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Sample records for cdt1-geminin complex regulates

  1. Cdt1 revisited: complex and tight regulation during the cell cycle and consequences of deregulation in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Masatoshi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In eukaryotic cells, replication of genomic DNA initiates from multiple replication origins distributed on multiple chromosomes. To ensure that each origin is activated precisely only once during each S phase, a system has evolved which features periodic assembly and disassembly of essential pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs at replication origins. The pre-RC assembly reaction involves the loading of a presumptive replicative helicase, the MCM2-7 complexes, onto chromatin by the origin recognition complex (ORC and two essential factors, CDC6 and Cdt1. The eukaryotic cell cycle is driven by the periodic activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks and assembly of pre-RCs can only occur during the low Cdk activity period from late mitosis through G1 phase, with inappropriate re-assembly suppressed during S, G2, and M phases. It was originally suggested that inhibition of Cdt1 function after S phase in vertebrate cells is due to geminin binding and that Cdt1 hyperfunction resulting from Cdt1-geminin imbalance induces re-replication. However, recent progress has revealed that Cdt1 activity is more strictly regulated by two other mechanisms in addition to geminin: (1 functional and SCFSkp2-mediated proteolytic regulation through phosphorylation by Cdks; and (2 replication-coupled proteolysis mediated by the Cullin4-DDB1Cdt2 ubiquitin ligase and PCNA, an eukaryotic sliding clamp stimulating replicative DNA polymerases. The tight regulation implies that Cdt1 control is especially critical for the regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells. Indeed, Cdt1 overexpression evokes chromosomal damage even without re-replication. Furthermore, deregulated Cdt1 induces chromosomal instability in normal human cells. Since Cdt1 is overexpressed in cancer cells, this could be a new molecular mechanism leading to carcinogenesis. In this review, recent insights into Cdt1 function and regulation in mammalian cells are discussed.

  2. Complexity theory and financial regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battiston, Stefano; Farmer, J.D.; Flache, Andreas; Garlaschelli, Diego; Haldane, Andrew G.; Heesterbeek, Hans; Hommes, Cars; Jaeger, Carlo; May, Robert; Scheffer, Marten

    2016-01-01

    Traditional economic theory could not explain, much less predict, the near collapse of the financial system and its long-lasting effects on the global economy. Since the 2008 crisis, there has been increasing interest in using ideas from complexity theory to make sense of economic and financial mark

  3. Teaching as Regulation and Dealing with Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshuizen, H. P. A.

    2016-01-01

    At an abstract level, teaching a class can be perceived as one big regulation problem. For an optimal result, teachers must continuously (re)align their goals and sub-goals, and need to get timely and valid information on how they are doing in reaching these goals. This discussion describes the specific difficulties due to the time characteristics…

  4. [Protective properties of avermectine complex and plant growth regulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iamborko, N A; Pindrus, A A

    2009-01-01

    Antimutagen properties of avermectine complex of Avercom synthesized by Streptomyces avermitilis UCM Ac-2161, and growth regulators of plants (GRP) of bioagrostim-extra, ivin and emistim-C have been revealed in experiments with test-cultures of Salmonella typhimurium TA 100, TA 98. Avercom and plant growth regulators neutralize by toxication 27-48% and mutagen action of pesticides on soil microbial associations by 19.0-30.0%.

  5. MLL1/WDR5 complex in leukemogenesis and epigenetic regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wu; Hong-Bing Shu

    2011-01-01

    MLL1 is a histone H3Lys4 methyltransferase and forms a complex with WDR5 and other components. It plays important roles in developmental events, transcriptional regulation, and leukemogenesis. MLL1-fusion proteins resulting from chromosomal translocations are molecular hallmarks of a special type of leukemia, which occurs in over 70% infant leukemia patients and often accompanies poor prognosis. Investigations in the past years on leukemogenesis and the MLL1-WDR5 histone H3Lys4 methyltransferase complex demonstrate that epigenetic regulation is one of the key steps in development and human diseases.

  6. The NSL complex regulates housekeeping genes in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Chung Lam

    Full Text Available MOF is the major histone H4 lysine 16-specific (H4K16 acetyltransferase in mammals and Drosophila. In flies, it is involved in the regulation of X-chromosomal and autosomal genes as part of the MSL and the NSL complexes, respectively. While the function of the MSL complex as a dosage compensation regulator is fairly well understood, the role of the NSL complex in gene regulation is still poorly characterized. Here we report a comprehensive ChIP-seq analysis of four NSL complex members (NSL1, NSL3, MBD-R2, and MCRS2 throughout the Drosophila melanogaster genome. Strikingly, the majority (85.5% of NSL-bound genes are constitutively expressed across different cell types. We find that an increased abundance of the histone modifications H4K16ac, H3K4me2, H3K4me3, and H3K9ac in gene promoter regions is characteristic of NSL-targeted genes. Furthermore, we show that these genes have a well-defined nucleosome free region and broad transcription initiation patterns. Finally, by performing ChIP-seq analyses of RNA polymerase II (Pol II in NSL1- and NSL3-depleted cells, we demonstrate that both NSL proteins are required for efficient recruitment of Pol II to NSL target gene promoters. The observed Pol II reduction coincides with compromised binding of TBP and TFIIB to target promoters, indicating that the NSL complex is required for optimal recruitment of the pre-initiation complex on target genes. Moreover, genes that undergo the most dramatic loss of Pol II upon NSL knockdowns tend to be enriched in DNA Replication-related Element (DRE. Taken together, our findings show that the MOF-containing NSL complex acts as a major regulator of housekeeping genes in flies by modulating initiation of Pol II transcription.

  7. Different Polycomb group complexes regulate common target genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevich, Grigory; Leroy, Olivier; Akinci, Umut; Schubert, Daniel; Clarenz, Oliver; Goodrich, Justin; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Köhler, Claudia

    2006-09-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins convey epigenetic inheritance of repressed transcriptional states. Although the mechanism of the action of PcG is not completely understood, methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) is important in establishing PcG-mediated transcriptional repression. We show that the plant PcG target gene PHERES1 is regulated by histone trimethylation on H3K27 residues mediated by at least two different PcG complexes in plants, containing the SET domain proteins MEDEA or CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. Furthermore, we identify FUSCA3 as a potential PcG target gene and show that FUSCA3 is regulated by MEDEA and CURLY LEAF/SWINGER. We propose that different PcG complexes regulate a common set of target genes during the different stages of plant development.

  8. COPI complex is a regulator of lipid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Beller

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Lipid droplets are ubiquitous triglyceride and sterol ester storage organelles required for energy storage homeostasis and biosynthesis. Although little is known about lipid droplet formation and regulation, it is clear that members of the PAT (perilipin, adipocyte differentiation related protein, tail interacting protein of 47 kDa protein family coat the droplet surface and mediate interactions with lipases that remobilize the stored lipids. We identified key Drosophila candidate genes for lipid droplet regulation by RNA interference (RNAi screening with an image segmentation-based optical read-out system, and show that these regulatory functions are conserved in the mouse. Those include the vesicle-mediated Coat Protein Complex I (COPI transport complex, which is required for limiting lipid storage. We found that COPI components regulate the PAT protein composition at the lipid droplet surface, and promote the association of adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL with the lipid droplet surface to mediate lipolysis. Two compounds known to inhibit COPI function, Exo1 and Brefeldin A, phenocopy COPI knockdowns. Furthermore, RNAi inhibition of ATGL and simultaneous drug treatment indicate that COPI and ATGL function in the same pathway. These data indicate that the COPI complex is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of lipid homeostasis, and highlight an interaction between vesicle transport systems and lipid droplets.

  9. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulation of Virulence Gene Expression: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sílvia A.; Feliciano, Joana R.; Pita, Tiago; Guerreiro, Soraia I.; Leitão, Jorge H.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria emerged as opportunistic pathogens in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. Their eradication is very difficult due to the high level of intrinsic resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics. Bcc bacteria have large and complex genomes, composed of two to four replicons, with variable numbers of insertion sequences. The complexity of Bcc genomes confers a high genomic plasticity to these bacteria, allowing their adaptation and survival to diverse habitats, including the human host. In this work, we review results from recent studies using omics approaches to elucidate in vivo adaptive strategies and virulence gene regulation expression of Bcc bacteria when infecting the human host or subject to conditions mimicking the stressful environment of the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:28106859

  10. A PLA1-2 punch regulates the Golgi complex

    OpenAIRE

    Bechler, Marie E.; de Figueiredo, Paul; Brown, William J

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian Golgi complex, trans Golgi network (TGN) and ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) are comprised of membrane cisternae, coated vesicles and membrane tubules, all of which contribute to membrane trafficking and maintenance of their unique architectures. Recently, a new cast of players was discovered to regulate the Golgi and ERGIC: four unrelated cytoplasmic phospholipase A (PLA) enzymes, cPLA(2)α (GIVA cPLA(2)), PAFAH Ib (GVIII PLA(2)), iPLA(2)-β (GVIA-2 iPLA(2)) and iPLA(1)...

  11. Regulation of flower development in Arabidopsis by SCF complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weimin; Xie, Daoxin; Hobbie, Lawrence; Feng, Baomin; Zhao, Dazhong; Akkara, Joseph; Ma, Hong

    2004-04-01

    SCF complexes are the largest and best studied family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases that facilitate the ubiquitylation of proteins targeted for degradation. The SCF core components Skp1, Cul1, and Rbx1 serve in multiple SCF complexes involving different substrate-specific F-box proteins that are involved in diverse processes including cell cycle and development. In Arabidopsis, mutations in the F-box gene UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) result in a number of defects in flower development. However, functions of the core components Cul1 and Rbx1 in flower development are poorly understood. In this study we analyzed floral phenotypes caused by altering function of Cul1 or Rbx1, as well as the effects of mutations in ASK1 and ASK2. Plants homozygous for a point mutation in the AtCUL1 gene showed reduced floral organ number and several defects in each of the four whorls. Similarly, plants with reduced AtRbx1 expression due to RNA interference also exhibited floral morphological defects. In addition, compared to the ask1 mutant, plants homozygous for ask1 and heterozygous for ask2 displayed enhanced reduction of B function, as well as other novel defects of flower development, including carpelloid sepals and an inhibition of petal development. Genetic analyses demonstrate that AGAMOUS (AG) is required for the novel phenotypes observed in the first and second whorls. Furthermore, the genetic interaction between UFO and AtCUL1 supports the idea that UFO regulates multiple aspects of flower development as a part of SCF complexes. These results suggest that SCF complexes regulate several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis.

  12. The RCP-Rab11 complex regulates endocytic protein sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Andrew A; Schonteich, Eric; Chun, John; Junutula, Jagath R; Scheller, Richard H; Prekeris, Rytis

    2004-08-01

    Rab 11 GTPase is an important regulator of endocytic membrane traffic. Recently, we and others have identified a novel family of Rab11 binding proteins, known as Rab11-family interacting proteins (FIPs). One of the family members, Rab coupling protein (RCP), was identified as a protein binding to both Rab4 and Rab11 GTPases. RCP was therefore suggested to serve a dual function as Rab4 and Rab11 binding protein. In this study, we characterized the cellular functions of RCP and mapped its interactions with Rab4 and Rab11. Our data show that RCP interacts only weakly with Rab4 in vitro and does not play the role of coupling Rab11 and Rab4 in vivo. Furthermore, our data indicate that the RCP-Rab11 complex regulates the sorting of transferrin receptors from the degradative to the recycling pathway. We therefore propose that RCP functions primarily as a Rab11 binding protein that regulates protein sorting in tubular endosomes.

  13. PR65A phosphorylation regulates PP2A complex signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Kotlo

    Full Text Available Serine-threonine Protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A, a member of the PPP family of phosphatases, regulates a variety of essential cellular processes, including cell-cycling, DNA replication, transcription, translation, and secondary signaling pathways. In the heart, increased PP2A activity/signaling has been linked to cardiac remodeling, contractile dysfunction and, in failure, arrythmogenicity. The core PP2A complex is a hetero-trimeric holoenzyme consisting of a 36 kDa catalytic subunit (PP2Ac; a regulatory scaffold subunit of 65 kDa (PR65A or PP2Aa; and one of at least 18 associated variable regulatory proteins (B subunits classified into 3 families. In the present study, three in vivo sites of phosphorylation in cardiac PR65A are identified (S303, T268, S314. Using HEK cells transfected with recombinant forms of PR65A with phosphomimetic (P-PR65A and non-phosphorylated (N-PR65A amino acid substitutions at these sites, these phosphorylations were shown to inhibit the interaction of PR65A with PP2Ac and PP2A holoenzyme signaling. Forty-seven phospho-proteins were increased in abundance in HEK cells transfected with P-PR65A versus N-PR65A by phospho-protein profiling using 2D-DIGE analysis on phospho-enriched whole cell protein extracts. Among these proteins were elongation factor 1α (EF1A, elongation factor 2, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60, NADPH-dehydrogenase 1 alpha sub complex, annexin A, and PR65A. Compared to controls, failing hearts from the Dahl rat had less phosphorylated PR65A protein abundance and increased PP2A activity. Thus, PR65A phosphorylation is an in vivo mechanism for regulation of the PP2A signaling complex and increased PP2A activity in heart failure.

  14. Expression, purification and spectroscopic characterization of the Regulator complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, M.L.C.; Silva, A.L.S.; Camilotti, D.; Silva, C.A.; Sforca, M.L.; Smetana, J.H.C.; Zeri, A.C. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ospina-Bedoya, M. [Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals, serves as a central regulator of cell metabolism in humans and its deregulation is linked to diseases like cancer and diabetes. The small GTPases Rag are mediators of signaling by amino acid (leucine). These GT-Pases are anchored on the surface of the lysosome through an interaction with a complex of three proteins, p18, MP1 and p14, called Ragulator. The p18 protein is responsible for interaction with the lysosomal membrane through its N terminal post translational modification. The objective of this project is to study the interaction of p18 and other components of the Ragulator complex. The p18 protein was expressed in inclusion bodies, which were isolated and solubilized in urea. p18 was renatured with its partners MP1/p14 and this complex, the Ragulator, was subjected to spectroscopic characterization using circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering. (author)

  15. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  16. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  17. Ambition, Regulation and Reality. Complex use of land and water resources in Luwu, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roth, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this book I present three case studies of the complex regulation of use of land and water resources in Luwu. Attention to the role of legalcomplexity -the existence of different sources and definitions of normative-legal regulation in

  18. Regulation of TORC2 complex in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Dictyostelium is an amoeba that lives in the soil where it feeds on bacteria. During scarcity of food, Dictyostelium cells undergo a highly regulated developmental process in which the cells aggregate by chemotaxing towards pulsatile emission of extracellular cAMP from a signaling center; the cells

  19. Complex regulation of sister kinetochore orientation in meiosis-I

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Bardhan

    2010-09-01

    Kinetochores mediate chromosome movement during cell division by interacting with the spindle microtubules. Sexual reproduction necessitates the daunting task of reducing ploidy (number of chromosome sets) in the gametes, which depends upon the specialized properties of meiosis. Kinetochores have a central role in the reduction process. In this review, we discuss the complexity of this role of kinetochores in meiosis-I.

  20. Regulated complex assembly safeguards the fidelity of Sleeping Beauty transposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Pryputniewicz-Dobrinska, Diana; Nagy, Enikö Éva; Kaufman, Christopher D.; Singh, Manvendra; Yant, Steve; Wang, Jichang; Dalda, Anna; Kay, Mark A.; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-01

    The functional relevance of the inverted repeat structure (IR/DR) in a subgroup of the Tc1/mariner superfamily of transposons has been enigmatic. In contrast to mariner transposition, where a topological filter suppresses single-ended reactions, the IR/DR orchestrates a regulatory mechanism to enforce synapsis of the transposon ends before cleavage by the transposase occurs. This ordered assembly process shepherds primary transposase binding to the inner 12DRs (where cleavage does not occur), followed by capture of the 12DR of the other transposon end. This extra layer of regulation suppresses aberrant, potentially genotoxic recombination activities, and the mobilization of internally deleted copies in the IR/DR subgroup, including Sleeping Beauty (SB). In contrast, internally deleted sequences (MITEs) are preferred substrates of mariner transposition, and this process is associated with the emergence of Hsmar1-derived miRNA genes in the human genome. Translating IR/DR regulation to in vitro evolution yielded an SB transposon version with optimized substrate recognition (pT4). The ends of SB transposons excised by a K248A excision+/integration- transposase variant are processed by hairpin resolution, representing a link between phylogenetically, and mechanistically different recombination reactions, such as V(D)J recombination and transposition. Such variants generated by random mutation might stabilize transposon-host interactions or prepare the transposon for a horizontal transfer. PMID:27913727

  1. Regulated complex assembly safeguards the fidelity of Sleeping Beauty transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Pryputniewicz-Dobrinska, Diana; Nagy, Enikö Éva; Kaufman, Christopher D; Singh, Manvendra; Yant, Steve; Wang, Jichang; Dalda, Anna; Kay, Mark A; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2017-01-09

    The functional relevance of the inverted repeat structure (IR/DR) in a subgroup of the Tc1/mariner superfamily of transposons has been enigmatic. In contrast to mariner transposition, where a topological filter suppresses single-ended reactions, the IR/DR orchestrates a regulatory mechanism to enforce synapsis of the transposon ends before cleavage by the transposase occurs. This ordered assembly process shepherds primary transposase binding to the inner 12DRs (where cleavage does not occur), followed by capture of the 12DR of the other transposon end. This extra layer of regulation suppresses aberrant, potentially genotoxic recombination activities, and the mobilization of internally deleted copies in the IR/DR subgroup, including Sleeping Beauty (SB). In contrast, internally deleted sequences (MITEs) are preferred substrates of mariner transposition, and this process is associated with the emergence of Hsmar1-derived miRNA genes in the human genome. Translating IR/DR regulation to in vitro evolution yielded an SB transposon version with optimized substrate recognition (pT4). The ends of SB transposons excised by a K248A excision(+)/integration(-) transposase variant are processed by hairpin resolution, representing a link between phylogenetically, and mechanistically different recombination reactions, such as V(D)J recombination and transposition. Such variants generated by random mutation might stabilize transposon-host interactions or prepare the transposon for a horizontal transfer.

  2. CTCF-cohesin complex: architect of chromatin structure regulates V(D)J rearrangement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ann J Feeney; Jiyoti Verma-Gaur

    2012-01-01

    The CTCF/cohesin complex regulates higher order chromatin structure by creating long-range chromatin loops and by insulating neighboring genes from each other.The lymphocyte antigen receptor loci have large numbers of CTCF/cohesin binding sites,and recent studies demonstrate that the CTCF/cohesin complex plays several important roles in regulating the process of V(D)J recombination at these megabase-sized receptor loci.

  3. Regulation loops for the ring magnet power supplies in the SSC accelerator complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacconi, E.; Christiansen, C.

    1993-05-01

    The SSC complex consists of five cascaded accelerators: The linear accelerator (linac) and four synchrotrons: The low energy booster (LEB), the medium energy booster (MEB), the high energy booster (HEB), and the collider. Twelve- or 24-pulse phase-controlled SCR power supplies are used to energize the ring magnets. Each power supply has a voltage loop designed to regulate the voltage applied to the magnets. The voltage regulation loops for these synchrotrons and the current regulation for the LEB are analyzed in this work. The digital voltage regulator is fiber-optic isolated from the power converter. It has a closed-loop bandwidth of 150 Hz with band rejections for 60-Hz and 120-Hz perturbations. The LEB has a very precise current regulation system composed of a feedforward compensator, a fast feedback regulator, and a slow synchronous regulator. The current regulation design is corroborated by computer simulations.

  4. Complexity of steroid hydroxylase gent expression in the adrenal cortex A microcosm of regulated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, M R; Lund, J; Simpson, E R

    1989-01-01

    Regulation of the expression of steroid hydroxylase genes in the adrenal cortex involves mechanisms required for maintenance of optimal steroidogenesis, tissue specificity, and ontogeny of the steroidogenic pathway. Evaluation of the molecular basis of this complexity promises to unfold new aspects of regulated eukaryotic gene expression.

  5. Detecting coordinated regulation of multi-protein complexes using logic analysis of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeates Todd O

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the functional units in cells are multi-protein complexes such as RNA polymerase, the ribosome, and the proteasome. For such units to work together, one might expect a high level of regulation to enable co-appearance or repression of sets of complexes at the required time. However, this type of coordinated regulation between whole complexes is difficult to detect by existing methods for analyzing mRNA co-expression. We propose a new methodology that is able to detect such higher order relationships. Results We detect coordinated regulation of multiple protein complexes using logic analysis of gene expression data. Specifically, we identify gene triplets composed of genes whose expression profiles are found to be related by various types of logic functions. In order to focus on complexes, we associate the members of a gene triplet with the distinct protein complexes to which they belong. In this way, we identify complexes related by specific kinds of regulatory relationships. For example, we may find that the transcription of complex C is increased only if the transcription of both complex A AND complex B is repressed. We identify hundreds of examples of coordinated regulation among complexes under various stress conditions. Many of these examples involve the ribosome. Some of our examples have been previously identified in the literature, while others are novel. One notable example is the relationship between the transcription of the ribosome, RNA polymerase and mannosyltransferase II, which is involved in N-linked glycan processing in the Golgi. Conclusions The analysis proposed here focuses on relationships among triplets of genes that are not evident when genes are examined in a pairwise fashion as in typical clustering methods. By grouping gene triplets, we are able to decipher coordinated regulation among sets of three complexes. Moreover, using all triplets that involve coordinated regulation with the ribosome

  6. An asymmetric heterodomain interface stabilizes a response regulator-DNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, Anoop; Kumar, Shivesh; Evrard, Amanda N.; Paul, Lake N.; Yernool, Dinesh A. [Purdue; (Duke-MED)

    2014-02-14

    Two-component signal transduction systems consist of pairs of histidine kinases and response regulators, which mediate adaptive responses to environmental cues. Most activated response regulators regulate transcription by binding tightly to promoter DNA via a phosphorylation-triggered inactive-to-active transition. The molecular basis for formation of stable response regulator–DNA complexes that precede the assembly of RNA polymerases is unclear. Here, we present structures of DNA complexed with the response regulator KdpE, a member of the OmpR/PhoB family. The distinctively asymmetric complex in an active-like conformation reveals a unique intramolecular interface between the receiver domain (RD) and the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of only one of the two response regulators in the complex. Structure–function studies show that this RD–DBD interface is necessary to form stable complexes that support gene expression. The conservation of sequence and structure suggests that these findings extend to a large group of response regulators that act as transcription factors.

  7. (Studies of the genetic regulation of the Thermomonospora cellulase complex)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of this project are to determine the molecular mechanisms regulating cellulose synthesis in the soil bacterium Thermomonosporafusca and to determine the molecular mechanism by which T.fusca cellulases degrade crystalline cellulose. We have determined a structure for the T.fusca E{sub 2} catalytic subunit (E{sub 2}-30) by x-ray crystallography. This structure is quite similar to that of T.reesei CBHU but there are a number of differences. One is that the E{sub 2} active site is in a cleft while that of CBHII is in a tunnel. This is an expected result since E{sub 2} is an endocellulase. Large amounts of homogenous E{sub 5} catalytic subunit have been prepared and attempts to crystallize it are underway. Crystals of E{sub 2}-30 were soaked in cellobiose and modified crystals detracted well, however difference Fourier analysis showed many changes, so that we could not localize cellobiose in the 3-D structure of E{sub 2}-30. This implies that binding of cellobiose causes a significant change in the structure of E{sub 2}-30. The stereochemistry of the cleavage catalyzed by E{sub l}, E{sub 2} and E{sub 5} was determined in collaboration with Dr. Stephen Withers and E{sub 1} and 2 inverted the glycoside linkage while E{sub 5} does not. The entire E{sub l} and E{sub 4} genes have been induced into Streptomyces lividans where they are expressed at a high level and the E{sub l} and E{sub 4} are completely secreted into the medium. Studies on the synergism between the exocellulase E{sub 3} and the endocellulases E{sub 2} or E{sub 5} show that both exo and endocellulase activities are stimulated when they are assayed together.

  8. Border control: selectivity of chloroplast protein import and regulation at the TOC-complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarsy, Emilie; Lakshmanan, Ashok M; Kessler, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex and sophisticated molecular mechanisms to regulate their development and adapt to their surrounding environment. Particularly the development of their specific organelles, chloroplasts and other plastid-types, is finely tuned in accordance with the metabolic needs of the cell. The normal development and functioning of plastids require import of particular subsets of nuclear encoded proteins. Most preproteins contain a cleavable sequence at their N terminal (transit peptide) serving as a signal for targeting to the organelle and recognition by the translocation machinery TOC-TIC (translocon of outer membrane complex-translocon of inner membrane complex) spanning the dual membrane envelope. The plastid proteome needs constant remodeling in response to developmental and environmental factors. Therefore selective regulation of preprotein import plays a crucial role in plant development. In this review we describe the diversity of transit peptides and TOC receptor complexes, and summarize the current knowledge and potential directions for future research concerning regulation of the different Toc isoforms.

  9. Characterizing complexity in socio-technical systems: a case study of a SAMU Medical Regulation Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Angela Weber; Wachs, Priscila; Saurin, Tarcísio Abreu

    2012-01-01

    Complexity theory has been adopted by a number of studies as a benchmark to investigate the performance of socio-technical systems, especially those that are characterized by relevant cognitive work. However, there is little guidance on how to assess, systematically, the extent to which a system is complex. The main objective of this study is to carry out a systematic analysis of a SAMU (Mobile Emergency Medical Service) Medical Regulation Center in Brazil, based on the core characteristics of complex systems presented by previous studies. The assessment was based on direct observations and nine interviews: three of them with regulator of emergencies medical doctor, three with radio operators and three with telephone attendants. The results indicated that, to a great extent, the core characteristics of complexity are magnified) due to basic shortcomings in the design of the work system. Thus, some recommendations are put forward with a view to reducing unnecessary complexity that hinders the performance of the socio-technical system.

  10. Complex Regulation of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 in the Basomedial Hypothalamus by Leptin and Nutritional Status

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva, Eneida C.; Münzberg, Heike; Cota, Daniela; Leshan, Rebecca L.; Kopp, Keely; Ishida-Takahashi, Ryoko; Jones, Justin C.; Fingar, Diane C.; Seeley, Randy J.; Myers, Martin G.

    2009-01-01

    The medial basal hypothalamus, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), integrates signals of energy status to modulate metabolism and energy balance. Leptin and feeding regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hypothalamus, and hypothalamic mTORC1 contributes to the control of feeding and energy balance. To determine the mechanisms by which leptin modulates mTORC1 in specific hypothalamic neurons, we immunohistochemicall...

  11. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse R Raab

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer.

  12. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation Mediated by Biochemically Distinct SWI/SNF Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Jesse R.; Resnick, Samuel; Magnuson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Multiple positions within the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex can be filled by mutually exclusive subunits. Inclusion or exclusion of these proteins defines many unique forms of SWI/SNF and has profound functional consequences. Often this complex is studied as a single entity within a particular cell type and we understand little about the functional relationship between these biochemically distinct forms of the remodeling complex. Here we examine the functional relationships among three complex-specific ARID (AT-Rich Interacting Domain) subunits using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, transcriptome analysis, and transcription factor binding maps. We find widespread overlap in transcriptional regulation and the genomic binding of distinct SWI/SNF complexes. ARID1B and ARID2 participate in wide-spread cooperation to repress hundreds of genes. Additionally, we find numerous examples of competition between ARID1A and another ARID, and validate that gene expression changes following loss of one ARID are dependent on the function of an alternative ARID. These distinct regulatory modalities are correlated with differential occupancy by transcription factors. Together, these data suggest that distinct SWI/SNF complexes dictate gene-specific transcription through functional interactions between the different forms of the SWI/SNF complex and associated co-factors. Most genes regulated by SWI/SNF are controlled by multiple biochemically distinct forms of the complex, and the overall expression of a gene is the product of the interaction between these different SWI/SNF complexes. The three mutually exclusive ARID family members are among the most frequently mutated chromatin regulators in cancer, and understanding the functional interactions and their role in transcriptional regulation provides an important foundation to understand their role in cancer. PMID:26716708

  13. Gene regulation in S. mutans: complex control in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E G; Spatafora, G A

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease of multifactorial etiology that derives from the interplay among cariogenic bacteria on the dentition, the host diet, and other environmental exposures. Streptococcus mutans proliferates as a biofilm on the tooth surface, where it obtains nutrients and metabolizes fermentable dietary carbohydrates. The accumulation of lactic acid as a by-product of fermentation results in acidification of the plaque biofilm and demineralization of tooth enamel, marking the onset of decay. The ability of S. mutans to respond to environmental stresses presented by salivary flow, acid pH, oxidative stress, and changes in carbohydrate source and availability is essential for its survival and predominance in caries lesions. Importantly, S. mutans has evolved a network of regulators to integrate its cellular response to environmental change. Herein we describe the latest insights into global gene regulation in S. mutans, including mechanisms of signal transduction, carbon catabolite repression, and quorum-sensing. An improved understanding of these regulatory networks can provide a basis for novel therapeutic applications aimed at treating and/or preventing caries.

  14. Regulation of Secondary Metabolism by the Velvet Complex Is Temperature-Responsive in Aspergillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L. Lind

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and responding to environmental cues is critical to the lifestyle of filamentous fungi. How environmental variation influences fungi to produce a wide diversity of ecologically important secondary metabolites (SMs is not well understood. To address this question, we first examined changes in global gene expression of the opportunistic human pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, after exposure to different temperature conditions. We found that 11 of the 37 SM gene clusters in A. fumigatus were expressed at higher levels at 30° than at 37°. We next investigated the role of the light-responsive Velvet complex in environment-dependent gene expression by examining temperature-dependent transcription profiles in the absence of two key members of the Velvet protein complex, VeA and LaeA. We found that the 11 temperature-regulated SM gene clusters required VeA at 37° and LaeA at both 30 and 37° for wild-type levels of expression. Interestingly, four SM gene clusters were regulated by VeA at 37° but not at 30°, and two additional ones were regulated by VeA at both temperatures but were substantially less so at 30°, indicating that the role of VeA and, more generally of the Velvet complex, in the regulation of certain SM gene clusters is temperature-dependent. Our findings support the hypothesis that fungal secondary metabolism is regulated by an intertwined network of transcriptional regulators responsive to multiple environmental factors.

  15. Magi Is Associated with the Par Complex and Functions Antagonistically with Bazooka to Regulate the Apical Polarity Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padash Barmchi, Mojgan; Samarasekera, Gayathri; Gilbert, Mary; Auld, Vanessa J.; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian MAGI proteins play important roles in the maintenance of adherens and tight junctions. The MAGI family of proteins contains modular domains such as WW and PDZ domains necessary for scaffolding of membrane receptors and intracellular signaling components. Loss of MAGI leads to reduced junction stability while overexpression of MAGI can lead to increased adhesion and stabilization of epithelial morphology. However, how Magi regulates junction assembly in epithelia is largely unknown. We investigated the single Drosophila homologue of Magi to study the in vivo role of Magi in epithelial development. Magi is localized at the adherens junction and forms a complex with the polarity proteins, Par3/Bazooka and aPKC. We generated a Magi null mutant and found that Magi null mutants were viable with no detectable morphological defects even though the Magi protein is highly conserved with vertebrate Magi homologues. However, overexpression of Magi resulted in the displacement of Baz/Par3 and aPKC and lead to an increase in the level of PIP3. Interestingly, we found that Magi and Baz functioned in an antagonistic manner to regulate the localization of the apical polarity complex. Maintaining the balance between the level of Magi and Baz is an important determinant of the levels and localization of apical polarity complex. PMID:27074039

  16. Interplay of Prior Knowledge, Self-Regulation and Motivation in Complex Multimedia Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H. S.; Kalet, A. L.; Plass, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the direct and indirect effects of medical clerkship students' prior knowledge, self-regulation and motivation on learning performance in complex multimedia learning environments. The data from 386 medical clerkship students from six medical schools were analysed using structural equation modeling. The structural model revealed…

  17. JARID2 regulates binding of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 to target genes in ES cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Cloos, Paul A C; Walfridsson, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have an important role in controlling the expression of genes essential for development, differentiation and maintenance of cell fates. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is believed to regulate transcriptional repression by catalysing the di- and tri-methy...

  18. Economic valuation of gas regulation as a Service by rice-duck-fish complex ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Weiling; Cao Cougui; Wang Jinping

    2008-01-01

    Valuating the function of ecosystem services is crucial for accounting green GDP, making a conserva-tion policy of ecological environment and the decision of regional development as well as sustainable development strategy. Rice-duck-fish symbiosis has been promoted in several developing countries as a way of&creasing incomes for rice farmers, but investigations of its value have mainly focused on direct economic benefits, such as food and raw material production. Few studies have been conducted on the estimation of indirect services provided by rice-duck-fish complex ecosystem. The gas regulation service and its economic values provided by rice-duck-fish complex ecosystem were studied in Wuhan, China. The major components of gas regulation are O2 emission and greenhouse, gases (GHGs, CO2) regulation. The results show that O2 emission from different treatments (including rice-duck (RD) rice-fish (RF), rice-duck-fish (RDF) and rice (CK)) ranged from 26,370 kg/ha to 33,910 kg/ha per year, with an eco- nomic value of 10,050-12,920 yuan/ha per year (Chinese currency: I euro=10.2475 yuan, August 28, 2007). The net GHGs exchange varied from 1,200 to 3,320 kg/ha per year, and its economic value ranged.from 1,040 yuan/ha to 2, 900 yuan/ha per year Consequently, the total economic value of gas regulation provided by symbiosis complex ecosystems ranged from 11,090 yuan/ha to 15,820 yuan/ha per year, and the maximum overall economic value of gas regulation was provided by RDF complex ecosystem. The work will be useful for further understanding of the func tions of rice-duek-fish complex ecosystem services and supplying the theoretical references to agricultural policy.

  19. Synergy and antagonism in regulation of recombinant human INO80 chromatin remodeling complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoft, Oliver; Bythell-Douglas, Rohan; McCormack, Elizabeth A.; Wigley, Dale B.

    2016-01-01

    We have purified a minimal core human Ino80 complex from recombinant protein expressed in insect cells. The complex comprises one subunit each of an N-terminally truncated Ino80, actin, Arp4, Arp5, Arp8, Ies2 and Ies6, together with a single heterohexamer of the Tip49a and Tip49b proteins. This core complex has nucleosome sliding activity that is similar to that of endogenous human and yeast Ino80 complexes and is also inhibited by inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). We show that IP6 is a non-competitive inhibitor that acts by blocking the stimulatory effect of nucleosomes on the ATPase activity. The IP6 binding site is located within the C-terminal region of the Ino80 subunit. We have also prepared complexes lacking combinations of Ies2 and Arp5/Ies6 subunits that reveal regulation imposed by each of them individually and synergistically that couples ATP hydrolysis to nucleosome sliding. This coupling between Ies2 and Arp5/Ies6 can be overcome in a bypass mutation of the Arp5 subunit that is active in the absence of Ies2. These studies reveal several underlying mechanisms for regulation of ATPase activity involving a complex interplay between these protein subunits and IP6 that in turn controls nucleosome sliding. PMID:27257055

  20. Regulation of Drosophila Brain Wiring by Neuropil Interactions via a Slit-Robo-RPTP Signaling Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Carlos; Soldano, Alessia; Mora, Natalia; De Geest, Natalie; Claeys, Annelies; Erfurth, Maria-Luise; Sierralta, Jimena; Ramaekers, Ariane; Dascenco, Dan; Ejsmont, Radoslaw K; Schmucker, Dietmar; Sanchez-Soriano, Natalia; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-10-24

    The axonal wiring molecule Slit and its Round-About (Robo) receptors are conserved regulators of nerve cord patterning. Robo receptors also contribute to wiring brain circuits. Whether molecular mechanisms regulating these signals are modified to fit more complex brain wiring processes is unclear. We investigated the role of Slit and Robo receptors in wiring Drosophila higher-order brain circuits and identified differences in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of Robo/Slit function. First, we find that signaling by Robo receptors in the brain is regulated by the Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase RPTP69d. RPTP69d increases membrane availability of Robo3 without affecting its phosphorylation state. Second, we detect no midline localization of Slit during brain development. Instead, Slit is enriched in the mushroom body, a neuronal structure covering large areas of the brain. Thus, a divergent molecular mechanism regulates neuronal circuit wiring in the Drosophila brain, partly in response to signals from the mushroom body.

  1. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M., E-mail: carien.niessen@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  2. Ambition, Regulation and Reality. Complex use of land and water resources in Luwu, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, D.

    2003-01-01

    In this book I present three case studies of the complex regulation of use of land and water resources in Luwu. Attention to the role of legalcomplexity -the existence of different sources and definitions of normative-legal regulation in the same socio-political space - is an important conceptual point of departure of this study. Each of the three case study sections contains specific conclusions pertaining to the issues involved. The last chapter of the book (chapter 11) is primarily a refle...

  3. Small molecule regulation of self-association and catalytic activity in a supramolecular coordination complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuirk, C Michael; Stern, Charlotte L; Mirkin, Chad A

    2014-03-26

    Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of the first weak-link approach (WLA) supramolecular construct that employs the small molecule regulation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions for the in situ control of catalytic activity. A biaryl urea group, prone to self-aggregation, was functionalized with a phosphinoalkyl thioether (P,S) hemilabile moiety and incorporated into a homoligated Pt(II) tweezer WLA complex. This urea-containing construct, which has been characterized by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study, can be switched in situ from a rigid fully closed state to a flexible semiopen state via Cl(-) induced changes in the coordination mode at the Pt(II) structural node. FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy studies were used to demonstrate that while extensive urea self-association persists in the flexible semiopen complex, these interactions are deterred in the rigid, fully closed complex because of geometric and steric restraints. Consequently, the urea moieties in the fully closed complex are able to catalyze a Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and methyl vinyl ketone to generate 2-acetyl-5-norbornene. The free urea ligand and the semiopen complex show no such activity. The successful incorporation and regulation of a hydrogen bond donating catalyst in a WLA construct open the doors to a vast and rapidly growing catalogue of allosteric catalysts for applications in the detection and amplification of organic analytes.

  4. Regulated proteolysis of a transcription factor complex is critical to cell cycle progression in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Kasia G; Cantin, Amber; Wohlever, Matthew; Joshi, Kamal K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle transitions are often triggered by the proteolysis of key regulatory proteins. In Caulobacter crescentus, the G1-S transition involves the degradation of an essential DNA-binding response regulator, CtrA, by the ClpXP protease. Here, we show that another critical cell cycle regulator, SciP, is also degraded during the G1-S transition, but by the Lon protease. SciP is a small protein that binds directly to CtrA and prevents it from activating target genes during G1. We demonstrate that SciP must be degraded during the G1-S transition so that cells can properly activate CtrA-dependent genes following DNA replication initiation and the reaccumulation of CtrA. These results indicate that like CtrA, SciP levels are tightly regulated during the Caulobacter cell cycle. In addition, we show that formation of a complex between CtrA and SciP at target promoters protects both proteins from their respective proteases. Degradation of either protein thus helps trigger the destruction of the other, facilitating a cooperative disassembly of the complex. Collectively, our results indicate that ClpXP and Lon each degrade an important cell cycle regulator, helping to trigger the onset of S phase and prepare cells for the subsequent programmes of gene expression critical to polar morphogenesis and cell division.

  5. Complex and shifting interactions of phytochromes regulate fruit development in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Suresh Kumar; Sharma, Sulabha; Santisree, Parankusam; Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Appenroth, Klaus; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2014-07-01

    Tomato fruit ripening is a complex metabolic process regulated by a genetical hierarchy. A subset of this process is also modulated by light signalling, as mutants encoding negative regulators of phytochrome signal transduction show higher accumulation of carotenoids. In tomato, phytochromes are encoded by a multi-gene family, namely PHYA, PHYB1, PHYB2, PHYE and PHYF; however, their contribution to fruit development and ripening has not been examined. Using single phytochrome mutants phyA, phyB1 and phyB2 and multiple mutants phyAB1, phyB1B2 and phyAB1B2, we compared the on-vine transitory phases of ripening until fruit abscission. The phyAB1B2 mutant showed accelerated transitions during ripening, with shortest time to fruit abscission. Comparison of transition intervals in mutants indicated a phase-specific influence of different phytochrome species either singly or in combination on the ripening process. Examination of off-vine ripened fruits indicated that ripening-specific carotenoid accumulation was not obligatorily dependent upon light and even dark-incubated fruits accumulated carotenoids. The accumulation of transcripts and carotenoids in off-vine and on-vine ripened mutant fruits indicated a complex and shifting phase-dependent modulation by phytochromes. Our results indicate that, in addition to regulating carotenoid levels in tomato fruits, phytochromes also regulate the time required for phase transitions during ripening.

  6. Complex regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in the basomedial hypothalamus by leptin and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Eneida C; Münzberg, Heike; Cota, Daniela; Leshan, Rebecca L; Kopp, Keely; Ishida-Takahashi, Ryoko; Jones, Justin C; Fingar, Diane C; Seeley, Randy J; Myers, Martin G

    2009-10-01

    The medial basal hypothalamus, including the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), integrates signals of energy status to modulate metabolism and energy balance. Leptin and feeding regulate the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hypothalamus, and hypothalamic mTORC1 contributes to the control of feeding and energy balance. To determine the mechanisms by which leptin modulates mTORC1 in specific hypothalamic neurons, we immunohistochemically assessed the mTORC1-dependent phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (pS6). In addition to confirming the modulation of ARC mTORC1 activity by acute leptin treatment, this analysis revealed the robust activation of mTORC1-dependent ARC pS6 in response to fasting and leptin deficiency in leptin receptor-expressing Agouti-related protein neurons. In contrast, fasting and leptin deficiency suppress VMH mTORC1 signaling. The appropriate regulation of ARC mTORC1 by mutant leptin receptor isoforms correlated with their ability to suppress the activity of Agouti-related protein neurons, suggesting the potential stimulation of mTORC1 by the neuronal activity. Indeed, fasting- and leptin deficiency-induced pS6-immunoreactivity (IR) extensively colocalized with c-Fos-IR in ARC and VMH neurons. Furthermore, ghrelin, which activates orexigenic ARC neurons, increased ARC mTORC1 activity and induced colocalized pS6- and c-Fos-IR. Thus, neuronal activity promotes mTORC1/pS6 in response to signals of energy deficit. In contrast, insulin, which activates mTORC1 via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, increased ARC and VMH pS6-IR in the absence of neuronal activation. The regulation of mTORC1 in the basomedial hypothalamus thus varies by cell and stimulus type, as opposed to responding in a uniform manner to nutritional and hormonal perturbations.

