. This differential substrate specificity raises important questions about the role of each of these individual reductases in heartwood formation, such as whether they are expressed in different cells/tissues or at different stages during heartwood development.

  2. Characterization of Japanese cedar bio-oil produced using a bench-scale auger pyrolyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Enomoto, Ryohei; Akazawa, Minami; Kojima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A bench-scale auger reactor was designed for use as a laboratory-scale fast pyrolyzer for producing bio-oil from Japanese cedar. An analytical pyrolysis method was performed simultaneously to determine the distribution of pyrolysis products. The pyrolysis temperature was found to have the greatest influence on the bio-oil characteristics; bio-oil yields increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 450 to 550 °C. The concentration of levoglucosan in the bio-oil, however, decreased significantly with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while it increased following analytical pyrolysis. The same results were obtained for 4-vinylguaiacol and E-isoeugenol, which were the major secondary products produced in the present study. Compared to the yields of these major products obtained via analytical pyrolysis, the yields from the auger reactor were very low, indicating that the auger reactor process had a longer vapor residence time than the analytical pyrolysis process, resulting in the acceleration of secondary reactions of the pyrolysates. The pH values and densities of the bio-oils produced in the auger reactor were similar to those reported by researchers using woody biomass, despite their lower viscosities. From these results, it was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature and residence time of the pyrolysates played a significant role in determining the characteristics of the cedar bio-oil.

  3. Biologically Important Eremophilane Sesquiterpenes from Alaska Cedar Heartwood Essential Oil and Their Semi-Synthetic Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe J. Karchesy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Alaska cedar heartwood is known to contain compounds which contribute to the remarkable durability of this species. While previous research has identified several compounds, a complete description of this oil has not been undertaken. In this research a profile of the oil is given in which the major components are identified by GC, isolation and spectroscopic techniques. The major components of the steam distilled essential oil were identified as nootkatin, nootkatone, valencene, nootaktene, carvacrol, methyl carvacrol, nootkatol (2, and eremophil-1(10,11-dien-13-ol (3. The last two compounds were isolated for the first time from Alaska cedar in this research. The absolute stereochemistry at C-2 of nootkatol was shown to have the (S configuration using the Mosher ester method. Assignment of stereochemistry for valencene-13-ol (3 was established by synthesis from valencene (6. Finally, two related sesquiterpenoids were synthesized from nootkatone and valencene. These sesquiterpenoids were nootkatone-1,10-11,12-diepoxide (5 and valencene-13-aldehyde (4, respectively.

  4. Biologically important eremophilane sesquiterpenes from alaska cedar heartwood essential oil and their semi-synthetic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasawneh, Mohammad A; Xiong, Yeping; Peralta-Cruz, Javier; Karchesy, Joe J

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil of Alaska cedar heartwood is known to contain compounds which contribute to the remarkable durability of this species. While previous research has identified several compounds, a complete description of this oil has not been undertaken. In this research a profile of the oil is given in which the major components are identified by GC, isolation and spectroscopic techniques. The major components of the steam distilled essential oil were identified as nootkatin, nootkatone, valencene, nootaktene, carvacrol, methyl carvacrol, nootkatol (2), and eremophil-1(10),11-dien-13-ol (3). The last two compounds were isolated for the first time from Alaska cedar in this research. The absolute stereochemistry at C-2 of nootkatol was shown to have the (S) configuration using the Mosher ester method. Assignment of stereochemistry for valencene-13-ol (3) was established by synthesis from valencene (6). Finally, two related sesquiterpenoids were synthesized from nootkatone and valencene. These sesquiterpenoids were nootkatone-1,10-11,12-diepoxide (5) and valencene-13-aldehyde (4), respectively. PMID:21654582

  5. Characterization and Antioxidant Properties of the Condensed Tannins from Alaska Cedar Inner Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rosales-Castro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure and antioxidant activity of condensed tannins isolated from Alaska Cedar inner bark have been investigated. Oligomers of flavan-3-ol were purified by column chromatography (Sephadex LH-20 and analyzed by 13CNMR and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometries. Their antioxidant activities were measured using 1,1’-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS free radicals scavenging, ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP, and β-carotene-linoleic acid model system (β-CLAMS assays. Results showed that the condensed tannins consents of both homogeneous and heterogeneous oligomers of procyanidins (catechin/epicatechin and prodelphinidins (gallocatechin/ epigallocatechin flavan-3-ol units; and oligomers from trimmers to heptamers with dominant interflavan linkages B-type as it is most common in proanthocyanidins. Condensed tannins showed significant ntioxidant activity as the median inhibition capacity IC 50 is comparable to the catechin control response. Alaska Cedar inner bark oligomers show high antioxidant capacity, evaluated by both methods based on electron transfer mechanisms and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. This bark may be considered as a new source of natural antioxidants for nutraceutical ingredients.

  6. Estimation of Carbon Balance in Young and Mature Stands of Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria Japonica) Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Sode, N.; Koizumi, H.

    2006-12-01

    Two-thirds of Japan is covered by forests, and Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) plantations occupy approximately 45% of the plantation areas or 20% of total forested area in Japan. Since the 1950s, cedar plantation has been encouraged and managed for timber production. Therefore, it is important to study quantitatively and synthetically the balance of carbon in cedar plantation ecosystems according to forest development. The ecological process-based approach provides a detailed assessment of belowground compartment as one of the major compartment of carbon balance. Carbon net balance (NEP: net ecosystem production) in ecosystems by this approach is determined by the balance between net primary production (NPP) of vegetation and heterotrophic respiration (HR) of soil (NEP= NPP-HR). HR is the difference between total soil respiration (SR) and root respiration (RR) (HR= SR-RR). To estimate the NPP, we used to biometric method by allometric relationships and litter traps. To estimate the SR, we used a chamber system with automatic open and closing for measuring continuous CO2 efflux from soil surface based on an open-flow method (AOCC) and a portable system for measuring leaf photosynthesis attached to a soil chamber (LI-6400). Our object is to examine balance of carbon in ca. 7 y old (young) and 45 y old (mature) stands of Japanese cedar. Our goal of this study is to investigate carbon cycling on a regional scale using ecological process, remote sensing, and climate observation and modeling analysis as part of the 21st COE program {Satellite Ecology}. This presents the initial results obtained by a process-based measurement since 2004. The study region refers to a cool temperate zone, Asia monsoon climate (36° 08'N, 137° 22'E). In the mature stand, Japanese cedar plantation located in about 10km east of Takayama city, central Japan. The ecological-process research plot was established on the middle of a slope (30m×50m) in November 2004. The slope

  7. Morphologic evaluations of Australian Cedar submitted to different doses of osmocote plus® fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Somavilla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Cedar (Toona ciliata M. Roem is an exotic specie that has been highlighting due its great potential in brazilian commercial silviculture for presenting high growing taxes. This work aimed evaluate the development of seedlights of Toona ciliata when submitted to differets doses of fertilizer. The experiment was developed in random blocks, being the respective doses of Osmocote Plus®: 0; 3; 6; 9; 12 kg m-³ of substrate. The fertilizer of controlled solubilization Osmocote Plus® in formulation of 15-09-12, in all dosing, afforded the increase in morphologic characteristics evaluated. Thus, the fertilization of Australian Ceder with Osmocote Plus® provided the best parameters evaluated, in doses ranging of 7,5 to 8,5 kg m-³ of substrate. So it is porssible infer that an ideal dose of Osmocote Plus® fertilizer in formulation of 15-09-12 for fertilization of Australian Cedar seedlights, is of 8,0 kg m-³ of substrate.

  8. Invasion of moso bamboo into a Japanese cedar plantation affects the chemical composition and humification of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsueh-Ching; Tian, Guanglong; Chiu, Chih-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo, which has dense culms and root rhizome systems, can alter soil properties when it invades adjacent forests. Therefore, this study investigated whether bamboo invasions can cause changes in soil organic matter (SOM) composition and soil humification. We combined solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis to examine the SOM in a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and adjacent bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) plantation. Bamboo reduced soil organic C (SOC) content, compared to the cedar plantation. The value of ∆logK (ratio of absorbance of humic acids at 400 and 600 nm) was cedar > transition zone > bamboo soils. Our results indicated that bamboo increased SOM humification, which could be due to the fast decomposition of bamboo litter with the high labile C. Furthermore, intensive management in the bamboo plantation could enhance the humification as well. Overall, litter type can control an ecosystem’s SOC nature, as reflected by the finding that higher labile C in bamboo litter contributed the higher ratios of labile C to SOC and lower ratios of recalcitrant C to SOC in bamboo soils compared with cedar soils. The invasion of bamboo into the Japanese cedar plantation accelerated the degradation of SOM. PMID:27558833

  9. Invasion of moso bamboo into a Japanese cedar plantation affects the chemical composition and humification of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsueh-Ching; Tian, Guanglong; Chiu, Chih-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bamboo, which has dense culms and root rhizome systems, can alter soil properties when it invades adjacent forests. Therefore, this study investigated whether bamboo invasions can cause changes in soil organic matter (SOM) composition and soil humification. We combined solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis to examine the SOM in a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and adjacent bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) plantation. Bamboo reduced soil organic C (SOC) content, compared to the cedar plantation. The value of ∆logK (ratio of absorbance of humic acids at 400 and 600 nm) was cedar > transition zone > bamboo soils. Our results indicated that bamboo increased SOM humification, which could be due to the fast decomposition of bamboo litter with the high labile C. Furthermore, intensive management in the bamboo plantation could enhance the humification as well. Overall, litter type can control an ecosystem's SOC nature, as reflected by the finding that higher labile C in bamboo litter contributed the higher ratios of labile C to SOC and lower ratios of recalcitrant C to SOC in bamboo soils compared with cedar soils. The invasion of bamboo into the Japanese cedar plantation accelerated the degradation of SOM. PMID:27558833

  10. 77 FR 3840 - Iowa Interstate Railroad, Ltd.-Lease Exemption-Line of Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... Surface Transportation Board Iowa Interstate Railroad, Ltd.--Lease Exemption--Line of Cedar Rapids and Iowa City Railway Company AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Exemption. SUMMARY.... 10902 for Iowa Interstate Railroad, Ltd. (IAIS), a Class II rail carrier, to lease and operate 8.4...

  11. Comprehensive Education Data and Research System (CEDARS) Data Manual: 2012-2013 School Year. Version 5.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Randy; Came, Deb

    2012-01-01

    The Comprehensive Education Data and Research System (CEDARS) is a longitudinal data system that will allow Washington's Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to collect, store and report data related to students, courses, and teachers in order to meet state and federal reporting requirements and to help educators and policy makers…

  12. Invasion of moso bamboo into a Japanese cedar plantation affects the chemical composition and humification of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsueh-Ching; Tian, Guanglong; Chiu, Chih-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Bamboo, which has dense culms and root rhizome systems, can alter soil properties when it invades adjacent forests. Therefore, this study investigated whether bamboo invasions can cause changes in soil organic matter (SOM) composition and soil humification. We combined solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis to examine the SOM in a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and adjacent bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) plantation. Bamboo reduced soil organic C (SOC) content, compared to the cedar plantation. The value of ∆logK (ratio of absorbance of humic acids at 400 and 600 nm) was cedar > transition zone > bamboo soils. Our results indicated that bamboo increased SOM humification, which could be due to the fast decomposition of bamboo litter with the high labile C. Furthermore, intensive management in the bamboo plantation could enhance the humification as well. Overall, litter type can control an ecosystem’s SOC nature, as reflected by the finding that higher labile C in bamboo litter contributed the higher ratios of labile C to SOC and lower ratios of recalcitrant C to SOC in bamboo soils compared with cedar soils. The invasion of bamboo into the Japanese cedar plantation accelerated the degradation of SOM.

  13. Floods of May 30 to June 15, 2008, in the Iowa and Cedar River basins, eastern Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Mike S.; Eash, David A.

    2010-01-01

    As a result of prolonged and intense periods of rainfall in late May and early June, 2008, along with heavier than normal snowpack the previous winter, record flooding occurred in Iowa in the Iowa River and Cedar River Basins. The storms were part of an exceptionally wet period from May 29 through June 12, when an Iowa statewide average of 9.03 inches of rain fell; the normal statewide average for the same period is 2.45 inches. From May 29 to June 13, the 16-day rainfall totals recorded at rain gages in Iowa Falls and Clutier were 14.00 and 13.83 inches, respectively. Within the Iowa River Basin, peak discharges of 51,000 cubic feet per second (flood-probability estimate of 0.2 to 1 percent) at the 05453100 Iowa River at Marengo, Iowa streamflow-gaging station (streamgage) on June 12, and of 39,900 cubic feet per second (flood-probability estimate of 0.2 to 1 percent) at the 05453520 Iowa River below Coralville Dam near Coralville, Iowa streamgage on June 15 are the largest floods on record for those sites. A peak discharge of 41,100 cubic feet per second (flood-probability estimate of 0.2 to 1 percent) on June 15 at the 05454500 Iowa River at Iowa City, Iowa streamgage is the fourth highest on record, but is the largest flood since regulation by the Coralville Dam began in 1958. Within the Cedar River Basin, the May 30 to June 15, 2008, flood is the largest on record at all six streamgages in Iowa located on the mainstem of the Cedar River and at five streamgages located on the major tributaries. Flood-probability estimates for 10 of these 11 streamgages are less than 1 percent. Peak discharges of 112,000 cubic feet per second (flood-probability estimate of 0.2 to 1 percent) at the 05464000 Cedar River at Waterloo, Iowa streamgage on June 11 and of 140,000 cubic feet per second (flood-probability estimate of less than 0.2 percent) at the 05464500 Cedar River at Cedar Rapids, Iowa streamgage on June 13 are the largest floods on record for those sites. Downstream

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  18. Dinosaur tracks from the Cedar Mountain Formation (Lower Cretaceous), Arches National Park, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockley, M.G.; White, D.; Kirkland, J.; Santucci, V.

    2004-01-01

    The seventh and largest known dinosaur tracksite from the Cedar Mountain Formation is reported from two important stratigraphic levels in the Ruby Ranch Member within the boundaries of Arches National Park. Previous reports of sites with a few isolated tracks are of limited utility in indicating the fauna represented by track makers. The Arches site reveals evidence of several theropod morphotypes, including a possible match for the coelurosaur Nedcolbertia and an apparently didactyl Utahraptor-like dromeosaurid. Sauropod tracks indicate a wide-gauge morphotype (cf. Brontopodus). Ornithischian tracks suggest the presence of an iguandontid-like ornithopod and a large ankylosaur. Dinosaur track diversity is high in comparison with other early Cretaceous vertebrate ichnofaunas, and it correlates well with faunal lists derived from skeletal remains, thus providing a convincing census of the known fauna. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  19. Precipitation reconstruction using ring-width chronology of Himalayan cedar from western Himalaya: Preliminary results

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram R Yadav; Won-Kyu Park

    2000-09-01

    Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara (D. Don) G. Don) due to its long age and wide ecological amplitude in the Himalayan region has strong dendroclimatic potential. A well replicated ring-width chronology of it, derived from the ensemble of tree-ring samples of two adjacent homogeneous sites, has been used to reconstruct precipitation for the non-monsoon months (previous year October to concurrent May) back to AD 1171. This provides the first record of hydrological conditions for the western Himalayan region, India during the whole of the `Little Ice Age' and latter part of the `Medieval Warm Period'. The reconstruction revealed the wettest and the driest non-monsoon months during the fourteenth and the thirteenth centuries, respectively. The seventeenth century consistently recorded dry non-monsoon months in the western Himalayan region. Surplus precipitation, especially more pronounced since the 1950s, is recorded in the current century.

  20. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Jennifer; Pirtle, Jody; Barndt, Scott A.

    2002-03-31

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River Basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River Basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the second year of this project. Adult (n = 24), metamorphosed (n = 247), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 387) stages from both species were examined in 2001. Lamprey were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. Twenty-nine spawning ground surveys were conducted. Nine strategic point-specific habitat surveys were performed to assess habitat requirements of juvenile lamprey.

  1. Monolignol radical-radical coupling networks in western red cedar and Arabidopsis and their evolutionary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung K.; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of a nine-member multigene dirigent family involved in control of monolignol radical-radical coupling in the ancient gymnosperm, western red cedar, suggested that a complex multidimensional network had evolved to regulate such processes in vascular plants. Accordingly, in this study, the corresponding promoter regions for each dirigent multigene member were obtained by genome-walking, with Arabidopsis being subsequently transformed to express each promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. It was found that each component gene of the proposed network is apparently differentially expressed in individual tissues, organs and cells at all stages of plant growth and development. The data so obtained thus further support the hypothesis that a sophisticated monolignol radical-radical coupling network exists in plants which has been highly conserved throughout vascular plant evolution.

  2. [Narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Tract: Calendar year 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar...

  3. A Study of Factors involved in possible regeneration of Atlantic White Cedar in a recently burned area in the Great Dismal Swamp

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Historically white cedar has managed to regenerate without benefit of controlled burns and it seems that .most wild fires occur during the dry season. It was...

  4. [Narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Tract: Calendar year 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar...

  5. [Narrative report for Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Cedar Point National Wildlife Refuge, West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuge, Navarre Tract: Calendar year 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ottawa, Cedar Point, and West Sister Island National Wildlife Refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar...

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Document Server

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  7. Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The pixelated rectangle we spend most of our day staring at in silence is not the television as many long feared, but the computer-the ubiquitous portal of work and personal lives. At this point, the computer is almost so common we don't notice it in our view. It's difficult to envision that not that long ago it was a gigantic, room-sized structure only to be accessed by a few inspiring as much awe and respect as fear and mystery. Now that the machine has decreased in size and increased in popular use, the computer has become a prosaic appliance, little-more noted than a toaster. These dramati

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  10. Yellow-cedar in vitro clonal production and evaluation of propagules for reforestation. FRDA research memo No. 211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Technical note describing a project that was part of an ongoing effort to develop micropropagation techniques on an operation scale and to investigate their possible use in producing genetically improved stock for planting. The project developed a commercially viable process that uses organogenic micropropagation to produce yellow-cedar stock for operational reforestation; evaluated the techniques for developing genetically improved clones; and established demonstration plots of mircopropagules.

  11. Cedar Middle School's Response to Intervention Journey: A Systematic, Multi-Tier, Problem-Solving Approach to Program Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Dulaney, Shannon Kay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to record Cedar Middle School's (CMS) response to intervention implementation journey. It is a qualitative case study that examines one school's efforts to bring school improvements under the response to inventory (RtI) umbrella in order to achieve a more systematic approach to providing high-quality educational services to every student enrolled at CMS. Participants included the 10 members of the school's Student Success Team along with the principal and ...

  12. A division of labour with role specialization in group-hunting bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) off Cedar Key, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Gazda, Stefanie K.; Richard C Connor; Edgar, Robert K.; Cox, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Individual role specialization during group hunting is extremely rare in mammals. Observations on two groups of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Cedar Key, Florida revealed distinctive behavioural roles during group feeding. In each group, one individual was consistently the ‘driver’, herding the fishes in a circle toward the remaining ‘barrier’ dolphins. Aerial fish-capture rates differed between groups, as well as between the driver and barrier dolphins, in one group but not in t...

  13. Effect of intranasal corticosteroid on pre-onset activation of eosinophils and mast cells in experimental Japanese cedar pollinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuyuki Noyama; Mitsuhiro Okano; Tazuko Fujiwara; Shin Kariya; Sei-ichiro Makihara; Takenori Haruna; Kengo Kanai; Takaya Higaki; Kazunori Nishizaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Minimal persistent inflammation (MPI) contributes to hyperreactivity in allergic rhinitis. However, little is known regarding whether pre-onset activation of eosinophils and mast cells is present or not in Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP). Furthermore, a prophylactic effect of intranasal corticosteroids on such MPI in JCP has not been investigated. Methods: We designed a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Twenty patients with JCP were examined outsi...

  14. Stable carbon isotope fractionation in pollen of Atlas cedar: first steps towards a new palaeoecological proxy for Northwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Benjamin; Fletcher, William; Ryan, Peter; Grant, Helen; Ilmen, Rachid

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of stable carbon isotopes can provide information on climate and the environmental conditions at different growth stages of the plant, both past and present. Carbon isotope discrimination in plant tissue is already well understood, and can be used as a drought stress indicator for semi-arid regions. Stable carbon isotope ratios measured directly on pollen provides the potential for the development of long-term environmental proxies (spanning thousands of years), as pollen is well preserved in the environment. Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica Endl. Manetti ex Carrière), is an ideal test case to develop a pollen stable carbon isotope proxy. The tree grows across a wide altitudinal and climatic range and is extremely sensitive to moisture availability. The pollen is abundant, and easily identifiable to the species level in pollen analysis because different cedar species are geographically confined to different regions of the world. In 2015 we sampled 76 individual cedar trees across latitudinal, altitudinal and environmental gradients, highly focused on the Middle Atlas region of Morocco, with 25 additional samples from botanical gardens across Europe and the US to extend these gradients. Here, we report new stable carbon isotope data from pollen, leaf and stem wood from these samples with a view to assessing and quantifying species-specific fractionation effects associated with pollen production. The isotopic response of individual trees at local and wider geographical scales to altitude and climatic conditions is presented. This research forms part of an ongoing PhD project working to develop and calibrate a modern carbon isotope proxy in Atlas cedar pollen, which can ultimately be applied to fossil sequences and complement existing multi-proxy records (e.g. pollen analysis in lake sediments, tree-rings).

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Document Server

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Document Server

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Document Server

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  2. Monitoring of damage from cedar shoot moth Dichelia cedricola Diakonoff (Lep.: Tortricidae by multi-temporal Landsat imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çoban HO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study defoliation damage in Taurus cedar (Cedrus libani A. Rich stands in Turkey (Isparta region caused by cedar shoot moth (Dichelia cedricola Diakonoff - Lep.: Tortricidae was examined using multi-temporal Landsat data. Undamaged, low-damaged and heavily-damaged areas were located by assessing the variation of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index derived from satellite imagery. Threshold boundaries for different damage levels were defined using mean NDVI values obtained from sub-areas spanning over the whole range of NDVI values. The reliability of the classification based on damages was statistically tested by comparing mean annual ring widths measured on increment cores extracted from sample trees exposed to different damage levels. Significant differences were found in mean annual ring widths among different areas previously classified based on NDVI data. Mean annual ring width in 2001 (an outbreak year was 1.64 mm for undamaged area, 1.04 mm for low-damaged area, and 0.54 mm for heavily-damaged area. These findings indicate that damage mapping and monitoring mass damage caused by insect defoliation in Taurus cedar stands can be performed remotely by using NDVI values and Landsat TM data.

  3. Impacts of Land Cover Changes on Runoff and Sediment in the Cedar Creek Watershed, St. Joseph River,Indiana, United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xiaobo; Chi-hua Huang; Fushui Ruan

    2008-01-01

    The relation between runoff and sediment and land cover is investigated in the Cedar Creek Watershed (CCW), located in Northeastern Indiana, United States. The major land cover types in this watershed are cultivated land, woodland and pasture/Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which account for approximate 90% of the total area in the region. Moreover, land use was changed tremendously from 2ooo to 2004, even without regarding the effect of the crop rotation system (corn & soybean). At least 49% of land cover types were changed into other types in this period. The land cover types, ranking by changing area from high to low series, are rye, soybean, corn, woodland and pasture/CRP. The CCW is divided into 21 sub-watersheds, and soil and water loss in each sub-watershed is computed by using Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The results indicate that the variations in runoff and sediment have positive relation to the area of crops (especially corn and soybean); sediment is more sensitive to land cover changes than runoff; more heavy rainfall does not always mean more runoff because the combination of different land cover types always modify runoff coefficient; and rye, soybean and corn are the key land cover types, which affected the variation in runoff and sediment in the CCW.

  4. Geochemistry and geobiology of a present-day serpentinization site in California: The Cedars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Penny L.; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Johnson, Orion J.; Suzuki, Shino; Rietze, Amanda; Sessions, Alex L.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2013-05-01

    Ultra-basic (pH 11-12) reducing (-656 to -585 mV) groundwater springs discharging from serpentinized peridotite of The Cedars, CA, were investigated for their geochemistry and geobiology. The spring waters investigated were of meteoric origin; however, geochemical modeling suggests that there were two sources of groundwater, a shallow source with sufficient contact with The Cedars' peridotite body to be altered geochemically by serpentinization, and a deeper groundwater source that not only flows through the peridotite body but was also in contact with the marine sediments of the Franciscan Subduction Complex (FSC) below the peridotite body. We propose that the groundwater discharging from lower elevations (GPS1 and CS1) reflect the geochemistry of the deeper groundwater in contact with FSC, while groundwaters discharging from springs at higher elevations (NS1 and BSC) were a mixture of the shallow peridotite-only groundwater and the deeper groundwater that has been in contact with the FSC. Cell densities of suspended microbes within these waters were extremely low. In the NS1 and BSC spring fluids, cell densities ranged from 102 to 103 cells/ml, while suspended cells at GPS were lower than 10 cells/mL. However, glass slides incubated in the BSC and GPS1 springs for 2-3 weeks were colonized by cells with densities ranging from 106 to 107 cells/cm2 attached to their surfaces. All of the springs were very low (⩽1 μM) in several essential elements and electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate/ammonium, sulfate, and phosphate) required for (microbial) growth, which is not uncommon at sites of continental serpentinization. Gases rich in N2, H2, and CH4 were exsolving from the springs. The stable carbon isotope value (δ13CCH4 = -68 ± 0.6‰) and the CH4/C2+ (>103) of methane and other gaseous hydrocarbons exsolving from NS1 were typical of microbially sourced methane, whereas the isotope values and the CH4/C2+ of BSC and CS1 springs were more enriched in 13C and had CH4/C2

  5. Influences of floral composition and environment on plant biomarkers across a Cretaceous landscape (Big Cedar Ridge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, R. T.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Wing, S. L.; McInerney, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Late Cretaceous fossil site at Big Cedar Ridge (BCR; late Campanian, 72.7 Ma), located in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, contains a flora preserved in situ in a volcanic ash tuff over an organic-rich paleosol. The BCR flora is irregularly but extensively exposed along a ~4 km north-south transect and records a lowland flora that grew on a coastal delta on the western shore of the Cretaceous Interior Seaway (Meeteetse Formation). The transect spans a diverse landscape and a range of environmental gradients from very carbon-rich, swampy soils in the southern portion to less carbon-rich in the north; the landscape is also intersected by multiple inactive channel cuts that were filling with sediment and organic matter at the time of ash deposition. Recently Wing and others (2012, Ecological Monographs) described the composition of the local plant community at high resolution across the entire landscape, including identification and quantification of cover and richness for >122 taxonomic morphotypes, for each of 100 sites along the transect. Big Cedar Ridge captures an important time in the ecological development of plant communities: the site preserves ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms in 'fern thicket' floral assemblages, which are rare today, as well as disturbed habitats with abundant herbaceous 'dicot' angiosperms. During the Late Cretaceous angiosperms were globally increasing in abundance, displacing other plant groups as vegetational dominants. This setting allows for a novel analysis of plant biomarkers in the context of floral diversity, abundance, and landscape heterogeneity. We quantified leaf waxes (n-alkyl lipids), plant-derived terpenoids, bacterial hopanes, carbon isotope values (including bulk and compound-specific), and percent total organic carbon of the underlying paleosol for 36 sites along the transect in order to assess the influence of floral composition and soil environment on biomarker distributions and preservation. We compare lipid

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Document Server

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  14. Noninvasive biological evaluation of response to pranlukast treatment in pediatric patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Minoru; Okubo, Kimihiro; Hashiguchi, Kazuhiro; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kanzaki, Sho; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Fujioka, Masato; Kawashima, Kayoko; Suematsu, Kiyochika; Sasaki, Koichi; Iwasaki, Manabu; Yamamotoya, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Pranlukast (PLK) is a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 antagonist approved for the treatment of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis in Japan. We previously reported that PLK dry syrup (DS) improved the total nasal symptom score, as well as sneezing, nasal discharge, and nasal obstruction scores over placebo. We investigated the efficacy of PLK DS with a noninvasive method in 10- to 15-year-old children with Japanese cedar (JC) pollinosis challenged with pollen allergen using an artificial exposure chamber (OHIO Chamber). Levels of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in nasal secretions, nasal obstruction score, and the relationship with nasal obstruction scores were analyzed. The estimated difference of means in ECP levels (PLK DS--placebo) was -22.9 micrograms (95% CI, -45.2 to -0.5), suggesting PLK DS reduced ECP significantly when compared with placebo (p = 0.0454). The difference in the least square means for nasal obstruction between the PLK DS and placebo was -0.25 (95% CI, -0.36 to -0.14) with a value of p eosinophilic inflammation is one of the pathways by which PLK DS improves pollinosis-induced nasal obstruction. PMID:23394502

  15. Seasonal Variation in the NDVI–Species Richness Relationship in a Prairie Grassland Experiment (Cedar Creek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Species richness generally promotes ecosystem productivity, although the shape of the relationship varies and remains the subject of debate. One reason for this uncertainty lies in the multitude of methodological approaches to sampling biodiversity and productivity, some of which can be subjective. Remote sensing offers new, objective ways of assessing productivity and biodiversity. In this study, we tested the species richness–productivity relationship using a common remote sensing index, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, as a measure of productivity in experimental prairie grassland plots (Cedar Creek. Our study spanned a growing season (May to October, 2014 to evaluate dynamic changes in the NDVI–species richness relationship through time and in relation to environmental variables and phenology. We show that NDVI, which is strongly associated with vegetation percent cover and biomass, is related to biodiversity for this prairie site, but it is also strongly influenced by other factors, including canopy growth stage, short-term water stress and shifting flowering patterns. Remarkably, the NDVI-biodiversity correlation peaked at mid-season, a period of warm, dry conditions and anthesis, when NDVI reached a local minimum. These findings confirm a positive, but dynamic, productivity–diversity relationship and highlight the benefit of optical remote sensing as an objective and non-invasive tool for assessing diversity–productivity relationships.

