WorldWideScience

Sample records for cdx-u spheromak

  1. Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Luckhardt, S.

    1999-01-01

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. Sputtering and erosion tests are currently underway in the PISCES device at the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). To complement this effort, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry will be addressed by a proposed new groundbreaking experiment in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The CDX-U plasma is intensely heated and well diagnosed, and an extensive liquid lithium plasma-facing surface will be used for the first time with a toroidal plasma. Since CDX-U is a small ST, only approximately1 liter or less of lithium is required to produce a toroidal liquid lithium limiter target, leading to a quick and cost-effective experiment

  2. Electron Bernstein Wave Research on NSTX and CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Jones, B.; Bell, G.L.; Bers, A.; Bigelow, T.S.; Carter, M.D.; Harvey, R.W.; Ram, A.K.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Smirnov, A.P.; Wilgen, J.B.; Wilson, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of thermally emitted electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) on CDX-U and NSTX, via mode conversion (MC) to electromagnetic radiation, support the use of EBWs to measure the Te profile and provide local electron heating and current drive (CD) in overdense spherical torus plasmas. An X-mode antenna with radially adjustable limiters successfully controlled EBW MC on CDX-U and enhanced MC efficiency to ∼ 100%. So far the X-mode MC efficiency on NSTX has been increased by a similar technique to 40-50% and future experiments are focused on achieving * 80% MC. MC efficiencies on both machines agree well with theoretical predictions. Ray tracing and Fokker-Planck modeling for NSTX equilibria are being conducted to support the design of a 3 MW, 15 GHz EBW heating and CD system for NSTX to assist non-inductive plasma startup, current ramp up, and to provide local electron heating and CD in high beta NSTX plasmas

  3. Diagnostics for liquid lithium experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Efthimion, P.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Kugel, H.; Majeski, R.; Munsat, T.; Raftopoulos, S.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Iovea, M.; Finkenthal, M.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Causey, R.

    2000-01-01

    A flowing liquid lithium first wall or diverter target could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls in fusion reactors. To investigate the interaction of a spherical torus plasma with liquid lithium limiters, large area diverter targets, and walls, discharges will be established in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) where the plasma-wall interactions are dominated by liquid lithium surfaces. Among the unique CDX-U lithium diagnostics is a multi-layer mirror (MLM) array, which will monitor the 135 (angstrom) LiIII line for core lithium concentrations. Additional spectroscopic diagnostics include a grazing incidence XUV spectrometer (STRS) and a filterscope system to monitor D α and various impurity lines local to the lithium limiter. Profile data will be obtained with a multichannel tangential bolometer and a multipoint Thomson scattering system configured to give enhanced edge resolution. Coupons on th e inner wall of the CDX-U vacuum vessel will be used for surface analysis. A 10,000 frame per second fast visible camera and an IR camera will also be available

  4. Recent Liquid Lithium Limiter Experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T.; Marfuta, P.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Rodgers, D.; Angelini, S.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R=34 cm, a=22 cm, B toroidal = 2 kG, I P =100 kA, T e (0) ∼ 100 eV, n e (0) ∼ 5 x 10 19 m -3 ) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium pool limiter with an area of 2000 cm 2 (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium pool limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium limited discharges are consistent with Z effective < 1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced

  5. Electron Bernstein Wave Research on CDX-U and NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Jones, B.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaita, R.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Majeski, R.; Munsat, T.; Phillips, C.K.; Spaleta, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Rasmussen, D.; Bell, G.; Bigelow, T.S.; Carter, M.D.; Swain, D.W.; Wilgen, J.B.; Ram, A.K.; Bers, A.; Harvey, R.W.; Forest, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    Mode-converted electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) potentially allow the measurement of local electron temperature (Te) and the implementation of local heating and current drive in spherical torus (ST) devices, which are not directly accessible to low harmonic electron cyclotron waves. This paper reports on the measurement of X-mode radiation mode-converted from EBWs observed normal to the magnetic field on the midplane of the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) spherical torus plasmas. The radiation temperature of the EBW emission was compared to Te measured by Thomson scattering and Langmuir probes. EBW mode-conversion efficiencies of over 20% were measured on both CDX-U and NSTX. Sudden increases of mode-conversion efficiency, of over a factor of three, were observed at high-confinement-mode transitions on NSTX, when the measured edge density profile steepened. The EBW mode-conversion efficiency was found to depend on the density gradient at the mode-conversion layer in the plasma scrape-off, consistent with theoretical predictions. The EBW emission source was determined by a perturbation technique to be localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer and was successfully used for radial transport studies. Recently, a new in-vessel antenna and Langmuir probe array were installed on CDX-U to better characterize and enhance the EBW mode-conversion process. The probe incorporates a local adjustable limiter to control and maximize the mode-conversion efficiency in front of the antenna by modifying the density profile in the plasma scrape-off where fundamental EBW mode conversion occurs. Initial results show that the mode-conversion efficiency can be increased to ∼100% when the local limiter is inserted near the mode-conversion layer. Plans for future EBW research, including EBW heating and current-drive studies, are discussed

  6. Liquid lithium limiter experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T.; Marfuta, P.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Rodgers, D.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Current Drive eXperiment - Upgrade provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R=34 cm, a=22 cm, B toroidal 2 kG, I P =100 kA, T e (0)∼100 eV, n e (0)∼ 5 x 10 19 m -3 ) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium tray limiter with an area of 2000 cm 2 (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium limited discharges are consistent with Z effective <1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced. (author)

  7. Liquid Lithium Limiter Experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T.; Marfuta, P.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Rodgers, D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R = 34 cm, a = 22 cm, B toroidal = 2 kG, I P = 100 kA, T e (0) = 100 eV, n e (0) ∼ 5 x 10 19 m -3 ) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium tray limiter with an area of 2000 cm 2 (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium-limited discharges are consistent with Z effective < 1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced

  8. Microwave polarimetry system in the CDX-U tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.S.; Fredriksen, A.; Qin, H.; Forest, C.B.; Ono, M.

    1995-01-01

    An existing microwave interferometer system is modified to add the capability of polarimetry in the CDX-U tokamak. Though this interferometer system can scan vertically and radially, only the vertical view channel is modified to accomodate Faraday rotation measurements, with its radial scanning capability preserved. For our relatively long microwave wavelength, the signal amplitude variation due to refraction is more important than effects due to vibration. An amplitude independent design of Faraday rotation diagnostics has been developed. By using a linearly polarized beam as input and putting a rotating polarizer in the beam after the plasma, birefringency effects are minimized. A digital phase detection technique has been developed for better resolution of the Faraday rotation angle

  9. Testing of Liquid Lithium Limiters in CDX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Majeski; R. Kaita; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; T. Gray; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Seraydarian; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith; D. Rodgers

    2004-07-30

    Part of the development of liquid metals as a first wall or divertor for reactor applications must involve the investigation of plasma-liquid metal interactions in a functioning tokamak. Most of the interest in liquid-metal walls has focused on lithium. Experiments with lithium limiters have now been conducted in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Initial experiments used a liquid-lithium rail limiter (L3) built by the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed some reduction of impurities in CDX-U plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. While no reduction in recycling was observed with the L3, which had a plasma-wet area of approximately 40 cm2, subsequent experiments with a larger area fully toroidal lithium limiter demonstrated significant reductions in both recycling and in impurity levels. Two series of experiments with the toroidal limiter have now be en performed. In each series, the area of exposed, clean lithium was increased, until in the latest experiments the liquid-lithium plasma-facing area was increased to 2000 cm2. Under these conditions, the reduction in recycling required a factor of eight increase in gas fueling in order to maintain the plasma density. The loop voltage required to sustain the plasma current was reduced from 2 V to 0.5 V. This paper summarizes the technical preparations for lithium experiments and the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations. The mechanical response of the liquid metal to induced currents, especially through contact with the plasma, is discussed. The effect of the lithium-filled toroidal limiter on plasma performance is also briefly described.

  10. Testing of Liquid Lithium Limiters in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gray, T.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.; Rodgers, D.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the development of liquid metals as a first wall or divertor for reactor applications must involve the investigation of plasma-liquid metal interactions in a functioning tokamak. Most of the interest in liquid-metal walls has focused on lithium. Experiments with lithium limiters have now been conducted in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Initial experiments used a liquid-lithium rail limiter (L3) built by the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed some reduction of impurities in CDX-U plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. While no reduction in recycling was observed with the L3, which had a plasma-wet area of approximately 40 cm2, subsequent experiments with a larger area fully toroidal lithium limiter demonstrated significant reductions in both recycling and in impurity levels. Two series of experiments with the toroidal limiter have now be en performed. In each series, the area of exposed, clean lithium was increased, until in the latest experiments the liquid-lithium plasma-facing area was increased to 2000 cm2. Under these conditions, the reduction in recycling required a factor of eight increase in gas fueling in order to maintain the plasma density. The loop voltage required to sustain the plasma current was reduced from 2 V to 0.5 V. This paper summarizes the technical preparations for lithium experiments and the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations. The mechanical response of the liquid metal to induced currents, especially through contact with the plasma, is discussed. The effect of the lithium-filled toroidal limiter on plasma performance is also briefly described

  11. Testing of liquid lithium limiters in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gray, T.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.; Rodgers, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the development of liquid metals as a first wall or divertor for reactor applications must involve the investigation of plasma-liquid metal interactions in a functioning tokamak. Most of the interest in liquid metal walls has focused on lithium. Experiments with lithium limiters have now been conducted in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Initial experiments used a liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) built by the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed some reduction of impurities in CDX-U plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. While no reduction in recycling was observed with the L3, which had a plasma-wet area of approximately 40 cm 2 , subsequent experiments with a larger area fully toroidal lithium limiter demonstrated significant reductions in both recycling and in impurity levels. Two series of experiments with the toroidal limiter have now been performed. In each series, the area of exposed, clean lithium was increased, until in the latest experiments, the liquid lithium plasma-facing area was increased to 2000 cm 2 . Under these conditions, the reduction in recycling required a factor of eight increase in gas fueling in order to maintain the plasma density. The loop voltage required to sustain the plasma current was reduced from 2 V to 0.5 V. This paper summarizes the technical preparations for lithium experiments and the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations. The mechanical response of the liquid metal to induced currents, especially through contact with the plasma, is discussed. The effect of the lithium-filled toroidal limiter on plasma performance is also briefly described

  12. Investigations of Low and Moderate Harmonic Fast Wave Physics on CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaleta, J.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C.K.; Dumont, R.J.; Kaita, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Zakharov, L.

    2003-01-01

    Third harmonic hydrogen cyclotron fast wave heating studies are planned in the near term on CDX-U to investigate the potential for bulk ion heating. In preparation for these studies, the available radio-frequency power in CDX-U has been increased to 0.5 MW. The operating frequency of the CDX-U radio-frequency transmitter was lowered to operate in the range of 8-10 MHz, providing access to the ion harmonic range 2* ∼ 4* in hydrogen. A similar regime is accessible for the 30 MHz radio-frequency system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), at 0.6 Tesla in hydrogen. Preliminary computational studies over the plasma regimes of interest for NSTX and CDX-U indicate the possibility of strong localized absorption on bulk ion species

  13. Transient Transport Experiments in the CDX-U Spherical Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Munsat; P.C. Efthimion; B. Jones; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; D. Stutman; G. Taylor

    2001-01-01

    Electron transport has been measured in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) using two separate perturbative techniques. Gas modulation at the plasma edge was used to introduce cold-pulses which propagate towards the plasma center, providing time-of-flight information leading to a determination of chi(subscript e) as a function of radius. Sawteeth at the q=1 radius (r/a ∼ 0.15) induced heat-pulses which propagated outward towards the plasma edge, providing a complementary time-of-flight based chi(subscript e) profile measurement. This work represents the first localized measurement of chi(subscript e) in a spherical torus. It is found that chi(subscript e) = 1-2 meters squared per second in the plasma core (r/a < 1/3), increasing by an order of magnitude or more outside of this region. Furthermore, the chi(subscript e) profile exhibits a sharp transition near r/a = 1/3. Spectral and profile analyses of the soft X-rays, scanning interferometer, and edge probe data show no evidence of a significant magnetic island causing the high chi(subscript e) region

  14. High frequency fast wave results from the CDX-U spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) is the first spherical torus (ST) to investigate radio frequency (RF) heating and current drive. To address the concern that large magnetic field line pitch at the outboard midplane of ST's could inhibit successful coupling to the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW), a rotatable, two strap antenna was installed on CDX-U. Parasitic loading and impurity generation were discovered to be weak and nearly independent of antenna phasing and angle over a wide range, and fast wave electron heating has been observed. Plasma densities up to about 10 12 cm -3 were obtained with noninductive startup solely with HHFW. New ST diagnostics under development on CDX-U include a multilayer mirror (MLM) detector to measure ultrasoft X-rays, a twelve spatial point Thomson scattering (TS) system, and an Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) system for both electron heating and electron temperature measurements. Preliminary experiments with a boron low velocity edge micropellet injector have also been performed, and further studies of its effectiveness for impurity control will be conducted with a variety of spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics on CDX-U. (author)

  15. High frequency fast wave results from the CDX-U spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    1999-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) is the first spherical torus (ST) to investigate radio frequency (RF) heating and current drive. To address the concern that large magnetic field line pitch at the outboard midplane of ST's could inhibit successful coupling to the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW), a rotatable, two strap antenna was installed on CDX-U. Parasitic loading and impurity generation were discovered to be weak and nearly independent of antenna phasing and angle over a wide range, and fast wave electron heating has been observed. Plasma densities up to about 10 12 cm -3 were obtained with noninductive startup solely with HHFW. New ST diagnostics under development on CDX-U include a multilayer mirror (MLM) detector to measure ultrasoft X-rays, a twelve spatial point Thomson scattering (TS) system, and an Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) system for both electron heating and electron temperature measurements. Preliminary experiments with a boron low velocity edge micropellet injector have also been performed, and further studies of its effectiveness for impurity control will be conducted with a variety of spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics on CDX-U. (author)

  16. Extremely low recycling and high power density handling in CDX-U lithium experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Gray, T.; Kugel, H.; Lynch, T.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical tokamak is to investigate lithium as a plasma-facing component (PFC). The latest CDX-U experiments used a combination of a toroidal liquid lithium limiter and lithium wall coatings applied between plasma shots. Recycling coefficients for these plasmas were deduced to be 30% or below, and are the lowest ever observed in magnetically-confined plasmas. The corresponding energy confinement times showed nearly a factor of six improvement over discharges without lithium PFC's. An electron beam (e-beam) for evaporating lithium from the toroidal limiter was one of the techniques used to create lithium wall coatings in CDX-U. The evaporation was not localized to the e-beam spot, but occurred only after the entire volume of lithium in toroidal limiter was liquefied. This demonstration of the ability of lithium to handle high heat loads can have significant consequences for PFC's in future burning plasma devices

  17. Mode-converted electron Bernstein wave emission research on CDX-U and NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Hosea, J.C; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Spaleta, J.; Wilson, J.R.; Wilgen, J.B.; Bell, G.L.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Ram, A.K.; Bers, A.; Harvey, R.W.; Smirnov, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) may enable electron temperature profile measurements and local electron heating and current drive in high β overdense (ω pe /ω ce >>1) plasmas. Significant results are presented from the measurement of X-mode radiation, converted from EBWs observed normal to the magnetic field on the mid-plane of overdense plasmas in CDX-U and NSTX. A radially scannable, in-vessel, quad-ridged antenna and Langmuir probe array on CDX-U studied EBW to X-mode conversion. A local limiter optimized the conversion efficiency by modifying the density scale length at the mode conversion layer. The fundamental EBW conversion efficiency increased, by an order of magnitude, to ∼100% when the local limiter and antenna were inserted near the conversion layer. This technique can be extended to large, high temperature devices. Another significant observation was that the EBW emission source was localized near the electron cyclotron resonance. As a result, mode-converted EBW radiometry has measured radial transport in CDX-U. In addition, a threefold increase in conversion efficiency was observed at the L to H transition in NSTX. Measured conversion efficiency agreed well with theoretical predictions. EBW ray tracing and bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck codes are being used to model EBW heating and current drive scenarios for NSTX equilibria with β up to 40%. So far, results show that it is possible to drive localized currents on the high field side of the magnetic axis in NSTX at β ∼ 12% with current drive efficiency which compares favorably with ECCD. (authors)

  18. CDX-U Operation with a Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Majeski; M. Boaz; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; R. Kaita; H. Kugel; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Timberlake; L. Zakharov; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R.W. Conn; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; R. Maingi; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-01

    The Current Drive experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has begun experiments with a fully toroidal liquid lithium limiter. CDX-U is a compact [R = 34 cm, a = 22 cm, B(subscript)toroidal = 2 kG, I(subscript)P = 100 kA, T(subscript)e(0) ∼ 100 eV, n(subscript)e(0) ∼ 5 x 10 19 m -3 ] short-pulse (<25 msec) spherical torus with extensive diagnostics. The limiter, which consists of a shallow circular stainless steel tray of radius 34 cm and width 10 cm, can be filled with lithium to a depth of a few millimeters, and forms the lower limiting surface for the discharge. Heating elements beneath the tray are used to liquefy the lithium prior to the experiment. Surface coatings are evident on part of the lithium. Despite the surface coatings, tokamak discharges operated in contact with the lithium-filled tray show evidence of reduced impurities and recycling. The reduction in recycling is largest when the lithium is liquefied by heating to 250 degrees Celsius

  19. Multilayer mirror and foil filter AXUV diode arrays on CDX-U spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Stutman, D.; Iovea, M.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.; Munsat, T.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2001-01-01

    Recent upgrades to CDX-U spherical torus diagnostics include two 10-channel AXUV diode arrays. The multilayer mirror (MLM) array measures the λ150 O VI brightness profile in the poloidal plane using the Mo/B 4 C synthetic multilayer structures as dispersive elements. The foil filter array has a tangential view and is equipped with interchangeable clear aperture, beryllium and titanium filters. This allows measurements of radiated power, O VI or C V radial distributions, respectively. The O VI and C V emissivity and the radiated power profiles are highly peaked. A Neoclassical impurity accumulation mechanism is considered as an explanation. For radiated power measurements in the T e ≤100 eV plasmas, photon energy dependent corrections must be used in order to account for nonlinear AXUV sensitivity in the range E phot ≤20 eV. The arrays are also used for characterization of resistive MHD phenomena, such as the low m modes, saw-tooth oscillations and internal reconnection events. Based on the successful operation of the diagnostics, a new ultra soft x-ray multilayer mirror diode AXUV diode array monitoring the 34 Aa emissivity distribution of C VI will be built and installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

  20. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance

  1. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith

    2002-01-18

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

  2. Studies of non-inductive current drive in the CDX-U tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.S.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of novel, non-inductive current drive concepts for starting-up and maintaining tokamak discharges, dc-helicity injection and internally-generated pressure-driven currents, have been developed on the CDX-U tokamak. To study the equilibrium and transport of these plasmas, a full set of magnetic diagnostics was installed. By applying a finite element method and a least squares error fitting technique, internal plasma current distributions are reconstructed from the measurements. Electron density distributions were obtained from 2 mm interferometer measurements by a similar least squares error technique utilizing magnetic flux configurations obtained by the magnetic analysis. Neoclassical pressure-driven currents in ECH plasmas are modeled with the reconstructed magnetic structure, using the electron density distribution and the electron temperature profile measured by a Langmuir probe. In the dc-helicity injection scheme, the need to increase injection current and maintain plasma equilibrium restricts possible arrangements. Several injection configurations were investigated, with the best found to be outside injection with a single divertor configuration, where the cathode is placed at the low field side of the x-point. Both pressure-driven and dc-helicity injected tokamaks show the importance of plasma equilibrium in obtaining high plasma current. Programmed vertical field operation has proven to be very important in achieving high plasma current. These non-inductive current drive techniques show great potential as efficient current drive methods for future steady-state and/or long-pulse fusion reactors

  3. Los Alamos Spheromak Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, S.O.; Barnes, C.W.; Fernandez, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos Spheromak Program consists of two experimental facilities. The confinement physics of sustained and decaying spheromaks are being studied in CTX, which has an extensive array of diagnostics. Experiments are directed towards extending the physics understanding of the spheromak as a magnetic confinement concept. Electrodes for the production of clean sustained spheromaks are developed on the Electrode Facility, which is more flexible in terms of experimental modifications. Improvements to helicity sources and elecrodes which are proven on the Electrode Facility are then considered for incorporation onto CTX

  4. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    2001-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e >100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  5. Sustained spheromak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    1999-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, will study spheromak physics with particular attention to energy confinement and magnetic fluctuations in a spheromak sustained by electrostatic helicity injection. In order to operate in a low collisionality mode, requiring T e > 100 eV, vacuum techniques developed for tokamaks will be applied, and a divertor will be used for the first time in a spheromak. The discharge will operate for pulse lengths of several milliseconds, long compared to the time to establish a steady-state equilibrium but short compared to the L/R time of the flux conserver. The spheromak and helicity injector ('gun') are closely coupled, as shown by an ideal MHD model with force-free injector and edge plasmas. The current from the gun passes along the symmetry axis of the spheromak, and the resulting toroidal magnetic field causes the safety factor, q, to diverge on the separatrix. The q-profile depends on the ratio of the injector current to spheromak current and on the magnetic flux coupling the injector to the spheromak. New diagnostics include magnetic field measurements by a reflectometer operating in combined O- and X-modes and by a transient internal probe (TIP). (author)

  6. Sustained spheromak technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Hoida, H.W.; Henins, I.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to devise a technique for driving a spheromak using dc-powered electrodes. The reduction or elimination of pulsed power components in the spheromak source would result in more attractive reactors, and simpler, cheaper experiments. This is important as experiments get larger and approach reactor size. According to some concepts, the dc spheromak would operate with plasma injection so that it would clean up any impurities produced during its formation. These features make the investigation of dc-powered spheromaks interesting. The questions that need to be answered in this investigation are: (1) can a spheromak be sustained by a dc source; and (2) can a practical source be designed to produce a hot clean plasma. After summarizing the evidence which suggests an answer to question one, the approach being taken to answer question two is discussed.

  7. Sustained spheromak technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Hoida, H.W.; Henins, I.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of these experiments is to devise a technique for driving a spheromak using dc-powered electrodes. The reduction or elimination of pulsed power components in the spheromak source would result in more attractive reactors, and simpler, cheaper experiments. This is important as experiments get larger and approach reactor size. According to some concepts, the dc spheromak would operate with plasma injection so that it would clean up any impurities produced during its formation. These features make the investigation of dc-powered spheromaks interesting. The questions that need to be answered in this investigation are: (1) can a spheromak be sustained by a dc source; and (2) can a practical source be designed to produce a hot clean plasma. After summarizing the evidence which suggests an answer to question one, the approach being taken to answer question two is discussed

  8. Steady-state spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    A major effort is being made in the national program to make the operation of axisymmetric, toroidal confinement systems steady state by the application of expensive rf current drive. Described here is a method by which such a confinement system, the spheromak, can be refluxed indefinitely through the application of dc power. As a step towards dc sustainment we have operated the present CTX source in the slow source mode with a longer power application time (approx. 0.1 ms) and successfully generated long-lived spheromaks. If the erosion of the electrodes can be controlled as well as it is with MPD arcs then dc operation should be very clean. If only a small fraction (approx. 10% for an experiment) of the poloidal flux of the spheromak connects to the source then the dc sustainment can be very efficient. The amount of connecting flux that is necessary for sustainment needs to be determined experimentally

  9. Spheromak Physics Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-01-01

    The spheromak is a Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) configuration, which is a leading alternative to the tokamak. It has a simple geometry which offers an opportunity to achieve the promise of fusion energy if the physics of confinement, current drive, and pressure holding capability extrapolate favorably to a reactor. Recent changes in the US MFE program, taken in response to budget constraints and programmatic directions from Congress, include a revitalization of an experimental alternative concept effort. Detailed studies of the spheromak were consequently undertaken to examine the major physics issues which need to be resolved to advance it as a fusion plasma, the optimum configuration for an advanced experiment, and its potential as a reactor. As a result of this study, we conclude that it is important to evaluate several physics issues experimentally. Such an experiment might be appropriately be named the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). It would address several critical issues, the solution to which will provide the physics basis to enable an advanced experiment. The specific scientific goals of SSPX would be to: * Demonstrate that electron and ion temperatures of a few hundred electron volts can be achieved in a steady-state spheromak plasma sustained by a magnetic dynamo (''helicity injection''). * Relate energy confinement quantitatively to the magnetic turbulence accompanying the dynamo and use this knowledge to optimize performance. * Measure the magnetic field profiles and magnetic turbulence in the plasma and relate these to the science of the magnetic dynamo which drives the current in the plasma. * Examine experimentally the pressure holding capability (''beta limit'') of the spheromak. * Understand the initial phases of the transition of the plasma from an equilibrium supported by a magnetic-flux conserving wall to one supported by external coils

  10. Advanced spheromak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    The spheromak has no toroidal magnetic field coils or other structure along its geometric axis, and is thus more attractive than the leading magnetic fusion reactor concept, the tokamak. As a consequence of this and other attributes, the spheromak reactor may be compact and produce a power density sufficiently high to warrant consideration of a liquid 'blanket' that breeds tritium, converts neutron kinetic energy to heat, and protects the reactor vessel from severe neutron damage. However, the physics is more complex, so that considerable research is required to learn how to achieve the reactor potential. Critical physics problems and possible ways of solving them are described. The opportunities and issues associated with a possible liquid wall are considered to direct future research

  11. Stellarator-Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-03-01

    A novel concept for magnetic plasma confinement, Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP), is proposed. Numerical analysis with the classical-stellarator-type outboard stellarator windings demonstrates a number of potential advantages of SSP for controlled nuclear fusion. Among the main ones are: simple and compact magnet coil configuration, absence of material structures (e.g. magnet coils or conducting walls) in the center of the torus, high rotational transform, and a possibility of MHD equilibria with very high β (pressure/magnetic pressure) of the confined plasma

  12. Review of spheromak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    Spheromak research from 1979 to the present is reviewed including over 160 references. Emphasis is on understanding and interpretation of results. In addition to summarizing results some new interpretations are presented. An introduction and brief history is followed by a discussion of generalized helicity and its time derivative. Formation and sustainment are discussed including five different methods, flux core, θ-pinch z-pinch, coaxial source, conical θ-pinch, and kinked z-pinch. All methods are helicity injections. Steady-state methods and rules for designing spheromak experiments are covered, followed by equilibrium and stability. Methods of stabilizing the tilt and shift modes are discussed as well as their impact on the reactor designs. Current-driven and pressure-driven instabilities as well as relaxation in general are covered. Energy confinement is discussed in terms of helicity decay time and βs limits. The confinement in high and low open-flux geometries are compared and the reactor implications discussed. (author)

  13. Theoretical issues in Spheromak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R. H.; Hooper, E.B.; LoDestro, L.L.; Mattor, N.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of theoretical knowledge of several physics issues important to the spheromak. It was prepared as part of the preparation for the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX), which addresses these goals: energy confinement and the physics which determines it; the physics of transition from a short-pulsed experiment, in which the equilibrium and stability are determined by a conducting wall (''''flux conserver'''') to one in which the equilibrium is supported by external coils. Physics is examined in this report in four important areas. The status of present theoretical understanding is reviewed, physics which needs to be addressed more fully is identified, and tools which are available or require more development are described. Specifically, the topics include: MHD equilibrium and design, review of MHD stability, spheromak dynamo, and edge plasma in spheromaks

  14. Spheromak type plasma experiment apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, Kiyoyuki; Miyauchi, Yasuyuki; Oomura, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    The fusion power reactor which is expected to be the most promising energy has been developed for several plasma confinement systems. Under these circumstances, Spheromak configuration has recently attracted attention because of its simple structure and efficient plasma confinement. This apparatus was ordered by the Engineering Department of University of Tokyo for basic studies of the Spheromak plasma confinement technologies. This forms Spheromak plasma according to the induction discharge system which injects this plasma with magnetic energy generated by a toroidal current in the plasma and discharges the current through the electrical feed through. Toroidal current is induced by the poloidal coil in the vessel. We worked together with the researchers of University of Tokyo to conduct experiments and confirmed the formation and confinement of Spheromak plasma in the initial test. (author)

  15. Spheromak Merging Experiments on SSX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. R.; Kornack, T. W.; Sollins, P. K.; Luh, W. J.

    1997-11-01

    Spheromak merging experiments are underway at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) at Swarthmore College. The spheromaks are formed by identical magnetized plasma guns and equilibrium is established in close fitting 0.5 m diameter copper flux conservers. Partial merging is achieved through openings in the back wall. We observe the formation of a reconnection boundary layer at the interface of the two spheromaks using a linear probe array. The characteristic scale of the flux reversal is about 1 cm (consistent with the diffusion scale δ_diff, the ion Larmor radius ρi and the ion inertial length c/ω_pi). Movies of the formation and evolution of the layer will be presented. Correlations between reconnection events and pulses of soft x-rays and energetic particles will be presented if available. Plans for 2D and 3D imaging of the layer will also be discussed.

  16. Sustained spheromak experiments in CTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Linford, R.K.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    So far, spheromaks can be sustained as long as the source is injecting helicity. When the injection stops the configuration decays. Spheromks have been sustained for more than 1 ms with total lifetimes of more than 2 ms. The physical properties of the sustained spheromak are under investigation in this paper. Preliminary data indicate that (B) approx. = 2 kG, n approx. = 2 x 10 14 -cm -3 and T /sub e/ approx. = 20-30 eV. An helicity decay rate is determined from the ratio of an estimate of the helicity content of the spheromak and the rate of helicity flow from the source. In the coaxial source geometry a constant value of poloidal flux /PHI/ /sub p/ is placed inside the center electrode. By applying a voltage V between the two electrodes toroidal flux is injected (/PHI/ /sub t/ =V) which links the poloidal flux. The rate of helicity injection is then 2V/PHI/ /sub p/ . The helicity content of the spheromak is estimated by measuring the fields at one point and using the model described above to calculate the profiles. The result is that /TAU/ /sub Hel/ approx. = 200 us. This value is about the same as the /TAU/ /sub B/ 2 of a decaying spheromak with similar parameters. These results indicate that helicity injection is possible and that a large fraction (30-100%) of the injected helicity is absorbed

  17. Stellarmak a hybrid stellarator: Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses hybridization of modified Stellarator-like transform windings (T-windings) with a Spheromak or Field-Reversed-Mirror configuration. This configuration, Stellarmak, retains the important topological advantage of the Spheromak or FRM of having no plasma linking conductors or blankets. The T-windings provide rotational transformation in toroidal angle of the outer poloidal field lines, in effect creating a reversed B/sub Toroidal/ Spheromak or adding average B/sub T/ to the FRM producing higher shear, increased limiting β, and possibly greater stability to kinks and tilt. The presence of field ripple in the toroidal direction may be sufficient to inhibit cancellation of directed ion current by electron drag to allow steady state operation with the toroidal as well as poloidal current maintained by neutral beams

  18. A new diagnostic for spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission from a spheromak plasma may be able to provide information about the confining magnetic field of the system. Emission generated in the extraordinary mode wit hits electric vector perpendicular to the local magnetic field at sufficiently high frequency will propagate out of the plasma while retaining the original orientation if its electric vector. Thus, a measurement of the orientation of the emergent electric vector and the emission frequency will allow one to deduce the orientation and strength of the magnetic field at the radiation source. In this paper, simple models of the Maryland spheromak are used to examine the practicality of such a diagnostic

  19. All plasma spheromak: the plasmak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koloc, P.; Ogden, J.

    1981-01-01

    There has been an evolutionary pattern established in magnetic fusion concepts. The flow in ideas follows three directions. By extrapolating this evolutionary movement, we have anticipated the concept called Spheromak and have predicted the omega of this evolution which is called PLASMAK, or Plasma Spheromak. The evolutionary directions are from open systems to closed systems, from zero or low dimensional compression schemes to three dimensional compression, and finally from plasma configurations without any self confining currents to a plasma configuration which is completely self confined except for the mechanical pressure necessary to maintain the verticle field and hoop stress. Nevertheless, the plasma is imprisoned by heavy poloidal coils and a vacuum wall

  20. Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment is proposed for experimental studies of spheromak confinement issues in a controlled way: in steady state relative to the confinement timescale and at low collisionality. Experiments in a flux - conserver will provide data on transport in the presence of resistive modes in shear-stabilized systems and establish operating regimes which pave the way for true steady-state experiments with the equilibrium field supplied by external coils. The proposal is based on analysis of past experiments, including the achievement of T e = 400 eV in a decaying spheromak in CTX. Electrostatic helicity injection from a coaxial ''''gun'''' into a shaped flux conserver will form and sustain the plasma for several milliseconds. The flux conserver minimizes fluxline intersection with the walls and provides MHD stability. Improvements from previous experiments include modem wall conditioning (especially boronization), a divertor for density and impurity control, and a bias magnetic flux for configurational flexibility. The bias flux will provide innovative experimental opportunities, including testing helicity drive on the large-radius plasma boundary. Diagnostics include Thomson scattering for T e measurements and ultra-short pulse reflectrometry to measure density and magnetic field profiles and turbulence. We expect to operate at T e of several hundred eV, allowing improved understanding of energy and current transport due to resistive MHD turbulence during sustained operation. This will provide an exciting advance in spheromak physics and a firm basis for future experiments in the fusion regime

  1. Spheromak Impedance and Current Amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T K; Hua, D D; Stallard, B W

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that high current amplification can be achieved only by injecting helicity on the timescale for reconnection, τ REC , which determines the effective impedance of the spheromak. An approximate equation for current amplification is: dI TOR 2 /dt ∼ I 2 /τ REC - I TOR 2 /τ closed where I is the gun current, I TOR is the spheromak toroidal current and τ CLOSED is the ohmic decay time of the spheromak. Achieving high current amplification, I TOR >> I, requires τ REC CLOSED . For resistive reconnection, this requires reconnection in a cold zone feeding helicity into a hot zone. Here we propose an impedance model based on these ideas in a form that can be implemented in the Corsica-based helicity transport code. The most important feature of the model is the possibility that τ REC actually increases as the spheromak temperature increases, perhaps accounting for the ''voltage sag'' observed in some experiments, and a tendency toward a constant ratio of field to current, B ∝ I, or I TOR ∼ I. Program implications are discussed

  2. Prospects for spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.; Hua, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    The reactor study of Hagenson and Krakowski demonstrated the attractiveness of the spheromak as a compact fusion reactor, based on physics principles confirmed in CTX experiments in many respects. Most uncertain was the energy confinement time and the role of magnetic turbulence inherent in the concept. In this paper, a one-dimensional model of heat confinement, calibrated by CTX, predicts negligible heat loss by magnetic turbulence at reactor scale

  3. High aspect ratio spheromak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, S.; Schmid, P.

    1987-05-01

    The Reversatron RFP (R/a = 50cm/8cm) has been operated as an ohmically heated spheromak of high aspect ratio. We find that the dynamo can drive the toroidal field upward at rates as high as 10 6 G/sec. Discharges can be initiated and ramped upward from seed fields as low as 50 G. Small toroidal bias fields of either polarity (-0.2 < F < 0.2) do not significantly affect operation. 5 refs., 3 figs

  4. Spheromak formation studies in SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.N.; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.L.; Hooper, E.B.; LoDestro, L.L.; Mattor, N.; McLean, H.S.; Moller, J.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Ryutov, D.D.; Stallard, B.W.; Wood, R.D.; Woodruff, S.; Holcomb, C.T.; Jarboe, T.; Sovinec, C.R.; Wang, Z.; Wurden, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present results from the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) at LLNL, which has been built to study energy confinement in spheromak plasmas sustained for up to 2 ms by coaxial DC helicity injection. Peak toroidal currents as high as 600kA have been obtained in the 1m dia. (0.23m minor radius) device using injection currents between 200-400kA; these currents generate edge poloidal fields in the range of 0.2-0.4T. The internal field and current profiles are inferred from edge field measurements using the CORSICA code. Density and impurity control is obtained using baking, glow discharge cleansing, and titanium gettering, after which long plasma decay times (τ (ge) 1.5ms) are observed and impurity radiation losses are reduced from ∼50% to e (0)∼120eV and β e ∼7%. Edge field measurements show the presence of n=1 modes during the formation phase, as has been observed in other spheromaks. This mode dies away during sustainment and decay so that edge fluctuation levels as low as 1% have been measured. These results are compared with numerical simulations using the NIMROD code

  5. Particle diffusion in a spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Levinton, F.M.; Yamada, M.

    1988-01-01

    The local carbon particle diffusion coefficient was measured in the Proto S-1/C spheromak using a test particle injection scheme. When the plasma was not in a force-free Taylor state, and when there were pressure gradients in the plasma, the particle diffusion was five times that predicted by Bohm and was consistent with collisional drift wave diffusion. The diffusion appears to be driven by correlations of the fluctuating electric field and density. During the decay phase of the discharge when the plasma was in the Taylor state, the diffusion coefficient of the carbon was classical. 23 refs., 4 figs

  6. Development of the STPX Spheromak System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. L.; Clark, J.; Weatherford, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    The progress made in starting up the STPX Spheromak system, which is now installed at the Florida A&M University, is reviewed. Experimental, computational and theoretical activities are underway. The control system for firing the magnetized coaxial plasma gun and for collecting data from the diagnostic probes, based on LabView, is being tested and adapted. Preliminary results of testing the installed magnetic field probes, Langmuir triple probes, cylindrical ion probes, and optical diagnostics will be discussed. Progress in modeling this spheromak using simulation codes, such as NIMROD, will be discussed. Progress in investigating the use of algebraic topology to describe this spheromak will be reported.