  7. Potato Tuber Induction is Regulated by Interactions Between Components of a Tuberigen Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Chin-Jit; Takahashi, Kenta; Shimizu, Kanae; Shimamoto, Ko; Taoka, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-12-27

    Photoperiod-regulated flowering and potato tuber formation involve leaf-produced mobile signals, florigen and tuberigen, respectively. The major protein component of florigen has been identified as the FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein. In rice, an FT-like protein, Heading date 3a (Hd3a), induces flowering by making the florigen activation complex (FAC) through interactions with 14-3-3 and OsFD1, a rice FD-like protein. In potato, StSP6A, an FT-like protein, was identified as a major component of tuberigen. However, the molecular mechanism of how StSP6A triggers tuber formation remains elusive. Here we analyzed the significance of the formation of a complex including StSP6A, 14-3-3 and FD-like proteins in tuberization. Yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation and in vitro pull-down assays showed that StSP6A and StFDL1, a potato FD-like protein, interact with St14-3-3s. StSP6A overexpression induced early tuberization in a 14-3-3-dependent manner, and suppression of StFDL1 delayed tuberization. These results strongly suggest that an FAC-like complex, the tuberigen activation complex (TAC), comprised of StSP6A, St14-3-3s and StFDL1, regulates potato tuber formation.

  8. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly...... identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized...... propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins....

  9. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gene transcription.

  10. Hem-1 complexes are essential for Rac activation, actin polymerization, and myosin regulation during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orion D Weiner

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Migrating cells need to make different actin assemblies at the cell's leading and trailing edges and to maintain physical separation of signals for these assemblies. This asymmetric control of activities represents one important form of cell polarity. There are significant gaps in our understanding of the components involved in generating and maintaining polarity during chemotaxis. Here we characterize a family of complexes (which we term leading edge complexes, scaffolded by hematopoietic protein 1 (Hem-1, that organize the neutrophil's leading edge. The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family Verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE2 complex, which mediates activation of actin polymerization by Rac, is only one member of this family. A subset of these leading edge complexes are biochemically separable from the WAVE2 complex and contain a diverse set of potential polarity-regulating proteins. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hem-1-containing complexes in neutrophil-like cells: (a dramatically impairs attractant-induced actin polymerization, polarity, and chemotaxis; (b substantially weakens Rac activation and phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate production, disrupting the (phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate/Rac/F-actin-mediated feedback circuit that organizes the leading edge; and (c prevents exclusion of activated myosin from the leading edge, perhaps by misregulating leading edge complexes that contain inhibitors of the Rho-actomyosin pathway. Taken together, these observations show that versatile Hem-1-containing complexes coordinate diverse regulatory signals at the leading edge of polarized neutrophils, including but not confined to those involving WAVE2-dependent actin polymerization.

  11. FIH-1 disrupts an LRRK1/EGFR complex to positively regulate keratinocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Han; Kaplan, Nihal; Yang, Wending; Getsios, Spiro; Lavker, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    Factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (FIH-1; official symbol HIF1AN) is a hydroxylase that negatively regulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α but also targets other ankyrin repeat domain-containing proteins such as Notch receptor to limit epithelial differentiation. We show that FIH-1 null mutant mice exhibit delayed wound healing. Importantly, in vitro scratch wound assays demonstrate that the positive role of FIH-1 in migration is independent of Notch signaling, suggesting that this hydroxylase targets another ankyrin repeat domain-containing protein to positively regulate motogenic signaling pathways. Accordingly, FIH-1 increases epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, which in turn enhances keratinocyte migration via mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, leading to extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. Our studies identify leucine-rich repeat kinase 1 (LRRK1), a key regulator of the EGFR endosomal trafficking and signaling, as an FIH-1 binding partner. Such an interaction prevents the formation of an EGFR/LRRK1 complex, necessary for proper EGFR turnover. The identification of LRRK1 as a novel target for FIH-1 provides new insight into how FIH-1 functions as a positive regulator of epithelial migration.

  12. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Balmer, Sophie; Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-04-07

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo-distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo.

  13. TDP-43 regulates the microprocessor complex activity during in vitro neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Valerio; Grossi, Elena; Laneve, Pietro; Morlando, Mariangela; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Ballarino, Monica; Bozzoni, Irene; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) is an RNA-binding protein implicated in RNA metabolism at several levels. Even if ubiquitously expressed, it is considered as a neuronal activity-responsive factor and a major signature for neurological pathologies, making the comprehension of its activity in the nervous system a very challenging issue. TDP-43 has also been described as an accessory component of the Drosha-DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8) microprocessor complex, which is crucially involved in basal and tissue-specific RNA processing events. In the present study, we exploited in vitro neuronal differentiation systems to investigate the TDP-43 demand for the microprocessor function, focusing on both its canonical microRNA biosynthetic activity and its alternative role as a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. Our findings reveal a novel role for TDP-43 as an essential factor that controls the stability of Drosha protein during neuronal differentiation, thus globally affecting the production of microRNAs. We also demonstrate that TDP-43 is required for the Drosha-mediated regulation of Neurogenin 2, a master gene orchestrating neurogenesis, whereas post-transcriptional control of Dgcr8, another Drosha target, resulted to be TDP-43-independent. These results implicate a previously uncovered contribution of TDP-43 in regulating the abundance and the substrate specificity of the microprocessor complex and provide new insights into TDP-43 as a key player in neuronal differentiation.

  14. BRCA1 regulates microRNA biogenesis via the DROSHA microprocessor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinji; Amano, Atsuo

    2012-04-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs that function as key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. miRNA maturation is controlled by the DROSHA microprocessor complex. However, the detailed mechanism of miRNA biogenesis remains unclear. We show that the tumor suppressor breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) accelerates the processing of miRNA primary transcripts. BRCA1 increased the expressions of both precursor and mature forms of let-7a-1, miR-16-1, miR-145, and miR-34a. In addition, this tumor suppressor was shown to be directly associated with DROSHA and DDX5 of the DROSHA microprocessor complex, and it interacted with Smad3, p53, and DHX9 RNA helicase. We also found that BRCA1 recognizes the RNA secondary structure and directly binds with primary transcripts of miRNAs via a DNA-binding domain. Together, these results suggest that BRCA1 regulates miRNA biogenesis via the DROSHA microprocessor complex and Smad3/p53/DHX9. Our findings also indicate novel functions of BRCA1 in miRNA biogenesis, which may be linked to its tumor suppressor mechanism and maintenance of genomic stability.

  15. Regulation of human ornithine decarboxylase expression by the c-Myc.Max protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, A; Reddy, C D; Wu, S; Hickok, N J; Reddy, E P; Yumet, G; Soprano, D R; Soprano, K J

    1993-12-25

    The presence of a CACGTG element within a region of the human ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promoter located at -491 to -474 base pairs 5' to the start site of transcription suggested that the c-Myc.Max protein complex may play a role in the regulation of ODC expression during growth. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and methylation interference analysis showed that the nuclei of WI-38 cells expressing ODC contained proteins that bound to this region of the ODC gene in a manner that correlated with growth-associated ODC expression. Also, use of antibodies against c-Myc and Max and purified recombinant c-Myc and Max protein in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that these proteins can specifically bind this portion of the human ODC promoter. Transient transfection studies showed that increase in the level of c-Myc and/or Max led to a significant enhancement of expression of a human ODC promoter-CAT reporter construct. Moreover, treatment of actively growing WI-38 cells with an antisense oligomer to c-Myc reduced the amount of endogenous protein complex formed and the amount of endogenous ODC mRNA expressed. These studies show that the c-Myc.Max protein complex plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of human ODC in vivo.

  16. Akt2 negatively regulates assembly of the POSH-MLK-JNK signaling complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Claudia; Tarras, Samantha; Taylor, Jennifer; Vojtek, Anne B

    2003-11-28

    We demonstrate that POSH, a scaffold for the JNK signaling pathway, binds to Akt2. A POSH mutant that is unable to bind Akt2 (POSH W489A) exhibits enhanced-binding to MLK3, and this increase in binding is accompanied by increased activation of the JNK signaling pathway. In addition, we show that the association of MLK3 with POSH is increased upon inhibition of the endogenous phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Thus, the assembly of an active JNK signaling complex by POSH is negatively regulated by Akt2. Further, the level of Akt-phosphorylated MLK3 is reduced in cells expressing the Akt2 binding domain of POSH, which acts as a dominant interfering protein. Taken together, our results support a model in which Akt2 binds to a POSH-MLK-MKK-JNK complex and phosphorylates MLK3; phosphorylation of MLK3 by Akt2 results in the disassembly of the JNK complex bound to POSH and down-regulation of the JNK signaling pathway.

  17. A conformational change within the WAVE2 complex regulates its degradation following cellular activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Noah; Biber, Guy; Fried, Sophia; Reicher, Barak; Levy, Omer; Sabag, Batel; Noy, Elad; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2017-01-01

    WASp family Verprolin-homologous protein-2 (WAVE2), a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family of actin nucleation promoting factors, is a central regulator of actin cytoskeleton polymerization and dynamics. Multiple signaling pathways operate via WAVE2 to promote the actin-nucleating activity of the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. WAVE2 exists as a part of a pentameric protein complex known as the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), which is unstable in the absence of its individual proteins. While the involvement of WAVE2 in actin polymerization has been well documented, its negative regulation mechanism is poorly characterized to date. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE2 undergoes ubiquitylation in a T-cell activation dependent manner, followed by proteasomal degradation. The WAVE2 ubiquitylation site was mapped to lysine 45, located at the N-terminus where WAVE2 binds to the WRC. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we reveal that the autoinhibitory conformation of the WRC maintains the stability of WAVE2 in resting cells; the release of autoinhibition following T-cell activation facilitates the exposure of WAVE2 to ubiquitylation, leading to its degradation. The dynamic conformational structures of WAVE2 during cellular activation dictate its degradation. PMID:28332566

  18. Sumoylation of the THO complex regulates the biogenesis of a subset of mRNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretes, Hugo; Rouviere, Jérôme O.; Leger, Thibaut; Oeffinger, Marlene; Devaux, Frédéric; Doye, Valérie; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) is a pivotal step in gene expression, but only a few molecular mechanisms contributing to its regulation have been described. Here, through a comprehensive proteomic survey of mRNP assembly, we demonstrate that the SUMO pathway specifically controls the association of the THO complex with mRNPs. We further show that the THO complex, a key player in the interplay between gene expression, mRNA export and genetic stability, is sumoylated on its Hpr1 subunit and that this modification regulates its association with mRNPs. Altered recruitment of the THO complex onto mRNPs in sumoylation-defective mutants does not affect bulk mRNA export or genetic stability, but impairs the expression of acidic stress-induced genes and, consistently, compromises viability in acidic stress conditions. Importantly, inactivation of the nuclear exosome suppresses the phenotypes of the hpr1 non-sumoylatable mutant, showing that SUMO-dependent mRNP assembly is critical to allow a specific subset of mRNPs to escape degradation. This article thus provides the first example of a SUMO-dependent mRNP-assembly event allowing a refined tuning of gene expression, in particular under specific stress conditions. PMID:24500206

  19. Sumoylation of the THO complex regulates the biogenesis of a subset of mRNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretes, Hugo; Rouviere, Jérôme O; Leger, Thibaut; Oeffinger, Marlene; Devaux, Frédéric; Doye, Valérie; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-04-01

    Assembly of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) is a pivotal step in gene expression, but only a few molecular mechanisms contributing to its regulation have been described. Here, through a comprehensive proteomic survey of mRNP assembly, we demonstrate that the SUMO pathway specifically controls the association of the THO complex with mRNPs. We further show that the THO complex, a key player in the interplay between gene expression, mRNA export and genetic stability, is sumoylated on its Hpr1 subunit and that this modification regulates its association with mRNPs. Altered recruitment of the THO complex onto mRNPs in sumoylation-defective mutants does not affect bulk mRNA export or genetic stability, but impairs the expression of acidic stress-induced genes and, consistently, compromises viability in acidic stress conditions. Importantly, inactivation of the nuclear exosome suppresses the phenotypes of the hpr1 non-sumoylatable mutant, showing that SUMO-dependent mRNP assembly is critical to allow a specific subset of mRNPs to escape degradation. This article thus provides the first example of a SUMO-dependent mRNP-assembly event allowing a refined tuning of gene expression, in particular under specific stress conditions.

  20. Encoding the microtubule structure: Allosteric interactions between the microtubule +TIP complex master regulators and TOG-domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Ashley D; Zanic, Marija; Kaverina, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Since their initial discovery, the intriguing proteins of the +TIP network have been the focus of intense investigation. Although many of the individual +TIP functions have been revealed, the capacity for +TIP proteins to regulate each other has not been widely addressed. Importantly, recent studies involving EBs, the master regulators of the +TIP complex, and several TOG-domain proteins have uncovered a novel mechanism of mutual +TIP regulation: allosteric interactions through changes in microtubule structure. These findings have added another level of complexity to the existing evidence on +TIP regulation and highlight the cooperative nature of the +TIP protein network. PMID:25895033

  1. The E2F-DP1 Transcription Factor Complex Regulates Centriole Duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline G; Liu, Yan; Williams, Christopher W; Smith, Harold E; O'Connell, Kevin F

    2016-01-15

    Centrioles play critical roles in the organization of microtubule-based structures, from the mitotic spindle to cilia and flagella. In order to properly execute their various functions, centrioles are subjected to stringent copy number control. Central to this control mechanism is a precise duplication event that takes place during S phase of the cell cycle and involves the assembly of a single daughter centriole in association with each mother centriole . Recent studies have revealed that posttranslational control of the master regulator Plk4/ZYG-1 kinase and its downstream effector SAS-6 is key to ensuring production of a single daughter centriole. In contrast, relatively little is known about how centriole duplication is regulated at a transcriptional level. Here we show that the transcription factor complex EFL-1-DPL-1 both positively and negatively controls centriole duplication in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. Specifically, we find that down regulation of EFL-1-DPL-1 can restore centriole duplication in a zyg-1 hypomorphic mutant and that suppression of the zyg-1 mutant phenotype is accompanied by an increase in SAS-6 protein levels. Further, we find evidence that EFL-1-DPL-1 promotes the transcription of zyg-1 and other centriole duplication genes. Our results provide evidence that in a single tissue type, EFL-1-DPL-1 sets the balance between positive and negative regulators of centriole assembly and thus may be part of a homeostatic mechanism that governs centriole assembly.

  2. The SAGA histone acetyltransferase complex regulates leucine uptake through the Agp3 permease in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sun, Xiaoying; Hamamoto, Makiko; Yashiroda, Yoko; Yoshida, Minoru

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic responses of unicellular organisms are mostly acute, transient, and cell-autonomous. Regulation of nutrient uptake in yeast is one such rapid response. High quality nitrogen sources such as NH(4)(+) inhibit uptake of poor nitrogen sources, such as amino acids. Both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms operate in nutrient uptake regulation; however, many components of this system remain uncharacterized in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we demonstrate that the Spt-Ada-Gcn acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex modulates leucine uptake. Initially, we noticed that a branched-chain amino acid auxotroph exhibits a peculiar adaptive growth phenotype on solid minimal media containing certain nitrogen sources. In fact, the growth of many auxotrophic strains is inhibited by excess NH(4)Cl, possibly through nitrogen-mediated uptake inhibition of the corresponding nutrients. Surprisingly, DNA microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional reprogramming during the adaptation of the branched-chain amino acid auxotroph was highly correlated with reprogramming observed in deletions of the SAGA histone acetyltransferase module genes. Deletion of gcn5(+) increased leucine uptake in the prototrophic background and rendered the leucine auxotroph resistant to NH(4)Cl. Deletion of tra1(+) caused the opposite phenotypes. The increase in leucine uptake in the gcn5Δ mutant was dependent on an amino acid permease gene, SPCC965.11c(+). The closest budding yeast homolog of this permease is a relatively nonspecific amino acid permease AGP3, which functions in poor nutrient conditions. Our analysis identified the regulation of nutrient uptake as a physiological function for the SAGA complex, providing a potential link between cellular metabolism and chromatin regulation.

  3. Differential Regulation of Adhesion Complex Turnover by ROCK1 and ROCK2

    OpenAIRE

    Lock, Frances E.; Katie R Ryan; Poulter, Natalie S.; Maddy Parsons; Hotchin, Neil A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that function downstream of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. Rho signalling via ROCK regulates a number of cellular functions including organisation of the actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we use RNAi to specifically knockdown ROCK1 and ROCK2 and analyse their role in assembly of adhesion complexes in human epidermal keratinocytes. We observe that loss of ROCK1 inhibi...

  4. Rfc5p regulates alternate RFC complex functions in sister chromatid pairing reactions in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Maradeo, Marie E.; Garg, Anisha; Skibbens, Robert V.

    2010-01-01

    Sister chromatid pairing reactions, termed cohesion establishment, occur during S phase and appear to be regulated by replication factor C (RFC) complexes. For instance, RFCs that contain Ctf18p exhibit pro-establishment activities while those that contain Elg1p exhibit anti-establishment activities. It remains unknown whether Ctf18p-RFC and Elg1p-RFC functions are simply opposing or instead reveal complicated and non-parallel regulatory mechanisms. To better understand the nature of these no...

  5. Spatio-temporal regulation of Hsp90-ligand complex leads to immune activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki eTamura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is the most abundant cytosolic HSP and is known to act as a molecular chaperone. We found that an Hsp90-cancer antigen peptide complex was efficiently cross-presented by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and induced peptide-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we observed that the internalized Hsp90-peptide complex was strictly sorted to the Rab5+, EEA1+ static early endosome and the Hsp90-chaperoned peptide was processed and bound to MHC class I molecules through a endosome-recycling pathway. We also found that extracellular Hsp90 complexed with CpG-A or self-DNA stimulates production of a large amount of IFN-α from pDCs via static early endosome targeting. Thus, extracellular Hsp90 can target the antigen or nucleic acid to a static early endosome by spatio-temporal regulation. Moreover, we showed that Hsp90 associates with and delivers TLR7/9 from the ER to early endosomes for ligand recognition. Hsp90 inhibitor, geldanamycin derivative inhibited the Hsp90 association with TLR7/9, resulting in inhibition IFN-α production, leading to improvement of SLE symptoms. Interstingly, we observed that serum Hsp90 is clearly increased in patients with active SLE compared with that in patients with inactive disease. Serum Hsp90 detected in SLE patients binds to self-DNA and/or anti-DNA Ab, thus leading to stimulation of pDCs to produce IFN-α. Thus, Hsp90 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of SLE and that an Hsp90 inhibitor will therefore provide a new therapeutic approach to SLE and other nucleic acid-related autoimmune diseases. We will discuss how spatio-temporal regulation of Hsp90-ligand complexes within antigen-presenting cells affects the innate immunity and adaptive immunity.

  6. Negative regulation of NaF-induced apoptosis by Bad-CAII complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, S; Sugiyama, K; Amano, O; Yasui, T; Sakagami, H

    2011-09-05

    Fluoride is used to prevent caries in dentistry. However, its mechanism of cytotoxicity induction is unclear. This study was undertaken to determine whether sodium fluoride (NaF) induces apoptosis in human oral cells and if so, whether Bad protein is involved in the process. NaF showed higher cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity against human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-2) than against human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). Western blot analysis showed that NaF enhanced the expression and dephosphorylation of Bad protein. This study demonstrates for the first time that Bad protein forms a complex with carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), and NaF stimulates the detachment of CAII from the Bad-CAII complex and the replacement by the formation of Bad-Bcl-2 complex. Knockdown of Bad and CAII mRNA by siRNA inhibited and enhanced the NaF-induced caspase activation, respectively. The present study suggests that CAII negatively regulates the NaF-induced apoptosis by forming a complex with Bad.

  7. Differential regulation of adhesion complex turnover by ROCK1 and ROCK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances E Lock

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that function downstream of the small GTP-binding protein RhoA. Rho signalling via ROCK regulates a number of cellular functions including organisation of the actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion and cell migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we use RNAi to specifically knockdown ROCK1 and ROCK2 and analyse their role in assembly of adhesion complexes in human epidermal keratinocytes. We observe that loss of ROCK1 inhibits signalling via focal adhesion kinase resulting in a failure of immature adhesion complexes to form mature stable focal adhesions. In contrast, loss of ROCK2 expression results in a significant reduction in adhesion complex turnover leading to formation of large, stable focal adhesions. Interestingly, loss of either ROCK1 or ROCK2 expression significantly impairs cell migration indicating both ROCK isoforms are required for normal keratinocyte migration. CONCLUSIONS: ROCK1 and ROCK2 have distinct and separate roles in adhesion complex assembly and turnover in human epidermal keratinocytes.

  8. A BRISC-SHMT Complex Deubiquitinates IFNAR1 and Regulates Interferon Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zheng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysine63-linked ubiquitin (K63-Ub chains represent a particular ubiquitin topology that mediates proteasome-independent signaling events. The deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB BRCC36 segregates into distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes that are specific for K63-Ub hydrolysis. RAP80 targets the five-member nuclear BRCC36 complex to K63-Ub chains at DNA double-strand breaks. The alternative four-member BRCC36 containing complex (BRISC lacks a known targeting moiety. Here, we identify serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT as a previously unappreciated component that fulfills this function. SHMT directs BRISC activity at K63-Ub chains conjugated to the type 1 interferon (IFN receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1. BRISC-SHMT2 complexes localize to and deubiquitinate actively engaged IFNAR1, thus limiting its K63-Ub-mediated internalization and lysosomal degradation. BRISC-deficient cells and mice exhibit attenuated responses to IFN and are protected from IFN-associated immunopathology. These studies reveal a mechanism of DUB regulation and suggest a therapeutic use of BRISC inhibitors for treating pathophysiological processes driven by elevated IFN responses.

  9. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  10. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA by the Microprocessor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunsun; Seong, Youngmo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Song, Hoseok

    2014-03-28

    Aurora kinase B regulates the segregation of chromosomes and the spindle checkpoint during mitosis. In this study, we showed that the Microprocessor complex, which is responsible for the processing of the primary transcripts during the generation of microRNAs, destabilizes the mRNA of Aurora kinase B in human cells. The Microprocessor-mediated cleavage kept Aurora kinase B at a low level and prevented premature entrance into mitosis. The cleavage was reduced during mitosis leading to the accumulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA and protein. In addition to Aurora kinase B mRNA, the processing of other primary transcripts of miRNAs were also decreased during mitosis. We found that the cleavage was dependent on an RNA helicase, DDX5, and the association of DDX5 and DDX17 with the Microprocessor was reduced during mitosis. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism by which the Microprocessor complex regulates stability of Aurora kinase B mRNA and cell cycle progression.

  11. Complex SUMO-1 regulation of cardiac transcription factor Nkx2-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro W Costa

    Full Text Available Reversible post-translational protein modifications such as SUMOylation add complexity to cardiac transcriptional regulation. The homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2-5/Csx is essential for heart specification and morphogenesis. It has been previously suggested that SUMOylation of lysine 51 (K51 of Nkx2-5 is essential for its DNA binding and transcriptional activation. Here, we confirm that SUMOylation strongly enhances Nkx2-5 transcriptional activity and that residue K51 of Nkx2-5 is a SUMOylation target. However, in a range of cultured cell lines we find that a point mutation of K51 to arginine (K51R does not affect Nkx2-5 activity or DNA binding, suggesting the existence of additional Nkx2-5 SUMOylated residues. Using biochemical assays, we demonstrate that Nkx2-5 is SUMOylated on at least one additional site, and this is the predominant site in cardiac cells. The second site is either non-canonical or a "shifting" site, as mutation of predicted consensus sites and indeed every individual lysine in the context of the K51R mutation failed to impair Nkx2-5 transcriptional synergism with SUMO, or its nuclear localization and DNA binding. We also observe SUMOylation of Nkx2-5 cofactors, which may be critical to Nkx2-5 regulation. Our data reveal highly complex regulatory mechanisms driven by SUMOylation to modulate Nkx2-5 activity.

  12. Regulation of coenzyme Q biosynthesis in yeast: a new complex in the block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; García-Testón, Elena; Padilla, Sergio; Martín-Montalvo, Alejandro; Pomares-Viciana, Teresa; Vazquez-Fonseca, Luis; Gandolfo-Domínguez, Pablo; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is an isoprenylated benzoquinone found in mitochondria, which functions mainly as an electron carrier from complex I or II to complex III in the inner membrane. CoQ is also an antioxidant that specifically prevents the oxidation of lipoproteins and the plasma membrane. Most of the information about the synthesis of CoQ comes from studies performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CoQ biosynthesis is a highly regulated process of sequential modifications of the benzene ring. There are three pieces of evidence supporting the involvement of a multienzymatic complex in yeast CoQ6 biosynthesis: (a) the accumulation of a unique early precursor in all null mutants of the COQ genes series, 4-hydroxy-3-hexaprenyl benzoate (HHB), (b) the lack of expression of several Coq proteins in COQ null mutants, and (c) the restoration of CoQ biosynthesis complex after COQ8 overexpression. The model we propose based on the formation of a multiprotein complex should facilitate a better understanding of CoQ biosynthesis. According to this model, the complex assembly requires the synthesis of a precursor such as HHB by Coq2p that must be recognized by the regulatory protein Coq4p to act as the core component of the complex. The phosphorylation of Coq3p and Coq5p by the kinase Coq8p facilitates the formation of an initial precomplex of 700 kDa that contains all Coq proteins with the exception of Coq7p. The precomplex is required for the synthesis of 5-demethoxy-Q6 , the substrate of Coq7p. When cells require de novo CoQ6 synthesis, Coq7p is dephosphorylated by Ptc7p, a mitochondrial phosphatase that activates the synthesis of CoQ6. This event allows for the full assembly of a complex of 1,300 kDa that is responsible for the final product of the pathway, CoQ6 .

  13. Sustained immune complex-mediated reduction in CD16 expression after vaccination regulates NK cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Goodier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linking of FcγRIII (CD16 by immune complexes induces antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC by natural killer (NK cells, contributing to control of intracellular pathogens; this pathway can also be targeted for immunotherapy of cancerous or otherwise diseased cells. However, down-regulation of CD16 expression on activated NK cells may limit or regulate this response. Here, we report sustained downregulation of CD16 expression on NK cells in vivo after intramuscular (but not intranasal influenza vaccination. CD16 downregulation persisted for at least 12 weeks after vaccination and was associated with robust enhancement of influenza-specific plasma antibodies after intramuscular (but not intranasal vaccination. This effect could be emulated in vitro by co-culture of NK cells with influenza antigen and immune serum and, consistent with the sustained effects after vaccination, only very limited recovery of CD16 expression was observed during long term in vitro culture of immune complex-treated cells. CD16 downregulation was most marked among normally CD16high CD57+ NK cells, irrespective of NKG2C expression, and was strongly positively associated with degranulation (surface CD107a expression. CD16 downregulation was partially reversed by inhibition of ADAM17 matrix metalloprotease, leading to a sustained increase in both CD107a and CD25(IL-2R expression. Both the degranulation and CD25 responses of CD57+ NK cells were uniquely dependent on TIV-specific IgG. These data support a role for CD16 in early activation of NK cells after vaccination and for CD16 down regulation as a means to modulate NK cell responses and maintain immune homeostasis of both antibody and T cell-dependent pathways.

  14. Understanding the role of ETS-mediated gene regulation in complex biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Victoria J; LaRue, Amanda C; Turner, David P; Watson, Patricia M; Watson, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    Ets factors are members of one of the largest families of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, regulating critical functions in normal cell homeostasis, which when perturbed contribute to tumor progression. The well-documented alterations in ETS factor expression and function during cancer progression result in pleiotropic effects manifested by the downstream effect on their target genes. Multiple ETS factors bind to the same regulatory sites present on target genes, suggesting redundant or competitive functions. The anti- and prometastatic signatures obtained by examining specific ETS regulatory networks will significantly improve our ability to accurately predict tumor progression and advance our understanding of gene regulation in cancer. Coordination of multiple ETS gene functions also mediates interactions between tumor and stromal cells and thus contributes to the cancer phenotype. As such, these new insights may provide a novel view of the ETS gene family as well as a focal point for studying the complex biological control involved in tumor progression. One of the goals of molecular biology is to elucidate the mechanisms that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Such an understanding of the molecular basis of cancer will provide new possibilities for: (1) earlier detection, as well as better diagnosis and staging of disease; (2) detection of minimal residual disease recurrences and evaluation of response to therapy; (3) prevention; and (4) novel treatment strategies. Increased understanding of ETS-regulated biological pathways will directly impact these areas.

  15. The complex contribution of NOS interneurons in the physiology of cerebrovascular regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eDuchemin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Following the discovery of the vasorelaxant properties of nitric oxide (NO by Furchgott and Ignarro, the finding by Bredt and coll. of a constitutively expressed NO synthase in neurons (nNOS led to the presumption that neuronal NO may control cerebrovascular functions. Consequently, numerous studies have sought to determine whether neuraly-derived NO is involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow. Anatomically, axons, dendrites or somata of NO neurons have been found to contact the basement membrane of blood vessels or perivascular astrocytes in all segments of the cortical microcirculation. Functionally, various experimental approaches support a role of neuronal NO in the maintenance of resting cerebral blood flow as well as in the vascular response to neuronal activity. Since decades, it has been assumed that neuronal NO simply diffuses to the local blood vessels and produce vasodilation through a cGMP-PKG dependent mechanism. However, NO is not the sole mediator of vasodilation in the cerebral microcirculation and is known to interact with a myriad of signaling pathways also involved in vascular control. In addition, cerebrovascular regulation is the result of a complex orchestration between all components of the neurovascular unit (i.e. neuronal, glial and vascular cells also known to produce NO. In this review article, the role of NO interneuron in the regulation of cortical microcirculation will be discussed in the context of the neurovascular unit.

  16. Support for Self-Regulation in Learning Complex Topics from Multimedia Explanations: Do Learners Need Extensive or Minimal Support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodicio, Hector Garcia; Sanchez, Emilio; Acuna, Santiago R.

    2013-01-01

    Acquiring complex conceptual knowledge requires learners to self-regulate their learning by planning, monitoring, and adjusting the process but they find it difficult to do so. In one experiment, we examined whether learners need broad systems of support for self-regulation or whether they are also able to learn with more economical support…

  17. The complexities of air pollution regulation: the need for an integrated research and regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadadur, Srikanth S; Miller, C Andrew; Hopke, Philip K; Gordon, Terry; Vedal, Sverre; Vandenberg, John J; Costa, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The Clean Air Act mandates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to periodically reassess existing and new science that underlie the regulation of major ambient pollutants -- particulate matter (PM) and tropospheric ozone being most notable. While toxic effects have been ascribed individually to these and other pollutants in the air, it is clear that mixtures of these contaminants have the potential to interact and thereby influence their overall toxic outcomes. It follows that a more comprehensive assessment of the potential health effects of the air pollution complex might better protect human health; however, traditional regulatory drivers and funding constraints have impeded progress to such a goal. Despite difficulties in empirically conducting studies of complex mixtures of air pollutants and acquiring relevant exposure data, there remains a need to develop integrated, interdisciplinary research and analytical strategies to provide more comprehensive (and relevant) assessments of associated health outcomes and risks. The research and assessment communities are endeavoring to dissect this complexity using varied approaches Here we present five interdisciplinary perspectives of this evolving line of thought among researchers and those who use such data in assessment: (1) analyses that coordinate air quality-health analyses utilizing representative polluted U.S. air sheds to apportion source and component-specific health risks; (2) novel approaches to characterize air quality in terms of emission sources and how emission reduction strategies might effectively impact pollutant levels; (3) insights from present-day studies of effects of single ambient pollutants in animal and controlled clinical toxicology studies and how these are evolving to address air pollution; (4) refinements in epidemiologic health assessments that take advantage of the complexities of existent air quality conditions; and (5) new approaches to integrative analyses to establish the

  18. Axonal transport and neurodegenerative disease: vesicle-motor complex formation and their regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson EN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eric N Anderson,* Joseph A White II,* Shermali GunawardenaDepartment of Biological Sciences, The State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The process of axonal transport serves to move components over very long distances on microtubule tracks in order to maintain neuronal viability. Molecular motors – kinesin and dynein – are essential for the movement of neuronal cargoes along these tracks; defects in this pathway have been implicated in the initiation or progression of some neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting that this process may be a key contributor in neuronal dysfunction. Recent work has led to the identification of some of the motor-cargo complexes, adaptor proteins, and their regulatory elements in the context of disease proteins. In this review, we focus on the assembly of the amyloid precursor protein, huntingtin, mitochondria, and the RNA-motor complexes and discuss how these may be regulated during long-distance transport in the context of neurodegenerative disease. As knowledge of these motor-cargo complexes and their involvement in axonal transport expands, insight into how defects in this pathway contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases becomes evident. Therefore, a better understanding of how this pathway normally functions has important implications for early diagnosis and treatment of diseases before the onset of disease pathology or behavior. Keywords: kinesin, dynein, amyloid precursor protein, huntingtin, microtubules

  19. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression—adding another layer of complexity to the DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucas, Jorge; Riabinska, Arina; Jokic, Mladen; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Chen, Shuhua; Höpker, Katja; Reinhardt, H. Christian

    2012-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for DNA repair, or, if the extend of damage is beyond repair capacity, induce apoptosis. This signaling network, which is collectively referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR), is primarily thought to consist of two components—a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes and a delayed transcriptional response that promotes a prolonged cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves potent posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms that control the cellular response to DNA damage. Although much has been written on the relevance of the DDR in cancer and on the post-transcriptional role of microRNAs (miRs) in cancer, the post-transcriptional regulation of the DDR by non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) still remains elusive in large parts. Here, we review the recent developments in this exciting new area of research in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. We put specific emphasis on the role of RBPs and the control of their function through DNA damage-activated protein kinases. PMID:22936947

  20. Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression – adding another layer of complexity to the DNA damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eBoucas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to DNA damage, cells activate a complex, kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and allow time for DNA repair, or, if the extend of damage is beyond repair capacity, induce apoptosis. This signaling network, which is collectively referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR, is primarily thought to consist of two components – a rapid phosphorylation-driven signaling cascade that results in immediate inhibition of Cdk/cyclin complexes and a delayed transcriptional response that promotes a prolonged cell cycle arrest through the induction of Cdk inhibitors, such as p21. In recent years a third layer of complexity has emerged that involves potent posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms that control the cellular response to DNA damage. Although much has been written on the relevance of the DDR in cancer and on the post-transcriptional role of microRNAs (miRs in cancer, the post-transcriptional regulation of the DDR by non-coding RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs still remains elusive in large parts. Here, we review the recent developments in this exciting new area of research in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. We put specific emphasis on the role of RNA-binding proteins and the control of their function through DNA damage-activated protein kinases.

  1. The Monopolin Complex Crosslinks Kinetochore Components to Regulate Chromosome-Microtubule Attachments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, Kevin D.; Yip, Calvin K.; Ee, Ly-Sha; Walz, Thomas; Amon, Angelika; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (MIT)

    2010-09-27

    The monopolin complex regulates different types of kinetochore-microtubule attachments in fungi, ensuring sister chromatid co-orientation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae meiosis I and inhibiting merotelic attachment in Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitosis. In addition, the monopolin complex maintains the integrity and silencing of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats in the nucleolus. We show here that the S. cerevisiae Csm1/Lrs4 monopolin subcomplex has a distinctive V-shaped structure, with two pairs of protein-protein interaction domains positioned {approx}10 nm apart. Csm1 presents a conserved hydrophobic surface patch that binds two kinetochore proteins: Dsn1, a subunit of the outer-kinetochore MIND/Mis12 complex, and Mif2/CENP-C. Csm1 point-mutations that disrupt kinetochore-subunit binding also disrupt sister chromatid co-orientation in S. cerevisiae meiosis I. We further show that the same Csm1 point-mutations affect rDNA silencing, probably by disrupting binding to the rDNA-associated protein Tof2. We propose that Csm1/Lrs4 functions as a molecular clamp, crosslinking kinetochore components to enforce sister chromatid co-orientation in S. cerevisiae meiosis I and to suppress merotelic attachment in S. pombe mitosis, and crosslinking rDNA repeats to aid rDNA silencing.

  2. Importin beta negatively regulates nuclear membrane fusion and nuclear pore complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J

    2003-11-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin beta negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin beta is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin beta down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Indeed, excess RanGTP (RanQ69L) alone stimulates excessive membrane fusion, leading to intranuclear membrane tubules and cytoplasmic annulate lamellae-like structures. We propose that a precise balance of importin beta to Ran is required to create a correct double nuclear membrane and simultaneously to repress undesirable fusion events. Interestingly, truncated importin beta 45-462 allows membrane fusion but produces nuclei lacking any NPCs. This reveals distinct importin beta-regulation of NPC assembly. Excess full-length importin beta and beta 45-462 act similarly when added to prefused nuclear intermediates, i.e., both block NPC assembly. The importin beta NPC block, which maps downstream of GTPgammaS and BAPTA-sensitive steps in NPC assembly, is reversible by cytosol. Remarkably, it is not reversible by 25 microM RanGTP, a concentration that easily reverses fusion inhibition. This report, using a full reconstitution system and natural chromatin substrates, significantly expands the repertoire of importin beta. Its roles now encompass negative regulation of two of the major events of nuclear assembly: membrane fusion and NPC assembly.

  3. The SOCS2 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates growth hormone receptor levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Vesterlund

    Full Text Available Growth Hormone is essential for the regulation of growth and the homeostatic control of intermediary metabolism. GH actions are mediated by the Growth Hormone Receptor; a member of the cytokine receptor super family that signals chiefly through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway. Target tissue responsiveness to GH is under regulatory control to avoid excessive and off-target effects upon GHR activation. The suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS is a key regulator of GHR sensitivity. This is clearly shown in mice where the SOCS2 gene has been inactivated, which show 30-40% increase in body length, a phenotype that is dependent on endogenous GH secretion. SOCS2 is a GH-stimulated, STAT5b-regulated gene that acts in a negative feedback loop to downregulate GHR signalling. Since the biochemical basis for these actions is poorly understood, we studied the molecular function of SOCS2. We demonstrated that SOCS2 is part of a multimeric complex with intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutational analysis shows that the interaction with Elongin B/C controls SOCS2 protein turnover and affects its molecular activity. Increased GHR levels were observed in livers from SOCS2⁻/⁻ mice and in the absence of SOCS2 in in vitro experiments. We showed that SOCS2 regulates cellular GHR levels through direct ubiquitination and in a proteasomally dependent manner. We also confirmed the importance of the SOCS-box for the proper function of SOCS2. Finally, we identified two phosphotyrosine residues in the GHR to be responsible for the interaction with SOCS2, but only Y487 to account for the effects of SOCS2. The demonstration that SOCS2 is an ubiquitin ligase for the GHR unveils the molecular basis for its physiological actions.

  4. Chromosome-biased binding and gene regulation by the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko M Tabuchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available DRM is a conserved transcription factor complex that includes E2F/DP and pRB family proteins and plays important roles in development and cancer. Here we describe new aspects of DRM binding and function revealed through genome-wide analyses of the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM subunit LIN-54. We show that LIN-54 DNA-binding activity recruits DRM to promoters enriched for adjacent putative E2F/DP and LIN-54 binding sites, suggesting that these two DNA-binding moieties together direct DRM to its target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression profiling reveals conserved roles for DRM in regulating genes involved in cell division, development, and reproduction. We find that LIN-54 promotes expression of reproduction genes in the germline, but prevents ectopic activation of germline-specific genes in embryonic soma. Strikingly, C. elegans DRM does not act uniformly throughout the genome: the DRM recruitment motif, DRM binding, and DRM-regulated embryonic genes are all under-represented on the X chromosome. However, germline genes down-regulated in lin-54 mutants are over-represented on the X chromosome. We discuss models for how loss of autosome-bound DRM may enhance germline X chromosome silencing. We propose that autosome-enriched binding of DRM arose in C. elegans as a consequence of germline X chromosome silencing and the evolutionary redistribution of germline-expressed and essential target genes to autosomes. Sex chromosome gene regulation may thus have profound evolutionary effects on genome organization and transcriptional regulatory networks.

  5. Emotion regulation in interpersonal problems: the role of cognitive-emotional complexity, emotion regulation goals, and expressivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Abby Heckman; Blanchard-Fields, Fredda

    2008-03-01

    Young, middle-aged, and older adults' emotion regulation strategies in interpersonal problems were examined. Participants imagined themselves in anger- or sadness-eliciting situations with a close friend. Factor analyses of a new questionnaire supported a 4-factor model of emotion regulation strategies, including passivity, expressing emotions, seeking emotional information or support, and solving the problem. Results suggest that age differences in emotion regulation (such as older adults' increased endorsement of passive emotion regulation relative to young adults) are partially due to older adults' decreased ability to integrate emotion and cognition, increased prioritization of emotion regulation goals, and decreased tendency to express anger.

  6. The effects of childhood abuse on symptom complexity in a clinical sample: mediating effects of emotion regulation difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Young; Choi, Young Min; Gim, Min Sook; Park, Jun Hyun; Park, Soo Hyun

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to first examine whether childhood abuse predicts symptom complexity, as indicated by the number of clinically elevated scales on the MMPI-2 in an adult clinical sample. Secondly, we investigated whether emotion regulation difficulties mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and symptom complexity. A total of 162 adult outpatients not presenting with psychotic symptoms completed the Korean Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (K-CTQ), Life Events Checklist (LEC), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and Korean Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2). Partial correlation analysis results indicated that after controlling for the presence of adulthood trauma, childhood abuse was associated with more symptom complexity, or more clinically elevated scales on the MMPI-2. Furthermore, structural equation modeling results showed that emotion regulation difficulties partially mediated the relationship between childhood abuse and symptom complexity. These findings indicate that individuals who had experienced childhood abuse evidence simultaneous presentation of diverse clinical symptoms.

  7. Regulating the Energy Flow in a Cyanobacterial Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Ido; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Harris, Dvir; Yochelis, Shira; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B; Adir, Noam; Keren, Nir; Paltiel, Yossi

    2017-02-16

    Photosynthetic organisms harvest light energy, utilizing the absorption and energy-transfer properties of protein-bound chromophores. Controlling the harvesting efficiency is critical for the optimal function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here, we show that the cyanobacterial light-harvesting antenna complex may be able to regulate the flow of energy to switch reversibly from efficient energy conversion to photoprotective quenching via a structural change. We isolated cyanobacterial light-harvesting proteins, phycocyanin and allophycocyanin, and measured their optical properties in solution and in an aggregated-desiccated state. The results indicate that energy band structures are changed, generating a switch between the two modes of operation, exciton transfer and quenching, achieved without dedicated carotenoid quenchers. This flexibility can contribute greatly to the large dynamic range of cyanobacterial light-harvesting systems.