  16. Resistance of pine, australian red cedar woods and their derivate products to Cryptotermes brevis attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Xisto Ribeiro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the resistance of Australian red cedar (Toona ciliata and pine (Pinus sp. woods and particleboards made from these species to dry-wood termite Cryptotermes brevis attack, as much as to quantify the mortality of the insects. 30 termite pseudo-workers were put in each 9,5 cm-diameter Petri dishes containing the samples (1,5 x 1,5 x 0,5 cm and cotton sheets positioned on the perforated covers, daily moisturized with 5 ml of water. The dishes were maintained in BOD (Biological Oxygen Demand at 24±5 ºC and 24 h of escotophase. A control sample without any feed source was included in the bioassay. The deterioration index (ID and mortality of the insects were evaluated after 60 days. Termites from the control sample presented higher termite mortality than the other treatments, which did not differ among each other. Toona ciliata wood was more resistant than Pinus sp. wood to Cryptotermes brevis attack. The average deterioration indexes were 1.74% and 6.62% respectively for those woods. The average deterioration index of the panels made with 100% Toona ciliata (ID=1.58% was similar to the deterioration index of particleboards made with this specie mixed with Pinus sp. (ID=1.87%.

  17. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirtle, Jodi; Stone, Jennifer; Barndt, Scott

    2003-03-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) and river lamprey (L. ayresi) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the third year of this project. Adult (n = 62), metamorphosed (n = 76), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 315) stages of Pacific and western brook lamprey were examined in 2002. Lampreys were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. In addition, fifty-four spawning ground surveys were conducted during which 124 Pacific lamprey and 13 western brook lamprey nests were identified. Stream gradient of spawning grounds were surveyed to better understand spawning habitat requirements.

  18. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 95-0023-2531, American Azide Corporation, Cedar City, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esswein, E.; Trout, D.; Hales, T.

    1995-09-01

    In response to a confidential request, an investigation was begun into possible exposures to sodium-azide and hydrazoic-acid at the American Azide Corporation (SIC-5169), Cedar City, Utah. Personal breathing zone samples indicated that concentrations of sodium-azide ranged up to 1.7mg/m3. Hydrazoic-acid levels ranged up to 1.1 parts per million (ppm). Sodium-azide levels exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure level (REL) of 0.3mg/m3 in 28% of the samples and hydrazoic-acid exceeded the REL of 0.1ppm in 14% of the samples. On one occasion the air sample taken inside a supplied air helmet showed a hydrazoic-acid level of 0.13ppm which was greater than the 0.05ppm level recorded from samples on the worker`s collar. The packaging and reblending operation appeared to be those in which workers were most at risk. Medical screening was performed on 11 workers, ten of whom reported headaches occurring in the production areas within 6 months of the evaluation. During that same time period, nine of the 11 reported low blood pressure episodes.

  19. Soil microbial community profiles and functional diversity in limestone cedar glades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Dzantor, E. Kudjo; Momen, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Rock outcrop ecosystems, such as limestone cedar glades (LCGs), are known for their rare and endemic plant species adapted to high levels of abiotic stress. Soils in LCGs are thin (communities (SMC) remain largely unstudied, despite the importance of SMC-plant interactions in regulating the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems. SMC profiles and functional diversity were characterized in LCGs using community level physiological profiling (CLPP) and plate-dilution frequency assays (PDFA). Most-probable number (MPN) estimates and microbial substrate-utilization diversity (H) were positively related to soil thickness, soil organic matter (OM), soil water content, and vegetation density, and were diminished in alkaline soil relative to circumneutral soil. Soil nitrate showed no relationship to SMCs, suggesting lack of N-limitation. Canonical correlation analysis indicated strong correlations between microbial CLPP patterns and several physical and chemical properties of soil, primarily temperature at the ground surface and at 4-cm depth, and secondarily soil-water content, enabling differentiation by season. Thus, it was demonstrated that several well-described abiotic determinants of plant community structure in this ecosystem are also reflected in SMC profiles.

  20. Impregnation of preservative and fire retardants into Japanese cedar lumber by passive impregnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Nazrul Islam

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper azole type B (CAz-B preservative and polyphosphatic carbamate (PPC fire retardants were impregnated in succession into green (97% MC and kiln-dried (18% MC Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica (L.f. D.Don lumber by the passive impregnation method to prolong the period of lumber use by increasing its resistance to fire and biological degradation. Lumber was dried with a kiln or by air-drying. Total chemical retention, penetration, leaching, decay resistance (JIS K 1571, and fire retardancy (ISO 834-1 standard, 20 minutes tests were performed according to the mentioned standards. Preservative retention was higher in the green lumber (4.97 kg/m3 compared with the kiln-dried (4.88 kg/m3 lumber. However, fire retardant retention was similar for both lumber types (107 and 111 kg/m3. Leaching was higher in kiln-dried lumber (21.8% compared to air-dried lumber (14.4%, although there were no significant differences in the decay resistance test between these two lumber types. The fire performance of both lumber types was similar in the fire resistance test. Therefore, the passive impregnation method can be used effectively for impregnation of both preservatives and fire retardants into wood.

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  2. Growth Response of Northern White-Cedar (Thuja occidentalis to Natural Disturbances and Partial Cuts in Mixedwood Stands of Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Ruel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Northern white-cedar (Thuja occidentalis is a species of high commercial and ecological value, the abundance of which has been declining since the middle of the 19th century. Very little information regarding its silviculture in mixedwood stands is currently available, even though a significant portion of wood resources comes from these stands. The present study is a retrospective analysis of white-cedar growth in partially harvested mixedwood stands of western Quebec, Canada. Eight stands distributed across two regions were analyzed. Dendrochronological approaches examined long-term diameter growth for sample white-cedar trees and stems of associated species. These approaches were used to reconstruct stand characteristics at the time of harvesting, together with local harvesting intensity. The study demonstrated white-cedar’s capacity to maintain good growth for long periods of time and at large tree sizes. Accession to the upper canopy positions occurs through repeated episodes of suppression/release, most of which seem to be associated with spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana outbreaks. White-cedar response to partial harvesting varies with tree size, residual basal area and species composition. Growth response was generally stronger for small trees, even though large trees still maintained the best diameter growth. Growth of white-cedar was negatively affected by an increase in softwood proportion in basal area. Growth responses to harvesting could be sustained for a period of 20 years.

  3. Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness (CEDAR: Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemes Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A considerable amount of research has been conducted on clinical decision making (CDM in short-term physical conditions. However, there is a lack of knowledge on CDM and its outcome in long-term illnesses, especially in care for people with severe mental illness. Methods/Design The study entitled "Clinical decision making and outcome in routine care for people with severe mental illness" (CEDAR is carried out in six European countries (Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Switzerland and UK. First, CEDAR establishes a methodology to assess CDM in people with severe mental illness. Specific instruments are developed (and psychometric properties established to measure CDM style, key elements of CDM in routine care, as well as CDM involvement and satisfaction from patient and therapist perspectives. Second, these instruments are being put to use in a multi-national prospective observational study (bimonthly assessments during a one-year observation period; N = 560. This study investigates the immediate, short- and long-term effect of CDM on crucial dimensions of clinical outcome (symptom level, quality of life, needs by taking into account significant variables moderating the relationship between CDM and outcome. Discussion The results of this study will make possible to delineate quality indicators of CDM, as well as to specify prime areas for further improvement. Ingredients of best practice in CDM in the routine care for people with severe mental illness will be extracted and recommendations formulated. With its explicit focus on the patient role in CDM, CEDAR will also contribute to strengthening the service user perspective. This project will substantially add to improving the practice of CDM in mental health care across Europe. Trial register ISRCTN75841675.

  4. Space weather effects on radio propagation: study of the CEDAR, GEM and ISTP storm events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Blagoveshchensky

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of 14 geomagnetic storms from a list of CEDAR, GEM and ISTP storms, that occurred during 1997–1999, on radio propagation conditions has been investigated. The propagation conditions were estimated through variations of the MOF and LOF (the maximum and lowest operation frequencies on three high-latitude HF radio paths in north-west Russia. Geophysical data of Dst, Bz, AE as well as some riometer data from Sodankyla observatory, Finland, were used for the analysis. It was shown that the storm impact on the ionosphere and radio propagation for each storm has an individual character. Nevertheless, there are common patterns in variation of the propagation parameters for all storms. Thus, the frequency range Δ=MOF−LOF increases several hours before a storm, then it narrows sharply during the storm, and expands again several hours after the end of the storm. This regular behaviour should be useful for the HF radio propagation predictions and frequency management at high latitudes. On the trans-auroral radio path, the time interval when the signal is lost through a storm (tdes depends on the local time. For the day-time storms an average value tdes is 6 h, but for night storms tdes is only 2 h. The ionization increase in the F2 layer before storm onset is 3.5 h during the day-time and 2.4 h at night. Mechanisms to explain the observed variations are discussed including some novel possibilities involving energy input through the cusp.

  5. Multiple views of the October 2003 Cedar Fires captured by the High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, E.; Nayak, A.; Vernon, F.; Braun, H.; Matthews, J.

    2004-12-01

    Late October 2003 brought devastating fires to the entire Southern California region. The NSF-funded High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN - http://hpwren.ucsd.edu/) cameras captured the development and progress of the Cedar fire in San Diego County. Cameras on Mt. Laguna, Mt. Woodson, Ramona Airport, and North Peak, recording one frame every 12 seconds, allowed for a time-lapse composite showing the fire's formation and progress from its beginnings on October 26th, to October 30th. The time-lapse camera footage depicts gushing smoke formations during the day, and bright orange walls of fire at night. The final video includes time synchronized views from multiple cameras, and an animated map highlighting the progress of the fire over time, and a directional indicator for each of the displaying cameras. The video is narrated by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection Fire Captain Ron Serabia (retd.) who was working then as a Air Tactical Group Supervisor with the aerial assault on the Cedar Fire Sunday October 26, 2004. The movie will be made available for download from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Visualization Center Visual Objects library (supported by the OptIPuter project) at http://www.siovizcenter.ucsd.edu.

  6. Application of nondestructive methods to evaluate mechanical properties of 32-year-old Taiwan incense cedar (Calocedrus formosana wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ming Chiu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the physical and mechanical properties of standing Taiwan incense cedar (Calocedrus formosana using nondestructive techniques (NDT. In addition, the relationship between characteristics of standing trees and wood properties was established. Results indicated that the velocity values and bending properties decreased as tree height increased. In addition, velocity values of specimens were greater than those of logs and standing trees. After regressive analysis, the correlation coefficients (r were 0.79 for standing trees and logs and 0.70 for logs and specimens. Not only the velocities measured by ultrasonic wave (Vu, tap tone (Vf, and vibration (Vt methods, but dynamic MOE also correlated well with the static bending properties of specimens. In addition, the values of dynamic and static MOE showed the following trend: DMOEu > DMOEf > DMOEt > MOE. For all specimens, the r values were found to be 0.92 for MOE and DMOEt, and 0.75 for MOR and DMOEt. Therefore, it was assumed that the nondestructive testing methods can provide basic information about standing trees and specimens for future management practices and utilization of Taiwan incense cedar.

  7. Carbon-Isotope Chemostratigraphy of the Yellow Cat Member of the Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, C. A.; Hatzell, G.; Suarez, M. B.; Salazar-Verdin, J.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Kirkland, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols and lacustrine sediments of the Yellow Cat Member (YCM), Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), Eastern Utah were collected at the "Lake Madsen" (a dominantly lacustrine section) and Doelling's Bowl (a mixed lacustrine/ palustrine/ paleosol section) and analyzed for bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) . The YCM is thought to span the Barremian to Aptian based on dinosaur faunal assemblages. Correlation with distinct carbon isotope excursions (CIE) specifically those associated with the Selli Event or OAE 1a would allow insight into the response of terrestrial ecosystems to C-cycle perturbations during the Aptian, and may improve chronostratigraphy. Lake Madsen data ranges between a minimum of -28.5‰ and a maximum of -21.4‰ with an average of ~ -25‰ and shows a stepped negative isotope excursion of -3‰., with three distinct negative steps starting ~ 7.5 m above the Jurassic Morrison Formation and an intervening large positive excursion ~ 4.5 m from the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone (~119Ma) Member of the CMF. Doelling's Bowl data spans a longer vertical distance and ranges from a minimum of -29.0‰ to a maximum of -25.7‰, averages -27.7‰ and is somewhat cyclic in nature. δ13Corg chemostratigraphic profile for Doelling's Bowl poorly correlates to the Lake Madsen section, likely due to recycling of organic C and wet/dry cycles of the palustrine environment. Correlation of the Lake Madsen section to marine δ13CCO3 curve from Cismon Valley of the southern Alps indicates the lower Aptian C-isotope excursions C1 to C6, with the distinctive C3 negative CIE occur at the top of the Yellow Cat Member, therefore documenting a terrestrial manifestation of the CIE associated with OAE1a - Selli Event. This suggests the age of the majority of the Yellow Cat Member is Barremian to lower Aptian and the Barremian-Aptian boundary occurs at the top of the Member ~ 25cm below the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone. Further isotopic analysis of vertebrate

  8. Comprehensive Education Data and Research System (CEDARS) Data Manual Appendices: For the 2012-2013 School Year. Version 5.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Randy; Came, Deb

    2012-01-01

    The Comprehensive Education Data and Research System (CEDARS) is a longitudinal data system managed by the Washington State Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to collect, store and report data related to students, courses, and teachers in order to meet state and federal reporting requirements, and to help educators and policy…

  9. A multidisciplinary study of the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Mussentuchit Wash, Utah: a determination of the paleoenvironment and paleoecology of the Eolambia caroljonesa dinosaur quarry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, J.R.; Brinkman, D.; Nichols, D.J.; Layer, P.; Burge, D.; Thayn, D.

    2007-01-01

    A quarry within the Cedar Mountain Formation in Mussentuchit Wash, Emery County, Utah, produced a fossil assemblage containing the remains of at least eight juvenile iguanodontid dinosaurs (Eolambia caroljonesa). The Cedar Mountain Formation lies stratigraphically between the Tithonian-Berriasian (Upper Jurassic) Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation and the Cenomanian (Upper Cretaceous) Dakota Formation. Detailed stratigraphic, sedimentological, geochronological, palynological, and paleontological data have been collected along a measured section at the site of the Cifelli #2 Eolambia caroljonesa Quarry. These data provide a chronostratigraphic and a biostratigraphic framework for the Cedar Mountain Formation and allow a detailed reconstruction of the paleoenvironment and the paleoecology of the local paleogeographic area from which E. caroljonesa have been recovered. Three 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 96.7 to 98.5 Ma have been obtained three stratigraphically distinct altered volcanic ash layers within the Mussentuchit Member, one of which passes through the E. caroljonesa quarry, that indicate that the quarry is latest Albian in age and that the stratigraphic boundary between the Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation and the overlying Dakota Formation is at or near the Albian/Cenomanian boundary. Sedimentological and biostratigraphic data suggest that significant long-term and short-term climatic changes are recorded in the Cedar Mountain Formation. During deposition of the lower part of the formation, climatic conditions were warm and arid to semi-arid. During deposition of the upper part of the formation, conditions became more humid. The progressive change in climatic conditions was probably related to the transgression of the Mowry Sea from the north. Cyclic sedimentation in the Mussentuchit Member suggests high-frequency changes from wet to dry periods. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the Metabolic Potential of Microbial Communities in Ultra-basic Reducing Spring at The Cedars, CA: Evidence of Microbial Methanogenesis and Heterotrophic Acetogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, L.; Cummings, E.; Cox, A.; Suzuki, S.; Morrrissey, L.; Lang, S. Q.; Richter, A.; Nealson, K. H.; Morrill, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Cedars is a complex of ultra-basic, reducing springs located in the Coastal Range Ophiolite (CA, USA), a site of present day serpentinization. Similar to other serpentinization-associated fluids, the groundwaters discharging at The Cedars contain elevated concentrations of C1-C6 alkanes and volatile organic acids (VOAs) which may originate from abiotic or thermogenic processes but can also be produced, consumed, or transformed by microbial activity. In contrast to other continental sites of serpentinization, geochemical indicators (δ13CCH4, δ2HCH4, CH4/C2-C6 alkanes) are consistent with a partial microbial origin of methane at The Cedars. These indicators, however, can provide only indirect evidence of microbial methanogenesis. To further explore the metabolic potential of the indigenous microbial communities at The Cedars, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments in which fluids and sediments collected at The Cedars were incubated with 13C labeled substrates (formate, acetate, bicarbonate, methanol) under anaerobic conditions. 13C from all amended substrates was incorporated into CH4 demonstrating that these microbial communities can convert both organic and inorganic substrates to CH4. The apparent fractionation of 13C between methane and potential substrates indicated that carbonate reduction was the dominant pathway of methanogenesis, and 16S rDNA based community profiling revealed the presence of an OTU closest related to Methanobacterium sp., an autotrophic (CO2/H2) methanogen. Concentrations of C1-C4 VOAs increased 5-fold over the course of the experiment indicating the microbial production of VOAs. This acetogenesis occurred heterotrophically as autotrophic acetogenesis can be excluded because (a) δ13C values of acetate were similar to those of inorganic carbon (inconsistent with the strong discrimination against 13C observed in autotrophic acetogenesis) and (b) no incorporation of 13C from labeled bicarbonate was into acetate was observed.

  11. Clinical decision making and outcome in the routine care of people with severe mental illness across Europe (CEDAR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puschner, B; Becker, T; Mayer, B;

    2016-01-01

    and Satisfaction Scale (CDIS) measured involvement and satisfaction with a specific decision at all time points. Primary outcome was patient-rated unmet needs measured with the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule (CANSAS). Mixed-effects multinomial regression was used to examine differences......Aims. Shared decision making has been advocated as a means to improve patient-orientation and quality of health care. There is a lack of knowledge on clinical decision making and its relation to outcome in the routine treatment of people with severe mental illness. This study examined preferred...... and experienced clinical decision making from the perspectives of patients and staff, and how these affect treatment outcome. Methods. "Clinical Decision Making and Outcome in Routine Care for People with Severe Mental Illness" (CEDAR; ISRCTN75841675) is a naturalistic prospective observational study...

  12. New basal iguanodonts from the Cedar Mountain formation of Utah and the evolution of thumb-spiked dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T McDonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Basal iguanodontian dinosaurs were extremely successful animals, found in great abundance and diversity almost worldwide during the Early Cretaceous. In contrast to Europe and Asia, the North American record of Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts has until recently been limited largely to skulls and skeletons of Tenontosaurus tilletti. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we describe two new basal iguanodonts from the Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation of eastern Utah, each known from a partial skull and skeleton. Iguanacolossus fortis gen. et sp. nov. and Hippodraco scutodens gen. et sp. nov. are each diagnosed by a single autapomorphy and a unique combination of characters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Iguanacolossus and Hippodraco add greatly to our knowledge of North American basal iguanodonts and prompt a new comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of basal iguanodont relationships. This analysis indicates that North American Early Cretaceous basal iguanodonts are more basal than their contemporaries in Europe and Asia.

  13. Water-soluble low-molecular-weight -(1, 3–1, 6 D-Glucan inhibit cedar pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Jippo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, asthma, and food allergies has increased in several countries. Mast cells have critical roles in various biologic processes related to allergic diseases. Mast cells express the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin (Ig E on their surface. The interaction of multivalent antigens with surface-bound IgE causes the secretion of granule-stored mediators, as well as the de novosynthesis of cytokines. Those mediators and cytokines proceed the allergic diseases. We investigated the effects of water-soluble, low-molecular-weight -(1, 3–1, 6 D-glucan isolated from Aureobasidium pullulans 1A1 strain black yeast (LMW--glucan on mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions. We reported that LMW--glucan dose-dependently inhibited the degranulation of mast cells. Furthermore, we found that orally administered LMW--glucan inhibited the IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA reaction in mice. Here, we examined if LMW--glucan had effects on Japanese cedar pollinosis. Findings: In a clinical study, a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study in 65 subjects (aged 2262 was performed. This study was undertaken 3 weeks before and until the end of the cedar pollen season. During the study, all subjects consumed one bottle of placebo or LMW--glucan daily and all subjects were required to record allergic symptoms in a diary. The LMW--glucan group had a significantly lower prevalence of sneezing, nose-blowing, tears, and hindrance to the activities of daily living than the placebo group. Conclusions: These results suggested that LMW--glucan could be an effective treatment for allergic diseases

  14. Flood-inundation maps for the Peckman River in the Townships of Verona, Cedar Grove, and Little Falls, and the Borough of Woodland Park, New Jersey, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemoczynski, Michal J.; Watson, Kara M.

    2016-10-19

    Digital flood-inundation maps for an approximate 7.5-mile reach of the Peckman River in New Jersey, which extends from Verona Lake Dam in the Township of Verona downstream through the Township of Cedar Grove and the Township of Little Falls to the confluence with the Passaic River in the Borough of Woodland Park, were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. The flood-inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Science Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation/ depict estimates of the probable areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels (stages) at the USGS streamgage on the Peckman River at Ozone Avenue at Verona, New Jersey (station number 01389534). Near-real-time stages at this streamgage may be obtained on the Internet from the USGS National Water Information System at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/.Flood profiles were simulated for the stream reach by means of a one-dimensional step-backwater model. The model was calibrated using the most current stage-discharge relations at USGS streamgages on the Peckman River at Ozone Avenue at Verona, New Jersey (station number 01389534) and the Peckman River at Little Falls, New Jersey (station number 01389550). The hydraulic model was then used to compute eight water-surface profiles for flood stages at 0.5-foot (ft) intervals ranging from 3.0 ft or near bankfull to 6.5 ft, which is approximately the highest recorded water level during the period of record (1979–2014) at USGS streamgage 01389534, Peckman River at Ozone Avenue at Verona, New Jersey. The simulated water-surface profiles were then combined with a geographic information system digital elevation model derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) data to delineate the area flooded at each water level.The availability of these maps along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS

  15. Nasal delivery of Japanese cedar pollen Cryj1 by using self-gelling immunostimulatory DNA for effective induction of immune responses in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii-Mizuno, Yumiko; Umeki, Yuka; Takahashi, Yuki; Kato, Yukinori; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2015-01-01

    To develop an immunotherapeutic vaccine for treatment of allergic rhinitis, we developed a controlled release formulation of Cryj1, a major Japanese cedar pollen allergen, with immunostimulatory potency. Two sets of hexapod-like structured DNA (hexapodna) were prepared using six oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) each, including ODNs with an unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sequence (CpG motif), to obtain an immunostimulatory DNA hydrogel (sDNA hydrogel). A non-immunostimulatory DNA hy...

  16. The Cedar Project: Surviving the Streets Without Shelter, Trauma and HIV vulnerability among Aboriginal young people who use drugs in two Canadian cities

    OpenAIRE

    Bingham, Brittany Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Aboriginal scholars suggest that the legacy of colonialism is a key contributing factor to rising rates of homelessness among Aboriginal young people. This analysis examined factors related to sleeping on the streets for 3 nights or more and HIV vulnerability among Aboriginal young people who use drugs. A profile of these young people was created using data from the Cedar Project. Young people who reported sleeping on the streets for 3 nights or more were significantly more likely to reside i...

  17. The impact of co-existing seasonal allergic rhinitis caused by Japanese Cedar Pollinosis (SAR-JCP) upon asthma control status

    OpenAIRE

    Masayuki Hojo; Ken Ohta; Motoyasu Iikura; Junko Hirashima; Haruhito Sugiyama; Kazuhisa Takahashi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis Caused by Japanese Cedar Pollinosis (SAR-JCP) is a most common allergic rhinitis, affecting about 40% in Japan, but the influence from SAR-JCP upon asthma is controversial. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of coexistence of SAR-JCP upon control status of asthma using SACRA (Self-Assessment of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Questionnaire). Methods: The design was prospective, single-center, observational study. Asthmatic patients we...