  7. Structure of Maryland Spheromak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, R.; Chinfatt, C.; Cote, C.; DeSilva, A.; Filuk, A.; Goldenbaum, G.; Gauvreau, J.; Hwang, Fukwun

    1990-01-01

    Recent efforts on the Maryland Spheromak (MS) have concentrated on detailed measurement of magnetic field structures in order to better understand the formation and evolution of the spheromak configuration. These efforts were prompted by results showing a very rapid decay of the magnetic field under certain conditions. It was not known if this loss was a rapid movement of the plasma to the walls of the vacuum vessel, or by some mechanism causing a rapid decay of a more or less stationary field. To investigate the magnetic field structure in more detail, an array of magnetic probes was built that could be moved from shot to shot so as to acquire a complete map of the three magnetic field components in a plane containing the symmetry axis of the machine. Data taken with these probes in a case where the rapid loss of field occurs is given. Further analysis of the data shows that the instability that forms is a combination of tilt and shift. The initial asymmetry of the magnetic field is possibly due to the non-symmetric configuration of the reversal field coils, or the non-symmetric cabling to the I z electrodes. Future work will concentrate on eliminating the initial plasma asymmetry by eliminating any asymmetries in the machine, and on stopping the tilt/shift instability by different configurations for the passive stabilization coils

  8. Progress in the SSPX Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, H S; Woodruff, S; Hill, D N; Bulmer, R H; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; Moller, J; Ryutov, D D; Stallard, B W; Wood, R D; Holcomb, C T; Jarboe, T R; Romero-Talamas, C

    2003-01-01

    The spheromak, with its simply connected geometry, holds promise as a less expensive fusion reactor. It has reasonably good plasma beta and can be formed and sustained in steady state with a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) shown in Fig. 1 was constructed to investigate the key issues of magnetic field generation and energy confinement. In addition to the coaxial gun, nine magnetic field coils are utilized to shape the vacuum magnetic flux. This flexibility allows operation in many different regimes producing very different plasma characteristics. Pulse length is extended and magnetic field strength is increased. Improved surface conditioning produces plasmas with low impurity content, and higher electron temperature, T e . Electron heat transport within the separatrix is reduced by a factor of 4. The results strongly suggest the existence of closed flux surfaces even though the plasma is connected to the coaxial source. The CORSICA Grad-Shafranov 2-d equilibrium code with data from edge magnetic probes along with T e and electron density ne from Thomson scattering is used to calculate internal profiles: normalized current γ = μ 0 J/B, safety factor = q, ohmic heating, thermal energy density, and thermal diffusivity = ξ e . Ohmic heating is calculated by assuming spatially constant Spitzer resistivity with Z eff =2.3 estimated by VUV spectroscopy

  9. Scaling studies of spheromak formation and equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.; Kornack, T.W.; Brown, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Formation and equilibrium studies have been performed on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Spheromaks are formed with a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and equilibrium is established in both small (d small =0.16 m) and large (d large =3d small =0.50 m) copper flux conservers. Using magnetic probe arrays it has been verified that spheromak formation is governed solely by gun physics (in particular the ratio of gun current to flux, μ 0 I gun /Φ gun ) and is independent of the flux conserver dimensions. It has also been verified that equilibrium is well described by the force free condition ∇xB=λB (λ=constant), particularly early in decay. Departures from the force-free state are due to current profile effects described by a quadratic function λ=λ(ψ). Force-free SSX spheromaks will be merged to study magnetic reconnection in simple magnetofluid structures. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Spheromak tilting and its stability control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Sato, T.

    1983-01-01

    Spheromak tilting instability was studied. A numerical technique to create a rather arbitrarily-shaped spheromak like the one with a flux hole was investigated. The dynamics governing the tilting instability, namely, the influence of the magnetic index, the toroidal current (q-profile) and the resistivity upon the tilting growth rate, and the roles of magnetc reconnection upon the nonlinear development were studied. The best way to control the tilting instability was invented. The stabilizing effects of the vertical wall, the isolated conducting cylindrical belt, and the horizontal wall were studied. Central pole stabilization was also investigated. The influence of the wall condition, namely, whether the wall acted as a flux conserver in the spheromak creation stage or not is discussed. The present study has shown that the three- dimensional simulation is indeed useful and practical in not only studying the underlying physics but also finding a stabilization technique of spheromaks. (Kato, T.)

  11. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  12. The Spheromak path to fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Barnes, C.W.; Bellan, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The spheromak is a simple and robust magnetofluid configuration with several attractive reactor attributes including compact geometry, no material center post, high engineering β, and sustained steady state operation through helicity injection. Spheromak physics was extensively studied in the US program and abroad (especially Japan) in the 1980' s with work continuing into the 1990s in Japan and the UK. Scientific results included demonstration of self-organization at constant helicity, control of the tilt and shift modes by shaped flux conservers, elucidation of the role of magnetic reconnection in the magnetic dynamo, and sustainment of a spheromak by helicity injection. Several groups attained electron temperatures above 100 eV in decaying plasmas, with CTX reaching 400 eV. This experiment had high magnetic field (>l T on the edge and ∼ 3 T near the symmetry axis) and good confinement. More recently, analysis of CTX found the energy confinement in the plasma core to be consistent with Rechester-Rosenbluth transport in a fluctuating magnetic field, potentially scaling to good confinement at higher electron temperatures. The SPHEX group developed an understanding of the dynamo in sustained spheromaks but in a relatively cold device. These and other physics results provide a foundation for a new ''concept exploration'' experiment to study the physics of a hot, sustained spheromak. If successful, this work leads to a next generation, proof-of-principle program. The new SSPX experiment will address the physics of a large-scale sustained spheromak in a national laboratory (LLNL) setting. The key issue in near term spheromak research will be to explore the possibly deleterious effects of sustainment on confinement. Other important issues include exploring the β scaling of confinement, scaling with Lundquist number S, and determining the need for active current-profile control. Collaborators from universities and other national laboratories are contributing

  13. Particle confinement and fueling effects on the Maryland spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filuk, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The spheromak plasma confinement concept provides the opportunity to study the evolution of a nearly force-free magnetic field configuration. The plasma currents and magnetic fields are produced self-consistently, making this type of device attractive as a possible fusion reactor. At present, spheromaks are observed to have poorer particle and magnetic confinement than expected from simple theory. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of plasma density in the decay of spheromaks produced in the Maryland Spheromak experiment. Density measurements are made with an interferometer and Langmuir probe, and results are correlated with those of other plasma diagnostics to understand the sources of plasma, the spheromak formation effects on the density, and the magnitude of particle loss during the spheromak decay. A power and particle balance computer model is constructed and applied to the spheromaks studied in order to assess the impact of high density and particle loss rate on the spheromak decay. The observations and model indicate that the decay of the spheromaks is at present dominated by impurity radiation loss. The model also predicts that high density and short particle confinement time play a critical role in the spheromak power balance when the impurity levels are reduced

  14. Steady-state spheromak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    After summarizing the essential elements of a gun-sustained spheromak, the potential for a steady-state is explored by means of a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model. A range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported

  15. Model predictions for auxiliary heating in spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauler, T.K.; Khua, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the plasma temperature waited for under auxiliary heating in spheromaks. A model, ensuring good agreement of earlier experiments with joule heating results, is used. The model includes heat losses due to magnetic fluctuations and shows that the plasma temperatures of the kilo-electron-volt order may be achieved in a small device with the radius of 0.3 m only

  16. Simulation of Spheromak Evolution and Energy Confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B; Hooper, E; Cohen, R; Hill, D; McLean, H; Wood, R; Woodruff, S; Sovinec, C; Cone, G

    2004-01-01

    Simulation results are presented that illustrate the formation and decay of a spheromak plasma driven by a coaxial electrostatic plasma gun, and that model the energy confinement of the plasma. The physics of magnetic reconnection during spheromak formation is also illuminated. The simulations are performed with the three-dimensional, time-dependent, resistive magnetohydrodynamic NIMROD code. The simulation results are compared to data from the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The simulation results are tracking the experiment with increasing fidelity (e.g., improved agreement with measurements of the magnetic field, fluctuation amplitudes, and electron temperature) as the simulation has been improved in its representations of the geometry of the experiment (plasma gun and flux conserver), the magnetic bias coils, and the detailed time dependence of the current source driving the plasma gun, and uses realistic parameters. The simulations are providing a better understanding of the dominant physics in SSPX, including when the flux surfaces close and the mechanisms limiting the efficiency of electrostatic drive

  17. Simulation of Spheromak Evolution and Energy Confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.; Hooper, E.; Cohen, R.; Hill, D.; McLean, H.; Wood, R.; Woodruff, S.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation results are presented that illustrate the formation and decay of a spheromak plasma driven by a coaxial electrostatic plasma gun, and that model the energy confinement of the plasma. The physics of magnetic reconnection during spheromak formation is also illuminated. The simulations are performed with the three-dimensional, time-dependent, resistive magnetohydrodynamic NIMROD code. The dimensional, simulation results are compared to data from the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The simulation results are tracking the experiment with increasing fidelity (e.g., improved agreement with measurements of the magnetic field, fluctuation amplitudes, and electron temperature) as the simulation has been improved in its representations of the geometry of the experiment (plasma gun and flux conserver), the magnetic bias coils, and the detailed time dependence of the current source driving the plasma gun, and uses realistic parameters. The simulations are providing a better understanding of the dominant physics in SSPX, including when the flux surfaces close and the mechanisms limiting the efficiency of electrostatic drive

  18. Increased particle confinement with the use of external dc bias field in the CTX spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Hoida, H.W.; Henins, I.; Fernandez, J.C.; Jarboe, T.R.; Marklin, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Spheromaks are formed in a mesh flux conserver in the presence of an external dc bias field. The spheromaks remain stable to tilt instabilities with ratios of bias-to-spheromak flux of up to 47 +- 7%. Normally applied bias flux puts the spheromak separatrix inside the metal mesh and improves the particle confinement

  19. Final Report Sustained Spheromak Physics Project FY 1997 - FY 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Hill, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report on the LDRD SI-funded Sustained Spheromak Physics Project for the years FY1997-FY1999, during which the SSPX spheromak was designed, built, and commissioned for operation at LLNL. The specific LDRD project covered in this report concerns the development, installation, and operation of specialized hardware and diagnostics for use on the SSPX facility in order to study energy confinement in a sustained spheromak plasma configuration. The USDOE Office of Fusion Energy Science funded the construction and routine operation of the SSPX facility. The main distinctive feature of the spheromak is that currents in the plasma itself produce the confining toroidal magnetic field, rather than external coils, which necessarily thread the vacuum vessel. There main objective of the Sustained Spheromak Physics Project was to test whether sufficient energy confinement could be maintained in a spheromak plasma sustained by DC helicity injection. Achieving central electron temperatures of several hundred eV would indicate this. In addition, we set out to determine how the energy confinement scales with T c and to relate the confinement time to the level of internal magnetic turbulence. Energy confinement and its scaling are the central technical issues for the spheromak as a fusion reactor concept. Pending the outcome of energy confinement studies now under way, the spheromak could be the basis for an attractive fusion reactor because of its compact size, simply-connected magnetic geometry, and potential for steady-state current drive

  20. Magnetic Reconnection Results on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornack, T. W.; Sollins, P. K.; Brown, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Linear and 2D arrays of magnetic probes are used to study magnetic reconnection in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Opposing coaxial plasma guns form two identical spheromaks into adjacent 0.5 m diameter copper flux conservers. The flux conservers have symmetrical openings that allow the spheromaks to merge in a controlled manner. The stable equilibrium of the spheromaks provides a reservoir of magnetic flux for reconnection experiments. Currently, the magnetic configuration of the spheromaks allows the study of counter-helicity reconnection. Preliminary analysis will be presented and may include 2D B field movies of the reconnection region, measurement of the reconnection rate and comparison to the Sweet-Parker and standard Petschek models.

  1. Current drive by spheromak injection into a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.R.; Bellan, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the first observation of current drive by spheromak injection into a tokamak due to the process of helicity injection. Current drive is observed in Caltech's ENCORE tokamak (30% increase, ΔI > 1 kA) only when both the tokamak and injected spheromak have the same sign of helicity (where helicity is defined as positive if current flows parallel to magnetic field lines and negative if anti-parallel). The initial increase (decrease) in current is accompanied by a sharp decrease (increase) in loop voltage and the increase in tokamak helicity is consistent with the helicity content of the injected spheromak. In addition, the injection of the spheromak raises the tokamak central density by a factor of six. The introduction of cold spheromak plasma causes sudden cooling of the tokamak discharge from 12 eV to 4 eV which results in a gradual decline in tokamak plasma current by a factor of three. In a second experiment, the authors inject spheromaks into the magnetized toroidal vacuum vessel (with no tokamak plasma). An m = 1 magnetic structure forms in the vessel after the spheromak undergoes a double tilt; once in the cylindrical entrance between gun and tokamak, then again in the tokamak vessel. A horizontal shift of the spheromak equilibrium is observed in the direction opposite that of the static toroidal field. In the absence of net toroidal flux, the structure develops a helical pitch as predicted by theory. Experiments with a number of refractory metal coatings have shown that tungsten and chrome coatings provide some improvement in spheromak parameters. They have also designed and will soon construct a larger, higher current spheromak gun with a new accelerator section for injection experiments on the Phaedrus-T tokamak

  2. Critical beta for analytical spheromak equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, E.M.; Clemente, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Mercier criterion is applied to two analytical spheromak equilibria, one with a spherical separatrix and the other with a cylindrical one of variable elongation. The maximum beta, defined as the ratio between the plasma pressure and the magnetic pressure averaged over the plasma volume, for which the criterion is satisfied on every magnetic surface, has been obtained. In the spherical model the critical beta is 0.003, while in the cylindrical case it is a function of the elongation of the separatrix with a maximum of 0.083. (author)

  3. Heat loss by helicity injection in spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    A model is presented for spheromak buildup and decay including thermal diffusivity associated with magnetic turbulence during helicity injection. It is shown that heat loss by magnetic turbulence scales more favorably than gyroBohm transport. Thus gyroBohm scaling for the proposed ignition experiment would be the conservative choice, though present experiments may be dominated by magnetic turbulence. Because of a change in boundary conditions when the gun is turned off, the model may account for the observed increase in electron temperature in CTX after turnoff

  4. Design of a spheromak compressor driven by high explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henins, I.; Fernandez, J.C.; Jarboe, T.R.; Marsh, S.P.; Marklin, G.J.; Mayo, R.M.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    High energy density spheromaks can be used to accelerate a thin section of the flux conserver wall to high velocities. The energy density of a spheromak, formed by conventional helicity injection into a flux conserver, can be increased by reducing the flux conserver volume after the spheromak is formed. A method of accomplishing this is by imploding one wall of the flux conserver with high explosives. The authors have embarked on a program to demonstrate that a spheromak can be used as an energy transfer medium, and that a velocity gain over high-explosive driven plate velocities can be achieved. To do this, a plasma gun helicity source that will inject a spheromak with suitable initial energy density and lifetime is needed. Also, an implodable flux conserver that remains intact and clean during the implosion must be developed. The flux conserver problem is probably the more challenging one, because very little experimental work has been done in the past on explosively driven metal plates into a high vacuum, with sizes and travel distances appropriate for their application. There are two necessary practical requirements for an explosive compression of a flux conserver. The first is that the imploding wall does not rupture. The second is that gasses or other debri are not ejected which could penetrate and poison the spheromak plasma, and thus reduce the spheromak lifetime below what is necessary to carry out the spheromak compression and the subsequent acceleration of the flyer plate. The authors have designed and fabricated a plasma gun to be used for injecting the initial spheromak plasma into the collapsible flux conserver

  5. Computational studies of ohmic heating in the spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Time-dependent computational simulations using both single-fluid O-D and two-fluid 1 1/2-D models are developed for and utilized in an investigation of the ohmic heating of a spheromak plasma. The plasma density and composition, the applied magnetic field strength, the plasma size, and the plasma current density profile are considered for their effects on the spheromak heating rate and maximum achievable temperature. The feasibility of ohmic ignition of a reactor-size spheromak plasma is also contemplated

  6. Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvreau, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP's and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 μs, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity

  7. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy

  8. The spheromak as a compact fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    After summarizing the economic and utility-based rationale for compact, higher-power-density fusion reactors, the gun-sustained spheromak concept is explored as one of a number of poloidal-field-dominated confinement configurations that might improve the prospects for economically attractive and operationally simplified fusion power plants. Using a comprehensive physics/engineering/costing model for the spheromak, guided by realistic engineering constraints and physics extrapolation, a range of cost-optimized reactor design points is presented, and the sensitivity of cost to key physics, engineering, and operational variables is reported. The results presented herein provide the basis for conceptual engineering designs of key fusion-power-core (FPC) subsystems and more detailed plasma modeling of this promising, high mass-power-density concept, which stresses single-piece FPC maintenance, steady-state current drive through electrostatic magnetic helicity injection, a simplified co-axial electrode-divertor, and efficient resistive-coal equilibrium-field coils. The optimal FPC size and the cost estimates project a system that competes aggressively with the best offered by alternative energy sources while simplifying considerably the complexity that has generally been associated with most approaches to magnetic fusion energy.

  9. Spheromak experiment using separate guns for formation and sustainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.R.; Martin, A.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment is described that incorporates the use of separate magnetized plasma guns for formation and sustainment of a spheromak. It is shown that energy coupling efficiency approaches unity if the gun and spheromak are of comparable size. A large gun should be able to operate at lower current and therefore lower voltage. In addition, it is expected that a gun matched to the size of the spheromak will cause less perturbation to the equilibrium. It is proposed to use a smaller gun for spheromak formation and a large, efficient gun for sustainment. The theoretical basis for the experiment is developed, and the details of the experiment are described. A prediction of the equilibrium magnetic flux surfaces using the EFIT code is presented. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Theory of the evolution of the decaying spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgro, A.G.; Marklin, G.; Mirin, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The strongly nonlinear dynamics present in decaying Spheromaks has been studied by various computational methods, demonstrating the tendency of the plasma to oscillate about or approach relaxed states and resulting in new insight into the significance of minimum energy states

  11. Effects of passive coils on spheromak gross MHD instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, C.; Janos, A.; Paul, S.; Wysocki, F.; Yamada, M.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental investigation of the effectiveness of figure-8 coils in stabilizing the n=1 tilting mode of spheromak plasmas in Proto S-1 A/B is extended. In addition, another coil configuration, the saddle coil, is examined

  12. Measurement of magnetic properties of confined compact toroid plasma (spheromak)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Fu-Kwun.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical aspect of the spheromak is described in this paper. The MS machine hardware will be explored along with the formation scheme and diagnostic systems. The magnetic pickup probes, their calibration procedures and the data analysis methods will be discussed. Observations from the probe measurements and magnetic properties of the MS spheromak are considered. The axisymmetric Grad-Shafranov equilibrium code calculations are presented and compared with the measurements. Magnetic helicity and its correlation with the experimental observations is described

  13. Investigations into the relationship between spheromak, solar, and astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellan, P.M.; Hsu, S.C.; Hansen, J.F.; Tokman, M.; Pracko, S.E.; Romero-Talamas, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Spheromaks offer the potential for a simple, low cost fusion reactor and involve physics similar to certain solar and astrophysical phenomena. A program to improve understanding of spheromaks by exploiting this relationship is underway using (i) a planar spheromak gun and (ii) a solar prominence simulator. These devices differ in symmetry but both involve spheromak technology whereby high-voltage is applied across electrodes linking a bias magnetic flux created by external coils. The planar spheromak gun consists of a co-planar disk and annulus linked by a poloidal bias field. Application of high voltage across the gap between disk and annulus drives a current along the bias field. If the current to flux ratio exceeds the inverse of the characteristic linear dimension, a spheromak is ejected. A distinct kink forms just below the ejection threshold. The solar simulation gun consists of two adjacent electromagnets which generate a 'horse-shoe' arched bias field. A current is driven along this arched field by a capacitor bank. The current channel first undergoes pinching, then writhes, and finally bulges outwards due to the hoop force. (author)

  14. Theory of edge plasma in a spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1998-01-01

    Properties of the edge plasma in the SSPX spheromak during the plasma formation and sustainment phases are discussed. For the breakdown and formation phase, the main emphasis is on the analysis of possible plasma contamination by impurities from the electrodes of the plasma gun (helicity injector). The issue of an azimuthally uniform breakdown initiation is also discussed. After the plasma settles down in the main vacuum chamber, one has to sustain the current between the electrodes, in order to continuously inject helicity. We discuss properties of the plasma on the field lines intersecting the electrodes. We conclude that the thermal balance of this plasma is maintained by Joule heating competing with parallel heat losses to the electrodes. The resulting plasma temperature is in the range of 15 - 30 eV. Under the expected operational conditions, the ''current'' velocity of the electrons is only slightly below their thermal velocity. Implications of this observation are briefly discussed

  15. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallard, B.W.; Hooper, E.B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R.H.; Hill, D.N.; McLean, H.S.; Wood, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX

  16. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T e and higher n e than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase

  17. Ohmic heating of a spheromak to 100 eV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Knox, S.O.; Linford, R.K.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    The first spheromaks with Thomson-scattering-measured electron temperatures of over 100 eV are described. The spheromak is generated by a magnetized coaxial plasma source in a background gas of 30 mTorr of H/sub 2/, and it is stably confined in an oblate 80 cm diam copper mesh flux conserver. The open mesh design allows rapid impurity transport out of the spheromak. The peak temperature, measured using multipoint Thomson scattering, is observed to rise from approximately 25 eV to over 100 eV in about 0.2 msec due to Ohmic heating from the decaying magnetic fields. Density (approx.5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/) and magnetic fields (approximately 2 kG) are measured using interferometry and magnetic probes.

  18. Ohmic heating of a spheromak to 100 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Knox, S.O.; Linford, R.K.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    The first spheromaks with Thomson-scattering-measured electron temperatures of over 100 eV are described. The spheromak is generated by a magnetized coaxial plasma source in a background gas of 30 mTorr of H 2 , and it is stably confined in an oblate 80 cm diam copper mesh flux conserver. The open mesh design allows rapid impurity transport out of the spheromak. The peak temperature, measured using multipoint Thomson scattering, is observed to rise from approximately 25 eV to over 100 eV in about 0.2 msec due to Ohmic heating from the decaying magnetic fields. Density (approx.5 x 10 13 cm -3 ) and magnetic fields (approximately 2 kG) are measured using interferometry and magnetic probes

  19. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Claude [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low Te and higher ne than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

  20. Re-examination of spheromak experiments and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.E.; Hammer, J.H.; Barnes, C.W.; Fernandez, J.C.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    The results of spheromak experiments are reexamined in light of the hypothesis that the core energy confinement is considerably better than the global confinement and that it extrapolates favorably with magnetic Reynolds number S. The data in decaying spheromaks are found to be consistent with the hypothesis and with magnetic fluctuations scaling as S -1/2 and determining the electron thermal conductivity. No conclusion is drawn from the data for sustained spheromaks, indicating the importance of a new experiment to determine core energy confinement while helicity is injected. The characteristics of such an experiment are discussed, including the importance of using modern vacuum and wall-conditioning techniques and of minimizing magnetic field errors. 44 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. Resistive stability of the cylindrical spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLucia, J.; Jardin, S.C.; Glasser, A.H.

    1983-11-01

    The growth rates for resistive instabilities in a straight circular cylinder with spheromak profiles are computed by using two complementary methods. The first method employs boundary layer analysis and asymptotic matching, most valid for values of the magnetic Reynolds number S greater than or equal to 10 5 . The second method solved the full linearized resistive MHD equations as an initial value problem, utilizing zone packing around the mode rational surface. Resolution requirements limit this to S less than or equal to 10 7 . The results from these two methods agree to better than 1 in 10 3 in the overlap region 10 7 greater than or equal to S greater than or equal to 10 5 . A scan of parameter space reveals that for parabolic q-profiles, the least unstable configurations have q 0 R/a approx. 0.67. The Hall term in Ohm's Law is easily incorporated into both methods. Recalculating the resistive MHD growth rates in the presence of this term shows that the resistive interchange mode is completely stabilized for a large enough value of the ion cyclotron time

  2. Progress with energy confinement time in the CTX spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Fernandez, J.C.; Wysocki, F.J.; Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Knox, S.O.; Marklin, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The 0.67 m radius mesh flux conserver (MFC) in CTX was replaced by a solid flux conserver (SFC), resulting in greatly reduced field errors. Decreased spheromak open flux led to vastly improved decaying discharged, including increased global energy confinement times, τ E (from 20 to 180 μs), and corresponding magnetic energy decay times, τ B 2 (from 0.7 to 2 ms). Improved confinement allowed the observation of the pressure-driven instability (predicted by Mercier) which ejects plasma from the spheromak interior to the wall

  3. The S-1 Spheromak Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathe, P.; Mika, R.; Oliaro, G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of a CAMAC based DEC LSI-11/23 microcomputer to perform all control functions for the S-1 Spheromak is described. The system monitors and controls the three coil systems, Toroidal, Poloidal, and Equilibrium field coils and their associated power sources, the water cooling system, the personnel and machine safety system, the machine and diagnostic timing system and the control room display and operator interface. Future requirements include control of the vacuum system, the gas injection system and interface to the PPPL Data Acquisition System DEC10. The computer is connected to five remotely located CAMAC crates by a fiber-optic serial highway operating at five megahertz. These crates contain interface modules required to control the S-1 experiment. These modules include: D/A and A/D converters, fast transient digitizers, timing modules, temperature sensing modules, CRT alphanumeric display drivers, watchdog timers, and relay and TTL parallel I/O ports. The computer itself resides in crate number0 and consists of an LSI-11/23 with hardware floating post processor, memory management, 256K bytes of memory, four RS-232 serial ports and a 30 megabyte hard disk with a one megabyte floppy disk backup. The majority of software is written in FORTRAN with a few speed critical programs written in PDP-11 MACRO assembly language. The software simulates a sequential state machine which allows easily changeable logic since all logic is represented by standard Boolean Fortran statements. The RSX-11/m operating system allows multiple tasks to be active simultaneously. This provides computing time for operator interactions, editing of critical machine parameters, data analysis and transmission of data to other computers while still maintaining the scan activity which constantly monitors machine parameters

  4. Equilibrium and stability of the Los Alamos spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklin, G.

    1984-01-01

    The open mesh flux conserver (MFC) on the Los Alamos spheromak (CTX) has been equipped with a large number of Rogowski loops measuring the current in the individual segments of the MFC, providing a complete picture of the surface current pattern induced by the equilibrium and oscillations of the confined plasma. An analysis was made of the data from these Rogowski loops

  5. Field and current amplification in the SSPX spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.N. . hilld@llnl.gov; Bulmer, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented from experiments relating to magnetic field generation and current amplification in the SSPX spheromak. The SSPX spheromak plasma is driven by DC coaxial helicity injection using a 2MJ capacitor bank. Peak toroidal plasma currents of up to 0.7MA and peak edge poloidal fields of 0.3T are produced; lower current discharges can be sustained up to 3.5msec. When edge magnetic fluctuations are reduced below 1% by driving the plasma near threshold, it is possible to produce plasmas with Te > 150eV, e >∼4% and core χ e ∼30m 2 /s. Helicity balance for these plasmas suggests that sheath dissipation can be significant, pointing to the importance of maximizing the voltage on the coaxial injector. For most operational modes we find a stiff relationship between peak spheromak field and injector current, and little correlation with plasma temperature, which suggests that other processes than ohmic dissipation may limit field amplification. However, slowing spheromak buildup by limiting the initial current pulse increases the ratio of toroidal current to injected current and points to new operating regimes with more favorable current amplification. (author)

  6. Steady-state operation of spheromaks by inductive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, A.

    1984-04-01

    A method to maintain a steady-state spheromak configuration inductively using the S-1 Spheromak device is described. The S-1 Spheromak formation apparatus can be utilized to inject magnetic helicity continuously (C.W., not pulsed or D.C.) into the spheromak configuration after equilibrium is achieved in the linked mode of operation. Oscillation of both poloidal- and toroidal-field currents in the flux core (psi-phi Pumping), with proper phasing, injects a net time-averaged helicity into the plasma. Steady-state maintenance relies on flux conversion, which has been earlier identified. Relevant experimental data from the operation of S-1 are described. Helicity flow has been measured and the proposed injection scheme simulated. In a reasonable time practical voltages and frequencies can inject an amount of helicity comparable to that in the initial plasma. Plasma currents can be maintained or increased. This pumping technique is similar to F-THETA Pumping of a Reversed-Field-Pinch but is applied to this inverse-pinch formation

  7. Pressure effect on equilibrium configuration of CTCC-2 spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Kato, Y.; Satomi, N.; Watanabe, K.

    1990-01-01

    In CTCC-2 experiment, the initial plasma is produced by a magnetized gun and ejected into a metallic aluminum flux conserver (FC) with thickness of 15 mm. The spheromak is formed in the FC during a life time of 1.5 ms, in which the plasma is isolated from any external feeder. A choking-field-generating coil is equipped on the entrance of the spheroidal FC. The choking field is suppressing some leakage of spheromak field along the entrance duct, which is made of thin stainless steel plate (0.8 mm) for rapid penetration of the choking magnetic field. This resistive part acts as an effective plasma current limiter, which produces stable currentless region (flux hole). The flux hole increases magnetic shear without inserting a central conducting pole along the symmetric axis and is controlled to decrease with the choking field strength. Thus, in CTCC-2 spheromak, a stable oblate spheroidal boundary is rigidly fixed by the metal wall of FC and the entrance hole of FC is effectively closed by choking magnetic field, so that it is suitable to investigate precisely a fine structure of configuration. In spheromak configuration whose aspect ratio is near one, the ratio of the magnetic strength at the inner part to that at the outer part on equi-flux surface (mirror ratio) becomes very large in comparison with that of a large aspect ratio. This extreme configuration with a high mirror ratio may be associated with an anisotropic pressure effect even in collisional state like as our experimental condition. They have investigated the pressure effect on spheromak configuration in more detail. The obtained equilibrium profile is grossly explained by a theoretical profile on assuming low beta limit until now. However, the authors observe a systematic discrepancy between a measured poloidal profile and a theoretical one as mentioned

  8. Relaxation phenomena in the high temperature S-1 spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Y.; Ellis, R.A. Jr.; Janos, A.C.; Levinton, F.M.; Mayo, R.M.; Motley, R.W.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

    1988-06-01

    Operation of the S-1 device in a high current density (j/n/sub e/ ≥ 2 /times/ 10 -14 A/center dot/m) regime has created high electron temperature spheromaks (50eV ≤ T/sub e/ ≤ 130eV). The mechanisms and causes of the periodic relaxation events often observed in these hotter spheromak plasmas were made clear. Also, a relationship between the MHD relaxation cycle and confinement characteristics was revealed for the first time. Resistive loss at the outer edge of the plasma causes a departure from the initial force-free minimum-energy Taylor state to a MHD profile unstable to low-n ideal MHD modes; a relaxation event then returns the configuration to nearly a Taylor state. 11 refs., 5 figs

  9. Overview of the HIT-SI3 spheromak experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Chandra, R. N.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Everson, C. J.; Penna, J. M.; Nelson, B. A.

    2017-10-01

    The HIT-SI and HIT-SI3 spheromak experiments (a = 23 cm) study efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel method which is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries. Sustained spheromaks show coherent, imposed plasma motion and low plasma-generated mode activity, indicating stability. Analysis of surface magnetic fields in HIT-SI indicates large n = 0 and 1 mode amplitudes and little energy in higher modes. Within measurement uncertainties all the n = 1 energy is imposed by the injectors, rather than being plasma-generated. The fluctuating field imposed by the injectors is sufficient to sustain the toroidal current through dynamo action whereas the plasma-generated field is not (Hossack et al., Phys. Plasmas, 2017). Ion Doppler spectroscopy shows coherent, imposed plasma motion inside r 10 cm in HIT-SI and a smaller volume of coherent motion in HIT-SI3. Coherent motion indicates the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n = 1 energy indicates the maximum q is maintained below 1 for stability during sustainment. In HIT-SI3, the imposed mode structure is varied to test the plasma response (Hossack et al., Nucl. Fusion, 2017). Imposing n = 2, n = 3, or large, rotating n = 1 perturbations is correlated with transient plasma-generated activity. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-96ER54361.

  10. Multi-pulse power injection and spheromak sustainment in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; Bulmer, R. H.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Woodruff, S.; Sspx Team

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. Spheromak formation (gun injection phase) and sustainment experiments are now routine in SSPX using a multi-bank power system. Gun voltage, impedance, and power coupling show a clear current threshold dependence on gun flux (I_th~=λ_0φ_gun/μ_0), increasing with current above the threshold, and are compared with CTX results. The characteristic gun inductance, L_gun~=0.6 μH, derived from the gun voltage dependence on di/dt, is larger than expected from Corsica modeling of the spheromak equilibrium. It’s value is consistent with the n=1 ‘doughook’ mode structure reported in SPHEX and believed important for helicity injection and toroidal current drive. Results of helicity and power balance calculations of spheromak poloidal field buildup are compared with experiment and used to project sustainment with a future longer pulse power supply. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  11. Spheromak Buildup in SSPX using a Modular Capacitor Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R D; McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Hooper, E B; Romero-Talamas, C A

    2006-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [1] was designed to address both magnetic field generation and confinement. The SSPX produces 1.5-3.5msec, spheromak plasmas with a 0.33m major radius and a minor radius of ∼0.23m. DC coaxial helicity injection is used to build and sustain the spheromak plasma within the flux conserver. Optimal operation is obtained by flattening the profile of λ = μ 0 j/B, consistent with reducing the drive for tearing and other MHD modes, and matching of edge current and bias flux to minimize |(delta)B/B| rms . With these optimizations, spheromak plasmas with central T e >350eV and β e ∼ 5% with toroidal fields of 0.6T [3] have been obtained. If a favorable balance between current drive efficiency and energy confinement can be shown, the spheromak has the potential to yield an attractive magnetic fusion concept [4]. The original SSPX power system consists of two lumped-circuit capacitor banks with fixed circuit parameters. This power system is used to produce an initial fast formation current pulse (10kV, 0.5MJ formation bank), followed by a lower current, 3.5ms flattop sustainment pulse (5kV, 1.5MJ sustainment bank). Experimental results indicate that a variety of injected current pulses, such as a longer sustainment flattop [5], higher and longer fast formation [6], and multiple current pulses [7], might further our understanding of magnetic field generation. Although the formation bank can be split into two independent banks capable of producing other injected current waveforms, the variety of current waveforms produced by this power system is limited. Thus, to extend the operating range of the SSPX, a new pulsed-power system has been designed and partially constructed. In this paper, we discuss the design of the programmable bank and present first results from using the bank to increase the magnetic field in SSPX

  12. Theoretical investigation of field-line quality in a driven spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Berk, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical studies aimed at predicting and diagnosing field-line quality in a spheromak are described. These include nonlinear 3-D MHD simulations, stability studies, analyses of confinement in spheromaks dominated by either open (stochastic) field lines or approximate flux surfaces, and a theory of fast electrons as a probe of field-line length. (author)

  13. Tearing-mode stability of a forming Spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Jardin, S.C.; Chance, M.S.

    1981-10-01

    The results of numerical calculations of Δ' for a class of equilibria typical of those encountered during the early formation stage of the S1 Spheromak are presented. The equilibrium plasma is assumed to be cylindrically symmetric and pressureless. It encloses a current carrying perfect conductor (flux core) and is surrounded by a vacuum with zero longitudinal field. Stability boundaries in the space formed by the equilibrium parameters are mapped. The plasma is tearing mode stable provided B/sub z//B/sub theta/ at the flux core is below a certain critical value which depends on the equilibrium parameters. For typical equilibria, this critical value is 0.65

  14. Properties of spheromaks generated by a magnetized coaxial source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoida, H.W.; Henins, I.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Lipson, J.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    In gun-generated spheromaks impurity contamination plays an important role in determining the energy loss. Metallic impurities can be reduced by an appropriate change of source parameters. The reduction of the level of metal impurities results in a spectrum showing a preponderance of oxygen and carbon lines and OIV radiation is observed to increase indicating a warmer plasma. However, the plasma lifetime is not changed. Discharge cleaning techniques appear to be necessary. It is still possible that electron heat conduction during the reconnection processs will be found to be important once the impurities are reduced

  15. Properties of spheromaks generated by a magnetized coaxial source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoida, H.W.; Henins, I.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Lipson, J.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    In gun-generated spheromaks impurity contamination plays an important role in determining the energy loss. Metallic impurities can be reduced by an appropriate change of source parameters. The reduction of the level of metal impurities results in a spectrum showing a preponderance of oxygen and carbon lines and OIV radiation is observed to increase indicating a warmer plasma. However, the plasma lifetime is not changed. Discharge cleaning techniques appear to be necessary. It is still possible that electron heat conduction during the reconnection processs will be found to be important once the impurities are reduced.