  8. BDNF regulation in the rat dorsal vagal complex during stress-induced anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Céline; Chigr, Fatiha; Tardivel, Catherine; Mahaut, Stéphanie; Jean, André; Najimi, Mohamed; Moyse, Emmanuel

    2006-08-30

    The dorsal vagal complex (DVC) is the satiety reflex-integrating center of adult mammals. Immobilization stress (IS) is known to elicit anorexia and to up-regulate BDNF expression in adult rat forebrain; intra-DVC delivery of BDNF was shown to elicit anorexia. Therefore, we addressed here whether IS would increase BDNF signaling in rat DVC by using PCR and western-blot on microdissected tissue extracts. Significant variations of BDNF expression in DVC after IS include exon V mRNA increase at 3 h, decreases of both protein and exon III mRNA at 24 h, and exon I mRNA decrease at 72 h. At the receptor level, IS elicited a highly significant induction of both full-length and truncated-1 TrkB mRNAs at 24 h after IS. In vivo recruitment of BDNF signaling in DVC during stress thus differs from hypothalamus, the relevance of which to anorexia is discussed.

  9. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by the Beclin 1 complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp A Jaeger

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intracellular degradation pathway that functions in protein and organelle turnover in response to starvation and cellular stress. Autophagy is initiated by the formation of a complex containing Beclin 1 (BECN1 and its binding partner Phosphoinositide-3-kinase, class 3 (PIK3C3. Recently, BECN1 deficiency was shown to enhance the pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer Disease (AD. However, the mechanism by which BECN1 or autophagy mediate these effects are unknown. Here, we report that the levels of Amyloid precursor protein (APP and its metabolites can be reduced through autophagy activation, indicating that they are a substrate for autophagy. Furthermore, we find that knockdown of Becn1 in cell culture increases the levels of APP and its metabolites. Accumulation of APP and APP C-terminal fragments (APP-CTF are accompanied by impaired autophagosomal clearance. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagosomal-lysosomal degradation causes a comparable accumulation of APP and APP-metabolites in autophagosomes. Becn1 reduction in cell culture leads to lower levels of its binding partner Pik3c3 and increased presence of Microtubule-associated protein 1, light chain 3 (LC3. Overexpression of Becn1, on the other hand, reduces cellular APP levels. In line with these observations, we detected less BECN1 and PIK3C3 but more LC3 protein in brains of AD patients. We conclude that BECN1 regulates APP processing and turnover. BECN1 is involved in autophagy initiation and autophagosome clearance. Accordingly, BECN1 deficiency disrupts cellular autophagy and autophagosomal-lysosomal degradation and alters APP metabolism. Together, our findings suggest that autophagy and the BECN1-PIK3C3 complex regulate APP processing and play an important role in AD pathology.

  10. Post-transcriptional regulator Hfq binds catalase HPII: crystal structure of the complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Yonekura

    Full Text Available We report a crystal structure of Hfq and catalase HPII from Escherichia coli. The post-transcriptional regulator Hfq plays a key role in the survival of bacteria under stress. A small non-coding RNA (sRNA DsrA is required for translation of the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS, which is the central regulator of the general stress response. Hfq facilitates efficient translation of rpoS mRNA, which encodes RpoS. Hfq helps in the function of other specific proteins involved in RNA processing, indicating its versatility in the cell. However, structural information regarding its interactions with partners is missing. Here we obtained crystals of Hfq and HPII complexes from cell lysates following attempts to overexpress a foreign membrane protein. HPII is one of two catalases in E. coli and its mRNA is transcribed by an RNA polymerase holoenzyme containing RpoS, which in turn is under positive control of small non-coding RNAs and of the RNA chaperone Hfq. This sigma factor is known to have a pronounced effect on the expression of HPII. The crystal structure reveals that a Hfq hexamer binds each subunit of a HPII tetramer. Each subunit of the Hfq hexamer exhibits a unique binding mode with HPII. The hexamer of Hfq interacts via its distal surface. The proximal and distal surfaces are known to specifically bind different sRNAs, and binding of HPII could affect Hfq function. Hfq-HPII complexation has no effect on catalase HPII activity.

  11. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.; (Danforth)

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  12. A simple strategy guides the complex metabolic regulation in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A way to decipher the complexity of the cellular metabolism is to study the effect of different external perturbations. Through an analysis over a sufficiently large set of gene knockouts and growing conditions, one aims to find a unifying principle that governs the metabolic regulation. For instance, it is known that the cessation of the microorganism proliferation after a gene deletion is only transient. However, we do not know the guiding principle that determines the partial or complete recovery of the growth rate, the corresponding redistribution of the metabolic fluxes and the possible different phenotypes. In spite of this large variety in the observed metabolic adjustments, we show that responses of E. coli to several different perturbations can always be derived from a sequence of greedy and myopic resilencings. This simple mechanism provides a detailed explanation for the experimental dynamics both at cellular (proliferation rate) and molecular level (13C-determined fluxes), also in case of appearance of multiple phenotypes. As additional support, we identified an example of a simple network motif that is capable of implementing this myopic greediness in the regulation of the metabolism.

  13. Arabidopsis TTG2 regulates TRY expression through enhancement of activator complex-triggered activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Martina; Dartan, Burcu; Birkenbihl, Rainer; Somssich, Imre E; Hülskamp, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Trichome patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a regulatory feedback loop of the trichome promoting factors TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), GLABRA3 (GL3)/ENHANCER OF GL3 (EGL3), and GL1 and a group of homologous R3MYB proteins that act as their inhibitors. Together, they regulate the temporal and spatial expression of GL2 and TTG2, which are considered to control trichome cell differentiation. In this work, we show that TTG2 is a specific activator of TRY (but not CPC or GL2). The WRKY protein TTG2 binds to W-boxes in a minimal promoter fragment of TRY, and these W-boxes are essential for rescue of the try mutant phenotype. We further show that TTG2 alone is not able to activate TRY expression, but rather drastically enhances the activation by TTG1 and GL3. As TTG2 physically interacts with TTG1 and because TTG2 can associate with GL3 through its interaction with TTG1, we propose that TTG2 enhances the activity of TTG1 and GL3 by forming a protein complex.

  14. The RSC complex localizes to coding sequences to regulate Pol II and histone occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Marla M; Ansari, Suraiya A; Pathak, Rakesh; Palumbo, Michael J; Morse, Randall H; Govind, Chhabi K

    2014-12-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers regulate chromatin structure during multiple stages of transcription. We report that RSC, an essential chromatin remodeler, is recruited to the open reading frames (ORFs) of actively transcribed genes genome wide, suggesting a role for RSC in regulating transcription elongation. Consistent with such a role, Pol II occupancy in the ORFs of weakly transcribed genes is drastically reduced upon depletion of the RSC catalytic subunit Sth1. RSC inactivation also reduced histone H3 occupancy across transcribed regions. Remarkably, the strongest effects on Pol II and H3 occupancy were confined to the genes displaying the greatest RSC ORF enrichment. Additionally, RSC recruitment to the ORF requires the activities of the SAGA and NuA4 HAT complexes and is aided by the activities of the Pol II CTD Ser2 kinases Bur1 and Ctk1. Overall, our findings strongly implicate ORF-associated RSC in governing Pol II function and in maintaining chromatin structure over transcribed regions.

  15. Forgetting is regulated via Musashi-mediated translational control of the Arp2/3 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziselimovic, Nils; Vukojevic, Vanja; Peter, Fabian; Milnik, Annette; Fastenrath, Matthias; Fenyves, Bank Gabor; Hieber, Petra; Demougin, Philippe; Vogler, Christian; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stetak, Attila

    2014-03-13

    A plastic nervous system requires the ability not only to acquire and store but also to forget. Here, we report that musashi (msi-1) is necessary for time-dependent memory loss in C. elegans. Tissue-specific rescue demonstrates that MSI-1 function is necessary in the AVA interneuron. Using RNA-binding protein immunoprecipitation (IP), we found that MSI-1 binds to mRNAs of three subunits of the Arp2/3 actin branching regulator complex in vivo and downregulates ARX-1, ARX-2, and ARX-3 translation upon associative learning. The role of msi-1 in forgetting is also reflected by the persistence of learning-induced GLR-1 synaptic size increase in msi-1 mutants. We demonstrate that memory length is regulated cooperatively through the activation of adducin (add-1) and by the inhibitory effect of msi-1. Thus, a GLR-1/MSI-1/Arp2/3 pathway induces forgetting and represents a novel mechanism of memory decay by linking translational control to the structure of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons.

  16. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Abhishek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems.

  17. Complex regulation of CREB-binding protein by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2

    KAUST Repository

    Kovács, Krisztián A.

    2015-11-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are transcriptional coactivators involved in numerous biological processes that affect cell growth, transformation, differentiation, and development. In this study, we provide evidence of the involvement of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) in the regulation of CBP activity. We show that HIPK2 interacts with and phosphorylates several regions of CBP. We demonstrate that serines 2361, 2363, 2371, 2376, and 2381 are responsible for the HIPK2-induced mobility shift of CBP C-terminal activation domain. Moreover, we show that HIPK2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional activity of CBP. However, our data suggest that HIPK2 activates CBP mainly by counteracting the repressive action of cell cycle regulatory domain 1 (CRD1), located between amino acids 977 and 1076, independently of CBP phosphorylation. Our findings thus highlight a complex regulation of CBP activity by HIPK2, which might be relevant for the control of specific sets of target genes involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Epidermal Differentiation Complex: A Review on Its Epigenetic Regulation and Potential Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Sinha; Palamadai Krishnan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The primary feature of the mammalian skin includes the hair follicle, inter-follicular epidermis and the sebaceous glands, all of which form pilo-sebaceous units. The epidermal protective layer undergoes an ordered/programmed process of proliferation and differentiation, ultimately culminating in the formation of a cornified envelope consisting of enucleated corneocytes. These terminally differentiated cells slough off in a cyclic manner and this process is regulated via induction or repression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) genes. These genes, spanning 2 Mb region of human chromosome 1q21, play a crucial role in epidermal development, through various mechanisms. Each of these mechanisms employs a unique chromatin re-modelling factor or an epigenetic modifier. These factors act to regulate epidermal differentiation singly and/or in combination. Diseases like psoriasis and cancer exhibit aberrations in proliferation and differentiation through, in part, dysregulation in these epigenetic mechanisms. Knowledge of the existing mechanisms in the physiological and the aforesaid pathological contexts may not only facilitate drug development, it also can make refinements to the existing drug delivery systems.

  19. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A.; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M.; Saecker, Ruth M.; Glickman, Michael S.; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A. (Rockefeller); (SKI)

    2017-01-09

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the -10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD.

  20. Ena/VASP proteins cooperate with the WAVE complex to regulate the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing Judy; Squarr, Anna Julia; Stephan, Raiko; Chen, Baoyu; Higgins, Theresa E; Barry, David J; Martin, Morag C; Rosen, Michael K; Bogdan, Sven; Way, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ena/VASP proteins and the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) regulate cell motility by virtue of their ability to independently promote actin polymerization. We demonstrate that Ena/VASP and the WRC control actin polymerization in a cooperative manner through the interaction of the Ena/VASP EVH1 domain with an extended proline rich motif in Abi. This interaction increases cell migration and enables VASP to cooperatively enhance WRC stimulation of Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin assembly in vitro in the presence of Rac. Loss of this interaction in Drosophila macrophages results in defects in lamellipodia formation, cell spreading, and redistribution of Ena to the tips of filopodia-like extensions. Rescue experiments of abi mutants also reveals a physiological requirement for the Abi:Ena interaction in photoreceptor axon targeting and oogenesis. Our data demonstrate that the activities of Ena/VASP and the WRC are intimately linked to ensure optimal control of actin polymerization during cell migration and development.

  1. Rfc5p regulates alternate RFC complex functions in sister chromatid pairing reactions in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradeo, Marie E; Garg, Anisha; Skibbens, Robert V

    2010-11-01

    Sister chromatid pairing reactions, termed cohesion establishment, occur during S-phase and appear to be regulated by Replication Factor C (RFC) complexes. For instance, RFCs that contain Ctf18p exhibit pro-establishment activities while those that contain Elg1p exhibit anti-establishment activities. It remains unknown whether Ctf18p-RFC and Elg1p-RFC functions are simply opposing or instead reveal complicated and non-parallel regulatory mechanisms. To better understand the nature of these novel pathways, we analyzed the small RFC subunit Rfc5p that is common to both Ctf18p-RFC and Elg1p-RFC. Despite this commonality, the data show that diminished Rfc5p function rescues ctf7/eco1 mutant cell phenotypes, revealing that Rfc5p promotes anti-establishment activities. This rescue is specific to establishment pathways in that rfc5-1 greatly accentuates growth defects when expressed in scc2 (deposition), mcd1/scc1 or smc3 (cohesion maintenance) mutated cells. Our results reveal for the first time a role for small RFC subunits in directing RFC complex functions-in this case towards anti-establishment pathways. We further report that Pds5p exhibits both establishment and anti-establishment functions in cohesion. This duality suggests that categorizations of establishment and anti-establishment activities require further examination.

  2. β-Arrestin1 regulates γ-secretase complex assembly and modulates amyloid-β pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosong Liu; Xiaohui Zhao; Xianglu Zeng; Koen Bossers; Dick F Swaab; Jian Zhao; Gang Pei

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and complex neurodegenerative disease in which the γ-secretasemediated amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology plays an important role.We found that a multifunctional protein,β-arrestin1,facilitated the formation of NCT/APH-1 (anterior pharynx-defective phenotype 1) precomplex and mature γ-secretase complex through its functional interaction with APH-1.Deficiency of β-arrestin1 or inhibition of binding of β-arrestin1 with APH-1 by small peptides reduced Aβ production without affecting Notch processing.Genetic ablation of β-arrestin1 diminished Aβ pathology and behavioral deficits in transgenic AD mice.Moreover,in brains of sporadic AD patients and transgenic AD mice,the expression of β-arrestin1 was upregulated and correlated well with neuropathological severity and senile Aβ plaques.Thus,our study identifies a regulatory mechanism underlying both γ-secretase assembly and AD pathogenesis,and indicates that specific reduction of Aβ pathology can be achieved by regulation of the γ-secretase assembly.

  3. Preprotein import into chloroplasts via the Toc and Tic complexes is regulated by redox signals in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Anna; Benz, J Philipp; Buchanan, Bob B; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2009-11-01

    The import of nuclear-encoded preproteins is necessary to maintain chloroplast function. The recognition and transfer of most precursor proteins across the chloroplast envelopes are facilitated by two membrane-inserted protein complexes, the translocons of the chloroplast outer and inner envelope (Toc and Tic complexes, respectively). Several signals have been invoked to regulate the import of preproteins. In our study, we were interested in redox-based import regulation mediated by two signals: regulation based on thiols and on the metabolic NADP+/NADPH ratio. We sought to identify the proteins participating in the regulation of these transport pathways and to characterize the preprotein subgroups whose import is redox-dependent. Our results provide evidence that the formation and reduction of disulfide bridges in the Toc receptors and Toc translocation channel have a strong influence on import yield of all tested preproteins that depend on the Toc complex for translocation. Furthermore, the metabolic NADP+/NADPH ratio influences not only the composition of the Tic complex, but also the import efficiency of most, but not all, preproteins tested. Thus, several Tic subcomplexes appear to participate in the translocation of different preprotein subgroups, and the redox-active components of these complexes likely play a role in regulating transport.

  4. A C9ORF72/SMCR8-containing complex regulates ULK1 and plays a dual role in autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mei; Liang, Chen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Herrlinger, Stephanie; Lai, Fan; Shiekhattar, Ramin; Chen, Jian-Fu

    2016-01-01

    The intronic GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) is a prevalent genetic abnormality identified in both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Smith-Magenis syndrome chromosomal region candidate gene 8 (SMCR8) is a protein with unclear functions. We report that C9ORF72 is a component of a multiprotein complex containing SMCR8, WDR41, and ATG101 (an important regulator of autophagy). The C9ORF72 complex displays guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity and acts as a guanosine diphosphate–guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GDP-GTP) exchange factor (GEF) for RAB39B. We created Smcr8 knockout mice and found that Smcr8 mutant cells exhibit impaired autophagy induction, which is similarly observed in C9orf72 knockdown cells. Mechanistically, SMCR8/C9ORF72 interacts with the key autophagy initiation ULK1 complex and regulates expression and activity of ULK1. The complex has an additional role in regulating later stages of autophagy. Whereas autophagic flux is enhanced in C9orf72 knockdown cells, depletion of Smcr8 results in a reduced flux with an abnormal expression of lysosomal enzymes. Thus, C9ORF72 and SMCR8 have similar functions in modulating autophagy induction by regulating ULK1 and play distinct roles in regulating autophagic flux. PMID:27617292

  5. Neuronal actin dynamics, spine density and neuronal dendritic complexity are regulated by CAP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2gt/gt mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2gt/gt with increased number of excitatory synapse. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2gt/gt neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics.

  6. TOR Complex 2-Ypk1 Signaling Maintains Sphingolipid Homeostasis by Sensing and Regulating ROS Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Niles

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are produced during normal metabolism and can function as signaling molecules. However, ROS at elevated levels can damage cells. Here, we identify the conserved target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2/Ypk1 signaling module as an important regulator of ROS in the model eukaryotic organism, S. cerevisiae. We show that TORC2/Ypk1 suppresses ROS produced both by mitochondria as well as by nonmitochondrial sources, including changes in acidification of the vacuole. Furthermore, we link vacuole-related ROS to sphingolipids, essential components of cellular membranes, whose synthesis is also controlled by TORC2/Ypk1 signaling. In total, our data reveal that TORC2/Ypk1 act within a homeostatic feedback loop to maintain sphingolipid levels and that ROS are a critical regulatory signal within this system. Thus, ROS sensing and signaling by TORC2/Ypk1 play a central physiological role in sphingolipid biosynthesis and in the maintenance of cell growth and viability.

  7. NAC1 regulates the recruitment of the proteasome complex into dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haowei; Korutla, Laxminarayana; Champtiaux, Nicholas; Toda, Shigenobu; LaLumiere, Ryan; Vallone, Joseph; Klugmann, Matthias; Blendy, Julie A; Mackler, Scott A; Kalivas, Peter W

    2007-08-15

    Coordinated proteolysis of synaptic proteins is required for synaptic plasticity, but a mechanism for recruiting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) into dendritic spines is not known. NAC1 is a cocaine-regulated transcriptional protein that was found to complex with proteins in the UPS, including cullins and Mov34. NAC1 and the proteasome were cotranslocated from the nucleus into dendritic spines in cortical neurons in response to proteasome inhibition or disinhibiting synaptic activity with bicuculline. Bicuculline also produced a progressive accumulation of the proteasome and NAC1 in the postsynaptic density. Recruitment of the proteasome into dendrites and postsynaptic density by bicuculline was prevented in neurons from mice harboring an NAC1 gene deletion or in neurons transfected with mutated NAC1 lacking the proteasome binding domain. These experiments show that NAC1 modulates the translocation of the UPS from the nucleus into dendritic spines, thereby suggesting a potential missing link in the recruitment of necessary proteolysis machinery for synaptic remodeling.

  8. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

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    Angela M Mabb

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1 inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc's that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc's, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A that stabilizes TOP1cc's. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression.

  9. An ER-resident membrane protein complex regulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit composition at the synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almedom, Ruta B; Liewald, Jana F; Hernando, Guillermina; Schultheis, Christian; Rayes, Diego; Pan, Jie; Schedletzky, Thorsten; Hutter, Harald; Bouzat, Cecilia; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are homo- or heteropentameric ligand-gated ion channels mediating excitatory neurotransmission and muscle activation. Regulation of nAChR subunit assembly and transfer of correctly assembled pentamers to the cell surface is only partially understood. Here, we characterize an ER transmembrane (TM) protein complex that influences nAChR cell-surface expression and functional properties in Caenorhabditis elegans muscle. Loss of either type I TM protein, NRA-2 or NRA-4 (nicotinic receptor associated), affects two different types of muscle nAChRs and causes in vivo resistance to cholinergic agonists. Sensitivity to subtype-specific agonists of these nAChRs is altered differently, as demonstrated by whole-cell voltage-clamp of dissected adult muscle, when applying exogenous agonists or after photo-evoked, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) mediated acetylcholine (ACh) release, as well as in single-channel recordings in cultured embryonic muscle. These data suggest that nAChRs desensitize faster in nra-2 mutants. Cell-surface expression of different subunits of the ‘levamisole-sensitive' nAChR (L-AChR) is differentially affected in the absence of NRA-2 or NRA-4, suggesting that they control nAChR subunit composition or allow only certain receptor assemblies to leave the ER. PMID:19609303

  10. Genome-wide Screening of Regulators of Catalase Expression: ROLE OF A TRANSCRIPTION COMPLEX AND HISTONE AND tRNA MODIFICATION COMPLEXES ON ADAPTATION TO STRESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia; Encinar Del Dedo, Javier; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental cues, the mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1-driven signaling cascade activates hundreds of genes to induce a robust anti-stress cellular response in fission yeast. Thus, upon stress imposition Sty1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus where it up-regulates transcription through the Atf1 transcription factor. Several regulators of transcription and translation have been identified as important to mount an integral response to oxidative stress, such as the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyl transferase or Elongator complexes, respectively. With the aim of identifying new regulators of this massive gene expression program, we have used a GFP-based protein reporter and screened a fission yeast deletion collection using flow cytometry. We find that the levels of catalase fused to GFP, both before and after a threat of peroxides, are altered in hundreds of strains lacking components of chromatin modifiers, transcription complexes, and modulators of translation. Thus, the transcription elongation complex Paf1, the histone methylase Set1-COMPASS, and the translation-related Trm112 dimers are all involved in full expression of Ctt1-GFP and in wild-type tolerance to peroxides.

  11. Nucleation promoting factors regulate the expression and localization of Arp2/3 complex during meiosis of mouse oocytes.

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    Jun Liu

    Full Text Available The actin nucleation factor Arp2/3 complex is a main regulator of actin assembly and is involved in multiple processes like cell migration and adhesion, endocytosis, and the establishment of cell polarity in mitosis. Our previous work showed that the Arp2/3 complex was involved in the actin-mediated mammalian oocyte asymmetric division. However, the regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathway of Arp2/3 complex in meiosis is still unclear. In the present work, we identified that the nucleation promoting factors (NPFs JMY and WAVE2 were necessary for the expression and localization of Arp2/3 complex in mouse oocytes. RNAi of both caused the degradation of actin cap intensity, indicating the roles of NPFs in the formation of actin cap. Moreover, JMY and WAVE2 RNAi decreased the expression of ARP2, a key component of Arp2/3 complex. However, knock down of Arp2/3 complex by Arpc2 and Arpc3 siRNA microinjection did not affect the expression and localization of JMY and WAVE2. Our results indicate that the NPFs, JMY and WAVE2, are upstream regulators of Arp2/3 complex in mammalian oocyte asymmetric division.

  12. Mitochondrial complex II participates in normoxic and hypoxic regulation of alpha-keto acids in the murine heart.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhling, J.; Tiefenbach, M.; Lopez-Barneo, J.; Piruat, J.I.; Garcia-Flores, P.; Pfeil, U.; Gries, B.; Muhlfeld, C.; Weigand, M.A.; Kummer, W.; Weissmann, N.; Paddenberg, R.

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Keto acids (alpha-KAs) are not just metabolic intermediates but are also powerful modulators of different cellular pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis that alpha-KA concentrations are regulated by complex II (succinate dehydrogenase=SDH), which represents an intersection between the mitoc

  13. Regulation of hepatic branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC) regulates branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism at the level of branched chain alpha-ketoacid (BCKA) catabolism. It has been demonstrated that the activity of hepatic BCKDC is markedly decreased in type 2 diabetic animal...

  14. TOR complex 2-Ypk1 signaling is an essential positive regulator of the general amino acid control response and autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Graef, Martin; Nunnari, Jodi; Powers, Ted

    2014-07-22

    The highly conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism in response to nutrient availability. TOR functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes, TOR Complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR Complex 2 (TORC2). Through TORC1, TOR negatively regulates autophagy, a conserved process that functions in quality control and cellular homeostasis and, in this capacity, is part of an adaptive nutrient deprivation response. Here we demonstrate that during amino acid starvation TOR also operates independently as a positive regulator of autophagy through the conserved TORC2 and its downstream target protein kinase, Ypk1. Under these conditions, TORC2-Ypk1 signaling negatively regulates the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, to enable the activation of the amino acid-sensing eIF2α kinase, Gcn2, and to promote autophagy. Our work reveals that the TORC2 pathway regulates autophagy in an opposing manner to TORC1 to provide a tunable response to cellular metabolic status.

  15. The transcriptional coactivator DRIP/mediator complex is involved in vitamin D receptor function and regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yuko; Chalkley, Robert J; Burlingame, Alma L; Bikle, Daniel D

    2010-10-01

    Mediator is a multisubunit coactivator complex that facilitates transcription of nuclear receptors. We investigated the role of the mediator complex as a coactivator for vitamin D receptor (VDR) in keratinocytes. Using VDR affinity beads, the vitamin D receptor interacting protein (DRIP)/mediator complex was purified from primary keratinocytes, and its subunit composition was determined by mass spectrometry. The complex included core subunits, such as DRIP205/MED1 (MED1), that directly binds to VDR. Additional subunits were identified that are components of the RNA polymerase II complex. The functions of different mediator components were investigated by silencing its subunits. The core subunit MED1 facilitates VDR activity and regulating keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. A newly described subunit MED21 also has a role in promoting keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, whereas MED10 has an inhibitory role. Blocking MED1/MED21 expression caused hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, accompanied by increases in mRNA expression of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 and/or glioma-associated oncogene homolog. Blocking MED1 or MED21 expression also resulted in defects in calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation, as indicated by decreased expression of differentiation markers and decreased translocation of E-cadherin to the membrane. These results show that keratinocytes use the transcriptional coactivator mediator to regulate VDR functions and control keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  16. FANCI Regulates Recruitment of the FA Core Complex at Sites of DNA Damage Independently of FANCD2.

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    Maria Castella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA-BRCA pathway mediates repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The FA core complex, a multi-subunit ubiquitin ligase, participates in the detection of DNA lesions and monoubiquitinates two downstream FA proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI (or the ID complex. However, the regulation of the FA core complex itself is poorly understood. Here we show that the FA core complex proteins are recruited to sites of DNA damage and form nuclear foci in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. ATR kinase activity, an intact FA core complex and FANCM-FAAP24 were crucial for this recruitment. Surprisingly, FANCI, but not its partner FANCD2, was needed for efficient FA core complex foci formation. Monoubiquitination or ATR-dependent phosphorylation of FANCI were not required for the FA core complex recruitment, but FANCI deubiquitination by USP1 was. Additionally, BRCA1 was required for efficient FA core complex foci formation. These findings indicate that FANCI functions upstream of FA core complex recruitment independently of FANCD2, and alter the current view of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  17. The alpha-chain of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex binds to and regulates FADD function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilo, Romania; Liguoro, Domenico; di Jeso, Bruno; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale

    2003-04-18

    FADD protein is a critical mediator of signal transduction pathways activated by several members of the TNF-receptor gene superfamily. Recently, an induced proximity model has been proposed to interpret FADD-mediated signaling events. According to this model, FADD facilitates signaling by inducing clusters of effector molecules in proximity of the activated receptor complex. An important corollary of the induced-proximity model is that FADD protein should not form oligomers in the absence of receptor stimulation. Here we show that, in the absence of death receptor stimulation, FADD is found associated to the alpha chain of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC). Exposure to TNF results in disruption of FADD/NAC complex. Expression of NAC regulates formation of FADD oligomers and modulates FADD-mediated signaling. Thus, our observation indicates that NAC may serve as an intracellular regulator of FADD function.

  18. Complex regulation and multiple developmental functions of misfire, the Drosophila melanogaster ferlin gene

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    Wakimoto Barbara T

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ferlins are membrane proteins with multiple C2 domains and proposed functions in Ca2+ mediated membrane-membrane interactions in animals. Caenorhabditis elegans has two ferlin genes, one of which is required for sperm function. Mammals have several ferlin genes and mutations in the human dysferlin (DYSF and otoferlin (OTOF genes result in muscular dystrophy and hearing loss, respectively. Drosophila melanogaster has a single ferlin gene called misfire (mfr. A previous study showed that a mfr mutation caused male sterility because of defects in fertilization. Here we analyze the expression and structure of the mfr gene and the consequences of multiple mutations to better understand the developmental function of ferlins. Results We show that mfr is expressed in the testis and ovaries of adult flies, has tissue-specific promoters, and expresses alternatively spliced transcripts that are predicted to encode distinct protein isoforms. Studies of 11 male sterile mutations indicate that a predicted Mfr testis isoform with five C2 domains and a transmembrane (TM domain is required for sperm plasma membrane breakdown (PMBD and completion of sperm activation during fertilization. We demonstrate that Mfr is not required for localization of Sneaky, another membrane protein necessary for PMBD. The mfr mutations vary in their effects in females, with a subset disrupting egg patterning and causing a maternal effect delay in early embryonic development. Locations of these mutations indicate that a short Mfr protein isoform carries out ferlin activities during oogenesis. Conclusion The mfr gene exhibits complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation and functions in three developmental processes: sperm activation, egg patterning, and early embryogenesis. These functions are in part due to the production of protein isoforms that vary in the number of C2 domains. These findings help establish D. melanogaster as model system for

  19. Complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The term complexity derives etymologically from the Latin plexus, which means interwoven. Intuitively, this implies that something complex is composed by elements that are difficult to separate. This difficulty arises from the relevant interactions that take place between components. This lack of separability is at odds with the classical scientific method - which has been used since the times of Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Laplace - and has also influenced philosophy and engineering. In recent decades, the scientific study of complexity and complex systems has proposed a paradigm shift in science and philosophy, proposing novel methods that take into account relevant interactions.

  20. The tumor suppressors p53, p63, and p73 are regulators of microRNA processing complex.

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    Lakshmanane Boominathan

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressors p53, p73, and p63 are known to function as transcription factors. They promote either growth arrest or apoptosis, depending upon the DNA damage. A number of microRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to function as transcriptional targets of p53 and they appear to aid p53 in promoting growth arrest and apoptosis. However, the question of p53/p63/p73 regulating the miRNA processing complex has not been addressed in depth so far. Comparative/computational genomic analysis was performed using Target scan, Mami, and Diana software to identify miRNAs that regulate the miRNA processing complex. Here, I present evidence for the first time that the tumor suppressors p53, p63, and p73 function as both positive and negative regulators of the miRNA processing components. Curated p53-dependent miRNA expression data was used to identify p53-miRs that target the components of the miRNA-processing complex. This analysis suggests that most of the components (mRNAs' 3'UTR of the miRNA processing complex are targeted by p53-miRs. Remarkably, this data revealed the conserved nature of p53-miRs in targeting a number of components of the miRNA processing complex. p53/p73/p63 appears to regulate the major components of the miRNA processing, such as Drosha-DGCR8, Dicer-TRBP2, and Argonaute proteins. In particular, p53/p73/p63 appears to regulate the processing of miRNAs, such as let-7, miR-200c, miR-143, miR-107, miR-16, miR-145, miR-134, miR-449a, miR-503, and miR-21. Interestingly, there seems to be a phenotypic similarity between p63(-/- and dicer(-/- mice, suggesting that p63 and dicer could regulate each other. In addition, p63, p73, and the DGCR8 proteins contain a conserved interaction domain. Further, promoters of a number of components of the miRNA processing machinery, including dicer and P2P-R, contain p53-REs, suggesting that they could be direct transcriptional targets of p63/p73/p53. Together, this study provides mechanistic insights into

  1. Effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Song; LIN Haiyan; QI Jianguo; WANG Yongchao

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of sense and antisense centromere/kinetochore complex protein-B (CENP-B) in cell cycle regulation. Full-length cenpb cDNA was subcloned into pBI-EGFP eukaryotic expression vector in both sense and antisense orientation. HeLa-Tet-Off cells were transfected with sense or antisense cenpb vectors. Sense transfection of HeLa-Tet-Off cells resulted in the formation of a large centromere/kinetochore complex, and apoptosis of cells following several times of cell division. A stable antisense cenpb transfected cell line, named HACPB, was obtained. The centromere/kinetochore complex of HACPB cells became smaller than control HeLa-Tet-Off cells and scattered, and the expression of CENP-B was down-regulated. In addition, delayed cell cycle progression, inhibited malignant phenotype, restrained ability of tumor formation in nude mice, and delayed entry from G2/M phase into next G1 phase were observed in HACPB cells. Furthermore, the expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), cyclins, and CDK inhibitors (CKIs) were modulated during different phases of the cell cycle. CENP-B is an essential protein for the maintenance of the structure and function of centromere/kinetochore complex, and plays important roles in cell cycle regulation.

  2. 3{prime} UTR sequence-specific mRNA-protein complexes and the post-transcriptional regulation of catalase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimer, D.L.; Ott, R.N.; Singh, S.M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Recently, sequences in the 3{prime} untranslated region (3{prime} UTR) of some genes have been recognized which may play an important role in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Mutations in this region of the gene are known to cause at least two diseases including myotonic dystrophy and a lysosomal accumulation disease. The mechanism is thought to involve mRNA-protein interactions that affect translation and/or mRNA stability. Reports of this nature are not common and the significance of the often large 3{prime} UTR on the regulation of gene expression remains speculative. Studies on the 3{prime} UTR mRNA-protein interactions in model eukaryotic genes therefore are critical to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Mouse catalase, encoded by Cas-1, was used as a model to characterize the molecular mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation. The 3{prime} UTR (752 bp) of Cas-1 contains three unusual, near repeats [(CA){sub 31}, (U){sub 15} and (TGTGC){sub 7}]. Gel mobility shift assays using {sup 32}P-labelled transcripts which contain these sequences and tissue homogenates from various sources identified mRNA-protein complexes specific to (CA){sub 31} and (U){sub 15} only. In all strains analyzed, a single protein of 69 kDa which was involved in the (CA){sub 31} complex, was observed in most tissues except lung and was localized to the polysomal fraction. Similarly, two proteins involved in the (U){sub 15} complex, 38 and 47 kDa, were observed in all tissues and strains studied. Only the 38 kDa protein was observed in the polysomal fraction. The results argue for a possible role for these 3{prime} UTR mRNA-binding protein complexes in the post-transcriptional regulation of this antioxidant enzyme.

  3. The PRR family of transcriptional regulators reflects the complexity and evolution of plant circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Eva M; Liu, Tiffany

    2013-10-01

    Circadian clocks are internal time-keeping mechanisms that provide an adaptive advantage by enabling organisms to anticipate daily changes and orchestrate biological processes accordingly. Circadian regulated pseudo-response regulators are key components of transcription/translation circadian networks in green alga and plants. Recent studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that most of them act as transcriptional repressors and directly regulate output pathways suggesting a close relationship between the central oscillator and circadian regulated processes. Moreover, phylogenetic studies on this small gene family have shed light on the evolution of circadian clocks in the green lineage.

  4. IMPROVING THE MECHANISMS OF STATE REGULATION OF THE AGRO-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX OF THE KRASNODAR REGION IN MODERN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemova E. I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines features of the functioning of the agro-industrial complex of Russia and the Krasnodar region in the economic crisis. It substantiates the urgency of adaptation of state regulation of agro-industrial complex mechanisms to modern economic realities, we have disclosed functions and principles for the development of regional policy strategy in the agricultural sector. It is proved, that the system of state regulation of regional agro-industrial complex should correlate with the priorities of the development of its main component - agriculture and to promote structural reforms in the agricultural sector, enhance its innovation and investment potential and maintain the social orientation of the agrarian reforms. Improving the mechanisms of state support of the agro-industrial complex of Russia and the Krasnodar region requires a special approach in relation to the country's membership in the World Trade Organization. Due to this, we have proposed the adjustment of state support instruments of domestic agro-industrial complex, which involves the use of priority measures of the "green box", including an increase in funding for research in agriculture, development of an effective institutional environment, which will stimulate the efficiency and competitiveness of the agricultural sector

  5. Resistance to topoisomerase cleavage complex induced lethality in Escherichia coli via titration of transcription regulators PurR and FNR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu I-Fen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of gyrase cleavage complex in Escherichia coli from the action of quinolone antibiotics induces an oxidative damage cell death pathway. The oxidative cell death pathway has also been shown to be involved in the lethality following accumulation of cleavage complex formed by bacterial topoisomerase I with mutations that result in defective DNA religation. Methods A high copy number plasmid clone spanning the upp-purMN region was isolated from screening of an E. coli genomic library and analyzed for conferring increased survival rates following accumulation of mutant topoisomerase I proteins as well as treatment with the gyrase inhibitor norfloxacin. Results Analysis of the intergenic region upstream of purM demonstrated a novel mechanism of resistance to the covalent protein-DNA cleavage complex through titration of the cellular transcription regulators FNR and PurR responsible for oxygen sensing and repression of purine nucleotide synthesis respectively. Addition of adenine to defined growth medium had similar protective effect for survival following accumulation of topoisomerase cleavage complex, suggesting that increase in purine level can protect against cell death. Conclusions Perturbation of the global regulator FNR and PurR functions as well as increase in purine nucleotide availability could affect the oxidative damage cell death pathway initiated by topoisomerase cleavage complex.

  6. Complex regulation of PKCβ2 and PDK-1/AKT by ROCK2 in diabetic heart.

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    Guorong Lin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The RhoA/ROCK pathway contributes to diabetic cardiomyopathy in part by promoting the sustained activation of PKCβ2 but the details of their interaction are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate if over-activation of ROCK in the diabetic heart leads to direct phosphorylation and activation of PKCβ2, and to determine if their interaction affects PDK-1/Akt signaling. METHODS: Regulation by ROCK of PKCβ2 and related kinases was investigated by Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation in whole hearts and isolated cardiomyocytes from 12 to 14-week diabetic rats. Direct ROCK2 phosphorylation of PKCβ2 was examined in vitro. siRNA silencing was used to confirm role of ROCK2 in PKCβ2 phosphorylation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose. Furthermore, the effect of ROCK inhibition on GLUT4 translocation was determined in isolated cardiomyocytes by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Expression of ROCK2 and expression and phosphorylation of PKCβ2 were increased in diabetic hearts. A physical interaction between the two kinases was demonstrated by reciprocal immunoprecipitation, while ROCK2 directly phosphorylated PKCβ2 at T641 in vitro. ROCK2 siRNA in vascular smooth muscle cells or inhibition of ROCK in diabetic hearts reduced PKCβ2 T641 phosphorylation, and this was associated with attenuation of PKCβ2 activity. PKCβ2 also formed a complex with PDK-1 and its target AKT, and ROCK inhibition resulted in upregulation of the phosphorylation of PDK-1 and AKT, and increased translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in diabetic hearts. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that over-activation of ROCK2 contributes to diabetic cardiomyopathy by multiple mechanisms, including direct phosphorylation and activation of PKCβ2 and interference with the PDK-1-mediated phosphorylation and activation of AKT and translocation of GLUT4. This suggests that ROCK2 is a critical node in the

  7. Cultivating Student Skills in Self-Regulated Learning through Evaluation of Task Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belski, Regina; Belski, Iouri

    2014-01-01

    In order to self-regulate, students need to honestly reflect on their learning and to take appropriate corrective action. A simple procedure to cultivate student skills in self-regulated learning, known as the Task Evaluation and Reflection Instrument for Student Self-Assessment (TERISSA) is discussed in this paper. TERISSA guides students through…

  8. Multiple complexes of nitrogen assimilatory enzymes in spinach chloroplasts: possible mechanisms for the regulation of enzyme function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kimata-Ariga

    Full Text Available Assimilation of nitrogen is an essential biological process for plant growth and productivity. Here we show that three chloroplast enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation, glutamate synthase (GOGAT, nitrite reductase (NiR and glutamine synthetase (GS, separately assemble into distinct protein complexes in spinach chloroplasts, as analyzed by western blots under blue native electrophoresis (BN-PAGE. GOGAT and NiR were present not only as monomers, but also as novel complexes with a discrete size (730 kDa and multiple sizes (>120 kDa, respectively, in the stromal fraction of chloroplasts. These complexes showed the same mobility as each monomer on two-dimensional (2D SDS-PAGE after BN-PAGE. The 730 kDa complex containing GOGAT dissociated into monomers, and multiple complexes of NiR reversibly converted into monomers, in response to the changes in the pH of the stromal solvent. On the other hand, the bands detected by anti-GS antibody were present not only in stroma as a conventional decameric holoenzyme complex of 420 kDa, but also in thylakoids as a novel complex of 560 kDa. The polypeptide in the 560 kDa complex showed slower mobility than that of the 420 kDa complex on the 2D SDS-PAGE, implying the assembly of distinct GS isoforms or a post-translational modification of the same GS protein. The function of these multiple complexes was evaluated by in-gel GS activity under native conditions and by the binding ability of NiR and GOGAT with their physiological electron donor, ferredoxin. The results indicate that these multiplicities in size and localization of the three nitrogen assimilatory enzymes may be involved in the physiological regulation of their enzyme function, in a similar way as recently described cases of carbon assimilatory enzymes.