  18. Surface-Water Quantity and Quality of the Upper Milwaukee River, Cedar Creek, and Root River Basins, Wisconsin, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission (SEWRPC), collected discharge and water-quality data at nine sites in previously monitored areas of the upper Milwaukee River, Cedar Creek, and Root River Basins, in Wisconsin from May 1 through November 15, 2004. The data were collected for calibration of hydrological models that will be used to simulate how various management strategies will affect the water quality of streams. The data also will support SEWRPC and Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) managers in development of the SEWRPC Regional Water Quality Management Plan and the MMSD 2020 Facilities Plan. These management plans will provide a scientific basis for future management decisions regarding development and maintenance of public and private waste-disposal systems. In May 2004, parts of the study area received over 13 inches of precipitation (3.06 inches is normal). In June 2004, most of the study area received between 7 and 11 inches of rainfall (3.56 inches is normal). This excessive rainfall caused flooding throughout the study area and resultant high discharges were measured at all nine monitoring sites. For example, the mean daily discharge recorded at the Cedar Creek site on May 27, 2004, was 2,120 cubic feet per second. This discharge ranked ninth of the largest 10 mean daily discharges in the 75-year record, and was the highest discharge recorded since March 30, 1960. Discharge records from continuous monitoring on the Root River Canal near Franklin since October 1, 1963, indicated that the discharge recorded on May 23, 2004, ranked second highest on record, and was the highest discharge recorded since March 4, 1974. Water-quality samples were taken during two base-flow events and six storm events at each of the nine sites. Analysis of water-quality data indicated that most concentrations of dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand, fecal coliform bacteria, chloride, suspended

  19. Influence of Bifidobacterium longum BB536 intake on faecal microbiota in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis during the pollen season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odamaki, Toshitaka; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Iwabuchi, Noriyuki; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Noritoshi; Kondo, Shizuki; Miyaji, Kazuhiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Togashi, Hideo; Enomoto, Tadao; Benno, Yoshimi

    2007-10-01

    It has been reported that intake of yogurt or powder supplemented with the Bifidobacterium longum BB536 probiotic strain alleviated subjective symptoms and affected blood markers of allergy in individuals with Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis) during the pollen seasons of 2004 and 2005, based on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Furthermore, the 2004 study found that intestinal bacteria such as the Bacteroides fragilis group significantly fluctuated during the pollen season in JCPsis individuals and intake of BB536 yogurt tended to suppress these fluctuations. The present study investigated faecal microbiota to examine whether any changes occurred during the pollen season and whether any influence was exerted by intake of BB536 powder in the 2005 pollen season, which happened to be a heavy season, to confirm the 2004 findings and to evaluate the relationship of microbiota with symptom development. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 44 JCPsis subjects received BB536 or a placebo for 13 weeks during the pollen season. Another 14 Japanese cedar pollen (JCP)-specific IgE negative healthy subjects received placebo for the same period. Faecal samples were collected before (week 0), during (weeks 4, 8 and 13) and after (week 17) intervention, and out of JCP season (week 28). Faecal microbiota were analysed using terminal-RFLP (T-RFLP) and real-time PCR methods. Principal component analysis based on T-RFLP indicated distinct patterns of microbiota between healthy subjects and JCPsis subjects in the placebo group, but an intermediate pattern in the BB536 group at week 13, the last stage of the pollen season. The coordinate of principal component 1 at week 13 correlated with composite scores of JCPsis symptoms recorded during the pollen season. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and the Bacteroides fragilis group were identified as the main contributors to microbiotal fluctuations. Real-time PCR indicated that BB536 intake suppressed

  20. Changes in the distribution of radiocesium in the wood of Japanese cedar trees from 2011 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hideki; Hirano, Yurika; Igei, Shigemitsu; Yokota, Kahori; Arai, Shio; Ito, Hirohisa; Kumata, Atsushi; Yoshida, Hirohisa

    2016-09-01

    The changes in the distribution of (137)Cs in the wood of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) trunks within three years after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNP) accident in 2011 were investigated. Thirteen trees were felled to collect samples at 6 forests in 2 regions of the Fukushima prefecture. The radial distribution of (137)Cs in the wood was measured at different heights. Profiles of (137)Cs distribution in the wood changed considerably from 2011 to 2013, and the process of (137)Cs distribution change in the wood was clarified. From 2011 to 2012, the active transportation from sapwood to heartwood and the radial diffusion in heartwood proceeded quickly, and the radial (137)Cs distribution differed according to the vertical positon of trees. From 2012 to 2013, the vertical diffusion of (137)Cs from the treetop to the ground, probably caused by the gradient of (137)Cs concentration in the trunk, was observed. Eventually, the radial (137)Cs distributions were nearly identical at any vertical positions in 2013. Our results suggested that the active transportation from sapwood to heartwood and the vertical and radial diffusion in heartwood proceeded according to the vertical position of the tree and (137)Cs distribution in the wood approached the equilibrium state within three years after the accident. PMID:26774216

  1. EVALUATION OF COLOR OF THE JUVENILE AND MATURE CEDAR WOOD BY MEANS OF CIEL*a*b* METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Avila Delucis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to characterize the radial profile of cedar wood (Cedrela fissilis by the colorimetric technique. Three different trees of approximately 100 years old were selected in Canguçu, Rio Grande do Sul. From each felled tree, discs were removed at breast height (1,3 m with a thickness of 20 cm and subsequently samples were segmented in centimeter lengths from pith to bark. The samples were conditioned at equilibrium moisture content of 12%, to carry out the colour evaluation with a portable colorimeter Konica Minolta brand in accordance with the CIEL*a*b* method. To determine the segregation of juvenile and mature woods position was employed the apparent specific gravity to 12% (ρa12% as a parameter. With colorimetric analysis, it was found that the lightness, the green-red coordinate and hue angle presented intimate relation with the transition from juvenile and adult logs. Has a result of blueyellow coordinate and chromaticity showed approximately a linear trend in pith-bark direction.

  2. Changes in plant-soil feedback regulate ecosystem nitrogen retention during stand development of Japanese cedar plantation after clear-cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, K.; Tateno, R.; Katsuyama, M.; Tokuchi, N.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have documented the impacts of forest clear-cutting on nitrogen (N) cycling and retention, and most of them reported a large loss of N (mainly NO3--N) after cutting. However, the recovery process of N dynamics after clear-cutting and subsequent afforestation has been unclear. It is well known that internal N cycling creates ecosystem feedback between plant productivity (i.e. N uptake rate and nitrogen use efficiency) and soil N availability (i.e. soil N transformation rate and microorganism activities). Therefore, we focused on the relationship between hydrological N loss and internal N cycling during development of monoculture Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) plantation stands. In our study site, stand age of planted trees is even within a watershed, but is various among watersheds. The use of these watersheds as chronosequence can help to isolate the effects of stand development processes after clear-cutting. We aimed to elucidate the factors regulating ecosystem N retention during forest development after clear-cutting. Our study site is located in Nara Prefecture, central Japan, which received 2,900 mm precipitation in annual means and 13 - 14 kg N ha-1 year-1 as mean bulk N deposition (2004-2007). Stream NO3- concentration, annual N export, litterfall, plant N uptake, soil N availability and transformation rates, carbon (C) and N content in forest-floor, mineral soil, and soil microbial biomass were examined in 1-, 6-, 17-, 32-, 43,- and 90-year-old-stand watersheds. After clear-cutting, early growth of Japanese cedar seedlings can be supported by higher soil N availability, resulting from enhanced decomposition processes by canopy opening. Thereafter in the 32-year-old stand, we found that the crucial increase in newly supplied litterfall on the forest floor can enhance N immobilization by C-limited soil microbes and decrease soil N availability, which can trigger a decline in net primary production and the increase in nitrogen use

  3. A preliminary study on the incidence of cedar pollinosis in district of Wuhan%武汉城区柳杉花粉症发病的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许丽娟; 张嵩玉; 杨强; 程雷; 殷敏; 三好彰

    2000-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the incidence of cedar pollinosis in district of Wuhan. Method..A surveyrelative to cedar pollinosis was carried out in 309 students in Hubei Medical University in 1999,including ques-tionnaire investigation, nasal inspection and scratch test. From February to April of 2000,a clinical investigationof cedar pollinosis was adopted anong 205 patients of allergic rhinitis including scratch test and nasal mucosatest. Result:①The positive rate of cedar pollen scratch test of 309 students was 7.8%. ②59 cases (28.8%00) washypersensitive to cedar pollen clinically in allergen test. Conclusion : Cedar pollinosis is one kind of importantpollinosis in district of Wuhan and should be paid high attention to.%目的:调查武汉城区柳杉花粉症的发病情况。方法:采用问卷调查、鼻腔检查和变应原皮肤试验等方法对湖北医科大学309例医学生进行柳杉花粉症的有关调查;并用皮肤划痕试验及鼻粘膜激发试验对205例变应性鼻炎患者行柳杉花粉症的临床调查。结果:①309例医学生中柳杉花粉变应原皮试阳性24例(7.8%);②205例变应性鼻炎患者中柳杉花粉变应原皮试阳性59例(28.8%)。结论:柳杉花粉症在武汉城区是一种常见的花粉症,临床上要予以足够重视。

  4. Growth and transpiration of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) and Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) seedlings in response to soil water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakura, Junko; Shigenaga, Hidetoshi; Akama, Akio; Takahashi, Masamichi

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the effects of soil water content on growth and transpiration of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) and Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa (Siebold et Zucc.) Endl.), potted seedlings were grown in well-watered soil (wet treatment) or in drying soil (dry treatment) for 12 weeks. Seedlings in the wet treatment were watered once every 2 or 3 days, whereas seedlings in the dry treatment were watered when soil water content (Theta; m3 m(-3)) reached 0.30, equivalent to a soil matric potential of -0.06 MPa. From Weeks 7 to 12 after the onset of the treatments, seedling transpiration was measured by weighing the potted seedlings. After the last watering, changes in transpiration rate during soil drying were monitored intensely. The dry treatment restricted aboveground growth but increased biomass allocation to the roots in both species, resulting in no significant treatment difference in whole-plant biomass production. The species showed similar responses in relative growth rate (RGR), net assimilation rate (NAR) and shoot mass ratio (SMR) to the dry treatment. Although NAR did not change significantly in either C. japonica or C. obtusa as the soil dried, the two species responded differently to the dry treatment in terms of mean transpiration rate (E) and water-use efficiency (WUE), which are parameters that relate to NAR. In the dry treatment, both E and WUE of C. japonica were stable, whereas in C. obtusa, E decreased and WUE increased (E and WUE counterbalanced to maintain a constant NAR). Transpiration rates were lower in C. obtusa seedlings than in C. japonica seedlings, even in well-watered conditions. During soil drying, the transpiration rate decreased after Theta reached about 0.38 (-0.003 MPa) in C. obtusa and 0.32 (-0.028 MPa) in C. japonica. We conclude that C. obtusa has more water-saving characteristics than C. japonica, particularly when water supply is limited. PMID:15339729

  5. Projecting the land cover change and its environmental impacts in the Cedar River Basin in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shuguang; Sohl, Terry L.; Young, Claudia J.

    2013-06-01

    The physical surface of the Earth is in constant change due to climate forcing and human activities. In the Midwestern United States, urban area, farmland, and dedicated energy crop (e.g., switchgrass) cultivation are predicted to expand in the coming decades, which will lead to changes in hydrological processes. This study is designed to (1) project the land use and land cover (LULC) by mid-century using the FORecasting SCEnarios of future land-use (FORE-SCE) model under the A1B greenhouse gas emission scenario (future condition) and (2) assess its potential impacts on the water cycle and water quality against the 2001 baseline condition in the Cedar River Basin using the physically based soil and water assessment tool (SWAT). We compared the baseline LULC (National Land Cover data 2001) and 2050 projection, indicating substantial expansions of urban area and pastureland (including the cultivation of bioenergy crops) and a decrease in rangeland. We then used the above two LULC maps as the input data to drive the SWAT model, keeping other input data (e.g., climate) unchanged to isolate the LULC change impacts. The modeling results indicate that quick-response surface runoff would increase significantly (about 10.5%) due to the projected urban expansion (i.e., increase in impervious areas), and the baseflow would decrease substantially (about 7.3%) because of the reduced infiltration. Although the net effect may cause an increase in water yield, the increased variability may impede its use for public supply. Additionally, the cultivation of bioenergy crops such as switchgrass in the newly added pasture lands may further reduce the soil water content and lead to an increase in nitrogen loading (about 2.5% increase) due to intensified fertilizer application. These study results will be informative to decision makers for sustainable water resource management when facing LULC change and an increasing demand for biofuel production in this area.

  6. The importance of delineating networks by activity type in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Cedar Key, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazda, Stefanie; Iyer, Swami; Killingback, Timothy; Connor, Richard; Brault, Solange

    2015-03-01

    Network analysis has proved to be a valuable tool for studying the behavioural patterns of complex social animals. Often such studies either do not distinguish between different behavioural states of the organisms or simply focus attention on a single behavioural state to the exclusion of all others. In either of these approaches it is impossible to ascertain how the behavioural patterns of individuals depend on the type of activity they are engaged in. Here we report on a network-based analysis of the behavioural associations in a population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Cedar Key, Florida. We consider three distinct behavioural states-socializing, travelling and foraging-and analyse the association networks corresponding to each activity. Moreover, in constructing the different activity networks we do not simply record a spatial association between two individuals as being either present or absent, but rather quantify the degree of any association, thus allowing us to construct weighted networks describing each activity. The results of these weighted activity networks indicate that networks can reveal detailed patterns of bottlenose dolphins at the population level; dolphins socialize in large groups with preferential associations; travel in small groups with preferential associates; and spread out to forage in very small, weakly connected groups. There is some overlap in the socialize and travel networks but little overlap between the forage and other networks. This indicates that the social bonds maintained in other activities are less important as they forage on dispersed, solitary prey. The overall network, not sorted by activity, does not accurately represent any of these patterns. PMID:26064611

  7. Use of novel compounds for pest control: insecticidal and acaricidal activity of essential oil components from heartwood of Alaska yellow cedar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panella, Nicholas A; Dolan, Marc C; Karchesy, Joseph J; Xiong, Yeping; Peralta-Cruz, Javier; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Montenieri, John A; Maupin, Gary O

    2005-05-01

    Laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the activity of 15 natural products isolated from essential oil components extracted from the heartwood of Alaska yellow cedar, Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach., against Ixodes scapularis Say nymphs, Xenopsylla cheopis (Rothchild), and Aedes aegypti (L.) adults. Four of the compounds from the essential oil have been identified as monoterpenes, five as eremophilane sesquiterpenes, five as eremophilane sesquiterpene derivatives from valencene and nootkatone, and one as a sesquiterpene outside the eremophilane parent group. Carvacrol was the only monoterpene that demonstrated biocidal activity against ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes with LC50 values after 24 h of 0.0068, 0.0059, and 0.0051% (wt:vol), respectively. Nootkatone from Alaska yellow cedar was the most effective of the eremophilane sesquiterpenes against ticks (LC50 = 0.0029%), whereas the nootkatone grapefruit extract exhibited the greatest biocidal activity against fleas (LC50 = 0.0029%). Mosquitoes were most susceptible to one of the derivatives of valencene, valencene-13-aldehyde (LC50 = 0.0024%), after 24 h. Bioassays to determine residual activity of the most effective products were conducted at 1, 2, 4, and 6 wk after initial treatment. Residual LC50 values for nootkatone did not differ significantly at 4 wk posttreatment from the observations made at the initial 24-h treatment. The ability of these natural products to kill arthropods at relatively low concentrations represents an alternative to the use of synthetic pesticides for control of disease vectors. PMID:15962787

  8. Safety and efficacy of a new regimen of short-term oral immunotherapy with Cry j 1-galactomannan conjugate for Japanese cedar pollinosis: A prospective, randomized, open-label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Murakami

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The new regimen of short-term OIT using the Cry j1-galactomannan conjugate for Japanese cedar pollinosis is effective, relatively safe and induces immune tolerance. Thus, OIT using allergen–galactomannan conjugates may provide a rapid, effective, and thus convenient immunotherapy for pollinosis instead of SLIT or SCIT.

  9. TERRAIN, CEDAR COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. Cedar Hill Tower Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A meteorological data system was designed, assembled, and installed to obtain, on a continuous basis, wind and temperature information at 12 levels on a television...

  11. Joseph Cedar, Footnote

    OpenAIRE

    France, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Il est fort probable que les universitaires qui voient ce film n’en aient pas exactement la même lecture que les critiques de cinéma. En effet, si la figure du professeur d’université ou du chercheur est parfois mise en scène, il est beaucoup plus rare d’avoir entre les mains un film où tout se passe dans le petit milieu de la recherche, en l'occurrence ici les spécialistes du Talmud à l’Université Hébraïque de Jérusalem. Et il est parfois beaucoup plus tentant de s’amuser à repérer les éléme...

  12. Geochemical and Rock Magnetic Properties of a Purple Sand Belt on Cedar Beach, Western Lake Erie, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Cioppa, M. T.; Zhang, S.

    2009-05-01

    Limited environmental magnetic studies have been carried out on beaches and shoreline processes. Therefore, we initiated a rock magnetic study at Cedar Beach on the north shore of western Lake Erie (42°N, 81°W) and noted the highest susceptibility values (9.6 x 10-2 SI) occurred in a purple sand belt that is 200m in length and 3.5m in width and located just outside the swash zone. To understand the rock magnetic properties of these purple sands, we systematically performed frequency-dependence of low-field susceptibility (Kfd%), partial anhysteretic remanent magnetization (pARM) spectra, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) acquisition, S-ratio, hysteresis measurements and Curie-point determinations for a set of representative purple sand samples. Most Kfd% values are lower than 1%, indicating that the dominant magnetic minerals fall in the large pseudo-single domain (PSD) to multidomain (MD) magnetic size, while single domain/super paramagnetic (SD/SP) grains are rare. pARM curves show only one group with a peak in the pARM spectra at 10 mT, indicating a low coercivity and a PSD to MD grain size (around 4 um). However, in a few samples, the pARM spectra at high coercivities (> 90mT) is not zero, suggesting the presence of either fine magnetic grains (SD magnetites) or high coercivity minerals (hematite or maghemite). Most IRM acquisition spectra show 95% of the magnetization gained below 200 mT, and S-300 ratios close to one, indicating the presence of fully saturated, coarse and fine magnetite. Some samples did not saturate until after 800 mT and showed two saturation levels, suggesting the presence of high coercivity minerals. High temperature susceptibility curves (K-T) and magnetization curves (Js-T) show Curie points (Tc) around 585°C, suggesting magnetite is the main magnetic mineral. The Js-T cycles are almost reversible, indicating that magnetic minerals have not been created or destroyed. Hysteresis curves are normally wasp- waisted

  13. Exploring the metabolic potential of microbial communities in ultra-basic, reducing springs at The Cedars, CA, USA: Experimental evidence of microbial methanogenesis and heterotrophic acetogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Lukas; Cumming, Emily; Cox, Alison; Rietze, Amanda; Morrissey, Liam; Lang, Susan Q.; Richter, Andreas; Suzuki, Shino; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Morrill, Penny L.

    2016-04-01

    Present-day serpentinization generates groundwaters with conditions (pH > 11, Eh production of organic compounds from inorganic precursors. Elevated concentrations of methane, C2-C6 alkanes, acetate, and formate have been detected at these sites, but the microbial or abiotic origin of these compounds remains unclear. While geochemical data indicate that methane at most sites of present-day serpentinization is abiogenic, the stable carbon, hydrogen, and clumped isotope data as well as the hydrocarbon gas composition from The Cedars, CA, USA, are consistent with a microbial origin for methane. However, there is no direct evidence of methanogenesis at this site of serpentinization. We report on laboratory experiments in which the microbial communities in fluids and sediments from The Cedars were incubated with 13C labeled substrates. Increasing methane concentrations and the incorporation of 13C into methane in live experiments, but not in killed controls, demonstrated that methanogens converted methanol, formate, acetate (methyl group), and bicarbonate to methane. The apparent fractionation between methane and potential substrates (α13CCH4-CO2(g) = 1.059 to 1.105, α13CCH4-acetate = 1.042 to 1.119) indicated that methanogenesis was dominated by the carbonate reduction pathway. Increasing concentrations of volatile organic acid anions indicated microbial acetogenesis. α13CCO2(g)-acetate values (0.999 to 1.000), however, were inconsistent with autotrophic acetogenesis, thus suggesting that acetate was produced through fermentation. This is the first study to show direct evidence of microbial methanogenesis and acetogenesis by the native microbial community at a site of present-day serpentinization.

  14. The Cedar Project: historical trauma, sexual abuse and HIV risk among young Aboriginal people who use injection and non-injection drugs in two Canadian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar Project Partnership; Pearce, Margo E; Christian, Wayne M; Patterson, Katharina; Norris, Kat; Moniruzzaman, Akm; Craib, Kevin J P; Schechter, Martin T; Spittal, Patricia M

    2008-06-01

    Recent Indigenist scholarship has situated high rates of traumatic life experiences, including sexual abuse, among Indigenous peoples of North America within the larger context of their status as colonized peoples. Sexual abuse has been linked to many negative health outcomes including mental, sexual and drug-related vulnerabilities. There is a paucity of research in Canada addressing the relationship between antecedent sexual abuse and negative health outcomes among Aboriginal people including elevated risk of HIV infection. The primary objectives of this study were to determine factors associated with sexual abuse among participants of the Cedar Project, a cohort of young Aboriginal people between the ages of 14 and 30 years who use injection and non-injection drugs in two urban centres in British Columbia, Canada; and to locate findings through a lens of historical and intergenerational trauma. We utilized post-colonial perspectives in research design, problem formulation and the interpretation of results. Multivariate modeling was used to determine the extent to which a history of sexual abuse was predictive of negative health outcomes and vulnerability to HIV infection. Of the 543 eligible participants, 48% reported ever having experienced sexual abuse; 69% of sexually abused participants were female. The median age of first sexual abuse was 6 years for both female and male participants. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables and factors of historical trauma, sexually abused participants were more likely to have ever been on the streets for more than three nights, to have ever self-harmed, to have suicide ideation, to have attempted suicide, to have a diagnosis of mental illness, to have been in the emergency department within the previous 6 months, to have had over 20 lifetime sexual partners, to have ever been paid for sex and to have ever overdosed. The prevalence and consequences of sexual abuse among Cedar Project participants are of grave concern

  15. Changes in heartwood chemistry of dead yellow-cedar trees that remain standing for 80 years or more in southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Rick G; Hennon, Paul E; Huso, Manuela; Karchesy, Joseph J

    2005-11-01

    We measured the concentrations of extractable bioactive compounds in heartwood of live yellow-cedar (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) trees and five classes of standing snags (1-5, averaging 4, 14, 26, 51, and 81 years-since-death, respectively) to determine how the concentrations changed in the slowly deteriorating snags. Three individuals from each of these six condition classes were sampled at four sites spanning a 260-km distance across southeast Alaska, and the influence of geographic location on heartwood chemistry was evaluated. Cores of heartwood were collected at breast height and cut into consecutive 5-cm segments starting at the pith. Each segment was extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by gas chromatography. Concentrations of carvacrol, nootkatene, nootkatol, nootkatone, nootkatin, and total extractives (a sum of 16 compounds) for the inner (0-5 cm from pith), middle (5-10 cm from pith), and surface (outer 1.1-6.0 cm of heartwood) segments from each core were compared within each tree condition class and within segments across condition classes. Heartwood of class 1 and 2 snags had the same chemical composition as live trees. The first concentration changes begin to appear in class 3 snags, which coincides with greater heartwood exposure to the external environment as decaying sapwood sloughs away, after losing the protective outer bark. Within core segments, the concentrations of all compounds, except nootkatene, decrease between snag classes 2 and 5, resulting in the heartwood of class 5 snags having the lowest quantities of bioactive compounds, although not different from the amounts in class 4 snags. This decline in chemical defense is consistent with heartwood of class 5 snags being less decay-resistant than heartwood of live trees, as observed by others. The unique heartwood chemistry of yellow cedar and the slow way it is altered after death allow dead trees to remain standing for up to a century with a profound impact on the ecology of forests

  16. The Cedar Project: high incidence of HCV infections in a longitudinal study of young Aboriginal people who use drugs in two Canadian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spittal Patricia M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors associated with HCV incidence among young Aboriginal people in Canada are still not well understood. We sought to estimate time to HCV infection and the relative hazard of risk factors associated HCV infection among young Aboriginal people who use injection drugs in two Canadian cities. Methods The Cedar Project is a prospective cohort study involving young Aboriginal people in Vancouver and Prince George, British Columbia, who use illicit drugs. Participants’ venous blood samples were drawn and tested for HCV antibodies. Analysis was restricted to participants who use used injection drugs at enrolment or any of follow up visit. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify independent predictors of time to HCV seroconversion. Results In total, 45 out of 148 participants seroconverted over the study period. Incidence of HCV infection was 26.3 per 100 person-years (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 16.3, 46.1 among participants who reported using injection drugs for two years or less, 14.4 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 7.7, 28.9 among participants who had been using injection drugs for between two and five years, and 5.1 per 100 person-years (95% CI: 2.6,10.9 among participants who had been using injection drugs for over five years. Independent associations with HCV seroconversion were involvement in sex work in the last six months (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR: 1.59; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.42 compared to no involvement, having been using injection drugs for less than two years (AHR: 4.14; 95% CI: 1.91, 8.94 and for between two and five years (AHR: 2.12; 95%CI: 0.94, 4.77 compared to over five years, daily cocaine injection in the last six months (AHR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.51, 4.05 compared to less than daily, and sharing intravenous needles in the last six months (AHR: 2.56; 95% CI: 1.47, 4.49 compared to not sharing. Conclusions This study contributes to the limited body of research addressing HCV infection among

  17. Concentrated protein body product derived from rice endosperm as an oral tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy--a new mucosal vaccine formulation against Japanese cedar pollen allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhya Wakasa

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum-derived type-I protein body (PB-I from rice endosperm cells is an ideal candidate formulation for the oral delivery of bioencapsulated peptides as tolerogens for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In the present study, PBs containing the deconstructed Japanese cedar pollen allergens Cryptomeria japonica 1 (Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 were concentrated by treatment with thermostable α-amylase at 90°C to remove the starch from milled rice powder, which resulted in a 12.5-fold reduction of dry weight compared to the starting material. The modified Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 antigens in this concentrated PB product were more resistant to enzymatic digestion than those in the milled seed powder despite the absence of intact cell wall and starch, and remained stable for at least 10 months at room temperature without detectable loss or degradation. The high resistance of these allergens could be attributed to changes in protein physicochemical properties induced by the high temperature concentration process, as suggested by the decreased solubility of the antigens and seed proteins in PBs in step-wise-extraction experiments. Confocal microscopy showed that the morphology of antigen-containing PB-Is was preserved in the concentrated PB product. The concentrated PB product induced specific immune tolerance against Cry j 1 and Cry j 2 in mice when orally administered, supporting its potential use as a novel oral tolerogen formulation.

  18. Development of clonal matrices of australian red cedar in different substrates under fertilizer doses Desenvolvimento de matrizes clonais de cedro Australiano em diferentes substratos sob doses de fertilizantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Peres Benatti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate fertilizers doses in different substrates for growth and development of clonal matrices of Australian Red Cedar [Toona ciliata var. australis (F. Muell. Bahadur], an experiment was conducted in a greenhouse. Five substrates were evaluate, with proportions by volume, the first consisting of 100% of Multiplant florestal®, the second of 50% vermiculite, 20% carbonized rice hulls, 20% soil and 10% coconut fiber, the third with 50% soil and 50% sand, the fourth was composed by 50% Multiplant florestal®, 10% soil and 40% coconut fiber and the fifth with 65% of Multiplant florestal®, 25% vermiculite and 10% carbonized rice hulls. The fertilizers doses applied were 0.0; 0.3; 0.6; 1.2; 2.4 of fertilization suggested by Malavolta (1980 for vases. The characteristics evaluated were: collar diameter of the matrices, production of dry mater by shoots, root system and total and accumulation of nutrients by shoot at the end of the experimental period of 150 days. The Australian Red Cedar plants have high nutritional requirements, as showed by the better development obtained with higher fertilizer doses than those suggested by Malavolta (1980. The substrate three provided the worst development to clonal matrices while the substrates 1, 4 and 5 provided the best environment for the development considering all the fertilizer doses and all variables.Com o objetivo de avaliar diferentes substratos com taxas de fertilizantes para o crescimento e desenvolvimento de matrizes clonais de cedro australiano [Toona ciliata var. australis (F. Muell. Bahadur], foi realizado um experimento em casa de vegetação. Foram avaliados cinco substratos, com as proporções em volume, sendo o primeiro composto por 100% Multiplant florestal®, o segundo de 50% Vermiculita, 20% casca de arroz carbonizada, 20% terra e 10% fibra de coco, o terceiro com 50% terra e 50% areia, o quarto com proporção de 50% Multiplant florestal®, 10% terra e 40% de fibra de coco e

  19. Azimuthal and radial variations in sap flux density and effects on stand-scale transpiration estimates in a Japanese cedar forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yoshinori; Tsuruta, Kenji; Ogura, Akira; Noto, Fumikazu; Komatsu, Hikaru; Otsuki, Kyoichi; Maruyama, Toshisuke

    2013-05-01

    Understanding radial and azimuthal variation, and tree-to-tree variation, in sap flux density (Fd) as sources of uncertainty is important for estimating transpiration using sap flow techniques. In a Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don.) forest, Fd was measured at several depths and aspects for 18 trees, using heat dissipation (Granier-type) sensors. We observed considerable azimuthal variation in Fd. The coefficient of variation (CV) calculated from Fd at a depth of 0-20 mm (Fd1) and Fd at a depth of 20-40 mm (Fd2) ranged from 6.7 to 37.6% (mean = 28.3%) and from 19.6 to 62.5% (mean = 34.6%) for the -azimuthal directions. Fd at the north aspect averaged for nine trees, for which azimuthal measurements were made, was -obviously smaller than Fd at the other three aspects (i.e., west, south and east) averaged for the nine trees. Fd1 averaged for the nine trees was significantly larger than Fd2 averaged for the nine trees. The error for stand-scale transpiration (E) estimates caused by ignoring the azimuthal variation was larger than that caused by ignoring the radial variation. The error caused by ignoring tree-to-tree variation was larger than that caused by ignoring both radial and azimuthal variations. Thus, tree-to-tree variation in Fd would be more important than both radial and azimuthal variations in Fd for E estimation. However, Fd for each tree should not be measured at a consistent aspect but should be measured at various aspects to make accurate E estimates and to avoid a risk of error caused by the relationship of Fd to aspect.