  16. Local carbon diffusion coefficient measurement in the S-1 spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, R.M.; Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Chu, T.K.; Paul, S.F.; Yamada, M.

    1988-10-01

    The local carbon diffusion coefficient was measured in the S - 1 spheromak by detecting the radial spread of injected carbon impurity. The radial impurity density profile is determined by the balance of ionization and diffusion. Using measured local electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/, the ionization rate is determined from which the particle diffusion coefficient is inferred. The results found in this work are consistent with Bohm diffusion. The absolute magnitude of D/sub /perpendicular// was determined to be (4/approximately/6) /times/ D/sub Bohm/. 25 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  17. New mode of operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for injecting magnetic helicity into a spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S.; Hill, D.N.; Stallard, B.W.; Bulmer, R.; Cohen, B.; Holcomb, C.T.; Hooper, E.B.; McLean, H.S.; Moller, J.; Wood, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    By operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun continuously with just sufficient current to enable plasma ejection, large gun-voltage spikes (∼1 kV) are produced, giving the highest sustained voltage ∼500 V and highest sustained helicity injection rate observed in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment. The spheromak magnetic field increases monotonically with time, exhibiting the lowest fluctuation levels observed during formation of any spheromak (B-tilde)/B≥2%). The results suggest an important mechanism for field generation by helicity injection, namely, the merging of helicity-carrying filaments

  18. New mode of operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for injecting magnetic helicity into a spheromak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, S; Hill, D N; Stallard, B W; Bulmer, R; Cohen, B; Holcomb, C T; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2003-03-07

    By operating a magnetized coaxial plasma gun continuously with just sufficient current to enable plasma ejection, large gun-voltage spikes (approximately 1 kV) are produced, giving the highest sustained voltage approximately 500 V and highest sustained helicity injection rate observed in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment. The spheromak magnetic field increases monotonically with time, exhibiting the lowest fluctuation levels observed during formation of any spheromak (B/B>/=2%). The results suggest an important mechanism for field generation by helicity injection, namely, the merging of helicity-carrying filaments.

  19. Stability of force-free spheromak plasma in spheroidal flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Tsutsui, Hiroaki

    1988-01-01

    The Woltjer-Taylor method is applied to spheromak plasmas in spheroidal flux conservers. As models of the flux conserver, both oblate and prolate spheroidal vessels with a center conductor are used. The plasma is not assumed to be nearly spherical, and the Rayleigh-Ritz method and the finite element method are used to evaluate the eigenvalues. The oblate spheromak is shown to be stable irrespective of the shape of the flux conserver. Though the prolate spheromak is unstable if there is no center conductor, it can be stable if the center conductor is installed. (author)

  20. Stability of spheroidal spheromak plasma by use of force-free approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Tsutsui, Hiroaki.

    1987-09-01

    The Woltjer-Taylor method is applied to spheromak plasmas in spheroidal flux conservers. As models of the flux conserver, both oblate and prolate spheroidal vessels with a center conductor are used. The plasma is not assumed to be nearly spherical, and the Rayleigh-Ritz method and the finite element method are used to evaluate the eigenvalues. The oblate spheromak is shown to be stable irrespective of the shape of the flux conserver. Though the prolate spheromak is unstable if there is no center conductor, it can be stable if the center conductor is installed. (author)

  1. Simulation study of stepwise relaxation in a spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Ritoku; Uchida, Masaya; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1991-10-01

    The energy relaxation process of a spheromak plasma in a flux conserver is investigated by means of a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation. The resistive decay of an initial force-free profile brings the spheromak plasma to an m = 1/n = 2 ideal kink unstable region. It is found that the energy relaxation takes place in two steps; namely, the relaxation consists of two physically distinguished phases, and there exists an intermediate phase in between, during which the relaxation becomes inactive temporarily. The first relaxation corresponds to the transition from an axially symmetric force-free state to a helically symmetric one with an n = 2 crescent magnetic island structure via the helical kink instability. The n = 2 helical structure is nonlinearly sustained in the intermediate phase. The helical twisting of the flux tube creates a reconnection current in the vicinity of the geometrical axis. The second relaxation is triggered by the rapid growth of the n = 1 mode when the reconnection current exceeds a critical value. The helical twisting relaxes through magnetic reconnection toward an axially symmetric force-free state. It is also found that the poloidal flux reduces during the helical twisting in the first relaxation and the generation of the toroidal flux occurs through the magnetic reconnection process in the second relaxation. (author)

  2. The University of Maryland spheromak fusion experiment: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniades, J.A.; Chin-Fatt, C.; DeSilva, A.W.; Goldenbaum, G.C.; Hess, R.A.; Shaw, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The spheromak is a magnetic plasma confinement configuration that features a simple magnetic structure free of coils that link the plasma torus. It offers the possibility of a simple and efficient confinement system for a fusion plasma. Design of the experimental apparatus occupied the first 15 months of the contract period. At the same time, computer studies of the formation of the spheromak plasma, using a two-dimensional MHD code were performed. After the first 12 months of the contract period, subcontracts were let for major components of the system, particularly for the liquid nitrogen cooled bias magnetic coils, the associated power supplies, and the capacitors for the reversal bank. When the design work was complete, the machining contract for the vacuum vessel was placed. At about this time, work on the operating system for the control computer was begun. The necessary hardware items for the data acquisition computer were decided upon and ordered at the end of the second year. The capacitor bank for the Z-directed current (I/sub z/ bank) was rebuilt from existing parts here, and construction of this bank and of the parts for the reversal bank was accomplished while the outside fabrication of other major parts was in progress. Switching hardware for the two capacitor banks was fabricated in house to reduce costs. As capacitors for the reversal bank were delivered, they were incorporated into the bank modules. A full description of the MS experimental hardware is described in this paper. 2 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  3. Fundamental Magnetofluid Physics Studies on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment: Reconnection and Sustainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.R.

    2001-01-01

    The general goal of the Magnetofluids Laboratory at Swarthmore College is to understand how magnetofluid kinetic energy can be converted to magnetic energy as it is in the core of the earth and sun (the dynamo problem) and to understand how magnetic energy can be rapidly converted back to kinetic energy and heat as it is in solar flares (the magnetic reconnection problem). Magnetic reconnection has been studied using the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) which was designed and built under this Junior Faculty Grant. In SSX we generate and merge two rings of magnetized plasma called spheromaks and study their interaction. The spheromaks have many properties similar to solar flares so this work is directly relevant to basic solar physics. In addition, since the spheromak is a magnetic confinement fusion configuration, issues of formation and stability have direct impact on the fusion program

  4. 0-D study of the compression of low temperature spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Hulse, R.A.; Zweibel, E.G.

    1985-09-01

    Compression of low temperature spheromak plasmas has been studied with the aid of a O-D two-fluid computer code. It is found that in a plasma which is radiation dominated, the electron temperature can be increased by up to a factor of seven for a compression of a factor of two, provided the temperature is above some critical value (approx.25eV) and the electron density particle confinement time product n/sub e/tau/sub p/ greater than or equal to 1 x 10 9 s/cm 3 . If the energy balance is dominated by particle confinement losses rather than radiation losses, the effect of compression is to raise the temperature as T/sub e/ approx.C/sup 6/5/, for constant tau/sub p/

  5. Recent results from the Los Alamos CTX spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Knox, S.O.; Linford, R.K.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Continued discharge cleaning, improved vacuum practices, and optimized plasma formation operation have resulted in the Los Alamos CTX spheromak experiment achieving 1 millisecond plasma lifetimes with average temperatures of 20 to 40 eV. Impurity radiation power loss has been reduced significantly and the plasma behavior appears to be dominated by pressure-driven instabilities causing increased particle loss. The major advance in operation has been the use of a constant, uniform background of 5 to 20 mTorr of H/sub 2/ filling the vacuum tank, flux conserver, and plasma source. This fill operation directly reduces the impurities generated in the plasma source, allows operation of the source at parameters resulting in fewer impurities, and provides a neutral source to maintain the density for long lifetimes. In this paper we present data on the improved operation of CTX, and present evidence for its ..beta..-limited operation.

  6. Selective decay in a helicity-injected spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez, P L Garcia; Farengo, R

    2009-01-01

    The non-linear evolution of several unstable equilibria, representative of helicity-injected spheromak configurations inside a cylindrical flux conserver, is studied by means of three dimensional resistive MHD simulations. These equilibria are force-free (∇ x B = λ(ψ)B) but do not correspond to minimum energy states, having linear λ(ψ) profiles with negative slope. Several aspects of this process are studied (magnetic energy relaxation, selective helicity decay, relaxed profiles) for different initial A slopes. The stability threshold predicted by linear theory is recovered. The results show that complete plasma relaxation leading to a uniform A, is achieved only if the initial profile is hollow enough. The evolution for cases just above the stability threshold is more gentle and does not end in a Taylor state. The final state in these cases has a linear λ(ψ) profile, as the initial condition, but with a smaller slope.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of spheromak plasma in spheroidal flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Kamitani, Atsushi.

    1985-11-01

    The MHD equilibrium configurations of spheromak plasmas in a spheroidal flux conserver are determined by use of a pressure distribution whose derivative dp/dψ vanishes on the magnetic axis, and by use of an optimized distribution. Here p is the pressure and ψ is the flux function. These equilibria are shown to be stable for symmetric modes. The stability for localized modes is investigated by the Mercier criterion. The values of the maximum beta ratio β max are evaluated for both pressure distributions and are shown to become about two times larger by optimization. If the condition, q axis max are found to be less than 30 %. The oblate spheroidal flux conserver is shown to be better than the toroidal conserver with a rectangular cross section from the standpoint of stability. (author)

  8. Recent results from the Los Alamos CTX spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Knox, S.O.; Linford, R.K.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Continued discharge cleaning, improved vacuum practices, and optimized plasma formation operation have resulted in the Los Alamos CTX spheromak experiment achieving 1 millisecond plasma lifetimes with average temperatures of 20 to 40 eV. Impurity radiation power loss has been reduced significantly and the plasma behavior appears to be dominated by pressure-driven instabilities causing increased particle loss. The major advance in operation has been the use of a constant, uniform background of 5 to 20 mTorr of H 2 filling the vacuum tank, flux conserver, and plasma source. This fill operation directly reduces the impurities generated in the plasma source, allows operation of the source at parameters resulting in fewer impurities, and provides a neutral source to maintain the density for long lifetimes. In this paper we present data on the improved operation of CTX, and present evidence for its β-limited operation

  9. Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

    1989-07-01

    The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.; Rochester Univ., NY; Los Alamos National Lab., NM; Princeton Univ., NJ

    1989-07-01

    The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (β to ∼ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m 2 . The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Route to High Temperatures by Current Amplification in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S.; Holbomb, C. T.; Stallard, B. W.; Hill, D. N.; Hooper, E. B.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Bulmer, R.; Cohen, B.; Sovinec, C.; Pearlstein, L. D.

    2002-01-01

    For the spheromak to be attractive as a reactor concept it would be necessary to sustain the configuration with a low recycling power, reflected in the current amplification factor: A 1 = I tor /I gun , where I tor is the toroidal current and I gun is the gun current. It is understood that A 1 needs to be around 60 for a reactor [1], although the highest obtained so far in the spheromak has been ∼3 [2]. The spheromak is a simply connected toroidal confinement device related to the reversed field pinch in that the q-profile falls at the edge and the first wall is conducting, although the central solenoid is absent. In the spheromak, the paradigm for field generation (and hence current amplification) is the injection of helicity, K = ∫A.BdV = 2ΦΨ where φ and Ψ are linked fluxes. Helicity is additive in the process of electrostatic injection by a coaxial gun [3]: K = 2V gunΨgun , where V gun is the voltage applied between two coaxial electrodes (giving the rate of toroidal flux injection) and Ψ gun is the poloidal vacuum flux connecting them. SSPX [4] is a 1m wide coaxial-gun-driven spheromak with W-coated copper electrodes (FIGURE 1) and a uniquely programmable vacuum field configuration. SSPX was built to assess if confinement can be reasonably preserved during injection, and to address the specific physics of the processes governing helicity injection

  12. MHD stability analysis of axisymmetric surface current model tokamaks close to the spheromak regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Toshihisa; Kaji, Ikuo; Fukai, Ichiro; Kito, Masafumi.

    1984-01-01

    In the toroidal coordinates, a stability analysis is presented for very low-aspect-ratio tokamaks with circular cross section which is described by a surface current model (SCM) of axisymmetric equilibria. The energy principle determining the stability of plasma is treated without any expansion of aspect ratio. Numerical results show that, owing to the occurrence of the non-axisymmetric (n=1) unstable modes, there exists no MHD-stable ideal SCM spheromak characterized by zero external toroidal vacuum field. Instead, a stable spheromak-type plasma which comes to the ideal SCM spheromak is provided by the configuration with a very weak external toroidal field. Close to the spheromak regime (1.0 1 aspect ratio< = 1.1), the minimum safety factor and the critical β-values increase mo notonically with aspect ratio decreasing from a large value, and curves of βsub(p) versus β in the marginal stability approach to an ideal SCM spheromak line βsub(p)=β. (author)

  13. Studies on spheromak plasma production by external-flux-core method, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arata, Masanori; Katsurai, Makoto

    1984-01-01

    The spheromak technique, one of magnetic plasma containment techniques, has such arrangement of magnetic fields that the toroidal magnetic field is produced by the poloidal current flowing in plasma, and the poloidal magnetic field is produced by the toroidal current in plasma and the current in external coils. The authors proposed external flux core method as the technique of plasma formation by this spheromak method, in which the toroidal magnetic field is injected by the discharge using electrodes, whereas the poloidal magnetic field is injected by induction discharge without electrode. Its fundamental action was analyzed by computer simulation and confirmed by experiment. In this study, the behavior of the spheromak plasma produced was investigated in detail and summarized. The contents were the measurement of the spheromak configuration produced and the estimation of plasma parameters. The experimental setup, the principle of action, and the experimental results of magnetic field distribution obtained by a magnetic probe, ion current measured by an electrostatic probe, electron temperature by spectroscopic measurement and the behavior of spheromak plasma observed with an image converter camera are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Transport and fluctuations in high temperature spheromak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, H.S.; Wood, R.D.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Hill, D.N.; Moller, J.M.; Romero-Talamas, C.; Woodruff, S.

    2006-01-01

    Higher electron temperature (T e >350 eV) and reduced electron thermal diffusivity (χ e 2 /s) is achieved in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) by increasing the discharge current=I gun and gun bias flux=ψ gun in a prescribed manner. The internal current and q=safety factor profile derived from equilibrium reconstruction as well as the measured magnetic fluctuation amplitude can be controlled by programming the ratio λ gun =μ 0 I gun /ψ gun . Varying λ gun above and below the minimum energy eigenvalue=λ FC of the flux conserver (∇xB-vector=λ FC B-vector) varies the q profile and produces the m/n=poloidal/toroidal magnetic fluctuation mode spectrum expected from mode-rational surfaces with q=m/n. The highest T e is measured when the gun is driven with λ gun slightly less than λ FC , producing low fluctuation amplitudes ( e as T e increases, differing from Bohm or open field line transport models where χ e increases with T e . Detailed resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the NIMROD code support the analysis of energy confinement in terms of the causal link with the q profile, magnetic fluctuations associated with low-order mode-rational surfaces, and the quality of magnetic surfaces

  15. Three dimensional simulation study of spheromak injection into magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Watanabe, T.H.; Sato, T.; Hayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    The three dimensional dynamics of a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) plasmoid, which is injected into a magnetized target plasma region, is investigated by using MHD numerical simulations. It is found that the process of SCT penetration into this region is much more complicated than that which has been analysed so far by using a conducting sphere (CS) model. The injected SCT suffers from a tilting instability, which grows with a similar timescale to that of the SCT penetration. The instability is accompanied by magnetic reconnection between the SCT magnetic field and the target magnetic field, which disrupts the magnetic configuration of the SCT. Magnetic reconnection plays a role in supplying the high density plasma, initially confined in the SCT magnetic field, to the target region. The penetration depth of the SCT high density plasma is also examined. It is shown to be shorter than that estimated from the CS model. The SCT high density plasma is decelerated mainly by the Lorentz force of the target magnetic field, which includes not only the magnetic pressure force but also the magnetic tension force. Furthermore, by comparing the SCT plasmoid injection with the bare plasmoid injection, magnetic reconnection is considered to relax the magnetic tension force, i.e. the deceleration of the SCT plasmoid. (author)

  16. The spheromak as a prototype for ultra-high-field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-08-01

    In view of current progress in the development of superconductor materials, the ultimate high-field limit of superconducting magnets is likely to be set by mechanical stress problems. Maximum field strength should be attainable by means of approximately force-free magnet windings having favorable ''MHD'' stability properties (so that small winding errors will not grow). Since a low-beta finite-flux-hole spheromak configuration qualifies as a suitable prototype, the theoretical and experimental spheromak research effort of the past decade has served to create a substantial technical basis for the design of ultra-high-field superconducting coils. 11 refs

  17. Confinement requirements for OHMIC-compressive ignition of a Spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.; Gilligan, J.; Miley, G.

    1980-01-01

    The Moving Plasmoid Reactor (MPR) is an attractive alternative magnetic fusion scheme in which Spheromak plasmoids are envisioned to be formed, compressed, burned, and expanded as the plasmoids translate through a series of linear reactor modules. Although auxiliary heating of the plasmoids may be possible, the MPR scenario would be especially interesting if ohmic decay and compression along were sufficient to heat the plasmoids to an ignition temperature. In the present work, we will study the transport conditions under which a Spheromak plasmoid could be expected to reach ignition via a combination of ohmic and compression heating

  18. Confinement requirements for ohmic-compressive ignition of a Spheromak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Moving Plasmoid Reactor (MPR) is an attractive alternative magnetic fusion scheme in which Spheromak plasmoids are envisioned to be formed, compressed, burned, and expanded as the plasmoids translate through a series of linear reactor modules. Although auxiliary heating of the plasmoids may be possible, the MPR scenario would be especially interesting if ohmic decay and compression alone is sufficient to heat the plasmoids to an ignition temperature. In the present work, we examine the transport conditions under which a Spheromak plasmoid can be expected to reach ignition via a combination of ohmic and compression heating

  19. Formation of a field-reversed configuration by coalescence of spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, B.; Sato, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Takaya; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Watanabe, Tomohiko

    1995-01-01

    We present a numerical simulation of the slow formation of FRC by the merging of two spheromaks with opposite toroidal fluxes. A rather important feature of such a method of formation of FRC should be made explicit. A spheromak is basically a Taylor minimum energy state. On the other hand the FRC with its single component poloidal magnetic field and high plasma beta is decidedly far away from a Taylor state. So a numerical simulation of this process, besides demonstrating the feasibility of such FRC formation, is expected to show the traits in the process of transition from a Taylor state to a non-Taylor state. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Simulation of multi-pulse coaxial helicity injection in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, J. B.; Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Woodruff, S.

    2018-03-01

    Nonlinear, numerical computation with the NIMROD code is used to explore magnetic self-organization during multi-pulse coaxial helicity injection in the Sustained Spheromak Physics eXperiment. We describe multiple distinct phases of spheromak evolution, starting from vacuum magnetic fields and the formation of the initial magnetic flux bubble through multiple refluxing pulses and the eventual onset of the column mode instability. Experimental and computational magnetic diagnostics agree on the onset of the column mode instability, which first occurs during the second refluxing pulse of the simulated discharge. Our computations also reproduce the injector voltage traces, despite only specifying the injector current and not explicitly modeling the external capacitor bank circuit. The computations demonstrate that global magnetic evolution is fairly robust to different transport models and, therefore, that a single fluid-temperature model is sufficient for a broader, qualitative assessment of spheromak performance. Although discharges with similar traces of normalized injector current produce similar global spheromak evolution, details of the current distribution during the column mode instability impact the relative degree of poloidal flux amplification and magnetic helicity content.

  1. Nonlinear saturation of non-resonant internal instabilities in a straight spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Jardin, S.C.

    1982-04-01

    An initial value numerical solution of the time dependent nonlinear ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations demonstrates that spheromak equilibria which are linearly unstable to nonresonant helical internal perturbations saturate at low amplitude without developing singularities. These instabilities thus represent the transition from an axisymmetric to a non-axisymmetric equilibrium state, caused by a peaking of the current density

  2. Experiments of spheromak and reversed field configuration in 2m theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogi, Y.; Shimamura, S.; Ogura, H.; Osanai, Y.; Saito, K.; Shiina, S.; Yoshimura, H.

    1981-01-01

    Since the z-current produces the paramagnetic field near the electrodes, the spheromak formation is more difficult in the straight bias field. In order to help the reconnection at the coil ends, the cusp bias coils are added to both ends of the straight coil. Then the spheromak configuration is formed and the plasma is confined for 5 to 10 μs. On the other hand, the RFC continues for about 30 μs in case of the straight bias field. The confinement time is limited by the rotational instability. Although the start time of the instability is not clear, the elongation of the plasma is detected in 15 to 20 μs after the RFC is formed. The period of the rotation is slightly different every shot. Detailed study of the instability is being pursued

  3. Field-Reversed Configuration Formation Scheme Utilizing a Spheromak and Solenoid Induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhardt, S.P.; Belova, E.V.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Ren, Y.; McGeehan, B.; Inomoto, M.

    2008-01-01

    A new field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation technique is described, where a spheromak transitions to a FRC with inductive current drive. The transition is accomplished only in argon and krypton plasmas, where low-n kink modes are suppressed; spheromaks with a lighter majority species, such as neon and helium, either display a terminal tilt-mode, or an n=2 kink instability, both resulting in discharge termination. The stability of argon and krypton plasmas through the transition is attributed to the rapid magnetic diffusion of the currents that drive the kink-instability. The decay of helicity during the transition is consistent with that expected from resistivity. This observation indicates a new scheme to form a FRC plasma, provided stability to low-n modes is maintained, as well as a unique situation where the FRC is a preferred state

  4. Current driven instabilities of the kinetic shear Alfven wave: application to reversed field pinches and spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Perkins, F.W.

    1984-04-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave is studied in a cylindrical force-free plasma with self-consistent magnetic fields. This equilibrium represents a reversed field pinch or a spheromak. The stability of the wave is found to depend on the ratio of the electron drift velocity to the Alfven velocity. This ratio varies inversely with the square root of the plasma line density. The critical line density using the Spitzer-Harm electron distribution function is found for reversed field pinches with deuterium plasmas to be approximately 2 x 10 18 m -1 and is 5 x 10 17 m -1 in spheromaks with hydrogen plasmas. The critical line density is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for reversed field pinches

  5. Controlled and spontaneous magnetic field generation in a gun-driven spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Mclean, H.S.; Stallard, B.W.; Hill, D.N.; Holcomb, C.T.; Romero-Talamas, C.; Wood, R.D.; Cone, G.; Sovinec, C.R.

    2005-01-01

    In the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX [E. B. Hooper, D. Pearlstein, and D. D. Ryutov, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)], progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that generate fields by helicity injection. SSPX injects helicity (linked magnetic flux) from 1 m diameter magnetized coaxial electrodes into a flux-conserving confinement region. Control of magnetic fluctuations (δB/B∼1% on the midplane edge) yields T e profiles peaked at >200 eV. Trends indicate a limiting beta (β e ∼4%-6%), and so we have been motivated to increase T e by operating with stronger magnetic field. Two new operating modes are observed to increase the magnetic field: (A) Operation with constant current and spontaneous gun voltage fluctuations. In this case, the gun is operated continuously at the threshold for ejection of plasma from the gun: stored magnetic energy of the spheromak increases gradually with δB/B∼2% and large voltage fluctuations (δV∼1 kV), giving a 50% increase in current amplification, I tor /I gun . (B) Operation with controlled current pulses. In this case, spheromak magnetic energy increases in a stepwise fashion by pulsing the gun, giving the highest magnetic fields observed for SSPX (∼0.7 T along the geometric axis). By increasing the time between pulses, a quasisteady sustainment is produced (with periodic good confinement), comparing well with resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In each case, the processes that transport the helicity into the spheromak are inductive and exhibit a scaling of field with current that exceeds those previously obtained. We use our newly found scaling to suggest how to achieve higher temperatures with a series of pulses

  6. Axisymmetric force-free states and relaxation of a spheroidal spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throumoulopoulos, G.N.; Pantis, G.

    1990-01-01

    Axisymmetric force-free equilibrium eigenstates for a prolate as well as an oblate spheroidal Spheromak with arbitrary elongation are obtained. In the framework of the Woltjer-Taylor relaxation theory the relaxed states are also identified. A simple hypothesis for the relaxation process is introduced, which implies that the plasma relaxes from multitoroidal formations to a singly toroidal configuration, in qualitative agreement with experimental results. (author)

  7. Controlled and Spontaneous Magnetic Field Generation in a Gun-Driven Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; McLean, H S; Stallard, B W; Hill, D N; Holcomb, C T; Romero-Talamas, C; Wood, R D; Cone, G; Sovinec, C R

    2005-04-01

    In the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX, progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms that generate fields by helicity injection. SSPX injects helicity (linked magnetic flux) from 1-m diameter magnetized coaxial electrodes into a flux-conserving confinement region. Control of magnetic fluctuations ((delta)B/B∼1% on the midplane edge) yields T e profiles peaked at > 200eV. Trends indicate a limiting beta (β e ∼ 4-6%), and so we have been motivated to increase T e by operating with stronger magnetic field. Two new operating modes are observed to increase the magnetic field: (A) Operation with constant current and spontaneous gun voltage fluctuations. In this case, the gun is operated continuously at the threshold for ejection of plasma from the gun: stored magnetic energy of the spheromak increases gradually with (delta)B/B ∼2% and large voltage fluctuations ((delta)V ∼ 1kV), giving a 50% increase in current amplification, I tor /I gun . (B) Operation with controlled current pulses. In this case, spheromak magnetic energy increases in a stepwise fashion by pulsing the gun, giving the highest magnetic fields observed for SSPX (∼0.7T along the geometric axis). By increasing the time between pulses, a quasi-steady sustainment is produced (with periodic good confinement), comparing well with resistive MHD simulations. In each case, the processes that transport the helicity into the spheromak are inductive and exhibit a scaling of field with current that exceeds those previously obtained. We use our newly found scaling to suggest how to achieve higher temperatures with a series of pulses

  8. Global magnetic fluctuations in S-1 spheromak plasmas and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, A.; Hart, G.W.; Yamada, M.

    1986-01-01

    Globally coherent modes have been observed during formation in the S-1 Spheromak plasma. These modes play an important role in flux conversion and plasma relaxation toward a minimum-energy state. A significant finding is the temporal progression through the n = 5, 4, 3, 2; m = 1 mode sequence as q rises through rational fractions m/n. Peak amplitudes of the modes relative to the unperturbed field are typically less than 5%, while amplitudes as high as 20% have been observed

  9. Axisymmetric force-free states and relaxation of a spheroidal spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throumoulopoulos, G.N.; Pantis, G.

    1990-01-01

    Axisymmetric force-free equilibrium eigenstates for a prolate as well as an oblate spheroidal spheromak with arbitrary elongation are obtained. In the framework of the Woltjer-Taylor relaxation theory the relaxed states are also identified. A simple hypothesis for the relaxation process is introduced which implies that the plasma relaxes from multitoroidal formations to a singly toroidal configuration in qualitative agreement with experimental results. (Author)

  10. Instantaneous current and field structure of a gun-driven spheromak for two gun polarities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, S; Nagata, M

    2002-01-01

    The instantaneous plasma structure of the SPHEX spheromak is determined here by numerically processing data from insertable Rogowski and magnetic field probes. Data is presented and compared for two modes of gun operation: with the central electrode biased positively and negatively. It is found that while the mean-, or even instantaneous-, field structure would give the impression of a roughly axisymmetric spheromak, the instantaneous current structure does not. Hundred per cent variations in J measured at the magnetic axis can be explained by the rotation of a current filament that has a width equal to half of the radius of the flux-conserving first wall. In positive gun operation, current leaves the filament in the confinement region leading to high wall current there. In negative gun operation, wall current remains low as all injected current returns to the gun through the plasma. The plasma, in either instance, is strongly asymmetric. We discuss evidence for the existence of the current filament in other gun-driven spheromaks and coaxial plasma thrusters

  11. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of kink instability and plasma flow during sustainment of a coaxial gun spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanki, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Kagei, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Kink instability and the subsequent plasma flow during the sustainment of a coaxial gun spheromak are investigated by three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Analysis of the parallel current density λ profile in the central open column revealed that the n = 1 mode structure plays an important role in the relaxation and current drive. The toroidal flow (v t ≈ 37 km/s) is driven by magnetic reconnection occurring as a result of the helical kink distortion of the central open column during repetitive plasmoid ejection and merging. (author)

  13. Verification of the Taylor (minimum energy) state in the S-1 Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, G.W.; Janos, A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Yamada, M.

    1985-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the equilibrium in the S-1 Spheromak by use of magnetic probes inside the plasma show that the final magnetic equilibrium is one which has relaxed close to the Taylor (minimum-energy) state, even though the plasma is far from that state during formation. The comparison is made by calculating the two-dimensional μ profile of the plasma from the probe data, where μ is defined as μ 0 j/sub parallel//B. Measurements using a triple Langmuir probe provide evidence to support the conclusion that the pressure gradients in the relaxed state are confined to the edge region of the plasma

  14. Design of spheromak injector using conical accelerator for large helical device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, J.; Yamada, H.; Yasui, K.; Kato, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T. [Himeji Inst. of Tech., Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-11-01

    Optimization of CT injector for LHD has been carried out and conical electrode for adiabatic CT compression is adopted in the design. Point-model of CT acceleration in a co-axial electrode is solved to optimize the electrode geometry and the power supplies. Large acceleration efficiency of 34% is to be obtained with 3.2 m long conical accelerator and 40 kV - 42 kJ power supply. The operation scenario of a CT injector named SPICA mk. I (SPheromak Injector using Conical Accelerator) consisting of 0.8 m conical accelerator is discussed based on this design. (author)

  15. Tilt and shift mode stability in a spheromak with a flux core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, J.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-07-01

    The stability of spheromak equilibria with a flux core, or reversal coil, is studied by means of an ideal MHD code. Results depend critically upon whether the flux hole region (the current free area just inside the separatrix) is treated as perfectly conducting plasma or as vacuum. This indicates that the tilt and shift modes persist as resistive instabilities if they are stable in ideal MHD. Specifically, for nonoptimally shaped equilibria, the flux core must nearly touch the current channel if the flux hole is vacuum, whereas the core may be slightly outside the separatrix if the flux hole has conducting plasma. A larger margin exists for optimally shaped equilibria.

  16. Amplification of S-1 Spheromak current by an inductive current transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Janos, A.; Yamada, M.

    1985-11-01

    We attempt to predict the consequences of adding an inductive current transformer (OH Transformer) to the present S-1 Spheromak experiment. Axisymmetric modeling with only classical dissipation shows an increase of toroidal current and a shrinking and hollowing of the current channel, conserving toroidal flux. These unstable profiles will undergo helical reconnection, conserving helicity K = ∫ A-vector x B-vector d tau while increasing the toroidal flux and decreasing the poloidal flux so that the plasma relaxes toward the Taylor state. This flux rearrangement is modeled by a new current viscosity term in the mean-field Ohm's law which conserves helicity and dissipates energy

  17. On the jets, kinks, and spheromaks formed by a planar magnetized coaxial gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.C.; Bellan, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of the various plasma configurations produced by a planar magnetized coaxial gun provide insight into the magnetic topology evolution resulting from magnetic helicity injection. Important features of the experiments are a very simple coaxial gun design so that all observed geometrical complexity is due to the intrinsic physical dynamics rather than the source shape and use of a fast multiple-frame digital camera which provides direct imaging of topologically complex shapes and dynamics. Three key experimental findings were obtained: (1) formation of an axial collimated jet [Hsu and Bellan, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 334, 257 (2002)] that is consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic description of astrophysical jets (2) identification of the kink instability when this jet satisfies the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and (3) the nonlinear properties of the kink instability providing a conversion of toroidal to poloidal flux as required for spheromak formation by a coaxial magnetized source [Hsu and Bellan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 215002 (2003)]. An interpretation is proposed for how the n=1 central column instability provides flux amplification during spheromak formation and sustainment, and it is shown that jet collimation can occur within one rotation of the background poloidal field

  18. Sustained spheromak coaxial gun operation in the presence of an n=1 magnetic distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, C.T.; Jarboe, T.R.; Hill, D.N.; Woodruff, S.; Wood, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)] uses a magnetized coaxial gun to form and sustain spheromaks by helicity injection. Internal probes give the magnetic profile within the gun. An analysis of these data show that a number of commonly applied assumptions are not completely correct, and some previously unrecognized processes may be at work. Specifically, the fraction of the available vacuum flux spanning the gun that is stretched out of the gun is variable and not usually 100%. The n=1 mode that is present during sustained discharges has its largest value of δB/B within the gun, so that instantaneously B within the gun is not axisymmetric. By applying a rigid-rotor model to account for the mode, the instantaneous field and current structure within the gun are determined. The current density is also highly nonaxisymmetric and the local value of λ≡μ 0 j parallel /B is not constant, although the global value λ g ≡μ 0 I g /ψ g closely matches that expected by axisymmetric models. The current distribution near the gun muzzle suggests a cross-field current exists, and this is explained as a line-tying reaction to plasma rotation

  19. Local drift parameter, j/n/sub e/ and resistivity anomaly measurements in CTX spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoida, H.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Jarboe, T.R.; Marklin, G.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Knox, S.O.

    1985-01-01

    In a spheromak, the magnetic fields confining the plasma are generated primarily by internal currents rather than external coils. In order to provide information on the possible existence of current-driven microinstabilities, localized measurements of the ratio of the drift velocity of the electrons generating the internal current to their thermal velocity, V/sub d//V/sub th/ proportional to j/n/sub e/√T/sub e/ (known as the drift or streaming parameter), and j/n/sub e/ (proportional to V/sub d/) are needed. These microinstabilities are in some theories associated with an increase in the resistivity anomaly factor (eta/eta/sub Spitzer/). We present results on local measurements (at the magnetic axis) of the values of V/sub d//V/sub th/ and eta/eta/sub Spitzer/ by combining data from the spatially-resolved diagnostics employed on the CTX spheromak experiment, coupled with current density profile information from equilibrium measurements. The values of V/sub d//V/sub th/ and j/n/sub e/ appear to be correlated with local variations in eta/eta/sub Spitzer/, and can be changed by varying the plasma density. Data sets are presented for three values of n/sub e/

  20. A spheromak ignition experiment reusing Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    Based on available experimental results and theory, a scenario is presented to achieve ohmic ignition in a spheromak by slow (∼ 10 sec.) helicity injection using power from the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation. Some of the other parts needed (vacuum vessel, coils, power supplies, pumps, shielded building space) might also be obtained from MFTF or other salvage, as well as some components needed for intermediate experiments for additional verification of the concept (especially confinement scaling). The proposed ignition experiment would serve as proof-of-principle for the spheromak DT fusion reactor design published by Hagenson and Krakowski, with a nuclear island cost about ten times less than a tokamak of comparable power. Designs at even higher power density and lower cost might be possible using Christofilos' concept of a liquid lithium blanket. Since all structures would be protected from neutrons by the lithium blanket and the tritium inventory can be reduced by continuous removal from the liquid blanket, environmental and safety characteristics appear to be favorable

  1. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis; Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  2. Effect of the helicity injection rate and the Lundquist number on spheromak sustainment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Martínez, Pablo Luis, E-mail: pablogm@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) and Sede Andina—Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (UNRN), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Lampugnani, Leandro Gabriel; Farengo, Ricardo [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche (CAB-CNEA), Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina)

    2014-12-15

    The dynamics of the magnetic relaxation process during the sustainment of spheromak configurations at different helicity injection rates is studied. The three-dimensional activity is recovered using time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A cylindrical flux conserver with concentric electrodes is used to model configurations driven by a magnetized coaxial gun. Magnetic helicity is injected by tangential boundary flows. Different regimes of sustainment are identified and characterized in terms of the safety factor profile. The spatial and temporal behavior of fluctuations is described. The dynamo action is shown to be in close agreement with existing experimental data. These results are relevant to the design and operation of helicity injected devices, as well as to basic understanding of the plasma relaxation mechanism in quasi-steady state.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of spheromak with spheroidal plasma-vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Kamitani, Atsushi; Takimoto, Akio.