  9. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  10. Regulation of fatty acid oxidation in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes during maturation and modulation by PPAR agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie R Dunning

    Full Text Available Fatty acid oxidation is an important energy source for the oocyte; however, little is known about how this metabolic pathway is regulated in cumulus-oocyte complexes. Analysis of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation showed that many are regulated by the luteinizing hormone surge during in vivo maturation, including acyl-CoA synthetases, carnitine transporters, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and acetyl-CoA transferase, but that many are dysregulated when cumulus-oocyte complexes are matured under in vitro maturation conditions using follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor. Fatty acid oxidation, measured as production of ³H₂O from [³H]palmitic acid, occurs in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes in response to the luteinizing hormone surge but is significantly reduced in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro. Thus we sought to determine whether fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes could be modulated during in vitro maturation by lipid metabolism regulators, namely peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR agonists bezafibrate and rosiglitazone. Bezafibrate showed no effect with increasing dose, while rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation. To determine the impact of rosiglitazone on oocyte developmental competence, cumulus-oocyte complexes were treated with rosiglitazone during in vitro maturation and gene expression, oocyte mitochondrial activity and embryo development following in vitro fertilization were assessed. Rosiglitazone restored Acsl1, Cpt1b and Acaa2 levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes and increased oocyte mitochondrial membrane potential yet resulted in significantly fewer embryos reaching the morula and hatching blastocyst stages. Thus fatty acid oxidation is increased in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vivo and deficient during in vitro maturation, a known model of poor oocyte quality. That rosiglitazone further

  11. How to regulate nonbiological complex drugs (NBCD) and their follow-on versions : points to consider

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Huub; Stegemann, Sven; Weinstein, Vera; de Vlieger, Jon S B; Flühmann, Beat; Mühlebach, Stefan; Gaspar, Rogério; Shah, Vinod P; Crommelin, Daan J A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this critical review is to reach a global consensus regarding the introduction of follow-on versions of nonbiological complex drugs (NBCD). A nonbiological complex drug is a medicinal product, not being a biological medicine, where the active substance is not a homo-molecular structure, b

  12. Identification of a protein phosphatase-1/phospholamban complex that is regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Vafiadaki

    Full Text Available In human and experimental heart failure, the activity of the type 1 phosphatase is significantly increased, associated with dephosphorylation of phospholamban, inhibition of the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ transport ATPase (SERCA2a and depressed function. In the current study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms controlling protein phosphatase-1 activity. Using recombinant proteins and complementary in vitro binding studies, we identified a multi-protein complex centered on protein phosphatase-1 that includes its muscle specific glycogen-targeting subunit GM and substrate phospholamban. GM interacts directly with phospholamban and this association is mediated by the cytosolic regions of the proteins. Our findings suggest the involvement of GM in mediating formation of the phosphatase-1/GM/phospholamban complex through the direct and independent interactions of GM with both protein phosphatase-1 and phospholamban. Importantly, the protein phosphatase-1/GM/phospholamban complex dissociates upon protein kinase A phosphorylation, indicating its significance in the β-adrenergic signalling axis. Moreover, protein phosphatase-1 activity is regulated by two binding partners, inhibitor-1 and the small heat shock protein 20, Hsp20. Indeed, human genetic variants of inhibitor-1 (G147D or Hsp20 (P20L result in reduced binding and inhibition of protein phosphatase-1, suggesting aberrant enzymatic regulation in human carriers. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms underlying fine-tuned regulation of protein phosphatase-1 and its impact on the SERCA2/phospholamban interactome in cardiac function.

  13. The Complex Relationship between Liver Cancer and the Cell Cycle: A Story of Multiple Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bisteau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver acts as a hub for metabolic reactions to keep a homeostatic balance during development and growth. The process of liver cancer development, although poorly understood, is related to different etiologic factors like toxins, alcohol, or viral infection. At the molecular level, liver cancer is characterized by a disruption of cell cycle regulation through many molecular mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the lack of regulation of the cell cycle during liver cancer, focusing mainly on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. We also provide a brief summary of novel therapies connected to cell cycle regulation.

  14. The Complex Relationship between Liver Cancer and the Cell Cycle: A Story of Multiple Regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisteau, Xavier [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos#3-09, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); Caldez, Matias J.; Kaldis, Philipp, E-mail: kaldis@imcb.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos#3-09, Singapore 138673 (Singapore); National University of Singapore (NUS), Department of Biochemistry, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2014-01-13

    The liver acts as a hub for metabolic reactions to keep a homeostatic balance during development and growth. The process of liver cancer development, although poorly understood, is related to different etiologic factors like toxins, alcohol, or viral infection. At the molecular level, liver cancer is characterized by a disruption of cell cycle regulation through many molecular mechanisms. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms underlying the lack of regulation of the cell cycle during liver cancer, focusing mainly on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also provide a brief summary of novel therapies connected to cell cycle regulation.

  15. The microtubule-associated Rho activating factor GEF-H1 interacts with exocyst complex to regulate vesicle traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ritu; Delorme-Walker, Violaine D; Howell, Michael C; Anselmo, Anthony N; White, Michael A; Bokoch, Gary M; Dermardirossian, Céline

    2012-08-14

    The exocyst complex plays a critical role in targeting and tethering vesicles to specific sites of the plasma membrane. These events are crucial for polarized delivery of membrane components to the cell surface, which is critical for cell motility and division. Though Rho GTPases are involved in regulating actin dynamics and membrane trafficking, their role in exocyst-mediated vesicle targeting is not very clear. Herein, we present evidence that depletion of GEF-H1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho proteins, affects vesicle trafficking. Interestingly, we found that GEF-H1 directly binds to exocyst component Sec5 in a Ral GTPase-dependent manner. This interaction promotes RhoA activation, which then regulates exocyst assembly/localization and exocytosis. Taken together, our work defines a mechanism for RhoA activation in response to RalA-Sec5 signaling and involvement of GEF-H1/RhoA pathway in the regulation of vesicle trafficking.

  16. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  17. COMMD1 is linked to the WASH complex and regulates endosomal trafficking of the copper transporter ATP7A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Krawczak, Christine A; Singla, Amika; Starokadomskyy, Petro; Deng, Zhihui; Osborne, Douglas G; Li, Haiying; Dick, Christopher J; Gomez, Timothy S; Koenecke, Megan; Zhang, Jin-San; Dai, Haiming; Sifuentes-Dominguez, Luis F; Geng, Linda N; Kaufmann, Scott H; Hein, Marco Y; Wallis, Mathew; McGaughran, Julie; Gecz, Jozef; Sluis, Bart van de; Billadeau, Daniel D; Burstein, Ezra

    2015-01-01

    COMMD1 deficiency results in defective copper homeostasis, but the mechanism for this has remained elusive. Here we report that COMMD1 is directly linked to early endosomes through its interaction with a protein complex containing CCDC22, CCDC93, and C16orf62. This COMMD/CCDC22/CCDC93 (CCC) complex interacts with the multisubunit WASH complex, an evolutionarily conserved system, which is required for endosomal deposition of F-actin and cargo trafficking in conjunction with the retromer. Interactions between the WASH complex subunit FAM21, and the carboxyl-terminal ends of CCDC22 and CCDC93 are responsible for CCC complex recruitment to endosomes. We show that depletion of CCC complex components leads to lack of copper-dependent movement of the copper transporter ATP7A from endosomes, resulting in intracellular copper accumulation and modest alterations in copper homeostasis in humans with CCDC22 mutations. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for the role of COMMD1 in copper homeostasis and uncovers additional genes involved in the regulation of copper transporter recycling.

  18. Regulation of the Tumor-Suppressor Function of the Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Complex by Ubiquitin and SUMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reidick, Christina [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany); El Magraoui, Fouzi; Meyer, Helmut E. [Biomedical Research, Human Brain Proteomics II, Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS, Dortmund 44139 (Germany); Stenmark, Harald [Department of Biochemistry, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Montebello, Oslo 0310 (Norway); Platta, Harald W., E-mail: harald.platta@rub.de [Biochemie Intrazellulärer Transportprozesse, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum 44801 (Germany)

    2014-12-23

    The occurrence of cancer is often associated with a dysfunction in one of the three central membrane-involution processes—autophagy, endocytosis or cytokinesis. Interestingly, all three pathways are controlled by the same central signaling module: the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex and its catalytic product, the phosphorylated lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P). The activity of the catalytic subunit of the PI3K-III complex, the lipid-kinase VPS34, requires the presence of the membrane-targeting factor VPS15 as well as the adaptor protein Beclin 1. Furthermore, a growing list of regulatory proteins associates with VPS34 via Beclin 1. These accessory factors define distinct subunit compositions and thereby guide the PI3K-III complex to its different cellular and physiological roles. Here we discuss the regulation of the PI3K-III complex components by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. Especially Beclin 1 has emerged as a highly regulated protein, which can be modified with Lys11-, Lys48- or Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by distinct E3 ligases from the RING-, HECT-, RBR- or Cullin-type. We also point out other cross-links of these ligases with autophagy in order to discuss how these data might be merged into a general concept.

  19. The Nicastrin-like protein Nicalin regulates assembly and stability of the Nicalin-nodal modulator (NOMO) membrane protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffner, Christof; Dettmer, Ulf; Weiler, Timotheus; Haass, Christian

    2007-04-06

    The assembly of the gamma-secretase complex, an Alzheimer disease-related protease required for beta-amyloid generation, is tightly regulated and predominantly limited by the stoichiometrical availability of its components. We have identified a novel endoplasmic reticulum-located protein complex that is regulated in a similar fashion. It contains the recently identified Nodal signaling antagonists Nicalin (a distant homolog of the gamma-secretase component Nicastrin) and NOMO (Nodal modulator). Using an RNA interference approach, we found that Nicalin and NOMO became unstable in the absence of the respective binding partner, suggesting that complex formation has a stabilizing effect. Overexpression of Nicalin resulted in an increase in NOMO, whereas endogenous Nicalin was reduced below the detection limit. Both effects were shown to occur at a post-transcriptional level. Thus, NOMO is most likely produced in excess amounts and either stabilized by Nicalin or rapidly degraded. In contrast, Nicalin levels are limited independently of NOMO. We, therefore, propose that Nicalin controls the assembly and stability of the Nicalin-NOMO complex.

  20. Coordinated regulation of transcriptional repression by the RBP2 H3K4 demethylase and Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Hansen, Klaus H; Christensen, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate important cellular processes such as embryogenesis, cell proliferation, and stem cell self-renewal through the transcriptional repression of genes determining cell fate decisions. The Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is highly conserved during evolution......, and its intrinsic histone H3 Lys 27 (K27) trimethylation (me3) activity is essential for PcG-mediated transcriptional repression. Here, we show a functional interplay between the PRC2 complex and the H3K4me3 demethylase Rbp2 (Jarid1a) in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. By genome-wide location analysis we...... found that Rbp2 is associated with a large number of PcG target genes in mouse ES cells. We show that the PRC2 complex recruits Rbp2 to its target genes, and that this interaction is required for PRC2-mediated repressive activity during ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate...

  1. Regulation of plant innate immunity by three proteins in a complex conserved across the plant and animal kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Kristoffer; Zhao, Qingguo; Cheng, Yu Ti; Bi, Dongling; Monaghan, Jacqueline; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Yuelin; Li, Xin

    2007-06-15

    Innate immunity against pathogen infection is an evolutionarily conserved process among multicellular organisms. Arabidopsis SNC1 encodes a Resistance protein that combines attributes of multiple mammalian pattern recognition receptors. Utilizing snc1 as an autoimmune model, we identified a discrete protein complex containing at least three members--MOS4 (Modifier Of snc1, 4), AtCDC5, and PRL1 (Pleiotropic Regulatory Locus 1)--that are all essential for plant innate immunity. AtCDC5 has DNA-binding activity, suggesting that this complex probably regulates defense responses through transcriptional control. Since the complex components along with their interactions are highly conserved from fission yeast to Arabidopsis and human, they may also have a yet-to-be-identified function in mammalian innate immunity.

  2. Dynamin Forms a Src Kinase–sensitive Complex with Cbl and Regulates Podosomes and Osteoclast Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-containing adhesion structures found in osteoclasts, macrophages, and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts. After integrin engagement, Pyk2 recruits Src and the adaptor protein Cbl, forming a molecular signaling complex that is critical for cell migration, and deletion of any molecule in this complex disrupts podosome ring formation and/or decreases osteoclast migration. Dynamin, a GTPase essential for endocytosis, is also involved in actin cytos...

  3. An Atypical SCF-like Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Promotes Wallerian Degeneration through Regulation of Axonal Nmnat2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Yamagishi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Axon degeneration is a tightly regulated, self-destructive program that is a critical feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanisms regulating this program remain poorly understood. Here, we identify S-phase kinase-associated protein 1A (Skp1a, a core component of a Skp/Cullin/F-box (SCF-type E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, as a critical regulator of axon degeneration after injury in mammalian neurons. Depletion of Skp1a prolongs survival of injured axons in vitro and in the optic nerve in vivo. We demonstrate that Skp1a regulates the protein level of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ synthesizing enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (Nmnat2 in axons. Loss of axonal Nmnat2 contributes to a local ATP deficit that triggers axon degeneration. Knockdown of Skp1a elevates basal levels of axonal Nmnat2, thereby delaying axon degeneration through prolonged maintenance of axonal ATP. Consistent with Skp1a functioning through regulation of Nmnat2, Skp1a knockdown fails to protect axons from Nmnat2 knockdown. These results illuminate the molecular mechanism underlying Skp1a-dependent axonal destruction.

  4. The Hrs/Stam complex acts as a positive and negative regulator of RTK signaling during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Chanut-Delalande

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endocytosis is a key regulatory step of diverse signalling pathways, including receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK signalling. Hrs and Stam constitute the ESCRT-0 complex that controls the initial selection of ubiquitinated proteins, which will subsequently be degraded in lysosomes. It has been well established ex vivo and during Drosophila embryogenesis that Hrs promotes EGFR down regulation. We have recently isolated the first mutations of stam in flies and shown that Stam is required for air sac morphogenesis, a larval respiratory structure whose formation critically depends on finely tuned levels of FGFR activity. This suggest that Stam, putatively within the ESCRT-0 complex, modulates FGF signalling, a possibility that has not been examined in Drosophila yet. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we assessed the role of the Hrs/Stam complex in the regulation of signalling activity during Drosophila development. We show that stam and hrs are required for efficient FGFR signalling in the tracheal system, both during cell migration in the air sac primordium and during the formation of fine cytoplasmic extensions in terminal cells. We find that stam and hrs mutant cells display altered FGFR/Btl localisation, likely contributing to impaired signalling levels. Electron microscopy analyses indicate that endosome maturation is impaired at distinct steps by hrs and stam mutations. These somewhat unexpected results prompted us to further explore the function of stam and hrs in EGFR signalling. We show that while stam and hrs together downregulate EGFR signalling in the embryo, they are required for full activation of EGFR signalling during wing development. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that the ESCRT-0 complex differentially regulates RTK signalling, either positively or negatively depending on tissues and developmental stages, further highlighting the importance of endocytosis in modulating signalling pathways during development.

  5. Identifying a kinase network regulating FGF14:Nav1.6 complex assembly using split-luciferase complementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Hsu

    Full Text Available Kinases play fundamental roles in the brain. Through complex signaling pathways, kinases regulate the strength of protein:protein interactions (PPI influencing cell cycle, signal transduction, and electrical activity of neurons. Changes induced by kinases on neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and brain connectivity are linked to complex brain disorders, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these cellular events remain for the most part elusive. To further our understanding of brain disease, new methods for rapidly surveying kinase pathways in the cellular context are needed. The bioluminescence-based luciferase complementation assay (LCA is a powerful, versatile toolkit for the exploration of PPI. LCA relies on the complementation of two firefly luciferase protein fragments that are functionally reconstituted into the full luciferase enzyme by two interacting binding partners. Here, we applied LCA in live cells to assay 12 kinase pathways as regulators of the PPI complex formed by the voltage-gated sodium channel, Nav1.6, a transmembrane ion channel that elicits the action potential in neurons and mediates synaptic transmission, and its multivalent accessory protein, the fibroblast growth factor 14 (FGF14. Through extensive dose-dependent validations of structurally-diverse kinase inhibitors and hierarchical clustering, we identified the PI3K/Akt pathway, the cell-cycle regulator Wee1 kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC as prospective regulatory nodes of neuronal excitability through modulation of the FGF14:Nav1.6 complex. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis shows convergence of these pathways on glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 and functional assays demonstrate that inhibition of GSK3 impairs excitability of hippocampal neurons. This combined approach provides a versatile toolkit for rapidly surveying PPI signaling, allowing the discovery of new modular pathways centered on GSK3 that might be the basis for functional alterations between the

  6. Enzymes of heme metabolism in the kidney: regulation by trace metals which do not form heme complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, M D; Kappas, A

    1977-11-01

    The in vivo regulation by metal ions of the enzymes of heme metabolism in kidney-particularly of ALAS, the rate-limiting enzyme in heine formation- was investigated. Ni(2+) and Pt(4+), metals which do not enzymatically form metalloporphyrins, were found to regulate ALAS in kidney as they do in liver. The pattern of this regulation was generally similar to that observed with heme and metal ions in liver, i.e., a late increase in enzyme activity after an early period in which ALAS activity was unaltered or inhibited. The metals did not interact with the enzyme in vitro to alter its activity. In this study no direct reciprocal relationship between ALAS activity and total cellular heine content was demonstrated. The metal ions, particularly Pt(4+), also altered the activity of other enzymes of heme biosynthesis in kidney. Pt(4+) severely inhibited the activity of ALAD and UROS. Ni(2+) and Pt(4+) were potent inducers of heme oxygenase, the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in heine degradation. It is proposed that the physiological regulation of ALAS is mediated through the action of metal ions, rather than by the cellular content of heine, and that the regulation of ALAS by heine reflects the action of the central metal ion of heme rather than that of the entire metalloporphyrin complex. In this proposed mechanism for metal ion regulation of ALAS, the tetrapyrrole moiety of heine is considered to function principally as an efficient carrier of metal to the regulatory site for ALAS production, inasmuch as the tetrapyrrole ring itself has been shown in earlier studies not to have any effect on ALAS activity. The production of heine oxygenase is believed to be similarly regulated.

  7. Ethylene Control of Fruit Ripening: Revisiting the Complex Network of Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingchun; Pirrello, Julien; Chervin, Christian; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Bouzayen, Mondher

    2015-12-01

    The plant hormone ethylene plays a key role in climacteric fruit ripening. Studies on components of ethylene signaling have revealed a linear transduction pathway leading to the activation of ethylene response factors. However, the means by which ethylene selects the ripening-related genes and interacts with other signaling pathways to regulate the ripening process are still to be elucidated. Using tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) as a reference species, the present review aims to revisit the mechanisms by which ethylene regulates fruit ripening by taking advantage of new tools available to perform in silico studies at the genome-wide scale, leading to a global view on the expression pattern of ethylene biosynthesis and response genes throughout ripening. Overall, it provides new insights on the transcriptional network by which this hormone coordinates the ripening process and emphasizes the interplay between ethylene and ripening-associated developmental factors and the link between epigenetic regulation and ethylene during fruit ripening.

  8. Defining components of the ß-catenin destruction complex and exploring its regulation and mechanisms of action during development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Roberts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A subset of signaling pathways play exceptionally important roles in embryonic and post-embryonic development, and mis-regulation of these pathways occurs in most human cancers. One such pathway is the Wnt pathway. The primary mechanism keeping Wnt signaling off in the absence of ligand is regulated proteasomal destruction of the canonical Wnt effector ßcatenin (or its fly homolog Armadillo. A substantial body of evidence indicates that SCF(βTrCP mediates βcat destruction, however, an essential role for Roc1 has not been demonstrated in this process, as would be predicted. In addition, other E3 ligases have also been proposed to destroy βcat, suggesting that βcat destruction may be regulated differently in different tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used cultured Drosophila cells, human colon cancer cells, and Drosophila embryos and larvae to explore the machinery that targets Armadillo for destruction. Using RNAi in Drosophila S2 cells to examine which SCF components are essential for Armadillo destruction, we find that Roc1/Roc1a is essential for regulating Armadillo stability, and that in these cells the only F-box protein playing a detectable role is Slimb. Second, we find that while embryonic and larval Drosophila tissues use the same destruction complex proteins, the response of these tissues to destruction complex inactivation differs, with Armadillo levels more elevated in embryos. We provide evidence consistent with the possibility that this is due to differences in armadillo mRNA levels. Third, we find that there is no correlation between the ability of different APC2 mutant proteins to negatively regulate Armadillo levels, and their recently described function in positively-regulating Wnt signaling. Finally, we demonstrate that APC proteins lacking the N-terminal Armadillo-repeat domain cannot restore Armadillo destruction but retain residual function in negatively-regulating Wnt signaling. CONCLUSIONS

  9. The apical complex provides a regulated gateway for secretion of invasion factors in Toxoplasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Katris

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The apical complex is the definitive cell structure of phylum Apicomplexa, and is the focus of the events of host cell penetration and the establishment of intracellular parasitism. Despite the importance of this structure, its molecular composition is relatively poorly known and few studies have experimentally tested its functions. We have characterized a novel Toxoplasma gondii protein, RNG2, that is located at the apical polar ring--the common structural element of apical complexes. During cell division, RNG2 is first recruited to centrosomes immediately after their duplication, confirming that assembly of the new apical complex commences as one of the earliest events of cell replication. RNG2 subsequently forms a ring, with the carboxy- and amino-termini anchored to the apical polar ring and mobile conoid, respectively, linking these two structures. Super-resolution microscopy resolves these two termini, and reveals that RNG2 orientation flips during invasion when the conoid is extruded. Inducible knockdown of RNG2 strongly inhibits host cell invasion. Consistent with this, secretion of micronemes is prevented in the absence of RNG2. This block, however, can be fully or partially overcome by exogenous stimulation of calcium or cGMP signaling pathways, respectively, implicating the apical complex directly in these signaling events. RNG2 demonstrates for the first time a role for the apical complex in controlling secretion of invasion factors in this important group of parasites.

  10. Dynamin Forms a Src Kinase–sensitive Complex with Cbl and Regulates Podosomes and Osteoclast Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Horne, William C.; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-containing adhesion structures found in osteoclasts, macrophages, and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts. After integrin engagement, Pyk2 recruits Src and the adaptor protein Cbl, forming a molecular signaling complex that is critical for cell migration, and deletion of any molecule in this complex disrupts podosome ring formation and/or decreases osteoclast migration. Dynamin, a GTPase essential for endocytosis, is also involved in actin cytoskeleton remodeling and is localized to podosomes where it has a role in actin turnover. We found that dynamin colocalizes with Cbl in the actin-rich podosome belt of osteoclasts and that dynamin forms a complex with Cbl in osteoclasts and when overexpressed in 293VnR or SYF cells. The association of dynamin with Cbl in osteoclasts was decreased by Src tyrosine kinase activity and we found that destabilization of the dynamin-Cbl complex involves the recruitment of Src through the proline-rich domain of Cbl. Overexpression of dynamin increased osteoclast bone resorbing activity and migration, whereas overexpression of dynK44A decreased osteoclast resorption and migration. These studies suggest that dynamin, Cbl, and Src coordinately participate in signaling complexes that are important in the assembly and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, leading to changes in osteoclast adhesion, migration, and resorption. PMID:15872089

  11. Dynamin forms a Src kinase-sensitive complex with Cbl and regulates podosomes and osteoclast activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzaniti, Angela; Neff, Lynn; Sanjay, Archana; Horne, William C; De Camilli, Pietro; Baron, Roland

    2005-07-01

    Podosomes are highly dynamic actin-containing adhesion structures found in osteoclasts, macrophages, and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts. After integrin engagement, Pyk2 recruits Src and the adaptor protein Cbl, forming a molecular signaling complex that is critical for cell migration, and deletion of any molecule in this complex disrupts podosome ring formation and/or decreases osteoclast migration. Dynamin, a GTPase essential for endocytosis, is also involved in actin cytoskeleton remodeling and is localized to podosomes where it has a role in actin turnover. We found that dynamin colocalizes with Cbl in the actin-rich podosome belt of osteoclasts and that dynamin forms a complex with Cbl in osteoclasts and when overexpressed in 293VnR or SYF cells. The association of dynamin with Cbl in osteoclasts was decreased by Src tyrosine kinase activity and we found that destabilization of the dynamin-Cbl complex involves the recruitment of Src through the proline-rich domain of Cbl. Overexpression of dynamin increased osteoclast bone resorbing activity and migration, whereas overexpression of dynK44A decreased osteoclast resorption and migration. These studies suggest that dynamin, Cbl, and Src coordinately participate in signaling complexes that are important in the assembly and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, leading to changes in osteoclast adhesion, migration, and resorption.

  12. Bordetella pertussis fim3 gene regulation by BvgA: phosphorylation controls the formation of inactive vs. active transcription complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Alice; Moon, Kyung; Decker, Kimberly B; Chen, Qing; Knipling, Leslie; Stibitz, Scott; Hinton, Deborah M

    2015-02-10

    Two-component systems [sensor kinase/response regulator (RR)] are major tools used by microorganisms to adapt to environmental conditions. RR phosphorylation is typically required for gene activation, but few studies have addressed how and if phosphorylation affects specific steps during transcription initiation. We characterized transcription complexes made with RNA polymerase and the Bordetella pertussis RR, BvgA, in its nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated (BvgA∼P) state at P(fim3), the promoter for the virulence gene fim3 (fimbrial subunit), using gel retardation, potassium permanganate and DNase I footprinting, cleavage reactions with protein conjugated with iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA, and in vitro transcription. Previous work has shown that the level of nonphosphorylated BvgA remains high in vivo under conditions in which BvgA is phosphorylated. Our results here indicate that surprisingly both BvgA and BvgA∼P form open and initiating complexes with RNA polymerase at P(fim3). However, phosphorylation of BvgA is needed to generate the correct conformation that can transition to competent elongation. Footprints obtained with the complexes made with nonphosphorylated BvgA are atypical; while the initiating complex with BvgA synthesizes short RNA, it does not generate full-length transcripts. Extended incubation of the BvgA/RNA polymerase initiated complex in the presence of heparin generates a stable, but defective species that depends on the initial transcribed sequence of fim3. We suggest that the presence of nonphosphorylated BvgA down-regulates P(fim3) activity when phosphorylated BvgA is present and may allow the bacterium to quickly adapt to the loss of inducing conditions by rapidly eliminating P(fim3) activation once the signal for BvgA phosphorylation is removed.

  13. EPCR-dependent PAR2 activation by the blood coagulation initiation complex regulates LPS-triggered interferon responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Hernandez, Irene; Basu, Sreemanti; Zogg, Mark; Botros, Fady; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Griffin, John H; Ruf, Wolfram; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-04-30

    Infection and inflammation are invariably associated with activation of the blood coagulation mechanism, secondary to the inflammation-induced expression of the coagulation initiator tissue factor (TF) on innate immune cells. By investigating the role of cell-surface receptors for coagulation factors in mouse endotoxemia, we found that the protein C receptor (ProcR; EPCR) was required for the normal in vivo and in vitro induction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-regulated gene expression. In cultured bone marrow-derived myeloid cells and in monocytic RAW264.7 cells, the LPS-induced expression of functionally active TF, assembly of the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa initiation complex of blood coagulation, and the EPCR-dependent activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) by the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa complex were required for the normal LPS induction of messenger RNAs encoding the TLR3/4 signaling adaptor protein Pellino-1 and the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8. In response to in vivo challenge with LPS, mice lacking EPCR or PAR2 failed to fully initiate an interferon-regulated gene expression program that included the Irf8 target genes Lif, Iigp1, Gbp2, Gbp3, and Gbp6. The inflammation-induced expression of TF and crosstalk with EPCR, PAR2, and TLR4 therefore appear necessary for the normal evolution of interferon-regulated host responses.

  14. Polycomb repressive complex 2 regulates MiR-200b in retinal endothelial cells: potential relevance in diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Anthony Ruiz

    Full Text Available Glucose-induced augmented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF production is a key event in diabetic retinopathy. We have previously demonstrated that downregulation of miR-200b increases VEGF, mediating structural and functional changes in the retina in diabetes. However, mechanisms regulating miR-200b in diabetes are not known. Histone methyltransferase complex, Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2, has been shown to repress miRNAs in neoplastic process. We hypothesized that, in diabetes, PRC2 represses miR-200b through its histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation mark. We show that human retinal microvascular endothelial cells exposed to high levels of glucose regulate miR-200b repression through histone methylation and that inhibition of PRC2 increases miR-200b while reducing VEGF. Furthermore, retinal tissue from animal models of diabetes showed increased expression of major PRC2 components, demonstrating in vivo relevance. This research established a repressive relationship between PRC2 and miR-200b, providing evidence of a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation through histone methylation.

  15. The SOCS2 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Growth Hormone Receptor Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterlund, Mattias; Zadjali, Fahad; Persson, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    Growth Hormone is essential for the regulation of growth and the homeostatic control of intermediary metabolism. GH actions are mediated by the Growth Hormone Receptor; a member of the cytokine receptor super family that signals chiefly through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway. Target tissue responsiveness...

  16. Lysine acetylation targets protein complexes and co-regulates major cellular functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Kumar, Chanchal; Gnad, Florian;

    2009-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a reversible posttranslational modification of proteins and plays a key role in regulating gene expression. Technological limitations have so far prevented a global analysis of lysine acetylation's cellular roles. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify 3600...

  17. HAUSP-nucleolin interaction is regulated by p53-Mdm2 complex in response to DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Park, Jang-Joon; Gu, Bon-Hee; Kim, Jin-Ock; Park, Sang Gyu; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-08-04

    HAUSP (herpes virus-associated ubiquitin specific protease, known as ubiquitin specific protease 7), one of DUBs, regulates the dynamics of the p53 and Mdm2 network in response to DNA damage by deubiquitinating both p53 and its E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2. Its concerted action increases the level of functional p53 by preventing proteasome-dependent degradation of p53. However, the protein substrates that are targeted by HAUSP to mediate DNA damage responses in the context of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex are not fully identified. Here, we identified nucleolin as a new substrate for HAUSP by proteomic analysis. Nucleolin has two HAUSP binding sites in its N- and C-terminal regions, and the mutation of HAUSP interacting peptides on nucleolin disrupts their interaction and it leads to the increased level of nucleolin ubiquitination. In addition, HAUSP regulates the stability of nucleolin by removing ubiquitin from nucleolin. Nucleolin exists as a component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex, and both Mdm2 and p53 are required for the interaction between HAUSP and nucleolin. Importantly, the irradiation increases the HAUSP-nucleolin interaction, leading to nucleolin stabilization significantly. Taken together, this study reveals a new component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex that governs dynamic cellular responses to DNA damage.

  18. The Uve1 endonuclease is regulated by the white collar complex to protect cryptococcus neoformans from UV damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Verma

    Full Text Available The pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans uses the Bwc1-Bwc2 photoreceptor complex to regulate mating in response to light, virulence and ultraviolet radiation tolerance. How the complex controls these functions is unclear. Here, we identify and characterize a gene in Cryptococcus, UVE1, whose mutation leads to a UV hypersensitive phenotype. The homologous gene in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes an apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease acting in the UVDE-dependent excision repair (UVER pathway. C. neoformans UVE1 complements a S. pombe uvde knockout strain. UVE1 is photoregulated in a Bwc1-dependent manner in Cryptococcus, and in Neurospora crassa and Phycomyces blakesleeanus that are species that represent two other major lineages in the fungi. Overexpression of UVE1 in bwc1 mutants rescues their UV sensitivity phenotype and gel mobility shift experiments show binding of Bwc2 to the UVE1 promoter, indicating that UVE1 is a direct downstream target for the Bwc1-Bwc2 complex. Uve1-GFP fusions localize to the mitochondria. Repair of UV-induced damage to the mitochondria is delayed in the uve1 mutant strain. Thus, in C. neoformans UVE1 is a key gene regulated in response to light that is responsible for tolerance to UV stress for protection of the mitochondrial genome.

  19. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the c

  20. Defects in the COG complex and COG-related trafficking regulators affect neuronal Golgi function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie K Climer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG complex is an evolutionarily conserved hetero-octameric protein complex that has been proposed to organize vesicle tethering at the Golgi apparatus. Defects in seven of the eight COG subunits are linked to Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG-type II, a family of rare diseases involving misregulation of protein glycosylation, alterations in Golgi structure, variations in retrograde trafficking through the Golgi and system-wide clinical pathologies. A troublesome aspect of these diseases are the neurological pathologies such as low IQ, microcephaly and cerebellar atrophy. The essential function of the COG complex is dependent upon interactions with other components of trafficking machinery, such as Rab-GTPases and SNAREs. COG-interacting Rabs and SNAREs have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Defects in Golgi maintenance disrupts trafficking and processing of essential proteins, frequently associated with and contributing to compromised neuron function and human disease. Despite the recent advances in molecular neuroscience, the subcellular bases for most neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. This article gives an overview of the potential contributions of the COG complex and its Rab and SNARE partners in the pathogenesis of different neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Complexity theory and financial regulation: economic policy needs interdisciplinary network analysis and behavioral modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battiston, S.; Farmer, J.D.; Flache, A.; Garlaschelli, D.; Haldane, A.G.; Heesterbeek, H.; Hommes, C.; Jaeger, C.; May, R.; Scheffer, M.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional economic theory could not explain, much less predict, the near collapse of the financial system and its long-lasting effects on the global economy. Since the 2008 crisis, there has been increasing interest in using ideas from complexity theory to make sense of economic and financial mark

  2. Regulation of the retinoblastoma protein-related p107 by G1 cyclin complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, R.L.; Carlée, L.; Kerkhoven, R.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The orderly progression through the cell cycle is mediated by the sequential activation of several cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) complexes. These kinases phosphorylate a number of cellular substrates, among which is the product of the retinoblastoma gene, pRb. Phosphorylation of pRb in late G

  3. Plasticity in Single Axon Glutamatergic Connection to GABAergic Interneurons Regulates Complex Events in the Human Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, Viktor; Paizs, Melinda; Csakvari, Eszter; Molnar, Gabor; Barzo, Pal; Tamas, Gabor; Lamsa, Karri

    2016-11-01

    In the human neocortex, single excitatory pyramidal cells can elicit very large glutamatergic EPSPs (VLEs) in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons capable of triggering their firing with short (3-5 ms) delay. Similar strong excitatory connections between two individual neurons have not been found in nonhuman cortices, suggesting that these synapses are specific to human interneurons. The VLEs are crucial for generating neocortical complex events, observed as single pyramidal cell spike-evoked discharge of cell assemblies in the frontal and temporal cortices. However, long-term plasticity of the VLE connections and how the plasticity modulates neocortical complex events has not been studied. Using triple and dual whole-cell recordings from synaptically connected human neocortical layers 2-3 neurons, we show that VLEs in fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons exhibit robust activity-induced long-term depression (LTD). The LTD by single pyramidal cell 40 Hz spike bursts is specific to connections with VLEs, requires group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, and has a presynaptic mechanism. The LTD of VLE connections alters suprathreshold activation of interneurons in the complex events suppressing the discharge of fast-spiking GABAergic cells. The VLEs triggering the complex events may contribute to cognitive processes in the human neocortex, and their long-term plasticity can alter the discharging cortical cell assemblies by learning.

  4. Examining the complex regulation and drug-induced plasticity of dopamine release and uptake using voltammetry in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Yorgason, Jordan T; Jones, Sara R

    2013-05-15

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices (slice voltammetry) has been used over the last several decades to increase substantially our understanding of the complex local regulation of dopamine release and uptake in the striatum. This technique is routinely used for the study of changes that occur in the dopamine system associated with various disease states and pharmacological treatments, and to study mechanisms of local circuitry regulation of dopamine terminal function. In the context of this Review, we compare the relative advantages of voltammetry using striatal slice preparations versus in vivo preparations, and highlight recent advances in our understanding of dopamine release and uptake in the striatum specifically from studies that use slice voltammetry in drug-naïve animals and animals with a history of psychostimulant self-administration.

  5. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis.

  6. Affects, agency, and self-regulation: complexity theory in the treatment of children with anxiety and disruptive behavior disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Phyllis

    2005-01-01

    In an increasingly unsettled and violent world, with swelling numbers of children who are abused, abandoned, or neglected, emotionally if not physically, and an increasing population of aggressive preschool children with anxiety and disruptive behavior disorders who cannot be contained in ordinary settings, psychoanalysts can make a contribution. Early intervention is essential. In very early childhood, new procedural memories for interacting with others and for regulating affects can be formed more easily than they can ever be again. Intervention should aim toward helping the child develop a sense of agency, establish moral standards, assume self-responsibility, and attain the capacity for emotional regulation. The principles of complex dynamic systems can inform psychoanalytic treatment strategies, as demonstrated with five children whose cases are presented.

  7. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Callø, Kirstine; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open...... probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated...

  8. Neurexin-Neuroligin Synaptic Complex Regulates Schizophrenia-Related DISC1/Kal-7/Rac1 “Signalosome”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Sylwia Owczarek; Bang, Marie Louise; Berezin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Neurexins (NXs) and neuroligins (NLs) are cell adhesion molecules that are localized at opposite sites of synaptic membranes. They interact with each other to promote the assembly, maintenance, and function of synapses in the central nervous system. Both NX and NL are cleaved from a membrane...... downstream of DISC1. We also show that NL1 binds to a well-characterized DISC1 interaction partner, Kal-7, and this interaction can be compromised by DISC1. Our results indicate that the NX/NL synaptic complex is intrinsically involved in the regulation of DISC1 function, thus contributing to a better...

  9. Heat shock protein 70 is associated with replicase complex of Japanese encephalitis virus and positively regulates viral genome replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ye

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes the most prevalent viral encephalitis in Asia. The NS5 protein of JEV is a key component of the viral replicase complex, which plays a crucial role in viral pathogenesis. In this study, tandem affinity purification (TAP followed by mass spectrometry analysis was performed to identify novel host proteins that interact with NS5. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, eukaryotic elongation factor 1-alpha (eEF-1α and ras-related nuclear protein (Ran were demonstrated to interact with NS5. In addition to NS5, Hsp70 was also found to interact with NS3 which is another important member of the replicase complex. It was observed that the cytoplasmic Hsp70 partially colocalizes with the components of viral replicase complex including NS3, NS5 and viral dsRNA during JEV infection. Knockdown of Hsp70 resulted in a significantly reduced JEV genome replication. Further analysis reveals that Hsp70 enhances the stability of viral proteins in JEV replicase complex. These results suggest an important role for Hsp70 in regulating JEV replication, which provides a potential target for the development of anti-JEV therapies.

  10. Regulation of flowering in rice: two florigen genes, a complex gene network, and natural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2011-02-01

    Photoperiodic control of flowering time consists of a complicated network that converges into the generation of a mobile flowering signal called florigen. Recent advances identifying the protein FT/Hd3a as the molecular nature responsible for florigen activity have focused current research on florigen genes as the important output of this complex signaling network. Rice is a model system for short-day plants and recent progress in elucidating the flowering network from rice and Arabidopsis, a long-day plant, provides an evolutionarily comparative view of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. This review summarizes photoperiodic flowering control in rice, including the interaction of complex layers of gene networks contributed from evolutionarily unique factors and the regulatory adaptation of conserved factors.

  11. p53/E1b58kDa complex regulates adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, P J; Hall, A R; Myers, C J; Braithwaite, A W

    1997-10-27

    We have explored a role for the adenovirus (Ad5) E1b58kDa/p53 protein complex in adenovirus replication. This was done by using virus mutants containing different defects in the E1b58kDa gene and cell lines that express either a wild-type p53 protein or a mutant p53 protein. We find that infection of wild-type p53-containing cells with wild-type Ad5 causes a shutoff of p53 and alpha-actin protein synthesis by distinct mechanisms, but neither occurs in mutant p53 cells. Our data also indicate that the shutoff is dependent on formation of the p53/E1b complex and may also involve another virus protein, E4ORF6. Following from these observations we asked whether failure to form the complex resulted in impaired adenovirus replication. Our experiments showed that neither wild-type Ad5 nor the E1b mutant dl338 could replicate in cells expressing a mutant p53 protein, but that wild-type adenovirus replicated well in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Collectively, our data suggest that the interaction between p53 and the E1b58kDa protein is necessary for efficient adenovirus replication. This is the first time such a direct link between the complex and virus replication has been demonstrated. These data raise serious questions about the usefulness of E1b-defective viruses in tumor therapy.

  12. The complex regulation of tanshinone IIA in rats with hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Pang

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA has definite protective effects on various cardiovascular diseases. However, in hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (H-LVH, the signaling pathways of tanshinone IIA in inhibition of remodeling and cardiac dysfunction remain unclear. Two-kidney, one-clip induced hypertensive rats (n = 32 were randomized to receive tanshinone IIA (5, 10, 15 mg/kg per day or 5% glucose injection (GS. Sham-operated rats (n = 8 received 5%GS as control. Cardiac function and dimensions were assessed by using an echocardiography system. Histological determination of the fibrosis and apoptosis was performed using hematoxylin eosin, Masson's trichrome and TUNEL staining. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases type 2 (TIMP2 protein expressions in rat myocardial tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Rat cardiomyocytes were isolated by a Langendorff perfusion method. After 48 h culture, the supernatant and cardiomyocytes were collected to determine the potential related proteins impact on cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis. Compared with the sham rats, the heart tissues of H-LVH (5%GS group suffered severely from the oxidative damage, apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM deposition. In the H-LVH group, tanshinone IIA treated decreased malondialdehyde (MDA content and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity. Tanshinone IIA inhibited cardiomyocytes apoptosis as confirmed by the reduction of TUNEL positive cardiomyocytes and the down-regulation of Caspase-3 activity and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Meanwhile, plasma apelin level increased with down-regulation of APJ receptor. Tanshinone IIA suppressed cardiac fibrosis through regulating the paracrine factors released by cardiomyocytes and the TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway activity. In conclusion, our in vivo study showed that tanshinone IIA could improve heart function by enhancing myocardial contractility, inhibiting ECM

  13. The complex regulation of tanshinone IIA in rats with hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hui; Han, Bing; Yu, Tao; Peng, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA has definite protective effects on various cardiovascular diseases. However, in hypertension-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (H-LVH), the signaling pathways of tanshinone IIA in inhibition of remodeling and cardiac dysfunction remain unclear. Two-kidney, one-clip induced hypertensive rats (n = 32) were randomized to receive tanshinone IIA (5, 10, 15 mg/kg per day) or 5% glucose injection (GS). Sham-operated rats (n = 8) received 5%GS as control. Cardiac function and dimensions were assessed by using an echocardiography system. Histological determination of the fibrosis and apoptosis was performed using hematoxylin eosin, Masson's trichrome and TUNEL staining. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases type 2 (TIMP2) protein expressions in rat myocardial tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Rat cardiomyocytes were isolated by a Langendorff perfusion method. After 48 h culture, the supernatant and cardiomyocytes were collected to determine the potential related proteins impact on cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis. Compared with the sham rats, the heart tissues of H-LVH (5%GS) group suffered severely from the oxidative damage, apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In the H-LVH group, tanshinone IIA treated decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) content and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Tanshinone IIA inhibited cardiomyocytes apoptosis as confirmed by the reduction of TUNEL positive cardiomyocytes and the down-regulation of Caspase-3 activity and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Meanwhile, plasma apelin level increased with down-regulation of APJ receptor. Tanshinone IIA suppressed cardiac fibrosis through regulating the paracrine factors released by cardiomyocytes and the TGF-β/Smads signaling pathway activity. In conclusion, our in vivo study showed that tanshinone IIA could improve heart function by enhancing myocardial contractility, inhibiting ECM deposition

  14. E2F-HDAC complexes negatively regulate the tumor suppressor gene ARHI in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Z; Luo, R Z; Peng, H;

    2006-01-01

    to the P2 region of the ARHI promoter and regulate its activity. Sequence analysis and oligonucleotide competition in electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified an A2 fragment containing an E2F-binding site. Using specific antibodies in supershift assays, we have shown that anti-E2F1 and 4 antibodies...... and increased E2F DNA-binding activity. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that both E2F1 and 4 bind to the ARHI promoter in breast cancer cells in vivo. This binding was reduced when the cells were treated with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor--trichostatin A (TSA). When SKBr3...