  20. Parallel block schemes for large scale least squares computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golub, G.H.; Plemmons, R.J.; Sameh, A.

    1986-04-01

    Large scale least squares computations arise in a variety of scientific and engineering problems, including geodetic adjustments and surveys, medical image analysis, molecular structures, partial differential equations and substructuring methods in structural engineering. In each of these problems, matrices often arise which possess a block structure which reflects the local connection nature of the underlying physical problem. For example, such super-large nonlinear least squares computations arise in geodesy. Here the coordinates of positions are calculated by iteratively solving overdetermined systems of nonlinear equations by the Gauss-Newton method. The US National Geodetic Survey will complete this year (1986) the readjustment of the North American Datum, a problem which involves over 540 thousand unknowns and over 6.5 million observations (equations). The observation matrix for these least squares computations has a block angular form with 161 diagnonal blocks, each containing 3 to 4 thousand unknowns. In this paper parallel schemes are suggested for the orthogonal factorization of matrices in block angular form and for the associated backsubstitution phase of the least squares computations. In addition, a parallel scheme for the calculation of certain elements of the covariance matrix for such problems is described. It is shown that these algorithms are ideally suited for multiprocessors with three levels of parallelism such as the Cedar system at the University of Illinois. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Reference Range of Functional Data of Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT by Quantitative Gated SPECT of Cedars-Sinai and 4D-MSPECT of Michigan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Kim, Young Dae [College of Medicine, Univ. of Donga, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Various programs have been developed for gating of myocardial perfusion SPECT. Among the those program, the most popular program is the Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS)? developed by Cedars-Sinai hospital and most recently released program is 4D-MSPECT? developed by university of Michigan. It is important to know the reference range of the functional data of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT because it is necessary to determine abnormality of individual patient and echocardiographic data is different from those of gated SPECT. Tc-99m MIBI gated myocardial perfusion SPECT image was reconstructed by dual head gamma camera (Siemens, BCAM, esoft) as routine procedure and analyzed using QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program. All patients (M: F=9: 18, Age 69{+-}9 yrs) showed normal myocardial perfusion. The patients with following characteristics were excluded: previous angina or MI history, ECG change with Q wave or ST-T change, diabetes melitius, hypercholesterolemia, typical chest pain, hypertension and cardiomyopathy. Pre-test likelihood of all patients was low. (1) In stress gated SPECT by QGS?, EDV was 73{+-}25 ml, ESV 25{+-}14 ml, EF 67{+-}11 % and area of first frame of gating 106.4{+-}21cm{sup 2}. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 76{+-}26 ml, ESV 27{+-}15 ml, EF 66{+-}12 and area of first frame of gating 108{+-}20cm{sup 2}. (2) In stress gated SPECT by 4D-MSPECT?, EDV was 76{+-}28 ml, ESV 23{+-}16 ml, EF 72{+-}11 %, mass 115{+-}24 g and ungated volume 42{+-}15 ml. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 75{+-}27 ml, ESV 23{+-}12 ml, EF 71{+-}9%, mass 113{+-}25g and ungate dvolume 42{+-}15 ml, (3) s-EDV, s-EF, r-ESV and r-EF were significantly different between QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? (each p=0.016, p<0.001. p=0.003 and p=0.001). We determined the normal reference range of functional parameters by QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program to diagnose individually the abnormality of patients. And the reference ranges have to adopted to be patients by each specific gating program.

  2. Reference Range of Functional Data of Gated Myocardial Perfusion SPECT by Quantitative Gated SPECT of Cedars-Sinai and 4D-MSPECT of Michigan University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various programs have been developed for gating of myocardial perfusion SPECT. Among the those program, the most popular program is the Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS)? developed by Cedars-Sinai hospital and most recently released program is 4D-MSPECT? developed by university of Michigan. It is important to know the reference range of the functional data of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT because it is necessary to determine abnormality of individual patient and echocardiographic data is different from those of gated SPECT. Tc-99m MIBI gated myocardial perfusion SPECT image was reconstructed by dual head gamma camera (Siemens, BCAM, esoft) as routine procedure and analyzed using QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program. All patients (M: F=9: 18, Age 69±9 yrs) showed normal myocardial perfusion. The patients with following characteristics were excluded: previous angina or MI history, ECG change with Q wave or ST-T change, diabetes melitius, hypercholesterolemia, typical chest pain, hypertension and cardiomyopathy. Pre-test likelihood of all patients was low. (1) In stress gated SPECT by QGS?, EDV was 73±25 ml, ESV 25±14 ml, EF 67±11 % and area of first frame of gating 106.4±21cm2. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 76±26 ml, ESV 27±15 ml, EF 66±12 and area of first frame of gating 108±20cm2. (2) In stress gated SPECT by 4D-MSPECT?, EDV was 76±28 ml, ESV 23±16 ml, EF 72±11 %, mass 115±24 g and ungated volume 42±15 ml. In rest gated SPECT, EDV was 75±27 ml, ESV 23±12 ml, EF 71±9%, mass 113±25g and ungate dvolume 42±15 ml, (3) s-EDV, s-EF, r-ESV and r-EF were significantly different between QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? (each p=0.016, p<0.001. p=0.003 and p=0.001). We determined the normal reference range of functional parameters by QGS? and 4D-MSPECT? program to diagnose individually the abnormality of patients. And the reference ranges have to adopted to be patients by each specific gating program

  3. Cloud Computing Vs. Grid Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Seyyed Mohsen Hashemi; Amid Khatibi Bardsiri

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing emerges as one of the hottest topic in field of information technology. Cloud computing is based on several other computing research areas such as HPC, virtualization, utility computing and grid computing. In order to make clear the essential of cloud computing, we propose the characteristics of this area which make cloud computing being cloud computing and distinguish it from other research areas. The service oriented, loose coupling, strong fault tolerant, business model and...

  4. Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavana Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is such a type of computing environment, where business owners outsource their computing needs including application software services to a third party and when they need to use the computing power or employees need to use the application resources like database, emails etc., they access the resources via Internet. Cloud computing the use of computing resources (hardware and software) that are delivered as a service over a (typically the Internet).

  5. Computer Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  6. Computer Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perry

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.). Although most people would think that analog synthesizers and electronic music substantially predate the use of computers in music, many experiments and complete computer music systems were being constructed and used as early as the 1950s.

  7. Water utilization of the Cretaceous Mussentuchit Member local vertebrate fauna, Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, USA: Using oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, C.A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Cifelli, R.L.; Tremain, E.

    2012-01-01

    While the oxygen isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate has successfully been used to address the effects of global climate change on the hydrologic cycle, detailed regional paleohydrologic studies are lacking. Since the hydrologic cycle can vary extensively on local or regional scales due to events such as such as mountain building, and since pedogenic carbonates (calcite) form in a narrow moisture regime, other proxies, such as vertebrate remains, must be used to decipher local versus regional variations in paleohydrology. In this study, the oxygen isotopic composition (?? 18O p) of phosphatic remains from a diverse set of vertebrate fossils (fish, turtles, crocodiles, dinosaurs, and micro-mammals) from the Mussentuchit Member (MM) of the Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah, USA (Aptian to Cenomanian) are analyzed in order to determine differences among the available water reservoirs and water utilization of each taxon. Calculated changes in water reservoir ?? 18O w over time are then used to determine the effects of the incursion of the Western Interior Seaway (WIS) and the Sevier Mountains on paleohydrology during the MM time. Calculation of ?? 18O w from the results of isotopic analysis of phosphate oxygen suggests that turtles and crocodiles serve as another proxy for meteoric water ?? 18O that can be used as a measure of average local precipitation ?? 18O w similar to pedogenic calcite. Pedogenic calcites can be slightly biased toward higher values, however, due to their formation during evaporative conditions. Turtles and crocodiles can be used in place of pedogenic calcite in environments that are not conducive to pedogenic carbonate formation. Remains of fish with rounded tooth morphology have ?? 18O p values that predict temperatures consistent with other estimates of mean annual temperature for this latitude and time. The ?? 18O p of ganoid scales and teeth with pointed morphology, however, indicates that these skeletal materials were precipitated from

  8. Determination of cedar sample interior characteristics based on stress wave and resistograph%应力波仪和阻力仪用于雪松立木内部材性检测的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴福社; 吴贻军; 邵卓平

    2011-01-01

    The cedar sample was tested by the technique of stress wave and resistograph. The results showed that the photographs obtained from stress wave and resistograph could exhibit the distribution of cedar sample interior characteristics. Combination of stress wave with resistograph for determination of standing tree interior characteristics could improve the testing accuracy and make up for the deficiency of both instruments. Moreover,there is a good correlation between the information of photographs obtained from stress wave and resistograph and the wood density with more than 0.8.correlation coefficients.%采用应力波仪和阻力仪分别对雪松进行了材性检测分析.结果表明,由应力波断层扫描得到的图片和阻力仪得到的阻力曲线图比较准确地反映出雪松立木内部的材质分布情况,应力波仪和阻力仪结合在一起对立木内部材性进行检测时,提高了检测结果的准确性,而且很好地弥补了每个设备的不足;通过和实际测量的生材密度相比较,无论是应力波速和雪松密度还是阻力值和雪松密度的相关系数都大于0.8,能够证明应力波和阻力仪所反映的材质材性信息和雪松立木的密度有较好的相关性.

  9. Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Bhavana Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is such a type of computing environment, where business owners outsource their computing needs including application software services to a third party and when they need to use the computing power or employees need to use the application resources like database, emails etc., they access the resources via Internet

  10. Computer Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高振桥

    2002-01-01

    If you work with a computer,it is certain that you can not avoid dealing, with at least one computer virus.But how much do you know about it? Well,actually,a computer virus is not a biological' one as causes illnesses to people.It is a kind of computer program

  11. Grid Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-05-01

    A computing grid interconnects resources such as high performancecomputers, scientific databases, and computercontrolledscientific instruments of cooperating organizationseach of which is autonomous. It precedes and is quitedifferent from cloud computing, which provides computingresources by vendors to customers on demand. In this article,we describe the grid computing model and enumerate themajor differences between grid and cloud computing.

  12. Analog computing

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive introduction to analog computing. As most textbooks about this powerful computing paradigm date back to the 1960s and 1970s, it fills a void and forges a bridge from the early days of analog computing to future applications. The idea of analog computing is not new. In fact, this computing paradigm is nearly forgotten, although it offers a path to both high-speed and low-power computing, which are in even more demand now than they were back in the heyday of electronic analog computers.

  13. Computational composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.; Redström, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Computational composite is introduced as a new type of composite material. Arguing that this is not just a metaphorical maneuver, we provide an analysis of computational technology as material in design, which shows how computers share important characteristics with other materials used in design...... and architecture. We argue that the notion of computational composites provides a precise understanding of the computer as material, and of how computations need to be combined with other materials to come to expression as material. Besides working as an analysis of computers from a designer’s point of view...

  14. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Truhlar, Donald G.; McKoy, Vincent

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  15. Duality Computing in Quantum Computers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Gui-Lu; LIU Yang

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a duality computing mode, which resembles particle-wave duality property when a quantum system such as a quantum computer passes through a double-slit. In this mode, computing operations are not necessarily unitary. The duality mode provides a natural link between classical computing and quantum computing. In addition, the duality mode provides a new tool for quantum algorithm design.

  16. Computational manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general framework for computational manufacturing. The methodology of computational manufacturing aims at integrating computational geometry, machining principle, sensor information fusion, optimization, computational intelligence and virtual prototyping to solve problems of the modeling, reasoning, control, planning and scheduling of manufacturing processes and systems. There are three typical problems in computational manufacturing, i.e., scheduling (time-domain), geometric reasoning (space-domain) and decision- making (interaction between time-domain and space-domain). Some theoretical fundamentals of computational manufacturing are also discussed.

  17. Contextual Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Porzel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This book uses the latest in knowledge representation and human-computer interaction to address the problem of contextual computing in artificial intelligence. It uses high-level context to solve some challenging problems in natural language understanding.

  18. Stream Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Kak, Subhash

    2008-01-01

    Stream computing is the use of multiple autonomic and parallel modules together with integrative processors at a higher level of abstraction to embody "intelligent" processing. The biological basis of this computing is sketched and the matter of learning is examined.

  19. Green Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shalini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green computing is all about using computers in a smarter and eco-friendly way. It is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources which includes the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units, servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste .Computers certainly make up a large part of many people lives and traditionally are extremely damaging to the environment. Manufacturers of computer and its parts have been espousing the green cause to help protect environment from computers and electronic waste in any way.Research continues into key areas such as making the use of computers as energy-efficient as Possible, and designing algorithms and systems for efficiency-related computer technologies.

  20. Computational dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  1. Computer Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelle, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature and use of computer algebra and its applications to various physical sciences. Includes diagrams illustrating, among others, a computer algebra system and flow chart of operation of the Euclidean algorithm. (SK)

  2. Cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Kodera, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with cloud computing in Czech Republic, specifically providers of cloud services. In theoretical part there will be explained what is cloud computing, different kinds of cloud computing, virtualization necessary for cloud computing, main concerns about cloud security and also, where cloud is physically stored. In practical part author choose the best solution for company from selected cloud providers in the Czech Republic by using mathematical methods, then author compare th...

  3. Computable models

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Computational models can be found everywhere in present day science and engineering. In providing a logical framework and foundation for the specification and design of specification languages, Raymond Turner uses this framework to introduce and study computable models. In doing so he presents the first systematic attempt to provide computational models with a logical foundation. Computable models have wide-ranging applications from programming language semantics and specification languages, through to knowledge representation languages and formalism for natural language semantics. They are al

  4. Computing fundamentals introduction to computers

    CERN Document Server

    Wempen, Faithe

    2014-01-01

    The absolute beginner's guide to learning basic computer skills Computing Fundamentals, Introduction to Computers gets you up to speed on basic computing skills, showing you everything you need to know to conquer entry-level computing courses. Written by a Microsoft Office Master Instructor, this useful guide walks you step-by-step through the most important concepts and skills you need to be proficient on the computer, using nontechnical, easy-to-understand language. You'll start at the very beginning, getting acquainted with the actual, physical machine, then progress through the most common

  5. Quantum Computing for Computer Architects

    CERN Document Server

    Metodi, Tzvetan

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computers can (in theory) solve certain problems far faster than a classical computer running any known classical algorithm. While existing technologies for building quantum computers are in their infancy, it is not too early to consider their scalability and reliability in the context of the design of large-scale quantum computers. To architect such systems, one must understand what it takes to design and model a balanced, fault-tolerant quantum computer architecture. The goal of this lecture is to provide architectural abstractions for the design of a quantum computer and to explore

  6. Computer Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    This manual designed to provide the teacher with methods of understanding the computer and its potential in the classroom includes four units with exercises and an answer sheet. Unit 1 covers computer fundamentals, the mini computer, programming languages, an introduction to BASIC, and control instructions. Variable names and constants described…

  7. Computational Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.

    of the new microprocessors and network technologies. However, the understanding of the computer represented within this program poses a challenge for the intentions of the program. The computer is understood as a multitude of invisible intelligent information devices which confines the computer as a tool...

  8. Computing Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielbo, Kristoffer Laigaard; Braxton, Donald M.; Upal, Afzal

    2012-01-01

    The computational approach has become an invaluable tool in many fields that are directly relevant to research in religious phenomena. Yet the use of computational tools is almost absent in the study of religion. Given that religion is a cluster of interrelated phenomena and that research...... concerning these phenomena should strive for multilevel analysis, this article argues that the computational approach offers new methodological and theoretical opportunities to the study of religion. We argue that the computational approach offers 1.) an intermediary step between any theoretical construct...... general computational issues, and finally applications that model behavior in religious contexts....

  9. Computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, Edward K

    2011-01-01

    Computer Science: The Hardware, Software and Heart of It focuses on the deeper aspects of the two recognized subdivisions of Computer Science, Software and Hardware. These subdivisions are shown to be closely interrelated as a result of the stored-program concept. Computer Science: The Hardware, Software and Heart of It includes certain classical theoretical computer science topics such as Unsolvability (e.g. the halting problem) and Undecidability (e.g. Godel's incompleteness theorem) that treat problems that exist under the Church-Turing thesis of computation. These problem topics explain in

  10. Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Mirashe, Shivaji P.; Kalyankar, N. V.

    2010-01-01

    Computing as you know it is about to change, your applications and documents are going to move from the desktop into the cloud. I'm talking about cloud computing, where applications and files are hosted on a "cloud" consisting of thousands of computers and servers, all linked together and accessible via the Internet. With cloud computing, everything you do is now web based instead of being desktop based. You can access all your programs and documents from any computer that's connected to the ...

  11. Human Computation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...

  12. Parallel computations

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    Parallel Computations focuses on parallel computation, with emphasis on algorithms used in a variety of numerical and physical applications and for many different types of parallel computers. Topics covered range from vectorization of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) and of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient (ICCG) algorithm on the Cray-1 to calculation of table lookups and piecewise functions. Single tridiagonal linear systems and vectorized computation of reactive flow are also discussed.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins by classifying parallel computers and describing techn

  13. Computer Science Research: Computation Directorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, M.J. (ed.); Grupe, K.F. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains short papers in the following areas: large-scale scientific computation; parallel computing; general-purpose numerical algorithms; distributed operating systems and networks; knowledge-based systems; and technology information systems.

  14. Computer sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The Computer Science Program provides advanced concepts, techniques, system architectures, algorithms, and software for both space and aeronautics information sciences and computer systems. The overall goal is to provide the technical foundation within NASA for the advancement of computing technology in aerospace applications. The research program is improving the state of knowledge of fundamental aerospace computing principles and advancing computing technology in space applications such as software engineering and information extraction from data collected by scientific instruments in space. The program includes the development of special algorithms and techniques to exploit the computing power provided by high performance parallel processors and special purpose architectures. Research is being conducted in the fundamentals of data base logic and improvement techniques for producing reliable computing systems.

  15. Computer programming and computer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hassitt, Anthony

    1966-01-01

    Computer Programming and Computer Systems imparts a "reading knowledge? of computer systems.This book describes the aspects of machine-language programming, monitor systems, computer hardware, and advanced programming that every thorough programmer should be acquainted with. This text discusses the automatic electronic digital computers, symbolic language, Reverse Polish Notation, and Fortran into assembly language. The routine for reading blocked tapes, dimension statements in subroutines, general-purpose input routine, and efficient use of memory are also elaborated.This publication is inten

  16. BIOECOLOGICAL BASIS OF SELECTION AND EUROPEAN CEDAR VARIETY TESTING Биоэкологические основы селекции и сортоиспытания кедра европейского

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titov E. V.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines bio ecological properties of the European cedar, important for the selection of the total seed production, principles of selection varieties of clones. A description of the first grade-clone “Carpathian” is given

  17. Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, A M

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarise not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, the review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the EPR experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from classical information theory, and, arguably, quantum from classical physics. Basic quantum information ideas are described, including key distribution, teleportation, data compression, quantum error correction, the universal quantum computer and qua...

  18. Organic Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Würtz, Rolf P

    2008-01-01

    Organic Computing is a research field emerging around the conviction that problems of organization in complex systems in computer science, telecommunications, neurobiology, molecular biology, ethology, and possibly even sociology can be tackled scientifically in a unified way. From the computer science point of view, the apparent ease in which living systems solve computationally difficult problems makes it inevitable to adopt strategies observed in nature for creating information processing machinery. In this book, the major ideas behind Organic Computing are delineated, together with a sparse sample of computational projects undertaken in this new field. Biological metaphors include evolution, neural networks, gene-regulatory networks, networks of brain modules, hormone system, insect swarms, and ant colonies. Applications are as diverse as system design, optimization, artificial growth, task allocation, clustering, routing, face recognition, and sign language understanding.

  19. Computer Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Computer viruses are small software programs that are designed to spread from one computerto another and to interfere with computer operation.A virus might delete data on your computer,use your e-mail program to spread itself to othercomputers,or even erase everything on your hard disk.Viruses are most easily spread by attach-ments in e-mail messages or instant messaging messages.That is why it is essential that you never

  20. Computer Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature and development of computer software. Programing, programing languages, types of software (including dynamic spreadsheets), and software of the future are among the topics considered. (JN)

  1. Biological computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lamm, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and Biological BackgroundBiological ComputationThe Influence of Biology on Mathematics-Historical ExamplesBiological IntroductionModels and Simulations Cellular Automata Biological BackgroundThe Game of Life General Definition of Cellular Automata One-Dimensional AutomataExamples of Cellular AutomataComparison with a Continuous Mathematical Model Computational UniversalitySelf-Replication Pseudo Code Evolutionary ComputationEvolutionary Biology and Evolutionary ComputationGenetic AlgorithmsExample ApplicationsAnalysis of the Behavior of Genetic AlgorithmsLamarckian Evolution Genet

  2. Computational Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Li

    2007-01-01

    @@ Computer science is the discipline that anchors the computer industry which has been improving processor performance, communication bandwidth and storage capacity on the so called "Moore's law" curve or at the rate of doubling every 18 to 24 months during the past decades.

  3. Computational Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Eric; University of Pennsylvania; Gomes, Carla P.; Cornell University; Williams, Brian; Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Computational sustainability problems, which exist in dynamic environments with high amounts of uncertainty, provide a variety of unique challenges to artificial intelligence research and the opportunity for significant impact upon our collective future. This editorial provides an overview of artificial intelligence for computational sustainability, and introduces this special issue of AI Magazine.

  4. Cafeteria Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervarics, Charles

    1992-01-01

    By relying on new computer hardware and software, school food service departments can keep better records of daily food consumption, free and reduced-price meals, inventory, production, and other essentials. The most commonly used systems fall into two basic categories: point-of-sale computers and behind-the-counter systems. State funding efforts…

  5. Platform computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Platform Computing releases first grid-enabled workload management solution for IBM eServer Intel and UNIX high performance computing clusters. This Out-of-the-box solution maximizes the performance and capability of applications on IBM HPC clusters" (1/2 page) .

  6. GPGPU COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN OANCEA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the first idea of using GPU to general purpose computing, things have evolved over the years and now there are several approaches to GPU programming. GPU computing practically began with the introduction of CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture by NVIDIA and Stream by AMD. These are APIs designed by the GPU vendors to be used together with the hardware that they provide. A new emerging standard, OpenCL (Open Computing Language tries to unify different GPU general computing API implementations and provides a framework for writing programs executed across heterogeneous platforms consisting of both CPUs and GPUs. OpenCL provides parallel computing using task-based and data-based parallelism. In this paper we will focus on the CUDA parallel computing architecture and programming model introduced by NVIDIA. We will present the benefits of the CUDA programming model. We will also compare the two main approaches, CUDA and AMD APP (STREAM and the new framwork, OpenCL that tries to unify the GPGPU computing models.

  7. Quantum Computation in Computational Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Sadakane, Kunihiko; Sugawara, Noriko; Tokuyama, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    We discuss applications of quantum computation to geometric data processing. These applications include problems on convex hulls, minimum enclosing balls, linear programming, and intersection problems. Technically, we apply well-known Grover’s algorithm (and its variants) combined with geometric algorithms, and no further knowledge of quantum computing is required. However, revealing these applications and emphasizing potential usefulness of quantum computation in geometric data processing wi...

  8. Granular Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The basic ideas and principles of granular computing (GrC) have been studied explicitly or implicitly in many fields in isolation. With the recent renewed and fast growing interest, it is time to extract the commonality from a diversity of fields and to study systematically and formally the domain independent principles of granular computing in a unified model. A framework of granular computing can be established by applying its own principles. We examine such a framework from two perspectives,granular computing as structured thinking and structured problem solving. From the philosophical perspective or the conceptual level,granular computing focuses on structured thinking based on multiple levels of granularity. The implementation of such a philosophy in the application level deals with structured problem solving.

  9. Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Simon

    2013-01-01

    with technological changes, the paradigmatic pendulum has swung between increased centralization on one side and a focus on distributed computing that pushes IT power out to end users on the other. With the introduction of outsourcing and cloud computing, centralization in large data centers is again dominating...... the IT scene. In line with the views presented by Nicolas Carr in 2003 (Carr, 2003), it is a popular assumption that cloud computing will be the next utility (like water, electricity and gas) (Buyya, Yeo, Venugopal, Broberg, & Brandic, 2009). However, this assumption disregards the fact that most IT production......), for instance, in establishing and maintaining trust between the involved parties (Sabherwal, 1999). So far, research in cloud computing has neglected this perspective and focused entirely on aspects relating to technology, economy, security and legal questions. While the core technologies of cloud computing (e...

  10. Computational Streetscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Torrens

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Streetscapes have presented a long-standing interest in many fields. Recently, there has been a resurgence of attention on streetscape issues, catalyzed in large part by computing. Because of computing, there is more understanding, vistas, data, and analysis of and on streetscape phenomena than ever before. This diversity of lenses trained on streetscapes permits us to address long-standing questions, such as how people use information while mobile, how interactions with people and things occur on streets, how we might safeguard crowds, how we can design services to assist pedestrians, and how we could better support special populations as they traverse cities. Amid each of these avenues of inquiry, computing is facilitating new ways of posing these questions, particularly by expanding the scope of what-if exploration that is possible. With assistance from computing, consideration of streetscapes now reaches across scales, from the neurological interactions that form among place cells in the brain up to informatics that afford real-time views of activity over whole urban spaces. For some streetscape phenomena, computing allows us to build realistic but synthetic facsimiles in computation, which can function as artificial laboratories for testing ideas. In this paper, I review the domain science for studying streetscapes from vantages in physics, urban studies, animation and the visual arts, psychology, biology, and behavioral geography. I also review the computational developments shaping streetscape science, with particular emphasis on modeling and simulation as informed by data acquisition and generation, data models, path-planning heuristics, artificial intelligence for navigation and way-finding, timing, synthetic vision, steering routines, kinematics, and geometrical treatment of collision detection and avoidance. I also discuss the implications that the advances in computing streetscapes might have on emerging developments in cyber

  11. COMPUTATIONAL THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy K. Khenner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the research is to draw attention of the educational community to the phenomenon of computational thinking which actively discussed in the last decade in the foreign scientific and educational literature, to substantiate of its importance, practical utility and the right on affirmation in Russian education.Methods. The research is based on the analysis of foreign studies of the phenomenon of computational thinking and the ways of its formation in the process of education; on comparing the notion of «computational thinking» with related concepts used in the Russian scientific and pedagogical literature.Results. The concept «computational thinking» is analyzed from the point of view of intuitive understanding and scientific and applied aspects. It is shown as computational thinking has evolved in the process of development of computers hardware and software. The practice-oriented interpretation of computational thinking which dominant among educators is described along with some ways of its formation. It is shown that computational thinking is a metasubject result of general education as well as its tool. From the point of view of the author, purposeful development of computational thinking should be one of the tasks of the Russian education.Scientific novelty. The author gives a theoretical justification of the role of computational thinking schemes as metasubject results of learning. The dynamics of the development of this concept is described. This process is connected with the evolution of computer and information technologies as well as increase of number of the tasks for effective solutions of which computational thinking is required. Author substantiated the affirmation that including «computational thinking » in the set of pedagogical concepts which are used in the national education system fills an existing gap.Practical significance. New metasubject result of education associated with

  12. Computer interfacing

    CERN Document Server

    Dixey, Graham

    1994-01-01

    This book explains how computers interact with the world around them and therefore how to make them a useful tool. Topics covered include descriptions of all the components that make up a computer, principles of data exchange, interaction with peripherals, serial communication, input devices, recording methods, computer-controlled motors, and printers.In an informative and straightforward manner, Graham Dixey describes how to turn what might seem an incomprehensible 'black box' PC into a powerful and enjoyable tool that can help you in all areas of your work and leisure. With plenty of handy

  13. Computing methods

    CERN Document Server

    Berezin, I S

    1965-01-01

    Computing Methods, Volume 2 is a five-chapter text that presents the numerical methods of solving sets of several mathematical equations. This volume includes computation sets of linear algebraic equations, high degree equations and transcendental equations, numerical methods of finding eigenvalues, and approximate methods of solving ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations and integral equations.The book is intended as a text-book for students in mechanical mathematical and physics-mathematical faculties specializing in computer mathematics and persons interested in the

  14. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Baun, Christian; Nimis, Jens; Tai, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a buzz-word in today's information technology (IT) that nobody can escape. But what is really behind it? There are many interpretations of this term, but no standardized or even uniform definition. Instead, as a result of the multi-faceted viewpoints and the diverse interests expressed by the various stakeholders, cloud computing is perceived as a rather fuzzy concept. With this book, the authors deliver an overview of cloud computing architecture, services, and applications. Their aim is to bring readers up to date on this technology and thus to provide a common basis for d

  15. Computational physics

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    A complete introduction to the field of computational physics, with examples and exercises in the Python programming language. Computers play a central role in virtually every major physics discovery today, from astrophysics and particle physics to biophysics and condensed matter. This book explains the fundamentals of computational physics and describes in simple terms the techniques that every physicist should know, such as finite difference methods, numerical quadrature, and the fast Fourier transform. The book offers a complete introduction to the topic at the undergraduate level, and is also suitable for the advanced student or researcher who wants to learn the foundational elements of this important field.