    1985-05-01

    The analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation are obtained for a prolate and an oblate spheroidal plasma by using Hill's vortex model. Effects of a toroidal magnetic field Bsub(phi) on the MHD equilibrium configurations are investigated by using these analytic solutions. When Bsub(phi) is larger than that of the force-free configuration, the spheroidal plasmas in a vacuum magnetic field are shown to be unable in the MHD equilibrium. The several physical quantities on the equilibrium configuration are evaluated. The spheromak plasma is proved to be unstable if dp/d psi not equal 0 and d 2 V/d psi 2 >= 0 on the magnetic axis. Here p is the pressure and V(psi) the volume surrounded by a magnetic surface of psi=const. The equilibrium configurations of the spheroidal plasmas by using Hill's vortex model are shown to satisfy the above conditions, i.e., to be unstable. (author)

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of spheromak with spheroidal plasma-vacuum interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Kamitani, Atsushi; Takimoto, Akio

    1985-01-01

    The analytic solutions to the Grad-Shafranov equation are obtained for a prolate and an oblate spheroidal plasma by using Hill's vortex model. Effects of a toroidal magnetic field Bsub(phi) on the MHD equilibrium configurations are investigated by using these analytic solutions. When Bsub(phi) is stronger than that of the force-free configuration, the spheroidal plasmas in a vacuum magnetic field are shown to be unable in the MHD equilibrium. The several physical quantities on the equilibrium configuration are evaluated. The spheromak plasma is proved to be unstable if dp/d psi not equal 0 and d 2 V/d psi 2 >= 0 on the magnetic axis. Here p is the pressure and V(psi) the volume surrounded by a magnetic surface of psi = const. The equilibrium configurations of the spheroidal plasmas by using Hill's vortex model are shown to satisfy the above conditions, i.e., to be unstable. (author)

  5. Relaxation and particle diffusion in the Proto S-1/C spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between relaxation and particle diffusion in the Proto S-1C spheromak has been studied. The plasma was formed in a magnetic configuration which was not the minimum-energy Taylor state, and went through a period of relaxation before its magnetic configuration was that of the Taylor state. Early in the relaxation phase, the internal and external magnetic fluctuations were correlated and it was found that, at the time of peak amplitude, they had a radial structure of a tearing mode. After the reconnection of these modes, the plasma continued to evolve towards the Taylor state with only small magnetic fluctuations at the center of plasma. The local particle diffusion coefficient was measured in these Proto S-1C discharges, the technique used was to inject a delta-function source of impurities into the plasma and observe the motion of the impurities relative to the flux surface. It was found that, during the decay phase of the spheromak discharge, when the plasma was in a Taylor state, the carbon diffusion coefficient was explained classically. While the plasma was relaxing towards the Taylor state, the diffusion coefficient was 2 ∼ 4a times larger than classical. At this time, the plasma was not yet force-free. This nonclassical diffusion appears to have been caused by v/sub ExB/ velocities due to correlations between the fluctuating electric field and density. Because the v/sub ExB/ velocity acts on all of the plasma species similarly, the anomalous hydrogen-particle diffusion coefficient should have been as large as that of carbon

  6. Experimental identification of the kink instability as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S C; Bellan, P M

    2003-05-30

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma. Onset of column kinking agrees quantitatively with the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and the kink acts as a dynamo which converts toroidal to poloidal flux. Regime II clearly leads to both poloidal flux amplification and the development of a spheromak configuration.

  7. Experimental identification of the kink instability as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, S.C.; Bellan, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma. Onset of column kinking agrees quantitatively with the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and the kink acts as a dynamo which converts toroidal to poloidal flux. Regime II clearly leads to both poloidal flux amplification and the development of a spheromak configuration

  8. Current-driven instabilities of the kinetic shear Alfven wave: Application to reversed field pinches and spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Perkins, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetic Alfven wave is studied in a cylindrical force-free plasma with self-consistent magnetic fields. This equilibrium represents a reversed field pinch or a spheromak. The stability of the wave is found to depend on the ratio of the electron drift velocity to the Alfven velocity. This ratio varies inversely with the square root of the plasma line density. The critical line density using the Spitzer--Harm electron distribution function is found for reversed field pinches with deuterium plasmas to be approximately 2 x 10 18 and is 5 x 10 17 m -1 in spheromaks with hydrogen plasmas. The critical line density is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for reversed field pinches

  9. Experimental Identification of the Kink Instability as a Poloidal Flux Amplification Mechanism for Coaxial Gun Spheromak Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S. C.; Bellan, P. M.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic kink instability is observed and identified experimentally as a poloidal flux amplification mechanism for coaxial gun spheromak formation. Plasmas in this experiment fall into three distinct regimes which depend on the peak gun current to magnetic flux ratio, with (I) low values resulting in a straight plasma column with helical magnetic field, (II) intermediate values leading to kinking of the column axis, and (III) high values leading immediately to a detached plasma...

  10. Energy conversion and concentration in a high-current gaseous discharge: Dense plasma spheromak in plasma focus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, A.B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V.A.; Terentiev, A.R.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which verify the possibility of the self-generated transformation of the magnetic field in plasma focus discharges to give a closed, spheromak-like magnetic configuration (SLMC). The energy conversion mechanism suggests a possibility of further concentrating the plasma power density by means of natural compressing the SLMC-trapped plasma by the residual magnetic field of the plasma focus discharge

  11. 3-D MHD modeling and stability analysis of jet and spheromak plasmas launched into a magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward; Arge, C. Nick

    2016-10-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) at the University of New Mexico uses a coaxial plasma gun to launch jet and spheromak magnetic plasma configurations into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) plasma device. Plasma structures launched from the gun drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the background magnetic field of the chamber providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, and shocks. Preliminary modeling is presented using the highly-developed 3-D, MHD, BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets, and is particularly suited to model the parameter regime under investigation. CCD images and magnetic field data from the experiment suggest the stabilization of an m =1 kink mode trailing a plasma jet launched into a background magnetic field. Results from a linear stability code investigating the effect of shear-flow as a cause of this stabilization from magnetic tension forces on the jet will be presented. Initial analyses of a possible magnetic Rayleigh Taylor instability seen at the interface between launched spheromaks and their entraining background magnetic field will also be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  12. HIFLUX: OBLATE FRCS, DOUBLE HELICES,SPHEROMAKS AND RFPS IN ONE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHAFFER, M.J.; BOEDO, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 High magnetic flux is required for thermonuclear FRC reactors and, more immediately, to advance the FRC experimental program in general. Oblate FRCs are of special interest because they are predicted to have certain improved MHD stability over elongated FRCs, and oblate FRCs may yield the most compact, magnetically confined fusion reactors. Neither oblate nor high-flux FRCs have been investigated experimentally to date. Our presently proposed technique is to make two high-flux, oppositely-handed plasmas by a pair of large, external, reversed-field pinch (RFP) sources. The plasmas would propagate as two Taylor-relaxed double-helix plasmas, to an oblate main plasma chamber, where they would relax further to a counter-helicity pair of spheromaks, which would finally merge into a single high-flux FRC. A concept for a new experimental facility, HIFLUX, to make and study high-magnetic-flux oblate Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas, is described. Similar principles might also enable high flux non-inductive startup of other plasma devices

  13. Formation and sustainment of field reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by spheromak merging and neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Masaaki [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey USA (United States)

    2016-03-25

    This paper briefly reviews a compact toroid reactor concept that addresses critical issues for forming, stabilizing and sustaining a field reversed configuration (FRC) with the use of plasma merging, plasma shaping, conducting shells, neutral beam injection (NBI). In this concept, an FRC plasma is generated by the merging of counter-helicity spheromaks produced by inductive discharges and sustained by the use of neutral beam injection (NBI). Plasma shaping, conducting shells, and the NBI would provide stabilization to global MHD modes. Although a specific FRC reactor design is outside the scope of the present paper, an example of a promising FRC reactor program is summarized based on the previously developed SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasmas by Induction, Reconnection and Injection Techniques) concept in order to connect this concept to the recently achieved the High Performance FRC plasmas obtained by Tri Alpha Energy [Binderbauer et al, Phys. Plasmas 22,056110, (2015)]. This paper includes a brief summary of the previous concept paper by M. Yamada et al, Plasma Fusion Res. 2, 004 (2007) and the recent experimental results from MRX.

  14. Configuration of gun-generated spheromak in effectively closed metal flux conserver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yushi; Nishikawa, Masahiro; Honda, Yoshihide; Satomi, Norio; Watanabe, Kenji

    1988-01-01

    In the CTCC-II spheromak experiment, the gun-generated plasma is confined in a spheroidal aluminum flux conserver (FC) with a choking coil. This coil produces the additional magnetic field to close perfectly all magnetic surfaces into the FC, i.e. the entrance hole for plasma injection is enable to be closed by magnetic field. Hence the plasma is confined in the effectively closed metal FC. In this experiment the average life time is 1.2 msec, and electron density and temperature are n e = 2 x 10 13 /cc, T e = 30 eV, respectively. The configuration with a flux hole region in which the toroidal magnetic field vanishes around the geometrical axis has been observed in the FC. The radius of the flux hole depends on the condition how the external choking field is applied. The flux hole enhances the magnetic shear near the plasma surfaces and, therefore, has a stabilizing effect even without inserting the central conducting pole. (author)

  15. Theoretical aspects of the use of pulsed reflectometry in a spheromak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B. J., LLNL

    1998-06-11

    Pulsed reflectometry using both ordinary (O) and extraordinary (X) modes has the potential of providing time and space-resolved measurements of the electron density, the magnitude of the magnetic field, and the magnetic shear as a function of radius. Such a diagnostic also yields the current profile from the curl of the magnetic field. This research addresses theoretical issues associated with the use of reflectometry in the SSPX spheromak experiment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We have extended a reflectometry simulation model to accommodate O and X-mode mixed polarization and linear mode conversion between the two polarizations. A Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys (WKBJ) formula for linear mode conversion agrees reasonably well with direct numerical solutions of the wave equation, and we have reconstructed the magnetic pitch-angle profile by matching the results of the WKBJ formula with the mode conversion data observed in simulations using a least-squares determination of coefficients in trial functions for the profile. The reflectometry data also yield information on fluctuations. Instrumental issues, e.g., the effects of microwave mixers and filters on model reflectometry pulses, have been examined to optimize the performance of the reflectometry diagnostics.

  16. Dynamics of spheromak-like compact toroids in a drift tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Hayashi, T.

    2001-01-01

    In order to supply plasma fuel confined in spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) to a fusion device, the SCTs must be successfully guided through a drift tube region, in which they might be influenced by the magnetic field leaking from the fusion device. To reveal the SCT dynamics in a drift tube, MHD numerical simulations, where the SCTs are accelerated in a co-axial perfectly conducting cylinder with an external magnetic field, are carried out. In addition, the effect of an extended central electrode is examined by changing the length of the inner conducting cylinder. It is revealed that the SCT penetration depth is shorter than that estimated from the conventional conducting sphere model and that the SCTs are further decelerated by extending the inner conducting cylinder. These results are consistent with the results of the compact toroid injection experiment performed on the TEXT Upgrade tokamak. Finally, the deceleration mechanism of the SCTs is discussed by comparing the simulation result with the proposed theoretical model. (author)

  17. Interaction of a spheromak-like compact toroid with a high beta spherical tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.Q.; McLean, H.S.; Baker, K.L.; Evans, R.W.; Horton, R.D.; Terry, S.D.; Howard, S.; Schmidt, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments using accelerated spheromak-like compact toroids (SCTs) to fuel tokamak plasmas have quantified the penetration mechanism in the low beta regime; i.e. external magnetic field pressure dominates plasma thermal pressure. However, fusion reactor designs require high beta plasma and, more importantly, the proper plasma pressure profile. Here, the effect of the plasma pressure profile on SCT penetration, specifically, the effect of diamagnetism, is addressed. It is estimated that magnetic field pressure dominates penetration even up to 50% local beta. The combination of the diamagnetic effect on the toroidal magnetic field and the strong poloidal field at the outer major radius of a spherical tokamak will result in a diamagnetic well in the total magnetic field. Therefore, the spherical tokamak is a good candidate to test the potential trapping of an SCT in a high beta diamagnetic well. The diamagnetic effects of a high beta spherical tokamak discharge (low aspect ratio) are computed. To test the penetration of an SCT into such a diamagnetic well, experiments have been conducted of SCT injection into a vacuum field structure which simulates the diamagnetic field effect of a high beta tokamak. The diamagnetic field gradient length is substantially shorter than that of the toroidal field of the tokamak, and the results show that it can still improve the penetration of the SCT. Finally, analytic results have been used to estimate the effect of plasma pressure on penetration, and the effect of plasma pressure was found to be small in comparison with the magnetic field pressure. The penetration condition for a vacuum field only is reported. To study the diamagnetic effect in a high beta plasma, additional experiments need to be carried out on a high beta spherical tokamak. (author)

  18. The dynomak: An advanced spheromak reactor concept with imposed-dynamo current drive and next-generation nuclear power technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, D.A., E-mail: das1990@uw.edu; Jarboe, T.R.; Morgan, K.D.; Pfaff, M.; Lavine, E.S.; Kamikawa, Y.; Hughes, M.; Andrist, P.; Marklin, G.; Nelson, B.A.

    2014-04-15

    A high-β spheromak reactor concept has been formulated with an estimated overnight capital cost that is competitive with conventional power sources. This reactor concept utilizes recently discovered imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) and a molten salt (FLiBe) blanket system for first wall cooling, neutron moderation and tritium breeding. Currently available materials and ITER-developed cryogenic pumping systems were implemented in this concept from the basis of technological feasibility. A tritium breeding ratio (TBR) of greater than 1.1 has been calculated using a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) neutron transport simulation. High temperature superconducting tapes (YBCO) were used for the equilibrium coil set, substantially reducing the recirculating power fraction when compared to previous spheromak reactor studies. Using zirconium hydride for neutron shielding, a limiting equilibrium coil lifetime of at least thirty full-power years has been achieved. The primary FLiBe loop was coupled to a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle due to attractive economics and high thermal efficiencies. With these advancements, an electrical output of 1000 MW from a thermal output of 2486 MW was achieved, yielding an overall plant efficiency of approximately 40%.

  19. The impedance of energy efficiency of a coaxial magnetized plasma source used for spheromak formation and sustainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Marklin, G.J.; Knox, S.O.; Henins, I.

    1989-01-01

    Electrostatic (dc) helicity injection has previously been shown to successfully sustain the magnetic fields of spheromaks and tokamaks. The magnitude of the injected magnetic helicity balances (within experimental error) the flux lost be resistive decay of the toroidal equilibrium. The problem of optimizing this current drive scheme hence involves maximizing the injected helicity (the voltage-connecting-flux product) while minimizing the current (which multiplied by the voltage represents the energy input and also possible damage to the electrodes). The impedance (voltage-to-current ratio) and energy efficiency of a dc helicity injection experiment are studied on the CTX spheromak. Over several years changes were made in the physical geometry of the coaxial magnetized plasmas source as well as changes in the external electrical circuit. The source could be operated over a wide range of external charging voltage (and hence current), applied axial flux, and source gas flow rate. A database of resulting voltage, helicity injection, efficiency, electron density, and rotation has been created. These experimental results are compared to an ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory of magnetic flux flow. The theory is parameterized by the dimensionless Hall parameter, the ratio of electric to mass current. For a constant Hall parameter the theory explains why the voltage depends quadratically on the current at constant flux. The theory also explains the approximately linear dependence of the impedance-to-current ratio on the current-to-flux ratio of the source. 9 refs., 6 figs

  20. Magnetic structure in the entrance region of spheromaks sustained by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun under long pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Takaichi, Kazuaki; Katsurai, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic structure in coaxial-gun-sustained spheromaks has been investigated. The plasma gun has been operated with a small axial/radial bias magnetic flux as compared to the azimuthal magnetic flux produced by the discharge current. Stronger magnetic field is observed in the entrance region (ER) than in the flux conserver (FC). In both ER and FC, the magnetic structure is nearly axisymmetric. The axial magnetic field in ER is amplified up to about sixteen times as large as the bias magnetic field. This amplification is limited by the drastic change in the magnetic structure, which occurs when the discharge current becomes very large. The magnetic structure before the drastic change is interpreted with the Bessel function model. The μ estimation shows that the magnetic structure is mainly determined by the boundary geometry, not by the external magnetic flux and current. (author)

  1. Two-fluid (plasma-neutral) Extended-MHD simulations of spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experiment with PSI-Tet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    A self-consistent, two-fluid (plasma-neutral) dynamic neutral model has been implemented into the 3-D, Extended-MHD code PSI-Tet. A monatomic, hydrogenic neutral fluid reacts with a plasma fluid through elastic scattering collisions and three inelastic collision reactions: electron-impact ionization, radiative recombination, and resonant charge-exchange. Density, momentum, and energy are evolved for both the plasma and neutral species. The implemented plasma-neutral model in PSI-Tet is being used to simulate decaying spheromak configurations in the HIT-SI experimental geometry, which is being compare to two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements (TALIF) made on the HIT-SI3 experiment. TALIF is used to measure the absolute density and temperature of monatomic deuterium atoms. Neutral densities on the order of 1015 m-3 and neutral temperatures between 0.6-1.7 eV were measured towards the end of decay of spheromak configurations with initial toroidal currents between 10-12 kA. Validation results between TALIF measurements and PSI-Tet simulations with the implemented dynamic neutral model will be presented. Additionally, preliminary dynamic neutral simulations of the HIT-SI/HIT-SI3 spheromak plasmas sustained with inductive helicity injection will be presented. Lastly, potential benefits of an expansion of the two-fluid model into a multi-fluid model that includes multiple neutral species and tracking of charge states will be discussed.

  2. Visible Spectrometer at the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment, the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment and the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak for Doppler Width and Shift Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, A; Howard, S; Horton, R; Hwang, D; May, M; Beiersdorfer, P; McLean, H; Terry, J

    2006-05-15

    A novel Doppler spectrometer is currently being used for ion or neutral velocity and temperature measurements on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. The spectrometer has an f/No. of {approx}3.1 and is appropriate for visible light (3500-6700 {angstrom}). The full width at half maximum from a line emitting calibration source has been measured to be as small as 0.4 {angstrom}. The ultimate time resolution is line brightness light limited and on the order of ms. A new photon efficient detector is being used for the setup at C-Mod. Time resolution is achieved by moving the camera during a plasma discharge in a perpendicular direction through the dispersion plane of the spectrometer causing a vertical streaking across the camera face. Initial results from C-Mod as well as previous measurements from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) and the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) are presented.

  3. Safety assessment for the S-1 Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R. Jr.; Stencel, J.R.

    1984-02-01

    The S-1 machine is part of the Magnetic Fusion Program. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. S-1 is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power

  4. Current results from the Los Alamos CTX spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Knox, S.O.; Linford, R.K.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Continued discharge cleaning, improved vacuum practices, and optimized plasma formation operation have resulted in the CTX experiment achieving 1-ms plasma lifetimes with average temperatures of 20 to 40 eV. The major advance in operation has been the use of 5 to 20 mTorr H/sub 2/ gas fill. A multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic with 12 radial positions yields radial profiles of temperature and densities, an example of which is shown. Local ..beta..'s can be determined from the measured pressure profile, and average values are typically 15 to 20%. In clean, long-lived discharges the density decreases at a more rapid rate than the magnetic field, until it reaches a value around 2 to 4 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ where it remains constant. This is in contrast to the colder, radiation-dominated behavior, and is taken as evidence that the plasma ..beta.. is a limit to current operation in CTX.

  5. On the jets, kinks, and spheromaks formed by a planar magnetized coaxial gun

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S. C.; Bellan, P. M.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of the various plasma configurations produced by a planar magnetized coaxial gun provide insight into the magnetic topology evolution resulting from magnetic helicity injection. Important features of the experiments are a very simple coaxial gun design so that all observed geometrical complexity is due to the intrinsic physical dynamics rather than the source shape and use of a fast multiple-frame digital camera which provides direct imaging of topologically complex shapes and dy...

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of spheromak plasma in toroidal flux conserver with rectangular cross section, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Shobu; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Taguchi, Masayoshi.

    1985-08-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states by Hill's vortex model and by the Coulomb-wave-function model are proved to be unstable. New MHD equilibrium configurations are determined by using another model for which dp/dψ = 0 on the magnetic axis. Here p is the pressure and ψ is the flux function. The values of the safety factor on the magnetic axis, q axis , are evaluated for these configurations. The MHD stability of these equilibrium states is investigated by the Mercier criterion. The values of the maximum beta ratio β max are evaluated for this model. The optimized pressure distributions are determined by use of the Mercier criterion and the values of β max are also evaluated for these pressure distributions. The values of β max are shown to be at most 12 %, if the condition q axis < 1 is required. (author)

  7. Performance Projections For The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.L.; Berzak, T.; Gray, R.; Kaita, T.; Kozub, F.; Levinton, D.P.; Lundberg, J.; Manickam, G.V.; Pereverzev, K.; Snieckus, V.; Soukhanovskii, J.; Spaleta, D.; Stotler, T.; Strickler, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Zakharov, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium limiter in the CDX-U tokamak produced the largest relative increase (an enhancement factor of 5-10) in Ohmic tokamak confinement ever observed. The confinement results from CDX-U do not agree with existing scaling laws, and cannot easily be projected to the new lithium tokamak experiment (LTX). Numerical simulations of CDX-U low recycling discharges have now been performed with the ASTRA-ESC code with a special reference transport model suitable for a diffusion-based confinement regime, incorporating boundary conditions for nonrecycling walls, with fueling via edge gas puffing. This model has been successful at reproducing the experimental values of the energy confinement (4-6 ms), loop voltage (<0.5 V), and density for a typical CDX-U lithium discharge. The same transport model has also been used to project the performance of the LTX, in Ohmic operation, or with modest neutral beam injection (NBI). NBI in LTX, with a low recycling wall of liquid lithium, is predicted to result in core electron and ion temperatures of 1-2 keV, and energy confinement times in excess of 50 ms. Finally, the unique design features of LTX are summarized

  8. Control of the Helicity Content of a Gun-Generated Spheromak by Incorporating a Conducting Shell into a Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko

    In the formation of magnetized plasmoid by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the magnetic helicity content of the generated plasmoid is one of the critical parameters. Typically, the bias coil to generate a poloidal flux is mounted either on the outer electrode or inside the inner electrode. However, most of the flux generated in the conventional method spreads even radially outside of the formation region. Thus, only a fraction of the total magnetic flux is actually exploited for helicity generation in the plasmoid. In the proposed system, the plasma gun incorporates a copper shell mounted on the outer electrode. By changing the rise time of the discharge bias coil current and the geometrical structure of the shell, the magnetic field structure and its time evolution can be controlled. The effect of the copper shell has been numerically simulated for the actual gun structure, and experimentally confirmed. This may increase the magnetic helicity content results, through increased poloidal magnetic field.

  9. Validation of single-fluid and two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic models of the helicity injected torus spheromak experiment with the NIMROD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akcay, Cihan; Victor, Brian S.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Kim, Charlson C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a comparison study of 3-D pressureless resistive MHD (rMHD) and 3-D presureless two-fluid MHD models of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI). HIT-SI is a current drive experiment that uses two geometrically asymmetric helicity injectors to generate and sustain toroidal plasmas. The comparable size of the collisionless ion skin depth d i to the resistive skin depth predicates the importance of the Hall term for HIT-SI. The simulations are run with NIMROD, an initial-value, 3-D extended MHD code. The modeled plasma density and temperature are assumed uniform and constant. The helicity injectors are modeled as oscillating normal magnetic and parallel electric field boundary conditions. The simulations use parameters that closely match those of the experiment. The simulation output is compared to the formation time, plasma current, and internal and surface magnetic fields. Results of the study indicate 2fl-MHD shows quantitative agreement with the experiment while rMHD only captures the qualitative features. The validity of each model is assessed based on how accurately it reproduces the global quantities as well as the temporal and spatial dependence of the measured magnetic fields. 2fl-MHD produces the current amplification (I tor /I inj ) and formation time τ f demonstrated by HIT-SI with similar internal magnetic fields. rMHD underestimates (I tor /I inj ) and exhibits much a longer τ f . Biorthogonal decomposition (BD), a powerful mathematical tool for reducing large data sets, is employed to quantify how well the simulations reproduce the measured surface magnetic fields without resorting to a probe-by-probe comparison. BD shows that 2fl-MHD captures the dominant surface magnetic structures and the temporal behavior of these features better than rMHD

  10. Effects of Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiters on Spherical Torus Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gray, T.; Hoffman, D.; Jardin, S.; Kugel, H.; Marfuta, P.; Munsat, T.; Neumeyer, C.; Raftopoulos, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Seraydarian, R.P.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Baldwin, M.; Conn, R.W.; Maingi, R.; Menon, M.; Causey, R.; Buchenauer, D.; Ulrickson, M.; Jones, B.; Rodgers, D.

    2004-01-01

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a first wall has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter

  11. Effects of large area liquid lithium limiters on spherical torus plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gray, T.; Hoffman, D.; Jardin, S.; Kugel, H.; Marfuta, P.; Munsat, T.; Neumeyer, C.; Raftopoulos, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Seraydarian, R.P.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Baldwin, M.; Conn, R.W.; Maingi, R.; Menon, M.; Causey, R.; Buchenauer, D.; Ulrickson, M.; Jones, B.; Rodgers, D.

    2005-01-01

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a limiter has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter

  12. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Kozub, Thomas; Berzak, Laura; Hammett, Gregory; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Jacobson, Craig M.; Lucia, Matthew; Jones, Andrew; Lundberg, Daniel; Timberlake, John; Majeski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas wa...

  13. Current drive by neutral beams, rotating magnetic fields and helicity injection in compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farengo, R.; Arista, N.R.; Lifschitz, A.F.; Clemente, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of neutral beams (NB) for current drive and heating in spheromaks, the relaxed states of flux core spheromaks (FCS) sustained by helicity injection and the effect of ion dynamics on rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in spherical tokamaks (ST) are studied. (author)

  14. Recent progress on the HESS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, R.M.; Barnes, D.C.; Freeman, B.; Henins, I.; Jarboe, T.R.; Platts, D.

    1990-01-01

    The new objective of the Los Alamos spheromak program is to assess the use of magnetized plasmas as an energy transfer medium to accelerate material objects to hyper-velocities (approx-gt 20 km/s). In meeting this objective, the authors are committed to the subordinate goals of (1) creating high field, long-lived spheromak discharges, (2) examining the technical feasibility of employing High Explosives (HE) to compress seed spheromaks, and (3) investigate the technical requirements involved in forming spheromaks by Mechanical Helicity Injection (HMI) using HE. This paper describes the recent efforts of the CTR-5, M-4, and M-6 groups at Los Alamos in assessing the feasibility of generating magnetic helicity by mechanical means in the High Explosive Spheromak Source (HESS) experiment

  15. Enhanced Mode Conversion of Thermally Emitted Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW)to Extraordinary Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Efthimion, P.C.; Taylor, G.; Munsat, T.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Maingi, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Spaleta, J.

    2002-01-01

    In the CDX-U spherical torus, approximately 100% conversion of thermal EBWs to X-mode has been observed by controlling the electron density scale length (Ln) in the conversion region with a local limiter outside the last closed flux surface. The radiation temperature profile agrees with Thomson scattering electron temperature data. Results are consistent with theoretical calculations of conversion efficiency using measured Ln. By reciprocity of the conversion process, prospects for efficient coupling in EBW heating and current drive scenarios are strongly supported

  16. Enhanced Mode Conversion of Thermally Emitted Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW)to Extraordinary Mode; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B. Jones; P.C. Efthimion; G. Taylor; T. Munsat; J.R. Wilson; J.C. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; R. Maingi; S. Shiraiwa; J. Spaleta

    2002-01-01

    In the CDX-U spherical torus, approximately 100% conversion of thermal EBWs to X-mode has been observed by controlling the electron density scale length (Ln) in the conversion region with a local limiter outside the last closed flux surface. The radiation temperature profile agrees with Thomson scattering electron temperature data. Results are consistent with theoretical calculations of conversion efficiency using measured Ln. By reciprocity of the conversion process, prospects for efficient coupling in EBW heating and current drive scenarios are strongly supported

  17. Final Technical Report - ''Determining How Magnetic Helicity Injection Really Works''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul M. Bellan

    2005-01-01

    This research program involved direct observation of the complicated plasma dynamics underlying spheromak formation. Spheromaks are self-organizing magnetically dominated plasma configurations which potentially offer a simple, low-cost means for confining the plasma in a controlled thermonuclear fusion reactor. The spheromak source used in these studies was a coaxial co-planar magnetized plasma gun which was specifically designed to have the simplest relevant geometry. The simplicity of the geometry facilitated understanding of the basic physics and minimized confusion that would otherwise have resulted from complexities due to the experimental geometry. The coaxial plasma gun was mounted on one end of a large vacuum tank that had excellent optical access so the spheromak formation process could be tracked in detail using ultra-high speed cameras. The main accomplishments of this research program were (1) obtaining experimental data characterizing the detailed physics underlying spheromak formation and the development of new theoretical models motivated by these observations, (2) determining the relationship between spheromak physics and astrophysical jets, (3) developing a new high-speed camera diagnostic for the SSPX spheromak at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab, and (4) training graduate students and postdoctoral fellows

  18. Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

    2001-03-20

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter.

  19. Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter

  20. Two novel compact toroidal concepts with Stellarator features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-07-01

    Two novel compact toroidal concepts are presented. One is the Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP) and another is the Extreme-Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator (ELARS). An SSP device represents a hybrid between a spherical stellarator (SS) and a spheromak. This configuration retains the main advantages of spheromaks ans has a potential for improving the spheromak concept regarding its main problems. The MHD equilibrium in an SSP with very high β of the confined plasma is demonstrated. Another concept, ELARS, represents an extreme limit of the SS approach, and considers devices with stellarator features and aspect ratios A ∼ 1. We have succeeded in finding ELARS configurations with extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform, large plasma volume, and good particle transport characteristics

  1. Increasing the magnetic helicity content of a plasma by pulsing a magnetized source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, S; Stallard, B W; McLean, H S; Hooper, E B; Bulmer, R; Cohen, B I; Hill, D N; Holcomb, C T; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2004-11-12

    By operating a magnetized coaxial gun in a pulsed mode it is possible to produce large voltage pulses of duration approximately 500 mus while reaching a few kV, giving a discrete input of helicity into a spheromak. In the sustained spheromak physics experiment (SSPX), it is observed that pulsing serves to nearly double the stored magnetic energy and double the temperature. We discuss these results by comparison with 3D MHD simulations of the same phenomenon.

  2. Energy efficiency of the CTX magnetized coaxial plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Knox, S.O.; Platts, D.A.; McKenna, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    The energy efficiency of the CTX coaxial plasma source in creating spheromaks is determined experimentally to be in agreement with the theoretical prediction of lambda/sub sp//lambda/sub g/, where del x B = lambda/sub sp/ B in the spheromak, and lambda/sub g/ identical with μ 0 I/sub g//phi/sub g/ with I/sub g/ the source current and phi/sub g/ the magnetic flux through either source electrode. This is shown to be equivalent to magnetic helicity conservation. The spheromak impurity radiation was measured using an absolutely calibrated single chord bolometer system. The theoretical efficiency is within the experimental uncertainty of the ratio of spheromak radiated energy to source input energy in a group of ''dirty'' discharges. But the radiation measurement uncertainty is too large to determine whether a substantial part of the excess source energy not used in the production of spheromak magnetic energy is radiated from the spheromak volume

  3. Plasma response to sustainment with imposed-dynamo current drive in HIT-SI and HIT-SI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, A. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Chandra, R. N.; Morgan, K. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Penna, J. M.; Everson, C. J.; Nelson, B. A.

    2017-07-01

    The helicity injected torus—steady inductive (HIT-SI) program studies efficient, steady-state current drive for magnetic confinement plasmas using a novel experimental method. Stable, high-beta spheromaks have been sustained using steady, inductive current drive. Externally induced loop voltage and magnetic flux are oscillated together so that helicity and power injection are always positive, sustaining the edge plasma current indefinitely. Imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) theory further shows that the entire plasma current is sustained. The method is ideal for low aspect ratio, toroidal geometries with closed flux surfaces. Experimental studies of spheromak plasmas sustained with IDCD have shown stable magnetic profiles with evidence of pressure confinement. New measurements show coherent motion of a stable spheromak in response to the imposed perturbations. On the original device two helicity injectors were mounted on either side of the spheromak and the injected mode spectrum was predominantly n  =  1. Coherent, rigid motion indicates that the spheromak is stable and a lack of plasma-generated n  =  1 energy indicates that the maximum q is maintained below 1 during sustainment. Results from the HIT-SI3 device are also presented. Three inductive helicity injectors are mounted on one side of the spheromak flux conserver. Varying the relative injector phasing changes the injected mode spectrum which includes n  =  2, 3, and higher modes.

  4. Progress Towards High Performance, Steady-state Spherical Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Bush, C.; Choe, W.; Chrzanowski, J.; Darrow, D.S.; Diem, S.J.; Doerner, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ferron, J.R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Garstka, G.D.; Gates, D.A.; Gray, T.; Grisham, L.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.W.; Hoffman, D.; Jarboe, T.R.; Johnson, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.H.; Kissick, M.W.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.G.; Lewicki, B.T.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Mau, T.K.; Mazzucato, E.; Medley, S.S.; Menard, J.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B.A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ostrander, C.N.; Pacella, D.; Paoletti, F.; Park, H.K.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pinsker, R.; Probert, P.H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Redi, M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rosenberg, A.; Ryan, P.M.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Schaffer, M.; Schooff, R.J.; Seraydarian, R.; Skinner, C.H.; Sontag, A.C.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Stevenson, T.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.W.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Tritz, K.L.; Unterberg, E.A.; Von Halle, A.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J.R.; Xu, X.; Zweben, S.J.; Akers, R.; Barry, R.E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bialek, J.M.; Blagojevic, B.; Bonoli, P.T.; Carter, M.D.; Davis, W.; Deng, B.; Dudek, L.; Egedal, J.; Ellis, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fredd, E.; Glasser, A.; Gibney, T.; Gilmore, M.; Goldston, R.J.; Hatcher, R.E.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Houlberg, W.; Harvey, R.; Jardin, S.C.; Hosea, J.C.; Ji, H.; Kalish, M.; Lowrance, J.; Lao, L.L.; Levinton, F.M.; Luhmann, N.C.; Marsala, R.; Mastravito, D.; Menon, M.M.; Mitarai, O.; Nagata, M.; Oliaro, G.; Parsells, R.; Peebles, T.; Peneflor, B.; Piglowski, D.; Porter, G.D.; Ram, A.K.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G.; Roney, P.; Shaing, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Sichta, P.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.C.; Vero, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Wurden, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Research on the Spherical Torus (or Spherical Tokamak) is being pursued to explore the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more moderate aspect-ratio devices, such as the conventional tokamak. The Spherical Tours (ST) experiments are being conducted in various U.S. research facilities including the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and three medium-size ST research facilities: Pegasus at University of Wisconsin, HIT-II at University of Washington, and CDX-U at Princeton. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the U.S., an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a Demo device, are being discussed. For these, it is essential to develop high-performance, steady-state operational scenarios. The relevant scientific issues are energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta (B), noninductive sustainment, ohmic-solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In the confinement area, the NSTX experiments have shown that the confinement can be up to 50% better than the ITER-98-pby2 H-mode scaling, consistent with the requirements for an ST-based CTF and Demo. In NSTX, CTF-relevant average toroidal beta values bT of up to 35% with the near unity central betaT have been obtained. NSTX will be exploring advanced regimes where bT up to 40% can be sustained through active stabilization of resistive wall modes. To date, the most successful technique for noninductive sustainment in NSTX is the high beta-poloidal regime, where discharges with a high noninductive fraction (∼60% bootstrap current + neutral-beam-injected current drive) were sustained over the resistive skin time. Research on radio-frequency-based heating and current drive utilizing HHFW (High Harmonic Fast Wave) and EBW (Electron Bernstein Wave) is also pursued on NSTX, Pegasus, and CDX-U. For noninductive start-up, the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI), developed in HIT/HIT-II, has been adopted

  5. Improvement of tokamak performance by injection of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1992-12-01

    Concepts for improving tokamak performance by utilizing injection of hot electrons are discussed. Motivation of this paper is to introduce the research work being performed in this area and to refer the interested readers to the literature for more detail. The electron injection based concepts presented here have been developed in the CDX, CCT, and CDX-U tokamak facilities. The following three promising application areas of electron injection are described here: 1. Non-inductive current drive, 2. Plasma preionization for tokamak start-up assist, and 3. Charging-up of tokamak flux surfaces for improved plasma confinement. The main motivation for the dc-helicity injection current drive is in its efficiency that, in theory, is independent of plasma density. This property makes it attractive for driving currents in high density reactor plasmas

  6. Operational Characteristics of Liquid Lithium Divertor in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Abrams, T.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kallman, J.; Leblanc, B.; Mansfield, D.; Mueller, D.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Scotti, F.; Skinner, C. H.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Maingi, R.; Nygren, R.; Raman, R.; Sabbagh, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2010-11-01

    Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) have resulted in improved plasma performance on NSTX in deuterium H-mode plasmas with neutral beam heating.^ Salient results included improved electron confinement and ELM suppression. In CDX-U, the use of lithium-coated PFC's and a large-area liquid lithium limiter resulted in a six-fold increase in global energy confinement time. A Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) has been installed in NSTX for the 2010 run campaign. The LLD PFC consists of a thin film of lithium on a temperature-controlled substrate to keep the lithium liquefied between shots, and handle heat loads during plasmas. This capability was demonstrated when the LLD withstood a strike point on its surface during discharges with up to 4 MW of neutral beam heating.