  15. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation sites and docking domain on the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr cooperatively regulate ERK2-Tpr interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomastek, Tomás; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Burack, W Richard; Tiwari, Divya; Kumar, Devanand; Parsons, J Thomas; Weber, Michael J; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2008-11-01

    Identifying direct substrates of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and understanding how those substrates are selected is central to understanding how these ubiquitously activated enzymes generate diverse biological responses. In previous work, we identified several new candidate substrates for the MAPK ERK2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2), including the nuclear pore complex protein Tpr (translocated promoter region). In this report, we identify sites on Tpr for ERK2 phosphorylation and binding and demonstrate their functional interaction. ERK2 phosphorylation and dimerization are necessary for ERK2-Tpr binding, and this occurs through a DEF (docking site for ERK2, FXF) domain on Tpr. Surprisingly, the DEF domain and the phosphorylation sites displayed positive cooperativity to promote ERK2 binding to Tpr, in contrast to substrates where phosphorylation reduces binding. Ectopic expression or depletion of Tpr resulted in decreased movement of activated ERK2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, implying a role for Tpr in ERK2 translocation. Collectively, the data provide direct evidence that a component of the nuclear pore complex is a bona fide substrate of ERK2 in vivo and that activated ERK2 stably associates with this substrate after phosphorylation, where it could play a continuing role in nuclear pore function. We propose that Tpr is both a substrate and a scaffold for activated ERKs.

  16. Mitotic Phosphorylation of TREX1 C Terminus Disrupts TREX1 Regulation of the Oligosaccharyltransferase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucej, Martin; Fermaintt, Charles S; Yang, Kun; Irizarry-Caro, Ricardo A; Yan, Nan

    2017-03-14

    TREX1 mutations are associated with several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The N-terminal DNase domain of TREX1 is important for preventing self-DNA from activating the interferon response. The C terminus of TREX1 is required for ER localization and regulation of oligosacchariyltransferase (OST) activity. Here, we show that during mitosis TREX1 is predominately phosphorylated at the C-terminal Serine-261 by Cyclin B/CDK1. TREX1 is dephosphorylated quickly at mitotic exit, likely by PP1/PP2-type serine/threonine phosphatase. Mitotic phosphorylation does not affect TREX1 DNase activity. Phosphomimetic mutations of mitotic phosphorylation sites in TREX1 disrupted the interaction with the OST subunit RPN1. RNA-seq analysis of Trex1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts expressing TREX1 wild-type or phosphor-mutants revealed a glycol-gene signature that is elevated when TREX1 mitotic phosphorylation sites are disrupted. Thus, the cell-cycle-dependent post-translation modification of TREX1 regulates its interaction with OST, which may have important implications for immune disease associated with the DNase-independent function of TREX1.

  17. The complex regulation of HIC (Human I-mfa domain containing protein) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Sklan, Ella; Levitzki, Alexander; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2009-07-07

    Human I-mfa domain containing protein (HIC) differentially regulates transcription from viral promoters. HIC affects the Wnt pathway, the JNK/SAPK pathway and the activity of positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb). Studies exploring HIC function in mammalian cells used ectopically expressed HIC due to undetected endogenous HIC protein. HIC mRNA contains exceptionally long 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) compared to the average length of mRNA UTRs. Here we show that HIC protein is subject to strict repression at multiple levels. The HIC mRNA UTRs reduce the expression of HIC or of a reporter protein: The HIC 3'-UTR decreases both HIC and reporter mRNA levels, whereas upstream open reading frames located in the 5'-UTR repress the translation of HIC or of the reporter protein. In addition, ectopically expressed HIC protein is degraded by the proteasome, with a half-life of approximately 1 h, suggesting that upon activation, HIC expression in cells may be transient. The strict regulation of HIC expression at the levels of mRNA stability, translation efficiency and protein stability suggests that expression of the HIC protein and its involvement in the various pathways is required only under specific cellular conditions.

  18. The complex regulation of HIC (Human I-mfa domain containing protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Reiss-Sklan

    Full Text Available Human I-mfa domain containing protein (HIC differentially regulates transcription from viral promoters. HIC affects the Wnt pathway, the JNK/SAPK pathway and the activity of positive transcription elongation factor-b (P-TEFb. Studies exploring HIC function in mammalian cells used ectopically expressed HIC due to undetected endogenous HIC protein. HIC mRNA contains exceptionally long 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs compared to the average length of mRNA UTRs. Here we show that HIC protein is subject to strict repression at multiple levels. The HIC mRNA UTRs reduce the expression of HIC or of a reporter protein: The HIC 3'-UTR decreases both HIC and reporter mRNA levels, whereas upstream open reading frames located in the 5'-UTR repress the translation of HIC or of the reporter protein. In addition, ectopically expressed HIC protein is degraded by the proteasome, with a half-life of approximately 1 h, suggesting that upon activation, HIC expression in cells may be transient. The strict regulation of HIC expression at the levels of mRNA stability, translation efficiency and protein stability suggests that expression of the HIC protein and its involvement in the various pathways is required only under specific cellular conditions.

  19. Interaction of PACAP with Sonic hedgehog reveals complex regulation of the hedgehog pathway by PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Pawel; Zhujiang, Annie; Youssef, Mary; Waschek, James A

    2013-11-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for proliferation of cerebellar granule cell progenitors (cGCPs) and its aberrant activation causes a cerebellar cancer medulloblastoma. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits Shh-driven proliferation of cGCPs and acts as tumor suppressor in murine medulloblastoma. We show that PACAP blocks canonical Shh signaling by a mechanism that involves activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibition of the translocation of the Shh-dependent transcription factor Gli2 into the primary cilium. PKA is shown to play an essential role in inhibiting gene transcription in the absence of Shh, but global PKA activity levels are found to be a poor predictor of the degree of Shh pathway activation. We propose that the core Shh pathway regulates a small compartmentalized pool of PKA in the vicinity of primary cilia. GPCRs that affect global PKA activity levels, such as the PACAP receptor, cooperate with the canonical Shh signal to regulate Gli protein phosphorylation by PKA. This interaction serves to fine-tune the transcriptional and physiological function of the Shh pathway.

  20. The complex logic of stringent response regulation in Caulobacter crescentus: starvation signalling in an oligotrophic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutte, Cara C; Crosson, Sean

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria rapidly adapt to nutritional changes via the stringent response, which entails starvation-induced synthesis of the small molecule, ppGpp, by RelA/SpoT homologue (Rsh) enzymes. Binding of ppGpp to RNA polymerase modulates the transcription of hundreds of genes and remodels the physiology of the cell. Studies of the stringent response have primarily focused on copiotrophic bacteria such as Escherichia coli; little is known about how stringent signalling is regulated in species that live in consistently nutrient-limited (i.e. oligotrophic) environments. Here we define the input logic and transcriptional output of the stringent response in the oligotroph, Caulobacter crescentus. The sole Rsh protein, SpoT(CC), binds to and is regulated by the ribosome, and exhibits AND-type control logic in which amino acid starvation is a necessary but insufficient signal for activation of ppGpp synthesis. While both glucose and ammonium starvation upregulate the synthesis of ppGpp, SpoT(CC) detects these starvation signals by two independent mechanisms. Although the logic of stringent response control in C. crescentus differs from E. coli, the global transcriptional effects of elevated ppGpp are similar, with the exception of 16S rRNA transcription, which is controlled independently of spoT(CC). This study highlights how the regulatory logic controlling the stringent response may be adapted to the nutritional niche of a bacterial species.

  1. MICU2, a paralog of MICU1, resides within the mitochondrial uniporter complex to regulate calcium handling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Plovanich

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial calcium uptake is present in nearly all vertebrate tissues and is believed to be critical in shaping calcium signaling, regulating ATP synthesis and controlling cell death. Calcium uptake occurs through a channel called the uniporter that resides in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recently, we used comparative genomics to identify MICU1 and MCU as the key regulatory and putative pore-forming subunits of this channel, respectively. Using bioinformatics, we now report that the human genome encodes two additional paralogs of MICU1, which we call MICU2 and MICU3, each of which likely arose by gene duplication and exhibits distinct patterns of organ expression. We demonstrate that MICU1 and MICU2 are expressed in HeLa and HEK293T cells, and provide multiple lines of biochemical evidence that MCU, MICU1 and MICU2 reside within a complex and cross-stabilize each other's protein expression in a cell-type dependent manner. Using in vivo RNAi technology to silence MICU1, MICU2 or both proteins in mouse liver, we observe an additive impairment in calcium handling without adversely impacting mitochondrial respiration or membrane potential. The results identify MICU2 as a new component of the uniporter complex that may contribute to the tissue-specific regulation of this channel.

  2. let-7 Modulates Chromatin Configuration and Target Gene Repression through Regulation of the ARID3B Complex

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    Tsai-Tsen Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Let-7 is crucial for both stem cell differentiation and tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a chromatin-dependent mechanism of let-7 in regulating target gene expression in cancer cells. Let-7 directly represses the expression of AT-rich interacting domain 3B (ARID3B, ARID3A, and importin-9. In the absence of let-7, importin-9 facilitates the nuclear import of ARID3A, which then forms a complex with ARID3B. The nuclear ARID3B complex recruits histone demethylase 4C to reduce histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation and promotes the transcription of stemness factors. Functionally, expression of ARID3B is critical for the tumor initiation in let-7-depleted cancer cells. An inverse association between let-7 and ARID3A/ARID3B and prognostic significance is demonstrated in head and neck cancer patients. These results highlight a chromatin-dependent mechanism where let-7 regulates cancer stemness through ARID3B.

  3. Coordinated regulation of the ESCRT-III component CHMP4C by the chromosomal passenger complex and centralspindlin during cytokinesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capalbo, Luisa; Mela, Ioanna; Abad, Maria Alba; Jeyaprakash, A. Arockia; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC)—composed of Aurora B kinase, Borealin, Survivin and INCENP—surveys the fidelity of genome segregation throughout cell division. The CPC has been proposed to prevent polyploidy by controlling the final separation (known as abscission) of the two daughter cells via regulation of the ESCRT-III CHMP4C component. The molecular details are, however, still unclear. Using atomic force microscopy, we show that CHMP4C binds to and remodels membranes in vitro. Borealin prevents the association of CHMP4C with membranes, whereas Aurora B interferes with CHMP4C's membrane remodelling activity. Moreover, we show that CHMP4C phosphorylation is not required for its assembly into spiral filaments at the abscission site and that two distinctly localized pools of phosphorylated CHMP4C exist during cytokinesis. We also characterized the CHMP4C interactome in telophase cells and show that the centralspindlin complex associates preferentially with unphosphorylated CHMP4C in cytokinesis. Our findings indicate that gradual dephosphorylation of CHMP4C triggers a ‘relay’ mechanism between the CPC and centralspindlin that regulates the timely distribution and activation of CHMP4C for the execution of abscission. PMID:27784789

  4. Polycomb protein SCML2 regulates the cell cycle by binding and modulating CDK/CYCLIN/p21 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rojas, Luis Alejandro; Bonasio, Roberto; Johnston, Andrew; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Reinberg, Danny

    2013-12-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors of genes involved in development and differentiation, and also maintain repression of key genes involved in the cell cycle, indirectly regulating cell proliferation. The human SCML2 gene, a mammalian homologue of the Drosophila PcG protein SCM, encodes two protein isoforms: SCML2A that is bound to chromatin and SCML2B that is predominantly nucleoplasmic. Here, we purified SCML2B and found that it forms a stable complex with CDK/CYCLIN/p21 and p27, enhancing the inhibitory effect of p21/p27. SCML2B participates in the G1/S checkpoint by stabilizing p21 and favoring its interaction with CDK2/CYCE, resulting in decreased kinase activity and inhibited progression through G1. In turn, CDK/CYCLIN complexes phosphorylate SCML2, and the interaction of SCML2B with CDK2 is regulated through the cell cycle. These findings highlight a direct crosstalk between the Polycomb system of cellular memory and the cell-cycle machinery in mammals.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 signaling pathway regulates transient receptor potential cation channel 6 in podocytes.

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    Fangrui Ding

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential cation channel 6 (TRPC6 is a nonselective cation channel, and abnormal expression and gain of function of TRPC6 are involved in the pathogenesis of hereditary and nonhereditary forms of renal disease. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying these diseases remain poorly understood, recent investigations revealed that many signaling pathways are involved in regulating TRPC6. We aimed to examine the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex (mTOR complex 1 [mTORC1] or mTOR complex 2 [mTORC2] signaling pathways on TRPC6 in podocytes, which are highly terminally differentiated renal epithelial cells that are critically required for the maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. We applied both pharmacological inhibitors of mTOR and specific siRNAs against mTOR components to explore which mTOR signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of TRPC6 in podocytes. The podocytes were exposed to rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, and ku0063794, a dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2. In addition, specific siRNA-mediated knockdown of the mTORC1 component raptor and the mTORC2 component rictor was employed. The TRPC6 mRNA and protein expression levels were examined via real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, respectively. Additionally, fluorescence calcium imaging was performed to evaluate the function of TRPC6 in podocytes. Rapamycin displayed no effect on the TRPC6 mRNA or protein expression levels or TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. However, ku0063794 down-regulated the TRPC6 mRNA and protein levels and suppressed TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. Furthermore, knockdown of raptor did not affect TRPC6 expression or function, whereas rictor knockdown suppressed TRPC6 protein expression and TRPC6-dependent calcium influx in podocytes. These findings indicate that the mTORC2 signaling pathway regulates TRPC6 in podocytes but that the mTORC1 signaling pathway does not appear

  6. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex.

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    Diana P Wehrendt

    Full Text Available It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4 had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF, an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface.

  7. α-1 Antitrypsin regulates human neutrophil chemotaxis induced by soluble immune complexes and IL-8.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary deficiency of the protein α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) causes a chronic lung disease in humans that is characterized by excessive mobilization of neutrophils into the lung. However, the reason for the increased neutrophil burden has not been fully elucidated. In this study we have demonstrated using human neutrophils that serum AAT coordinates both CXCR1- and soluble immune complex (sIC) receptor-mediated chemotaxis by divergent pathways. We demonstrated that glycosylated AAT can bind to IL-8 (a ligand for CXCR1) and that AAT-IL-8 complex formation prevented IL-8 interaction with CXCR1. Second, AAT modulated neutrophil chemotaxis in response to sIC by controlling membrane expression of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) Fc receptor FcγRIIIb. This process was mediated through inhibition of ADAM-17 enzymatic activity. Neutrophils isolated from clinically stable AAT-deficient patients were characterized by low membrane expression of FcγRIIIb and increased chemotaxis in response to IL-8 and sIC. Treatment of AAT-deficient individuals with AAT augmentation therapy resulted in increased AAT binding to IL-8, increased AAT binding to the neutrophil membrane, decreased FcγRIIIb release from the neutrophil membrane, and normalization of chemotaxis. These results provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the effect of AAT augmentation therapy in the pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency.

  8. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

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    Anne-Cécile eBoulay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction protein Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30 allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ, we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (SG, a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-Sarcoglycan, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions.

  9. Bunched and Madm Function Downstream of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex to Regulate the Growth of Intestinal Stem Cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yingchao; Li, Qi; Amcheslavsky, Alla; Duhart, Juan Carlos; Veraksa, Alexey; Stocker, Hugo; Raftery, Laurel A; Ip, Y Tony

    2015-12-01

    The Drosophila adult midgut contains intestinal stem cells that support homeostasis and repair. We show here that the leucine zipper protein Bunched and the adaptor protein Madm are novel regulators of intestinal stem cells. MARCM mutant clonal analysis and cell type specific RNAi revealed that Bunched and Madm were required within intestinal stem cells for proliferation. Transgenic expression of a tagged Bunched showed a cytoplasmic localization in midgut precursors, and the addition of a nuclear localization signal to Bunched reduced its function to cooperate with Madm to increase intestinal stem cell proliferation. Furthermore, the elevated cell growth and 4EBP phosphorylation phenotypes induced by loss of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex or overexpression of Rheb were suppressed by the loss of Bunched or Madm. Therefore, while the mammalian homolog of Bunched, TSC-22, is able to regulate transcription and suppress cancer cell proliferation, our data suggest the model that Bunched and Madm functionally interact with the TOR pathway in the cytoplasm to regulate the growth and subsequent division of intestinal stem cells.

  10. JFK, a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, links the SCF complex to p53 regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenqian; Yu, Wenhua; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Xiaohan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifang; Yao, Xingrong; Yi, Xia; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-06-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Currently, several ubiquitin ligases, including the single-subunit RING-finger types--MDM2, Pirh2, and COP1--and the HECT-domain type--ARF-BP1--have been reported to target p53 for degradation. Here, we report the identification of a human Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, JFK. We showed that JFK promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53. But unlike MDM2, Pirh2, COP1, and ARF-BP1, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assembly of a Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex. Significantly, JFK inhibits p53-dependent transcription, and depletion of JFK stabilizes p53, promotes cell apoptosis, arrests cells in the G(1) phase, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation-induced cell death. These data indicate that JFK is a critical negative regulator of p53 and represents a pathway for the maintenance of p53 levels in unstressed cells. Our experiments link the Skp1-Cul1-F-box system to p53 regulation.

  11. An integrated RNA-Seq and network study reveals a complex regulation process of rice embryo during seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; He, Zilong; Tan, XinYu; Liu, Xue; Yuan, Xiao; Luo, Yingfeng; Hu, Songnian

    2015-08-14

    Seed germination is a crucial stage for plant development and agricultural production. To investigate its complex regulation process, the RNA-Seq study of rice embryo was conducted at three time points of 0, 12 and 48 h post imbibition (HPI). Dynamic transcriptional alterations were observed, especially in the early stage (0-12 HPI). Seed related genes, especially those encoding desiccation inducible proteins and storage reserves in embryo, decreased drastically after imbibition. The expression profiles of phytohormone related genes indicated distinct roles of abscisic acid (ABA), gibberellin (GA) and brassinosteroid (BR) in germination. Moreover, network analysis revealed the importance of protein phosphorylation in phytohormone interactions. Network and gene ontology (GO) analyses suggested that transcription factors (TFs) played a regulatory role in functional transitions during germination, and the enriched TF families at 0 HPI implied a regulation of epigenetic modification in dry seeds. In addition, 35 germination-specific TF genes in embryo were identified and seven genes were verified by qRT-PCR. Besides, enriched TF binding sites (TFBSs) supported physiological changes in germination. Overall, this study expands our comprehensive knowledge of multiple regulation factors underlying rice seed germination.

  12. Chemical biology tools for regulating RAS signaling complexity in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hattum, Hilde; Waldmann, Herbert

    2014-09-18

    Rat sarcoma (RAS) family members are small GTPases that control a number of signaling pathways important for normal cellular proliferation. Therefore, it is no surprise that a significant portion of human tumors express constitutively active mutated RAS proteins, which leads to deregulation of RAS signaling pathways, resulting in pathological perturbations of cell growth and death. Although the molecular details of RAS signaling cascades are well understood, there is still a largely unmet need for small molecule probes to control RAS signaling in space and time. More broadly, given the prevalence of mutated RAS in cancer, the need to translate the insights obtained from using small molecule probes into clinically useful drugs is also significant. In this review, we introduce RAS proteins and the signaling pathways they are involved in, and discuss some of the innovative chemical biology approaches to regulate RAS signaling, which include the exploitation of newly identified binding pockets, covalent inhibitors for mutated RAS, and RAS localization impairment.

  13. The AMPK enzyme-complex: From the regulation of cellular energy homeostasis to a possible new molecular target in the management of chronic inflammatory disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonioli, Luca; Colucci, Rocchina; Pellegrini, Carolina; Giustarini, Giulio; Sacco, Deborah; Tirotta, Erika; Caputi, Valentina; Marsilio, Ilaria; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Németh, Zoltán H; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), known as an enzymatic complex that regulates the energetic metabolism, is emerging as a pivotal enzyme and enzymatic pathway involved in the regulation of immune homeostatic networks. It is also involved in the molecular mechanis

  14. Members of the Penicillium chrysogenum velvet complex play functionally opposing roles in the regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and conidiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopke, Katarina; Hoff, Birgit; Bloemendal, Sandra; Katschorowski, Alexandra; Kamerewerd, Jens; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    A velvet multisubunit complex was recently detected in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, the major industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. Core components of this complex are P. chrysogenum VelA (PcVelA) and PcLaeA, which regulate secondary metabolite production, hyphal morphology, conidiation, and pellet formation. Here we describe the characterization of PcVelB, PcVelC, and PcVosA as novel subunits of this velvet complex. Using yeast two-hybrid analysis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), we demonstrate that all velvet proteins are part of an interaction network. Functional analyses using single- and double-knockout strains clearly indicate that velvet subunits have opposing roles in the regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and light-dependent conidiation. PcVelC, together with PcVelA and PcLaeA, activates penicillin biosynthesis, while PcVelB represses this process. In contrast, PcVelB and PcVosA promote conidiation, while PcVelC has an inhibitory effect. Our genetic analyses further show that light-dependent spore formation depends not only on PcVelA but also on PcVelB and PcVosA. The results provided here contribute to our fundamental understanding of the function of velvet subunits as part of a regulatory network mediating signals responsible for morphology and secondary metabolism and will be instrumental in generating mutants with newly derived properties that are relevant to strain improvement programs.

  15. How to regulate nonbiological complex drugs (NBCD) and their follow-on versions: points to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Huub; Stegemann, Sven; Weinstein, Vera; de Vlieger, Jon S B; Flühmann, Beat; Mühlebach, Stefan; Gaspar, Rogério; Shah, Vinod P; Crommelin, Daan J A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this critical review is to reach a global consensus regarding the introduction of follow-on versions of nonbiological complex drugs (NBCD). A nonbiological complex drug is a medicinal product, not being a biological medicine, where the active substance is not a homo-molecular structure, but consists of different (closely related and often nanoparticulate) structures that cannot be isolated and fully quantitated, characterized and/or described by state of the art physicochemical analytical means and where the clinical meaning of the differences is not known. The composition, quality and in vivo performance of NBCD are highly dependent on manufacturing processes of both the active ingredient as well as in most cases the formulation. The challenges posed by the development of follow-on versions of NBCD are illustrated in this paper by discussing the 'families' of liposomes, iron-carbohydrate ('iron-sugar') drugs and glatiramoids. It is proposed that the same principles for the marketing authorization of copies of NBCD as for biosimilars be used: the need for animal and/or clinical data and the need to show similarity in quality, safety and efficacy. The regulatory approach of NBCD will have to take into consideration the specific characteristics of the drugs, their formulation and manufacturing process and the resulting critical attributes to achieve their desired quality, safety and efficacy. As with the biosimilars, for the NBCD product, family-specific methods should be evaluated and applied where scientifically proven, including sophisticated quality methods, pharmacodynamic markers and animal models. Concerning substitution and interchangeability of NBCD, it is also advisable to take biosimilars as an example, i.e. (1) substitution without the involvement of a healthcare professional should be discouraged to ensure traceability of the treatment of individual patients, (2) keep an individual patient on a specific treatment if the patient is doing well

  16. SLAC, a complex between Sla1 and Las17, regulates actin polymerization during clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Daniel; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2012-11-01

    During clathrin-mediated endocytosis, branched actin polymerization nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex provides force needed to drive vesicle internalization. Las17 (yeast WASp) is the strongest activator of the Arp2/3 complex in yeast cells; it is not autoinhibited and arrives to endocytic sites 20 s before actin polymerization begins. It is unclear how Las17 is kept inactive for 20 s at endocytic sites, thus restricting actin polymerization to late stages of endocytosis. In this paper, we demonstrate that Las17 is part of a large and biochemically stable complex with Sla1, a clathrin adaptor that inhibits Las17 activity. The interaction is direct, multivalent, and strong, and was mapped to novel Las17 polyproline motifs that are simultaneously class I and class II. In vitro pyrene-actin polymerization assays established that Sla1 inhibition of Las17 activity depends on the class I/II Las17 polyproline motifs and is based on competition between Sla1 and monomeric actin for binding to Las17. Furthermore, live-cell imaging showed the interaction with Sla1 is important for normal Las17 recruitment to endocytic sites, inhibition during the initial 20 s, and efficient endocytosis. These results advance our understanding of the regulation of actin polymerization in endocytosis.

  17. Resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity involving extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and ternary complex factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rössler, Oliver G.; Glatzel, Daniel; Thiel, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.thiel@uks.eu

    2015-03-01

    Many intracellular functions have been attributed to resveratrol, a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in grapes and in other plants. Here, we show that resveratrol induces the expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 in human embryonic kidney cells. Using a chromosomally embedded Egr-1-responsive reporter gene, we show that the Egr-1 activity was significantly elevated in resveratrol-treated cells, indicating that the newly synthesized Egr-1 protein was biologically active. Stimulus-transcription coupling leading to the resveratrol-induced upregulation of Egr-1 expression and activity requires the protein kinases Raf and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK, while MAP kinase phosphatase-1 functions as a nuclear shut-off device that interrupts the signaling cascade connecting resveratrol stimulation with enhanced Egr-1 expression. On the transcriptional level, Elk-1, a key transcriptional regulator of serum response element-driven gene transcription, connects the intracellular signaling cascade elicited by resveratrol with transcription of the Egr-1 gene. These data were corroborated by the observation that stimulation of the cells with resveratrol increased the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. The SRE as well as the GC-rich DNA binding site of Egr-1 function as resveratrol-responsive elements. Thus, resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of the stimulus-regulated protein kinases Raf and ERK and the stimulus-responsive transcription factors TCF and Egr-1. - Highlights: • The plant polyphenol resveratrol upregulates Egr-1 expression and activity. • The stimulation of Egr-1 requires the protein kinases ERK and Raf. • Resveratrol treatment upregulates the transcriptional activation potential of Elk-1. • Resveratrol-induced stimulation of Egr-1 requires ternary complex factors. • Two distinct resveratrol-responsive elements were identified.

  18. Phosphorylation of the Synaptonemal Complex Protein Zip1 Regulates the Crossover/Noncrossover Decision during Yeast Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Suhandynata, Ray T; Sandhu, Rima; Rockmill, Beth; Mohibullah, Neeman; Niu, Hengyao; Liang, Jason; Lo, Hsiao-Chi; Miller, Danny E; Zhou, Huilin; Börner, G Valentin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2015-12-01

    Interhomolog crossovers promote proper chromosome segregation during meiosis and are formed by the regulated repair of programmed double-strand breaks. This regulation requires components of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a proteinaceous structure formed between homologous chromosomes. In yeast, SC formation requires the "ZMM" genes, which encode a functionally diverse set of proteins, including the transverse filament protein, Zip1. In wild-type meiosis, Zmm proteins promote the biased resolution of recombination intermediates into crossovers that are distributed throughout the genome by interference. In contrast, noncrossovers are formed primarily through synthesis-dependent strand annealing mediated by the Sgs1 helicase. This work identifies a conserved region on the C terminus of Zip1 (called Zip1 4S), whose phosphorylation is required for the ZMM pathway of crossover formation. Zip1 4S phosphorylation is promoted both by double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the meiosis-specific kinase, MEK1/MRE4, demonstrating a role for MEK1 in the regulation of interhomolog crossover formation, as well as interhomolog bias. Failure to phosphorylate Zip1 4S results in meiotic prophase arrest, specifically in the absence of SGS1. This gain of function meiotic arrest phenotype is suppressed by spo11Δ, suggesting that it is due to unrepaired breaks triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. Epistasis experiments combining deletions of individual ZMM genes with sgs1-md zip1-4A indicate that Zip1 4S phosphorylation functions prior to the other ZMMs. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Zip1 at DSBs commits those breaks to repair via the ZMM pathway and provides a mechanism by which the crossover/noncrossover decision can be dynamically regulated during yeast meiosis.

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Heon [Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa Kyoung [Department of Anatomy, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik, E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  20. Subcellular localization of regulator of G protein signaling RGS7 complex in neurons and transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Evangelos; Sandiford, Simone; Wang, Qiang; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Motti, Dario; Levay, Konstantin; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2012-08-01

    The R7 family of regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) is involved in many functions of the nervous system. This family includes RGS6, RGS7, RGS9, and RGS11 gene products and is defined by the presence of the characteristic first found in Disheveled, Egl-10, Pleckstrin (DEP), DEP helical extension (DHEX), Gγ-like, and RGS domains. Herein, we examined the subcellular localization of RGS7, the most broadly expressed R7 member. Our immunofluorescence studies of retinal and dorsal root ganglion neurons showed that RGS7 concentrated at the plasma membrane of cell bodies, in structures resembling lamellipodia or filopodia along the processes, and at the dendritic tips. At the plasma membrane of dorsal root ganglia neurons, RGS7 co-localized with its known binding partners R7 RGS binding protein (R7BP), Gαo, and Gαq. More than 50% of total RGS7-specific immunofluorescence was present in the cytoplasm, primarily within numerous small puncta that did not co-localize with R7BP. No specific RGS7 or R7BP immunoreactivity was detected in the nuclei. In transfected cell lines, ectopic RGS7 had both diffuse cytosolic and punctate localization patterns. RGS7 also localized in centrosomes. Structure-function analysis showed that the punctate localization was mediated by the DEP/DHEX domains, and centrosomal localization was dependent on the DHEX domain.

  1. A complex thiolate switch regulates the Bacillus subtilis organic peroxide sensor OhrR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Won; Soonsanga, Sumarin; Helmann, John D

    2007-05-22

    Oxidation of protein thiolates is central to numerous redox-regulated processes. Bacillus subtilis OhrR is an organic peroxide sensor that represses expression of an inducible peroxiredoxin, OhrA. Here, we present evidence that oxidation of the sole cysteine residue in OhrR leads to a sulfenic acid-containing intermediate that retains DNA-binding activity: further reaction to generate either a mixed disulfide (S-thiolation) or a protein sulfenamide (sulfenyl-amide) derivative is essential for derepression. Protein S-thiolation protects OhrR from overoxidation and provides for a facile regeneration of active OhrR by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. The sulfenamide can also be reduced by thiol-disulfide exchange reactions, although this process is much slower than for mixed disulfides. Recovery of oxidized OhrR from B. subtilis identifies three distinct S-thiolated species, including mixed disulfides with a novel 398-Da thiol, cysteine, and CoASH. Evidence for in vivo formation of the sulfenamide derivative is also presented.

  2. Complexity in regulation of microRNA machinery components in invasive breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Young; Lee, Jae-ho; Kim, Bora; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Kang, Sun Hee; Kim, Shin

    2014-07-01

    Altered expression of microRNA (miRNA) machinery components may play an important role in breast cancer progression. The objective of the current study was to evaluate Drosha, the DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 8 (DGCR8), Dicer, and Argonaute 2 (AGO2) mRNA expression in invasive breast carcinoma (IBC) and to assess the value of clinical parameters on their expression. By using quantitative real-time PCR, we examined the expression of the four miRNA machinery components in 52 breast tumor tissues which are diagnosed as invasive ductal carcinoma and adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. In the present study, decreased mRNA expression levels of major miRNA machinery components were observed in IBC. The altered mRNA expression levels of DGCR8 and AGO2 are positively correlated with to each other. This study revealed for the first time that expression alterations of DGCR8 are significantly associated with estrogen receptor and Ki-67 status in IBC. Moreover, AGO2 mRNA expression level was significantly correlated with N stage. These results provided evidences that down-regulated the four miRNA machinery components may play an important role in breast pathobiology and that DGCR8 and AGO2 might be associated with important clinical factors.

  3. Regulation of Muscle Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in Insulin Resistance: Effects of Exercise and Dichloroacetate

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    Dumitru Constantin-Teodosiu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC controls the rate of carbohydrate oxidation, impairment of PDC activity mediated by high-fat intake has been advocated as a causative factor for the skeletal muscle insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D. There are also situations where muscle insulin resistance can occur independently from high-fat dietary intake such as sepsis, inflammation, or drug administration though they all may share the same underlying mechanism, i.e., via activation of forkhead box family of transcription factors, and to a lower extent via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. The main feature of T2D is a chronic elevation in blood glucose levels. Chronic systemic hyperglycaemia is toxic and can lead to cellular dysfunction that may become irreversible over time due to deterioration of the pericyte cell's ability to provide vascular stability and control to endothelial proliferation. Therefore, it may not be surprising that T2D's complications are mainly macrovascular and microvascular related, i.e., neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, coronary artery, and peripheral vascular diseases. However, life style intervention such as exercise, which is the most potent physiological activator of muscle PDC, along with pharmacological intervention such as administration of dichloroacetate or L-carnitine can prove to be viable strategies for treating muscle insulin resistance in obesity and T2D as they can potentially restore whole body glucose disposal.

  4. AP-2-complex-mediated endocytosis of Drosophila Crumbs regulates polarity by antagonizing Stardust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Huei; Currinn, Heather; Pocha, Shirin Meher; Rothnie, Alice; Wassmer, Thomas; Knust, Elisabeth

    2015-12-15

    Maintenance of epithelial polarity depends on the correct localization and levels of polarity determinants. The evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein Crumbs is crucial for the size and identity of the apical membrane, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the amount of Crumbs at the surface. Here, we show that Crumbs levels on the apical membrane depend on a well-balanced state of endocytosis and stabilization. The adaptor protein 2 (AP-2) complex binds to a motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Crumbs that overlaps with the binding site of Stardust, a protein known to stabilize Crumbs on the surface. Preventing endocytosis by mutation of AP-2 causes expansion of the Crumbs-positive plasma membrane domain and polarity defects, which can be partially rescued by removing one copy of crumbs. Strikingly, knocking down both AP-2 and Stardust leads to the retention of Crumbs on the membrane. This study provides evidence for a molecular mechanism, based on stabilization and endocytosis, to adjust surface levels of Crumbs, which are essential for maintaining epithelial polarity.

  5. The IFT-A complex regulates Shh signaling through cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Karel F; Ashe, Alyson; He, Mu; Satir, Peter; Moran, Jennifer; Beier, David; Wicking, Carol; Anderson, Kathryn V

    2012-06-11

    Two intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, build and maintain primary cilia and are required for activity of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway. A weak allele of the IFT-A gene, Ift144, caused subtle defects in cilia structure and ectopic activation of the Shh pathway. In contrast, strong loss of IFT-A, caused by either absence of Ift144 or mutations in two IFT-A genes, blocked normal ciliogenesis and decreased Shh signaling. In strong IFT-A mutants, the Shh pathway proteins Gli2, Sufu, and Kif7 localized correctly to cilia tips, suggesting that these pathway components were trafficked by IFT-B. In contrast, the membrane proteins Arl13b, ACIII, and Smo failed to localize to primary cilia in the absence of IFT-A. We propose that the increased Shh activity seen in partial loss-of-function IFT-A mutants may be a result of decreased ciliary ACIII and that the loss of Shh activity in the absence of IFT-A is a result of severe disruptions of cilia structure and membrane protein trafficking.

  6. The Fuzzy Logic of MicroRNA Regulation: A Key to Control Cell Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoli, Andrea; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Milena; Mercatanti, Alberto; Pitto, Letizia

    2010-08-01

    Genomic and clinical evidence suggest a major role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression, with a clear impact on development and physiology; miRNAs are a class of endogenous 22-25 nt single-stranded RNA molecules, that negatively regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, by imperfect base pairing with the 3' UTR of the corresponding mRNA target. Because of this imperfection, each miRNA can bind multiple targets, and multiple miRNAs can bind the same mRNA target; although digital, the miRNAs control mechanism is characterized by an imprecise action, naturally understandable in the theoretical framework of fuzzy logic.A major practical application of fuzzy logic is represented by the design and the realization of efficient and robust control systems, even when the processes to be controlled show chaotic, deterministic as well unpredictable, behaviours. The vagueness of miRNA action, when considered together with the controlled and chaotic gene expression, is a hint of a cellular fuzzy control system. As a demonstration of the possibility and the effectiveness of miRNA based fuzzy mechanism, a fuzzy cognitive map -a mathematical formalism combining neural network and fuzzy logic- has been developed to study the apoptosis/proliferation control performed by the miRNA-17-92 cluster/E2F1/cMYC circuitry.When experimentally demonstrated, the concept of fuzzy control could modify the way we analyse and model gene expression, with a possible impact on the way we imagine and design therapeutic intervention based on miRNA silencing.

  7. Role of the BAHD1 Chromatin-Repressive Complex in Placental Development and Regulation of Steroid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakisic, Goran; Wendling, Olivia; Libertini, Emanuele; Radford, Elizabeth J.; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Champy, Marie-France; Wattenhofer-Donzé, Marie; Soubigou, Guillaume; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Feunteun, Jean; Sorg, Tania; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    BAHD1 is a vertebrate protein that promotes heterochromatin formation and gene repression in association with several epigenetic regulators. However, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ablation of the Bahd1 gene results in hypocholesterolemia, hypoglycemia and decreased body fat in mice. It also causes placental growth restriction with a drop of trophoblast glycogen cells, a reduction of fetal weight and a high neonatal mortality rate. By intersecting transcriptome data from murine Bahd1 knockout (KO) placentas at stages E16.5 and E18.5 of gestation, Bahd1-KO embryonic fibroblasts, and human cells stably expressing BAHD1, we also show that changes in BAHD1 levels alter expression of steroid/lipid metabolism genes. Biochemical analysis of the BAHD1-associated multiprotein complex identifies MIER proteins as novel partners of BAHD1 and suggests that BAHD1-MIER interaction forms a hub for histone deacetylases and methyltransferases, chromatin readers and transcription factors. We further show that overexpression of BAHD1 leads to an increase of MIER1 enrichment on the inactive X chromosome (Xi). In addition, BAHD1 and MIER1/3 repress expression of the steroid hormone receptor genes ESR1 and PGR, both playing important roles in placental development and energy metabolism. Moreover, modulation of BAHD1 expression in HEK293 cells triggers epigenetic changes at the ESR1 locus. Together, these results identify BAHD1 as a core component of a chromatin-repressive complex regulating placental morphogenesis and body fat storage and suggest that its dysfunction may contribute to several human diseases. PMID:26938916

  8. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  9. The structure of a DnaA/HobA complex from Helicobacter pylori provides insight into regulation of DNA replication in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Natrajan, Ganesh; Noirot-Gros, Marie Francoise; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Kapp, Ulrike; Terradot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial DNA replication requires DnaA, an AAA+ ATPase that initiates replication at a specific chromosome region, oriC, and is regulated by species-specific regulators that directly bind DnaA. HobA is a DnaA binding protein, recently identified as an essential regulator of DNA replication in Helicobacter pylori. We report the crystal structure of HobA in complex with domains I and II of DnaA (DnaAI–II) from H. pylori, the first structure of DnaA bound to one of its regulators. Biochemical c...

  10. HOIL-1L interacting protein (HOIP as an NF-kappaB regulating component of the CD40 signaling complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce S Hostager

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR superfamily mediates signals critical for regulation of the immune system. One family member, CD40, is important for the efficient activation of antibody-producing B cells and other antigen-presenting cells. The molecules and mechanisms that mediate CD40 signaling are only partially characterized. Proteins known to interact with the cytoplasmic domain of CD40 include members of the TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF family, which regulate signaling and serve as links to other signaling molecules. To identify additional proteins important for CD40 signaling, we used a combined stimulation/immunoprecipitation procedure to isolate CD40 signaling complexes from B cells and characterized the associated proteins by mass spectrometry. In addition to known CD40-interacting proteins, we detected SMAC/DIABLO, HTRA2/Omi, and HOIP/RNF31/PAUL/ZIBRA. We found that these previously unknown CD40-interacting partners were recruited in a TRAF2-dependent manner. HOIP is a ubiquitin ligase capable of mediating NF-kappaB activation through the ubiquitin-dependent activation of IKKgamma. We found that a mutant HOIP molecule engineered to lack ubiquitin ligase activity inhibited the CD40-mediated activation of NF-kappaB. Together, our results demonstrate a powerful approach for the identification of signaling molecules associated with cell surface receptors and indicate an important role for the ubiquitin ligase activity of HOIP in proximal CD40 signaling.

  11. Arabidopsis TTG2 Regulates TRY Expression through Enhancement of Activator Complex-Triggered Activation[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Martina; Dartan, Burcu; Birkenbihl, Rainer; Somssich, Imre E.; Hülskamp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Trichome patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a regulatory feedback loop of the trichome promoting factors TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), GLABRA3 (GL3)/ENHANCER OF GL3 (EGL3), and GL1 and a group of homologous R3MYB proteins that act as their inhibitors. Together, they regulate the temporal and spatial expression of GL2 and TTG2, which are considered to control trichome cell differentiation. In this work, we show that TTG2 is a specific activator of TRY (but not CPC or GL2). The WRKY protein TTG2 binds to W-boxes in a minimal promoter fragment of TRY, and these W-boxes are essential for rescue of the try mutant phenotype. We further show that TTG2 alone is not able to activate TRY expression, but rather drastically enhances the activation by TTG1 and GL3. As TTG2 physically interacts with TTG1 and because TTG2 can associate with GL3 through its interaction with TTG1, we propose that TTG2 enhances the activity of TTG1 and GL3 by forming a protein complex. PMID:25304203

  12. Dynamics in enzymatic protein complexes offer a novel principle for the regulation of melatonin synthesis in the human pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronde, Erik; Saade, Anastasia; Ackermann, Katrin; Goubran-Botros, Hany; Pagan, Cecile; Bux, Roman; Bourgeron, Thomas; Dehghani, Faramarz; Stehle, Jörg H

    2011-08-01

    Time of day is communicated to the body through rhythmic cues, including pineal gland melatonin synthesis, which is restricted to nighttime. Whereas in most rodents transcriptional regulation of the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) gene is essential for rhythmic melatonin synthesis, investigations into nonrodent mammalian species have shown post-transcriptional regulation to be of central importance, with molecular mechanisms still elusive. Therefore, human pineal tissues, taken from routine autopsies were allocated to four time-of-death groups (night/dawn/day/dusk) and analyzed for daytime-dependent changes in phosphorylated AANAT (p31T-AANAT) and in acetyl-serotonin-methyltransferase (ASMT) expression and activity. Protein content, intracellular localization, and colocalization of p31T-AANAT and ASMT were assessed, using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation techniques. Fresh sheep pineal gland preparations were used for comparative purposes. The amount of p31T-AANAT and ASMT proteins as well as their intracellular localization showed no diurnal variation in autoptic human and fresh sheep pineal glands. Moreover, in human and sheep pineal extracts, AANAT could not be dephosphorylated, which was at variance to data derived from rat pineal extracts. P31T-AANAT and ASMT were often found to colocalize in cellular rod-like structures that were also partly immunoreactive for the pinealocyte process-specific marker S-antigen (arrestin) in both, human and sheep pinealocytes. Protein-protein interaction studies with p31T-AANAT, ASMT, and S-antigen demonstrated a direct association and formation of robust complexes, involving also 14-3-3. This work provides evidence for a regulation principle for AANAT activity in the human pineal gland, which may not be based on a p31T-AANAT phosphorylation/dephosphorylation switch, as described for other mammalian species.