  16. Computational Viscoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, Severino P C

    2012-01-01

    This text is a guide how to solve problems in which viscoelasticity is present using existing commercial computational codes. The book gives information on codes’ structure and use, data preparation  and output interpretation and verification. The first part of the book introduces the reader to the subject, and to provide the models, equations and notation to be used in the computational applications. The second part shows the most important Computational techniques: Finite elements formulation, Boundary elements formulation, and presents the solutions of Viscoelastic problems with Abaqus.

  17. COMPUTERS HAZARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Augustynek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, over 12.6 million Polish users of the Web registered. On the average, each of them spent 21 hours and 37 minutes monthly browsing the Web. That is why the problems of the psychological aspects of computer utilization have become an urgent research subject. The results of research into the development of Polish information society carried out in AGH University of Science and Technology, under the leadership of Leslaw H. Haber, in the period from 2000 until present time, indicate the emergence dynamic changes in the ways of computer utilization and their circumstances. One of the interesting regularities has been the inverse proportional relation between the level of computer skills and the frequency of the Web utilization.It has been found that in 2005, compared to 2000, the following changes occurred:- A significant drop in the number of students who never used computers and the Web;- Remarkable increase in computer knowledge and skills (particularly pronounced in the case of first years student- Decreasing gap in computer skills between students of the first and the third year; between male and female students;- Declining popularity of computer games.It has been demonstrated also that the hazard of computer screen addiction was the highest in he case of unemployed youth outside school system. As much as 12% of this group of young people were addicted to computer. A lot of leisure time that these youths enjoyed inducted them to excessive utilization of the Web. Polish housewives are another population group in risk of addiction to the Web. The duration of long Web charts carried out by younger and younger youths has been another matter of concern. Since the phenomenon of computer addiction is relatively new, no specific therapy methods has been developed. In general, the applied therapy in relation to computer addition syndrome is similar to the techniques applied in the cases of alcohol or gambling addiction. Individual and group

  18. Computational sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Kersting, Kristian; Morik, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The book at hand gives an overview of the state of the art research in Computational Sustainability as well as case studies of different application scenarios. This covers topics such as renewable energy supply, energy storage and e-mobility, efficiency in data centers and networks, sustainable food and water supply, sustainable health, industrial production and quality, etc. The book describes computational methods and possible application scenarios.

  19. Essentials of cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekaran, K

    2014-01-01

    ForewordPrefaceComputing ParadigmsLearning ObjectivesPreambleHigh-Performance ComputingParallel ComputingDistributed ComputingCluster ComputingGrid ComputingCloud ComputingBiocomputingMobile ComputingQuantum ComputingOptical ComputingNanocomputingNetwork ComputingSummaryReview PointsReview QuestionsFurther ReadingCloud Computing FundamentalsLearning ObjectivesPreambleMotivation for Cloud ComputingThe Need for Cloud ComputingDefining Cloud ComputingNIST Definition of Cloud ComputingCloud Computing Is a ServiceCloud Computing Is a Platform5-4-3 Principles of Cloud computingFive Essential Charact

  20. Computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  1. Computational creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López de Mántaras Badia, Ramon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New technologies, and in particular artificial intelligence, are drastically changing the nature of creative processes. Computers are playing very significant roles in creative activities such as music, architecture, fine arts, and science. Indeed, the computer is already a canvas, a brush, a musical instrument, and so on. However, we believe that we must aim at more ambitious relations between computers and creativity. Rather than just seeing the computer as a tool to help human creators, we could see it as a creative entity in its own right. This view has triggered a new subfield of Artificial Intelligence called Computational Creativity. This article addresses the question of the possibility of achieving computational creativity through some examples of computer programs capable of replicating some aspects of creative behavior in the fields of music and science.Las nuevas tecnologías y en particular la Inteligencia Artificial están cambiando de forma importante la naturaleza del proceso creativo. Los ordenadores están jugando un papel muy significativo en actividades artísticas tales como la música, la arquitectura, las bellas artes y la ciencia. Efectivamente, el ordenador ya es el lienzo, el pincel, el instrumento musical, etc. Sin embargo creemos que debemos aspirar a relaciones más ambiciosas entre los ordenadores y la creatividad. En lugar de verlos solamente como herramientas de ayuda a la creación, los ordenadores podrían ser considerados agentes creativos. Este punto de vista ha dado lugar a un nuevo subcampo de la Inteligencia Artificial denominado Creatividad Computacional. En este artículo abordamos la cuestión de la posibilidad de alcanzar dicha creatividad computacional mediante algunos ejemplos de programas de ordenador capaces de replicar algunos aspectos relacionados con el comportamiento creativo en los ámbitos de la música y la ciencia.

  2. Computational mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudreau, G.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area sponsors research into the underlying solid, structural and fluid mechanics and heat transfer necessary for the development of state-of-the-art general purpose computational software. The scale of computational capability spans office workstations, departmental computer servers, and Cray-class supercomputers. The DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ codes have achieved world fame through our broad collaborators program, in addition to their strong support of on-going Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. Several technology transfer initiatives have been based on these established codes, teaming LLNL analysts and researchers with counterparts in industry, extending code capability to specific industrial interests of casting, metalforming, and automobile crash dynamics. The next-generation solid/structural mechanics code, ParaDyn, is targeted toward massively parallel computers, which will extend performance from gigaflop to teraflop power. Our work for FY-92 is described in the following eight articles: (1) Solution Strategies: New Approaches for Strongly Nonlinear Quasistatic Problems Using DYNA3D; (2) Enhanced Enforcement of Mechanical Contact: The Method of Augmented Lagrangians; (3) ParaDyn: New Generation Solid/Structural Mechanics Codes for Massively Parallel Processors; (4) Composite Damage Modeling; (5) HYDRA: A Parallel/Vector Flow Solver for Three-Dimensional, Transient, Incompressible Viscous How; (6) Development and Testing of the TRIM3D Radiation Heat Transfer Code; (7) A Methodology for Calculating the Seismic Response of Critical Structures; and (8) Reinforced Concrete Damage Modeling.

  3. [DNA computing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  4. Multiparty Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziembowski, Stefan

    In this thesis we study a problem of doing Verifiable Secret Sharing (VSS) and Multiparty Computations in a model where private channels between the players and a broadcast channel is available. The adversary is active, adaptive and has an unbounded computing power. The thesis is based on two...... an impossibility result indicating that a similar equivalence does not hold for Multiparty Computation (MPC): we show that even if protocols are given black-box access for free to an idealized secret sharing scheme secure for the access structure in question, it is not possible to handle all relevant access...... adversary structure. We propose new VSS and MPC protocols that are substantially more efficient than the ones previously known. Another contribution of [2] is an attack against a Weak Secret Sharing Protocol (WSS) of [3]. The attack exploits the fact that the adversary is adaptive. We present this attack...

  5. Computational mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raboin, P J

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

  6. Chemical and energetic characterization for utilization of thinning and slab wood from Australian red cedar Caracterização química e energética para aproveitamento da madeira de costaneira e desbaste de cedro australiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Bufalino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    This work aimed to quantify and compare chemical and energetic properties of Australian red cedar Toona ciliata MJ Roem var. australis (FV Muell. C. DC wood from thinning and primary sawing for reconstituted panel and energy production; and also to verify the efficiency of extractive removal by water treatments, in order to improve wood quality for particleboard production. Lignin, holocellulose, extractives, ash, carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur contents and higher heating value were determined. Two water treatments for extractive removal were performed: immersion in cold water for 24 hours and immersion in boiling water for 2 hours. Lower values of ash, holocellulose, hydrogen and nitrogen contents and higher contents of lignin, total extractives, hydrogen and nitrogen contents were found for wood from primary sawing residues. For other properties, the values were significantly equal. Australian red cedar wood presents high extractive content, being water pre-treatment necessary for the production of some particleboards. Higher heating values of materials indicate potential for energy production.

    doi: 10.4336/2012.pfb.32.70.13

    O objetivo desse trabalho foi quantificar e comparar as propriedades químicas e energéticas da madeira de cedro australiano Toona ciliata MJ Roem var. australis (FV Muell. C. DC proveniente de desbaste e desdobro para produção de painéis reconstituídos e energia, além de verificar a eficiência da remoção de extrativos por tratamentos em água para viabilizar a produção de painéis de partículas. Os teores de lignina, holocelulose, extrativos totais, cinzas, carbono, hidrogênio, oxigênio, nitrogênio, enxofre e poder calorífico superior foram determinados. Dois tratamentos em água para remoção de extrativos foram realizados nos materiais: imersão em água fria durante 24 horas e em água fervente durante 2 horas. Foram encontrados menores teores de cinzas, holocelulose

  7. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Antonopoulos, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has recently emerged as a subject of substantial industrial and academic interest, though its meaning and scope is hotly debated. For some researchers, clouds are a natural evolution towards the full commercialisation of grid systems, while others dismiss the term as a mere re-branding of existing pay-per-use technologies. From either perspective, 'cloud' is now the label of choice for accountable pay-per-use access to third party applications and computational resources on a massive scale. Clouds support patterns of less predictable resource use for applications and services a

  8. Distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Van Renesse, R

    1991-01-01

    This series will start with an introduction to distributed computing systems. Distributed computing paradigms will be presented followed by a discussion on how several important contemporary distributed operating systems use these paradigms. Topics will include processing paradigms, storage paradigms, scalability and robustness. Throughout the course everything will be illustrated by modern distributed systems notably the Amoeba distributed operating system of the Free University in Amsterdam and the Plan 9 operating system of AT&T Bell Laboratories. Plan 9 is partly designed and implemented by Ken Thompson, the main person behind the successful UNIX operating system.

  9. Computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lola

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the discussions, Ocean Climate Data Workshop hosts gave participants an opportunity to hear about, see, and test for themselves some of the latest computer tools now available for those studying climate change and the oceans. Six speakers described computer systems and their functions. The introductory talks were followed by demonstrations to small groups of participants and some opportunities for participants to get hands-on experience. After this familiarization period, attendees were invited to return during the course of the Workshop and have one-on-one discussions and further hands-on experience with these systems. Brief summaries or abstracts of introductory presentations are addressed.

  10. Reconfigurable Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Joao MP

    2011-01-01

    As the complexity of modern embedded systems increases, it becomes less practical to design monolithic processing platforms. As a result, reconfigurable computing is being adopted widely for more flexible design. Reconfigurable Computers offer the spatial parallelism and fine-grained customizability of application-specific circuits with the postfabrication programmability of software. To make the most of this unique combination of performance and flexibility, designers need to be aware of both hardware and software issues. FPGA users must think not only about the gates needed to perform a comp

  11. Computational engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The book presents state-of-the-art works in computational engineering. Focus is on mathematical modeling, numerical simulation, experimental validation and visualization in engineering sciences. In particular, the following topics are presented: constitutive models and their implementation into finite element codes, numerical models in nonlinear elasto-dynamics including seismic excitations, multiphase models in structural engineering and multiscale models of materials systems, sensitivity and reliability analysis of engineering structures, the application of scientific computing in urban water management and hydraulic engineering, and the application of genetic algorithms for the registration of laser scanner point clouds.

  12. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  13. Computer security

    CERN Document Server

    Gollmann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    A completely up-to-date resource on computer security Assuming no previous experience in the field of computer security, this must-have book walks you through the many essential aspects of this vast topic, from the newest advances in software and technology to the most recent information on Web applications security. This new edition includes sections on Windows NT, CORBA, and Java and discusses cross-site scripting and JavaScript hacking as well as SQL injection. Serving as a helpful introduction, this self-study guide is a wonderful starting point for examining the variety of competing sec

  14. Computer busses

    CERN Document Server

    Buchanan, William

    2000-01-01

    As more and more equipment is interface or'bus' driven, either by the use of controllers or directly from PCs, the question of which bus to use is becoming increasingly important both in industry and in the office. 'Computer Busses' has been designed to help choose the best type of bus for the particular application.There are several books which cover individual busses, but none which provide a complete guide to computer busses. The author provides a basic theory of busses and draws examples and applications from real bus case studies. Busses are analysed using from a top-down approach, helpin

  15. CEDAR Electrodynamics Thermosphere Ionosphere (ETI) Challenge for systematic assessment of ionosphere/thermosphere models: NmF2, hmF2, and vertical drift using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J. S.; Kuznetsova, M.; RastäTter, L.; Hesse, M.; Bilitza, D.; Butala, M.; Codrescu, M.; Emery, B.; Foster, B.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Huba, J.; Mannucci, A. J.; Pi, X.; Ridley, A.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Stephens, P.; Thompson, D. C.; Zhu, L.; Anderson, D.; Chau, J. L.; Sojka, J. J.; Rideout, B.

    2011-12-01

    Objective quantification of model performance based on metrics helps us evaluate the current state of space physics modeling capability, address differences among various modeling approaches, and track model improvements over time. The Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Electrodynamics Thermosphere Ionosphere (ETI) Challenge was initiated in 2009 to assess accuracy of various ionosphere/thermosphere models in reproducing ionosphere and thermosphere parameters. A total of nine events and five physical parameters were selected to compare between model outputs and observations. The nine events included two strong and one moderate geomagnetic storm events from GEM Challenge events and three moderate storms and three quiet periods from the first half of the International Polar Year (IPY) campaign, which lasted for 2 years, from March 2007 to March 2009. The five physical parameters selected were NmF2 and hmF2 from ISRs and LEO satellites such as CHAMP and COSMIC, vertical drifts at Jicamarca, and electron and neutral densities along the track of the CHAMP satellite. For this study, four different metrics and up to 10 models were used. In this paper, we focus on preliminary results of the study using ground-based measurements, which include NmF2 and hmF2 from Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISRs), and vertical drifts at Jicamarca. The results show that the model performance strongly depends on the type of metrics used, and thus no model is ranked top for all used metrics. The analysis further indicates that performance of the model also varies with latitude and geomagnetic activity level.

  16. Effect of probiotic Bifidobacterium longum BB536 [corrected] in relieving clinical symptoms and modulating plasma cytokine levels of Japanese cedar pollinosis during the pollen season. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, J Z; Kondo, S; Yanagisawa, N; Takahashi, N; Odamaki, T; Iwabuchi, N; Iwatsuki, K; Kokubo, S; Togashi, H; Enomoto, K; Enomoto, T

    2006-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms have been shown to be effective in the treatment of allergic inflammation and food allergy, but their efficacy remains controversial. This study tested the effect of a yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum BB536 in the treatment of Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCPsis). Forty subjects with a clinical history of JCPsis were given yoghurt either containing BB536 (BB536 yoghurt) or without BB536 (placebo yoghurt) at 2 X 100 g per day for 14 weeks, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjective symptoms and self-care measures were recorded daily and blood samples were taken before and during the intervention (at weeks 4, 9, and 14) to measure the blood parameter levels related to JCPsis. Yoghurt supplemented with BB536 significantly alleviated eye symptoms compared with placebo yoghurt (odds ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.97; p = 0.044). Although no statistically significant differences were detected, nasal symptoms such as itching, rhinorrhea, and blockage, as well as throat symptoms tended to be relieved with the BB536 yoghurt. BB536 tended to suppress the decreasing blood levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-y) and the increasing blood eosinophil rates; a significantly higher IFN-gamma level was observed for the difference from baseline at week 4. A decreased trend in the difference from baseline levels of JCP-specific IgE levels was also observed at week 4 in the BB536 group compared with the placebo group. In conclusion, these results suggest that intake of BB536-supplemented yoghurt may relieve JCPsis symptoms, probably through a modulating effect on Th balance.

  17. CEDAR Electrodynamics Thermosphere Ionosphere (ETI) Challenge for Systematic Assessment of Ionosphere/Thermosphere Models: NmF2, hmF2, and Vertical Drift Using Ground-Based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J. S.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastatter, L.; Hesse, M.; Bilitza, D.; Butala, M.; Codrescu, M.; Emery, B.; Foster, B.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Huba, J.; Mannucci, A. J.; Pi, X.; Ridley, A.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Stephens, P.; Thompson, D. C.; Zhu, L.; Anderson, D.; Chau, J. L.; Sojka, J. J.; Rideout, B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective quantification of model performance based on metrics helps us evaluate the current state of space physics modeling capability, address differences among various modeling approaches, and track model improvements over time. The Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions (CEDAR) Electrodynamics Thermosphere Ionosphere (ETI) Challenge was initiated in 2009 to assess accuracy of various ionosphere/thermosphere models in reproducing ionosphere and thermosphere parameters. A total of nine events and five physical parameters were selected to compare between model outputs and observations. The nine events included two strong and one moderate geomagnetic storm events from GEM Challenge events and three moderate storms and three quiet periods from the first half of the International Polar Year (IPY) campaign, which lasted for 2 years, from March 2007 to March 2009. The five physical parameters selected were NmF2 and hmF2 from ISRs and LEO satellites such as CHAMP and COSMIC, vertical drifts at Jicamarca, and electron and neutral densities along the track of the CHAMP satellite. For this study, four different metrics and up to 10 models were used. In this paper, we focus on preliminary results of the study using ground-based measurements, which include NmF2 and hmF2 from Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISRs), and vertical drifts at Jicamarca. The results show that the model performance strongly depends on the type of metrics used, and thus no model is ranked top for all used metrics. The analysis further indicates that performance of the model also varies with latitude and geomagnetic activity level.

  18. Riemannian computing in computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive treatise on Riemannian geometric computations and related statistical inferences in several computer vision problems. This edited volume includes chapter contributions from leading figures in the field of computer vision who are applying Riemannian geometric approaches in problems such as face recognition, activity recognition, object detection, biomedical image analysis, and structure-from-motion. Some of the mathematical entities that necessitate a geometric analysis include rotation matrices (e.g. in modeling camera motion), stick figures (e.g. for activity recognition), subspace comparisons (e.g. in face recognition), symmetric positive-definite matrices (e.g. in diffusion tensor imaging), and function-spaces (e.g. in studying shapes of closed contours).   ·         Illustrates Riemannian computing theory on applications in computer vision, machine learning, and robotics ·         Emphasis on algorithmic advances that will allow re-application in other...

  19. [Grid computing

    CERN Multimedia

    Wolinsky, H

    2003-01-01

    "Turn on a water spigot, and it's like tapping a bottomless barrel of water. Ditto for electricity: Flip the switch, and the supply is endless. But computing is another matter. Even with the Internet revolution enabling us to connect in new ways, we are still limited to self-contained systems running locally stored software, limited by corporate, institutional and geographic boundaries" (1 page).

  20. Computational Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacino, Dario; Voss, Stefan; Jensen, Rune Møller

    2013-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computational Logistics, ICCL 2013, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in September 2013. The 19 papers presented in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected for inclusion in the book. They are organized...... in topical sections named: maritime shipping, road transport, vehicle routing problems, aviation applications, and logistics and supply chain management....

  1. Computational Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lykke

    One of the major challenges in todays post-crisis finance environment is calculating the sensitivities of complex products for hedging and risk management. Historically, these derivatives have been determined using bump-and-revalue, but due to the increasing magnitude of these computations does...

  2. Computing News

    CERN Multimedia

    McCubbin, N

    2001-01-01

    We are still five years from the first LHC data, so we have plenty of time to get the computing into shape, don't we? Well, yes and no: there is time, but there's an awful lot to do! The recently-completed CERN Review of LHC Computing gives the flavour of the LHC computing challenge. The hardware scale for each of the LHC experiments is millions of 'SpecInt95' (SI95) units of cpu power and tens of PetaBytes of data storage. PCs today are about 20-30SI95, and expected to be about 100 SI95 by 2005, so it's a lot of PCs. This hardware will be distributed across several 'Regional Centres' of various sizes, connected by high-speed networks. How to realise this in an orderly and timely fashion is now being discussed in earnest by CERN, Funding Agencies, and the LHC experiments. Mixed in with this is, of course, the GRID concept...but that's a topic for another day! Of course hardware, networks and the GRID constitute just one part of the computing. Most of the ATLAS effort is spent on software development. What we ...

  3. Computational trigonometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, K. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    By means of the author`s earlier theory of antieigenvalues and antieigenvectors, a new computational approach to iterative methods is presented. This enables an explicit trigonometric understanding of iterative convergence and provides new insights into the sharpness of error bounds. Direct applications to Gradient descent, Conjugate gradient, GCR(k), Orthomin, CGN, GMRES, CGS, and other matrix iterative schemes will be given.

  4. Computational Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  5. Computational Electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Rylander, Thomas; Bondeson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Computational Electromagnetics is a young and growing discipline, expanding as a result of the steadily increasing demand for software for the design and analysis of electrical devices. This book introduces three of the most popular numerical methods for simulating electromagnetic fields: the finite difference method, the finite element method and the method of moments. In particular it focuses on how these methods are used to obtain valid approximations to the solutions of Maxwell's equations, using, for example, "staggered grids" and "edge elements." The main goal of the book is to make the reader aware of different sources of errors in numerical computations, and also to provide the tools for assessing the accuracy of numerical methods and their solutions. To reach this goal, convergence analysis, extrapolation, von Neumann stability analysis, and dispersion analysis are introduced and used frequently throughout the book. Another major goal of the book is to provide students with enough practical understan...

  6. Egalitarian computing

    OpenAIRE

    Biryukov, Alex; Khovratovich, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore several contexts where an adversary has an upper hand over the defender by using special hardware in an attack. These include password processing, hard-drive protection, cryptocurrency mining, resource sharing, code obfuscation, etc. We suggest memory-hard computing as a generic paradigm, where every task is amalgamated with a certain procedure requiring intensive access to RAM both in terms of size and (very importantly) bandwidth, so that transferring the com...

  7. Everything Computes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bill; Hofmann

    1999-01-01

    Dear American Professor, I am a student in Beijing. At the beginning of last semester, we fourroommates gathered some 10,000 yuan (a big sum here. approximately 1150USD ) and bought a computer, which is our joint-property. Since the computercame into our room, it was used round the clock except the time we were havingc1asses. So even at midnight, when I woke up from the dream, I could still see

  8. Computer Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Using NASA studies of advanced lunar exploration and colonization, KDT Industries, Inc. and Wesson International have developed MOONBASE, a computer game. The player, or team commander, must build and operate a lunar base using NASA technology. He has 10 years to explore the surface, select a site and assemble structures brought from Earth into an efficient base. The game was introduced in 1991 by Texas Space Grant Consortium.

  9. Bacteria as computers making computers

    OpenAIRE

    Danchin, Antoine

    2008-01-01

    Various efforts to integrate biological knowledge into networks of interactions have produced a lively microbial systems biology. Putting molecular biology and computer sciences in perspective, we review another trend in systems biology, in which recursivity and information replace the usual concepts of differential equations, feedback and feedforward loops and the like. Noting that the processes of gene expression separate the genome from the cell machinery, we analyse the role of the separa...

  10. Customizable computing

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu-Ting; Gill, Michael; Reinman, Glenn; Xiao, Bingjun

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of Dennard scaling in the early 2000s, improving the energy efficiency of computation has been the main concern of the research community and industry. The large energy efficiency gap between general-purpose processors and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) motivates the exploration of customizable architectures, where one can adapt the architecture to the workload. In this Synthesis lecture, we present an overview and introduction of the recent developments on energy-efficient customizable architectures, including customizable cores and accelerators, on-chip memory

  11. Computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennery, D.; Cunningham, R.; Saund, E.; High, J.; Ruoff, C.

    1981-01-01

    The field of computer vision is surveyed and assessed, key research issues are identified, and possibilities for a future vision system are discussed. The problems of descriptions of two and three dimensional worlds are discussed. The representation of such features as texture, edges, curves, and corners are detailed. Recognition methods are described in which cross correlation coefficients are maximized or numerical values for a set of features are measured. Object tracking is discussed in terms of the robust matching algorithms that must be devised. Stereo vision, camera control and calibration, and the hardware and systems architecture are discussed.

  12. Computational Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Astsatryan, H. V.

    2015-07-01

    Present astronomical archives that contain billions of objects, both Galactic and extragalactic, and the vast amount of data on them allow new studies and discoveries. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories (VO) use available databases and current observing material as a collection of interoperating data archives and software tools to form a research environment in which complex research programs can be conducted. Most of the modern databases give at present VO access to the stored information, which makes possible also a fast analysis and managing of these data. Cross-correlations result in revealing new objects and new samples. Very often dozens of thousands of sources hide a few very interesting ones that are needed to be discovered by comparison of various physical characteristics. VO is a prototype of Grid technologies that allows distributed data computation, analysis and imaging. Particularly important are data reduction and analysis systems: spectral analysis, SED building and fitting, modelling, variability studies, cross correlations, etc. Computational astrophysics has become an indissoluble part of astronomy and most of modern research is being done by means of it.

  13. Computational crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  14. Computational crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed. PMID:26792536

  15. Computer Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur AĞAOĞLU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is crucial that gifted and talented students should be supported by different educational methods for their interests and skills. The science and arts centres (gifted centres provide the Supportive Education Program for these students with an interdisciplinary perspective. In line with the program, an ICT lesson entitled “Computer Tree” serves for identifying learner readiness levels, and defining the basic conceptual framework. A language teacher also contributes to the process, since it caters for the creative function of the basic linguistic skills. The teaching technique is applied for 9-11 aged student level. The lesson introduces an evaluation process including basic information, skills, and interests of the target group. Furthermore, it includes an observation process by way of peer assessment. The lesson is considered to be a good sample of planning for any subject, for the unpredicted convergence of visual and technical abilities with linguistic abilities.

  16. computer networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we construct a new dynamic model for the Token Bucket (TB algorithm used in computer networks and use systems approach for its analysis. This model is then augmented by adding a dynamic model for a multiplexor at an access node where the TB exercises a policing function. In the model, traffic policing, multiplexing and network utilization are formally defined. Based on the model, we study such issues as (quality of service QoS, traffic sizing and network dimensioning. Also we propose an algorithm using feedback control to improve QoS and network utilization. Applying MPEG video traces as the input traffic to the model, we verify the usefulness and effectiveness of our model.