  7. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFC's) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, T-11M, and FT-U. Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

  8. Application of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for formation of a high-beta field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishida, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Kiguchi, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Asai, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)]. E-mail: asai@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Matsuzawa, Y. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Okano, T. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Nogi, Y. [College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    We have tested a field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation with a spheromak injection for the first time. In this method, initial pre-ionized plasma is injected as a magnetized spheromak-like plasmoid into the discharge chamber prior to main field reversal. The FRC plasma with an electron density of 1.3 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}, a separatrix radius of 0.04 m and a plasma length of 0.8 m was produced successfully in initial background plasma of about 1.6 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} by spheromak injection. The density is about one third of the conventional formed by the z-ionized method.

  9. Reduction of plasma density in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance experiment by using a helicon pre-ionization source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossack, Aaron C.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Victor, Brian S.; Firman, Taylor; Prager, James R.; Ziemba, Timothy; Wrobel, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    A helicon based pre-ionization source has been developed and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance (HIT-SI) spheromak. The source initiates plasma breakdown by injecting impurity-free, unmagnetized plasma into the HIT-SI confinement volume. Typical helium spheromaks have electron density reduced from (2–3) × 10 19 m −3 to 1 × 10 19 m −3 . Deuterium spheromak formation is possible with density as low as 2 × 10 18 m −3 . The source also enables HIT-SI to be operated with only one helicity injector at injector frequencies above 14.5 kHz. A theory explaining the physical mechanism driving the reduction of breakdown density is presented

  10. Reduction of plasma density in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance experiment by using a helicon pre-ionization source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossack, Aaron C.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Victor, Brian S. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Firman, Taylor; Prager, James R.; Ziemba, Timothy [Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc., 119 W. Denny Way, Suite 210, Seattle, Washington 98119 (United States); Wrobel, Jonathan S. [979B West Moorhead Circle, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    A helicon based pre-ionization source has been developed and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance (HIT-SI) spheromak. The source initiates plasma breakdown by injecting impurity-free, unmagnetized plasma into the HIT-SI confinement volume. Typical helium spheromaks have electron density reduced from (2–3) × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} to 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Deuterium spheromak formation is possible with density as low as 2 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3}. The source also enables HIT-SI to be operated with only one helicity injector at injector frequencies above 14.5 kHz. A theory explaining the physical mechanism driving the reduction of breakdown density is presented.

  11. Particle transport and gas feed during gun injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T K.

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that ion and neutral transport during gun injection tends to equalize the density in the spheromak to that in the open-line current channel. Since a gun operating at or near the ion saturation current requires a minimum density, because of transport these gun requirements also determine a minimum density in the spheromak that increases as the field increases. Hence attaining high fields by gun injection sets lower limits on the density, which in turn limits the temperature of the plasma and increases its ohmic resistance. Estimates of these effects are given using 0-D models calibrated to CTX, as guidance to 2-D UEDGE calculations in progress. For gun power levels in SSPX and the Pulsed Spheromak reactor, we find that buildup persists to the highest field levels of interest

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory and Astrophysical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaeus, W.; Brown, M.

    2006-01-01

    This is the final technical report for a funded program to provide theoretical support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. We examined mhd relaxation, reconnecton between two spheromaks, particle acceleration by these processes, and collisonless effects, e.g., Hall effect near the reconnection zone,. Throughout the project, applications to space plasma physics and astrophysics were included. Towards the end of the project we were examining a more fully turbulent relaxation associated with unconstrained dynamics in SSX. We employed experimental, spacecraft observations, analytical and numerical methods.

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting, Innovative approaches to fusion energy, Pleasanton, CA, October 20-23, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    The Purpose of this Meeting is to provide a forum for discussion of approaches to fusion other than conventional tokamaks and stellarators, such as: (1) quasi-steady-state systems (mirrors, RFP's, spheromaks, FRC'S, spherical tori,...); (2) short-pulsed systems (liners, Z-pinch variants, plasma foci, novel ICF, ...); and (3) fusion technology innovations

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Particle Acceleration Processes: SSX Experiments, Theory, and Astrophysical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to provide theoretical and modeling support to the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). Accordingly, the theoretical effort was tightly integrated into the SSX experimental effort. During the grant period, Michael Brown and his experimental collaborators at Swarthmore, with assistance from W. Matthaeus as appropriate, made substantial progress in understanding the physics SSX plasmas

  15. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This annual report covers research progress on each of the following areas: (1) PLT device, (2) PDX, (3) spheromak, (4) smaller devices, (5) theory, (6) TFTR, (7) applied physics, (8) TFTR blanket module experiments, (9) advanced toroidal facility, (10) advanced projects design and analysis, (11) engineering, and (12) fabrication, operations and maintenance

  16. Physics issues of a proposed program, SPIRIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki

    2000-01-01

    Physics issues of the proposed program, SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasma with Induction, Reconnection, and Induction Techniques) are discussed. The main purpose of this program is to explore the physics of global stability and sustainment of compact toroids, including FRC (field reversed configuration) as well as low-aspect-ratio RFP (reversed field pinch), spheromak and spherical torus. (author)

  17. Parallel-beam correlation technique for measuring density fluctuations in plasmas with strong magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1981-04-01

    A laser diagnostic scheme is described which facilitates localization of density fluctuations along the line of sight. The method exploits both the generally observed anisotropy of density fluctuations in low-beta plasmas, as well as the twisting of the magnetic field which occurs across the minor diameter of reversed-field pinches, spheromaks, etc. Both interferometric and schlieren variations are discussed

  18. Theoretical plasma physics: Progress report, January 1, 1987-December 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.; Vahala, G.; Tracy, E.R.

    1987-09-01

    During the past year, research has been carried out on current drive in tokamaks and in spheromaks, fast integration techniques for magnetic field lines, alpha particle diagnostics that use CO 2 laser scattering, and plasma turbulence. This paper discusses this research

  19. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Summaries of research progress during this period are given for the following areas: (1) TFTR, (2) PLT, (3) PBX, (4) S-1 Spheromak, (5) Advanced Concepts Torus-1, (6) x-ray laser studies, (7) theory, (8) tokamak modeling, (9) spin-polarization, and (10) ignition studies

  20. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Progress made during this reporting period is reported for each of the following areas: (1) principal parameters achieved in experimental devices, (2) TFTR, (3) PLT, (4) PBX, (5) S-1 Spheromak, (6) advanced concepts Torus-1, (7) x-ray laser studies, (8) theory, (9) tokamak modeling, (10) reactor studies, (11) spin-polarized fusion program, (12) tokamak fusion core experiment, and (13) engineering

  1. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemon, R.E.

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations

  2. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: Annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Principle Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices (FY87); Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; Current-Drive Experiment; X-Ray Laser Studies; Theoretical Division; Tokamak Modeling; Compact Ignition Tokamak; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; Quality Assurance and Reliability; Administrative Operations; and PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures (FY87)

  3. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    This annual report covers research progress on each of the following areas: (1) PLT device, (2) PDX, (3) spheromak, (4) smaller devices, (5) theory, (6) TFTR, (7) applied physics, (8) TFTR blanket module experiments, (9) advanced toroidal facility, (10) advanced projects design and analysis, (11) engineering, and (12) fabrication, operations and maintenance. (MOW)

  4. Ultrasoft x-ray imaging system for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; May, M. J.; Moos, H. W.; Kaita, R.

    1999-01-01

    A spectrally resolved ultrasoft x-ray imaging system, consisting of arrays of high resolution (the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Initially, three poloidal arrays of diodes filtered for C 1s-np emission will be implemented for fast tomographic imaging of the colder start-up plasmas. Later on, mirrors tuned to the C Lyα emission will be added in order to enable the arrays to "see" the periphery through the hot core and to study magnetohydrodynamic activity and impurity transport in this region. We also discuss possible core diagnostics, based on tomographic imaging of the Lyα emission from the plume of recombined, low Z impurity ions left by neutral beams or fueling pellets. The arrays can also be used for radiated power measurements and to map the distribution of high Z impurities injected for transport studies. The performance of the proposed system is illustrated with results from test channels on the CDX-U spherical torus at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  5. ECH on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, T.S.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; Peng, M.; Wilson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating has been proposed for plasma initiation, startup assistance and non-inductive startup on NSTX. One physics goal of NSTX will be to establish entirely non-inductive plasma operation by utilizing ECH to provide a sufficient start-up plasma to support further current drive from other heating systems. Scaling of previous ECH-only startup experiments on CDX-U and DIII-D indicate that 400 kW of ECH should be capable of driving 42 kA of pressure driven current on NSTX and possibly higher levels after optimizing the process. Due to the low NSTX magnetic field, over-dense plasmas exist during most of the discharge so conventional ECH operation is limited to the low density startup phase. To extend the useful operating range for ECH, a scheme involving mode conversion to the electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) from either O or X mode launch is being investigated for bulk heating and current drive applications at higher density. Microwave equipment, including 18 GHz klystrons and 28 GHz gyrotrons are available at ORNL and appear ideal for use on NSTX. Preliminary pre-ionization and start-up system configurations are presented here along with discussions on various operation modes. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. ECH on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelow, T.S.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; Peng, M.; Wilson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating has been proposed for plasma initiation, startup assistance and non-inductive startup on NSTX. One physics goal of NSTX will be to establish entirely non-inductive plasma operation by utilizing ECH to provide a sufficient start-up plasma to support further current drive from other heating systems. Scaling of previous ECH-only startup experiments on CDX-U and DIII-D indicate that 400 kW of ECH should be capable of driving 42 kA of pressure driven current on NSTX and possibly higher levels after optimizing the process. Due to the low NSTX magnetic field, over-dense plasmas exist during most of the discharge so conventional ECH operation is limited to the low density startup phase. To extend the useful operating range for ECH, a scheme involving mode conversion to the electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) from either O r X mode launch is being investigated for bulk heating and current drive applications at higher density. Microwave equipment, including 18 GHz klystrons and 28 GHz gyrotrons are available at ORNL and appear ideal for use on NSTX. Preliminary pre-ionization and start-up system configurations are presented here along with discussions on various operation modes

  7. Application of Electron Bernstein Wave heating and current drive to high beta plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efthimion, P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW) can potentially heat and drive current in high-beta plasmas. Electromagnetic waves can convert to EBW via two paths. O-mode heating, demonstrated on W-7AS, requires waves be launched within a narrow k-parallel range. Alternately, in high-beta plasmas, the X-mode cutoff and EBW conversion layers are millimeters apart, so the fast X-mode can tunnel to the EBW branch. We are studying the conversion of EBW to the X-mode by measuring the radiation temperature of the cyclotron emission and comparing it to the electron temperature. In addition, mode conversion has been studied with an approximate kinetic full-wave code. We have enhanced EBW mode conversion to ∼ 100% by encircling the antenna with a limiter that shortens the density scale length at the conversion layer in the scrape off of the CDX-U spherical torus (ST) plasma. Consequently, a limiter in front of a launch antenna achieves efficient X-mode coupling to EBW. Ray tracing and Fokker-Planck codes have been used to develop current drive scenarios in NSTX high-beta (∼ 40%) ST plasmas and a relativistic code will examine the potential synergy of EBW current drive with the bootstrap current. (author)

  8. Liquid Lithium Limiter Effects on Tokamak Plasmas and Plasma-Liquid Surface Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; R. Doerner; G. Antar; M. Baldwin; R. Conn; P. Efthimion; M. Finkenthal; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; S. Krashenninikov; H. Kugel; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; J. Menard; T. Munsat; D. Stutman; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; V. Soukhanovskii; D. Whyte; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov

    2002-10-15

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors.

  9. Experiments with liquid metal walls: Status of the lithium tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, Robert, E-mail: kaita@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Berzak, Laura; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M.; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlake, John [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Abstarct: Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the current drive experiment-upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS). Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions.

  10. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, Robert; Berzak, Laura; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M.; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlak, John

    2010-01-01

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions.

  11. Filterscope diagnostic system on EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, Z.W.; Gao, W.; Zhang, L.; Huang, J.; Chen, Y.J.; Wu, C.R.; Zhang, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    Filterscope diagnostic system, which is designed for monitoring the line emission in fusion plasma has been widely used on fusion devices such as DIII-D, NSTX, CDX-U, KSTAR etc. On EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak), a filterscope diagnostic system has been mounted to observe the line emission and visible bremsstrahlung emission in plasma from discharge campaign of 2014. It plays a crucial role in studying Edge Localized Modes (ELM) and H-mode, thanks to its high temporal resolution (0.005ms) and good spatial resolution (∼2cm). Furthermore, multi-channel signals at up to 200kHz sampling rates can be digitized simultaneously. The wavelength covers He II (468.5nm), Li I (670.8nm), Li II (548.3nm), C III (465.0nm), O II (441.5nm), Mo I (386.4nm), W I (400.9nm) and visible bremsstrahlung radiation at 538nm besides Dα (656.1nm) and Dγ (433.9nm) with the corresponding wavelength filters. The new developed filterscope system was operating during the EAST 2014 fall experimental campaign and several types ELMs has been observed. (author)

  12. Liquid Lithium Limiter Effects on Tokamak Plasmas and Plasma-Liquid Surface Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Baldwin, M.; Conn, R.; Efthimion, P.; Finkenthal, M.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Krashenninikov, S.; Kugel, H.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Whyte, D.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.

    2002-01-01

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors

  13. Liquid lithium limiter effects on tokamak plasmas and plasma-liquid surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors. (author)

  14. Optimization of the Magnetic Field Structure for Sustained Plasma Gun Helicity Injection for Magnetic Turbulence Studies at the Bryn Mawr Plasma Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Sanchez, C. A.; Schaffner, D. A.; Johnson, H. K.; Fahim, L. E.

    2017-10-01

    A long-pulsed magnetic coaxial plasma gun is being implemented and characterized at the Bryn Mawr Plasma Laboratory (BMPL). A cold cathode discharged between the cylindrical electrodes generates and launches plasma into a 24cm diameter, 2m long chamber. Three separately pulsed magnetic coils are carefully positioned to generate radial magnetic field between the electrodes at the gun edge in order to provide stuffing field. Magnetic helicity is continuously injected into the flux-conserving vacuum chamber in a process akin to sustained slow-formation of spheromaks. The aim of this source, however, is to supply long pulses of turbulent magnetized plasma for measurement rather than for sustained spheromak production. The work shown here details the optimization of the magnetic field structure for this sustained helicity injection.

  15. Nonlinear electron magnetohydrodynamics physics. IV. Whistler instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2008-01-01

    A very large low-frequency whistler mode is excited with magnetic loop antennas in a uniform laboratory plasma. The wave magnetic field exceeds the ambient field causing in one polarity a field reversal, and a magnetic topology resembling that of spheromaks in the other polarity. These propagating ''whistler spheromaks'' strongly accelerate the electrons and create non-Maxwellian distributions in their toroidal current ring. It is observed that the locally energized electrons in the current ring excite new electromagnetic instabilities and emit whistler modes with frequencies unrelated to the applied frequency. Emissions are also observed from electrons excited in X-type neutral lines around the antenna. The properties of the excited waves such as amplitudes, frequency spectra, field topologies, propagation, polarization, growth, and damping have been investigated. The waves remain linear (B wave 0 ) and convert a small part of the electron kinetic energy into wave magnetic energy (B wave 2 /2μ 0 e )

  16. Review of recent experiments on magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, M.

    1995-02-01

    The present paper reviews recent laboratory experiments on magnetic reconnection. Examples will be drawn from electron current sheet experiments, merging spheromaks, and from high temperature tokamak plasmas with the Lundquist numbers exceeding 10 7 . These recent laboratory experiments create an environment which satisfies the criteria for MHD plasma and in which the global boundary conditions can be controlled externally. Experiments with fully three dimensional reconnection are now possible. In the most recent TFTR tokamak discharges, Motional Stark effect (MSE) data have verified the existence of a partial reconnection. In the experiment of spheromak merging, a new plasma acceleration parallel to the neutral line has been indicated. Together with the relationship of these observations to the analysis of magnetic reconnection in space and in solar flares, important physics issues such as global boundary conditions, local plasma parameters, merging angle of the field lines, and the 3-D aspects of the reconnection are discussed

  17. Los Alamos Compact Toroid, fast liner, and High-Density Z-Pinch programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Hammel, J.E.; Sherwood, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The compact Toroid and High Density Z-Pinch are two of the plasma configurations presently being studied at Los Alamos. This paper summarizes these two programs along with the recently terminated Fast Liner Program. Included in this discussion is an analysis of compact Toroid formation techniques showing the tearing and reconnection of the fields that separate the spheromak from the radial fields of the coaxial source, and the final equilibrium state of the elongated FRC in the theta-pinch coil. In addition the typical dimensions of the geometry of the Fast Liner experiments are delineated Z-pinch and electrode assembly is displayed as is a graphic of the temporal behavior of the current required for radial equilibrium. Spheromak is examined in terms of formation, gross stability, and equilibrium and field reversed configuration is discussed in terms of gross stability, equilibrium, and confinement scaling

  18. Compact toroidal plasmas: Simulations and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harned, D.S.; Hewett, D.W.; Lilliequist, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    Realistic FRC equilibria are calculated and their stability to the n=1 tilting mode is studied. Excluding kinetic effects, configurations ranging from elliptical to racetrack are unstable. Particle simulations of FRCs show that particle loss on open field lines can cause sufficient plasma rotation to drive the n=2 rotational instability. The allowed frequencies of the shear Alfven wave are calculated for use in heating of spheromaks. An expanded spheromak is introduced and its stability properties are studied. Transport calculations of CTs are described. A power balance model shows that many features of gun-generated CT plasmas can be explained by the dominance of impurity radiation. It is shown how the Taylor relaxation theory, applied to gun-generated CT plasmas, leads to the possibility of steady-state current drive. Lastly, applications of accelerated CTs are considered. (author)

  19. Conceptual design of a cassette compact toroid reactor (the zero-phase study) - Quick replacement of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Narikawa, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Watanabe, K.

    1986-01-01

    A study of a conceptual design for a ''cassette'' compact toroid reactor has been performed that emphasizes quick replacement handling. The core plasma, spheromak, is ohmically heated in a merging process between the core plasma and the gun-produced spheromak. The quick handling of replacement accomplished by using a functional material, a shape memory alloy (SMA) joint, which is proposed for release from first-wall high neutron loading in a newly devised mechanical and structural method. The SMA joint can be used for connecting or disconnecting the coupling by simply controlling the SMA temperature without the need for a robot system. Effective heat removal from the first wall and thermal and electromagnetic stress in a fusion core with very high heat flux are discussed from an engineering standpoint

  20. Generalized helicity and its time derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Marklin, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Spheromaks can be sustained against resistive decay by helicity injection because they tend to obey the minimum energy principle. This principle states that a plasma-laden magnetic configuration will relax to a state of minimum energy subject to the constraint that the magnetic helicity is conserved. Use of helicity as a constraint on the minimization of energy was first proposed by Woltjer in connection with astrophysical phenomena. Helicity does decay on the resistive diffusion time. However, if helicity is created and made to flow continuoiusly into a confinement geometry, these additional linked fluxes can relax and sustain the configuration indefinitely against the resistive decay. In this paper we will present an extension of the definition of helicity to include systems where B vector can penetrate the boundary and the penetration can be varying in time. We then discuss the sustainment of RFPs and spheromaks in terms of helicity injection

  1. Operation of SPHEX in helium and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, S.J.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    In the SPHEX spheromak a magnetised Marshall gun generates a toroidal plasma with embedded toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. The resulting spheromak plasma is almost entirely governed by the programmed gun flux, Ψ G . Surprisingly then following ejection, the voltage V G between the gun electrodes attains a value which is largely independent of Ψ G . The SPHEX power supply acts as an approximate current source, consequently V G is entirely determined by the non linear load presented to it by the plasma, for any given gun current. The signature of initial gas breakdown in the gun is a period of low V G (∼ 140 V) called the pedestal. This is interpreted as the electrode sheath voltage, and persists throughout the discharge. After the initial gas breakdown, the gun voltage remains at this pedestal voltage as the gun current builds up, until the instant of plasma ejection when it starts to rise rapidly. Ejection is governed by a simple force balance at the gun muzzle, occurring when the internal azimuthal field due to the gun current exceeds the external radial field from the gun solenoid. The sharp rise in V G continues until it reaches some critical value when it abruptly stops, suggesting that a breakdown of the 'magnetic insulation' occurs, which is then subsequently maintained at a finite V G throughout the discharge. This implied breakdown cannot be 'gas like' which would tend to reduce V G to the pedestal voltage and would divert all of the gun current from the spheromak, neither of which are seen. Nor can it be due to 'short flux' linking the gun electrodes (effectively bypassing the spheromak) since this would short out the electrodes at any voltage. We propose that the observed gun voltage is limited by breakdown of the azimuthal magnetic insulation between the gun electrodes, by ions which acquire enough energy so that their Larmor diameter equals the inter electrode gap. (author) 7 refs., 4 figs

  2. Annual report covering the period October 1, 1980 to September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.; Jones, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    Research during this period is described for each of the following areas: (1) Princeton Large Torus, (2) Poloidal Divertor Experiment, (3) Spheromak, (4) smaller devices, (5) x-ray laser studies, (6) theory, (7) TFTR, (8) applied physics, (9) design studies for new devices, (10) advanced projects design and analysis, (11) engineering, (12) fabrication, operations, and maintenance (13) Projects Office, (14) Computer Division, (15) Administration, and (16) Graduate Education

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1984-01-01

    Progress made during this reporting period is reported for each of the following areas: (1) principal parameters achieved in experimental devices, (2) TFTR, (3) PLT, (4) PBX, (5) S-1 Spheromak, (6) advanced concepts Torus-1, (7) x-ray laser studies, (8) theory, (9) tokamak modeling, (10) reactor studies, (11) spin-polarized fusion program, (12) tokamak fusion core experiment, and (13) engineering. (MOW)

  5. A laboratory plasma experiment for studying magnetic dynamics of accretion discs and jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S. C.; Bellan, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    This work describes a laboratory plasma experiment and initial results which should give insight into the magnetic dynamics of accretion discs and jets. A high-speed multiple-frame CCD camera reveals images of the formation and helical instability of a collimated plasma, similar to MHD models of disc jets, and also plasma detachment associated with spheromak formation, which may have relevance to disc winds and flares. The plasmas are produced by a planar magnetized coaxial gun. The resulting...

  6. Recent results in the Los Alamos compact torus program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W.T.; Barnes, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    A Compact Toroid is a toroidal magnetic-plasma-containment geometry in which no conductors or vacuum-chamber walls pass through the hole in the torus. Two types of compact toroids are studied experimentally and theoretically at Los Alamos: spheromaks that are oblate in shape and contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, and field-reversed configurations (FRC) that are very prolate and contain poloidal field only

  7. EMAPS: An Efficient Multiscale Approach to Plasma Systems with Non-MHD Scale Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omelchenko, Yuri A. [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, CA (United States); Karimabadi, Homa [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, CA (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Using Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) as a novel paradigm for time integration of large-scale physics-driven systems, we have achieved significant breakthroughs in simulations of multi-dimensional magnetized plasmas where ion kinetic and finite Larmor radius (FLR) and Hall effects play a crucial role. For these purposes we apply a unique asynchronous simulation tool: a parallel, electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) code, HYPERS (Hybrid Particle Event-Resolved Simulator), which treats plasma electrons as a charge neutralizing fluid and solves a self-consistent set of non-radiative Maxwell, electron fluid equations and ion particle equations on a structured computational grid. HYPERS enables adaptive local time steps for particles, fluid elements and electromagnetic fields. This ensures robustness (stability) and efficiency (speed) of highly dynamic and nonlinear simulations of compact plasma systems such spheromaks, FRCs, ion beams and edge plasmas. HYPERS is a unique asynchronous code that has been designed to serve as a test bed for developing multi-physics applications not only for laboratory plasma devices but generally across a number of plasma physics fields, including astrophysics, space physics and electronic devices. We have made significant improvements to the HYPERS core: (1) implemented a new asynchronous magnetic field integration scheme that preserves local divB=0 to within round-off errors; (2) Improved staggered-grid discretizations of electric and magnetic fields. These modifications have significantly enhanced the accuracy and robustness of 3D simulations. We have conducted first-ever end-to-end 3D simulations of merging spheromak plasmas. The preliminary results show: (1) tilt-driven relaxation of a freely expanding spheromak to an m=1 Taylor helix configuration and (2) possibility of formation of a tilt-stable field-reversed configuration via merging and magnetic reconnection of two double-sided spheromaks with opposite helicities.

  8. (Fusion energy research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  9. Tilt stability of rotating current rings with passive conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibel, E.G.; Pomphrey, N.

    1984-12-01

    We study the combined effects of rotation and resistive passive conductors on the stability of a rigid current in an external magnetic field. We present numerical and approximate analytical solutions to the equations of motion, which show that the ring is always tilt unstable on the resistive decay timescale of the conductors, although rotation and eddy currents may stabilize it over short times. Possible applications of our model include spheromaks which rotate or which are encircled by energetic particle rings

  10. Compact toroids with Alfvenic flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhehui; Tang, X.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The Chandrasekhar equilibria form a class of stationary ideal magnetohydrodynamics equilibria stabilized by magnetic-field-aligned Alfvenic flows. Analytic solutions of the Chandrasekhar equilibria are explicitly constructed for both field-reversed configurations and spheromaks. Favorable confinement property of nested closed flux surfaces and the ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of the compact toroids are of interest for both magnetic trapping of high energy electrons in astrophysics and confinement of high temperature plasmas in laboratory

  11. Spherical tokamak without external toroidal fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.; Avinash, K.; Srinivasan, R.

    2001-01-01

    A spherical tokamak design without external toroidal field coils is proposed. The tokamak is surrounded by a spheromak shell carrying requisite force free currents to produce the toroidal field in the core. Such equilibria are constructed and it is indicated that these equilibria are likely to have robust ideal and resistive stability. The advantage of this scheme in terms of a reduced ohmic dissipation is pointed out. (author)

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations

  13. [Fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer

  14. MHD stability studies in the Proto S-1 A/B device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, C.; Janos, A.; Newhouse, M.; Salberta, E.; Wysocki, F.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of the gross MHD stability properties of Spheromak plasmas in the Proto S-1 A/B device is presented. Utilizing the previously demonstrated S-1 slow formation technique, plasmas have been produced which exhibit the predicted tilting instability in a regime of slightly negative field index. A relatively simple passive coil system suggested by numerical stability studies has proven to be effective in stabilizing the observed tilting mode

  15. NIMROD simulations and physics assessment of possible designs for a next generation Steady Inductive Helicity Injection HIT device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, James; Morgan, Kyle; Grubb, Isaac; Jarboe, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus - Steady Inductive 3 (HIT-SI3) experiment forms and maintains spheromaks via Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (SIHI) using discrete injectors that inject magnetic helicity via a non-axisymmetric perturbation and drive toroidally symmetric current. Newer designs for larger SIHI-driven spheromaks incorporate a set of injectors connected to a single external manifold to allow more freedom for the toroidal structure of the applied perturbation. Simulations have been carried out using the NIMROD code to assess the effectiveness of various imposed mode structures and injector schema in driving current via Imposed Dynamo Current Drive (IDCD). The results are presented here for varying flux conserver shapes on a device approximately 1.5 times larger than the current HIT-SI3 experiment. The imposed mode structures and spectra of simulated spheromaks are analyzed in order to examine magnetic structure and stability and determine an optimal regime for IDCD sustainment in a large device. The development of scaling laws for manifold operation is also presented, and simulation results are analyzed and assessed as part of the development path for the large scale device.

  16. Experimental investigation of coaxial-gun-formed plasmas injected into a background transverse magnetic field or plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Fisher, Dustin M.; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott C.; Lynn, Alan G.

    2018-05-01

    Injection of coaxial-gun-formed magnetized plasmas into a background transverse vacuum magnetic field or into a background magnetized plasma has been studied in the helicon-cathode (HelCat) linear plasma device at the University of New Mexico [M. Gilmore et al., J. Plasma Phys. 81, 345810104 (2015)]. A magnetized plasma jet launched into a background transverse magnetic field shows emergent kink stabilization of the jet due to the formation of a sheared flow in the jet above the kink stabilization threshold 0.1kVA [Y. Zhang et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 110702 (2017)]. Injection of a spheromak-like plasma into a transverse background magnetic field led to the observation of finger-like structures on the side with a stronger magnetic field null between the spheromak and the background field. The finger-like structures are consistent with magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Jets or spheromaks launched into a background, low-β magnetized plasma show similar behavior as above, respectively, in both cases.

  17. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. IV. Unusual Magnetic Cloud and Overall Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Chertok, I. M.; Belov, A. V.; Filippov, B. P.; Slemzin, V. A.; Jackson, B. V.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic superstorm of 20 November 2003 with Dst=-422 nT, one of the most intense in history, is not well understood. The superstorm was caused by a moderate solar eruptive event on 18 November, comprehensively studied in our preceding Papers I - III. The analysis has shown a number of unusual and extremely complex features, which presumably led to the formation of an isolated right-handed magnetic-field configuration. Here we analyze the interplanetary disturbance responsible for the 20 November superstorm, compare some of its properties with the extreme 28 - 29 October event, and reveal a compact size of the magnetic cloud (MC) and its disconnection from the Sun. Most likely, the MC had a spheromak configuration and expanded in a narrow angle of ≤ 14∘. A very strong magnetic field in the MC up to 56 nT was due to the unusually weak expansion of the disconnected spheromak in an enhanced-density environment constituted by the tails of the preceding ICMEs. Additional circumstances favoring the superstorm were i) the exact impact of the spheromak on the Earth's magnetosphere and ii) the almost exact southward orientation of the magnetic field, corresponding to the original orientation in its probable source region near the solar disk center.

  18. The Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Deuterium Retention in Solid and Liquid Lithium Films on Molybdenum Plasma-Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) enable in-situ renewal of the surface, thereby offering a solution to neutron damage, erosion, and thermal fatigue experienced by solid PFCs. Lithium in particular has a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, which has resulted in reduced recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices including TFTR, T11-M, FTU, CDX-U, LTX, TJ-II, and NSTX. A key component to the improvement in plasma performance is deuterium retention in Li; however, this process is not well understood in the complex tokamak environment. Recent surface science experiments conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have used electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption to understand the mechanisms for D retention in Li coatings on Mo substrates. The experiments were designed to give monolayer-control of Li films and were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum under controlled environments. An electron cyclotron resonance plasma source was used to deliver a beam of deuterium ions to the surface over a range of ion energies. Our work shows that D is retained as LiD in metallic Li films. However, when oxygen is present in the film, either by diffusion from the subsurface at high temperature or as a contaminant during the deposition process, Li oxides are formed that retain D as LiOD. Experiments indicate that LiD is more thermally stable than LiOD, which decomposes to liberate D2 gas and D2O at temperatures 100 K lower than the LiD decomposition temperature. Other experiments show how D retention varies with substrate temperature to provide insight into the differences between solid and liquid lithium films. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Multilayer mirror based monitors for impurity controls in large fusion reactor type devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, S.P.; May, M.J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Multilayer Mirror (MLM) based monitors are compact, high throughput diagnostics capable of extracting XUV emissions (the wavelength range including the soft-x-ray and the extreme ultraviolet, 10 angstrom to 304 angstrom) of impurities from the harsh environment of large fusion reactor type devices. For several years the Plasma Spectroscopy Group at Johns Hopkins University has investigated the application of MLM based XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas. MLM based monitors have been constructed for and extensively used on DIII-D, Alcator C-mod, TEXT, Phaedrus-T, and CDX-U tokamaks to study the impurity behavior of elements ranging from He to Mo. On ITER MLM based devices would be used to monitor the spectral line emissions from Li I-like to F I-like charge states of Fe, Cr, and Ni, as well as extractors for the bands of emissions from high Z elements such as Mo or W for impurity controls of the fusion plasma. In addition to monitoring the impurity emissions from the main plasma, MLM based devices can also be adapted for radiation measurements of low Z elements in the divertor. The concepts and designs of these MLM based monitors for impurity controls in ITER will be presented. The results of neutron irradiation experiments of the MLMs performed in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will also be discussed. These preliminary neutron exposure studies show that the dispersive and reflective qualities of the MLMs were not affected in a significant manner

  20. ARIES-ST STUDIES REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 1, 1998 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V.S. CHAN; L.L. LAO; Y.R. LIN-LIU; R.L. MILLER; T.W. PETRIE; P.A. POLITZER; R. PRATER; M.J. SCHAFFER; G.M. STAEBLER; R.D. STAMBAUGH; A.D. TURNBULL; W.P.WEST

    1999-01-01

    During 1998, the General Atomics (GA) ARIES-Spherical Torus (ST) team examined several critical issues related to the physics performance of the ARIES-ST design, and a number of suggestions were made concerning possible improvements in performance. These included specification of a reference plasma equilibrium, optimization about the reference equilibrium to achieve higher beta limits, examination of three possible schemes for plasma initiation, development of a detailed scenario for ramp-up of the plasma current and pressure to its full, final operating values, an assessment of the requirement for electron confinement, and several suggestions for divertor heat flux reduction. The reference equilibrium was generated using the TOQ code, with the specification of a 100%, self-consistent bootstrap current. The equilibrium has β = 51%, 10% below the stability limit (a margin specified by the ARIES-ST study). In addition, a series of intermediate equilibria were defined, corresponding to the ramp-up scenario discussed. A study of the influence of shaping on ARIES-ST performance indicates that significant improvement in both kink and ballooning stability can be obtained by modest changes in the squareness of the plasma. In test equilibria the ballooning beta limit is increased from 58% to 67%. Also the maximum allowable plasma-wall separation for kink stability can be increased by 30%. Three schemes were examined for noninductive plasma initiation. These are helicity injection (HICD), electron cyclotron heating (ECH)-assisted startup, and inductive startup using only the external equilibrium coils. HICD startup experiments have been done on the HIT and CDX devices. ECH-assisted startup has been demonstrated on CDX-U and DIII-D. External coil initiation is based on calculations for a proposed DIII-D experiment. In all cases, plasma initiation and preparation of an approximately 0.3 MA plasma for ARIES-ST appears entirely feasible

  1. 13th TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. BARNES

    2000-07-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau} > 2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves which can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large K{sub i}. This talk reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0} {approx} 2 kG, {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e} {approx} 10 - 200 eV. Results will be presented for both direct detection of EBWs and for mode-converted EBW emission. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {le} T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe was employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Changes in the mode conversion efficiency may explain the observation of mode-converted EBW radiation temperatures below T{sub e}. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce}.

  2. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, J.P.; Rokusek, D.L.; Harilal, S.S.; Nieto-Perez, M.; Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.W.; Heim, B.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2009-01-01

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  3. 13. TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.