  13. HuR-Regulated mRNAs Associated with Nuclear hnRNP A1-RNP Complexes

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    Apostolia Guialis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional regulatory networks are dependent on the interplay of many RNA-binding proteins having a major role in mRNA processing events in mammals. We have been interested in the concerted action of the two RNA-binding proteins hnRNP A1 and HuR, both stable components of immunoselected hnRNP complexes and having a major nuclear localization. Specifically, we present here the application of the RNA-immunoprecipitation (RIP-Chip technology to identify a population of nuclear transcripts associated with hnRNP A1-RNPs as isolated from the nuclear extract of either HuR WT or HuR-depleted (KO mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells. The outcome of this analysis was a list of target genes regulated via HuR for their association (either increased or reduced with the nuclear hnRNP A1-RNP complexes. Real time PCR analysis was applied to validate a selected number of nuclear mRNA transcripts, as well as to identify pre-spliced transcripts (in addition to their mature mRNA counterpart within the isolated nuclear hnRNP A1-RNPs. The differentially enriched mRNAs were found to belong to GO categories relevant to biological processes anticipated for hnRNP A1 and HuR (such as transport, transcription, translation, apoptosis and cell cycle indicating their concerted function in mRNA metabolism.

  14. The PAF complex and Prf1/Rtf1 delineate distinct Cdk9-dependent pathways regulating transcription elongation in fission yeast.

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    Jean Mbogning

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9 promotes elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII, mRNA processing, and co-transcriptional histone modification. Cdk9 phosphorylates multiple targets, including the conserved RNAPII elongation factor Spt5 and RNAPII itself, but how these different modifications mediate Cdk9 functions is not known. Here we describe two Cdk9-dependent pathways in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that involve distinct targets and elicit distinct biological outcomes. Phosphorylation of Spt5 by Cdk9 creates a direct binding site for Prf1/Rtf1, a transcription regulator with functional and physical links to the Polymerase Associated Factor (PAF complex. PAF association with chromatin is also dependent on Cdk9 but involves alternate phosphoacceptor targets. Prf1 and PAF are biochemically separate in cell extracts, and genetic analyses show that Prf1 and PAF are functionally distinct and exert opposing effects on the RNAPII elongation complex. We propose that this opposition constitutes a Cdk9 auto-regulatory mechanism, such that a positive effect on elongation, driven by the PAF pathway, is kept in check by a negative effect of Prf1/Rtf1 and downstream mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B. Thus, optimal RNAPII elongation may require balanced action of functionally distinct Cdk9 pathways.

  15. Cooperation of divalent ions and thiamin diphosphate in regulation of the function of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerniecki, J; Czygier, M

    2001-12-01

    The role of Mg2+, Ca2+, and Mn2+ in regulation of purified pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) containing endogenous thiamin diphosphate (TDP) was studied. It was found that the effects of the cations depended on the presence of exogenous TDP. In the absence of added TDP, the divalent cations led to a shortening of a lag phase of the PDC reaction and a strong reduction of the Km value for pyruvate. The relative efficiency of the three types of ions are presented as follows: Mn2+>Ca2+>Mg2+. The other sources claim that in the presence of exogenous TDP, which alone strongly increased the affinity of PDC for pyruvate, any significant additional effects of the cations were not observed. However, Mg2+, Ca2+, and Mn2+ decreased the Km value for CoA in both cases, the absence and presence of exogenous TDP, in approximately a similar extent (about twofold). The affinity of PDC for NAD+ seems to be not sensitive to the presence of the divalent cations. The data obtained suggest that Mg2+, Ca2+, and Mn2+ can cooperate with TDP as positive regulatory effectors of pig heart PDC on the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase and lipoamide acetyltransferase components of the complex.

  16. Ribosomal protein S3: a KH domain subunit in NF-kappaB complexes that mediates selective gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fengyi; Anderson, D Eric; Barnitz, Robert A; Snow, Andrew; Bidere, Nicolas; Zheng, Lixin; Hegde, Vijay; Lam, Lloyd T; Staudt, Louis M; Levens, David; Deutsch, Walter A; Lenardo, Michael J

    2007-11-30

    NF-kappaB is a DNA-binding protein complex that transduces a variety of activating signals from the cytoplasm to specific sets of target genes. To understand the preferential recruitment of NF-kappaB to specific gene regulatory sites, we used NF-kappaB p65 in a tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry proteomic screen. We identified ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3), a KH domain protein, as a non-Rel subunit of p65 homodimer and p65-p50 heterodimer DNA-binding complexes that synergistically enhances DNA binding. RPS3 knockdown impaired NF-kappaB-mediated transcription of selected p65 target genes but not nuclear shuttling or global protein translation. Rather, lymphocyte-activating stimuli caused nuclear translocation of RPS3, parallel to p65, to form part of NF-kappaB bound to specific regulatory sites in chromatin. Thus, RPS3 is an essential but previously unknown subunit of NF-kappaB involved in the regulation of key genes in rapid cellular activation responses. Our observations provide insight into how NF-kappaB selectively controls gene expression.

  17. Supported Lipid Bilayer Platform To Test Inhibitors of the Membrane Attack Complex: Insights into Biomacromolecular Assembly and Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorulmaz, Saziye; Jackman, Joshua A; Hunziker, Walter; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-11-01

    Complement activation plays an important role in innate immune defense by triggering formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), which is a biomacromolecular assembly that exhibits membrane-lytic activity against foreign invaders including various pathogens and biomaterials. Understanding the details of MAC structure and function has been the subject of extensive work involving bulk liposome and erythrocyte assays. However, it is difficult to characterize the mechanism of action of MAC inhibitor drug candidates using the conventional assays. To address this issue, we employ a biomimetic supported lipid bilayer platform to investigate how two MAC inhibitors, vitronectin and clusterin, interfere with MAC assembly in a sequential addition format, as monitored by the quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) technique. Two experimental strategies based on modular assembly were selected, precincubation of inhibitor and C5b-7 complex before addition to the lipid bilayer or initial addition of inhibitor followed by the C5b-7 complex. The findings indicate that vitronectin inhibits membrane association of C5b-7 via a direct interaction with C5b-7 and via competitive membrane association onto the supported lipid bilayer. On the other hand, clusterin directly interacts with C5b-7 such that C5b-7 is still able to bind to the lipid bilayer, and clusterin affects the subsequent binding of other complement proteins involved in the MAC assembly. Taken together, the findings in this study outline a biomimetic approach based on supported lipid bilayers to explore the interactions between complement proteins and inhibitors, thereby offering insight into MAC assembly and regulation.

  18. Mitochondrial complex II participates in normoxic and hypoxic regulation of α-keto acids in the murine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühling, Jörg; Tiefenbach, Martina; López-Barneo, José; Piruat, José I; García-Flores, Paula; Pfeil, Uwe; Gries, Barbara; Mühlfeld, Christian; Weigand, Markus A; Kummer, Wolfgang; Weissmann, Norbert; Paddenberg, Renate

    2010-12-01

    α-Keto acids (α-KAs) are not just metabolic intermediates but are also powerful modulators of different cellular pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis that α-KA concentrations are regulated by complex II (succinate dehydrogenase=SDH), which represents an intersection between the mitochondrial respiratory chain for which an important function in cardiopulmonary oxygen sensing has been demonstrated, and the Krebs cycle, a central element of α-KA metabolism. SDH subunit D heterozygous (SDHD(+/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice were housed at normoxia or hypoxia (10% O(2)) for 4 days or 3 weeks, and right ventricular pressure, right ventricle/(left ventricle+septum) ratio, cardiomyocyte ultrastructure, pulmonary vascular remodelling, ventricular complex II subunit expression, SDH activity and α-KA concentrations were analysed. In both strains, hypoxia induced increases in right ventricular pressure and enhanced muscularization of distal pulmonary arteries. Right ventricular hypertrophy was less severe in SDHD(+/-) mice although the cardiomyocyte ultrastructure and mitochondrial morphometric parameters were unchanged. Protein amounts of SDHA, SDHB and SDHC, and SDH activity were distinctly reduced in SDHD(+/-) mice. In normoxic SDHD(+/-) mice, α-ketoisocaproate concentration was lowered to 50% as compared to WT animals. Right/left ventricular concentration differences and the hypoxia-induced decline in individual α-KAs were less pronounced in SDHD(+/-) animals indicating that mitochondrial complex II participates in the adjustment of cardiac α-KA concentrations both under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. These characteristics are not related to the hemodynamic consequences of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodelling, since its extent and right ventricular pressure were not affected in SDHD(+/-) mice albeit right ventricular hypertrophy was attenuated.

  19. Alteration of light-dependent gene regulation by the absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex in the fungus Neurospora crassa.

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    Carmen Ruger-Herreros

    Full Text Available The activation of transcription by light in the fungus Neurospora crassa requires the White Collar Complex (WCC, a photoreceptor and transcription factor complex. After light reception two WCCs interact and bind the promoters of light-regulated genes to activate transcription. This process is regulated by VVD, a small photoreceptor that disrupts the interaction between WCCs and leads to a reduction in transcription after long exposures to light. The N. crassa RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex is the homolog of the Tup1-Ssn6 repressor complex in yeast, and its absence modifies photoadaptation. We show that the absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex leads to several alterations in transcription that are gene-specific: an increase in the accumulation of mRNAs in the dark, a repression of transcription, and a derepression of transcription after long exposures to light. The absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex leads to lower VVD levels that are available for the regulation of the activity of the WCC. The reduction in the amount of VVD results in increased WCC binding to the promoters of light-regulated genes in the dark and after long exposures to light, leading to the modification of photoadaptation that has been observed in rco-1 and rcm-1 mutants. Our results show that the photoadaptation phenotype of mutants in the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex is, at least in part, an indirect consequence of the reduction of vvd transcription, and the resulting modification in the regulation of transcription by the WCC.

  20. Regulation of human ornithine decarboxylase expression following prolonged quiescence: role for the c-Myc/Max protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, A; Wu, S; Hickok, N J; Soprano, D R; Soprano, K J

    1995-02-01

    WI-38 cells can remain quiescent for long periods of time and still be induced to reenter the cell cycle by the addition of fresh serum. However, the longer these cells remain growth arrested, the more time they require to enter S phase. This prolongation of the prereplicative phase has been localized to a point early in G1, after the induction of "immediate early" G1 genes such as c-fos and c-jun but before maximal expression of "early" G1 genes such as ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). Understanding the molecular basis for ODC mRNA induction can therefore provide information about the molecular events which regulate the progression of cells out of long-term quiescence into G1 and subsequently into DNA synthesis. Studies utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) of nuclear extracts from short- and long-term quiescent WI-38 cells identified a region of the human ODC promoter at -491 bp to -474 bp which exhibited a protein binding pattern that correlated with the temporal pattern of ODC mRNA expression. The presence of a CACGTG element within this fragment, studies with antibodies against c-Myc and Max, the use of purified recombinant c-Myc protein in the mobility shift assay, and antisense studies suggest that these proteins can specifically bind this portion of the human ODC promoter in a manner consistent with growth-associated modulation of the expression of ODC and other early G1 genes following prolonged quiescence. These studies suggest a role for the c-Myc/Max protein complex in regulating events involved in the progression of cells out of long-term quiescence into G1 and subsequently into S.

  1. Rab6 regulates both ZW10/RINT-1 and conserved oligomeric Golgi complex-dependent Golgi trafficking and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Shestakova, Anna; Hunt, Lauren; Sehgal, Siddharth; Lupashin, Vladimir; Storrie, Brian

    2007-10-01

    We used multiple approaches to investigate the role of Rab6 relative to Zeste White 10 (ZW10), a mitotic checkpoint protein implicated in Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) trafficking/transport, and conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex, a putative tether in retrograde, intra-Golgi trafficking. ZW10 depletion resulted in a central, disconnected cluster of Golgi elements and inhibition of ERGIC53 and Golgi enzyme recycling to ER. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) against RINT-1, a protein linker between ZW10 and the ER soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor, syntaxin 18, produced similar Golgi disruption. COG3 depletion fragmented the Golgi and produced vesicles; vesicle formation was unaffected by codepletion of ZW10 along with COG, suggesting ZW10 and COG act separately. Rab6 depletion did not significantly affect Golgi ribbon organization. Epistatic depletion of Rab6 inhibited the Golgi-disruptive effects of ZW10/RINT-1 siRNA or COG inactivation by siRNA or antibodies. Dominant-negative expression of guanosine diphosphate-Rab6 suppressed ZW10 knockdown induced-Golgi disruption. No cross-talk was observed between Rab6 and endosomal Rab5, and Rab6 depletion failed to suppress p115 (anterograde tether) knockdown-induced Golgi disruption. Dominant-negative expression of a C-terminal fragment of Bicaudal D, a linker between Rab6 and dynactin/dynein, suppressed ZW10, but not COG, knockdown-induced Golgi disruption. We conclude that Rab6 regulates distinct Golgi trafficking pathways involving two separate protein complexes: ZW10/RINT-1 and COG.

  2. Peroxiredoxin-6 Negatively Regulates Bactericidal Activity and NF-κB Activity by Interrupting TRAF6-ECSIT Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yoon; Wi, Sae M.; Shin, Dongwoo; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2017-01-01

    A TRAF6-ECSIT complex is crucial for the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation induced by Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Peroxiredoxin-6 (Prdx6) as a member of the peroxiredoxin family of antioxidant enzymes is involved in antioxidant protection and cell signaling. Here, we report on a regulatory role of Prdx6 in mROS production and NF-κB activation by TLR4. Prdx6 was translocated into the mitochondria by TLR4 stimulation and Prdx6-knockdown (Prdx6KD) THP-1 cells had increased level of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels and were resistant to Salmonella typhimurium infection. Biochemical studies revealed Prdx6 interaction with the C-terminal TRAF-C domain of TRAF6, which drove translocation into the mitochondria. Interestingly, Prdx6 competitively interacted with ECSIT to TRAF6 through its C-terminal TRAF-C domain, leading to the interruption of TRAF6-ECSIT interaction. The inhibitory effect was critically implicated in the activation of NF-κB induced by TLR4. Overexpression of Prdx6 led to the inhibition of NF-κB induced by TLR4, whereas Prdx6KD THP-1 cells displayed enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-6 and -1β, and the up-regulation of NF-κB-dependent genes induced by TLR4 stimulation. Taken together, the data demonstrate that Prdx6 interrupts the formation of TRAF6-ECSIT complex induced by TLR4 stimulation, leading to suppression of bactericidal activity because of inhibited mROS production in mitochondria and the inhibition of NF-κB activation in the cytoplasm.

  3. A glutathione peroxidase, intracellular peptidases and the TOR complexes regulate peptide transporter PEPT-1 in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Benner

    Full Text Available The intestinal peptide transporter PEPT-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans is a rheogenic H(+-dependent carrier responsible for the absorption of di- and tripeptides. Transporter-deficient pept-1(lg601 worms are characterized by impairments in growth, development and reproduction and develop a severe obesity like phenotype. The transport function of PEPT-1 as well as the influx of free fatty acids was shown to be dependent on the membrane potential and on the intracellular pH homeostasis, both of which are regulated by the sodium-proton exchanger NHX-2. Since many membrane proteins commonly function as complexes, there could be proteins that possibly modulate PEPT-1 expression and function. A systematic RNAi screening of 162 genes that are exclusively expressed in the intestine combined with a functional transport assay revealed four genes with homologues existing in mammals as predicted PEPT-1 modulators. While silencing of a glutathione peroxidase surprisingly caused an increase in PEPT-1 transport function, silencing of the ER to Golgi cargo transport protein and of two cytosolic peptidases reduced PEPT-1 transport activity and this even corresponded with lower PEPT-1 protein levels. These modifications of PEPT-1 function by gene silencing of homologous genes were also found to be conserved in the human epithelial cell line Caco-2/TC7 cells. Peptidase inhibition, amino acid supplementation and RNAi silencing of targets of rapamycin (TOR components in C. elegans supports evidence that intracellular peptide hydrolysis and amino acid concentration are a part of a sensing system that controls PEPT-1 expression and function and that involves the TOR complexes TORC1 and TORC2.

  4. hELP3 Subunit of the Elongator Complex Regulates the Transcription of HSP70 Gene in Human Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuju HAN; Xiaozhe HOU; Dongmei SU; Lina PAN; Jizhou DUAN; Liguo CUI; Baiqu HUANG; Jun LU

    2007-01-01

    The human Elongator complex is remarkably similar to its yeast counterpart in several aspects.In a previous study, we analyzed the functions of the human elongation protein 3 (hELP3) subunit of the human Elongator by using an in vivo yeast complementation system. However, direct evidence for hELP3 functions in regulating gene expression in human cells was not obtained. In this study, we used hELP3 antisense oligonucleotide inhibitors to knock down hELP3 gene expression to investigate its function in human 293T cells. The results showed that specific reduction of hELP3 mRNA and protein caused a significant suppression of HSP70-2 gene expression, and this was accompanied by histone H3 hypoacetylation and decreased RNA polymerase Ⅱ density at the HSP70-2 gene. Moreover, the data also showed that hELP3 exerted the transcriptional regulatory function directly through its presence on the HSP70-2 gene. Data presented in this report provide further insight and direct evidence of the functions of hELP3 in HSP70-2 gene transcriptional elongation in human cells.

  5. Biochemical characterization of the Caenorhabditis elegans FBF.CPB-1 translational regulation complex identifies conserved protein interaction hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichelli, Elena; Wu, Joann; Campbell, Zachary T; Wickens, Marvin; Williamson, James R

    2013-02-22

    Caenorhabditis elegans CPB-1 (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein homolog-1) and FBF (fem-3 mRNA binding factor) are evolutionary conserved regulators of mRNA translation that belong to the CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding) and PUF (Pumilio and FBF) protein families, respectively. In hermaphrodite worms, CPB-1 and FBF control key steps during germline development, including stem cell maintenance and sex determination. While CPB-1 and FBF are known to interact, the molecular basis and function of the CPB-1⋅FBF complex are not known. The surface of CPB-1 that interacts with FBF was localized using in vivo and in vitro methods to a 10-residue region at the N-terminus of the protein and these residues are present in the FBF-binding protein GLD-3 (germline development defective-3). PUF proteins are characterized by the presence of eight α-helical repeats (PUF repeats) arranged side by side in an elongated structure. Critical residues for CPB-1 binding are found in the extended loop that connects PUF repeats 7 and 8. The same FBF residues also mediate binding to GLD-3, indicating a conserved binding mode between different protein partners. CPB-1 binding was competitive with GLD-3, suggestive of mutual exclusivity in vivo. RNA binding measurements demonstrated that CPB-1 alters the affinity of FBF for specific RNA sequences, implying a functional model where the coregulatory protein CPB-1 modulates FBF target selection.

  6. Nutrient-induced FNIP degradation by SCFβ-TRCP regulates FLCN complex localization and promotes renal cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Katsuyuki; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Shimizu, Kouhei; Yamada, Aya; Hidaka, Masumi; Hasumi, Hisashi; Ikebe, Tetsuro; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Okabe, Koji; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-07

    Folliculin-interacting protein 1 and 2 (FNIP1 and FNIP2) play critical roles in preventing renal malignancy through their association with the tumor suppressor FLCN. Mutations in FLCN are associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare disorder with increased risk of renal cancer. Recent studies indicated that FNIP1/FNIP2 double knockout mice display enlarged polycystic kidneys and renal carcinoma, which phenocopies FLCN knockout mice, suggesting that these two proteins function together to suppress renal cancer. However, the molecular mechanism functionally linking FNIP1/FNIP2 and FLCN remains largely elusive. Here, we demonstrated that FNIP2 protein is unstable and subjected to proteasome-dependent degradation via β-TRCP and Casein Kinase 1 (CK1)-directed ubiquitination in a nutrition-dependent manner. Degradation of FNIP2 leads to lysosomal dissociation of FLCN and subsequent lysosomal association of mTOR, which in turn promotes the proliferation of renal cancer cells. These results indicate that SCFβ-TRCP negatively regulates the FLCN complex by promoting FNIP degradation and provide molecular insight into the pathogenesis of BHD-associated renal cancer.

  7. A Critical Role for PKR Complexes with TRBP in Immunometabolic Regulation and eIF2α Phosphorylation in Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Nakamura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant stress and inflammatory responses are key factors in the pathogenesis of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, and the double-stranded RNA-dependent kinase (PKR has been proposed to play an important role in integrating these pathways. Here, we report the formation of a complex between PKR and TAR RNA-binding protein (TRBP during metabolic and obesity-induced stress, which is critical for the regulation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α phosphorylation and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activation. We show that TRBP phosphorylation is induced in the setting of metabolic stress, leading to PKR activation. Suppression of hepatic TRBP reduced inflammation, JNK activity, and eIF2α phosphorylation and improved systemic insulin resistance and glucose metabolism, while TRBP overexpression exacerbated the impairment in glucose homeostasis in obese mice. These data indicate that the association between PKR and TRBP integrates metabolism with translational control and inflammatory signaling and plays important roles in metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  8. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 in complex with AMP–PNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baoguang; Lehr, Ruth; Smallwood, Angela M.; Ho, Thau F.; Maley, Kathleen; Randall, Tanya; Head, Martha S.; Koretke, Kristin K.; Schnackenberg, Christine G.

    2007-01-01

    Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase of the AGC family which participates in the control of epithelial ion transport and is implicated in proliferation and apoptosis. We report here the 1.9 Å crystal structure of the catalytic domain of inactive human SGK1 in complex with AMP–PNP. SGK1 exists as a dimer formed by two intermolecular disulfide bonds between Cys258 in the activation loop and Cys193. Although most of the SGK1 structure closely resembles the common protein kinase fold, the structure around the active site is unique when compared to most protein kinases. The αC helix is not present in this inactive form of SGK1 crystal structure; instead, the segment corresponding to the C helix forms a β-strand that is stabilized by the N-terminal segment of the activation loop through a short antiparallel β-sheet. Since the differences from other kinases occur around the ATP binding site, this structure can provide valuable insight into the design of selective and highly potent ATP-competitive inhibitors of SGK1 kinase. PMID:17965184

  9. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 in complex with AMP-PNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Baoguang; Lehr, Ruth; Smallwood, Angela M; Ho, Thau F; Maley, Kathleen; Randall, Tanya; Head, Martha S; Koretke, Kristin K; Schnackenberg, Christine G [GSKPA

    2008-06-30

    Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) is a serine/threonine protein kinase of the AGC family which participates in the control of epithelial ion transport and is implicated in proliferation and apoptosis. We report here the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the catalytic domain of inactive human SGK1 in complex with AMP-PNP. SGK1 exists as a dimer formed by two intermolecular disulfide bonds between Cys258 in the activation loop and Cys193. Although most of the SGK1 structure closely resembles the common protein kinase fold, the structure around the active site is unique when compared to most protein kinases. The {alpha}C helix is not present in this inactive form of SGK1 crystal structure; instead, the segment corresponding to the C helix forms a {beta}-strand that is stabilized by the N-terminal segment of the activation loop through a short antiparallel {beta}-sheet. Since the differences from other kinases occur around the ATP binding site, this structure can provide valuable insight into the design of selective and highly potent ATP-competitive inhibitors of SGK1 kinase.

  10. Klotho Regulates 14-3-3ζ Monomerization and Binding to the ASK1 Signaling Complex in Response to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds K Brobey

    Full Text Available The reactive oxygen species (ROS-sensitive apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 signaling complex is a key regulator of p38 MAPK activity, a major modulator of stress-associated with aging disorders. We recently reported that the ratio of free ASK1 to the complex-bound ASK1 is significantly decreased in Klotho-responsive manner and that Klotho-deficient tissues have elevated levels of free ASK1 which coincides with increased oxidative stress. Here, we tested the hypothesis that: 1 covalent interactions exist among three identified proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex; 2 in normal unstressed cells the ASK1, 14-3-3ζ and thioredoxin (Trx proteins simultaneously engage in a tripartite complex formation; 3 Klotho's stabilizing effect on the complex relied solely on 14-3-3ζ expression and its apparent phosphorylation and dimerization changes. To verify the hypothesis, we performed 14-3-3ζ siRNA knock-down experiments in conjunction with cell-based assays to measure ASK1-client protein interactions in the presence and absence of Klotho, and with or without an oxidant such as rotenone. Our results show that Klotho activity induces posttranslational modifications in the complex targeting 14-3-3ζ monomer/dimer changes to effectively protect against ASK1 oxidation and dissociation. This is the first observation implicating all three proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex in close proximity.

  11. The TIP60 complex regulates bivalent chromatin recognition by 53BP1 through direct H4K20me binding and H2AK15 acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Karine; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Avvakumov, Nikita; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Roques, Céline; Pandita, Raj K.; Paquet, Eric; Herst, Pauline; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Pandita, Tej K.; Legube, Gaëlle; Doyon, Yannick; Durocher, Daniel; Côté, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The NuA4/TIP60 acetyltransferase complex is a key regulator of genome expression and stability. Here, we identified MBTD1 as a new stable subunit of the complex and gleaned intriguing insights into TIP60’s function. Harboring a histone reader domain for H4K20me1/2, MBTD1 allows TIP60 to associate with specific gene promoters and to promote the repair of DNA double strand breaks by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the non-homologous end joining factor 53BP1 engages chromatin through simultaneous binding of H4K20me2 and H2AK15ub, and it was postulated that Tip60-dependent acetylation of H4 regulates this binding. Our findings now indicate that the TIP60 complex is a potent regulator of DNA damage repair pathways in part by targeting the same histone mark as 53BP1. In addition, deposition of H2AK15ub by RNF168 inhibits chromatin acetylation by TIP60, while this residue can be acetylated by TIP60 in vivo, blocking its ubiquitylation. Altogether, these results uncover an intricate mechanism orchestrated by the TIP60 complex which regulates 53BP1-dependent repair pathway selection through incompatible bivalent binding and modification of chromatin. PMID:27153538

  12. Fbxl10/Kdm2b recruits polycomb repressive complex 1 to CpG islands and regulates H2A ubiquitylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xudong; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) catalyzes lysine 119 monoubiquitylation on H2A (H2AK119ub1) and regulates pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, the mechanisms controlling the binding of PRC1 to genomic sites and its catalytic activity are poorly understood. Here, we show that...

  13. An Oxygen-Sensing Two-Component System in the Burkholderia cepacia Complex Regulates Biofilm, Intracellular Invasion, and Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tiffany L.; Boisvert, Nicole M.; Priebe, Gregory P.

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia dolosa is a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), which is a group of bacteria that cause chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and can be associated with outbreaks carrying high morbidity and mortality. While investigating the genomic diversity of B. dolosa strains collected from an outbreak among CF patients, we previously identified fixL as a gene showing signs of strong positive selection. This gene has homology to fixL of the rhizobial FixL/FixJ two-component system. The goals of this study were to determine the functions of FixLJ and their role in virulence in B. dolosa. We generated a fixLJ deletion mutant and complemented controls in B. dolosa strain AU0158. Using a fixK-lacZ reporter we found that FixLJ was activated in low oxygen in multiple BCC species. In a murine pneumonia model, the B. dolosa fixLJ deletion mutant was cleared faster from the lungs and spleen than wild-type B. dolosa strain AU0158 at 7 days post infection. Interestingly, the fixLJ deletion mutant made more biofilm, albeit with altered structure, but was less motile than strain AU0158. Using RNA-seq with in vitro grown bacteria, we found ~11% of the genome was differentially expressed in the fixLJ deletion mutant relative to strain AU0158. Multiple flagella-associated genes were down-regulated in the fixLJ deletion mutant, so we also evaluated virulence of a fliC deletion mutant, which lacks a flagellum. We saw no difference in the ability of the fliC deletion mutant to persist in the murine model relative to strain AU0158, suggesting factors other than flagella caused the phenotype of decreased persistence. We found the fixLJ deletion mutant to be less invasive in human lung epithelial and macrophage-like cells. In conclusion, B. dolosa fixLJ is a global regulator that controls biofilm formation, motility, intracellular invasion/persistence, and virulence. PMID:28046077

  14. Chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide subunit eta (CCT-eta is a specific regulator of fibroblast motility and contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha Satish

    Full Text Available Integumentary wounds in mammalian fetuses heal without scar; this scarless wound healing is intrinsic to fetal tissues and is notable for absence of the contraction seen in postnatal (adult wounds. The precise molecular signals determining the scarless phenotype remain unclear. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta is specifically reduced in healing fetal wounds in a rabbit model. In this study, we examine the role of CCT-eta in fibroblast motility and contractility, properties essential to wound healing and scar formation. We demonstrate that CCT-eta (but not CCT-beta is underexpressed in fetal fibroblasts compared to adult fibroblasts. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that adult fibroblasts showed increased cell migration in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF stimulation, whereas fetal fibroblasts were unresponsive. Downregulation of CCT-eta in adult fibroblasts with short inhibitory RNA (siRNA reduced cellular motility, both basal and growth factor-induced; in contrast, siRNA against CCT-beta had no such effect. Adult fibroblasts were more inherently contractile than fetal fibroblasts by cellular traction force microscopy; this contractility was increased by treatment with EGF and PDGF. CCT-eta siRNA inhibited the PDGF-induction of adult fibroblast contractility, whereas CCT-beta siRNA had no such effect. In each of these instances, the effect of downregulating CCT-eta was to modulate the behavior of adult fibroblasts so as to more closely approximate the characteristics of fetal fibroblasts. We next examined the effect of CCT-eta modulation on alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA expression, a gene product well known to play a critical role in adult wound healing. Fetal fibroblasts were found to constitutively express less alpha-SMA than adult cells. Reduction of CCT-eta with siRNA had minimal effect on cellular

  15. p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 collaborate in the regulation of transcription by recruiting cyclin-Cdk complexes on the promoters of target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Serena; Gallastegui, Edurne; Besson, Arnaud; Abril, Gabriel; Aligué, Rosa; Pujol, Maria Jesus; Bachs, Oriol

    2015-08-18

    Transcriptional repressor complexes containing p130 and E2F4 regulate the expression of genes involved in DNA replication. During the G1 phase of the cell cycle, sequential phosphorylation of p130 by cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) disrupts these complexes allowing gene expression. The Cdk inhibitor and tumor suppressor p27(Kip1) associates with p130 and E2F4 by its carboxyl domain on the promoters of target genes but its role in the regulation of transcription remains unclear. We report here that p27(Kip1) recruits cyclin D2/D3-Cdk4 complexes on the promoters by its amino terminal domain in early and mid G1. In cells lacking p27(Kip1), cyclin D2/D3-Cdk4 did not associate to the promoters and phosphorylation of p130 and transcription of target genes was increased. In late G1, these complexes were substituted by p21(Cip1)-cyclin D1-Cdk2. In p21(Cip1) null cells cyclin D1-Cdk2 were not found on the promoters and transcription was elevated. In p21/p27 double null cells transcription was higher than in control cells and single knock out cells. Thus, our results clarify the role of p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1) in transcriptional regulation of genes repressed by p130/E2F4 complexes in which p27(Kip1) and p21(Cip1) play a sequential role by recruiting and regulating the activity of specific cyclin-Cdk complexes on the promoters.

  16. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript and calcium binding proteins immunoreactivity in the subicular complex of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Barbara; Najdzion, Janusz; Równiak, Maciej; Bogus-Nowakowska, Krystyna; Hermanowicz, Beata; Kolenkiewicz, Małgorzata; Żakowski, Witold; Robak, Anna

    2016-03-01

    In this study we present the distribution and colocalization pattern of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and three calcium-binding proteins: calbindin (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) in the subicular complex (SC) of the guinea pig. The subiculum (S) and presubiculum (PrS) showed higher CART-immunoreactivity (-IR) than the parasubiculum (PaS) as far as the perikarya and neuropil were concerned. CART- IR cells were mainly observed in the pyramidal layer and occasionally in the molecular layer of the S. In the PrS and PaS, single CART-IR perikarya were dispersed, however with a tendency to be found only in superficial layers. CART-IR fibers were observed throughout the entire guinea pig subicular neuropil. Double-labeling immunofluorescence showed that CART-IR perikarya, as well as fibers, did not stain positively for any of the three CaBPs. CART-IR fibers were only located near the CB-, CR-, PV-IR perikarya, whereas CART-IR fibers occasionally intersected fibers containing one of the three CaBPs. The distribution pattern of CART was more similar to that of CB and CR than to that of PV. In the PrS, the CART, CB and CR immunoreactivity showed a laminar distribution pattern. In the case of the PV, this distribution pattern in the PrS was much less prominent than that of CART, CB and CR. We conclude that a heterogeneous distribution of the CART and CaBPs in the guinea pig SC is in keeping with findings from other mammals, however species specific differences have been observed.

  17. Developmental regulation and complex organization of the promoter of the non-coding hsr gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Lakhotia; T K Rajendra; K V Prasanth

    2001-03-01

    The nucleus-limited large non-coding hsrω-n RNA product of the 93D or the hsrω gene of Drosophila melanogaster binds to a variety of RNA-binding proteins involved in nuclear RNA processing. We examined the developmental and heat shock induced expression of this gene by in situ hybridization of nonradioactively labelled riboprobe to cellular transcripts in intact embryos, larval and adult somatic tissues of wild type and an enhancer-trap line carrying the hsrω05241 allele due to insertion of a P-LacZ-rosy+ transposon at — 130 bp position of the hsrω promoter. We also examined LacZ expression in the enhancer-trap line and in two transgenic lines carrying different lengths of the hsrω promoter upstream of the LacZ reporter. The hsrω gene is expressed widely at all developmental stages; in later embryonic stages, its expression in the developing central nervous system was prominent. In spite of insertion of a big transposon in the promoter, expression of the hsrω05241 allele in the enhancer-trap line, as revealed by in situ hybridization to hsrω transcripts in cells, was similar to that of the wild type allele in all the embryonic, larval and adult somatic tissues examined. Expression of the LacZ gene in this enhancer-trap line was similar to that of the hsrω RNA in all diploid cell types in embryos and larvae but in the polytene cells, the LacZ gene did not express at all, neither during normal development nor after heat shock. Comparison of the expression patterns of hsrω gene and those of the LacZ reporter gene under its various promoter regions in the enhancer-trap and transgenic lines revealed a complex pattern of regulation, which seems to be essential for its dynamically varying expression in diverse cell types.

  18. Modernization of the Mechanism of State Regulation of Regional Russian Agro-Industrial Complex Under New Social and Economic Constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babich Tatyana Vladimirovna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the obstacles in building the necessary amount of food and in ensuring the full import substitution based on the efficient use of the available resources: Russia’s lagging behind economically developed countries in the technical and technological modernization of agricultural sectors; low-rate processes of production intensification in the ongoing targeted programs; insufficient use of existing competitive advantages of individual regions. Consequently, in the current environment of increased competition between agricultural commodity producers of different countries, the mechanism of Russian agriculture state support needs to be improved. Based on the analysis of threats due to Russia’s entry into the WTO in terms of sanctions imposed by the European Union in relation to the events in Ukraine, the authors proposed and justified measures aimed at modernizing the mechanism of state regulation of regional agriculture of Russia in the new economic and social constructs. In order to develop a high-tech industrial chain in agricultural business, the authors have developed the mechanism of functioning production and logistics agrocenter organized to bring together competences and cooperation between enterprises in different industries. Agrocenter is a special investment area, which should be provided with all necessary infrastructure and professional management for subsequent placement on the same territory: commercial resident working in the agricultural sector; commercial residents working in the transport and warehouse complex; financial market enterprises and organizations for quality control and certification; consulting firms for the development and promotion agrocenter; consumers of agricultural products: manufacturing, wholesale and retail, commercial enterprises, social sphere.

  19. The TWD40-2 protein and the AP2 complex cooperate in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of cellulose synthase to regulate cellulose biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Ying

    2015-10-13

    Cellulose biosynthesis is performed exclusively by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthases (CESAs). Therefore, the trafficking of CESAs to and from the plasma membrane is an important mechanism for regulating cellulose biosynthesis. CESAs were recently identified as cargo proteins of the classic adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway. The AP2 complex of the CME pathway is conserved in yeast, animals, and plants, and has been well-characterized in many systems. In contrast, the recently discovered TPLATE complex (TPC), which is proposed to function as a CME adaptor complex, is only conserved in plants and a few other eukaryotes. In this study, we discovered that the TWD40-2 protein, a putative member of the TPC, is also important for the endocytosis of CESAs. Genetic analysis between TWD40-2 and AP2M of the AP2 complex revealed that the roles of TWD40-2 in CME are both distinct from and cooperative with the AP2 complex. Loss of efficient CME in twd40-2-3 resulted in the unregulated overaccumulation of CESAs at the plasma membrane. In seedlings of twd40-2-3 and other CME-deficient mutants, a direct correlation was revealed between endocytic deficiency and cellulose content deficiency, highlighting the importance of controlled CESA endocytosis in regulating cellulose biosynthesis.

  20. Human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex transcriptionally regulates the BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein (BCCIP) in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaming; Sui, Yi; Ding, Jian; Li, Fuqiang; Shen, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Lu, Zeming; Wang, Fei; Cao, Lingling; Liu, Xiaoxia; Jin, Jingji; Cai, Yong

    2016-10-01

    The BCCIP (BRCA2- and CDKN1A-interacting protein) is an important cofactor for BRCA2 in tumor suppression. Although the low expression of BCCIP is observed in multiple clinically diagnosed primary tumor tissues such as ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma and colorectal carcinoma, the mechanism of how BCCIP is regulated in cells is still unclear. The human INO80/YY1 chromatin remodeling complex composed of 15 subunits catalyzes ATP-dependent sliding of nucleosomes along DNA. Here, we first report that BCCIP is a novel target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex by presenting a series of experimental evidence. Gene expression studies combined with siRNA knockdown data locked candidate genes including BCCIP of the INO80/YY1 complex. Silencing or over-expressing the subunits of the INO80/YY1 complex regulates the expression level of BCCIP both in mRNA and proteins in cells. Also, the functions of INO80/YY1 complex in regulating the transactivation of BCCIP were confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments clarify the enrichment of INO80 and YY1 at +0.17 kb downstream of the BCCIP transcriptional start site. However, this enrichment is significantly inhibited by either knocking down INO80 or YY1, suggesting the existence of both INO80 and YY1 is required for recruiting the INO80/YY1 complex to BCCIP promoter region. Our findings strongly indicate that BCCIP is a potential target gene of the INO80/YY1 complex.

  1. MiRNA-Mediated Regulation of the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Controls Pluripotency and Endodermal Differentiation in Human ESCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Staton L; Langer, Lee F; Ward, James M; Archer, Trevor K

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs and chromatin remodeling complexes represent powerful epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the pluripotent state. miR-302 is a strong inducer of pluripotency, which is characterized by a distinct chromatin architecture. This suggests that miR-302 regulates global chromatin structure; however, a direct relationship between miR-302 and chromatin remodelers has not been established. Here, we provide data to show that miR-302 regulates Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex composition in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) through direct repression of the BAF53a and BAF170 subunits. With the subsequent overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs, we show that miR-302's inhibition of BAF170 protein levels can affect the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation. Furthermore, miR-302-mediated repression of BAF170 regulates pluripotency by positively influencing mesendodermal differentiation. Overexpression of BAF170 in hESCs led to biased differentiation toward the ectoderm lineage during EB formation and severely hindered directed definitive endoderm differentiation. Taken together, these data uncover a direct regulatory relationship between miR-302 and the Brg1 chromatin remodeling complex that controls gene expression and cell fate decisions in hESCs and suggests that similar mechanisms are at play during early human development.

  2. SWR1 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Subunits and H2A.Z Have Non-overlapping Functions in Immunity and Gene Regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriri, Souha; Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Kumar, S Vinod

    2016-07-06

    Incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z into nucleosomes by the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex is a critical step in eukaryotic gene regulation. In Arabidopsis, SWR1c and H2A.Z have been shown to control gene expression underlying development and environmental responses. Although they have been implicated in defense, the specific roles of the complex subunits and H2A.Z in immunity are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the SWR1c subunits, PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING1 (PIE1), ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 (ARP6), and SWR1 COMPLEX 6 (SWC6), as well as H2A.Z, in defense and gene regulation. We found that SWR1c components play different roles in resistance to different pathogens. Loss of PIE1 and SWC6 function as well as depletion of H2A.Z led to reduced basal resistance, while loss of ARP6 fucntion resulted in enhanced resistance. We found that mutations in PIE1 and SWC6 resulted in impaired effector-triggered immunity. Mutation in SWR1c components and H2A.Z also resulted in compromised jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated immunity. Genome-wide expression analyses similarly reveal distinct roles for H2A.Z and SWR1c components in gene regulation, and suggest a potential role for PIE1 in the regulation of the cross talk between defense signaling pathways. Our data show that although they are part of the same complex, Arabidopsis SWR1c components could have non-redundant functions in plant immunity and gene regulation.