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  19. Analog and hybrid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hyndman, D E

    2013-01-01

    Analog and Hybrid Computing focuses on the operations of analog and hybrid computers. The book first outlines the history of computing devices that influenced the creation of analog and digital computers. The types of problems to be solved on computers, computing systems, and digital computers are discussed. The text looks at the theory and operation of electronic analog computers, including linear and non-linear computing units and use of analog computers as operational amplifiers. The monograph examines the preparation of problems to be deciphered on computers. Flow diagrams, methods of ampl

  20. Study of Quantum Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Anil Patil

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the detailed information about Quantum computer, and difference between quantum computer and traditional computers, the basis of Quantum computers which are slightly similar but still different from traditional computer. Many research groups are working towards the highly technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. Quantum computer is very much use full for computation purpose in field of Science and Research. Large amount of data and information will be computed, processing, storing, retrieving, transmitting and displaying information in less time with that much of accuracy which is not provided by traditional computers.

  1. HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING APPLIED TO CLOUD COMPUTING

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Luxingzi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to introduce high performance computing and cloud computing. The purpose was also to describe how to apply high performance computing to cloud computing as well as its possibilities and challenges. There were two case studies in the thesis project to present the application of cloud computing. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used in this research. The majority of materials were from books and Internet resources. The thesis may be us...

  2. Computing handbook computer science and software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Teofilo; Tucker, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Overview of Computer Science Structure and Organization of Computing Peter J. DenningComputational Thinking Valerie BarrAlgorithms and Complexity Data Structures Mark WeissBasic Techniques for Design and Analysis of Algorithms Edward ReingoldGraph and Network Algorithms Samir Khuller and Balaji RaghavachariComputational Geometry Marc van KreveldComplexity Theory Eric Allender, Michael Loui, and Kenneth ReganFormal Models and Computability Tao Jiang, Ming Li, and Bala

  3. Unconventional Quantum Computing Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Seth

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates a variety of unconventional quantum computation devices, including fermionic quantum computers and computers that exploit nonlinear quantum mechanics. It is shown that unconventional quantum computing devices can in principle compute some quantities more rapidly than `conventional' quantum computers.

  4. Distributed Computing: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Firoj Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Decrease in hardware costs and advances in computer networking technologies have led to increased interest in the use of large-scale parallel and distributed computing systems. Distributed computing systems offer the potential for improved performance and resource sharing. In this paper we have made an overview on distributed computing. In this paper we studied the difference between parallel and distributed computing, terminologies used in distributed computing, task allocation in distributed computing and performance parameters in distributed computing system, parallel distributed algorithm models, and advantages of distributed computing and scope of distributed computing.

  5. Applied Parallel Computing Industrial Computation and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kaj; NA NA NA Olesen, Dorte

    Proceedings and the Third International Workshop on Applied Parallel Computing in Industrial Problems and Optimization (PARA96)......Proceedings and the Third International Workshop on Applied Parallel Computing in Industrial Problems and Optimization (PARA96)...

  6. Further computer appreciation

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, T F

    2014-01-01

    Further Computer Appreciation is a comprehensive cover of the principles and aspects in computer appreciation. The book starts by describing the development of computers from the first to the third computer generations, to the development of processors and storage systems, up to the present position of computers and future trends. The text tackles the basic elements, concepts and functions of digital computers, computer arithmetic, input media and devices, and computer output. The basic central processor functions, data storage and the organization of data by classification of computer files,

  7. Typologies of Computation and Computational Models

    OpenAIRE

    Burgin, Mark; Dodig-Crnkovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    We need much better understanding of information processing and computation as its primary form. Future progress of new computational devices capable of dealing with problems of big data, internet of things, semantic web, cognitive robotics and neuroinformatics depends on the adequate models of computation. In this article we first present the current state of the art through systematization of existing models and mechanisms, and outline basic structural framework of computation. We argue tha...

  8. Democratizing Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jane; Goode, Joanna; Ryoo, Jean J.

    2015-01-01

    Computer science programs are too often identified with a narrow stratum of the student population, often white or Asian boys who have access to computers at home. But because computers play such a huge role in our world today, all students can benefit from the study of computer science and the opportunity to build skills related to computing. The…

  9. Computational Methods for Simulating Quantum Computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    This review gives a survey of numerical algorithms and software to simulate quantum computers. It covers the basic concepts of quantum computation and quantum algorithms and includes a few examples that illustrate the use of simulation software for ideal and physical models of quantum computers.

  10. Computational thinking and thinking about computing

    OpenAIRE

    Wing, Jeannette M.

    2008-01-01

    Computational thinking will influence everyone in every field of endeavour. This vision poses a new educational challenge for our society, especially for our children. In thinking about computing, we need to be attuned to the three drivers of our field: science, technology and society. Accelerating technological advances and monumental societal demands force us to revisit the most basic scientific questions of computing.

  11. Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security and Computational Models

    CERN Document Server

    Anitha, R; Lekshmi, R; Kumar, M; Bonato, Anthony; Graña, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This book contains cutting-edge research material presented by researchers, engineers, developers, and practitioners from academia and industry at the International Conference on Computational Intelligence, Cyber Security and Computational Models (ICC3) organized by PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, India during December 19–21, 2013. The materials in the book include theory and applications for design, analysis, and modeling of computational intelligence and security. The book will be useful material for students, researchers, professionals, and academicians. It will help in understanding current research trends and findings and future scope of research in computational intelligence, cyber security, and computational models.

  12. Soft computing in computer and information science

    CERN Document Server

    Fray, Imed; Pejaś, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a carefully selected and reviewed collection of papers presented during the 19th Advanced Computer Systems conference ACS-2014. The Advanced Computer Systems conference concentrated from its beginning on methods and algorithms of artificial intelligence. Further future brought new areas of interest concerning technical informatics related to soft computing and some more technological aspects of computer science such as multimedia and computer graphics, software engineering, web systems, information security and safety or project management. These topics are represented in the present book under the categories Artificial Intelligence, Design of Information and Multimedia Systems, Information Technology Security and Software Technologies.

  13. Cloud Computing (4)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ 8 Case Study Cloud computing is still a new phenomenon. Although many IT giants are developing their own cloud computing infrastructures,platforms, software, and services, few have really succeeded in becoming cloud computing providers.

  14. PR Educators Stress Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    Surveys the varied roles computers play in public relations education. Asserts that, because computers are used extensively in the public relations field, students should become acquainted with the varied capabilities of computers and their role in public relations practice. (MM)

  15. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and others responsible for academic computer facilities. Teachers can minimize the possibility. Eight suggestions for avoiding computer viruses are given. (JOW)

  16. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  17. Computing technology in the 1980's. [computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Advances in computing technology have been led by consistently improving semiconductor technology. The semiconductor industry has turned out ever faster, smaller, and less expensive devices since transistorized computers were first introduced 20 years ago. For the next decade, there appear to be new advances possible, with the rate of introduction of improved devices at least equal to the historic trends. The implication of these projections is that computers will enter new markets and will truly be pervasive in business, home, and factory as their cost diminishes and their computational power expands to new levels. The computer industry as we know it today will be greatly altered in the next decade, primarily because the raw computer system will give way to computer-based turn-key information and control systems.

  18. A Review on Modern Distributed Computing Paradigms: Cloud Computing, Jungle Computing and Fog Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Hajibaba, Majid; Gorgin, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    The distributed computing attempts to improve performance in large-scale computing problems by resource sharing. Moreover, rising low-cost computing power coupled with advances in communications/networking and the advent of big data, now enables new distributed computing paradigms such as Cloud, Jungle and Fog computing.Cloud computing brings a number of advantages to consumers in terms of accessibility and elasticity. It is based on centralization of resources that possess huge processing po...

  19. Cloud Computing (2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: Cloud computing is a topic of intense interest in the Internet field. Major IT giants have launched their own cloud computing products. This four-part lecture series discusses cloud computing technology in the following aspects: The first part provided a brief description of the origin and characteristics of cloud computing from the users view of point; the other parts introduce typical applications of cloud computing, technically analyze the specific content within the cloud, its components, architecture and computational paradigm, compare cloud computing to other distributed computing technologies, and discuss its successful cases, commercial models, related technical and economic issues, and development trends.

  20. Cloud Computing (1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: Cloud computing is a topic of intense interest in the Internet field. Major IT giants have launched their own cloud computing products. This four-part lecture series will discuss cloud computing technology in the following aspects: The first part provides a brief description of the origin and characteristics of cloud computing from the users view of point; the other parts introduce typical applications of cloud computing, technically analyze the specific content within the cloud, its components, architecture and computational paradigm, compare cloud computing to other distributed computing technologies, and discuss its successful cases, commercial models, related technical and economic issues, and development trends.

  1. Computer jargon explained

    CERN Document Server

    Enticknap, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Computer Jargon Explained is a feature in Computer Weekly publications that discusses 68 of the most commonly used technical computing terms. The book explains what the terms mean and why the terms are important to computer professionals. The text also discusses how the terms relate to the trends and developments that are driving the information technology industry. Computer jargon irritates non-computer people and in turn causes problems for computer people. The technology and the industry are changing so rapidly; it is very hard even for professionals to keep updated. Computer people do not

  2. Computer hardware fault administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  3. Computers and data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Deitel, Harvey M

    1985-01-01

    Computers and Data Processing provides information pertinent to the advances in the computer field. This book covers a variety of topics, including the computer hardware, computer programs or software, and computer applications systems.Organized into five parts encompassing 19 chapters, this book begins with an overview of some of the fundamental computing concepts. This text then explores the evolution of modern computing systems from the earliest mechanical calculating devices to microchips. Other chapters consider how computers present their results and explain the storage and retrieval of

  4. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance Computing The ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  5. Computability and unsolvability

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Martin

    1985-01-01

    ""A clearly written, well-presented survey of an intriguing subject."" - Scientific American. Classic text considers general theory of computability, computable functions, operations on computable functions, Turing machines self-applied, unsolvable decision problems, applications of general theory, mathematical logic, Kleene hierarchy, computable functionals, classification of unsolvable decision problems and more.

  6. Computing and Introductory Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Much of the computing that students do in introductory statistics courses is based on techniques that were developed before computing became inexpensive and ubiquitous. Now that computing is readily available to all students, instructors can change the way we teach statistical concepts. This article describes computational ideas that can support teaching George Cobb's Three Rs of statistical inference: Randomize, Repeat, Reject.

  7. Great Principles of Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Denning, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Great Principles of Computing is a framework for understanding computing as a field of science. The website ...April 2008 (Rev. 8/31/08) The Great Principles of Computing is a framework for understanding computing as a field of science.

  8. Computer Literacy for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapin, Marvin I.; Post, Paul E.

    Basic concepts of computer literacy are discussed as they relate to industrial arts/technology education. Computer hardware development is briefly examined, and major software categories are defined, including database management, computer graphics, spreadsheet programs, telecommunications and networking, word processing, and computer assisted and…

  9. The Computer Manpower Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Joseph J.

    1975-01-01

    Advances and employment outlook in the field of computer science are discussed as well as the problems related to improving the quality of computer education. Specific computer jobs discussed include: data processing machine repairers, systems analysts, programmers, computer and peripheral equipment operators, and keypunch operators. (EA)

  10. Elementary School Computer Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This curriculum guide presents lessons for computer literacy instruction in the elementary grades. The first section of the guide includes 22 lessons on hardware, covering such topics as how computers work, keyboarding, word processing, and computer peripherals. The 13 lessons in the second section cover social topics related to the computer,…

  11. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  12. 浙江天目山种植林管理历史及粗死木残体特征影响柳杉腐木甲虫多样性%Plantation management history and coarse woody debris characteristics influence the diversity of saproxylic beetles associated with Chinese cedar in Tianmushan, Zhejiang, East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴捷; 潘卉; 杨淑贞; 牛晓玲

    2013-01-01

    Unreasonable forest management has been proposed as an important causation for the decline of saproxylic beetle diversity.In subtropical regions of China,plantation forests have been widely established to replace natural forests with high diversity.However,our knowledge about the impact of these plantation forests on saproxylic beetle diversity is still very poor.In this study,we compared the composition and diversity of saproxylic beetle assemblages associated with snags of Chinese cedar (Cryptomeria fortunei) in young cedar plantation (YPF) (30-40 year),mature cedar plantation (MPF) (80-100 year),and semi-natural mixed forests (SNMF) (> 200 year) in Tianmushan Nature Reserve,Zhejiang province.The results showed that the number of saproxylic beetle individuals was significantly higher in SNMF (97.4 + 66.7) (mean + SD) than in YPF (39.9 + 16.3) and MPF (21.9± 5.9).However,no significant difference in species richness was found between SNMF (27.9 + 11.2)and YPF (24.1 + 3.7).In contrast,the numbers of species and individuals were significantly higher in YPF than in MPF (P < 0.05).Both species richness and abundance were significantly related to the volume of coarse woody debris (CWD) in surveyed plots (P < 0.05).The canonical correspondence analysis and multi-response permutation procedure analysis confirmed that the saproxylic beetle assemblages were significantly different between forest types (P < 0.001).The diameter of sampled snags,CWD diameter and amount,and canopy cover in plots had significant effects on species composition (P < 0.05).Analysis of trophic composition also indicated that mycetophagous species were significantly more abundant in SNMF than in plantation forests (P < 0.001).The results suggest that improving quantity and quality of CWD habitats in cedar plantations may increase species richness of saproxylic beetles,but the diversity of saproxylic beetles in these plantations may decline in later succession stage

  13. Study on Parallel Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Liang Chen; Guang-Zhong Sun; Yun-Quan Zhang; Ze-Yao Mo

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general survey on parallel computing. The main contents include parallel computer system which is the hardware platform of parallel computing, parallel algorithm which is the theoretical base of parallel computing, parallel programming which is the software support of parallel computing. After that, we also introduce some parallel applications and enabling technologies. We argue that parallel computing research should form an integrated methodology of "architecture - algorithm - programming - application". Only in this way, parallel computing research becomes continuous development and more realistic.

  14. Students’ Choice for Computers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai; Wei

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays,computers are widely used as useful tools for our daily life.So you can see students using computers everywhere.The purpose of our survey is to find out the answers to the following questions:1.What brand of computers do students often choose?2.What is the most important factor of choosing computers in students’idea?3.What do students want to do with computers most?After that,we hope the students will know what kind of computers they really need and how many factors must be thought about when buying computers.

  15. Computer mathematics for programmers

    CERN Document Server

    Abney, Darrell H; Sibrel, Donald W

    1985-01-01

    Computer Mathematics for Programmers presents the Mathematics that is essential to the computer programmer.The book is comprised of 10 chapters. The first chapter introduces several computer number systems. Chapter 2 shows how to perform arithmetic operations using the number systems introduced in Chapter 1. The third chapter covers the way numbers are stored in computers, how the computer performs arithmetic on real numbers and integers, and how round-off errors are generated in computer programs. Chapter 4 details the use of algorithms and flowcharting as problem-solving tools for computer p

  16. Roadmap to greener computing

    CERN Document Server

    Nguemaleu, Raoul-Abelin Choumin

    2014-01-01

    A concise and accessible introduction to green computing and green IT, this book addresses how computer science and the computer infrastructure affect the environment and presents the main challenges in making computing more environmentally friendly. The authors review the methodologies, designs, frameworks, and software development tools that can be used in computer science to reduce energy consumption and still compute efficiently. They also focus on Computer Aided Design (CAD) and describe what design engineers and CAD software applications can do to support new streamlined business directi

  17. Parallel computing works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-23

    An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

  18. Computation in Classical Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Timberlake, Todd

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing consensus that physics majors need to learn computational skills, but many departments are still devoid of computation in their physics curriculum. Some departments may lack the resources or commitment to create a dedicated course or program in computational physics. One way around this difficulty is to include computation in a standard upper-level physics course. An intermediate classical mechanics course is particularly well suited for including computation. We discuss the ways we have used computation in our classical mechanics courses, focusing on how computational work can improve students' understanding of physics as well as their computational skills. We present examples of computational problems that serve these two purposes. In addition, we provide information about resources for instructors who would like to include computation in their courses.

  19. Crime in computer networks

    OpenAIRE

    Skrbková, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    This diploma thesis deals with computer crime, especially in computer networks. The aim is to assess the level of security in joint-stock company Žďas, identify potential threats and security weaknesses and suggest possible solutions. The work is divided into two parts. The first part focuses on theoretical knowledge of computer crimes. It defines the term known as computer crime and mentions list of computer-related offenses based on classification created by the Council of Europe. It briefl...

  20. The digital computer

    CERN Document Server

    Parton, K C

    2014-01-01

    The Digital Computer focuses on the principles, methodologies, and applications of the digital computer. The publication takes a look at the basic concepts involved in using a digital computer, simple autocode examples, and examples of working advanced design programs. Discussions focus on transformer design synthesis program, machine design analysis program, solution of standard quadratic equations, harmonic analysis, elementary wage calculation, and scientific calculations. The manuscript then examines commercial and automatic programming, how computers work, and the components of a computer

  1. Automata and Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Ambainis, Andris; Yakaryilmaz, Abuzer

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computing is a new model of computation, based on quantum physics. Quantum computers can be exponentially faster than conventional computers for problems such as factoring. Besides full-scale quantum computers, more restricted models such as quantum versions of finite automata have been studied. In this paper, we survey various models of quantum finite automata and their properties. We also provide some open questions and new directions for researchers.

  2. Toward Cloud Computing Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Susanto, Heru; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Kang, Chen Chin

    2012-01-01

    -Information Technology (IT) shaped the success of organizations, giving them a solid foundation that increases both their level of efficiency as well as productivity. The computing industry is witnessing a paradigm shift in the way computing is performed worldwide. There is a growing awareness among consumers and enterprises to access their IT resources extensively through a "utility" model known as "cloud computing." Cloud computing was initially rooted in distributed grid-based computing. ...

  3. Algorithmically specialized parallel computers

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Lawrence; Gannon, Dennis B

    1985-01-01

    Algorithmically Specialized Parallel Computers focuses on the concept and characteristics of an algorithmically specialized computer.This book discusses the algorithmically specialized computers, algorithmic specialization using VLSI, and innovative architectures. The architectures and algorithms for digital signal, speech, and image processing and specialized architectures for numerical computations are also elaborated. Other topics include the model for analyzing generalized inter-processor, pipelined architecture for search tree maintenance, and specialized computer organization for raster

  4. Introduction to parallel computing

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to Parallel Computing is a complete end-to-end source of information on almost all aspects of parallel computing from introduction to architectures to programming paradigms to algorithms to programming standards. It is the only book to have complete coverage of traditional Computer Science algorithms (sorting, graph and matrix algorithms), scientific computing algorithms (FFT, sparse matrix computations, N-body methods), and data intensive algorithms (search, dynamic programming, data-mining).

  5. Cloud Computing (3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: In the preceding two parts of this series, several aspects of cloud computing-including definition, classification, characteristics, typical applications, and service levels-were discussed. This part continues with a discussion of Cloud Computing Oopen Architecture and Market-Oriented Cloud. A comparison is made between cloud computing and other distributed computing technologies, and Google's cloud platform is analyzed to determine how distributed computing is implemented in its particular model.

  6. Research on Comparison of Cloud Computing and Grid Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Yuxi; Wang Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    The development of computer industry is promoted by the progress of distributed computing, parallel computing and grid computing, so the cloud computing movement rises. This study describes the types of cloud computing services, the similarities and differences of cloud computing and grid computing, meanwhile discusses the better aspect of cloud computing than grid computing, and refers the common problems faced to the both computing, and some security issues.

  7. Computational Biology, Advanced Scientific Computing, and Emerging Computational Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-06-27

    This CRADA was established at the start of FY02 with $200 K from IBM and matching funds from DOE to support post-doctoral fellows in collaborative research between International Business Machines and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to explore effective use of emerging petascale computational architectures for the solution of computational biology problems. 'No cost' extensions of the CRADA were negotiated with IBM for FY03 and FY04.

  8. Understanding Student Computational Thinking with Computational Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Aiken, John M; Douglas, Scott S; Burk, John B; Scanlon, Erin M; Thoms, Brian D; Schatz, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the National Research Council's framework for next generation science standards highlighted "computational thinking" as one of its "fundamental practices". Students taking a physics course that employed the Arizona State University's Modeling Instruction curriculum were taught to construct computational models of physical systems. Student computational thinking was assessed using a proctored programming assignment, written essay, and a series of think-aloud interviews, where the students produced and discussed a computational model of a baseball in motion via a high-level programming environment (VPython). Roughly a third of the students in the study were successful in completing the programming assignment. Student success on this assessment was tied to how students synthesized their knowledge of physics and computation. On the essay and interview assessments, students displayed unique views of the relationship between force and motion; those who spoke of this relationship in causal (rather than obs...

  9. Enzyme Computation - Computing the Way Proteins Do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime-Alberto Parra-Plaza

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is presented enzyme computation, a computational paradigm based on the molecular activity inside the biological cells, particularly in the capacity of proteins to represent information, of enzymes to transform that information, and of genes to produce both elements according to the dynamic requirements of a given system. The paradigm explodes the rich computational possibilities offered by metabolic pathways and genetic regulatory networks and translates those possibilities into a distributed computational space made up of active agents which communicate through the mechanism of message passing. Enzyme computation has been tested in diverse problems, such as image processing, species classification, symbolic regression, and constraints satisfaction. Also, given its distributed nature, an implementation in dynamical reconfigurable hardware has been possible.

  10. Understanding student computational thinking with computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, John M.; Caballero, Marcos D.; Douglas, Scott S.; Burk, John B.; Scanlon, Erin M.; Thoms, Brian D.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the National Research Council's framework for next generation science standards highlighted "computational thinking" as one of its "fundamental practices". 9th Grade students taking a physics course that employed the Arizona State University's Modeling Instruction curriculum were taught to construct computational models of physical systems. Student computational thinking was assessed using a proctored programming assignment, written essay, and a series of think-aloud interviews, where the students produced and discussed a computational model of a baseball in motion via a high-level programming environment (VPython). Roughly a third of the students in the study were successful in completing the programming assignment. Student success on this assessment was tied to how students synthesized their knowledge of physics and computation. On the essay and interview assessments, students displayed unique views of the relationship between force and motion; those who spoke of this relationship in causal (rather than observational) terms tended to have more success in the programming exercise.

  11. Cloud Computing for radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Amit T; Safvi, Amjad; Thind, Ss; Singh, Amarjit

    2012-07-01

    Cloud computing is a concept wherein a computer grid is created using the Internet with the sole purpose of utilizing shared resources such as computer software, hardware, on a pay-per-use model. Using Cloud computing, radiology users can efficiently manage multimodality imaging units by using the latest software and hardware without paying huge upfront costs. Cloud computing systems usually work on public, private, hybrid, or community models. Using the various components of a Cloud, such as applications, client, infrastructure, storage, services, and processing power, Cloud computing can help imaging units rapidly scale and descale operations and avoid huge spending on maintenance of costly applications and storage. Cloud computing allows flexibility in imaging. It sets free radiology from the confines of a hospital and creates a virtual mobile office. The downsides to Cloud computing involve security and privacy issues which need to be addressed to ensure the success of Cloud computing in the future.

  12. Duality quantum computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article,we make a review on the development of a newly proposed quantum computer,duality computer,or the duality quantum computer and the duality mode of quantum computers.The duality computer is based on the particle-wave duality principle of quantum mechanics.Compared to an ordinary quantum computer,the duality quantum computer is a quantum computer on the move and passing through a multi-slit.It offers more computing operations than is possible with an ordinary quantum computer.The most two distinct operations are:the quantum division operation and the quantum combiner operation.The division operation divides the wave function of a quantum computer into many attenuated,and identical parts.The combiner operation combines the wave functions in different parts into a single part.The duality mode is a way in which a quantum computer with some extra qubit resource simulates a duality computer.The main structure of duality quantum computer and duality mode,the duality mode,their mathematical description and algorithm designs are reviewed.

  13. Computers for imagemaking

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, D

    1981-01-01

    Computers for Image-Making tells the computer non-expert all he needs to know about Computer Animation. In the hands of expert computer engineers, computer picture-drawing systems have, since the earliest days of computing, produced interesting and useful images. As a result of major technological developments since then, it no longer requires the expert's skill to draw pictures; anyone can do it, provided they know how to use the appropriate machinery. This collection of specially commissioned articles reflects the diversity of user applications in this expanding field

  14. Polymorphous computing fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw; Gokhale, Maya B.; McCabe, Kevin Peter

    2011-01-18

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  15. Quantum computer science

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this text we present a technical overview of the emerging field of quantum computation along with new research results by the authors. What distinguishes our presentation from that of others is our focus on the relationship between quantum computation and computer science. Specifically, our emphasis is on the computational model of quantum computing rather than on the engineering issues associated with its physical implementation. We adopt this approach for the same reason that a book on computer programming doesn't cover the theory and physical realization of semiconductors. Another distin

  16. Language and Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Dickinson, Markus; Meurers, Detmar

    2012-01-01

    Language and Computers introduces students to the fundamentals of how computers are used to represent, process, and organize textual and spoken information. Concepts are grounded in real-world examples familiar to students’ experiences of using language and computers in everyday life. A real-world introduction to the fundamentals of how computers process language, written specifically for the undergraduate audience, introducing key concepts from computational linguistics. Offers a comprehensive explanation of the problems computers face in handling natural language Covers a broad spectru

  17. Computer techniques for electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittra, R

    1973-01-01

    Computer Techniques for Electromagnetics discusses the ways in which computer techniques solve practical problems in electromagnetics. It discusses the impact of the emergence of high-speed computers in the study of electromagnetics. This text provides a brief background on the approaches used by mathematical analysts in solving integral equations. It also demonstrates how to use computer techniques in computing current distribution, radar scattering, and waveguide discontinuities, and inverse scattering. This book will be useful for students looking for a comprehensive text on computer techni

  18. Explorations in quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Colin P

    2011-01-01

    By the year 2020, the basic memory components of a computer will be the size of individual atoms. At such scales, the current theory of computation will become invalid. ""Quantum computing"" is reinventing the foundations of computer science and information theory in a way that is consistent with quantum physics - the most accurate model of reality currently known. Remarkably, this theory predicts that quantum computers can perform certain tasks breathtakingly faster than classical computers -- and, better yet, can accomplish mind-boggling feats such as teleporting information, breaking suppos

  19. Computing networks from cluster to cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Vicat-Blanc, Pascale; Guillier, Romaric; Soudan, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    "Computing Networks" explores the core of the new distributed computing infrastructures we are using today:  the networking systems of clusters, grids and clouds. It helps network designers and distributed-application developers and users to better understand the technologies, specificities, constraints and benefits of these different infrastructures' communication systems. Cloud Computing will give the possibility for millions of users to process data anytime, anywhere, while being eco-friendly. In order to deliver this emerging traffic in a timely, cost-efficient, energy-efficient, and

  20. Aspects of Computability in Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Shipman, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews connections between physics and computation, and explores their implications. The main topics are computational "hardness" of physical systems, computational status of fundamental theories, quantum computation, and the Universe as a computer.

  1. Applications of computer algebra

    CERN Document Server

    1985-01-01

    Today, certain computer software systems exist which surpass the computational ability of researchers when their mathematical techniques are applied to many areas of science and engineering. These computer systems can perform a large portion of the calculations seen in mathematical analysis. Despite this massive power, thousands of people use these systems as a routine resource for everyday calculations. These software programs are commonly called "Computer Algebra" systems. They have names such as MACSYMA, MAPLE, muMATH, REDUCE and SMP. They are receiving credit as a computational aid with in­ creasing regularity in articles in the scientific and engineering literature. When most people think about computers and scientific research these days, they imagine a machine grinding away, processing numbers arithmetically. It is not generally realized that, for a number of years, computers have been performing non-numeric computations. This means, for example, that one inputs an equa­ tion and obtains a closed for...