    2000-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. ω pe >> (Omega) ce in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition (τ > 2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves which can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large K i . This talk reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B 0 ∼ 2 kG, e > ∼ 10 13 cm -3 and T e ∼ 10 - 200 eV. Results will be presented for both direct detection of EBWs and for mode-converted EBW emission. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be ≤ T e and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe was employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Changes in the mode conversion efficiency may explain the observation of mode-converted EBW radiation temperatures below T e . Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where ω pe >> (Omega) ce

  4. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Spaleta, J.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either ''overdense,'' operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g., ω pe >>Omega ce in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition (τ>2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers as a result of their large k perp . In this article we report on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B 0 ∼2kG, e >∼10 13 cm -3 and T e ∼10--200eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be ≤T e and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in the edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where ω pe >>Omega ce

  5. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. III. Catastrophe of the Eruptive Filament at a Magnetic Null Point and Formation of an Opposite-Handedness CME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uralov, A. M.; Grechnev, V. V.; Rudenko, G. V.; Myshyakov, I. I.; Chertok, I. M.; Filippov, B. P.; Slemzin, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Our analysis in Papers I and II (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. 289, 289, 2014b and Solar Phys. 289, 1279, 2014c) of the 18 November 2003 solar event responsible for the 20 November geomagnetic superstorm has revealed a complex chain of eruptions. In particular, the eruptive filament encountered a topological discontinuity located near the solar disk center at a height of about 100 Mm, bifurcated, and transformed into a large cloud, which did not leave the Sun. Concurrently, an additional CME presumably erupted close to the bifurcation region. The conjectures about the responsibility of this compact CME for the superstorm and its disconnection from the Sun are confirmed in Paper IV (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys. submitted, 2014a), which concludes about its probable spheromak-like structure. The present article confirms the presence of a magnetic null point near the bifurcation region and addresses the origin of the magnetic helicity of the interplanetary magnetic clouds and their connection to the Sun. We find that the orientation of a magnetic dipole constituted by dimmed regions with the opposite magnetic polarities away from the parent active region corresponded to the direction of the axial field in the magnetic cloud, while the pre-eruptive filament mismatched it. To combine all of the listed findings, we propose an intrinsically three-dimensional scheme, in which a spheromak-like eruption originates via the interaction of the initially unconnected magnetic fluxes of the eruptive filament and pre-existing ones in the corona. Through a chain of magnetic reconnections their positive mutual helicity was transformed into the self-helicity of the spheromak-like magnetic cloud.

  6. Fluctuations in three Los Alamos experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    We review results from three magnetic fusion experiments at Los Alamos: the ZT-40M, a reversed-field toroidal pinch; the CTX, a spheromak produced by a magnetized coaxial source; and the FRX-C, a field-reversed configuration generated by theta-pinch techniques. These experiments share the common feature that a major fraction of the confining magnetic field is associated with currents carried by the plasma. We emphasize here the important role that fluctuations play in the maintenance and evolution of these configurations

  7. Large density amplification measured on jets ejected from a magnetized plasma gun

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Gunsu S.; You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Observation of a large density amplification in the collimating plasma jet ejected from a coplanar coaxial plasma gun is reported. The jet velocity is ~30 km s^-1 and the electron density increases from ~10^20 to 10^(22–23) m^-3. In previous spheromak experiments, electron density of the order 10^(19–21) m^-3 had been measured in the flux conserver region, but no density measurement had been reported for the source gun region. The coplanar geometry of our electrodes permits direct observation...

  8. Start-up scenario of compact tori based on REB-injection developed in SPAC-group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, K.

    1981-01-01

    Quasi-static start-up of compact tori without toroidal field coil is reviewed thoroughly in a proposal of the S-1 spheromak. During the formation phase we should note that the rapid heat loss from the plasma will give a bad effect for the generation of the confinement configuration. In the case of fast start-up of the configuration plasma can safely pass over the dangerous state of the instability toward the desirable stable state with a bonus of producing hot plasma. By this reason it is intended to discuss a fast start-up scenario of the compact tori based on REB injection developed in SPAC group

  9. Spatiotemporal Signal Analysis via the Phase Velocity Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattor, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    The phase velocity transform (PVT) is an integral transform that divides a function of space and time into components that propagate at uniform phase velocities without distortion. This paper examines the PVT as a method to analyze spatiotemporal fluctuation data. The transform is extended to systems with discretely sampled data on a periodic domain, and applied to data from eight azimuthally distributed probes on the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). This reveals features not shown by Fourier analysis, particularly regarding nonsinusoidal mode structure. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  10. Operation of SPHEX in helium and deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, S.J.; Rusbridge, M.G. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    In the SPHEX spheromak a magnetised Marshall gun generates a toroidal plasma with embedded toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields. The resulting spheromak plasma is almost entirely governed by the programmed gun flux, {Psi}{sub G}. Surprisingly then following ejection, the voltage V{sub G} between the gun electrodes attains a value which is largely independent of {Psi}{sub G}. The SPHEX power supply acts as an approximate current source, consequently V{sub G} is entirely determined by the non linear load presented to it by the plasma, for any given gun current. The signature of initial gas breakdown in the gun is a period of low V{sub G} ({approx} 140 V) called the pedestal. This is interpreted as the electrode sheath voltage, and persists throughout the discharge. After the initial gas breakdown, the gun voltage remains at this pedestal voltage as the gun current builds up, until the instant of plasma ejection when it starts to rise rapidly. Ejection is governed by a simple force balance at the gun muzzle, occurring when the internal azimuthal field due to the gun current exceeds the external radial field from the gun solenoid. The sharp rise in V{sub G} continues until it reaches some critical value when it abruptly stops, suggesting that a breakdown of the `magnetic insulation` occurs, which is then subsequently maintained at a finite V{sub G} throughout the discharge. This implied breakdown cannot be `gas like` which would tend to reduce V{sub G} to the pedestal voltage and would divert all of the gun current from the spheromak, neither of which are seen. Nor can it be due to `short flux` linking the gun electrodes (effectively bypassing the spheromak) since this would short out the electrodes at any voltage. We propose that the observed gun voltage is limited by breakdown of the azimuthal magnetic insulation between the gun electrodes, by ions which acquire enough energy so that their Larmor diameter equals the inter electrode gap. (author) 7 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Theory and application of maximum magnetic energy in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic energy in an inductively driven steady-state toroidal plasma is a maximum for a given rate of dissipation of energy (Poynting flux). A purely resistive steady state of the piecewise force-free configuration, however, cannot exist, as the periodic removal of the excess poloidal flux and pressure, due to heating, ruptures the static equilibrium of the partitioning rational surfaces intermittently. The rupture necessitates a plasma with a negative q'/q (as in reverse field pinches and spheromaks) to have the same α in all its force-free regions and with a positive q'/q (as in tokamaks) to have centrally peaked α's

  12. Engineering design of the FRX-C experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kewish, R.W. Jr.; Bartsch, R.R.; Siemon, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Research on Compact Toroid (CT) configurations has been greatly accelerated in the last few years because of their potential for providing a practical and economical fusion system. Los Alamos research is being concentrated on two types of configurations: (1) magnetized-gun-produced Spheromaks (configurations that contain a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields); and (2) field-reversed configurations (FRCs) that contain purely poloidal magnetic field. This paper describes the design of FRX-C, a field-reversed theta pinch used to form FRCs

  13. Identification of Y-shaped and O-shaped diffusion regions during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, H.; Hsu, S.; Carter, T.; Kulsrud, R.; Ono, Yasushi; Perkins, F.

    1997-01-01

    Two strikingly different shapes of diffusion regions are identified during magnetic reconnection in a magnetohydrodynamic laboratory plasma. The shapes depend on the third vector component of the reconnecting magnetic fields. Without the third component (anti-parallel or null-helicity reconnection), a thin double-Y shaped diffusion region is identified. In this case, the neutral sheet current profile is accurately measured to be as narrow as the order of the ion gyro-radius. In the presence of an appreciable third component (co-helicity reconnection), an O-shaped diffusion region appears and grows into a spheromak configuration

  14. In Situ Heating of the 2007 May 19 CME Ejecta Detected by STEREO/PLASTIC and ACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Cara E. Rakowski,1 J. Martin Laming2 & Maxim Lyutikov3 ABSTRACT In situ measurements of ion charge states can provide unique insight into the heating...2010) found ideal self-similar solutions for expanding spheromak, with electric fields E = r c α̇ α er ×B (2) – 6 – (dot denotes differentiation with...the electric field should be related to the cur- rent density through Ohm’s law. Formally, the procedure described below breaks down the assumption of

  15. Advanced concepts in the United States fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of the magnetic fusion program is to establish the scientific and technological base for fusion energy. Development of a variety of magnetic confinement systems is essential to achieving that goal. The role of the advanced concepts program is to conduct experimental investigations of confinement concepts other than the tokamaks and tandem mirror concepts. The present advanced concepts program consists of the reversed-field-pinch (RFP), the spheromak and the field-reversed configuration (FRC). Significant new experiments in the RFP and FRC concepts have been approved and are described

  16. Equilibrium of the kink source experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The kink source experiment (KSX) was conceived of as a method of injecting helicity into a spheromak making special use of the m = 1 helical Taylor state. It has a Z pinch as a helicity generating source, connected to a flux conserver through an entrance region. Since the entrance region is a long (length > diameter) cyclinder, the magnetic field should be close to the helical Taylor state, which is the minimum energy configuration of a magnetized plasma in an infinite cylinder with no net flux. This paper will be concerned with modeling the actual fields in the entrance region of the KSX using zero-beta ideal MHD equilibrium theory

  17. Critical bias fields for tilting stability in the BETA-II experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalhed, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    The PEST equilibrium code and the GATO ideal MHD stability code have been modified to study stability properties of Spheromak configurations. Of particular interest is the effect on tilting modes of perfectly conducting walls which do not link the plasma. This paper makes use of equilibria and conducting walls specifically designed to model the BETA-II experiment at LLNL. Onset of the tilting mode is determined as a function of the bias magnetic field. Comparison with available experimental data shows promising agreement with the numerical results

  18. Final Technical Report for NSF/DOE partnership grant ER54905; 2006-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The nonlinear physics of electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) in plasmas. Time-varying wave magnetic field exceeding the background magnetic field produces highly nonlinear whistler mode since the wave dispersion depends on the total magnetic field. There exists no theory for such whistler modes. The present experimental work is the first one to explore this regime of nonlinear whistlers. A field-reversed configuration has been found which has the same vortex topology as an MHD spheromak, termed a whistler spheromak. Whistler mirrors have compressed and twisted field lines propagating in the whistler mode. Their helicity properties have been studied. Whistler spheromaks and mirrors have different propagation and damping characteristics. Wave collisions have been studied. Head-on collisions of two whistler spheromaks form a stationary field-reversed configuration (FRC) without helicity. When whistler spheromaks are excited the toroidal current flows mainly in the toroidal null line. It is only carried by electrons since ion currents and displacement currents are negligible. A change in the poloidal (axial) magnetic field induces a toroidal electric field which drives the current. Magnetic energy is dissipated and converted into electron kinetic energy. This process is called magnetic reconnection in 2D geometries, which are simplifications for theoretical convenience but rarely occur in nature. A crucial aspect of reconnection is its rate, determined by the electron collisionality. Regular Coulomb collisions can rarely account for the observed reconnection rates. In the present experiments we have also observed fast reconnection and explained it by electron transit time damping in the finite-size null layer. Electrons move faster than a whistler spheromak, hence transit through the toroidal null line where they are freely accelerated. The transit time is essentially the collision time but no particle collisions are required. Strong electron heating and visible light

  19. Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10 6 frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs

  20. Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M. [Applied Physics, Caltech, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10{sup 6} frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs.

  1. Compact toroid theory issues and approaches: a panel report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    In the six years since the initiation of the compact toroid program by the Office of Fusion Energy, remarkable scientific advances have occurred on both field-reversed configurations (FRC) and spheromaks. This progress has been stimulated by a diverse experimental program with facilities at six laboratories, and by a small but nevertheless broad theoretical research effort encompassing more than a dozen institutions. The close coupling between theoretical and experimental programs has contributed immeasurably to this progress. This document offers guidance for future compact toroid theory by identifying and discussing the key physics issues. In most cases promising approaches to these issues are offered

  2. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  3. Magnetic vortex growth in the transition layer of a mildly relativistic plasma shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G. C.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Drury, L. O'C.

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional particle simulation models the collision of two electron-ion plasma clouds along a quasiparallel magnetic field. The collision speed is 0.9c and the density ratio, 10. A current sheet forms at the front of the dense cloud, in which the electrons and the magnetic field reach energy equipartition with the ions. A structure composed of a solenoidal and a toroidal magnetic field grows in this sheet. It resembles the cross-section of the torus of a spheromak, which may provide the coherent magnetic fields in gamma-ray burst jets needed for their prompt emissions.

  4. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY84 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and PPPL's largest tokamak, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) had a complete year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak was in operation and the RF Test Facility came on-line. The phased approach of TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the addition of neutron monitors. During CY84 there were no adverse effects to the environment resulting from any operational program at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations

  5. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A. [University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  6. Theoretical aspects of magnetic helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic helicity, usually defined as K=integralA.Bdv, where A is the vector potential and B the magnetic field, measures the topological linkage of magnetic fluxes. Helicity manifests itself in the twistedness and knottedness of flux tubes. Its significance is that it is an ideal MHD invariant. While the helicity formalism has proven very useful in understanding reversed field pinch and spheromak behavior, some problems exist in applying the method consistently for complex (e.g., toroidal) conductor geometries or in situations where magnetic flux penetrates conducting walls. Recent work has attempted to generalize K to allow for all possible geometries

  7. Noninductive Current Generation in NSTX using Coaxial Helicity Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T.R.; Mueller, D.; Schaffer, M.J.; Maqueda, R.; Nelson, B.A.; Sabbagh, S.; Bell, M.; Ewig, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Gates, D.; Hosea, J.; Jardin, S.; Ji, H.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.M.; Kugel, H.; Lao, L.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Orvis, D.; Paul, S.; Peng, M.; Skinner, C.H.; Wilgen, J.B.; Zweben, S.

    2001-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has produced 240 kA of toroidal current without the use of the central solenoid. Values of the current multiplication ratio (CHI produced toroidal current/injector current) up to 10 were obtained, in agreement with predictions. The discharges which lasted for up to 200 ms, limited only by the programmed waveform, are more than an order of magnitude longer in duration that any CHI discharges previously produced in a Spheromak or a Spherical Torus (ST)

  8. New method for computing ideal MHD normal modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysocki, F.; Grimm, R.C.

    1984-11-01

    Analytic elimination of the two magnetic surface components of the displacement vector permits the normal mode ideal MHD equations to be reduced to a scalar form. A Galerkin procedure, similar to that used in the PEST codes, is implemented to determine the normal modes computationally. The method retains the efficient stability capabilities of the PEST 2 energy principle code, while allowing computation of the normal mode frequencies and eigenfunctions, if desired. The procedure is illustrated by comparison with earlier various of PEST and by application to tilting modes in spheromaks, and to stable discrete Alfven waves in tokamak geometry

  9. Proceedings of the seventh symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, A.R.

    1986-09-01

    The Seventh Symposium on Compact Toroid (CT) Research was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 21-23, 1985. As has been the case for the last few CT symposia, CT research progress was reported in a combination of invited talks and poster sessions. The following record of these presentations in the form of four page papers is in keeping with the format followed in previous years. We have continued the practice of dividing the papers into three subject categories - spheromak, FRC (Field Reversed Configuration), and other (mostly particle rings)

  10. Application of Coaxial Ion Gun for Film Generation and Ion Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, Mikio; Asai, Tomohiko; Kurumi, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) is here utilized for deposition on high-melting-point metals. MCPGs have hitherto been studied mostly in the context of nuclear fusion research, for particle and magnetic helicity injection and spheromak formation. During spheromak formation, the electrode materials are ionized and mixed into the plasmoid. In this study, this ablation process by gun-current sputtering is enhanced for metallic thin-film generation. In the proposed system geometry, only ionized materials are electromagnetically accelerated by the self-Lorentz force, with ionized operating gas as a magnetized thermal plasmoid, contributing to the thin-film deposition. This reduces the impurity and non-uniformity of the deposited thin-film. Furthermore, as the ions are accelerated in a parallel direction to the injection axis, vertical implantation of the ions into the substrate surface is achieved. To test a potential application of the developed system, experiments were conducted involving the formation of a buffer layer on hard ceramics, for use in dental materials.

  11. Effects of the current boundary conditions at the plasma-gun gap on density in SSPX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Roman; Lodestro, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.

    2012-10-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) was a toroidal magnetic-confinement device without toroidal magnetic-field coils or a central transformer but which generated core-plasma currents by dynamo processes driven by coaxial plasma-gun injection into a flux-conserving vessel. Record electron temperatures in a spheromak (Te˜500eV) were achieved, and final results of the SSPX program were reported in [1]. Plasma density, which depended strongly on wall conditions, was an important parameter in SSPX. It was observed that density rises with Igun and that confinement improved as the density was lowered. Shortly after the last experiments, a new feature was added to the Corsica code's solver used to reconstruct SSPX equilibria. Motivated by n=0 fields observed in NIMROD simulations of SSPX, an insulating boundary condition was implemented at the plasma-gun gap. Using this option we will perform new reconstructions of SSPX equilibria and look for correlations between the location of the separatrix (which moves up the gun wall and onto the insulating gap as Igun increases) and plasma density and magnetic-flux amplification [2].[4pt] [1] H. S. McLean, APS, DPP, Dallas, TX, 2008.[0pt] [2] E. B. Hooper et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, 1064 (2007).

  12. Progress on FIR interferometry and Thomson Scattering measurements on HIT-SI3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Christopher; Jarboe, Thomas; Morgan, Kyle

    2017-10-01

    Spatially resolved measurements of the electron temperature (Te) and density (ne) will be fundamental in assessing the degree to which HIT-SI3 demonstrates closed magnetic flux and energy confinement. Further, electron temperature measurements have not yet been made on an inductively-driven spheromak. Far infrared (FIR) interferometer and Thomson Scattering (TS) systems have been installed on the HIT-SI3 spheromak. The TS system currently implemented on HIT-SI3 was originally designed for other magnetic confinement experiments, and progress continues toward modifying and optimizing for HIT-SI3 plasmas. Initial results suggest that the electron temperature is of order 10 eV. Plans to modify the TS system to provide more sensitivity and accuracy at low temperatures are presented. The line-integrated ne is measured on one chord by the FIR interferometer, with densities near 5x1019 m-3. Four cylindrical volumes have been added to the HIT-SI3 apparatus to enhance passive pumping. It is hoped that this will allow for more control of the density during the 2 ms discharges. Density measurements from before and after the installation of the passive pumping volumes are presented for comparison.

  13. Recent results of the RECE-Christa experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taggart, D.; Parker, M.; Hopman, H.; Jayakumar, R.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is primarily a description of recent experimental studies in the RECE-Christa device on the dynamics and stability characteristics of mixed-CT configurations which are generated by inducing sizable plasma ring currents in field-reversing E-layers. Other potential CT configurations, in particular the Spheromak-type, have been projected theoretically and also observed experimentally to have a strong tendency towards tilt-instability except under certain circumstances which would tend to exclude potentially very interesting reactor designs. Based on the fact that this instability has never been observed in field-reversing large-orbit electron ring experiments (probably due to coupling through the large-orbit particles between the tilt motion and the internal length parameters of the rings), it has been suggested (4) that this problem may be avoided by adding large-orbit particles carrying some of the ring current to the normal Spheromak configuration. Also, recent theoretical analyses using the angular momentum of the fact particles indicate a stabilizing tendency, although we believe this mechanism is resistively unstable. The present experiments are the first to test this situation, with the results indicating good gross stability even in cases with large plasma currents. In addition we report the generation of highly elongated E-layers and preliminary results of trapping experiments in low toroidal (B/sub theta/) fields

  14. Merging formation of FRC and its application to high-beta ST formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ueda, Y.; Matsuyama, T.; Ohshima, Y.; Katsurai, M.

    2001-01-01

    Merging formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) explored not only a new scenario of highly-efficient FRC formation/amplification experiment but also a new boundary research between FRC, spheromak and spherical tokamak (ST). A new finding is that the produced FRC is transformed stably into an ultra-high-β ST by applying external toroidal field B t,ext . The toroidal field was observed to vanish around magnetic axis after the B t,ext application to the FRC, indicating formation of diamagnetic ST. The hollow current profile of FRC was maintained during the equilibrium transition, eliminating a need for the difficult hollow-current-formation process of start-up discharge of high-β ST. The energy-conversion effect of merging transformed the force-free merging spheromaks with paramagnetic current into the FRC with diamagnetic current and the further application of B t,ext did the FRC into the ultra-high-β (>60%)/diamagnetic ST, indicating the close relationship between FRC and ST in second stability. (author)

  15. Numerical Study of Field-reversed Configurations: The Formation and Ion Spin-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, E.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Cothran, C.D.; Brown, M.R.; Schaffer, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are presented. Emphasis of this work is on the nonlinear evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in kinetic FRCs, and the new FRC formation method by counter-helicity spheromak merging. Kinetic simulations show nonlinear saturation of the n = 1 tilt mode, where n is the toroidal mode number. The n = 2 and n = 3 rotational modes are observed to grow during the nonlinear phase of the tilt instability due to the ion spin-up in the toroidal direction. The ion toroidal spin-up is shown to be related to the resistive decay of the internal flux, and the resulting loss of particle confinement. Three-dimensional MHD simulations of counter-helicity spheromak merging and FRC formation show good qualitative agreement with results from the SSX-FRC experiment. The simulations show formation of an FRC in about 20-30 Alfven times for typical experimental parameters. The growth rate of the n = 1 tilt mode is shown to be significantly reduced compared to the MHD growth rate due to the large plasma viscosity and field-line-tying effects

  16. Numerical Study of the Formation, Ion Spin-up and Nonlinear Stability Properties of Field-reversed Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, E.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Cothran, C.D.; Brown, M.R.; Schaffer, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of field-reversed configurations (FRCs) are presented. Emphasis of this work is on the nonlinear evolution of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in kinetic FRCs and the new FRC formation method by the counter-helicity spheromak merging. Kinetic simulations show nonlinear saturation of the n = 1 tilt mode, where n is the toroidal mode number. The n = 2 and n = 3 rotational modes are observed to grow during the nonlinear phase of the tilt instability due to the ion spin-up in the toroidal direction. The ion toroidal spin-up is shown to be related to the resistive decay of the internal flux, and the resulting loss of particle confinement. Three-dimensional MHD simulations of counter-helicity spheromak merging and FRC formation show good agreement with results from the SSX-FRC experiment. Simulations show formation of an FRC in about 30 Alfven times for typical experimental parameters. The growth rate of the n = 1 tilt mode is shown to be significantly reduced compared to the MHD growth rate due to the large plasma viscosity and field-line-tying effects

  17. Observations and modeling of magnetized plasma jets and bubbles launched into a transverse B-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward B., IV; van der Holst, Bart; Rogers, Barrett N.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2017-10-01

    Hot, dense, plasma structures launched from a coaxial plasma gun on the HelCat dual-source plasma device at the University of New Mexico drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the chamber's background magnetic field providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, shocks, as well as CME-like dynamics possibly relevant to the solar corona. Vector magnetic field data from an eleven-tipped B-dot rake probe and images from an ultra-fast camera will be presented in comparison with ongoing MHD modeling using the 3-D MHD BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid (AMR) that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets and is uniquely suited for flux-rope expansion modeling. Recent experiments show a possible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability that appears asymmetrically at the interface between launched spheromaks (bubbles) and their entraining background magnetic field. Efforts to understand this instability using in situ measurements, new chamber boundary conditions, and ultra-fast camera data will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  18. An Overview of Research and Design Activities at CTFusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, D. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Hossack, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    CTFusion, a newly formed company dedicated to the development of compact, toroidal fusion energy, is a spin-off from the University of Washington that will build upon the successes of the HIT-SI research program. The mission of the company to develop net-gain fusion power cores that will serve as the heart of economical fusion power plants or radioactive-waste destroying burner reactors. The overarching vision and development plan of the company will be presented, along with a detailed justification and design for our next device, the HIT-TD (Technology Demonstration) prototype. By externally driving the edge current and imposing non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations, HIT-TD should demonstrate the sustainment of stable spheromak configurations with Imposed-Dynamo Current Drive (IDCD), as was accomplished in the HIT-SI device, with higher current gains and temperatures than previously possible. HIT-TD, if successful, will be an instrumental step along this path to economical fusion energy, and will serve as the stepping stone to our Proof-Of-Principle device (HIT-PoP). Beyond the implications of higher performance, sustained spheromaks for fusion applications, the HIT-TD platform will provide a unique system to observe plasma self-organizational phenomena of interest for other fusion devices, and astrophysical systems as well. Lastly, preliminary nuclear engineering design simulations with the MCNP6 code of the HIT-FNSF (Fusion Nuclear Science Facility) device will be presented.

  19. Initial Results of the SSPX Transient Internal Probe System for Measuring Toroidal Field Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, C. T.; Jarboe, T. R.; Mattick, A. T.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.; Cellamare, V.

    2000-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) is using a field profile diagnostic called the Transient Internal Probe (TIP). TIP consists of a verdet-glass bullet that is used to measure the magnetic field by Faraday rotation. This probe is shot through the spheromak by a light gas gun at speeds near 2 km/s. An argon laser is aligned along the path of the probe. The light passes through the probe and is retro-reflected to an ellipsometer that measures the change in polarization angle. The measurement is spatially resolved down to the probes’ 1 cm length to within 15 Gauss. Initial testing results are given. This and future data will be used to determine the field profile for equilibrium reconstruction. TIP can also be used in conjunction with wall probes to map out toroidal mode amplitudes and phases internally. This work was performed under the auspices of US DOE by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  20. Recent results from the HIT-II and HIT-SI helicity injection current drive experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.; Hamp, W.T.; Izzo, V.A.; Nelson, B.A.; O'Neill, R.G.; Raman, R.; Redd, A.J.; Sieck, P.E.; Smith, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Three important results are reported. 1) CHI startup has produced 100 kA of closed current without using poloidal field (PF) coils or any transformer action. The initial equilibrium is then driven to 240 kA with a 3 V transformer loop voltage, indicating high quality plasma. 2) For the first time CHI alone has produced toroidal currents (350 kA) that far exceed q a I inj , and with I p /I tf as high as 1.2. The key to these new results appears to be having the toroidal field small enough that relaxation will occur. 3) The steady inductive helicity injection spheromak experiment has operated at 5 kHz for 6 ms with current amplitudes up to 11 kA in each injector. The helicity injection rate is nearly constant with the ExB flow always into the plasma and not into the walls. NIMROD simulations of HIT-SI show a buildup of spheromak fields. (author)

  1. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, V.A.; Jarboe, T.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive drive (HIT-SI) [P. E. Sieck, W. T. Hamp, V. A. Izzo, T. R. Jarboe, B. A. Nelson, R. G. O'Neill, A. J. Redd, and R. J. Smith, IEEE Conference Record-Abstracts. 31st IEEE International Conference On Plasma Science (IEEE Catalog No. 04CH37537), 2004, p. 160] is a spheromak driven by steady inductive helicity injection (SIHI) and consists of the toroidally symmetric spheromak confinement region and two nonsymmetric helicity injectors. The three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic code NIMROD [A. H. Glasser, C. R. Sovinec, R. A. Nebel, T. A. Gianakon, S. J. Plimpton, M. S. Chu, and D. D. Schnack, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 41, A747 (1999)] is used to simulate HIT-SI operation, but the code's toroidally symmetric boundary requires a creative treatment of the injectors. Sustained HIT-SI operation is simulated with nonaxisymmetric boundary conditions. In driven simulations at low Lundquist number S no n=0 fields are generated as a result of relaxation of the predominantly n=1 injector fields until the injectors are quickly shut off. At S=500, an n=0 component arises due to relaxation during sustainment. As S is increased further, the ratio of n=0 (equilibrium) fields to n=1 (injector) fields increases. The effects of a thin insulating boundary layer on the plasma decay time are also discussed

  2. Current drive by neutral beams, rotating magnetic fields and helicity injection in compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farengo, R.

    2002-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo code is used to study neutral beam current drive in Spheromaks. The exact particle trajectories are followed in the self-consistent equilibria calculated including the beam current. Reducing Z(eff) does not increase the current drive efficiency because the reduction of the stopping cross section is compensated by an increase in the electron canceling current. Significant changes in the safety factor profile can be produced with relatively low beam currents. Minimum dissipation states of a flux core spheromak sustained by helicity injection are presented. Helicity balance is used as a constraint and the resistivity is considered to be non-uniform. Two types of relaxed states are found; one has a central core of open flux surrounded by a toroidal region of closed flux surfaces and the other has the open flux wrapped around the closed flux surfaces. Non-uniform resistivity effects can be very important due to the changes they produce in the safety factor profile. A hybrid, fluid electrons particle ions, code is employed to study ion dynamics in FRCs sustained by rotating magnetic fields. (author)

  3. Numerical Studies of Magnetohydrodynamic Activity Resulting from Inductive Transients. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovinec, Carl R.

    2005-01-01

    This report describes results from numerical studies of transients in magnetically confined plasmas. The work has been performed by University of Wisconsin graduate students James Reynolds and Giovanni Cone and by the Principal Investigator through support from contract DE-FG02-02ER54687, a Junior Faculty in Plasma Science award from the DOE Office of Science. Results from the computations have added significantly to our knowledge of magnetized plasma relaxation in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) and spheromak. In particular, they have distinguished relaxation activity expected in sustained configurations from transient effects that can persist over a significant fraction of the plasma discharge. We have also developed the numerical capability for studying electrostatic current injection in the spherical torus (ST). These configurations are being investigated as plasma confinement schemes in the international effort to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for environmentally benign energy production. Our numerical computations have been performed with the NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) using local computing resources and massively parallel computing hardware at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. Direct comparisons of simulation results for the spheromak with laboratory measurements verify the effectiveness of our numerical approach. The comparisons have been published in refereed journal articles by this group and by collaborators at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (see Section 4). In addition to the technical products, this grant has supported the graduate education of the two participating students for three years

  4. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    This exchange workshop was an open meeting coordinated by the P-24 Plasma Physics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We brought together scientists from institutions in the US and Japan who are researching the various and complementary types of Compact Toroids (CT). Many concepts, including both experimental and theoretical investigations, are represented. The range spans Field Reversed Configuration (FRC), spheromak, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP), spherical tokamaks, linear devices dedicated to fundamental physics studies, and hybrid transitions that bridge multiple configurations. The participants represent facilities on which significant experiments are now underway: FRC Injection experiment (FIX), Translation Confinement experiment (TCS), Nihon-University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), HITSI (Helicity Injection experiment, Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SIHI)), Field Reversed Configuration experiment-Liner (FRX-L), TS-3/4, Sustained Spheromak Experiment (SSPX), Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX), HIST, Caltech Spheromak, or in the design process such as MRX-FRC (PPPL), Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD at UW). Several new directions and results in compact toroid (CT) research have recently emerged, including neutral-beam injection, rotating magnetic fields, flux build up from Ohmic boost coils, electrostatic helicity injection techniques, CT injection into other large devices, and high density configurations for applications to magnetized target fusion and translational compression of CT's. CT experimental programs in both the US and Japan have also shown substantial progress in the control and sustainment of CT's. Both in theory and experiment, there is increased emphasis on 3D dynamics, which is also related to astrophysical and space physics issues. 3D data visualization is now frequently used for experimental data display. There was much discussion of the effects of weak toroidal fields in FRC's and possible implications

  5. Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions - Atomic Spectroscopy and Fusion Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clementson, Joel [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    The spectra of highly charged tungsten ions have been investigated using x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy. These heavy ions are of interest in relativistic atomic structure theory, where high-precision wavelength measurements benchmark theoretical approaches, and in magnetic fusion research, where the ions may serve to diagnose high-temperature plasmas. The work details spectroscopic investigations of highly charged tungsten ions measured at the Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility. Here, the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT electron beam ion traps have been employed to create, trap, and excite tungsten ions of M- and L-shell charge states. The emitted spectra have been studied in high resolution using crystal, grating, and x-ray calorimeter spectrometers. In particular, wavelengths of n = 0 M-shell transitions in K-like W55+ through Ne-like W64+, and intershell transitions in Zn-like W44+ through Co-like W47+ have been measured. Special attention is given to the Ni-like W46+ ion, which has two strong electric-dipole forbidden transitions that are of interest for plasma diagnostics. The EBIT measurements are complemented by spectral modeling using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC), and predictions for tokamak spectra are presented. The L-shell tungsten ions have been studied at electron-beam energies of up to 122 keV and transition energies measured in Ne-like W64+ through Li-like W71+. These spectra constitute the physics basis in the design of the ion-temperature crystal spectrometer for the ITER tokamak. Tungsten particles have furthermore been introduced into the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) spheromak in Livermore in order to investigate diagnostic possibilities of extreme ultraviolet tungsten spectra for the ITER divertor. The spheromak measurement and spectral modeling using FAC suggest that tungsten ions in charge states around Er-like W6+ could be useful for

  6. Coaxial helicity injection and n=1 relaxation activity in the HIST spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, M.; Oguro, T.; Kagei, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand comprehensively the role of the n=1 instability and relaxation on current generation processes in helicity-driven spherical systems, we have investigated dynamics of ST plasmas produced in the HIST device by decreasing the external toroidal field (TF) and reversing its sign in time. In result, we have discovered that the ST relaxes towards flipped ST configurations through formation of reversed-field pinches (RFPs)-like magnetic field profiles. Surprisingly, it has been observed that not only toroidal flux but also poloidal flux reverses sign spontaneously during the relaxation process. The dynamics associated to self-reversal of the magnetic fields is presently investigated by using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations. Furthermore, we have first demonstrated that a flipped ST plasma can be successfully sustained by CHI. The n=1 relaxation activity is found to be essential in the current sustainment of the flipped ST as well as the spheromak and the unflipped ST. (author)

  7. Tilting mode in field-reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzmeier, J.L.; Barnes, D.C.; Lewis, H.R.; Seyler, C.E.; Shestakov, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Field Reversed Configurations (FRCs) experimentally have exhibited remarkable stability on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) timescale, despite numerous MHD calculations showing FRCs to be unstable. It is easy to believe that local modes are stabilized by finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, but more puzzling is the apparent stability of FRCs against global modes, where one would expect FLR effects to be less important. In this paper we study the tilting mode, which MHD has shown to be a rapidly growing global mode. The tilting mode in FRCs is driven by the pressure gradient, and magnetic compression and field line bending are the stabilizing forces. A schematic of the evolution of the tilting mode is shown. The tilting mode is considered dangerous, because it would lead to rapid tearing across the separatrix. Unlike spheromaks, the tilting mode in FRCs has a separatrix that is fixed in space, so that the mode is strictly internal

  8. Acceleration of a compact torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, C.W.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Kusse, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the first results of a study of acceleration of spheromak-type compact toruses in the RACE experiment (plasma Ring ACceleration Experiment). The RACE apparatus consists of (1) a magnetized, coaxial plasma gun 50 cm long, 35 cm OD, 20 cm ID, (2) 600 cm long coaxial acceleration electrodes 50 cm OD, 20 cm ID, (3) a 250 kJ electrolytic capacitor bank to drive the gun solenoid for initial magnetization, (4) a 200 kJ gun bank, (5) a 260 kJ accelerator bank, and (6) magnetic probes and other diagnostics, and vacuum apparatus. To outer acceleration electrode is an extension, at larger OD, of the gun outer electrode, and the inner acceleration electrode is supported and fed by a coaxial insert in the gun center electrode as shown

  9. Laboratory Experiments on Propagating Plasma Bubbles into Vacuum, Vacuum Magnetic Field, and Background Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Alan G.; Zhang, Yue; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the dynamics of plasma ``bubbles'' as they propagate through a variety of background media. These bubbles are formed by a pulsed coaxial gun with an externally applied magnetic field. Bubble parameters are typically ne ~1020 m-3, Te ~ 5 - 10 eV, and Ti ~ 10 - 15 eV. The structure of the bubbles can range from unmagnetized jet-like structures to spheromak-like structures with complex magnetic flux surfaces. Some of the background media the bubbles interact with are vacuum, vacuum with magnetic field, and other magnetized plasmas. These bubbles exhibit different qualitative behavior depending on coaxial gun parameters such as gas species, gun current, and gun bias magnetic field. Their behavior also depends on the parameters of the background they propagate through. Multi-frame fast camera imaging and magnetic probe data are used to characterize the bubble evolution under various conditions.

  10. Recent Progress on the magnetic turbulence experiment at the Bryn Mawr Plasma Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, D. A.; Cartagena-Sanchez, C. A.; Johnson, H. K.; Fahim, L. E.; Fiedler-Kawaguchi, C.; Douglas-Mann, E.

    2017-10-01

    Recent progress is reported on the construction, implementation and testing of the magnetic turbulence experiment at the Bryn Mawr Plasma Laboratory (BMPL). The experiment at the BMPL consists of an ( 300 μs) long coaxial plasma gun discharge that injects magnetic helicity into a flux-conserving chamber in a process akin to sustained slow-formation of spheromaks. A 24cm by 2m cylindrical chamber has been constructed with a high density axial port array to enable detailed simultaneous spatial measurements of magnetic and plasma fluctuations. Careful positioning of the magnetic structure produced by the three separately pulsed coils (one internal, two external) are preformed to optimize for continuous injection of turbulent magnetized plasma. High frequency calibration of magnetic probes is also underway using a power amplifier.