  3. Conserved roles for Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in the regulation of lateral organ development in Aquilegia x coerulea ‘Origami’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Epigenetic regulation is necessary for maintaining gene expression patterns in multicellular organisms. The Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins form several complexes with important and deeply conserved epigenetic functions in both the plant and animal kingdoms. One such complex, the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), is critical to many developmental processes in plants including the regulation of major developmental transitions. In addition, PRC2 restricts the expression domain of various transcription factor families in Arabidopsis, including the class I KNOX genes and several of the ABCE class MADS box genes. While the functions of these transcription factors are known to be deeply conserved, whether or not their regulation by PRC2 is similarly conserved remains an open question. Results Here we use virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to characterize the function of the PRC2 complex in lateral organ development of Aquilegia x coerulea ‘Origami’, a member of the lower eudicot order Ranunculales. Leaves with PRC2 down-regulation displayed a range of phenotypes including ruffled or curled laminae, additional lobing, and an increased frequency of higher order branching. Sepals and petals were also affected, being narrowed, distorted, or, in the case of the sepals, exhibiting partial homeotic transformation. Many of the petal limbs also had a particularly intense yellow coloration due to an accumulation of carotenoid pigments. We show that the A. x coerulea floral MADS box genes AGAMOUS1 (AqAG1), APETALA3-3 (AqAP3-3) and SEPALLATA3 (AqSEP3) are up-regulated in many tissues, while expression of the class I KNOX genes and several candidate genes involved in carotenoid production or degradation are largely unaffected. Conclusions PRC2 targeting of several floral MADS box genes may be conserved in dicots, but other known targets do not appear to be. In the case of the type I KNOX genes, this may reflect a regulatory shift associated with the evolution of

  4. The structure of a DnaA/HobA complex from Helicobacter pylori provides insight into regulation of DNA replication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrajan, Ganesh; Noirot-Gros, Marie Francoise; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Kapp, Ulrike; Terradot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial DNA replication requires DnaA, an AAA+ ATPase that initiates replication at a specific chromosome region, oriC, and is regulated by species-specific regulators that directly bind DnaA. HobA is a DnaA binding protein, recently identified as an essential regulator of DNA replication in Helicobacter pylori. We report the crystal structure of HobA in complex with domains I and II of DnaA (DnaAI–II) from H. pylori, the first structure of DnaA bound to one of its regulators. Biochemical characterization of the complex formed shows that a tetramer of HobA binds four DnaAI–II molecules, and that DnaAI–II is unable to oligomerize by itself. Mutagenesis and protein–protein interaction studies demonstrate that some of the residues located at the HobA-DnaAI–II interface in the structure are necessary for complex formation. Introduction of selected mutations into H. pylori shows that the disruption of the interaction between HobA and DnaA is lethal for the bacteria. Remarkably, the DnaA binding site of HobA is conserved in DiaA from Escherichia coli, suggesting that the structure of the HobA/DnaA complex represents a model for DnaA regulation in other Gram-negative bacteria. Our data, together with those from other studies, indicate that HobA could play a crucial scaffolding role during the initiation of replication in H. pylori by organizing the first step of DnaA oligomerization and attachment to oriC. PMID:19940251

  5. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Preciados

    2016-12-01

    findings suggest that in addition to estrogen signaling, EEDs influencing NRF1 regulated communities of genes across genomic and epigenomic multiple networks may contribute in the development of complex chronic human brain health disorders.

  6. Estrogenic Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Influencing NRF1 Regulated Gene Networks in the Development of Complex Human Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciados, Mark; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2016-01-01

    suggest that in addition to estrogen signaling, EEDs influencing NRF1 regulated communities of genes across genomic and epigenomic multiple networks may contribute in the development of complex chronic human brain health disorders. PMID:27983596

  7. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: Integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight...

  8. ADP-regulation of mitochondrial free radical production is different with complex I- or complex II-linked substrates: implications for the exercise paradox and brain hypermetabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, A; Barja, G

    1997-06-01

    In agreement with classic studies, succinate-supplemented rat and pigeon heart and nonsynaptic brain mitochondrial free radical production is stopped by ADP additions causing the stimulation of respiration from State 4 to State 3. Nevertheless, with Complex I-linked substrates, mitochondria produce free radicals in State 3 at rates similar or somewhat higher than during resting respiration. The absence of sharp increases in free radical production during intense respiration is possible due to strong decreases of free radical leak in State 3. The results indicate that Complex I is the main mitochondrial free radical generator in State 3, adding to its already known important generation of active oxygen species in State 4. The observed rate of mitochondrial free radical production with Complex I-linked substrates in the active State 3 can help to explain two paradoxes: (a) the lack of massive muscle oxidative damage and shortening of life span due to exercise, in spite of up to 23-fold increases of oxygen consumption together with the very low levels of antioxidants present in heart, skeletal muscle, and brain; (b) the presence of some degree of oxidative stress during exercise and hyperactivity in spite of the stop of mitochondrial free radical production by ADP with succinate as substrate.

  9. COMMD1 is linked to the WASH complex and regulates endosomal trafficking of the copper transporter ATP7A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips-Krawczak, Christine A.; Singla, Amika; Starokadomskyy, Petro; Deng, Zhihui; Osborne, Douglas G.; Li, Haiying; Dick, Christopher J.; Gomez, Timothy S.; Koenecke, Megan; Zhang, Jin-San; Dai, Haiming; Sifuentes-Dominguez, Luis F.; Geng, Linda N.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Hein, Marco Y.; Wallis, Mathew; McGaughran, Julie; Gecz, Jozef; De Sluis, Bart van; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Burstein, Ezra

    2015-01-01

    COMMD1 deficiency results in defective copper homeostasis, but the mechanism for this has remained elusive. Here we report that COMMD1 is directly linked to early endosomes through its interaction with a protein complex containing CCDC22, CCDC93, and C16orf62. This COMMD/CCDC22/CCDC93 (CCC) complex

  10. The complexity of DNA double strand break is a crucial factor for activating ATR signaling pathway for G2/M checkpoint regulation regardless of ATM function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lian; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Miura, Masahiko; Cui, Xing; Liu, Cuihua; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Yajima, Hirohiko; Yu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice following ionizing radiation (IR) is currently an appealing research topic, which is still largely unclear. Our recent paper indicated that the complexity of DSBs is a critical factor that enhances DNA end resection. It has been well accepted that the RPA-coated single strand DNA produced by resection is a signaling structure for ATR activation. Therefore, taking advantage of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to effectively produce complex DSBs, we investigated how the complexity of DSB influences the function of ATR pathway on the G2/M checkpoint regulation. Human skin fibroblast cells with or without ATM were irradiated with X rays or heavy ion particles, and dual-parameter flow cytometry was used to quantitatively assess the mitotic entry at early period post radiation by detecting the cells positive for phosphor histone H3. In ATM-deficient cells, ATR pathway played a pivotal role and functioned in a dose- and LET-dependent way to regulate the early G2/M arrest even as low as 0.2Gy for heavy ion radiation, which indicated that ATR pathway could be rapidly activated and functioned in an ATM-independent, but DSB complexity-dependent manner following exposure to IR. Furthermore, ATR pathway also functioned more efficiently in ATM-proficient cells to block G2 to M transition at early period of particle radiation exposure. Accordingly, in contrast to ATM inhibitor, ATR inhibitor had a more effective radiosensitizing effect on survival fraction following heavy ion beams as compared with X ray radiation. Taken together, our results reveal that the complexity of DSBs is a crucial factor for the activation of ATR pathway for G2/M checkpoint regulation, and ATM-dependent end resection is not essential for the activation.

  11. PRC2 regulates RNA polymerase III transcribed non-translated RNA gene transcription through EZH2 and SUZ12 interaction with TFIIIC complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chang; Li Shuai; Dai Xiaoyan; Ma Ji; Wan Junhu; Jiang Hao; Wang Peng; Liu Zhaoli; Zhang Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repression complex 2 ( PRC2 ) component EZH2 tri-methylates H3 K27 and exerts ep-igenetic repression on target gene expression. EZH2-mediated epigenetic control of RNA polymerase II(Pol II) transcribed coding gene transcription has been well established. However, little is known about EZH2-mediated epigenetic regulation of RNA polymerase III( Pol III) transcription. Here we present a paradigm that EZH2 is in-volved in the repression of Pol III transcription via interaction with transcriptional factor complex IIIC ( TFIIIC ) . EZH2 and H3K27 me3 cooccupy the promoter of tRNATyr, 5S rRNA and 7SL RNA genes. Depletion of EZH2 or inhibition of EZH2 methyl transferase activity led to upregulation of Pol III target gene transcription. EZH2-media-ted repression of Pol III transcribed gene expression requires presence of SUZ12 . SUZ12 was able to interact with TFIIIC complex and knockdown of SUZ12 decreased occupancy of EZH2 and H3 K27 me3 at the promoter of Pol III target genes. Our findings pointed out a previously unidentified role of PRC2 complex in suppressing transcription of Pol III transcribed non-translated RNA genes, putting Pol III on a new layer of epigenetic regulation.

  12. Regulating with imagery and the complexity of basic emotions. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marcel; Kuchinke, Lars

    2015-06-01

    Literature, music and the arts have long attested to the complexity of human emotions. Hitherto, psychological and biological theories of emotions have largely neglected this rich heritage. In their review Koelsch and colleagues [1] have embarked upon the pioneering endeavour of integrating the diverse perspectives in emotion research. Noting that the focus of prior neurobiological theories relies mainly on animal studies, the authors sought to complement this body of research with a model of complex ("moral") emotions in humans (henceforth: complex emotions). According to this novel framework, there are four main interacting affective centres in the brain. Each centre is associated with a dominant affective function, such as ascending activation (brainstem), pain/pleasure (diencephalon), attachment-related affects (hippocampus) or moral emotions and unconscious cognitive appraisal (orbitofrontal cortex). Furthermore, language is ascribed a key role in (a) the communication of subjective feeling (reconfiguration) and (b) in the conscious regulation of emotions (by means of logic and rational thought).

  13. Mitotic regulator Nlp interacts with XPA/ERCC1 complexes and regulates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in response to UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Juan; Shang, Li; Zhang, Wei-Min; Wang, Ming-Rong; Zhan, Qi-Min

    2016-04-10

    Cellular response to DNA damage, including ionizing radiation (IR) and UV radiation, is critical for the maintenance of genomic fidelity. Defects of DNA repair often result in genomic instability and malignant cell transformation. Centrosomal protein Nlp (ninein-like protein) has been characterized as an important cell cycle regulator that is required for proper mitotic progression. In this study, we demonstrate that Nlp is able to improve nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity and protects cells against UV radiation. Upon exposure of cells to UVC, Nlp is translocated into the nucleus. The C-terminus (1030-1382) of Nlp is necessary and sufficient for its nuclear import. Upon UVC radiation, Nlp interacts with XPA and ERCC1, and enhances their association. Interestingly, down-regulated expression of Nlp is found to be associated with human skin cancers, indicating that dysregulated Nlp might be related to the development of human skin cancers. Taken together, this study identifies mitotic protein Nlp as a new and important member of NER pathway and thus provides novel insights into understanding of regulatory machinery involved in NER.

  14. of bullies and buddies : socio-spatial behavior and emotional regulation drives primate-like social complexity in silico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Groups of primates form complex spatial and social structures. Often, dominance rank is reflected in an individual's spatial position within the group, and individuals maintain individualized reciprocal relationships with affiliates, which reflect earlier interactions. The hypothesized underlying me

  15. pH-Regulated Reversible Transition Between Polyion Complexes (PIC) and Hydrogen-Bonding Complexes (HBC) with Tunable Aggregation-Induced Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sidan; Liu, Guhuan; Wang, Xiaorui; Wu, Tao; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong; Zhang, Guoying; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-02-17

    The mimicking of biological supramolecular interactions and their mutual transitions to fabricate intelligent artificial systems has been of increasing interest. Herein, we report the fabrication of supramolecular micellar nanoparticles consisting of quaternized poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PEO-b-PQDMA) and tetrakis(4-carboxylmethoxyphenyl)ethene (TPE-4COOH), which was capable of reversible transition between polyion complexes (PIC) and hydrogen bonding complexes (HBC) with tunable aggregation-induced emission (AIE) mediated by solution pH. At pH 8, TPE-4COOH chromophores can be directly dissolved in aqueous milieu without evident fluorescence emission. However, upon mixing with PEO-b-PQDMA, polyion complexes were formed by taking advantage of electrostatic interaction between carboxylate anions and quaternary ammonium cations and the most compact PIC micelles were achieved at the isoelectric point (i.e., [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] = 1), as confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Simultaneously, fluorescence spectroscopy revealed an evident emission turn-on and the maximum fluorescence intensity was observed near the isoelectric point due to the restriction of intramolecular rotation of TPE moieties within the PIC cores. The kinetic study supported a micelle fusion/fission mechanism on the formation of PIC micelles at varying charge ratios, exhibiting a quick time constant (τ1) relating to the formation of quasi-equilibrium micelles and a slow time constant (τ2) corresponding to the formation of final equilibrium micelles. Upon deceasing the pH of PIC micelles from 8 to 2 at the [QDMA(+)]/[COO(-)] molar ratio of 1, TPE-4COOH chromophores became gradually protonated and hydrophobic. The size of micellar nanoparticles underwent a remarkable decrease, whereas the fluorescence intensity exhibited a further increase by approximately 7.35-fold, presumably because of the formation of HBC micelles comprising cationic PQDMA

  16. Insight into the flagella type III export revealed by the complex structure of the type III ATPase and its regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru; Uchida, Yumiko; Kinoshita, Miki; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-29

    FliI and FliJ form the FliI6FliJ ATPase complex of the bacterial flagellar export apparatus, a member of the type III secretion system. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of F1-ATPase. The FliH homodimer binds to FliI to connect the ATPase complex to the flagellar base, but the details are unknown. Here we report the structure of the homodimer of a C-terminal fragment of FliH (FliHC2) in complex with FliI. FliHC2 shows an unusually asymmetric homodimeric structure that markedly resembles the peripheral stalk of the A/V-type ATPases. The FliHC2-FliI hexamer model reveals that the C-terminal domains of the FliI ATPase face the cell membrane in a way similar to the F/A/V-type ATPases. We discuss the mechanism of flagellar ATPase complex formation and a common origin shared by the type III secretion system and the F/A/V-type ATPases.

  17. Regulation of N-WASP and the Arp2/3 complex by Abp1 controls neuronal morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roser Pinyol

    Full Text Available Polymerization and organization of actin filaments into complex superstructures is indispensable for structure and function of neuronal networks. We here report that knock down of the F-actin-binding protein Abp1, which is important for endocytosis and synaptic organization, results in changes in axon development virtually identical to Arp2/3 complex inhibition, i.e., a selective increase of axon length. Our in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrate that Abp1 interacts directly with N-WASP, an activator of the Arp2/3 complex, and releases the autoinhibition of N-WASP in cooperation with Cdc42 and thereby promotes N-WASP-triggered Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. In line with our mechanistical studies and the colocalization of Abp1, N-WASP and Arp2/3 at sites of actin polymerization in neurons, we reveal an essential role of Abp1 and its cooperativity with Cdc42 in N-WASP-induced rearrangements of the neuronal cytoskeleton. We furthermore show that introduction of N-WASP mutants lacking the ability to bind Abp1 or Cdc42, Arp2/3 complex inhibition, Abp1 knock down, N-WASP knock down and Arp3 knock down, all cause identical neuromorphological phenotypes. Our data thus strongly suggest that these proteins and their complex formation are important for cytoskeletal processes underlying neuronal network formation.

  18. FLP-4 neuropeptide and its receptor in a neuronal circuit regulate preference choice through functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yonglin; Zhi, Lingtong; Guan, Xiangmin; Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2016-02-18

    Preference choice on food is an important response strategy for animals living in the environment. Using assay system of preference choice on bacterial foods, OP50 and PA14, we identified the involvement of ADL sensory neurons in the control of preference choice in Caenorhabditis elegans. Both genetically silencing and ChR2-mediated activation of ADL sensory neurons significantly affected preference choice. ADL regulated preference choice by inhibiting function of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)/SRH-220. ADL sensory neurons might regulate preference choice through peptidergic signals of FLP-4 and NLP-10, and function of FLP-4 or NLP-10 in regulating preference choice was regulated by SRH-220. FLP-4 released from ADL sensory neurons further regulated preference choice through its receptor of NPR-4 in AIB interneurons. In AIB interneurons, NPR-4 was involved in the control of preference choice by activating the functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex consisting of SET-2, ASH-2, and WDR-5, implying the crucial role of molecular machinery of trimethylation of histone H3K4 in the preference choice control. The identified novel neuronal circuit and the underlying molecular mechanisms will strengthen our understanding neuronal basis of preference choice in animals.

  19. The budding yeast Cdc48(Shp1 complex promotes cell cycle progression by positive regulation of protein phosphatase 1 (Glc7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Böhm

    Full Text Available The conserved, ubiquitin-selective AAA ATPase Cdc48 regulates numerous cellular processes including protein quality control, DNA repair and the cell cycle. Cdc48 function is tightly controlled by a multitude of cofactors mediating substrate specificity and processing. The UBX domain protein Shp1 is a bona fide substrate-recruiting cofactor of Cdc48 in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Even though Shp1 has been proposed to be a positive regulator of Glc7, the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 in S. cerevisiae, its cellular functions in complex with Cdc48 remain largely unknown. Here we show that deletion of the SHP1 gene results in severe growth defects and a cell cycle delay at the metaphase to anaphase transition caused by reduced Glc7 activity. Using an engineered Cdc48 binding-deficient variant of Shp1, we establish the Cdc48(Shp1 complex as a critical regulator of mitotic Glc7 activity. We demonstrate that shp1 mutants possess a perturbed balance of Glc7 phosphatase and Ipl1 (Aurora B kinase activities and show that hyper-phosphorylation of the kinetochore protein Dam1, a key mitotic substrate of Glc7 and Ipl1, is a critical defect in shp1. We also show for the first time a physical interaction between Glc7 and Shp1 in vivo. Whereas loss of Shp1 does not significantly affect Glc7 protein levels or localization, it causes reduced binding of the activator protein Glc8 to Glc7. Our data suggest that the Cdc48(Shp1 complex controls Glc7 activity by regulating its interaction with Glc8 and possibly further regulatory subunits.

  20. The Drosophila IKK-related kinase (Ik2 and Spindle-F proteins are part of a complex that regulates cytoskeleton organization during oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaanan Boaz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IkappaB kinases (IKKs regulate the activity of Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factors by targeting their inhibitory partner proteins, IkappaBs, for degradation. The Drosophila genome encodes two members of the IKK family. Whereas the first is a kinase essential for activation of the NF-kappaB pathway, the latter does not act as IkappaB kinase. Instead, recent findings indicate that Ik2 regulates F-actin assembly by mediating the function of nonapoptotic caspases via degradation of DIAP1. Also, it has been suggested that ik2 regulates interactions between the minus ends of the microtubules and the actin-rich cortex in the oocyte. Since spn-F mutants display oocyte defects similar to those of ik2 mutant, we decided to investigate whether Spn-F could be a direct regulatory target of Ik2. Results We found that Ik2 binds physically to Spn-F, biomolecular interaction analysis of Spn-F and Ik2 demonstrating that both proteins bind directly and form a complex. We showed that Ik2 phosphorylates Spn-F and demonstrated that this phosphorylation does not lead to Spn-F degradation. Ik2 is localized to the anterior ring of the oocyte and to punctate structures in the nurse cells together with Spn-F protein, and both proteins are mutually required for their localization. Conclusion We conclude that Ik2 and Spn-F form a complex, which regulates cytoskeleton organization during Drosophila oogenesis and in which Spn-F is the direct regulatory target for Ik2. Interestingly, Ik2 in this complex does not function as a typical IKK in that it does not direct SpnF for degradation following phosphorylation.

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F and other synthetic multivulva genes negatively regulate the anaphase-promoting complex gene mat-3/APC8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, David; Doto, Jeffrey B; Sundaram, Meera V

    2004-06-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb)/E2F complexes repress expression of many genes important for G(1)-to-S transition, but also appear to regulate gene expression at other stages of the cell cycle. In C. elegans, lin-35/Rb and other synthetic Multivulva (SynMuv) group B genes function redundantly with other sets of genes to regulate G(1)/S progression, vulval and pharyngeal differentiation, and other unknown processes required for viability. Here we show that lin-35/Rb, efl-1/E2F, and other SynMuv B genes negatively regulate a component of the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). The APC/C is a multisubunit complex that promotes metaphase-to-anaphase progression and G(1) arrest by targeting different substrates for ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated destruction. The C. elegans APC/C gene mat-3/APC8 has been defined by temperature-sensitive embryonic lethal alleles that strongly affect germline meiosis and mitosis but only weakly affect somatic development. We describe severe nonconditional mat-3 alleles and a hypomorphic viable allele (ku233), all of which affect postembryonic cell divisions including those of the vulval lineage. The ku233 lesion is located outside of the mat-3 coding region and reduces mat-3 mRNA expression. Loss-of-function alleles of lin-35/Rb and other SynMuv B genes suppress mat-3(ku233) defects by restoring mat-3 mRNA to wild-type levels. Therefore, Rb/E2F complexes appear to repress mat-3 expression.

  2. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  3. Localization of nucleoporin Tpr to the nuclear pore complex is essential for Tpr mediated regulation of the export of unspliced RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajanala, Kalpana; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoporin Tpr is a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) that localizes exclusively to intranuclear filaments. Tpr functions as a scaffolding element in the nuclear phase of the NPC and plays a role in mitotic spindle checkpoint signalling. Export of intron-containing mRNA in Mason Pfizer Monkey Virus is regulated by direct interaction of cellular proteins with the cis-acting Constitutive Transport Element (CTE). In mammalian cells, the transport of Gag/Pol-CTE reporter construct is not very efficient, suggesting a regulatory mechanism to retain this unspliced RNA. Here we report that the knockdown of Tpr in mammalian cells leads to a drastic enhancement in the levels of Gag proteins (p24) in the cytoplasm, which is rescued by siRNA resistant Tpr. Tpr's role in the retention of unspliced RNA is independent of the functions of Sam68 and Tap/Nxf1 proteins, which are reported to promote CTE dependent export. Further, we investigated the possible role for nucleoporins that are known to function in nucleocytoplasmic transport in modulating unspliced RNA export. Results show that depletion of Nup153, a nucleoporin required for NPC anchoring of Tpr, plays a role in regulating the export, while depletion of other FG repeat-containing nucleoporins did not alter the unspliced RNA export. Results suggest that Tpr and Nup153 both regulate the export of unspliced RNA and they are most likely functioning through the same pathway. Importantly, we find that localization of Tpr to the NPC is necessary for Tpr mediated regulation of unspliced RNA export. Collectively, the data indicates that perinuclear localization of Tpr at the nucleopore complex is crucial for regulating intron containing mRNA export by directly or indirectly participating in the processing and degradation of aberrant mRNA transcripts.

  4. Dynamic regulation of a GPCR-tetraspanin-G protein complex on intact cells: central role of CD81 in facilitating GPR56-Galpha q/11 association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Kevin D; Hemler, Martin E; Stipp, Christopher S

    2004-05-01

    By means of a variety of intracellular scaffolding proteins, a vast number of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) may achieve specificity in signaling through a much smaller number of heterotrimeric G proteins. Members of the tetraspanin family organize extensive complexes of cell surface proteins and thus have the potential to act as GPCR scaffolds; however, tetraspanin-GPCR complexes had not previously been described. We now show that a GPCR, GPR56/TM7XN1, and heterotrimeric G protein subunits, Galpha(q), Galpha(11), and Gbeta, associate specifically with tetraspanins and CD81, but not with other tetraspanins. CD9 Complexes of GPR56 with CD9 and CD81 remained intact when fully solubilized and were resistant to cholesterol depletion. Hence they do not depend on detergent-insoluble, raft-like membrane microdomains for stability. A central role for CD81 in promoting or stabilizing a GPR56-CD81-Galpha(q/11) complex was revealed by CD81 immunodepletion and reexpression experiments. Finally, antibody engagement of cell surface CD81 or cell activation with phorbol ester revealed two distinct mechanisms by which GPR56-CD81-Galpha(q/11) complexes can be dynamically regulated. These data reveal a potential role for tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 as GPCR scaffolding proteins.

  5. The FgNot3 Subunit of the Ccr4-Not Complex Regulates Vegetative Growth, Sporulation, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc-Cuong Bui

    Full Text Available The Ccr4-Not complex is evolutionarily conserved and important for multiple cellular functions in eukaryotic cells. In this study, the biological roles of the FgNot3 subunit of this complex were investigated in the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgNOT3 resulted in retarded vegetative growth, retarded spore germination, swollen hyphae, and hyper-branching. The ΔFgnot3 mutants also showed impaired sexual and asexual sporulation, decreased virulence, and reduced expression of genes related to conidiogenesis. Fgnot3 deletion mutants were sensitive to thermal stress, whereas NOT3 orthologs in other model eukaryotes are known to be required for cell wall integrity. We found that FgNot3 functions as a negative regulator of the production of secondary metabolites, including trichothecenes and zearalenone. Further functional characterization of other components of the Not module of the Ccr4-Not complex demonstrated that the module is conserved. Each subunit primarily functions within the context of a complex and might have distinct roles outside of the complex in F. graminearum. This is the first study to functionally characterize the Not module in filamentous fungi and provides novel insights into signal transduction pathways in fungal development.

  6. G1/S-regulated E2F-containing protein complexes bind to the mouse thymidine kinase gene promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Q P; Zhao, S; Levin, A H;

    1994-01-01

    By performing DNase I footprint analysis, we had identified three distinct protein binding sequences (MT1, MT2, and MT3) located on the mouse thymidine kinase (TK) upstream promoter (Dou, Q.-P., Fridovich-Keil, J. L., and Pardee, A.B. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 1157-1161). Here we...... report that MT2 includes an E2F-like binding site (GTTCGCGGGCAAA), as shown by the following evidence. (i) MT2 bound specifically to an affinity-purified fusion human E2F protein. (ii) Both MT2 and an authentic E2F site (TTTCGCGCGCTTT) bound specifically to similar or identical nuclear protein complexes....... (iii) Formation of both these DNA-protein complexes were cell cycle-dependent: a G0/G1 phase-specific complex (E2F.G0/G1) was replaced by an S phase-specific complex(es) (E2F.S), whereas "free" E2F increased after the G1/S transition. (iv) Pulse inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide...

  7. Expanding the Cyanobacterial Nitrogen Regulatory Network: The GntR-Like Regulator PlmA Interacts with the PII-PipX Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labella, Jose I.; Obrebska, Anna; Espinosa, Javier; Salinas, Paloma; Forcada-Nadal, Alicia; Tremiño, Lorena; Rubio, Vicente; Contreras, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, phototrophic organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis, perceive nitrogen status by sensing 2-oxoglutarate levels. PII, a widespread signaling protein, senses and transduces nitrogen and energy status to target proteins, regulating metabolism and gene expression. In cyanobacteria, under conditions of low 2-oxoglutarate, PII forms complexes with the enzyme N-acetyl glutamate kinase, increasing arginine biosynthesis, and with PII-interacting protein X (PipX), making PipX unavailable for binding and co-activation of the nitrogen regulator NtcA. Both the PII-PipX complex structure and in vivo functional data suggested that this complex, as such, could have regulatory functions in addition to PipX sequestration. To investigate this possibility we performed yeast three-hybrid screening of genomic libraries from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, searching for proteins interacting simultaneously with PII and PipX. The only prey clone found in the search expressed PlmA, a member of the GntR family of transcriptional regulators proven here by gel filtration to be homodimeric. Interactions analyses further confirmed the simultaneous requirement of PII and PipX, and showed that the PlmA contacts involve PipX elements exposed in the PII-PipX complex, specifically the C-terminal helices and one residue of the tudor-like body. In contrast, PII appears not to interact directly with PlmA, possibly being needed indirectly, to induce an extended conformation of the C-terminal helices of PipX and for modulating the surface polarity at the PII-PipX boundary, two elements that appear crucial for PlmA binding. Attempts to inactive plmA confirmed that this gene is essential in S. elongatus. Western blot assays revealed that S. elongatus PlmA, irrespective of the nitrogen regime, is a relatively abundant transcriptional regulator, suggesting the existence of a large PlmA regulon. In silico studies showed that PlmA is universally and exclusively found in cyanobacteria

  8. Expanding the cyanobacterial nitrogen regulatory network: The GntR-like regulator PlmA interacts with the PII-PipX complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ignacio Labella

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, phototrophic organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis, perceive nitrogen status by sensing 2-oxoglutarate levels. PII, a widespread signaling protein, senses and transduces nitrogen and energy status to target proteins, regulating metabolism and gene expression. In cyanobacteria, under conditions of low 2-oxoglutarate, PII forms complexes with the enzyme N-acetyl glutamate kinase, increasing arginine biosynthesis, and with PII-interacting protein X (PipX, making PipX unavailable for binding and co-activation of the nitrogen regulator NtcA. Both the PII-PipX complex structure and in vivo functional data suggested that this complex, as such, could have regulatory functions in addition to PipX sequestration. To investigate this possibility we performed yeast three-hybrid screening of genomic libraries from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, searching for proteins interacting simultaneously with PII and PipX. The only prey clone found in the search expressed PlmA, a member of the GntR family of transcriptional regulators proven here by gel filtration to be homodimeric. Interactions analyses further confirmed the simultaneous requirement of PII and PipX, and showed that the PlmA contacts involve PipX elements exposed in the PII-PipX complex, specifically the C-terminal helices and one residue of the tudor-like body. In contrast, PII appears not to interact directly with PlmA, possibly being needed indirectly, to induce an extended conformation of the C-terminal helices of PipX and for modulating the surface polarity at the PII-PipX boundary, two elements that appear crucial for PlmA binding. Attempts to inactive plmA confirmed that this gene is essential in S. elongatus. Western blot assays revealed that S. elongatus PlmA, irrespective of the nitrogen regime, is a relatively abundant transcriptional regulator, suggesting the existence of a large PlmA regulon. In silico studies showed that PlmA is universally and exclusively found

  9. The role of surface electrostatics on the stability, function and regulation of human cystathionine β-synthase, a complex multidomain and oligomeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Angel L; Majtan, Tomas; Kraus, Jan P

    2014-09-01

    Human cystathionine β-synthase (hCBS) is a key enzyme of sulfur amino acid metabolism, controlling the commitment of homocysteine to the transsulfuration pathway and antioxidant defense. Mutations in hCBS cause inherited homocystinuria (HCU), a rare inborn error of metabolism characterized by accumulation of toxic homocysteine in blood and urine. hCBS is a complex multidomain and oligomeric protein whose activity and stability are independently regulated by the binding of S-adenosyl-methionine (SAM) to two different types of sites at its C-terminal regulatory domain. Here we study the role of surface electrostatics on the complex regulation and stability of hCBS using biophysical and biochemical procedures. We show that the kinetic stability of the catalytic and regulatory domains is significantly affected by the modulation of surface electrostatics through noticeable structural and energetic changes along their denaturation pathways. We also show that surface electrostatics strongly affect SAM binding properties to those sites responsible for either enzyme activation or kinetic stabilization. Our results provide new insight into the regulation of hCBS activity and stability in vivo with implications for understanding HCU as a conformational disease. We also lend experimental support to the role of electrostatic interactions in the recently proposed binding modes of SAM leading to hCBS activation and kinetic stabilization.

  10. Identification of a BET Family Bromodomain/Casein Kinase II/TAF-Containing Complex as a Regulator of Mitotic Condensin Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Soo Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Condensin is a central regulator of mitotic genome structure with mutants showing poorly condensed chromosomes and profound segregation defects. Here, we identify NCT, a complex comprising the Nrc1 BET-family tandem bromodomain protein (SPAC631.02, casein kinase II (CKII, and several TAFs, as a regulator of condensin function. We show that NCT and condensin bind similar genomic regions but only briefly colocalize during the periods of chromosome condensation and decondensation. This pattern of NCT binding at the core centromere, the region of maximal condensin enrichment, tracks the abundance of acetylated histone H4, as regulated by the Hat1-Mis16 acetyltransferase complex and recognized by the first Nrc1 bromodomain. Strikingly, mutants in NCT or Hat1-Mis16 restore the formation of segregation-competent chromosomes in cells containing defective condensin. These results are consistent with a model where NCT targets CKII to chromatin in a cell-cycle-directed manner in order to modulate the activity of condensin during chromosome condensation and decondensation.

  11. Emotion Regulation in Context: The Jealousy Complex between Young Siblings and Its Relations with Child and Family Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volling, Brenda L.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Miller, Alison L.

    2002-01-01

    Examined relations between sibling jealousy and child and family characteristics in families with toddler and preschool-age siblings. Found that positive marital relationship was particularly strong predictor of older siblings' abilities to regulate jealousy in sessions with mothers. Younger siblings' jealous affect with mothers related to child's…

  12. LQR-Based least-squares output feedback control of rotor vibrations using the complex mode and balanced realization methods. [Linear-Quadratic-Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, G.W. (3-I Scientific Development Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States)); Nelson, H.D. (Texas Christian Univ., Fort Worth (United States)); Crouch, P.E.; Mignolet, M.P. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The complex mode and balanced realization methods are used separately to obtain reduced-order models for general linear asymmetric rotor systems. The methods are outlined and then applied to a typical rotor system represented by a 52 degree-or-freedom finite element model. The accuracy of the two methods is compared for this model and the complex model method is found to be more accurate than the balanced realization method for the desired frequency bandwidth and for models of the same reduced order. However, with some limitations, it is also shown that the balanced realization method can be applied to the reduced-order complex mode model to obtain further order reduction without loss of model accuracy. A Linear-Quadratic-Regulator-based least-squares output feedback control procedure is developed for the vibration control of rotor systems. This output feedback procedure eliminates the requirement of an observer for the use of an LQ regulator, and provides the advantage that the rotor vibration can be effectively controlled by monitoring only one single location along the rotor shaft while maintaining an acceptable performance. The procedures presented are quite general and may be applied to a large class of vibration problems including rotordynamics.

  13. Up-regulation of Paxillin and Focal Adhesion Signaling follows Dystroglycan Complex deletions and promotes a Hypertensive State of Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Shamik; Tewari, Manorama; Zajac, Allison; Barton, Elisabeth; Sweeney, H. Lee; Discher, Dennis E.

    2011-01-01

    Anchorage to matrix is mediated for many cells not only by integrin-based focal adhesions but also by a parallel assembly of integral and peripheral membrane proteins known as the Dystroglycan Complex. Deficiencies in either dystrophin (mdx mice) or γ-sarcoglycan (γSG−/− mice) components of the Dystroglycan Complex lead to upregulation of numerous focal adhesion proteins, and the phosphoprotein paxillin proves to be among the most prominent. In mdx muscle, paxillin-Y31 and Y118 are both hyper...

  14. Complex regulation of autophagy in cancer - integrated approaches to discover the networks that hold a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubisch, János; Türei, Dénes; Földvári-Nagy, László; Dunai, Zsuzsanna A; Zsákai, Lilian; Varga, Máté; Vellai, Tibor; Csermely, Péter; Korcsmáros, Tamás

    2013-08-01

    Autophagy, a highly regulated self-degradation process of eukaryotic cells, is a context-dependent tumor-suppressing mechanism that can also promote tumor cell survival upon stress and treatment resistance. Because of this ambiguity, autophagy is considered as a double-edged sword in oncology, making anti-cancer therapeutic approaches highly challenging. In this review, we present how systems-level knowledge on autophagy regulation can help to develop new strategies and efficiently select novel anti-cancer drug targets. We focus on the protein interactors and transcriptional/post-transcriptional regulators of autophagy as the protein and regulatory networks significantly influence the activity of core autophagy proteins during tumor progression. We list several network resources to identify interactors and regulators of autophagy proteins. As in silico analysis of such networks often necessitates experimental validation, we briefly summarize tractable model organisms to examine the role of autophagy in cancer. We also discuss fluorescence techniques for high-throughput monitoring of autophagy in humans. Finally, the challenges of pharmacological modulation of autophagy are reviewed. We suggest network-based concepts to overcome these difficulties. We point out that a context-dependent modulation of autophagy would be favored in anti-cancer therapy, where autophagy is stimulated in normal cells, while inhibited only in stressed cancer cells. To achieve this goal, we introduce the concept of regulo-network drugs targeting specific transcription factors or miRNA families identified with network analysis. The effect of regulo-network drugs propagates indirectly through transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy proteins, and, as a multi-directional intervention tool, they can both activate and inhibit specific proteins in the same time. The future identification and validation of such regulo-network drug targets may serve as novel intervention

  15. The Smc5-Smc6 complex and SUMO modification of Rad52 regulates recombinational repair at the ribosomal gene locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Sunjevaric, Ivana; De Piccoli, Giacomo;

    2007-01-01

    at an extranucleolar site. The nucleolar exclusion of Rad52 recombination foci entails Mre11 and Smc5-Smc6 complexes and depends on Rad52 SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) modification. Remarkably, mutations that abrogate these activities result in the formation of Rad52 foci within the nucleolus and cause r...

  16. Generative Learning Strategies and Metacognitive Feedback to Facilitate Comprehension of Complex Science Topics and Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Woo; Lim, Kyu Yon; Grabowski, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Comprehension of complex science topics occurs from the creation of new understanding of the information by the learner. However, learners are not very successful generating their own meaning, especially in computer based learning environments in which learners are required to make decisions about their learning process, since they rarely regulate…

  17. Recruitment of the Mammalian Histone-modifying EMSY Complex to Target Genes Is Regulated by ZNF131.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varier, Radhika A; Carrillo de Santa Pau, Enrique; van der Groep, Petra; Lindeboom, Rik G H; Matarese, Filomena; Mensinga, Anneloes; Smits, Arne H; Edupuganti, Raghu Ram; Baltissen, Marijke P; Jansen, Pascal W T C; Ter Hoeve, Natalie; van Weely, Danny R; Poser, Ina; van Diest, Paul J; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    Recent work from others and us revealed interactions between the Sin3/HDAC complex, the H3K4me3 demethylase KDM5A, GATAD1, and EMSY. Here, we characterize the EMSY/KDM5A/SIN3B complex in detail by quantitative interaction proteomics and ChIP-sequencing. We identify a novel substoichiometric interactor of the complex, transcription factor ZNF131, which recruits EMSY to a large number of active, H3K4me3 marked promoters. Interestingly, using an EMSY knock-out line and subsequent rescue experiments, we show that EMSY is in most cases positively correlated with transcriptional activity of its target genes and stimulates cell proliferation. Finally, by immunohistochemical staining of primary breast tissue microarrays we find that EMSY/KDM5A/SIN3B complex subunits are frequently overexpressed in primary breast cancer cases in a correlative manner. Taken together, these data open venues for exploring the possibility that sporadic breast cancer patients with EMSY amplification might benefit from epigenetic combination therapy targeting both the KDM5A demethylase and histone deacetylases.

  18. Ghrelin receptor conformational dynamics regulate the transition from a preassembled to an active receptor:Gq complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Marjorie; Mary, Sophie; Maingot, Mathieu; M'Kadmi, Céline; Gagne, Didier; Leyris, Jean-Philippe; Denoyelle, Séverine; Gaibelet, Gérald; Gavara, Laurent; Garcia de Souza Costa, Mauricio; Perahia, David; Trinquet, Eric; Mouillac, Bernard; Galandrin, Ségolène; Galès, Céline; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Floquet, Nicolas; Martinez, Jean; Marie, Jacky; Banères, Jean-Louis

    2015-02-03

    How G protein-coupled receptor conformational dynamics control G protein coupling to trigger signaling is a key but still open question. We addressed this question with a model system composed of the purified ghrelin receptor assembled into lipid discs. Combining receptor labeling through genetic incorporation of unnatural amino acids, lanthanide resonance energy transfer, and normal mode analyses, we directly demonstrate the occurrence of two distinct receptor:Gq assemblies with different geometries whose relative populations parallel the activation state of the receptor. The first of these assemblies is a preassembled complex with the receptor in its basal conformation. This complex is specific of Gq and is not observed with Gi. The second one is an active assembly in which the receptor in its active conformation triggers G protein activation. The active complex is present even in the absence of agonist, in a direct relationship with the high constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor. These data provide direct evidence of a mechanism for ghrelin receptor-mediated Gq signaling in which transition of the receptor from an inactive to an active conformation is accompanied by a rearrangement of a preassembled receptor:G protein complex, ultimately leading to G protein activation and signaling.

  19. The Caenorhabditis elegans RDE-10/RDE-11 complex regulates RNAi by promoting secondary siRNA amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Chi; Montgomery, Taiowa A; Fischer, Sylvia E J; Garcia, Susana M D A; Riedel, Christian G; Fahlgren, Noah; Sullivan, Christopher M; Carrington, James C; Ruvkun, Gary

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nematodes, plants, and fungi, RNAi is remarkably potent and persistent due to the amplification of initial silencing signals by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs). In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), the interaction between the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) loaded with p

  20. A dynamic complex of signaling proteins uses polar localization to regulate cell-fate asymmetry in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, Christos G; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2011-03-15

    Cellular asymmetry is critical to metazoan development and the life cycle of many microbes. In Caulobacter, cell cycle progression and the formation of asymmetric daughter cells depend on the polarly-localized histidine kinase CckA. How CckA is regulated and why activity depends on localization are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the unorthodox kinase DivL promotes CckA activity and that the phosphorylated regulator DivK inhibits CckA by binding to DivL. Early in the cell cycle, CckA is activated by the dephosphorylation of DivK throughout the cell. However, in later stages, when phosphorylated DivK levels are high, CckA activation relies on polar localization with a DivK phosphatase. Localization thus creates a protected zone for CckA within the cell, without the use of membrane-enclosed compartments. Our results reveal the mechanisms by which CckA is regulated in a cell-type-dependent manner. More generally, our findings reveal how cells exploit subcellular localization to orchestrate sophisticated regulatory processes.

  1. BRAHMA ATPase of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex acts as a positive regulator of gibberellin-mediated responses in arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Archacki

    Full Text Available SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes perform a pivotal function in the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in major SWI/SNF subunits display embryo-lethal or dwarf phenotypes, indicating their critical role in molecular pathways controlling development and growth. As gibberellins (GA are major positive regulators of plant growth, we wanted to establish whether there is a link between SWI/SNF and GA signaling in Arabidopsis. This study revealed that in brm-1 plants, depleted in SWI/SNF BRAHMA (BRM ATPase, a number of GA-related phenotypic traits are GA-sensitive and that the loss of BRM results in markedly decreased level of endogenous bioactive GA. Transcriptional profiling of brm-1 and the GA biosynthesis mutant ga1-3, as well as the ga1-3/brm-1 double mutant demonstrated that BRM affects the expression of a large set of GA-responsive genes including genes responsible for GA biosynthesis and signaling. Furthermore, we found that BRM acts as an activator and directly associates with promoters of GA3ox1, a GA biosynthetic gene, and SCL3, implicated in positive regulation of the GA pathway. Many GA-responsive gene expression alterations in the brm-1 mutant are likely due to depleted levels of active GAs. However, the analysis of genetic interactions between BRM and the DELLA GA pathway repressors, revealed that BRM also acts on GA-responsive genes independently of its effect on GA level. Given the central position occupied by SWI/SNF complexes within regulatory networks controlling fundamental biological processes, the identification of diverse functional intersections of BRM with GA-dependent processes in this study suggests a role for SWI/SNF in facilitating crosstalk between GA-mediated regulation and other cellular pathways.