  2. Applying Computational Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Kordon, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Offers guidelines on creating value from the application of computational intelligence methods. This work introduces a methodology for effective real-world application of computational intelligence while minimizing development cost, and outlines the critical, underestimated technology marketing efforts required

  3. ICASE Computer Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering computer science program is discussed in outline form. Information is given on such topics as problem decomposition, algorithm development, programming languages, and parallel architectures.

  4. Computational Science Facility (CSF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL Institutional Computing (PIC) is focused on meeting DOE's mission needs and is part of PNNL's overarching research computing strategy. PIC supports large-scale...

  5. Intelligent Computer Graphics 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Miaoulis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    In Computer Graphics, the use of intelligent techniques started more recently than in other research areas. However, during these last two decades, the use of intelligent Computer Graphics techniques is growing up year after year and more and more interesting techniques are presented in this area.   The purpose of this volume is to present current work of the Intelligent Computer Graphics community, a community growing up year after year. This volume is a kind of continuation of the previously published Springer volumes “Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Computer Graphics” (2008), “Intelligent Computer Graphics 2009” (2009), “Intelligent Computer Graphics 2010” (2010) and “Intelligent Computer Graphics 2011” (2011).   Usually, this kind of volume contains, every year, selected extended papers from the corresponding 3IA Conference of the year. However, the current volume is made from directly reviewed and selected papers, submitted for publication in the volume “Intelligent Computer Gr...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

  8. Computational Continuum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shabana, Ahmed A

    2011-01-01

    This text presents the theory of continuum mechanics using computational methods. Ideal for students and researchers, the second edition features a new chapter on computational geometry and finite element analysis.

  9. Cloud Computing Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Şiclovan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Cloud computing was and it will be a new way of providing Internet services and computers. This calculation approach is based on many existing services, such as the Internet, grid computing, Web services. Cloud computing as a system aims to provide on demand services more acceptable as price and infrastructure. It is exactly the transition from computer to a service offered to the consumers as a product delivered online. This paper is meant to describe the quality of cloud computing services, analyzing the advantages and characteristics offered by it. It is a theoretical paper.

    Keywords: Cloud computing, QoS, quality of cloud computing

  10. Socially Enhanced Services Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Dustdar, Schahram; Skopik, Florian; Juszczyk, Lukasz; Psaier, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Socially enhanced services computing is located at the intersection of social, service-oriented, crowd, and cloud computing. This book presents a collection of selected papers which will help the reader achieve an understanding of this complex field.

  11. The Global Computer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharp, Robin

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a Danish project, involving partners from Copenhagen University, DTU, the University of Southern Denmark, Aalborg University, Copenhagen Business School and UNI-C, for exploiting Grid technology to provide computer resources for applications with very large computational...

  12. Cognitive Computing for Security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenedictis, Erik [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rothganger, Fredrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aimone, James Bradley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Marinella, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, Brian Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warrender, Christina E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mickel, Patrick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Final report for Cognitive Computing for Security LDRD 165613. It reports on the development of hybrid of general purpose/ne uromorphic computer architecture, with an emphasis on potential implementation with memristors.

  13. Book Review: Computational Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Computational Topology by Herbert Edelsbrunner and John L. Harer. American Matheamtical Society, 2010 - ISBN 978-0-8218-4925-5......Computational Topology by Herbert Edelsbrunner and John L. Harer. American Matheamtical Society, 2010 - ISBN 978-0-8218-4925-5...

  14. Pervasive and mobile computing

    OpenAIRE

    Conti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The Pervasive and Mobile Computing Journal (PMC) is a professional, peer-reviewed journal that publishes high-quality scientific articles (both theory and practice) covering all aspects of pervasive computing and communications.

  15. Computer Crime and Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Ralph H.

    1985-01-01

    The susceptibility of colleges and universities to computer crime is great. While insurance coverage is available to cover the risks, an aggressive loss-prevention program is the wisest approach to limiting the exposures presented by computer technology. (MLW)

  16. Computer-assisted psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Jesse H.; Wright, Andrew S.

    1997-01-01

    The rationale for using computers in psychotherapy includes the possibility that therapeutic software could improve the efficiency of treatment and provide access for greater numbers of patients. Computers have not been able to reliably duplicate the type of dialogue typically used in clinician-administered therapy. However, computers have significant strengths that can be used to advantage in designing treatment programs. Software developed for computer-assisted therapy gen...

  17. Computer Supported Collaborative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hinze-Hoare, Vita

    2009-01-01

    Although the areas of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW), and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) are now relatively well established, the related field of Computer Supported Collaborative Research (CSCR) is newly proposed here. An analysis of the principles and issues behind CSCR is performed leading to a full definition and specification of the CSCR domain is provided with a view to setting up an e-laboratory designed to support...

  18. Computational physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Vesely, Franz J

    1994-01-01

    Author Franz J. Vesely offers students an introductory text on computational physics, providing them with the important basic numerical/computational techniques. His unique text sets itself apart from others by focusing on specific problems of computational physics. The author also provides a selection of modern fields of research. Students will benefit from the appendixes which offer a short description of some properties of computing and machines and outline the technique of 'Fast Fourier Transformation.'

  19. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  20. Nanoelectronics: Metrology and Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Lundstrom, Mark S.; Clark, Jason Vaughn; Klimeck, Gerhard; Raman, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    Research in nanoelectronics poses new challenges for metrology, but advances in theory, simulation and computing and networking technology provide new opportunities to couple simulation and metrology. This paper begins with a brief overview of current work in computational nanoelectronics. Three examples of how computation can assist metrology will then be discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of how cyberinfrastructure can help connect computing and metrology using the nanoHUB (ww...

  1. Cloud Computing: a Prologue

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Sultan; Xuefeng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    An emerging internet based super computing model is represented by cloud computing. Cloud computing is the convergence and evolution of several concepts from virtualization, distributed storage, grid, and automation management to enable a more flexible approach for deploying and scaling applications. However, cloud computing moves the application software and databases to the large data centers, where the management of the data and services may not be fully trustworthy. The concept of cloud c...

  2. Computational intelligence in optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Tenne, Yoel

    2010-01-01

    This volume presents a collection of recent studies covering the spectrum of computational intelligence applications with emphasis on their application to challenging real-world problems. Topics covered include: Intelligent agent-based algorithms, Hybrid intelligent systems, Cognitive and evolutionary robotics, Knowledge-Based Engineering, fuzzy sets and systems, Bioinformatics and Bioengineering, Computational finance and Computational economics, Data mining, Machine learning, and Expert systems. ""Computational Intelligence in Optimization"" is a comprehensive reference for researchers, prac

  3. Approximation and Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Gautschi, Walter; Rassias, Themistocles M

    2011-01-01

    Approximation theory and numerical analysis are central to the creation of accurate computer simulations and mathematical models. Research in these areas can influence the computational techniques used in a variety of mathematical and computational sciences. This collection of contributed chapters, dedicated to renowned mathematician Gradimir V. Milovanovia, represent the recent work of experts in the fields of approximation theory and numerical analysis. These invited contributions describe new trends in these important areas of research including theoretic developments, new computational alg

  4. Computation: A New Open Access Journal of Computational Chemistry, Computational Biology and Computational Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Karlheinz Schwarz; Rainer Breitling; Christian Allen

    2013-01-01

    Computation (ISSN 2079-3197; http://www.mdpi.com/journal/computation) is an international scientific open access journal focusing on fundamental work in the field of computational science and engineering. Computational science has become essential in many research areas by contributing to solving complex problems in fundamental science all the way to engineering. The very broad range of application domains suggests structuring this journal into three sections, which are briefly characterized ...

  5. Learning through computer games

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanova, Biljana; Sivevska, Despina

    2009-01-01

    In this text we will talk about modern computer technology and its infl uence on children education. Th e computer technology is entering many spheres of human activities and is changing the life style of the modern man. It infl uences the educational process by changing the way of learning. How that works we can see and understand if we direct learners’ attention through computer games. Computer games are wildly popular with young people. Th ey show new ways of learning ...

  6. COMPUTER GAMES AND EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhov, Anton

    2015-01-01

    This paper devoted to the research of educational resources and possibilities of modern computer games. The “internal” educational aspects of computer games include educational mechanism (a separate or integrated “tutorial”) and representation of a real or even fantastic educational process within virtual worlds. The “external” dimension represents educational opportunities of computer games for personal and professional development in different genres of computer games (various transport, so...

  7. Integrable Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Integrable quantum computation is defined as quantum computing via the integrable condition, in which two-qubit gates are either nontrivial unitary solutions of the Yang--Baxter equation or the Swap gate (permutation). To make the definition clear, in this article, we explore the physics underlying the quantum circuit model, and then present a unified description on both quantum computing via the Bethe ansatz and quantum computing via the Yang--Baxter equation.

  8. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  9. Quantum computing and probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  10. Biomolecular computation for bionanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jian-Qin

    2006-01-01

    Computers built with moleware? The drive toward non-silicon computing is underway, and this first-of-its-kind guide to molecular computation gives researchers a firm grasp of the technologies, biochemical details, and theoretical models at the cutting edge. It explores advances in molecular biology and nanotechnology and illuminates how the convergence of various technologies is propelling computational capacity beyond the limitations of traditional hardware technology and into the realm of moleware.

  11. Quantum computation: Honesty test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2013-11-01

    Alice does not have a quantum computer so she delegates a computation to Bob, who does own one. But how can Alice check whether the computation that Bob performs for her is correct? An experiment with photonic qubits demonstrates such a verification protocol.

  12. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. Education for Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslep, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    The computer engineers who refer to the education of computers do not have a definite idea of education and do not bother to justify the fuzzy ones to which they allude. Hence, they logically cannot specify the features a computer must have in order to be educable. This paper puts forth a non-standard, but not arbitrary, concept of education that…

  15. Uncertainty In Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2002-01-01

    We examine the effect of previous history on starting a computation on a quantum computer. Specifically, we assume that the quantum register has some unknown state on it, and it is required that this state be cleared and replaced by a specific superposition state without any phase uncertainty, as needed by quantum algorithms. We show that, in general, this task is computationally impossible.

  16. Computing environment logbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  17. Computers in Engineering Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, N. J.

    This bibliography cites 26 books, papers, and reports dealing with various uses of computers in engineering education; and describes several computer programs available for use in teaching aeronautical, chemical, civil, electrical and electronic, mechanical, and nuclear engineering. Each computer program entry is presented by name, author,…

  18. On Understanding Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Henry F., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Three articles discuss the use of computers in education: (1) "References for a Broader Vision" (Henry F. Olds, Jr.); (2) "What Every Teacher Should Know About Computer Simulations" (David Grady); and (3) "The Computer as Palette and Model Builder" (Interview of Alan Kay). (CJ)

  19. Optimizing Computer Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon-Marable, Elizabeth; Valentine, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand what optimal computer technology integration looks like in adult basic skills education (ABSE). One question guided the research: How is computer technology integration best conceptualized and measured? The study used the Delphi method to map the construct of computer technology integration and…

  20. Computational Thinking Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Andri; Bennett, Vicki; Repenning, Alexander; Koh, Kyu Han; Basawapatna, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The iDREAMS project aims to reinvent Computer Science education in K-12 schools, by using game design and computational science for motivating and educating students through an approach we call Scalable Game Design, starting at the middle school level. In this paper we discuss the use of Computational Thinking Patterns as the basis for our…

  1. Coping with Computing Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Richard D.

    Elements of computing success of Iona College, the challenges it currently faces, and the strategies conceived to cope with future computing needs are discussed. The college has mandated computer literacy for students and offers nine degrees in the computerized information system/management information system areas. Since planning is needed in…

  2. Computer-assisted instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Voogt; P. Fisser

    2015-01-01

    Since the early days of computer technology in education in the 1960s, it was claimed that computers can assist instructional practice and hence improve student learning. Since then computer technology has developed, and its potential for education has increased. In this article, we first discuss th

  3. Mixing Computations and Proofs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beeson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relationship between proof and computation in mathematics, especially in formalized mathematics. We compare the various approaches to proofs with a significant computational component, including (i verifying  the algorithms, (ii verifying the results of the unverified algorithms, and (iii trusting an external computation.

  4. The computer program HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer programme HERA is used for comparative calculation of temperature gradients in sodium-cooled fuel element clusters. It belongs to the group of computer programmes assuming the subchannels formed by the rods to be the smallest element of the flow diameter. The short description outlines the basic characteristics of this computer programme. (HR)

  5. How Computers Work: Computational Thinking for Everyone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Page

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available What would you teach if you had only one course to help students grasp the essence of computation and perhaps inspire a few of them to make computing a subject of further study? Assume they have the standard college prep background. This would include basic algebra, but not necessarily more advanced mathematics. They would have written a few term papers, but would not have written computer programs. They could surf and twitter, but could not exclusive-or and nand. What about computers would interest them or help them place their experience in context? This paper provides one possible answer to this question by discussing a course that has completed its second iteration. Grounded in classical logic, elucidated in digital circuits and computer software, it expands into areas such as CPU components and massive databases. The course has succeeded in garnering the enthusiastic attention of students with a broad range of interests, exercising their problem solving skills, and introducing them to computational thinking.

  6. Neural Computation and the Computational Theory of Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Gualtiero; Bahar, Sonya

    2013-01-01

    We begin by distinguishing computationalism from a number of other theses that are sometimes conflated with it. We also distinguish between several important kinds of computation: computation in a generic sense, digital computation, and analog computation. Then, we defend a weak version of computationalism--neural processes are computations in the…

  7. Trust Based Pervasive Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shiqun; Shane Balfe; ZHOU Jianying; CHEN Kefei

    2006-01-01

    Pervasive computing environment is a distributed and mobile space. Trust relationship must be established and ensured between devices and the systems in the pervasive computing environment. The trusted computing (TC) technology introduced by trusted computing group is a distributed-system-wide approach to the provisions of integrity protection of resources. The TC' notion of trust and security can be described as conformed system behaviors of a platform environment such that the conformation can be attested to a remote challenger. In this paper the trust requirements in a pervasive/ubiquitous environment are analyzed. Then security schemes for the pervasive computing are proposed using primitives offered by TC technology.

  8. Analogue computing methods

    CERN Document Server

    Welbourne, D

    1965-01-01

    Analogue Computing Methods presents the field of analogue computation and simulation in a compact and convenient form, providing an outline of models and analogues that have been produced to solve physical problems for the engineer and how to use and program the electronic analogue computer. This book consists of six chapters. The first chapter provides an introduction to analogue computation and discusses certain mathematical techniques. The electronic equipment of an analogue computer is covered in Chapter 2, while its use to solve simple problems, including the method of scaling is elaborat

  9. Cloud Computing Bible

    CERN Document Server

    Sosinsky, Barrie

    2010-01-01

    The complete reference guide to the hot technology of cloud computingIts potential for lowering IT costs makes cloud computing a major force for both IT vendors and users; it is expected to gain momentum rapidly with the launch of Office Web Apps later this year. Because cloud computing involves various technologies, protocols, platforms, and infrastructure elements, this comprehensive reference is just what you need if you'll be using or implementing cloud computing.Cloud computing offers significant cost savings by eliminating upfront expenses for hardware and software; its growing popularit

  10. Theory of computation

    CERN Document Server

    Tourlakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Learn the skills and acquire the intuition to assess the theoretical limitations of computer programming Offering an accessible approach to the topic, Theory of Computation focuses on the metatheory of computing and the theoretical boundaries between what various computational models can do and not do—from the most general model, the URM (Unbounded Register Machines), to the finite automaton. A wealth of programming-like examples and easy-to-follow explanations build the general theory gradually, which guides readers through the modeling and mathematical analysis of computational pheno

  11. Essential numerical computer methods

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael L

    2010-01-01

    The use of computers and computational methods has become ubiquitous in biological and biomedical research. During the last 2 decades most basic algorithms have not changed, but what has is the huge increase in computer speed and ease of use, along with the corresponding orders of magnitude decrease in cost. A general perception exists that the only applications of computers and computer methods in biological and biomedical research are either basic statistical analysis or the searching of DNA sequence data bases. While these are important applications they only scratch the surface

  12. Rough-Granular Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej Skowron

    2006-01-01

    Solving complex problems by multi-agent systems in distributed environments requires new approximate reasoning methods based on new computing paradigms. One such recently emerging computing paradigm is Granular Computing(GC). We discuss the Rough-Granular Computing(RGC) approach to modeling of computations in complex adaptive systems and multiagent systems as well as for approximate reasoning about the behavior of such systems. The RGC methods have been successfully applied for solving complex problems in areas such as identification of objects or behavioral patterns by autonomous systems, web mining, and sensor fusion.

  13. Pediatric Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Bharat K.; Kim, Jong-Eun; Ito, Yasushi; Wagner, Christina D.; Yang, King-Hay

    A computational model is a computer program that attempts to simulate a behavior of a complex system by solving mathematical equations associated with principles and laws of physics. Computational models can be used to predict the body's response to injury-producing conditions that cannot be simulated experimentally or measured in surrogate/animal experiments. Computational modeling also provides means by which valid experimental animal and cadaveric data can be extrapolated to a living person. Widely used computational models for injury biomechanics include multibody dynamics and finite element (FE) models. Both multibody and FE methods have been used extensively to study adult impact biomechanics in the past couple of decades.

  14. Replacing the computer mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Dernoncourt, Franck

    2014-01-01

    In a few months the computer mouse will be half-a-century-old. It is known to have many drawbacks, the main ones being: loss of productivity due to constant switching between keyboard and mouse, and health issues such as RSI. Like the keyboard, it is an unnatural human-computer interface. However the vast majority of computer users still use computer mice nowadays. In this article, we explore computer mouse alternatives. Our research shows that moving the mouse cursor can be done efficiently ...

  15. Computer - Assisted Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    SORIN-CIPRIAN TEIUŞAN

    2009-01-01

    What is computer-assisted accounting? Where is the place and what is the role of the computer in the financial-accounting activity? What is the position and importance of the computer in the accountant’s activity? All these are questions that require scientific research in order to find the answers. The paper approaches the issue of the support granted to the accountant to organize and manage the accounting activity by the computer. Starting from the notions of accounting and computer, the co...

  16. Computing meaning v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Bunt, Harry; Pulman, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers by leading researchers in computational semantics. It presents a state-of-the-art overview of recent and current research in computational semantics, including descriptions of new methods for constructing and improving resources for semantic computation, such as WordNet, VerbNet, and semantically annotated corpora. It also presents new statistical methods in semantic computation, such as the application of distributional semantics in the compositional calculation of sentence meanings. Computing the meaning of sentences, texts, and spoken or texted dialogue i

  17. Computer Security Handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bosworth, Seymour; Whyne, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The classic and authoritative reference in the field of computer security, now completely updated and revised With the continued presence of large-scale computers; the proliferation of desktop, laptop, and handheld computers; and the vast international networks that interconnect them, the nature and extent of threats to computer security have grown enormously. Now in its fifth edition, Computer Security Handbook continues to provide authoritative guidance to identify and to eliminate these threats where possible, as well as to lessen any losses attributable to them. With seventy-seven chapter

  18. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  19. Computer algebra and operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateman, Richard; Grossman, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The symbolic computation of operator expansions is discussed. Some of the capabilities that prove useful when performing computer algebra computations involving operators are considered. These capabilities may be broadly divided into three areas: the algebraic manipulation of expressions from the algebra generated by operators; the algebraic manipulation of the actions of the operators upon other mathematical objects; and the development of appropriate normal forms and simplification algorithms for operators and their actions. Brief descriptions are given of the computer algebra computations that arise when working with various operators and their actions.

  20. Secure cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Jajodia, Sushil; Samarati, Pierangela; Singhal, Anoop; Swarup, Vipin; Wang, Cliff

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a range of cloud computing security challenges and promising solution paths. The first two chapters focus on practical considerations of cloud computing. In Chapter 1, Chandramouli, Iorga, and Chokani describe the evolution of cloud computing and the current state of practice, followed by the challenges of cryptographic key management in the cloud. In Chapter 2, Chen and Sion present a dollar cost model of cloud computing and explore the economic viability of cloud computing with and without security mechanisms involving cryptographic mechanisms. The next two chapters addres

  1. Topology for computing

    CERN Document Server

    Zomorodian, Afra J

    2005-01-01

    The emerging field of computational topology utilizes theory from topology and the power of computing to solve problems in diverse fields. Recent applications include computer graphics, computer-aided design (CAD), and structural biology, all of which involve understanding the intrinsic shape of some real or abstract space. A primary goal of this book is to present basic concepts from topology and Morse theory to enable a non-specialist to grasp and participate in current research in computational topology. The author gives a self-contained presentation of the mathematical concepts from a comp

  2. Cloud Computing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Carlin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the key characteristics that cloud computing technologies possess and illustrates the cloud computing stack containing the three essential services (SaaS, PaaS and IaaS that have come to define the technology and its delivery model. The underlying virtualization technologies that make cloud computing possible are also identified and explained. The various challenges that face cloud computing technologies today are investigated and discussed. The future of cloud computing technologies along with its various applications and trends are also explored, giving a brief outlook of where and how the technology will progress into the future.

  3. Scalable distributed computing hierarchy: cloud, fog and dew computing

    OpenAIRE

    Skala, Karolj; Davidović, Davor; Afgan, Enis; Sović, Ivan; Šojat, Zorislav

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the conceptual approach for organization of the vertical hierarchical links between the scalable distributed computing paradigms: Cloud Computing, Fog Computing and Dew Computing. In this paper, the Dew Computing is described and recognized as a new structural layer in the existing distributed computing hierarchy. In the existing computing hierarchy, the Dew computing is positioned as the ground level for the Cloud and Fog computing paradigms. Vertical, complementary, hier...

  4. ALMA correlator computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Jim; Amestica, Rodrigo; Perez, Jesus

    2004-09-01

    We present a design for the computer systems which control, configure, and monitor the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) correlator and process its output. Two distinct computer systems implement this functionality: a rack- mounted PC controls and monitors the correlator, and a cluster of 17 PCs process the correlator output into raw spectral results. The correlator computer systems interface to other ALMA computers via gigabit Ethernet networks utilizing CORBA and raw socket connections. ALMA Common Software provides the software infrastructure for this distributed computer environment. The control computer interfaces to the correlator via multiple CAN busses and the data processing computer cluster interfaces to the correlator via sixteen dedicated high speed data ports. An independent array-wide hardware timing bus connects to the computer systems and the correlator hardware ensuring synchronous behavior and imposing hard deadlines on the control and data processor computers. An aggregate correlator output of 1 gigabyte per second with 16 millisecond periods and computational data rates of approximately 1 billion floating point operations per second define other hard deadlines for the data processing computer cluster.

  5. Richard Feynman and computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Tony

    1999-04-01

    The enormous contribution of Richard Feynman to modern physics is well known, both to teaching through his famous Feynman Lectures on Physics, and to research with his Feynman diagram approach to quantum field theory and his path integral formulation of quantum mechanics. Less well known perhaps is his long-standing interest in the physics of computation and this is the subject of this paper. Feynman lectured on computation at Caltech for most of the last decade of his life, first with John Hopfield and Carver Mead, and then with Gerry Sussman. The story of how these lectures came to be written up as the Feynman Lectures on Computation is briefly recounted. Feynman also discussed the fundamentals of computation with other legendary figures of the computer science and physics community such as Ed Fredkin, Rolf Landauer, Carver Mead, Marvin Minsky and John Wheeler. He was also instrumental in stimulating developments in both nanotechnology and quantum computing. During the 1980s Feynman re-visited long-standing interests both in parallel computing with Geoffrey Fox and Danny Hillis, and in reversible computation and quantum computing with Charles Bennett, Norman Margolus, Tom Toffoli and Wojciech Zurek. This paper records Feynman's links with the computational community and includes some reminiscences about his involvement with the fundamentals of computing.

  6. Design of Computer Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehlendorff, Christian

    The main topic of this thesis is design and analysis of computer and simulation experiments and is dealt with in six papers and a summary report. Simulation and computer models have in recent years received increasingly more attention due to their increasing complexity and usability. Software...... packages make the development of rather complicated computer models using predefined building blocks possible. This implies that the range of phenomenas that are analyzed by means of a computer model has expanded significantly. As the complexity grows so does the need for efficient experimental designs...... and analysis methods, since the complex computer models often are expensive to use in terms of computer time. The choice of performance parameter is an important part of the analysis of computer and simulation models and Paper A introduces a new statistic for waiting times in health care units. The statistic...

  7. Programming in Biomolecular Computation:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue;

    2011-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We identify a number of common features in programming that seem...... conspicuously absent from the literature on biomolecular computing; to partially redress this absence, we introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined...... by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only executable, but are also compilable and interpretable. It is universal: all computable functions can be computed (in natural ways...

  8. Computer assisted radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the CAR'93 symposium present the 126 oral papers and the 58 posters contributed to the four Technical Sessions entitled: (1) Image Management, (2) Medical Workstations, (3) Digital Image Generation - DIG, and (4) Application Systems - AS. Topics discussed in Session (1) are: picture archiving and communication systems, teleradiology, hospital information systems and radiological information systems, technology assessment and implications, standards, and data bases. Session (2) deals with computer vision, computer graphics, design and application, man computer interaction. Session (3) goes into the details of the diagnostic examination methods such as digital radiography, MRI, CT, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, digital angiography, and multimodality imaging. Session (4) is devoted to computer-assisted techniques, as there are: computer assisted radiological diagnosis, knowledge based systems, computer assisted radiation therapy and computer assisted surgical planning. (UWA). 266 figs

  9. Community Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Marinos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    Cloud Computing is rising fast, with its data centres growing at an unprecedented rate. However, this has come with concerns over privacy, efficiency at the expense of resilience, and environmental sustainability, because of the dependence on Cloud vendors such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft. Our response is an alternative model for the Cloud conceptualisation, providing a paradigm for Clouds in the community, utilising networked personal computers for liberation from the centralised vendor model. Community Cloud Computing (C3) offers an alternative architecture, created by combing the Cloud with paradigms from Grid Computing, principles from Digital Ecosystems, and sustainability from Green Computing, while remaining true to the original vision of the Internet. It is more technically challenging than Cloud Computing, having to deal with distributed computing issues, including heterogeneous nodes, varying quality of service, and additional security constraints. However, these are not insurmountable challenge...

  10. Hyperswitch Communication Network Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Priel, Moshe; Upchurch, Edwin T.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperswitch Communications Network (HCN) computer is prototype multiple-processor computer being developed. Incorporates improved version of hyperswitch communication network described in "Hyperswitch Network For Hypercube Computer" (NPO-16905). Designed to support high-level software and expansion of itself. HCN computer is message-passing, multiple-instruction/multiple-data computer offering significant advantages over older single-processor and bus-based multiple-processor computers, with respect to price/performance ratio, reliability, availability, and manufacturing. Design of HCN operating-system software provides flexible computing environment accommodating both parallel and distributed processing. Also achieves balance among following competing factors; performance in processing and communications, ease of use, and tolerance of (and recovery from) faults.

  11. Natural Computing in Computational Finance Volume 4

    CERN Document Server

    O’Neill, Michael; Maringer, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    This book follows on from Natural Computing in Computational Finance  Volumes I, II and III.   As in the previous volumes of this series, the  book consists of a series of  chapters each of  which was selected following a rigorous, peer-reviewed, selection process.  The chapters illustrate the application of a range of cutting-edge natural  computing and agent-based methodologies in computational finance and economics.  The applications explored include  option model calibration, financial trend reversal detection, enhanced indexation, algorithmic trading,  corporate payout determination and agent-based modeling of liquidity costs, and trade strategy adaptation.  While describing cutting edge applications, the chapters are  written so that they are accessible to a wide audience. Hence, they should be of interest  to academics, students and practitioners in the fields of computational finance and  economics.  