  11. Possible signatures of dissipation from time-series analysis techniques using a turbulent laboratory magnetohydrodynamic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffner, D. A.; Brown, M. R.; Rock, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    The frequency spectrum of magnetic fluctuations as measured on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment is broadband and exhibits a nearly Kolmogorov 5/3 scaling. It features a steepening region which is indicative of dissipation of magnetic fluctuation energy similar to that observed in fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence systems. Two non-spectrum based time-series analysis techniques are implemented on this data set in order to seek other possible signatures of turbulent dissipation beyond just the steepening of fluctuation spectra. Presented here are results for the flatness, permutation entropy, and statistical complexity, each of which exhibits a particular character at spectral steepening scales which can then be compared to the behavior of the frequency spectrum.

  12. Compression of an Accelerated Taylor State in SSX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrock, J. E.; Suen-Lewis, E. M.; Barbano, L. J.; Kaur, M.; Schaffner, D. A.; Brown, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    In the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), compact toroidal plasmas are launched from a plasma gun and evolve into minimum energy twisted Taylor states. The plumes initially have a velocity 40 km/s, density 0.4 ×1016 cm-3 , and proton temperature 20 eV . After formation, the plumes are accelerated by pulsed pinch coils with rise times τ1 / 4 = (π / 2) √{ LC } less than 1 μ s and currents Ipeak =V0 / Z =V0 /√{ L / C } on the order of 104 A. The accelerated Taylor States are abruptly stagnated in a copper flux conserver, and over the course of t plasma, the other to particle motion parallel to the field. We observe Taylor state compression most in agreement with the parallel equation of state: d / dt (P∥B2 /n3) = 0 . DOE ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  13. Spectroscopy and titanium gettering in SPHEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.; Giroud, C.; Summers, H.; Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon

    1994-01-01

    SPHEX is a spheromak wherein the toroidal and poloidal currents are generated and sustained by direct current injection from a Marshall gun, and organised by the effect of magnetic relaxation. In the past it has not achieved high temperature (Langmuir probes indicate a flat profile of about 20 eV), and this was thought to be due to radiation from impurities originating in the Marshall gun. For this paper, titanium has been applied to the plasma-facing surface of the flux conserver in an attempt to reduce impurity levels and plasma density. Calibrated spectrometers were used to measure plasma properties and impurity levels, both before and after application of titanium. The titanium is also found to have a surprisingly large effect on the magnetic properties, which gives some evidence regarding the relaxation mechanism. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. Sustainment dynamo reexamined: nonlocal electrical conductivity of plasma in a stochastic magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.; Moses, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma dynamo is both an intriguing and a practical concept. The intrigue derives from attempting to explain naturally occurring and man-made plasmas whose strong field-aligned currents j/sub parallel/ apparently disobey the most naive Ohm's law j/sub parallel/ = sigma/sub parallel/E/sub parallel/. The practical importance derives from the dynamo's role both in formation and in sustainment of reversed-field pinch (RFP) and Spheromak fusion plasmas. We will examine certain features of the documented quasi-steady discharges on ZT-40M, and RFP in apparent need of a sustainment dynamo. We will show that the tail electrons (which carry j/sub parallel/) are probably wandering (along stochastic B Vector-field lines) over much of the minor radius in one mean-free-path

  15. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics. Progress report, December 15, 1977--December 14, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahala, G.

    1978-01-01

    Incompressible MHD turbulence is considered for both 2D and 3D plasmas in cylindrical geometry. It is found that for virtually all initial conditions (including quiescent ones) the plasma is nonlinearly unstable in that mean square turbulent velocity fields develop. However, there is a unique stable state of extremal magnetic helicity/energy ratio for which no turbulent fields develop [in 2D with B/sub z/ = const., it is the state of extremal mean square vector potential/energy]. It is force free and is just the Taylor state. A conjecture can be put forward (based on a dual cascade argument for resistive MHD) to explain Taylor's hypothesis. In spherical geometry, the stable axisymmetric state is the spheromak

  16. Validation of extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the HIT-SI3 experiment using the NIMROD code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, K. D.; Jarboe, T. R.; Hossack, A. C.; Chandra, R. N.; Everson, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    The HIT-SI3 experiment uses a set of inductively driven helicity injectors to apply a non-axisymmetric current drive on the edge of the plasma, driving an axisymmetric spheromak equilibrium in a central confinement volume. These helicity injectors drive a non-axisymmetric perturbation that oscillates in time, with relative temporal phasing of the injectors modifying the mode structure of the applied perturbation. A set of three experimental discharges with different perturbation spectra are modelled using the NIMROD extended magnetohydrodynamics code, and comparisons are made to both magnetic and fluid measurements. These models successfully capture the bulk dynamics of both the perturbation and the equilibrium, though disagreements related to the pressure gradients experimentally measured exist.

  17. Measurement of the local particle diffusion coefficient in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Levinton, F.M.

    1987-02-01

    Local impurity particle diffusion coefficients have been measured in a low temperature plasma by the injection of test particles at the center of the plasma. The injection is accomplished by a high voltage discharge between two small graphite electrodes on a probe. The probe can be located anywhere in the plasma. The diffusion is observed spectroscopically. An analysis of the spatial and temporal evolution of the CII radiation from the carbon discharge can determine the parallel and perpendicular diffusion of the impurity ions. Results with the diagnostic have been obtained in the Proto S-1/C spheromak. The measured value of the diffusion coefficient in the afterglow plasma is in good agreement with classical predictions

  18. Magnetic reconnection and self-organized plasma systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the recent results from the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) at PPPL are discussed along with their relationship to observations from solar flares, the magnetosphere, and current carrying pinch discharges such as tokamaks, reversed field pinches, spheromaks and field reversed configurations. It is found that the reconnection speed decreases as the angle of merging field lines decreases, consistent with the well-established observation in the dayside magnetosphere. This observation can also provide a qualitative interpretation of a generally observed trend in pinch plasmas, namely that magnetic field diffuses (or reconnects) faster when magnetic shear is larger. A recently conceived research project, SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasma with Induction, Reconnection, and Injection Techniques), will also be discussed. (author)

  19. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 μs pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity

  20. Field-reversing electron and ion rings for the confinement and heating of plasmas. Annual progress report, September 1, 1980-August 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, H.H.

    1981-09-01

    Our experimental work on the RECE-Christa device during the present period concentrated on obtaining conditions for first measurements of plasma confinement and on the generation of mixed-CT configurations. The most important results in these areas included the generation of rings with plasma currents significantly larger than originally hoped for, and - on the other hand - a failure to propagate rings efficiently in background gas densities below 1 mTorr. In addition, a digital data management system has been acquired and the respective software is being completed. Finally, theoretical work was performed on calculating banana drift orbits in Spheromak-type configurations and on developing a semi-analytic model for the equilibrium of ion rings which could be used for estimating the ring behavior during the slow-down of the ions

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric systems with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, N.L.P.

    1986-01-01

    A model for studying magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymetrically confined plasma with toroidal rotation, extended to the Grad. Shafranov equation is presented. The expression used for the scalar pressure is modifiec, and the influence of toroidal magnetic field is included, The equation for general motion of axisymetrically confined plasma, particularizing for rotation movements is described. Two cases are compared: one supposes the entropy as a function of poloidal magnetic flux and other supposes the temperature as a function of flux. The equations for these two cases obtaining a simplified expression by others approximations are established. The proposed model is compared with Shibata model, which uses density as function of flux, and with the ideal spheromak model. A set of cases taking in account experimental data is studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. CTR plasma engineering studies. Annual progress report, 1 December 1984-30 November 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    Work under this project is focused on plasma engineering developments in support of fusion reactor studies. The work described in this annual progress report covers a variety of topics ranging from plasma transport modelling for compact tori to radiation heating of the first wall in a fusion device. Sections 2 and 3 decribe computer codes developed for use with field-reversed configurations such as spheromaks and field-reversed mirrors. Section 4 presents an evaluation of the feasibility of heating a RFP-type reactor to ignition with ohmic current input alone. Sections 5 and 6 describe new work that has been initiated on optimal control theory for fusion reactors. Sections 7 to 9 discuss recent results on alpha-particle transport, instabilities, and diagnostics. In the final section, methods for analysis of the poloidal variation in the thermal wall loading of a tokamak reactor are discussed and some typical results are presented

  3. Compact toroid fueling of the TdeV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.; Raman, R.; Xiao, C.; Thomas, J.

    1993-01-01

    Compact toroids have been proposed as a means of centrally fueling tokamak reactors because of the high velocity to which they can be accelerated. These are cold (T e ∼ 10 eV), high density (n e > 10 20 m -3 ) spheromak plasmoids that are accelerated in a magnetized Marshall gun. As a proof of principle experiment, a compact toroid fueler (CTF) has been developed for injection into the TdeV tokamak. The engineering goals of the experiment are to measure and minimize the impurity content of the CT plasma and the neutral gas remaining after CT formation. Also of importance is the effect of CT central fueling on the tokamak density profile and bootstrap current, and the relaxation rate of the density profile providing information on the confinement time of the CT fuel

  4. The role of improved fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.B.; Linford, R.K.; Liu, C.S.; Logan, B.G.; Rose, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy discusses concept improvement in the tokamak and concept improvement in the mirror. Controlled Thermonuclear Research comments on what constitutes an attractive fusion reactor, and provides a table of achieved parameters of RFP, FRC and the spheromak experiments. GA Technologies Inc. remarks on the direction which industry must take in the fusion program. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory concentrates on commercial reactor studies. Spectra Technology focuses on problems dealing with fusion proponents making a convincing and clear economic argument for fusion based on a mils per kilowat basis, and the large costs of flagship experiments. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory remarks on the need for an economic energy source for fusion. A table of cost of electricity contours is shown

  5. The role of improved fusion concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.B.; Linford, R.K.; Liu, C.S.; Logan, B.G.; Rose, P.H.

    1985-06-01

    The U.S. Dept. of Energy discusses concept improvement in the tokamak and concept improvement in the mirror. Controlled Thermonuclear Research comments on what constitutes an attractive fusion reactor, and provides a table of achieved parameters of RFP, FRC and the spheromak experiments. GA Technologies Inc. remarks on the direction which industry must take in the fusion program. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory concentrates on commercial reactor studies. Spectra Technology focuses on problems dealing with fusion proponents making a convincing and clear economic argument for fusion based on a mils per kilowat basis, and the large costs of flagship experiments. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory remarks on the need for an economic energy source for fusion. A table of cost of electricity contours is shown.

  6. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Progress In Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Francis Y. C.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael; Smith, James; Martin, Adam; Wu, S. T.; Schmidt, George; hide

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) attempts to combine the favorable attributes of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) for energy confinement with the attributes of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for efficient compression heating and wall-free containment of the fusing plasma. It uses a material liner to compress and contain a magnetized plasma. For practical applications, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC).

  8. Impurity production and acceleration in CTIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-9161, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov; Clift, W.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-9161, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Klauser, R.; Horton, R.D. [CTIX Group, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Howard, S.J. [General Fusion Inc., Burnaby, BC V5A 3H4 (Canada); Brockington, S.J. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Evans, R.W.; Hwang, D.Q. [CTIX Group, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) produces a high density, high velocity hydrogen plasma that maintains its configuration in free space on a MHD resistive time scale. In order to study the production and acceleration of impurities in the injector, several sets of silicon collector probes were exposed to spheromak-like CT's exiting the accelerator. Elemental analysis by Auger Electron Spectroscopy indicated the presence of O, Al, Fe, and Cu in films up to 200 A thickness (1000 CT interactions). Using a smaller number of CT interactions (10-20), implantation of Fe and Cu was measured by Auger depth profiling. The amount of impurities was found to increase with accelerating voltage and number of CT interactions while use of a solenoidal field reduced the amount. Comparison of the implanted Fe and Cu with TRIM simulations indicated that the impurities were traveling more slowly than the hydrogen CT.

  9. Environmental monitoring report for calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    The results of the environmental monitoring program for CY85 for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. All of the tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), has a full year of run time. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the RF Test Facility were in operation. The phased approach to TFTR environmental monitoring continued with the establishment of locations for off-site monitoring. An environmental committee established in December 1984 reviewed items of environmental importance. During CY85 no adverse effects to the environmental resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable Federal, State, and local environmental regulations

  10. GATO: an MHD stability code for axisymmetric plasmas with internal separatrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Helton, F.J.; Moore, R.W.

    1981-07-01

    The GATO code computes the growth rate of ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in axisymmetric geometries with internal separatrices such as doublet and expanded spheromak. The basic method, which uses a variational principle and a Galerkin procedure to obtain a matrix eigenvalue problem, is common to the ERATO and PEST codes. A new coordinate system has been developed to handle the internal separatrix. Efficient algorithms have been developed to solve the matrix eigenvalue problem for matrices of rank as large as 40,000. Further improvement is expected using graph theoretical techniques to reorder the matrices. Using judicious mesh repartition, the marginal point can be determined with great precision. The code has been extensively used to optimize doublet and general tokamak plasmas

  11. GATO: An MHD stability code for axisymmetric plasmas with internal separatrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, L.C.; Helton, F.J.; Moore, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The GATO code computes the growth rate of ideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in axisymmetric geometries with internal separatrices such as doublet and expanded spheromak. The basic method, which uses a variational principle and a Galerkin procedure to obtain a matrix eigenvalue problem, is common to the ERATO and PEST codes. A new coordinate system has been developed to handle the internal separatrix. Efficient algorithms have been developed to solve the matrix eigenvalue problem for matrices of rank as large as 40 000. Further improvement is expected using graph theoretical techniques to reorder the matrices. Using judicious mesh repartition, the marginal point can be determined with great precision. The code has been extensively used to optimize doublet and general tokamak plasmas. (orig.)

  12. Numerical study of two-fluid flowing equilibria of helicity-driven spherical torus plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanki, T.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    2004-01-01

    Two-fluid flowing equilibrium configurations of a helicity-driven spherical torus (HD-ST) are numerically determined by using the combination of the finite difference and the boundary element methods. It is found from the numerical results that electron fluids near the central conductor are tied to an external toroidal field and ion fluids are not. The magnetic configurations change from the high-q HD-ST (q>1) with paramagnetic toroidal field and low-β (volume average β value, ∼ 2%) through the helicity-driven spheromak and RFP (reverse field pinch) to the ultra low-q HD-ST (0 ∼ 18%) as the external toroidal field at the inner edge regions decreases and reverses the sign. The two-fluid effects are more significant in this equilibrium transition when the ion diamagnetic drift is dominant in the flowing two-fluid. (authors)

  13. Performance and stability limits at near-unity aspect ratio in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment is a mid-sized extremely-low aspect ratio (A) spherical torus (ST). It has the dual roles of exploring limits of ST behavior as A approaches 1 and studying the physics of ST plasmas in the tokamak-spheromak overlap regime. Major parameters are R 0.25 - 0.45 m, A 1.1 - 1.4, I p ≤ 0.15MA, and B t p =aB t is similar to that observed for NBI-heated START discharges. Achievable plasma current apparently is subject to a 'soft' limit of I p =I t f ≤ 1. Access to higher-current plasmas appears to be restricted by the appearance of large internal MHD activity, including m/n=2/1 and 3/2 modes. Recent experiments have begun to access ideal stability limits, with disruptions observed as q 95 approaches 5, in agreement with numerical predictions. (author)

  14. Relaxed and partially relaxed magnetic equilibria in tight-aspect-ratio tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, P.K.; Clegg, J.R.; Duck, R.C.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1993-01-01

    Force-free equilibrium magnetic fields in tight-aspect-ratio toroidal configurations are investigated. The study is mainly directed to modelling field configurations in the 'rodomak', a modification to the SPHEX gun-injected spheromak in which a current-carrying rod is inserted along the geometric axis. A family of analytical relaxed states (∇ x B = μB, μ constant) is presented for a torus of rectangular cross section, with boundary conditions allowing for flux embedded in the walls, representing the gun. Numerically calculated fields in SPHEX geometry, with μ profiles relevant to the driven phase of operation, are also given. The dependence of the field configurations and global quantities such as energy, helicity and toroidal current on the controlling parameters (gun flux, gun current and rod current) and geometry is discussed. (author)

  15. The benefits of ITER for the portfolio of fusion configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent plasma science challenges are 1) what limits the pressure in plasmas? (macroscopic stability), 2) how do hot particles and plasma waves interact in the non-linear regime? (wave-particle interactions), 3) what causes plasma transport? (microscopic turbulence and transport) and 4) how can high-temperature plasma and material surface co-exist? (plasma-material interactions). This fusion plasma science is addressed using a 'Portfolio' of configurations, like Stellarator, Tokamak, Spherical Torus, Reversed Field Pinch, Spheromak, and Field Reversed Configuration. Namely, the scientific results from one configuration benefit progress in others. Recent example of this effort can be found in NCSX, NSTX and RFP. ITER will provide very significant benefits to the development of the full fusion portfolio; macroscopic stability, wave-particle interactions, microturbulence and transport, plasma-material interactions, and technical demonstration of an integrated fusion system. (author)

  16. The benefits of ITER for the portfolio of fusion configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Recent plasma science challenges are 1) what limits the pressure in plasmas? (macroscopic stability), 2) how do hot particles and plasma waves interact in the non-linear regime? (wave-particle interactions), 3) what causes plasma transport? (microscopic turbulence and transport) and 4) how can high-temperature plasma and material surface co-exist? (plasma-material interactions). This fusion plasma science is addressed using a 'Portfolio' of configurations, like Stellarator, Tokamak, Spherical Torus, Reversed Field Pinch, Spheromak, and Field Reversed Configuration. Namely, the scientific results from one configuration benefit progress in others. Recent example of this effort can be found in NCSX, NSTX and RFP. ITER will provide very significant benefits to the development of the full fusion portfolio; macroscopic stability, wave-particle interactions, microturbulence and transport, plasma-material interactions, and technical demonstration of an integrated fusion system. (author)

  17. The need and prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Miller, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10-15 yr have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points toward smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. The results of a number of recent conceptual designs of reversed-field pinch, spheromak, and tokamak fusion reactors are summarized as examples of more compact approaches. While a focus has been placed on increasing the fusion-power-core mass power density beyond the minimum economic threshold of 100-200 kWe/tonne, other means by which the overall attractiveness of fusion as a long-term energy source are also addressed

  18. Compact toroid formation, compression, and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Peterkin, R.E. Jr.; Baca, G.P.; Beason, J.D.; Bell, D.E.; Dearborn, M.E.; Dietz, D.; Douglas, M.R.; Englert, S.E.; Englert, T.J.; Hackett, K.E.; Holmes, J.H.; Hussey, T.W.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Lehr, F.M.; Marklin, G.J.; Mullins, B.W.; Price, D.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruden, E.L.; Sovinec, C.R.; Turchi, P.J.; Bird, G.; Coffey, S.K.; Seiler, S.W.; Chen, Y.G.; Gale, D.; Graham, J.D.; Scott, M.; Sommars, W.

    1993-01-01

    Research on forming, compressing, and accelerating milligram-range compact toroids using a meter diameter, two-stage, puffed gas, magnetic field embedded coaxial plasma gun is described. The compact toroids that are studied are similar to spheromaks, but they are threaded by an inner conductor. This research effort, named MARAUDER (Magnetically Accelerated Ring to Achieve Ultra-high Directed Energy and Radiation), is not a magnetic confinement fusion program like most spheromak efforts. Rather, the ultimate goal of the present program is to compress toroids to high mass density and magnetic field intensity, and to accelerate the toroids to high speed. There are a variety of applications for compressed, accelerated toroids including fast opening switches, x-radiation production, radio frequency (rf) compression, as well as charge-neutral ion beam and inertial confinement fusion studies. Experiments performed to date to form and accelerate toroids have been diagnosed with magnetic probe arrays, laser interferometry, time and space resolved optical spectroscopy, and fast photography. Parts of the experiment have been designed by, and experimental results are interpreted with, the help of two-dimensional (2-D), time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations. When not driven by a second discharge, the toroids relax to a Woltjer--Taylor equilibrium state that compares favorably to the results of 2-D equilibrium calculations and to 2-D time-dependent MHD simulations. Current, voltage, and magnetic probe data from toroids that are driven by an acceleration discharge are compared to 2-D MHD and to circuit solver/slug model predictions. Results suggest that compact toroids are formed in 7--15 μsec, and can be accelerated intact with material species the same as injected gas species and entrained mass ≥1/2 the injected mass

  19. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-09-23

    installation on their tokamak. Instead, after a no-cost extension, the apparatus was moved to the University of Washington-Seattle and successfully tested on the HIT-SI3 spheromak experiment. As a result of this project, TALIF measurements of the absolutely calibrated neutral density hydrogen and deuterium were obtained in a helicon source and in a spheromak, designs were developed for installation of a TALIF system on a tokamak, and a new, xenon-based calibration scheme was proposed and demonstrated. The xenon-calibration scheme eliminates significant problems that were identified with the standard krypton calibration scheme.

  20. Dynamics of Plasma Jets and Bubbles Launched into a Transverse Background Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue

    2017-10-01

    A coaxial magnetized plasma gun has been utilized to launch both plasma jets (open B-field) and plasma bubbles (closed B-field) into a transverse background magnetic field in the HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) linear device at the University of New Mexico. These situations may have bearing on fusion plasmas (e.g. plasma injection for tokamak fueling, ELM pacing, or disruption mitigation) and astrophysical settings (e.g. astrophysical jet stability, coronal mass ejections, etc.). The magnetic Reynolds number of the gun plasma is 100 , so that magnetic advection dominates over magnetic diffusion. The gun plasma ram pressure, ρjetVjet2 >B02 / 2μ0 , the background magnetic pressure, so that the jet or bubble can easily penetrate the background B-field, B0. When the gun axial B-field is weak compared to the gun azimuthal field, a current-driven jet is formed with a global helical magnetic configuration. Applying the transverse background magnetic field, it is observed that the n = 1 kink mode is stabilized, while magnetic probe measurements show contrarily that the safety factor q(a) drops below unity. At the same time, a sheared axial jet velocity is measured. We conclude that the tension force arising from increasing curvature of the background magnetic field induces the measured sheared flow gradient above the theoretical kink-stabilization threshold, resulting in the emergent kink stabilization of the injected plasma jet. In the case of injected bubbles, spheromak-like plasma formation is verified. However, when the spheromak plasma propagates into the transverse background magnetic field, the typical self-closed global symmetry magnetic configuration does not hold any more. In the region where the bubble toroidal field opposed the background B-field, the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability has been observed. Details of the experiment setup, diagnostics, experimental results and theoretical analysis will be presented. Supported by the National Science Foundation

  1. The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Koelfgen, Syri; Lee, Mike; Smith, James W.

    2003-01-01

    A plasmoid is a compact plasma structure with an integral magnetic field. They have been studied extensively in controlled fusion research and are categorized according to the relative strength of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field (B(phi), and B(tau), respectively). An object with B(phi)/B(tau) >> 1 is classified as a Field Reverse Configuration (FRC); if B(phi) = B(tau), it is called a Spheromak. There are a number of possible advantages to using accelerated plasmoids for in-space propulsion. A thruster based on this concept would operate by repetitively producing plasmoids and ejecting them from the device at high velocity. The plasmoid is formed inside of a single turn conical theta-pinch coil; as this process is inductive, there are no life-limiting electrodes. Similar experiments have yielded plasmoid velocities of at least 50 km/s (l), and calculations indicate that velocities in excess of 100 km/s are possible. A thruster based on this concept would be capable of producing an I(sp) in the range of 5,000 - 10,OOO s, with thrust densities of order 10(exp 5) N/m(exp 2). The current experiment is designed to produce jet powers in the range of 5-10 kW, although the concept should be scalable to higher power. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the feasibility of this plasma propulsion concept. To accomplish this, it will be necessary to determine: a.) specific impulse and thrust, b.) efficiency and mass utilization, c.) which type of plasmoid (FRC-like or Spheromak-like) gives the best performance, and d.) the characteristics required of actual thruster components (i.e., switch and capacitor technology). The plasmoid mass and velocity will be measured with a variety of diagnostics, including internal and external B-dot probes, flux loops, Langmuir probes, high-speed cameras, and an interferometer. Simulations of the plasmoid thruster using MOQUI, a time dependent MHD code, will be carried out concurrently with experimental testing. The PTX

  2. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, Earl E.

    2016-01-01

    tokamak. Instead, after a no-cost extension, the apparatus was moved to the University of Washington-Seattle and successfully tested on the HIT-SI3 spheromak experiment. As a result of this project, TALIF measurements of the absolutely calibrated neutral density hydrogen and deuterium were obtained in a helicon source and in a spheromak, designs were developed for installation of a TALIF system on a tokamak, and a new, xenon-based calibration scheme was proposed and demonstrated. The xenon-calibration scheme eliminates significant problems that were identified with the standard krypton calibration scheme.

  3. Influence of external toroidal flux on low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuno, S.; Natori, M.; Kamitani, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the HIST device, the external flux is generated by two kinds of currents: the current I s flowing along the symmetry axis and the bias coil current I D . The influence of the external flux on the MHD equilibrium and stability of the low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasma in the HIST device is investigated numerically. Equilibrium configurations of the low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasma in the HIST device are numerically determined by means of the combination of FDM and BEM. The influence of I s and I D on their stability is also investigated by using the Mercier criterion. The results of computations show that the Mercier limit decreases to zero with increasing I s and with decreasing I D . Moreover, either a further increase in I s or a further decrease in I D raises the Mercier limit considerably. Besides, the equilibrium configuration in the HIST device changes its state from spheromak through ultra-low q to tokamak with increasing I s and with decreasing I D . (author)

  4. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  5. Investigation of MHD Instabilities in Jets and Bubbles Using a Compact Coaxial Plasma Gun in a Background Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D. M.; Wallace, B.; Gilmore, M.; Hsu, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental investigation of launching plasma into a lower density background magnetized plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear device HelCat at UNM. Four distinct operational regimes with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images. For regime I plasma jet formation, a global helical magnetic configuration is determined by a B-dot probe array data. Also the m =1 kink instability is observed and verified. Furthermore, when the jet is propagating into background magnetic field, a longer length and lifetime jet is formed. Axial shear flow caused by the background magnetic tension force contributes to the increased stability of the jet body. In regime II, a spheromak-like plasma bubble formation is identified when the gun plasma is injected into vacuum. In contrast, when the bubble propagates into a background magnetic field, the closed magnetic field configuration does not hold anymore and a lateral side, Reilgh-Taylor instability develops. Detailed experimental data and analysis will be presented for these cases.

  6. Dynamics of Magnetized Plasma Jets and Bubbles Launched into a Background Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, B.; Zhang, Y.; Fisher, D. M.; Gilmore, M.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation of dense magnetized plasma, either collimated with mainly azimuthal B-field (jet) or toroidal with closed B-field (bubble), in a background plasma occurs in a number of solar and astrophysical cases. Such cases include coronal mass ejections moving in the background solar wind and extragalactic radio lobes expanding into the extragalactic medium. Understanding the detailed MHD behavior is crucial for correctly modeling these events. In order to further the understanding of such systems, we are investigating the injection of dense magnetized jets and bubbles into a lower density background magnetized plasma using a coaxial plasma gun and a background helicon or cathode plasma. In both jet and bubble cases, the MHD dynamics are found to be very different when launched into background plasma or magnetic field, as compared to vacuum. In the jet case, it is found that the inherent kink instability is stabilized by velocity shear developed due to added magnetic tension from the background field. In the bubble case, rather than directly relaxing to a minimum energy Taylor state (spheromak) as in vacuum, there is an expansion asymmetry and the bubble becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable on one side. Recent results will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  7. Performance Improvement of a Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun by adopting Iron-core Bias Coil and New Pre-Ionization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, Takahiro; Asai, T.; Tanaka, F.; Yamada, S.; Hosozawa, A.; Gota, H.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Matsumoto, T.

    2017-10-01

    A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) is a device used to generate a compact toroid (CT), which has a spheromak-like configuration. A typical MCPG consists of a set of axisymmetric cylindrical electrodes, bias coil, and gas-puff valves. In order to expand the CT operating range, the distributions of the bias magnetic field and neutral gas have been investigated. We have developed a new means of generating stuffing flux. By inserting an iron core into the bias coil, the magnetic field increases dramatically; even a small current of a few Amps produces a sufficient bias field. According to a simulation result, it was also suggested that the radial distribution of the bias field is easily controlled. The ejected CT and the target FRC are cooled by excess neutral gas that typical MCPGs require to initiate a breakdown; therefore, we have adopted a miniature gun as a new pre-ionization (PI) system. By introducing this PI system, the breakdown occurs at lower neutral gas density so that the amount of excess neutral gas can be reduced.

  8. Results of subscale MTF compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Mossman, A.; Donaldson, M.; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    In magnetized target fusion (MTF) a magnetized plasma torus is compressed in a time shorter than its own energy confinement time, thereby heating to fusion conditions. Understanding plasma behavior and scaling laws is needed to advance toward a reactor-scale demonstration. General Fusion is conducting a sequence of subscale experiments of compact toroid (CT) plasmas being compressed by chemically driven implosion of an aluminum liner, providing data on several key questions. CT plasmas are formed by a coaxial Marshall gun, with magnetic fields supported by internal plasma currents and eddy currents in the wall. Configurations that have been compressed so far include decaying and sustained spheromaks and an ST that is formed into a pre-existing toroidal field. Diagnostics measure B, ne, visible and x-ray emission, Ti and Te. Before compression the CT has an energy of 10kJ magnetic, 1 kJ thermal, with Te of 100 - 200 eV, ne 5x1020 m-3. Plasma was stable during a compression factor R0/R >3 on best shots. A reactor scale demonstration would require 10x higher initial B and ne but similar Te. Liner improvements have minimized ripple, tearing and ejection of micro-debris. Plasma facing surfaces have included plasma-sprayed tungsten, bare Cu and Al, and gettering with Ti and Li.

  9. Compact toroids generated by a magnetized coaxial source in the CTX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, A.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; McKenna, K.F.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Compact toroids containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic field (Spheromak-type) have been generated in CTX using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. These CTs tear loose from the gun by magnetic field line reconnection, and they are trapped in flux conservers having various geometries. In a straight cylindrical flux conserver the CTs are observed to be unstable to a gross tilting mode. Stability to the tilting mode has been demonstrated in flux conservers having an oblate trapping region; however, the geometry of the entrance region leading to the trapping volume can also have important effects. Lifetimes of about 150 μs for the CTs are typically observed. Interferometric measurements give a value of about 2 x 10 14 cm -3 for the initial plasma density. The plasma temperature measured at a single spot near the minor magnetic axis decreases to around 10 eV by the time the magnetic reconnection is complete. Spectrographic measurements and pressure probe results are in agreement with this temperature. A snipper coil has been installed to induce the CT to tear loose from the gun sooner. The use of this coil is observed to speed up the magnetic field reconnection process by about a factor of 2

  10. Magnetic Compression Experiment at General Fusion with Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, Carl; Khalzov, Ivan; Hirose, Akira; Xiao, Chijin; Fusion Team, General

    2017-10-01

    The magnetic compression experiment at GF was a repetitive non-destructive test to study plasma physics applicable to Magnetic Target Fusion compression. A spheromak compact torus (CT) is formed with a co-axial gun into a containment region with an hour-glass shaped inner flux conserver, and an insulating outer wall. External coil currents keep the CT off the outer wall (levitation) and then rapidly compress it inwards. The optimal external coil configuration greatly improved both the levitated CT lifetime and the rate of shots with good compressional flux conservation. As confirmed by spectrometer data, the improved levitation field profile reduced plasma impurity levels by suppressing the interaction between plasma and the insulating outer wall during the formation process. We developed an energy and toroidal flux conserving finite element axisymmetric MHD code to study CT formation and compression. The Braginskii MHD equations with anisotropic heat conduction were implemented. To simulate plasma / insulating wall interaction, we couple the vacuum field solution in the insulating region to the full MHD solution in the remainder of the domain. We see good agreement between simulation and experiment results. Partly funded by NSERC and MITACS Accelerate.

  11. Maryland magnetic fusion research program: MS speromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSilva, A.W.; Goldenbaum, G.C.; Griem, H.R.

    1989-07-01

    The main theme of our present experimentation on MS is to prolong the spheromak lifetime. This research has been concerned with such topics as passive MHD stabilization coils, impurity control and increased energy storage. At the present time the longest lived plasmas appear to be line tied to the liner or reversal coils. The natural consequence of having net flux outside the separatrix and a resistive plasma is that the plasma shrinks in time. At some point in time the plasma is far enough from the liner, or stabilization coils, that it becomes unstable. If we increase the bias field so as to move the separatrix further inside the liner, the plasma becomes unstable earlier as the separatrix moves to a smaller radius in a shorter time than if it starts out outside the liner. We have tried to circumvent this behavior with various configurations of passive conductors used as stabilizing elements. In this paper, we detail some of the machine modifications that have been tried in attempts to produce a stable, long-lived plasma

  12. NIMROD Simulations of the HIT-SI and HIT-SI3 Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kyle; Jarboe, Tom; Hossack, Aaron; Chandra, Rian; Everson, Chris

    2017-10-01

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI) experiment uses a set of inductively driven helicity injectors to apply non-axisymmetric current drive on the edge of the plasma, driving an axisymmetric spheromak equilibrium in a central confinement volume. Significant improvements have been made to extended MHD modeling of HIT-SI, with both the resolution of disagreement at high injector frequencies in HIT-SI in addition to successes with the new upgraded HIT-SI3 device. Previous numerical studies of HIT-SI, using a zero-beta eMHD model, focused on operations with a drive frequency of 14.5 kHz, and found reduced agreement with both the magnetic profile and current amplification at higher frequencies (30-70 kHz). HIT-SI3 has three helicity injectors which are able to operate with different mode structures of perturbations through the different relative temporal phasing of the injectors. Simulations that allow for pressure gradients have been performed in the parameter regimes of both devices using the NIMROD code and show improved agreement with experimental results, most notably capturing the observed Shafranov-shift due to increased beta observed at higher finj in HIT-SI and the variety of toroidal perturbation spectra available in HIT-SI3. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02- 96ER54361.

  13. A self-organized plasma with induction, reconnection, and injection techniques: the SPIRIT concept for field reversed configuration research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaaki; JI, Hantao; Gerhardt, Stefan P.; Belova, Elena V.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Mikkelsen, David R.

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive research concept, known as SPIRIT, is described for the investigation of the formation, stability, and sustainment of oblate field reversed configurations (FRCs). This concept, whose name stands for Self-organized Plasma with Induction, Reconnection, and Injection Techniques (SPIRIT), allows for the study of FRC stability properties on time scales much longer than the energy confinement time. Counter-helicity merging of inductively formed spheromaks is utilized to form large-flux FRCs. These FRCs are sustained by neutral beam injection with the initial aid of compact ohmic solenoids. Stability to n=1 tilt/shift modes is provided by plasma shaping and conducting shells. Stability to n ≥ 2 co-interchange modes is achieved by a distribution of high-energy non-thermal ions provided by the neutral beam. The combination of plasma shaping, conducting shells, current sustainment, and the non-thermal beam component are expected to lead to a configuration with stability to all global MHD modes, a regime recently discovered through hybrid-MHD simulation using the HYM code. An experimental test of the concept, utilizing the existing Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) facility, is described. Initial experiments in MRX have confirmed the viability of the SPIRIT concept, and calculations indicate that the confinement of high-energy ions in MRX should be sufficient to test the SPIRIT concept. (author)

  14. Advances in Compact Torus research. Report on the IAEA technical committee meeting, held in Sydney, Australia, 4-7 March 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durance, G

    1985-08-01

    A Compact Torus (CT) is a low-aspect-ratio, axisymmetric, closed-magnetic-field-line configuration with no vessel wall or magnetic field coils linking the hole in the plasma toroid. The potential reactor advantages include high beta, simple geometry, high power density, and translation of the toroid. FRC (Field Reversed Configuration) have negligible toroidal magnetic fields; equilibria tend to be elongated. Gross stability is observed for several Alfven times, but transport mechanisms and confinement time scaling are poorly understood. Translation experiments are expanding the accessable parameter space. Spheromaks have comparable toroidal and poloidal fields. The configuration is related to the RFP although the toroidal field is generated by internal plasma currents. Detached mode (plasma and gun or flux core not connected) and linked mode have been studied. Rotamaks use a rotating magnetic field to maintain the plasma toroidal current; the drive mechanism is analagous to an induction motor. There has been no evidence for gross instabilities although temperatures are low. Particle rings generate CT with particle gyroradii comparable to plasma dimensions. The large orbits may aid in gross MHD stability.

  15. Advanced fusion concepts project summaries, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This report summarizes all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Applied Plasma Physics Division of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. Each project summary was written by the respective principal investigator using the format: title, principal investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. This report is organized into three sections: Section one contains five summaries describing work in the reversed-field pinch program being performed by a diversified group of contractors, these include a national laboratory, a private company, and several universities. Section two contains eight summaries of work from the compact toroid area which encompasses field-reversed configurations, spheromaks, and heating and formation experiments. Section three contains summaries from two other programs, a density Z-pinch experiment and high-beta Q machine experiment. The intent of this collection of project summaries is to help the contractors of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch understand their relationship with the rest of the branch's activities. It is also meant to provide background to those outside the program by showing the range of activities of interest of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch

  16. Introduction to the m = 1 helicity source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platts, D.A.; Jarboe, T.R.; Wright, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The m = 1 Helicity Source, formerly called the Kinked Z-pinch, was developed as part of the Electrode Studies program at Los Alamos. The Electrode Studies program was initiated to study the control of electrode erosion in long discharge duration spheromak sources. Erosion control is necessary to reduce plasma impurities and to obtain adequate electrode lifetimes. The first task of the Electrode Studies program is to determine, from among a variety of configurations including the coaxial one, a helicity source geometry with good prospects for erosion control. The more efficient the helicity source the easier it will be to control erosion, but the source most also be easy to diagnose and modify if it is to be a useful test bed. The various erosion control techniques which have been proposed will require extensive experimentation to evaluate and optimize. Proposed techniques include, using refractory metals, profiling of the electrodes and magnetic fields, and various gas injection schemes including porous electrodes. It is considered necessary to do these experiments on an optimized helicity source so that the electrode geometries and plasma properties will be relevant. Therefore the present Electrode Studies program is aimed at developing an improved helicity source design

  17. Dynamic mode decomposition for plasma diagnostics and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Roy; Kutz, J. Nathan; Morgan, Kyle; Nelson, Brian A.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate the application of the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) for the diagnostic analysis of the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetized plasma in resistive magnetohydrodynamics. The DMD method is an ideal spatio-temporal matrix decomposition that correlates spatial features of computational or experimental data while simultaneously associating the spatial activity with periodic temporal behavior. DMD can produce low-rank, reduced order surrogate models that can be used to reconstruct the state of the system with high fidelity. This allows for a reduction in the computational cost and, at the same time, accurate approximations of the problem, even if the data are sparsely sampled. We demonstrate the use of the method on both numerical and experimental data, showing that it is a successful mathematical architecture for characterizing the helicity injected torus with steady inductive (HIT-SI) magnetohydrodynamics. Importantly, the DMD produces interpretable, dominant mode structures, including a stationary mode consistent with our understanding of a HIT-SI spheromak accompanied by a pair of injector-driven modes. In combination, the 3-mode DMD model produces excellent dynamic reconstructions across the domain of analyzed data.

  18. Study of driven magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, H.; Hsu, S.; Carter, T.; Kulsrud, R.; Bretz, N.; Jobes, F.; Ono, Yasushi; Perkins, F.

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) has been constructed to investigate the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in a well controlled laboratory setting. This device creates an environment satisfying the criteria for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma (S much-gt 1, ρ i much-lt L). The boundary conditions can be controlled externally, and experiments with fully three-dimensional reconnection are now possible. In the initial experiments, the effects of the third vector component of reconnecting fields have been studied. Two distinctively different shapes of neutral sheet current layers, depending on the third component, are identified during driven magnetic reconnection. Without the third component (anti-parallel or null-helicity reconnection), a thin double-Y shaped diffusion region is identified. A neutral sheet current profile is measured accurately to be as narrow as order ion gyro-radius. In the presence of an appreciable third component (co-helicity reconnection), an O-shaped diffusion region appears and grows into a spheromak configuration

  19. Compact toroids generated by a magnetized coaxial source in the CTX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, A.R.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; McKenna, K.F.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Platts, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Compact toroids containing both toroidal and poloidal magnetic field (Spheromak-type) have been generated in CTX using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. These CTs tear loose from the gun by magnetic field line reconnection, and they are trapped in flux conservers having various geometries. In a straight cylindrical flux conserver the CTs are observed to be unstable to a gross tilting mode. Stability to the tilting mode has been demonstrated in flux conservers having an oblate trapping region; however, the geometry of the entrance region leading to the trapping volume can also have important effects. Lifetimes of about 150 ..mu..s for the CTs are typically observed. Interferometric measurements give a value of about 2 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ for the initial plasma density. The plasma temperature measured at a single spot near the minor magnetic axis decreases to around 10 eV by the time the magnetic reconnection is complete. Spectrographic measurements and pressure probe results are in agreement with this temperature. A snipper coil has been installed to induce the CT to tear loose from the gun sooner. The use of this coil is observed to speed up the magnetic field reconnection process by about a factor of 2.

  20. Theory and MHD simulation of fuelling process by Compact Toroid (CT) injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Kishimoto, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The fuelling process by a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) injection is investigated by using MHD numerical simulations, where the SCT is injected into a magnetized target plasma region corresponding to a fusion device. In our previous study, the theoretical model to determine the penetration depth of the SCT into the target region has been proposed based on the simulation results, in which the SCT is decelerated not only by the magnetic pressure force but also by the magnetic tension force. However, since both ends of the target magnetic field are fixed on the boundary wall in the simulation, the deceleration caused by the magnetic tension force would be overestimated. In this study, the dependence of the boundary condition of the target magnetic field on the SCT penetration process is examined. From these results, the theoretical model we have proposed is improved to include the effect that the wave length of the target magnetic field bent by the SCT penetration expands with the Alfven velocity. In addition, by carrying out the simulation with the torus domain, it is confirmed that the theoretical model is applicable to estimate the penetration depth of the SCT under such conditions. Furthermore, the dependence of the injection position (the side injection and the top/bottom injection) on the penetration process is examined. (author)

  1. Characteristics of modified CT injector for JFT-2M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, N. [Himeji Institute of Technology, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2201 (Japan)]. E-mail: fukumoto@elct.eng.himeji-tech.ac.jp; Ogawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Nagata, M. [Himeji Institute of Technology, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2201 (Japan); Uyama, T. [Himeji Institute of Technology, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2201 (Japan); Shibata, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Kashiwa, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Kusama, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 2-4 Shirakatashirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2004-10-01

    The HIT-CTI mark II compact toroid (CT) injector employed for the JFT-2M tokamak facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been upgraded to improve injection performance. The nozzle of the mark III injector now has a linear tube in place of the original focus cone to avoid rapid focus and deceleration, and the tapered outer electrode has been replaced with more gentle taper in the compression section in order to facilitate gradual compression. The dependence of CT velocity and electron density on poloidal bias flux and trigger time of CT acceleration have been investigated in the operable range of 70-230 km/s average CT velocity and electron density of 0.1-1.0 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -3} at an accelerator bank voltage of 25 kV. The operation window is broader than that of the mark II injector. Emission of a CT plasmoid from the injector, and transport to the flux conserver as a high-density spheromak magnetic structure have also been confirmed.

  2. Coaxial helicity injection and n=1 relaxation activity in the HIST spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, M.

    2002-01-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has demonstrated non-inductive current generation of spherical tokamak (ST) and spheromak plasmas on several devices. In order to understand comprehensively the role of the n=1 instability and relaxation on current generation processes in helicity-driven spherical systems, we have investigated dynamics of ST plasmas produced in the HIST device (major radius R=0.30 m, minor radius a=0.24 m, aspect ratio A=1.25, toroidal field B t t <150 kA and discharge time t<5 ms in the ST configuration) by decreasing the external toroidal field (TF) and reversing its sign in time. In results, we have discovered that the ST relaxes towards flipped ST configurations through formation of reversed-field pinches (RFPs)-like magnetic field profiles. Surprisingly, it has been observed that not only toroidal flux but also poloidal flux reverses sign spontaneously during the relaxation process. This self-reversal of the poloidal field is thought to be evidence for 'global helicity conservation'. Furthermore, we have first demonstrated that a flipped ST plasma can be successfully sustained by CHI. (author)

  3. Performance and stability limits at near-unity aspect ratio in the pegasus toroidal experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.; Diem, S.; Garstka, G.; Kissick, M.; Lewicki, B.; Ostrander, C.; Probert, P.; Reinke, M.; Sontag, A.; Tritz, K.; Unterberg, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment is a mid-sized extremely-low aspect ratio (A) spherical torus (ST). It has the dual roles of exploring limits of ST behavior as A approaches 1 and studying the physics of ST plasmas in the tokamak-spheromak overlap regime. Major parameters are R 0.25 - 0.45 m, A 1.1 - 1.4, I p T 20% have been obtained, and the operational space of beta vs I p /aB T is similar to that observed for NBI-heated START discharges. Achievable plasma current is subject to an apparent limit of I p /I tf ∼ 1. Access to higher-current plasmas appears to be restricted by the appearance of large internal MHD activity, including m/n=2/1 and 3/2 modes. Recent experiments have begun to access ideal stability limits, with disruptions observed as q 95 approaches 5, in agreement with numerical predictions for external kink mode onset. (author)

  4. Annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1984-01-01

    The construction of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been proceeding in a highly satisfactory manner, giving confidence that the project schedule will be met. The vacuum vessel and toroidal-field coil systems are now in place, and the entire mechanical assembly process is about to be completed. Experimental operation of TFTR will begin with ohmic-heating studies in early CY83, and will proceed to intensive neutral-beam heating in CY84. Radio-frequency experiments on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) have used a new 3-MW ion cyclotron heating source to demonstrate second-harmonic heating of hydrogen ions up to temperatures of 3 keV. Lower hybrid current drive has sustained plasma currents as large as 400 kA in quasi-steady state. The 7-MW neutral-beam-heating capability of the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) was utilized to investigate finite-beta stability limits. Beta values above 3% were achieved at safety factor values as low as 1.7. A physical mechanism for beta-limitation was discovered and documented: the energetic-ion-driven, fishbone mode of MHD instability. Construction of the S-1 spheromak is progressing on schedule, with preliminary experimental operation planned for early CY83.

  5. Recent helicity source and power supply improvements in CTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henins, I.; Knox, S.O.; Jarboe, T.R.; Barnes, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Since the last CT Symposium, two major changes in CTX have been the introduction of pulse forming networks (PFNs) to drive the coaxial electrode helicity source, and the very recent installation of a larger source with electrode diameters about twice of the previous ones. The power supplies used for CTX have ranged from the simple connection of the capacitor bank across the electrode collector plates (slow mode) to the more sophisticated PFNs, described here, which optimize the energy transfer from the capacitor bank to the magnetic fields of the spheromak. Using the PFNs, the formation and sustainment phase to peak toroidal plasma current lasts longer (approx. =0.7 ms) than in the slow mode (approx. =0.05 ms), thus lowering the peak current that must flow through the electrode surfaces. Also, by supplying the source electrodes with both a square pulse current waveform and a quasi-steady source flux, phi/sub g/, one can generate helicity at a constant source lambda/sub g/ parameter. The use of a larger diameter helicity source will improve the energy efficiency of helicity injection and allow higher source current for the same surface current density because of the larger electrode surface area

  6. Comparative study of the electron density profiles in the compact torus plasma merging experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashiya, Hitoshi; Asaka, Takeo; Katsurai, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    Following two previous papers on the comparative studies of the electron density distributions for a single compact torus (CT) and a spherical tokamak (ST), and for the a single ST and a merged ST, a comparative study on the dynamics of the electron density profile and after the CT and ST plasma merging process was performed. The sharpness of the peak in the electron density profile around the mid-plane just after the merging of CT with a low safety factor (q value) such as RFP or spheromak is found to be related to the speed of the magnetic axis during the plasma merging process. It is also found that the electron density gradient near the plasma edge in a high q ST is larger than that of a low q CT. High q ST is found to be provided with the magnetic structure which is able to sustain a large thermal pressure by a strong j x B force. Despite these differences in the electron density profile between CT and ST during merging, the confinement characteristics evaluated from the number of electrons confined within the magnetic separatrix after the completion of the merging is almost similar between in the merging CT and in the merging ST. For all configurations, the electron density profiles after the completion of the merging are analogous to those of the corresponding single configuration produced without the merging process. (author)

  7. High-beta characteristics of first and second-stable spherical tokamaks in reconnection heating experiments of TS-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Novel formations of ultra-high-beta Spherical Tokamak (ST) have been developed in the TS-3 device using high power heating of merging/ reconnection. In Type-A merging, two STs were merged together to build up the plasma beta. In Type-B merging, an oblate FRC was initially formed by merging of two spheromaks with opposing toroidal field B t and was transformed into an ultra-high-beta ST by applying external B t . Ballooning stability analyses confirmed formations of the first-stable STs by Type- A merging and the second-stable STs by Type-B merging and also the unstable STs by both mergings, revealing the ballooning stability window consistent with measured high-n instabilities. We made (1) those model analyses of the produced STs for the first time using the BALLOO stability code, revealing that hollowness/ broadness of current/pressure profiles widen significantly the window to the second-stable regime. This paper also addresses (2) normalized betas of the second-stable STs as large as 6-17 for comparison with the Troyon scaling and (3) a promising scaling of the reconnection heating energy. (author)

  8. Study of the effects of photoelectron statistics on Thomson scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, G.W.; Levinton, F.M.; McNeill, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code has been developed which simulates a Thomson scattering measurement, from the counting statistics of the input channels through the mathematical analysis of the data. The scattered and background signals in each of the wavelength channels are assumed to obey Poisson statistics, and the spectral data are fitted to a Gaussian curve using a nonlinear least-squares fitting algorithm. This method goes beyond the usual calculation of the signal-to-noise ratio for the hardware and gives a quantitative measure of the effect of the noise on the final measurement. This method is applicable to Thomson scattering measurements in which the signal-to-noise ratio is low due to either low signal or high background. Thomson scattering data from the S-1 spheromak have been compared to this simulation, and they have been found to be in good agreement. This code has proven to be useful in assessing the effects of counting statistics relative to shot-to-shot variability in producing the observed spread in the data. It was also useful for designing improvements for the S-1 Thomson scattering system, and this method would be applicable to any measurement affected by counting statistics

  9. Annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been proceeding in a highly satisfactory manner, giving confidence that the project schedule will be met. The vacuum vessel and toroidal-field coil systems are now in place, and the entire mechanical assembly process is about to be completed. Experimental operation of TFTR will begin with ohmic-heating studies in early CY83, and will proceed to intensive neutral-beam heating in CY84. Radio-frequency experiments on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) have used a new 3-MW ion cyclotron heating source to demonstrate second-harmonic heating of hydrogen ions up to temperatures of 3 keV. Lower hybrid current drive has sustained plasma currents as large as 400 kA in quasi-steady state. The 7-MW neutral-beam-heating capability of the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) was utilized to investigate finite-beta stability limits. Beta values above 3% were achieved at safety factor values as low as 1.7. A physical mechanism for beta-limitation was discovered and documented: the energetic-ion-driven, fishbone mode of MHD instability. Construction of the S-1 spheromak is progressing on schedule, with preliminary experimental operation planned for early CY83

  10. Classical transport in field reversed mirrors: reactor implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.P.; Condit, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Assuming that the field-reversed mirror (or the closely related spheromak) turns out to be stable, the next crucial issue is transport of particles and heat. Of particular concern is the field null on axis (the X-point), which at first glance seems to allow particles to flow out unhindered. We have evaluated the classical diffusion coefficients for particles and heat in field-reversed mirrors, with particular reference to a class of Hill's vortex models. Two fairly surprising results emerge from this study. First, the diffusion-driven flow of particles and heat is finite at the X-points. This may be traced to the geometrical constraint that the current (and hence the ion-electron drag force, which causes cross-field transport) must vanish on axis. This conclusion holds for any transport model. Second, the classical diffusion coefficient D(psi), which governs both particle and heat flux, is finite on the separatrix. Indeed, in a wide class of Hill's vortex equilibria (spherical, oblate, or prolate) D(psi) is essentially independent of psi (except for the usual factor of n

  11. Present status of fusion researches in USA, 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi; Okabayashi, Michio

    1983-01-01

    25 years have elapsed since nuclear fusion was published at the second Geneva conference in 1958. During this period, the Plasma Physics Laboratory of Princeton University has achieved the central role in the research on toroidal system nuclear fusion devices. Also the experiment of the large tokamak TFTR started from December, 1982, recorded the longest containment time of 200 ms as the initial data, and toroidal devices look to approach one step close to the scientific verification experiment (Q = 1) of reactors. In the PPPL, in order to perfect the basis required for the realization of nuclear fusion reactors, the experimental and theoretical developments have been carried out. Plasma containment experiment has been advanced successively from stellarater through internal conductor type to tokamak, and in plasma heating, ion cyclotron heating, fast neutral particle injection heating and low region hybrid heating were successfully carried out. As the experimental apparatuses, that for poloidal divertor experiment, Princeton large torus, tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) and S-1 spheromak are described. From the theories developed recently, bean type tokamak, heliac-stellarator and nuclear fusion reaction utilizing μ-mesons and nuclear spin are explained. (Kako, I.)

  12. MHD simulation study of compact toroid injection into magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2000-01-01

    To understand the fuelling process in a fusion device by a compact toroid (CT) plasmoid injection method, we have carried out MHD numerical simulations where a spheromak-like CT (SCT) is injected into a magnetized target plasma region. So far, we revealed that the penetration depth of the SCT plasma becomes shorter than that estimated from the conducting sphere (CS) model, because in the simulation the Lorentz force of the target magnetic field sequentially decelerates the injected SCT while in the CS model only the magnetic pressure force acts as the deceleration mechanism. In this study, we represent the new theoretical model where the injected SCT is decelerated by both the magnetic pressure force and the magnetic tension force (we call it the non-slipping sphere (NS) model) and investigate in detail the deceleration mechanism of the SCT by comparison with simulation results. As a result, it is found that the decrease of the SCT kinetic energy in the simulation coincides with that in the NS model more than in the CS model. It means that not only the magnetic pressure force but also the magnetic tension force acts as the deceleration mechanism of the SCT. Furthermore, it is revealed that magnetic reconnection between the SCT magnetic field and the target magnetic field plays a role to relax the SCT deceleration. (author)

  13. Liquid first walls for magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Liquids (∼7 neutron mean free paths thick) with certain restrictions can probably be used in magnetic fusion designs between the burning plasma and the structural materials of the plant. If this works there are a number of profound advantages: lower the cost of electricity by more than 35%; remove the need to develop first wall materials saving over 4B$ in development costs; reduce the amount and kind of wastes generated in the plant; and permit a wider choice of materials. Evaporated liquid must be efficiently ionized in an edge plasma to prevent penetrating into the burning plasma and diminishing the burn rate. The fraction of evaporated material ionized is estimated to be 0.993 for Li, 0.98 for Flibe and 0.9999 for Li 17 Pb 83 . This ionized vapor would be swept along open field lines into a remote burial chamber. The most practical systems would be those with topological open field lines on the outer surface as is the case of a field reversed configuration (FRC), a Spheromak, a Z-pinch, or a mirror machine. In a Tokamak, including the Spherical Tokamak, the field lines outside the separatrix are restricted to a small volume inside the toroidal coil making for difficulties in introducing the liquid and removing the ionized vapor

  14. Equilibrium: two-dimensional configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    In Chapter 6, the problem of toroidal force balance is addressed in the simplest, nontrivial two-dimensional geometry, that of an axisymmetric torus. A derivation is presented of the Grad-Shafranov equation, the basic equation describing axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium. The solutions to equations provide a complete description of ideal MHD equilibria: radial pressure balance, toroidal force balance, equilibrium Beta limits, rotational transform, shear, magnetic wall, etc. A wide number of configurations are accurately modeled by the Grad-Shafranov equation. Among them are all types of tokamaks, the spheromak, the reversed field pinch, and toroidal multipoles. An important aspect of the analysis is the use of asymptotic expansions, with an inverse aspect ratio serving as the expansion parameter. In addition, an equation similar to the Grad-Shafranov equation, but for helically symmetric equilibria, is presented. This equation represents the leading-order description low-Beta and high-Beta stellarators, heliacs, and the Elmo bumpy torus. The solutions all correspond to infinitely long straight helices. Bending such a configuration into a torus requires a full three-dimensional calculation and is discussed in Chapter 7

  15. Summary of the 16th IAEA Technical Meeting on 'Research using Small Fusion Devices'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribkov, V.; Oost, G. van; Malaquias, A.; Herrera, J.

    2006-01-01

    Common research topics that are being studied in small, medium and large devices such as H-mode like or improved confinement, turbulence and transport are reported. These included modelling and diagnostic developments for edge and core, to characterize plasma density, temperature, electric potential, plasma flows, turbulence scale, etc. Innovative diagnostic methods were designed and implemented which could be used to develop experiments in small devices (in some cases not possible in large devices due to higher power deposition) to allow a better understanding of plasma edge and core properties. Reports are given addressing research in linear devices that can be used to study particular plasma physics topics relevant for other magnetic confinement devices such as the radial transport and the modelling of self-organized plasma jets involved in spheromak-like plasma formation. Some aspects of the work presented are of interest to the astrophysics community since they are believed to shed light on the basis of the physics of stellar jets. On the dense magnetized plasmas (DMP) topic, the present status of research, operation of new devices, plasma dynamics modelling and diagnostic developments is reported. The main devices presented belong to the class of Z-pinches, mostly plasma foci, and several papers were presented under this topic. The physics of DMP is important both for the main-stream fusion investigations as well as for providing the basis for elaboration of new concepts. New high-current technology introduced in the DMP devices design and construction make these devices nowadays more reliably fitted to various applications and give the possibility to widen the energy range used by them in both directions-to the multi-MJ level facilities and down to miniature plasma focus devices with energy of just a few J. (conference report)

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) achieved first plasma at 3:05 a.m. on December 24, 1982. During the course of the year, the plasma current was raised to a maximum of 1 MA, and extensive confinement studies were carried out with ohmic-heated plasmas. The most important finding was that tokamak energy confinement time increases as the cube of the plasma size. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT) carried out a number of high-powered plasma-heating experiments in the ion cyclotron frequency range, and also demonstrated for the first time that a 100-kA tokamak discharge can be built up by means of rf-waves in the lower hybrid range, without any need for inductive current drive by the conventional tokamak transformer system. The Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) demonstrated that substantial improvements in plasma confinement during intense neutral-beam heating can be obtained by means of either a magnetic divertor or a mechanical scoop limiter. The S-1 spheromak experiment has come into operation, with first plasma in January 1983, and machine completion in August. The soft X-ray laser development experiment continues to make strong progress towards the demonstration of laser amplification. Thus far, a single-pass gain of 3.5 has been achieved, using the 182 A line of CVI. Theoretical MHD-stability studies have shed new light on the nature of the energetic-ion-driven ''fishbone instability,'' and the utilization of the bean-shaping technique to reach higher beta values in the tokamak

  17. A Plasmoid Thruster for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Hawk, Clark W.; Eskridge, Richard; Smith, James W.; Martin, Adam K.

    2003-01-01

    There are a number of possible advantages to using accelerated plasmoids for in-space propulsion. A plasmoid is a compact plasma structure with an integral magnetic field. They have been studied extensively in controlled fusion research and are classified according to the relative strength of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic field (B(sub p), and B(sub t), respectively). An object with B(sub p), / B(sub t) much greater than 1 is classified as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC); if B(sub p) approximately equal to B(sub t), it is called a Spheromak. The plasmoid thruster operates by producing FRC-like plasmoids and subsequently ejecting them from the device at a high velocity. The plasmoid is formed inside of a single-turn conical theta-pinch coil. As this process is inductive, there are no electrodes. Similar experiments have yielded plasmoid velocities of at least 50 km/s, and calculations indicate that velocities in excess of 100 km/s should be possible. This concept should be capable of producing Isp's in the range of 5,000 - 15,000 s with thrust densities on the order of 10(exp 5) N per square meters. The current experiment is designed to produce jet powers in the range of 5 - 10 kW, although the concept should be scalable to several MW's. The plasmoid mass and velocity will be measured with a variety of diagnostics, including internal and external B-dot probes, flux loops, Langmuir probes, high-speed cameras and a laser interferometer. Also of key importance will be measurements of the efficiency and mass utilization. Simulations of the plasmoid thruster using MOQUI, a time-dependent MHD code, will be carried out concurrently with experimental testing.

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) achieved first plasma at 3:05 a.m. on December 24, 1982. During the course of the year, the plasma current was raised to a maximum of 1 MA, and extensive confinement studies were carried out with ohmic-heated plasmas. The most important finding was that tokamak energy confinement time increases as the cube of the plasma size. The Princeton Large Torus (PLT) carried out a number of high-powered plasma-heating experiments in the ion cyclotron frequency range, and also demonstrated for the first time that a 100-kA tokamak discharge can be built up by means of rf-waves in the lower hybrid range, without any need for inductive current drive by the conventional tokamak transformer system. The Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) demonstrated that substantial improvements in plasma confinement during intense neutral-beam heating can be obtained by means of either a magnetic divertor or a mechanical scoop limiter. The S-1 spheromak experiment has come into operation, with first plasma in January 1983, and machine completion in August. The soft X-ray laser development experiment continues to make strong progress towards the demonstration of laser amplification. Thus far, a single-pass gain of 3.5 has been achieved, using the 182 A line of CVI. Theoretical MHD-stability studies have shed new light on the nature of the energetic-ion-driven ''fishbone instability,'' and the utilization of the bean-shaping technique to reach higher beta values in the tokamak.

  19. The central column structure in SPHEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duck, R.C.; French, P.A.; Browning, P.K.; Cunningham, G.; Gee, S.J.; al-Karkhy, A.; Martin, R.; Rusbridge, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    SPHEX is a gun injected spheromak in which a magnetised Marshall gun generates and maintains an approximately axisymmetric toroidal plasma within a topologically spherical flux conserving vessel. The central column has been defined as a region of high mean floating potential, f > up to ∼ 150 V, aligned with the geometric axis of the device. It has been suggested that this region corresponds to the open magnetic flux which is connected directly to the central electrode of the gun and links the toroidal annulus (in which f > ∼ 0 V). Poynting vector measurements have shown that the power required to drive toroidal current in the annulus is transmitted out of the column by the coherent 20 kHz mode which pervades the plasma. Measurements of the MHD dynamo in the column indicate an 'antidynamo' electric field due to correlated fluctuations in v and B at the 20 kHz mode frequency which is consistent with the time-averaged Ohm's Law. On shorting the gun electrodes, the density in the column region decays rapidly leaving a 'hole' of radius R c ∼ 7 cm. This agrees with the estimated dimension of the open flux from mean internal B measurements and axisymmetric force-free equilibrium modelling, but is considerably smaller than the radius of ∼ 13 cm inferred from the time-averaged potential. In standard operating conditions the gun delivers a current of I G ∼ 60 kA at V G ∼ 500 V for ∼ 1 ms, driving a toroidal current of I t ∼ 60 kA. Ultimately we wish to understand the mechanism which drives toroidal current in the annulus; the central column is of interest because of the crucial role it plays in this process. (author) 8 refs., 6 figs

  20. Calculations in the tokamak vacuum region: δWυ and diagnostic capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chance, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The calculational methods used for the magnetic energy, δW v , in the vacuum region surrounding tokamak plasmas permit a natural extension to more general toroidal configurations, and also for calculating useful ancillary quantities like the simulation of the Mirnov-loop measurements, and the eddy currents generated in the conducting materials outside the plasma discharge. The generalizations include the capabilities for topologically spherical shells, and toroidally symmetric unlinked (with respect to the plasma discharge) solid conductors. The former was motivated by spheromak-like configurations, and the latter for simulating the segmented shell of PBX-M. The collocation method and Green's second identity is used for solving ∇ 2 χ = 0 for the magnetic scalar potential. This lends itself readily to incorporating the necessary boundary conditions, and once χ is known on the surfaces, a second application of Green's identity enables the simulation of the Mirnov-loop measurements. The eddy currents on the surface of the conductors, K c , is given by n x ∇χ. This is useful for visualizing the proposed coil currents needed for stabilizing the external kink modes by feedback mechanisms, and also for estimating the stresses in the shell due to disruptions, etc. The code is modular and can be easily interfaced to various stability codes like the PEST, NOVA, GATO, etc. system of codes, or can be used in a stand-alone mode for diagnostic purposes. Details of the numerical method and results are presented. These include the efficient treatment of the singularities inherently present in the Green's function method

  1. Eigenvalues of relaxed toroidal plasmas of arbitrary sharp edged cross sections. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Sh M [Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Relaxed (force-free) toroidal plasmas described by the equations cur 1 B={mu}B, and grad {mu}=O (B is the magnetic field) induces interest in nuclear fusion. Its solution is perceived to describe the gross of the reversed field pinch (RFP), spheromak configuration, current limitation in toroidal plasmas, and others. The parameter {mu} plays an important roll in relaxed states. It cannot exceed the smallest eigenvalue {mu} (min), and that for a toroidal discharge there is a maximum toroidal current which is connected to this value. The values of{mu} were calculated numerically, using the methods of collocation points, for toroids of arbitrary aspect ratio {alpha} ({alpha} = R/a, ratio of major/minor radii of tokamak) and arbitrary curved cross-sections (circle, ellipse, cassini, and D-shaped). The aim of present work is to prove the applicability of the numerical methods for calculating the eigenvalues for toroidal plasmas having sharp edged cross sections and arbitrary aspect ratio. The lowest eigenvalue {mu} (min), satisfy the boundary condition {beta} .n = O (or RB. = O) for which the toroidal flux are calculated. These are the zero field eigenvalues of the equation cur 1 b={mu}B. The poloidal magnetic field lines corresponding to different cross sections are shown by plotting the boundary condition B.n=O. The plots showed good fulfillment of the boundary condition along the whole boundaries of different cross sections. Dependence of eigenvalues {mu}a on aspect ratio {alpha} is also obtained. Several runs of the programme with various wave numbers K showed that {mu}a is very insensitive to the choice of K. 8 figs.

  2. Models of large-scale magnetic fields in stellar interiors. Application to solar and ap stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duez, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Stellar astrophysics needs today new models of large-scale magnetic fields, which are observed through spectropolarimetry at the surface of Ap/Bp stars, and thought to be an explanation for the uniform rotation of the solar radiation zone, deduced from helio seismic inversions. During my PhD, I focused on describing the possible magnetic equilibria in stellar interiors. The found configurations are mixed poloidal-toroidal, and minimize the energy for a given helicity, in analogy with Taylor states encountered in spheromaks. Taking into account the self-gravity leads us to the 'non force-free' equilibria family, that will thus influence the stellar structure. I derived all the physical quantities associated with the magnetic field; then I evaluated the perturbations they induce on gravity, thermodynamic quantities as well as energetic ones, for a solar model and an Ap star. 3D MHD simulations allowed me to show that these equilibria form a first stable states family, the generalization of such states remaining an open question. It has been shown that a large-scale magnetic field confined in the solar radiation zone can induce an oblateness comparable to a high core rotation law. I also studied the secular interaction between the magnetic field, the differential rotation and the meridional circulation in the aim of implementing their effects in a next generation stellar evolution code. The influence of the magnetism on convection has also been studied. Finally, hydrodynamic processes responsible for the mixing have been compared with diffusion and a change of convection's efficiency in the case of a CoRoT star target. (author) [fr

  3. Exploiting Laboratory and Heliophysics Plasma Synergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Dahlburg

    2010-05-01

    provides direct experimental observation of reconnection dynamics; and the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment, which provides well-diagnosed data on three-dimensional (3D null-point magnetic reconnection that is also applicable to solar active regions embedded in pre-existing coronal fields. New computer capabilities highlighted include: HYPERION, a fully compressible 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD code with radiation transport and thermal conduction; ORBIT-RF, a 4D Monte-Carlo code for the study of wave interactions with fast ions embedded in background MHD plasmas; the 3D implicit multi-fluid MHD spectral element code, HiFi; and, the 3D Hall MHD code VooDoo. Research synergies for these new tools are primarily in the areas of magnetic reconnection, plasma charged particle acceleration, plasma wave propagation and turbulence in a diverging magnetic field, plasma atomic processes, and magnetic dynamo behavior.

  4. Improvements to the ion Doppler spectrometer diagnostic on the HIT-SI experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, Aaron; Chandra, Rian; Everson, Chris; Jarboe, Tom

    2018-03-01

    An ion Doppler spectrometer diagnostic system measuring impurity ion temperature and velocity on the HIT-SI and HIT-SI3 spheromak devices has been improved with higher spatiotemporal resolution and lower error than previously described devices. Hardware and software improvements to the established technique have resulted in a record of 6.9 μs temporal and ≤2.8 cm spatial resolution in the midplane of each device. These allow Ciii and Oii flow, displacement, and temperature profiles to be observed simultaneously. With 72 fused-silica fiber channels in two independent bundles, and an f/8.5 Czerny-Turner spectrometer coupled to a video camera, frame rates of up to ten times the imposed magnetic perturbation frequency of 14.5 kHz were achieved in HIT-SI, viewing the upper half of the midplane. In HIT-SI3, frame rates of up to eight times the perturbation frequency were achieved viewing both halves of the midplane. Biorthogonal decomposition is used as a novel filtering tool, reducing uncertainty in ion temperature from ≲13 to ≲5 eV (with an instrument temperature of 8-16 eV) and uncertainty in velocity from ≲2 to ≲1 km/s. Doppler shift and broadening are calculated via the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, after which the errors in velocity and temperature are uniquely specified. Axisymmetric temperature profiles on HIT-SI3 for Ciii peaked near the inboard current separatrix at ≈40 eV are observed. Axisymmetric plasma displacement profiles have been measured on HIT-SI3, peaking at ≈6 cm at the outboard separatrix. Both profiles agree with the upper half of the midplane observable by HIT-SI. With its complete midplane view, HIT-SI3 has unambiguously extracted axisymmetric, toroidal current dependent rotation of up to 3 km/s. Analysis of the temporal phase of the displacement uncovers a coherent structure, locked to the applied perturbation. Previously described diagnostic systems could not achieve such results.

  5. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  6. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    discharges, production and self-organization of a turbulent plasma column in a spheromak (''SK-CG-1''), and (iv) a planned large-aspect ratio, high-beta tokamak (HBT-EP) experiment. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Experiments and models of MHD jets and their relevance to astrophysics and solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, Paul

    2017-10-01

    MHD-driven flows exist in both space and lab plasmas because the MHD force-balance equation J × B - ∇ P = 0 can only be satisfied in situations having an unusual degree of symmetry. In the normal situation where such symmetry does not exist, an arbitrary magnetic field B and its associated current J =μ0- 1 ∇ × B provide a magnetic force F = J × B having the character of a torque, i.e., ∇ × F ≠ 0 . Because ∇ × ∇ P = 0 is a mathematical identity, no pressure gradient can balance this torque so a flow is driven. Additionally, since ideal MHD has magnetic flux frozen into the frame of the moving plasma, the flow convects frozen-in magnetic flux. If the flow slows and piles up, both the plasma and the frozen-in magnetic flux will be compressed. This magnetic flux compression amplifies both the frozen-in B and its associated J . Slowing down thus increases certain components of F , in particular the pinch force associated with the electric current in the flow direction. This increased pinching causes the flow to self-collimate if the leading edge of the flow moves slower than the trailing part so there is compression in the flow frame. The result is that the flow self-collimates and forms a narrow jet. Self-collimating jets with embedded electric current and helical magnetic field are analogous to the straight cylindrical approximation of a tokamak, but now with the length of the cylinder continuously increasing and the radius depending on axial position. The flows are directed from axial regions having small radius to axial regions having large radius. The flow velocity is proportional to the axial electric current and is a significant fraction of the Alfvén velocity. Examples of these MHD-driven flows are astrophysical jets, certain solar coronal situations, and the initial plasma produced by the coaxial magnetized plasma guns used for making spheromaks. The above picture has been developed from laboratory measurements, analytic models, and numerical

  8. Final Technical Report for NSF/DOE partnership grant 1004284/ER54905/SC0004660; 2011- 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenzel, Reiner [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Urrutia, Manuel [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Research has been performed on two topics: (1) Nonlinear time-dependent phenomena in the regime of electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). (2) Plasma structures forming ”bubbles”. The latter are regions of localized density depletions or enhancements separated from the ambient plasma by sheaths or double layers. Three-dimensional magnetic null points can also be considered as ”magnetic bubbles”. Nonlinear EMHD fields are generated by pulsed magnetic loops. The magnetic field varies in time faster than an ion cyclotron period, hence interacts only with electrons. Space charge electric fields are created when magnetic forces try to separate electrons from ions. Electric and magnetic forces nearly balance to keep the plasma quasi neutral. This leads to rotational electron motions, i.e. Hall currents and associated magnetic perturbations. When the time scale falls between the ion and electron cyclotron period the magnetic perturbation is convected in the whistler mode. When the time-varying magnetic field exceeds the background magnetic field the whistler mode becomes highly nonlinear since its properties depend on the total magnetic field. When the time-varying magnetic field creates magnetic null points or null lines EMHD breaks down. Electrons can be accelerated in null lines which dissipated magnetic energy like in magnetic reconnection. Energized electrons with anisotropic distributions create secondary whistler instabilities. These effects have been observed in field topologies resembling spheromaks and field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The whistler mode propagation near magnetic nulls is not trivial when the field gradients and wavelength are comparable. Ray tracing is inappropriate when the WKB approximation breaks down. Experiments have been started to map wave propagation on curved field lines with null points. Initial results show that whistlers in highly nonuniform fields have highly oblique phase velocities but the energy flow remains dominantly