  12. Computational Biology and High Performance Computing 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst D.; Zorn, Manfred D.; Spengler, Sylvia J.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Stewart, Craig; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2000-10-19

    The pace of extraordinary advances in molecular biology has accelerated in the past decade due in large part to discoveries coming from genome projects on human and model organisms. The advances in the genome project so far, happening well ahead of schedule and under budget, have exceeded any dreams by its protagonists, let alone formal expectations. Biologists expect the next phase of the genome project to be even more startling in terms of dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of human biology, the biology of health and of disease. Only today can biologists begin to envision the necessary experimental, computational and theoretical steps necessary to exploit genome sequence information for its medical impact, its contribution to biotechnology and economic competitiveness, and its ultimate contribution to environmental quality. High performance computing has become one of the critical enabling technologies, which will help to translate this vision of future advances in biology into reality. Biologists are increasingly becoming aware of the potential of high performance computing. The goal of this tutorial is to introduce the exciting new developments in computational biology and genomics to the high performance computing community.

  13. Photonic Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Stefanie

    2013-05-01

    Quantum physics has revolutionized our understanding of information processing and enables computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. In this talk I will present a series of experiments in the field of photonic quantum computing. The first experiment is in the field of photonic state engineering and realizes the generation of heralded polarization-entangled photon pairs. It overcomes the limited applicability of photon-based schemes for quantum information processing tasks, which arises from the probabilistic nature of photon generation. The second experiment uses polarization-entangled photonic qubits to implement ``blind quantum computing,'' a new concept in quantum computing. Blind quantum computing enables a nearly-classical client to access the resources of a more computationally-powerful quantum server without divulging the content of the requested computation. Finally, the concept of blind quantum computing is applied to the field of verification. A new method is developed and experimentally demonstrated, which verifies the entangling capabilities of a quantum computer based on a blind Bell test.

  14. Quantum analogue computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  15. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  16. CLOUD COMPUTING AND SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asharani Shinde

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This document gives an insight into Cloud Computing giving an overview of key features as well as the detail study of exact working of Cloud computing. Cloud Computing lets you access all your application and documents from anywhere in the world, freeing you from the confines of the desktop thus making it easier for group members in different locations to collaborate. Certainly cloud computing can bring about strategic, transformational and even revolutionary benefits fundamental to future enterprise computing but it also offers immediate and pragmatic opportunities to improve efficiencies today while cost effectively and systematically setting the stage for the strategic change. As this technology makes the computing, sharing, networking easy and interesting, we should think about the security and privacy of information too. Thus the key points we are going to be discussed are what is cloud, what are its key features, current applications, future status and the security issues and the possible solutions.

  17. Programming in Biomolecular Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Lars; Jones, Neil; Simonsen, Jakob Grue

    2010-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a top-down approach to biomolecular computation. In spite of widespread discussion about connections between biology and computation, one question seems notable by its absence: Where are the programs? We introduce a model of computation that is evidently programmable......, by programs reminiscent of low-level computer machine code; and at the same time biologically plausible: its functioning is defined by a single and relatively small set of chemical-like reaction rules. Further properties: the model is stored-program: programs are the same as data, so programs are not only...... in a strong sense: a universal algorithm exists, that is able to execute any program, and is not asymptotically inefficient. A prototype model has been implemented (for now in silico on a conventional computer). This work opens new perspectives on just how computation may be specified at the biological level....

  18. New computing systems and their impact on computational mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact computational mechanics are reviewed. The technical needs for computational mechanics technology are outlined. The major features of new and projected computing systems, including supersystems, parallel processing machines, special-purpose computing hardware, and small systems are described. Advances in programming environments, numerical algorithms, and computational strategies for new computing systems are reviewed, and a novel partitioning strategy is outlined for maximizing the degree of parallelism on multiprocessor computers with a shared memory.

  19. Computable de Finetti measures

    CERN Document Server

    Freer, Cameron E

    2009-01-01

    We prove a uniformly computable version of de Finetti's theorem on exchangeable sequences of real random variables. As a consequence, exchangeable stochastic processes in probabilistic functional programming languages can be automatically rewritten as procedures that do not modify non-local state. Along the way, we prove that a distribution on the unit interval is computable if and only if its moments are uniformly computable.

  20. Incremental Computation with Names

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Matthew A.; Dunfield, Joshua; Headley, Kyle; Labich, Nicholas; Foster, Jeffrey S.; Hicks, Michael; Van Horn, David

    2015-01-01

    Over the past thirty years, there has been significant progress in developing general-purpose, language-based approaches to incremental computation, which aims to efficiently update the result of a computation when an input is changed. A key design challenge in such approaches is how to provide efficient incremental support for a broad range of programs. In this paper, we argue that first-class names are a critical linguistic feature for efficient incremental computation. Names identify compu...

  1. Computability and dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Buescu, Jorge; Graça, Daniel; Zhong, Ning

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore results that establish a link between dynamical systems and computability theory (not numerical analysis). In the last few decades, computers have increasingly been used as simulation tools for gaining insight into dynamical behavior. However, due to the presence of errors inherent in such numerical simulations, with few exceptions, computers have not been used for the nobler task of proving mathematical results. Nevertheless, there have been some recen...

  2. The Computer Science Network

    OpenAIRE

    Landweber, Lawrence H.

    1982-01-01

    The CSNET project, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, has as its goal the design and implementation of a computer communications network to provide services to computer science research groups in the United States. Experience with Arpanet has shown that access to a computer network can lead to significantly higher level of interaction between geographically dispersed researchers. This can result in an increase in the quantity and quality of research produced by these researchers. I...

  3. Introduction to reversible computing

    CERN Document Server

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Few books comprehensively cover the software and programming aspects of reversible computing. Filling this gap, Introduction to Reversible Computing offers an expanded view of the field that includes the traditional energy-motivated hardware viewpoint as well as the emerging application-motivated software approach. Collecting scattered knowledge into one coherent account, the book provides a compendium of both classical and recently developed results on reversible computing. It explores up-and-coming theories, techniques, and tools for the application of rever

  4. Research in computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Various graduate research activities in the field of computer science are reported. Among the topics discussed are: (1) failure probabilities in multi-version software; (2) Gaussian Elimination on parallel computers; (3) three dimensional Poisson solvers on parallel/vector computers; (4) automated task decomposition for multiple robot arms; (5) multi-color incomplete cholesky conjugate gradient methods on the Cyber 205; and (6) parallel implementation of iterative methods for solving linear equations.

  5. Virtualizace a cloud computing

    OpenAIRE

    Davídek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this diploma thesis are current computing technologies known as Cloud computing. Main goal is to compare technologies and Cloud services provided by companies nowadays. During this thesis will be proven or not, that usage of Cloud technologies can save company finance due to optimized data management, effective backups, license administration or management of computing resources for single applications/users. Final part will present recommendations for Cloud Service providers or en...

  6. Quantum Computational Complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Watrous, John

    2008-01-01

    This article surveys quantum computational complexity, with a focus on three fundamental notions: polynomial-time quantum computations, the efficient verification of quantum proofs, and quantum interactive proof systems. Properties of quantum complexity classes based on these notions, such as BQP, QMA, and QIP, are presented. Other topics in quantum complexity, including quantum advice, space-bounded quantum computation, and bounded-depth quantum circuits, are also discussed.

  7. Basics of Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Vedral, Vlatko; Martin B. Plenio

    1998-01-01

    Quantum computers require quantum logic, something fundamentally different to classical Boolean logic. This difference leads to a greater efficiency of quantum computation over its classical counter-part. In this review we explain the basic principles of quantum computation, including the construction of basic gates, and networks. We illustrate the power of quantum algorithms using the simple problem of Deutsch, and explain, again in very simple terms, the well known algorithm of Shor for fac...

  8. Computer science I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Raus, Randall

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Computer Science I includes fundamental computer concepts, number representations, Boolean algebra, switching circuits, and computer architecture.

  9. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  10. Sensor sentinel computing device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damico, Joseph P.

    2016-08-02

    Technologies pertaining to authenticating data output by sensors in an industrial environment are described herein. A sensor sentinel computing device receives time-series data from a sensor by way of a wireline connection. The sensor sentinel computing device generates a validation signal that is a function of the time-series signal. The sensor sentinel computing device then transmits the validation signal to a programmable logic controller in the industrial environment.

  11. Computer-based simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Antonoaie, C.; Antonoaie, N.

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based simulation replicates an environment through a computer program designed to consider multiple variables, interactions, and system constraints. Computer-based simulation is used in organization studies to model human social systems to better understand the dynamics between individual and group behaviours.These methods advance organization studies research in many ways. They can be used for extrapolating theory, validating hypotheses, or revealing emergent behaviour. Simulation...

  12. Parallel computing works!

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Geoffrey C; Messina, Guiseppe C

    2014-01-01

    A clear illustration of how parallel computers can be successfully appliedto large-scale scientific computations. This book demonstrates how avariety of applications in physics, biology, mathematics and other scienceswere implemented on real parallel computers to produce new scientificresults. It investigates issues of fine-grained parallelism relevant forfuture supercomputers with particular emphasis on hypercube architecture. The authors describe how they used an experimental approach to configuredifferent massively parallel machines, design and implement basic systemsoftware, and develop

  13. Electronics and computer acronyms

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Phil

    1988-01-01

    Electronics and Computer Acronyms presents a list of almost 2,500 acronyms related to electronics and computers. The material for this book is drawn from a number of subject areas, including electrical, electronics, computers, telecommunications, fiber optics, microcomputers/microprocessors, audio, video, and information technology. The acronyms also encompass avionics, military, data processing, instrumentation, units, measurement, standards, services, organizations, associations, and companies. This dictionary offers a comprehensive and broad view of electronics and all that is associated wi

  14. (Computer) Vision without Sight

    OpenAIRE

    Manduchi, Roberto; Coughlan, James

    2012-01-01

    Computer vision holds great promise for helping persons with blindness or visual impairments (VI) to interpret and explore the visual world. To this end, it is worthwhile to assess the situation critically by understanding the actual needs of the VI population and which of these needs might be addressed by computer vision. This article reviews the types of assistive technology application areas that have already been developed for VI, and the possible roles that computer vision can play in fa...

  15. Mobile computing for radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. PMID:24200475

  16. Intelligent distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Thampi, Sabu

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a selection of refereed and revised papers of the Intelligent Distributed Computing Track originally presented at the third International Symposium on Intelligent Informatics (ISI-2014), September 24-27, 2014, Delhi, India.  The papers selected for this Track cover several Distributed Computing and related topics including Peer-to-Peer Networks, Cloud Computing, Mobile Clouds, Wireless Sensor Networks, and their applications.

  17. Computational neurogenetic modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Benuskova, Lubica

    2010-01-01

    Computational Neurogenetic Modeling is a student text, introducing the scope and problems of a new scientific discipline - Computational Neurogenetic Modeling (CNGM). CNGM is concerned with the study and development of dynamic neuronal models for modeling brain functions with respect to genes and dynamic interactions between genes. These include neural network models and their integration with gene network models. This new area brings together knowledge from various scientific disciplines, such as computer and information science, neuroscience and cognitive science, genetics and molecular biol

  18. Discrete computational structures

    CERN Document Server

    Korfhage, Robert R

    1974-01-01

    Discrete Computational Structures describes discrete mathematical concepts that are important to computing, covering necessary mathematical fundamentals, computer representation of sets, graph theory, storage minimization, and bandwidth. The book also explains conceptual framework (Gorn trees, searching, subroutines) and directed graphs (flowcharts, critical paths, information network). The text discusses algebra particularly as it applies to concentrates on semigroups, groups, lattices, propositional calculus, including a new tabular method of Boolean function minimization. The text emphasize

  19. Distributed Computing Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Jim

    2004-01-01

    Computing economics are changing. Today there is rough price parity between (1) one database access, (2) ten bytes of network traffic, (3) 100,000 instructions, (4) 10 bytes of disk storage, and (5) a megabyte of disk bandwidth. This has implications for how one structures Internet-scale distributed computing: one puts computing as close to the data as possible in order to avoid expensive network traffic.

  20. Frontiers in Computer Education

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Egui; 2011 International Conference on Frontiers in Computer Education (ICFCE 2011)

    2012-01-01

    This book is the proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Frontiers in Computer Education (ICFCE 2011) in Sanya, China, December 1-2, 2011. The contributions can be useful for researchers, software engineers, and programmers, all interested in promoting the computer and education development. Topics covered are computing and communication technology, network management, wireless networks, telecommunication, Signal and Image Processing, Machine Learning, educational management, educational psychology, educational system, education engineering, education technology and training.  The emphasis is on methods and calculi for computer science and education technology development, verification and verification tools support, experiences from doing developments, and the associated theoretical problems.

  1. COMPUTER BASED ENVIRONMENT CONTROLS

    OpenAIRE

    Macoveiciuc Pastorel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to give an overview of the main activities of computer based activities controls. The basic principles of computer controls should be common to all sectors and to most types of hardware and software. The absence of a common definition of computer control may, in part, be due to the relative newness of computer controls. A key feature of many organisations today is change. Although not necessarily the driver of change, IT is invariably an intrinsec component and much ...

  2. Computer Games and Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sukhov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article devoted to the search of relevant sources (primary and secondary and characteristics of computer games that allow to include them in the field of art (such as the creation of artistic games, computer graphics, active interaction with other forms of art, signs of spiritual aesthetic act, own temporality of computer games, “aesthetic illusion”, interactivity. In general, modern computer games can be attributed to commercial art and popular culture (blockbuster games and to elite forms of contemporary media art (author’s games, visionary games.

  3. Discrete and computational geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Devadoss, Satyan L

    2011-01-01

    Discrete geometry is a relatively new development in pure mathematics, while computational geometry is an emerging area in applications-driven computer science. Their intermingling has yielded exciting advances in recent years, yet what has been lacking until now is an undergraduate textbook that bridges the gap between the two. Discrete and Computational Geometry offers a comprehensive yet accessible introduction to this cutting-edge frontier of mathematics and computer science. This book covers traditional topics such as convex hulls, triangulations, and Voronoi diagrams, as well a

  4. Computability theory an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Neil D

    1973-01-01

    Computability Theory: An Introduction provides information pertinent to the major concepts, constructions, and theorems of the elementary theory of computability of recursive functions. This book provides mathematical evidence for the validity of the Church-Turing thesis.Organized into six chapters, this book begins with an overview of the concept of effective process so that a clear understanding of the effective computability of partial and total functions is obtained. This text then introduces a formal development of the equivalence of Turing machine computability, enumerability, and decida

  5. Dictionary of computing

    CERN Document Server

    Illingworth, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    The world of computing continues to expand and to cross new frontiers of public awareness. Jargon grows apace, and confusion abounds as the field moves from the domain of specialists into general knowledge. In preparing the Dictionary of Computing, the need for clear explanations of the concepts that affect more and more aspects of life and the terminology that accompanies them, has been recognized. The dictionary is aimed mainly at students and teachers of computing but should also be of value to professional and amateur computer users. The fourth edition of the dictionary contains ne

  6. Computational approaches to vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, H. G.; Tenenbaum, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Vision is examined in terms of a computational process, and the competence, structure, and control of computer vision systems are analyzed. Theoretical and experimental data on the formation of a computer vision system are discussed. Consideration is given to early vision, the recovery of intrinsic surface characteristics, higher levels of interpretation, and system integration and control. A computational visual processing model is proposed and its architecture and operation are described. Examples of state-of-the-art vision systems, which include some of the levels of representation and processing mechanisms, are presented.

  7. Computational Abstraction Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lone Leth; Thomsen, Bent; Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we discuss computational abstraction steps as a way to create class abstractions from concrete objects, and from examples. Computational abstraction steps are regarded as symmetric counterparts to computational concretisation steps, which are well-known in terms of function calls...... or capturing concrete values, objects, or actions. As the next step, some of these are lifted to a higher level by computational means. In the object-oriented paradigm the target of such steps is classes. We hypothesise that the proposed approach primarily will be beneficial to novice programmers or during...

  8. Cloud Computing: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ling; Luo, Zhiguo; Du, Yujian; Guo, Leitao

    In order to support the maximum number of user and elastic service with the minimum resource, the Internet service provider invented the cloud computing. within a few years, emerging cloud computing has became the hottest technology. From the publication of core papers by Google since 2003 to the commercialization of Amazon EC2 in 2006, and to the service offering of AT&T Synaptic Hosting, the cloud computing has been evolved from internal IT system to public service, from cost-saving tools to revenue generator, and from ISP to telecom. This paper introduces the concept, history, pros and cons of cloud computing as well as the value chain and standardization effort.

  9. Forensic webwatch: Forensic computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaidar, R

    2005-02-01

    With the rapid and continuous development of information technology, policing faces new challenges. As computer equipments are becoming cheaper and the internet more readily available, computer crime and criminal exploitation is on the increase. Investigating such crimes requires identification, preservation, analysis and presentation of digital evidence, the key elements of forensic computing. This is helped by the fact that Locard's principle is applicable to this branch of science as much as in other areas of forensic science. This webwatch considers the ever evolving area of Forensic Computing.

  10. Modeling Trusted Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shuyi; WEN Yingyou; ZHAO Hong

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a formal approach based on predicate logic is proposed for representing and reasoning of trusted computing models. Predicates are defined to represent the characteristics of the objects and the relationship among these objects in a trusted system according to trusted computing specifications. Inference rules of trusted relation are given too. With the semantics proposed, some trusted computing models are formalized and verified, which shows that Predicate calculus logic provides a general and effective method for modeling and reasoning trusted computing systems.

  11. Computing by Observing Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Matteo; Leupold, Peter

    Computing by Observing is a paradigm for the implementation of models of Natural Computing. It was inspired by the setup of experiments in biochemistry. One central feature is an observer that translates the evolution of an underlying observed system into sequences over a finite alphabet. We take a step toward more realistic observers by allowing them to notice only an occurring change in the observed system rather than to read the system's entire configuration. Compared to previous implementations of the Computing by Observing paradigm, this decreases the computational power; but with relatively simple systems we still obtain the language class generated by matrix grammars.

  12. Numbers and computers

    CERN Document Server

    Kneusel, Ronald T

    2015-01-01

    This is a book about numbers and how those numbers are represented in and operated on by computers. It is crucial that developers understand this area because the numerical operations allowed by computers, and the limitations of those operations, especially in the area of floating point math, affect virtually everything people try to do with computers. This book aims to fill this gap by exploring, in sufficient but not overwhelming detail, just what it is that computers do with numbers. Divided into two parts, the first deals with standard representations of integers and floating point numb

  13. Educational Computer Utilization and Computer Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jai P.; Morgan, Robert P.

    As part of an analysis of educational needs and telecommunications requirements for future educational satellite systems, three studies were carried out. 1) The role of the computer in education was examined and both current status and future requirements were analyzed. Trade-offs between remote time sharing and remote batch process were explored…

  14. Annual review of computer science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, J.F. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Grosz, B.J. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Lampson, B.W. (Digital Equipment Corp. (US)); Nilsson, N.J. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA))

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the annual review of computer science. Topics covered include: Database security, parallel algorithmic techniques for combinatorial computation, algebraic complexity theory, computer applications in manufacturing, and computational geometry.

  15. Introduction to Computer Programming Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, Alfred M.

    1971-01-01

    A brief introduction to computer programing explains the basic grammar of computer language as well as fundamental computer techniques. What constitutes a computer program is made clear, then three simple kinds of statements basic to the computational computer are defined: assignment statements, input-output statements, and branching statements. A…

  16. Who Owns Computer Software?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscomb, Anne Wells

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the protection of intellectual property as it applies to computer software and its impact on private enterprise and the public good. Highlights include the role of patents, copyrights, and trade secrets; some court cases; and recommendations for alternatives to the existing legal framework for protecting computer software. (KRN)

  17. Computer Crimes in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Moshe

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the occurrence of computer crimes in schools, focusing on the main types of crimes possible, potential criminals in schools, and how the organizational characteristics of schools invite computer crimes. Means to counter this problem and minimize it as far as possible are suggested. (MBR)

  18. Simulation of quantum computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; Michielsen, K; Hams, AH; Miyashita, S; Saito, K; Landau, DP; Lewis, SP; Schuttler, HB

    2001-01-01

    We describe a simulation approach to study the functioning of Quantum Computer hardware. The latter is modeled by a collection of interacting spin-1/2 objects. The time evolution of this spin system maps one-to-one to a quantum program carried out by the Quantum Computer. Our simulation software con

  19. Simulation of quantum computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.; Hams, A.H.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a simulation approach to study the functioning of Quantum Computer hardware. The latter is modeled by a collection of interacting spin-1/2 objects. The time evolution of this spin system maps one-to-one to a quantum program carried out by the Quantum Computer. Our simulation software con

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a ... by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a ... by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional ...

  2. COMPUTER MODELS/EPANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipe network flow analysis was among the first civil engineering applications programmed for solution on the early commercial mainframe computers in the 1960s. Since that time, advancements in analytical techniques and computing power have enabled us to solve systems with tens o...

  3. Preventing Computer Glitches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2009-01-01

    It has been said that a computer lets a person make more mistakes faster than any other invention in human history, with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila. Computers also make mistakes on their own, whether they're glitches, conflicts, bugs, crashes, or failures. Avoiding glitches is considerably less frustrating than trying to fix…

  4. Theory and computational science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical and computational science carried out at the Daresbury Laboratory in 1984/5 is detailed in the Appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report. The Theory, Computational Science and Applications Groups, provide support work for the experimental projects conducted at Daresbury. Use of the FPS-164 processor is also described. (U.K.)

  5. Computer Aided Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Course notes of a PhD course held in 1998. The central idea is to introduce students to computational mathematics using object oriented programming in C++.......Course notes of a PhD course held in 1998. The central idea is to introduce students to computational mathematics using object oriented programming in C++....

  6. The Computational Materials Repository

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landis, David D.; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Nestorov, Svetlozar;

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities for designing new materials based on quantum physics calculations are rapidly growing, but these design efforts lead to a significant increase in the amount of computational data created. The Computational Materials Repository (CMR) addresses this data challenge and provides...

  7. Introduction to Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes cloud computing, its main characteristics and the models that are currently used for both deployment and delivery. It examines the benefits and business issues with using the cloud, and how they can be addressed. It describes some of the early adapters of cloud computing, together with their experiences.

  8. Learning Computational Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nerbonne, J.; Belz, A.; Cancedda, N.; Dejean, H.; Hammerton, J.; Koeling, R.; Konstantopoulos, S.; Osborne, M.; Thollard, F.; Tjong Kim Sang, E.F.; Daelemans, W.; Zajac, R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on the LEARNING COMPUTATIONAL GRAMMARS (LCG) project, a postdoc network devoted to studying the application of machine learning techniques to grammars suitable for computational use. We were interested in a more systematic survey to understand the relevance of many factors to the

  9. Testing On Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Russell

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Russell and Haney (1997 reported that open-ended test items administered on paper may underestimate the achievement of students accustomed to writing on computers. This study builds on Russell and Haney's work by examining the effect of taking open-ended tests on computers and on paper for students with different levels of computer skill. Using items from the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP, this study focuses on language arts, science and math tests administered to eighth grade students. In addition, information on students' prior computer use and keyboarding speed was collected. Unlike the previous study that found large effects for open-ended writing and science items, this study reports mixed results. For the science test, performance on computers had a positive group effect. For the two language arts tests, an overall group effect was not found. However, for students whose keyboarding speed is at least 0.5 or one-half of a standard deviation above the mean, performing the language arts test on computer had a moderate positive effect. Conversely, for students whose keyboarding speed was 0.5 standard deviations below the mean, performing the tests on computer had a substantial negative effect. For the math test, performing the test on computer had an overall negative effect, but this effect became less pronounced as keyboarding speed increased. Implications are discussed in terms of testing policies and future research.

  10. Learning with Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenheck, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    If ubiquitous computing becomes a reality and is widely adopted, it will inevitably have an impact on education. This article reviews the background of ubiquitous computing and current research projects done involving educational "ubicomp." Finally it explores how ubicomp may and may not change education in both formal and informal settings and…

  11. Computers, Networks and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Alan C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how globally networked, easy-to-use computers can enhance learning only within an educational environment that encourages students to question "facts" and seek challenges. The strengths and weaknesses of computers used as amplifiers for learning are described. (KR)

  12. Computational physics: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, A M

    2002-06-15

    Computing comprises three distinct strands: hardware, software and the ways they are used in real or imagined worlds. Its use in research is more than writing or running code. Having something significant to compute and deploying judgement in what is attempted and achieved are especially challenging. In science or engineering, one must define a central problem in computable form, run such software as is appropriate and, last but by no means least, convince others that the results are both valid and useful. These several strands are highly interdependent. A major scientific development can transform disparate aspects of information and computer technologies. Computers affect the way we do science, as well as changing our personal worlds. Access to information is being transformed, with consequences beyond research or even science. Creativity in research is usually considered uniquely human, with inspiration a central factor. Scientific and technological needs are major forces in innovation, and these include hardware and software opportunities. One can try to define the scientific needs for established technologies (atomic energy, the early semiconductor industry), for rapidly developing technologies (advanced materials, microelectronics) and for emerging technologies (nanotechnology, novel information technologies). Did these needs define new computing, or was science diverted into applications of then-available codes? Regarding credibility, why is it that engineers accept computer realizations when designing engineered structures, whereas predictive modelling of materials has yet to achieve industrial confidence outside very special cases? The tensions between computing and traditional science are complex, unpredictable and potentially powerful.

  13. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  14. Quantum Analog Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  15. Programming the social computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David; Giunchiglia, Fausto

    2013-03-28

    The aim of 'programming the global computer' was identified by Milner and others as one of the grand challenges of computing research. At the time this phrase was coined, it was natural to assume that this objective might be achieved primarily through extending programming and specification languages. The Internet, however, has brought with it a different style of computation that (although harnessing variants of traditional programming languages) operates in a style different to those with which we are familiar. The 'computer' on which we are running these computations is a social computer in the sense that many of the elementary functions of the computations it runs are performed by humans, and successful execution of a program often depends on properties of the human society over which the program operates. These sorts of programs are not programmed in a traditional way and may have to be understood in a way that is different from the traditional view of programming. This shift in perspective raises new challenges for the science of the Web and for computing in general.

  16. Computer Virus Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  17. Abstractions for biomolecular computations

    CERN Document Server

    Okunoye, Babatunde O

    2008-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid is increasingly being understood to be an informational molecule, capable of information processing.It has found application in the determination of non-deterministic algorithms and in the design of molecular computing devices. This is a theoretical analysis of the mathematical properties and relations of the molecules which constituting DNA, which explains in part why DNA is a successful computing molecule.

  18. Teaching Using Computer Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lee Dee; Shell, Duane; Khandaker, Nobel; Soh, Leen-Kiat

    2011-01-01

    Computer games have long been used for teaching. Current reviews lack categorization and analysis using learning models which would help instructors assess the usefulness of computer games. We divide the use of games into two classes: game playing and game development. We discuss the Input-Process-Outcome (IPO) model for the learning process when…

  19. Exercises in Computational Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16).......A selection of HyperChem© PC-exercises in computational chemistry. Answers to most questions are appended (Roskilde University 2014-16)....

  20. Properties of Stabilizing Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Burgin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Models play an important role in the development of computerscience and information technology applications. Turing machine isone of the most popular model of computing devices andcomputations. This model, or more exactly, a family of models,provides means for exploration of capabilities of informationtechnology. However, a Turing machine stops after giving a result.In contrast to this, computers, networks and their software, suchas an operating system, very often work without stopping but givevarious results. There are different modes of such functioning andTuring machines do not provide adequate models for theseprocesses. One of the closest to halting computation isstabilizing computation when the output has to stabilize in orderto become the result of a computational process. Such stabilizingcomputations are modeled by inductive Turing machines. Incomparison with Turing machines, inductive Turing machinesrepresent the next step in the development of computer scienceproviding better models for contemporary computers and computernetworks. At the same time, inductive Turing machines reflectpivotal traits of stabilizing computational processes. In thispaper, we study relations between different modes of inductiveTuring machines functioning. In particular, it is demonstratedthat acceptation by output stabilizing and acceptation by statestabilizing are linguistically equivalent.