  2. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  3. CD147 interacts with NDUFS6 in regulating mitochondrial complex I activity and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human malignant melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Z; Zeng, W; Tang, W; Long, T; Zhang, J; Xie, X; Kuang, Y; Chen, M; Su, J; Chen, X

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is one of the most lethal tumors and is characterized by high invasiveness, frequent metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy. The risk of metastatic MM is accompanied by disordered energy metabolism involving the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) process, which is largely carried out in mitochondrial complexes. Complex I is the first and largest mitochondrial enzyme complex associated with this process. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein mainly expressed on the cell surface, and also appears in the cytoplasm in some tumors. We found that CD147 is often translocated to the cytoplasm in metastatic MM specimens as compared to primary MM. We also demonstrated high expression of CD147 in isolated mitochondrial fractions of A375 cells. The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay identified NDUFS6 (which encodes a subunit of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I) as a candidate that interacts with CD147 and depletion of CD147 in A375 cells significantly decreased complex I enzyme activity. We also showed that CD147 increased the viability of A375 cells exposed to berberine-induced mitochondrial damage, and protected them from apoptosis through a mitochondrial-dependent pathway. This finding was confirmed by adding exogenous Bcl-2 to A375 cell cultures. In summary, our results identify the existence of CD147 in human melanoma cell mitochondria. They indicate that CD147 appears to regulate complex I activity and apoptosis in MM by interacting with mitochondrial NDUFS6. Our findings provide new insight into the function of CD147 and identify it as a promising therapeutic target in melanoma through disruption of the energy metabolism.

  4. Systems biology of lignin biosynthesis in Populus trichocarpa: heteromeric 4-coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligase protein complex formation, regulation, and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Song, Jina; Wang, Jack P; Lin, Ying-Chung; Ducoste, Joel; Shuford, Christopher M; Liu, Jie; Li, Quanzi; Shi, Rui; Nepomuceno, Angelito; Isik, Fikret; Muddiman, David C; Williams, Cranos; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2014-03-01

    As a step toward predictive modeling of flux through the pathway of monolignol biosynthesis in stem differentiating xylem of Populus trichocarpa, we discovered that the two 4-coumaric acid:CoA ligase (4CL) isoforms, 4CL3 and 4CL5, interact in vivo and in vitro to form a heterotetrameric protein complex. This conclusion is based on laser microdissection, coimmunoprecipitation, chemical cross-linking, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and mass spectrometry. The tetramer is composed of three subunits of 4CL3 and one of 4CL5. 4CL5 appears to have a regulatory role. This protein-protein interaction affects the direction and rate of metabolic flux for monolignol biosynthesis in P. trichocarpa. A mathematical model was developed for the behavior of 4CL3 and 4CL5 individually and in mixtures that form the enzyme complex. The model incorporates effects of mixtures of multiple hydroxycinnamic acid substrates, competitive inhibition, uncompetitive inhibition, and self-inhibition, along with characteristic of the substrates, the enzyme isoforms, and the tetrameric complex. Kinetic analysis of different ratios of the enzyme isoforms shows both inhibition and activation components, which are explained by the mathematical model and provide insight into the regulation of metabolic flux for monolignol biosynthesis by protein complex formation.

  5. Feedback regulation on PTEN/AKT pathway by the ER stress kinase PERK mediated by interaction with the Vault complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Neo, Suat Peng; Gunaratne, Jayantha

    2015-01-01

    The high proliferation rate of cancer cells, together with environmental factors such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation can cause Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress. The protein kinase PERK is an essential mediator in one of the three ER stress response pathways. Genetic and pharmacological...... inhibition of PERK has been reported to limit tumor growth in xenograft models. Here we provide evidence that inactive PERK interacts with the nuclear pore-associated Vault complex protein and that this compromises Vault-mediated nuclear transport of PTEN. Pharmacological inhibition of PERK under ER stress...... results is abnormal sequestration of the Vault complex, leading to increased cytoplasmic PTEN activity and lower AKT activation. As the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway is crucial for many aspects of cell growth and survival, this unexpected effect of PERK inhibitors on AKT activity may have implications...

  6. KRAS protein stability is regulated through SMURF2: UBCH5 complex-mediated β-TrCP1 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shirish; Allam, Uday Sankar; Ahsan, Aarif; Chen, Guoan; Krishnamurthy, Pranathi Meda; Marsh, Katherine; Rumschlag, Matthew; Shankar, Sunita; Whitehead, Christopher; Schipper, Matthew; Basrur, Venkatesha; Southworth, Daniel R; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Beer, David G; Lawrence, Theodore S; Nyati, Mukesh K; Ray, Dipankar

    2014-02-01

    Attempts to target mutant KRAS have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the identification of Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (SMURF2) and UBCH5 as a critical E3:E2 complex maintaining KRAS protein stability. Loss of SMURF2 either by small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA (siRNA/shRNA) or by overexpression of a catalytically inactive mutant causes KRAS degradation, whereas overexpression of wild-type SMURF2 enhances KRAS stability. Importantly, mutant KRAS is more susceptible to SMURF2 loss where protein half-life decreases from >12 hours in control siRNA-treated cells to stability and propose that targeting such complex may be a unique strategy to degrade mutant KRAS to kill cancer cells.

  7. KRAS Protein Stability Is Regulated through SMURF2: UBCH5 Complex-Mediated β-TrCP1 Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirish Shukla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to target mutant KRAS have been unsuccessful. Here, we report the identification of Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (SMURF2 and UBCH5 as a critical E3:E2 complex maintaining KRAS protein stability. Loss of SMURF2 either by small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA (siRNA/shRNA or by overexpression of a catalytically inactive mutant causes KRAS degradation, whereas overexpression of wild-type SMURF2 enhances KRAS stability. Importantly, mutant KRAS is more susceptible to SMURF2 loss where protein half-life decreases from >12 hours in control siRNA-treated cells to <3 hours on Smurf2 silencing, whereas only marginal differences were noted for wild-type protein. This loss of mutant KRAS could be rescued by overexpressing a siRNA-resistant wild-type SMURF2. Our data further show that SMURF2 monoubiquitinates UBCH5 at lysine 144 to form an active complex required for efficient degradation of a RAS-family E3, β-transducing repeat containing protein 1 (β-TrCP1. Conversely, β-TrCP1 is accumulated on SMURF2 loss, leading to increased KRAS degradation. Therefore, as expected, β-TrCP1 knockdown following Smurf2 siRNA treatment rescues mutant KRAS loss. Further, we identify two conserved proline (P residues in UBCH5 critical for SMURF2 interaction; mutation of either of these P to alanine also destabilizes KRAS. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that Smurf2 silencing reduces the clonogenic survival in vitro and prolongs tumor latency in vivo in cancer cells including mutant KRAS-driven tumors. Taken together, we show that SMURF2:UBCH5 complex is critical in maintaining KRAS protein stability and propose that targeting such complex may be a unique strategy to degrade mutant KRAS to kill cancer cells.

  8. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropa...

  9. Gene expression regulation and lineage evolution: the North and South tale of the hybrid polyploid Squalius alburnoides complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Irene; Schartl, Manfred; Brito, Miguel; Vacas, Joana Malta; Coelho, Maria Manuela

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of hybrid polyploid vertebrates, their viability and their perpetuation over evolutionary time have always been questions of great interest. However, little is known about the impact of hybridization and polyploidization on the regulatory networks that guarantee the appropriate quantitative and qualitative gene expression programme. The Squalius alburnoides complex of hybrid fish is an attractive system to address these questions, as it includes a wide variety of diploid and polyploid forms, and intricate systems of genetic exchange. Through the study of genome-specific allele expression of seven housekeeping and tissue-specific genes, we found that a gene copy silencing mechanism of dosage compensation exists throughout the distribution range of the complex. Here we show that the allele-specific patterns of silencing vary within the complex, according to the geographical origin and the type of genome involved in the hybridization process. In southern populations, triploids of S. alburnoides show an overall tendency for silencing the allele from the minority genome, while northern population polyploids exhibit preferential biallelic gene expression patterns, irrespective of genomic composition. The present findings further suggest that gene copy silencing and variable expression of specific allele combinations may be important processes in vertebrate polyploid evolution. PMID:20554543

  10. On the viability of cyclometalated Ru(II) complexes as dyes in DSSC regulated by COOH group, a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Bai, Fu-Quan; Xia, Bao-Hui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Pan, Qing-Jiang

    2011-02-14

    The Ru(II) complexes [Ru(bpp)(dcbpy)Cl](+) (1), [Ru(tcbpp)(bpy)Cl](+) (2), and [Ru(tc'bpp)(bpy)Cl](+) (3) (bpp = 2,6-bis(N-pyrazolyl)pyridine, dcbpy = 4,4'-dicarboxyl-bipyridine, bpy = bipyridine, tcbpp = 4-carboxyl-2,6-bis(2-carboxyl-N-pyrazolyl)pyridine, tc'bpp = 4-carboxyl-2,6-bis(4-carboxyl-N-pyrazolyl)pyridine) are studied theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) techniques to explore their properties as dye in a solar cell. The calculated geometry structure and absorption spectrum of 1 are consistent with its experimental results. The calculation results indicate which sites the COOH groups attach to can significantly influence the electronic structure of the complex. By migrating the COOH groups from the bpy ligand in 1 to bpp ligand in 2 and 3, the nature of LUMO changes from bpy-localized to bpp dominated. The calculated low-lying absorptions at λ > 370 nm of the three complexes are categorized as metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) transitions and the transition terminates at the orbital populated by the COOH appended ligand. The atomic spin density analysis also indicates that the ligand which is modified by the COOH groups is the ideal spot for the captured electron to situate. It can be predicted that the performance of 2 and 3 in the dye-sensitized solar cell can be enhanced as compared with 1.

  11. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS. We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. Results We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284 within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284

  12. JFK, a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, links the SCF complex to p53 regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Luyang; SHI, LEI; Li, Wenqian; Yu, Wenhua; LIANG, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Xiaohan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifang; Yao, Xingrong; Yi, Xia; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Currently, several ubiquitin ligases, including the single-subunit RING-finger types—MDM2, Pirh2, and COP1—and the HECT-domain type—ARF-BP1—have been reported to target p53 for degradation. Here, we report the identification of a human Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, JFK. We ...

  13. Differential regulation of spontaneous and immune complex-induced neutrophil apoptosis by proinflammatory cytokines. Role of oxidants, Bax and caspase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottonello, Luciano; Frumento, Guido; Arduino, Nicoletta; Bertolotto, Maria; Dapino, Patrizia; Mancini, Marina; Dallegri, Franco

    2002-07-01

    Neutrophil apoptosis represents a crucial step in the mechanisms governing the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. Several soluble mediators of inflammation modulate neutrophil survival, retarding their apoptosis, whereas neutrophil activation by immune complexes (IC) results in the acceleration of apoptosis. To investigate neutrophil fate at the site of inflammation, we studied the effects of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, GM-CSF, and fMLP on spontaneous and IC-induced neutrophil apoptosis and the mechanisms regulating the survival of these cells. Spontaneous apoptosis was inhibited by GM-CSF, IL-6, and IL-15, but only GM-CSF overturned IC-induced apoptosis. No role of oxidants on the modulation of IC-dependent apoptosis was found. Indeed, fMLP or GM-CSF augmented the IC-dependent oxidative response, whereas the other compounds were ineffective. CGD neutrophils showed low levels of spontaneous apoptosis, but when exposed to IC, underwent a sharp increment of the apoptotic rate in a GM-CSF-inhibitable manner. Conversely, the expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax in 18-h aged neutrophils was down-regulated by GM-CSF, IL-6, and IL-15. Furthermore, IC induced a nearly threefold Bax up-regulation, which was completely reversed only by GM-CSF. Accordingly, the spontaneous activity of caspase-3 was inhibited by GM-CSF, IL-6, and IL-15. Furthermore, IC induced a sharp increment of enzymatic activity, and only GM-CSF inhibited the IC-dependent acceleration. Our results show that apoptosis of resting and IC-activated neutrophils is regulated differently, GM-CSF being the most potent neutrophil antiapoptotic factor. The results also unveil the existence of an oxidant-independent, Bax- and caspase-3-dependent, intracellular pathway regulating neutrophil apoptosis.

  14. Regulation of cell shape, wing hair initiation and the actin cytoskeleton by Trc/Fry and Wts/Mats complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaolan; Adler, Paul N

    2010-05-15

    The two NDR kinase family genes in Drosophila are tricornered (trc) and warts (wts). Previous studies on trc have focused on its role in the morphogenesis of extensions of epidermal cells and in dendrite branching and tiling. Studies on wts have focused on its roles as a tumor suppressor, in controlling photoreceptor type and in the maintenance of dendrites. Here we examine and compare the function of these genes in wing cells prior to their terminal differentiation. Mutations in these genes lead to changes in cell shape, cellular levels of F-actin, the timing of differentiation, and the expression of multiple wing hairs and DE-Cadherin. We showed that the effects of wts on all of these processes appear to be mediated by its regulation of the Yorkie transcription factor. We also provide evidence that trc regulates the expression of DE-cadherin and mwh. In addition, we showed that the effects on cell shape and the timing of differentiation appear to be not linked to changes in relative growth rate of cells compared to their neighbors.

  15. Complex formation between malate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis is regulated by tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomae, Maike; Meyer, Frederik M; Commichau, Fabian M; Burkovski, Andreas; Hillen, Wolfgang; Seidel, Gerald

    2014-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, recent in vivo studies revealed that particular enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle form complexes that allow an efficient transfer of metabolites. Remarkably, a complex of the malate dehydrogenase (Mdh) (EC 1.1.1.37) with isocitrate dehydrogenase (Icd) (EC 1.1.1.42) was identified, although both enzymes do not catalyze subsequent reactions. In the present study, the interactions between these enzymes were characterized in vitro by surface plasmon resonance in the absence and presence of their substrates and cofactors. These analyses revealed a weak but specific interaction between Mdh and Icd, which was specifically stimulated by a mixture of substrates and cofactors of Icd: isocitrate, NADP(+) and Mg(2+). Wild-type Icd converted these substrates too fast, preventing any valid quantitative analysis of the interaction with Mdh. Therefore, binding of the IcdS104P mutant to Mdh was quantified because the mutation reduced the enzymatic activity by 174-fold but did not affect the stimulatory effect of substrates and cofactors on Icd-Mdh complex formation. The analysis of the unstimulated Mdh-IcdS104P interaction revealed kinetic constants of k(a) = 2.0 ± 0.2 × 10(2) m(-1) ·s(-1) and k(d) = 1.0 ± 0.1 × 10(-3) ·s(-1) and a K(D) value of 5.0 ± 0.1 μm. Addition of isocitrate, NADP(+) and Mg(2+) stimulated the affinity of IcdS104P to Mdh by 33-fold (K(D) = 0.15 ± 0.01 μm, k(a) = 1.7 ± 0.7 × 10(3) m(-1) ·s(-1), k(d) = 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10(-4) ·s(-1)). Analyses of the enzymatic activities of wild-type Icd and Mdh showed that Icd activity doubles in the presence of Mdh, whereas Mdh activity was slightly reduced by Icd. In summary, these data indicate substrate control of complex formation in the tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolon assembly and maintenance of the α-ketoglutarate supply for amino acid anabolism in vivo.

  16. Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 is associated with hepatitis C virus replication complex and regulates viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, LN; Lim, YS; Pham, Long

    2014-01-01

    exogenous supplementation of either oleate or palmitoleate, products of SCD1 activity, resurrected HCV replication in SCD1 knockdown cells. SCD1 was coimmunoprecipitated with HCV nonstructural proteins and colocalized with both double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and HCV nonstructural proteins, indicating that SCD1...... is associated with HCV replication complex. Moreover, SCD1 was fractionated and enriched with HCV nonstructural proteins at detergent-resistant membrane. Electron microscopy data showed that SCD1 is required for NS4B-mediated intracellular membrane rearrangement. These data further support the idea that SCD1...

  17. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  18. The Adhesion Molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1 Regulates Neurite Branching through a SAX-7/L1CAM–EGL-15/FGFR Receptor Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Díaz-Balzac

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurite branching is essential for correct assembly of neural circuits, yet it remains a poorly understood process. For example, the neural cell adhesion molecule KAL-1/anosmin-1, which is mutated in Kallmann syndrome, regulates neurite branching through mechanisms largely unknown. Here, we show that KAL-1/anosmin-1 mediates neurite branching as an autocrine co-factor with EGL-17/FGF through a receptor complex consisting of the conserved cell adhesion molecule SAX-7/L1CAM and the fibroblast growth factor receptor EGL-15/FGFR. This protein complex, which appears conserved in humans, requires the immunoglobulin (Ig domains of SAX-7/L1CAM and the FN(III domains of KAL-1/anosmin-1 for formation in vitro as well as function in vivo. The kinase domain of the EGL-15/FGFR is required for branching, and genetic evidence suggests that ras-mediated signaling downstream of EGL-15/FGFR is necessary to effect branching. Our studies establish a molecular pathway that regulates neurite branching during development of the nervous system.

  19. Zfrp8 forms a complex with fragile-X mental retardation protein and regulates its localization and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, William; Schauder, Curtis; Naryshkina, Tatyana; Minakhina, Svetlana; Steward, Ruth

    2016-02-15

    Fragile-X syndrome is the most commonly inherited cause of autism and mental disabilities. The Fmr1 (Fragile-X Mental Retardation 1) gene is essential in humans and Drosophila for the maintenance of neural stem cells, and Fmr1 loss results in neurological and reproductive developmental defects in humans and flies. FMRP (Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein) is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, involved in mRNA silencing and translational repression. Both Zfrp8 and Fmr1 have essential functions in the Drosophila ovary. In this study, we identified FMRP, Nufip (Nuclear Fragile-X Mental Retardation Protein-interacting Protein) and Tral (Trailer Hitch) as components of a Zfrp8 protein complex. We show that Zfrp8 is required in the nucleus, and controls localization of FMRP in the cytoplasm. In addition, we demonstrate that Zfrp8 genetically interacts with Fmr1 and tral in an antagonistic manner. Zfrp8 and FMRP both control heterochromatin packaging, also in opposite ways. We propose that Zfrp8 functions as a chaperone, controlling protein complexes involved in RNA processing in the nucleus.

  20. The mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel G Valdivieso

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease. It results from different possible mutations in the CFTR gene, which encodes the CFTR chloride channel. We have previously studied the differential expression of genes in CF and CF corrected cell lines, and found a reduced expression of MTND4 in CF cells. MTND4 is a mitochondrial gene encoding the MTND4 subunit of the mitochondrial Complex I (mCx-I. Since this subunit is essential for the assembly and activity of mCx-I, we have now studied whether the activity of this complex was also affected in CF cells. By using Blue Native-PAGE, the in-gel activity (IGA of the mCx-I was found reduced in CFDE and IB3-1 cells (CF cell lines compared with CFDE/6RepCFTR and S9 cells, respectively (CFDE and IB3-1 cells ectopically expressing wild-type CFTR. Moreover, colon carcinoma T84 and Caco-2 cells, which express wt-CFTR, either treated with CFTR inhibitors (glibenclamide, CFTR(inh-172 or GlyH101 or transfected with a CFTR-specific shRNAi, showed a significant reduction on the IGA of mCx-I. The reduction of the mCx-I activity caused by CFTR inhibition under physiological or pathological conditions may have a profound impact on mitochondrial functions of CF and non-CF cells.

  1. The mechanism of E. coli RNA polymerase regulation by ppGpp is suggested by the structure of their complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yuhong; Wang, Yeming; Steitz, Thomas A

    2013-05-01

    Guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) is an alarmone that enables bacteria to adapt to their environment. It has been known for years that ppGpp acts directly on RNA polymerase (RNAP) to alter the rate of transcription, but its exact target site is still under debate. Here we report a crystal structure of Escherichia coli RNAP holoenzyme in complex with ppGpp at 4.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals that ppGpp binds at an interface between the shelf and core modules on the outer surface of RNAP, away from the catalytic center and the nucleic acid binding path. Bound ppGpp connects these two pivotal modules that may restrain the opening of the RNAP cleft. A detailed mechanism of action of ppGpp is proposed in which ppGpp prevents the closure of the active center that is induced by the binding of NTP, which could slow down nucleotide addition cycles and destabilize the initial transcription complexes.

  2. Combined small RNA and degradome sequencing reveals complex microRNA regulation of catechin biosynthesis in tea (Camellia sinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Cheng, Chunzhen; Lin, Yuling; Zhu, Qiufang; Lin, Jinke

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNAs playing crucial regulatory roles in plants. Tea, a globally popular non-alcoholic drink, is rich in health-enhancing catechins. In this study, 69 conserved and 47 novel miRNAs targeting 644 genes were identified by high-throughout sequencing. Predicted target genes of miRNAs were mainly involved in plant growth, signal transduction, morphogenesis and defense. To further identify targets of tea miRNAs, degradome sequencing and RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5’cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) were applied. Using degradome sequencing, 26 genes mainly involved in transcription factor, resistance protein and signal transduction protein synthesis were identified as potential miRNA targets, with 5 genes subsequently verified. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the expression patterns of novel-miR1, novel-miR2, csn-miR160a, csn-miR162a, csn-miR394 and csn-miR396a were negatively correlated with catechin content. The expression of six miRNAs (csn-miRNA167a, csn-miR2593e, csn-miR4380a, csn-miR3444b, csn-miR5251 and csn-miR7777-5p.1) and their target genes involved in catechin biosynthesis were also analyzed by qRT-PCR. Negative and positive correlations were found between these miRNAs and catechin contents, while positive correlations were found between their target genes and catechin content. This result suggests that these miRNAs may negatively regulate catechin biosynthesis by down-regulating their biosynthesis-related target genes. Taken together, our results indicate that miRNAs are crucial regulators in tea, with the results of 5’-RLM-RACE and expression analyses revealing the important role of miRNAs in catechin anabolism. Our findings should facilitate future research to elucidate the function of miRNAs in catechin biosynthesis. PMID:28225779

  3. Complex regulation of Arabidopsis AGR1/PIN2-mediated root gravitropic response and basipetal auxin transport by cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Heungsop; Shin, Hwa-Soo; Guo, Zibiao; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Masson, Patrick H.; Chen, Rujin

    2005-01-01

    Polar auxin transport, mediated by two distinct plasma membrane-localized auxin influx and efflux carrier proteins/complexes, plays an important role in many plant growth and developmental processes including tropic responses to gravity and light, development of lateral roots and patterning in embryogenesis. We have previously shown that the Arabidopsis AGRAVITROPIC 1/PIN2 gene encodes an auxin efflux component regulating root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport. However, the regulatory mechanism underlying the function of AGR1/PIN2 is largely unknown. Recently, protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases, respectively, have been implicated in regulating polar auxin transport and root gravitropism. Here, we examined the effects of chemical inhibitors of protein phosphatases on root gravitropism and basipetal auxin transport, as well as the expression pattern of AGR1/PIN2 gene and the localization of AGR1/PIN2 protein. We also examined the effects of inhibitors of vesicle trafficking and protein kinases. Our data suggest that protein phosphatases, sensitive to cantharidin and okadaic acid, are likely involved in regulating AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and gravitropism, as well as auxin response in the root central elongation zone (CEZ). BFA-sensitive vesicle trafficking may be required for the cycling of AGR1/PIN2 between plasma membrane and the BFA compartment, but not for the AGR1/PIN2-mediated root basipetal auxin transport and auxin response in CEZ cells.

  4. Early gene Broad complex plays a key role in regulating the immune response triggered by ecdysone in the Malpighian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Puja; Tapadia, Madhu G

    2015-08-01

    In insects, humoral response to injury is accomplished by the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are secreted in the hemolymph to eliminate the pathogen. Drosophila Malpighian tubules (MTs), however, are unique immune organs that show constitutive expression of AMPs even in unchallenged conditions and the onset of immune response is developmental stage dependent. Earlier reports have shown ecdysone positively regulates immune response after pathogenic challenge however, a robust response requires prior potentiation by the hormone. Here we provide evidence to show that MTs do not require prior potentiation with ecdysone hormone for expression of AMPs and they respond to ecdysone very fast even without immune challenge, although the different AMPs Diptericin, Cecropin, Attacin, Drosocin show differential expression in response to ecdysone. We show that early gene Broad complex (BR-C) could be regulating the IMD pathway by activating Relish and physically interacting with it to activate AMPs expression. BR-C depletion from Malpighian tubules renders the flies susceptible to infection. We also show that in MTs ecdysone signaling is transduced by EcR-B1 and B2. In the absence of ecdysone signaling the IMD pathway associated genes are down regulated and activation and translocation of transcription factor Relish is also affected.

  5. Phospho-regulated Drosophila adducin is a determinant of synaptic plasticity in a complex with Dlg and PIP2 at the larval neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ji Hau Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Adducin is a ubiquitously expressed actin- and spectrin-binding protein involved in cytoskeleton organization, and is regulated through phosphorylation of the myristoylated alanine-rich C-terminal kinase (MARCKS-homology domain by protein kinase C (PKC. We have previously shown that the Drosophila adducin, Hu-li tai shao (Hts, plays a role in larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ growth. Here, we find that the predominant isoforms of Hts at the NMJ contain the MARCKS-homology domain, which is important for interactions with Discs large (Dlg and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Through the use of Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA, we show that the adducin-like Hts isoforms are in complexes with Dlg and PIP2 at the NMJ. We provide evidence that Hts promotes the phosphorylation and delocalization of Dlg at the NMJ through regulation of the transcript distribution of the PAR-1 and CaMKII kinases in the muscle. We also show that Hts interactions with Dlg and PIP2 are impeded through phosphorylation of the MARCKS-homology domain. These results are further evidence that Hts is a signaling-responsive regulator of synaptic plasticity in Drosophila.

  6. The vacuolar-ATPase complex and assembly factors, TMEM199 and CCDC115, control HIF1α prolyl hydroxylation by regulating cellular iron levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Anna L; Burr, Stephen P; Grice, Guinevere L; Nathan, James A

    2017-03-15

    Hypoxia Inducible transcription Factors (HIFs) are principally regulated by the 2-oxoglutarate and Iron(II) prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) enzymes, which hydroxylate the HIFα subunit, facilitating its proteasome-mediated degradation. Observations that HIFα hydroxylation can be impaired even when oxygen is sufficient emphasise the importance of understanding the complex nature of PHD regulation. Here, we use an unbiased genome-wide genetic screen in near-haploid human cells to uncover cellular processes that regulate HIF1α. We identify that genetic disruption of the Vacuolar H+ ATPase (V-ATPase), the key proton pump for endo-lysosomal acidification, and two previously uncharacterised V-ATPase assembly factors, TMEM199 and CCDC115, stabilise HIF1α in aerobic conditions. Rather than preventing the lysosomal degradation of HIF1α, disrupting the V-ATPase results in intracellular iron depletion, thereby impairing PHD activity and leading to HIF activation. Iron supplementation directly restores PHD catalytic activity following V-ATPase inhibition, revealing important links between the V-ATPase, iron metabolism and HIFs.

  7. Transcriptomic Profiling Reveals Complex Molecular Regulation in Cotton Genic Male Sterile Mutant Yu98-8A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Fang

    Full Text Available Although cotton genic male sterility (GMS plays an important role in the utilization of hybrid vigor, its precise molecular mechanism remains unclear. To characterize the molecular events of pollen abortion, transcriptome analysis, combined with histological observations, was conducted in the cotton GMS line, Yu98-8A. A total of 2,412 genes were identified as significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs before and during the critical pollen abortion stages. Bioinformatics and biochemical analysis showed that the DEGs mainly associated with sugars and starch metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and plant endogenous hormones play a critical and complicated role in pollen abortion. These findings extend a better understanding of the molecular events involved in the regulation of pollen abortion in genic male sterile cotton, which may provide a foundation for further research studies on cotton heterosis breeding.

  8. Complex marine natural products as potential epigenetic and production regulators of antibiotics from a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Waters, Amanda L; Sims, James W; Fullmer, Alexis; Ellison, Serena; Hamann, Mark T

    2013-05-01

    Marine microbes are capable of producing secondary metabolites for defense and competition. Factors exerting an impact on secondary metabolite production of microbial communities included bioactive natural products and co-culturing. These external influences may have practical applications such as increased yields or the generation of new metabolites from otherwise silent genes in addition to reducing or limiting the production of undesirable metabolites. In this paper, we discuss the metabolic profiles of a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of a number of potential chemical epigenetic regulators, adjusting carbon sources and co-culturing with other microbes to induce a competitive response. As a result of these stressors certain groups of antibiotics or antimalarial agents were increased most notably when treating P. aeruginosa with sceptrin and co-culturing with another Pseudomonas sp. An interesting cross-talking event between these two Pseudomonas species when cultured together and exposed to sceptrin was observed.

  9. Energetic modeling and single-molecule verification of dynamic regulation on receptor complexes by actin corrals and lipid raft domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We developed an energetic model by integrating the generalized Langevin equation with the Cahn-Hilliard equation to simulate the diffusive behaviors of receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of a living cell. Simulation results are presented to elaborate the confinement effects from actin corrals and protein-induced lipid domains. Single-molecule tracking data of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) acquired on live HeLa cells agree with the simulation results and the mechanism that controls the diffusion of single-molecule receptors is clarified. We discovered that after ligand binding, EGFR molecules move into lipid nanodomains. The transition rates between different diffusion states of liganded EGFR molecules are regulated by the lipid domains. Our method successfully captures dynamic interactions of receptors at the single-molecule level and provides insight into the functional architecture of both the diffusing EGFR molecules and their local cellular environment.

  10. Post-transcriptional regulation of NifA expression by Hfq and RNase E complex in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghua Zhang; Guofan Hong

    2009-01-01

    NifA is the general transcriptional activator of nitrogen fixation genes in diazotrophic bacteria. In Rhizobium leguminosarum by. viciae strain 8401/pRL1JI, the NifA gene is part of a gene cluster (fixABCXNifAB). In this study, results showed that in R. leguminosarum by. viciae 8401/pRLI1I, host factor required (Hfq), and RNase E were involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of NifA expression. It was found that Hfq-dependent RNase E cleavage of NifA mRNA was essen-tial for NifA translation. The cleavage site is located at 32 nucleotides upstream of the NifA translational start codon. A possible explanation based on predicted RNA secondary structure of the NifA 5'-untranslated region was that the cleavage made ribosome-binding sites accessible for translation.

  11. Essential role of D1R in the regulation of mTOR complex1 signaling induced by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Laurie P; Caron, Marc G

    2015-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that is involved in neuronal adaptions that underlie cocaine-induced sensitization and reward. mTOR exists in two functionally distinct multi-component complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2. In this study, we show that increased mTORC1 activity induced by cocaine is mediated by the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R). Specifically, cocaine treatment increased the phosphorylation on residues Thr2446 and Ser2481 but not on Ser2448 in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and that this increase in phosphorylated mTOR levels was also apparent when complexed with its binding partner Raptor. Furthermore, the increase in phosphorylated mTOR levels, as well as phosphorylated 4E-BP1 and S6K, downstream targets of mTORC1 were blocked with SCH23390 treatment. Similar results were also observed in the dopamine-transporter knockout mice as the increase in phosphorylated mTOR Thr2446 and Ser2481 was blocked by SCH23390 but not with raclopride. To further validate D1R role in mTORC1 signaling, decrease in phosphorylated mTOR levels were observed in D1R knockout mice, whereas administration of SKF81297 elevated phosphorylated mTOR in the NAc. Lastly deletion of mTOR or Raptor in D1R expressing neurons reduced cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Together, our data supports a mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling is activated by cocaine administration through the stimulation of D1R.

  12. A heterodimeric complex of the LRR proteins LRIM1 and APL1C regulates complement-like immunity in Anopheles gambiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Richard H.G.; Steinert, Stefanie; Chelliah, Yogarany; Volohonsky, Gloria; Levashina, Elena A.; Deisenhofer, Johann (CNRS-UMR); (UTSMC)

    2012-01-20

    The leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins LRIM1 and APL1C control the function of the complement-like protein TEP1 in Anopheles mosquitoes. The molecular structure of LRIM1 and APL1C and the basis of their interaction with TEP1 represent a new type of innate immune complex. The LRIM1/APL1C complex specifically binds and solubilizes a cleaved form of TEP1 without an intact thioester bond. The LRIM1 and APL1C LRR domains have a large radius of curvature, glycosylated concave face, and a novel C-terminal capping motif. The LRIM1/APL1C complex is a heterodimer with a single intermolecular disulfide bond. The structure of the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer reveals an interface between the two LRR domains and an extensive C-terminal coiled-coil domain. We propose that a cleaved form of TEP1 may act as a convertase for activation of other TEP1 molecules and that the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer regulates formation of this TEP1 convertase.

  13. Interaction of the Ku heterodimer with the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex and its regulation by DNA-PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Silvia; Woodbine, Lisa; Andreoli, Lucia; Jeggo, Penny A; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major mechanism for repairing DNA double-stranded (ds) breaks in mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the interaction between two key components of the NHEJ machinery, the Ku heterodimer and the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Our results demonstrate that Ku interacts with DNA ligase IV via its tandem BRCT domain and that this interaction is enhanced in the presence of Xrcc4 and dsDNA. Moreover, residues 644-748 of DNA ligase IV encompassing the first BRCT motif are necessary for binding. We show that Ku needs to be in its heterodimeric form to bind DNA ligase IV and that the C-terminal tail of Ku80, which mediates binding to DNA-PKcs, is dispensable for DNA ligase IV recognition. Although the interaction between Ku and DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 occurs in the absence of DNA-PKcs, the presence of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK kinase enhances complex formation. Previous studies have shown that DNA-PK kinase activity causes disassembly of DNA-PKcs from Ku at the DNA end. Here, we show that DNA-PK kinase activity also results in disassembly of the Ku/DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Collectively, our findings provide novel information on the protein-protein interactions that regulate NHEJ in cells.

  14. RNA:DNA complex formation upon transcription of immunoglobulin switch regions: implications for the mechanism and regulation of class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G A; Lieber, M R

    1995-01-01

    Central the regulation and mechanism of class switch recombination is the understanding of the relationship between transcription and DNA recombination. We demonstrated previously, using mini-chromosome substrates, that physiologically oriented transcription is required for recombination to occur between switch regions. In this report, we demonstrate the formation of an RNA:DNA complex under in vitro transcription conditions for these same and other switch DNA fragments. We find that cell-free transcription of repetitive murine switch regions (Smu, S gamma 2b and S gamma 3) leads to altered DNA mobility on agarose gels. These altered mobilities are resistant to RNase A but sensitive to RNase H. Transcription in the presence of labeled ribonucleotides demonstrates the stable physical association of the RNA with the DNA. Importantly, complex formation only occurs upon transcription in the physiologic orientation. Reaban and Griffin [1990 Nature, 348, 342-344] found an RNA:DNA hybrid structure that was limited to an atypical 143 nucleotide purine region within a 2.3 kb S alpha segment. Here we demonstrate RNA:DNA hybrid formation in more typical switch sequences (lacking the atypical 143 nucleotide purine tract) from a variety of switch regions that are only 60-70% purine on the non-template strand. These results suggest a general model involving an RNA:DNA complex as an intermediate during class switch recombination. Images PMID:8559658

  15. Dynamic regulation of a cell adhesion protein complex including CADM1 by combinatorial analysis of FRAP with exponential curve-fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10 min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation.

  16. p63 and Brg1 control developmentally regulated higher-order chromatin remodelling at the epidermal differentiation complex locus in epidermal progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardaryev, Andrei N.; Gdula, Michal R.; Yarker, Joanne L.; Emelianov, Vladimir N.; Poterlowicz, Krzysztof; Sharov, Andrey A.; Sharova, Tatyana Y.; Scarpa, Julie A.; Chambon, Pierre; Botchkarev, Vladimir A.; Fessing, Michael Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin structural states and their remodelling, including higher-order chromatin folding and three-dimensional (3D) genome organisation, play an important role in the control of gene expression. The role of 3D genome organisation in the control and execution of lineage-specific transcription programmes during the development and differentiation of multipotent stem cells into specialised cell types remains poorly understood. Here, we show that substantial remodelling of the higher-order chromatin structure of the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC), a keratinocyte lineage-specific gene locus on mouse chromosome 3, occurs during epidermal morphogenesis. During epidermal development, the locus relocates away from the nuclear periphery towards the nuclear interior into a compartment enriched in SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Relocation of the EDC locus occurs prior to the full activation of EDC genes involved in controlling terminal keratinocyte differentiation and is a lineage-specific, developmentally regulated event controlled by transcription factor p63, a master regulator of epidermal development. We also show that, in epidermal progenitor cells, p63 directly regulates the expression of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller Brg1, which binds to distinct domains within the EDC and is required for relocation of the EDC towards the nuclear interior. Furthermore, Brg1 also regulates gene expression within the EDC locus during epidermal morphogenesis. Thus, p63 and its direct target Brg1 play an essential role in remodelling the higher-order chromatin structure of the EDC and in the specific positioning of this locus within the landscape of the 3D nuclear space, as required for the efficient expression of EDC genes in epidermal progenitor cells during skin development. PMID:24346698

  17. Differential Gene Expression and Protein Phosphorylation as Factors Regulating the State of the Arabidopsis SNX1 Protein Complexes in Response to Environmental Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbarova, Tzvetina; Ivanov, Rumen

    2016-01-01

    Endosomal recycling of plasma membrane proteins contributes significantly to the regulation of cellular transport and signaling processes. Members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SORTING NEXIN (SNX) protein family were shown to mediate the endosomal retrieval of transporter proteins in response to external challenges. Our aim is to understand the possible ways through which external stimuli influence the activity of SNX1 in the root. Several proteins are known to contribute to the function of SNX1 through direct protein–protein interaction. We, therefore, compiled a list of all Arabidopsis proteins known to physically interact with SNX1 and employed available gene expression and proteomic data for a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of this interactome. The genes encoding SNX1-interaction partners showed distinct expression patterns with some, like FAB1A, being uniformly expressed, while others, like MC9 and BLOS1, were expressed in specific root zones and cell types. Under stress conditions known to induce SNX1-dependent responses, two genes encoding SNX1-interacting proteins, MC9 and NHX6, showed major gene-expression variations. We could also observe zone-specific transcriptional changes of SNX1 under iron deficiency, which are consistent with the described role of the SNX1 protein. This suggests that the composition of potential SNX1-containing protein complexes in roots is cell-specific and may be readjusted in response to external stimuli. On the level of post-transcriptional modifications, we observed stress-dependent changes in the phosphorylation status of SNX1, FAB1A, and CLASP. Interestingly, the phosphorylation events affecting SNX1 interactors occur in a pattern which is largely complementary to transcriptional regulation. Our analysis shows that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation play distinct roles in SNX1-mediated endosomal recycling under external stress. PMID:27725825

  18. Small molecule-based disruption of the Axin/lβ-catenin protein complex regulates mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jungsug Gwak; Dong-Eun Kim; Jeong Woo Cho; Sangtaek Oh; Sun Gwan Hwang; Hyung-Soon Park; Sang Rak Choi; Sun-Hee Park; Hyunjoon Kim; Nam-Chul Ha; Sung Jin Bae; Jin-Kwan Han

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays important roles in the differentiation of multiple cell types,including mesenchymal stem cells.Using a cell-based chemical screening assay with a synthetic chemical library of 270 000 compounds,we identified the compound SKL2001 as a novel agonist of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and uncovered its molecular mechanism of action.SKL2001 upregulated β-catenin responsive transcription by increasing the intracellular β-catenin protein level and inhibited the phosphorylation of β-catenin at residues Ser33/37/Thr41 and Ser45,which would mark it for proteasomal degradation,without affecting CK1 and GSK-3β enzyme activities.Biochemical analysis revealed that SKL2001 disrupted the Axin/β-catenin interaction,which is a critical step for CK1- and GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37/Thr41 and Ser45.The treatment of mesenchymal stem cells with SKL2001 promoted osteoblastogenesis and suppressed adipocyte differentiation,both of which were accompanied by the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway.Our findings provide a new strategy to regulate mesenchymal stem cell differentiation by modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  19. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristína Záhonová

    Full Text Available Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL. Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any.

  20. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhonová, Kristína; Füssy, Zoltán; Oborník, Miroslav; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL). Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS) as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct) of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any. PMID:27391690

  1. Complex evolution of S5, a major reproductive barrier regulator, in the cultivated rice Oryza sativa and its wild relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongyi; Ouyang, Yidan; Zhang, Chengjun; Zhang, Qifa

    2011-07-01

    • The hybrid sterility gene S5 comprises three types of alleles in cultivated rice. Such tri-allelic system provided a unique opportunity to study the molecular bases of evolutionary changes underlying reproductive isolation in plants. • We analysed the sequence diversity and evolutionary history of S5 in 138 Oryza accessions. We also examined the effect of the two functional variations (C819A and C1412T) in determining hybrid sterility by transformation. • Nineteen haplotypes were identified, which were classified into the indica-like, the japonica-like and the wide-compatibility gene (WCG)-like group, according to the sequence features of the tri-allelic system. The origin and evolutionary course of the three allelic groups were investigated, thus confirming the independent origins of indica and japonica subspecies. There were perfect associations between C819A and C1412T in the rice germplasm assayed, and the combination of C819 and C1412 was required for hybrid sterility. Evidence of positive selection in the WCG-like alleles suggested that they might have been favored by selection for higher compatibility in hybrids. • The complex evolution of S5 revealed the counteractive function of the three allelic groups at the species level. S5 might perform an important primary function in an evolutionary scale, and hybrid sterility acts as a 'byproduct' of this speciation gene.

  2. The Nogo-C2/Nogo receptor complex regulates the morphogenesis of zebrafish lateral line primordium through modulating the expression of dkk1b, a Wnt signal inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Wei Han

    Full Text Available The fish lateral line (LL is a mechanosensory system closely related to the hearing system of higher vertebrates, and it is composed of several neuromasts located on the surface of the fish. These neuromasts can detect changes in external water flow, to assist fish in maintaining a stationary position in a stream. In the present study, we identified a novel function of Nogo/Nogo receptor signaling in the formation of zebrafish neuromasts. Nogo signaling in zebrafish, like that in mammals, involves three ligands and four receptors, as well as three co-receptors (TROY, p75, and LINGO-1. We first demonstrated that Nogo-C2, NgRH1a, p75, and TROY are able to form a Nogo-C2 complex, and that disintegration of this complex causes defective neuromast formation in zebrafish. Time-lapse recording of the CldnB::lynEGFP transgenic line revealed that functional obstruction of the Nogo-C2 complex causes disordered morphogenesis, and reduces rosette formation in the posterior LL (PLL primordium during migration. Consistent with these findings, hair-cell progenitors were lost from the PLL primordium in p75, TROY, and Nogo-C2/NgRH1a morphants. Notably, the expression levels of pea3, a downstream marker of Fgf signaling, and dkk1b, a Wnt signaling inhibitor, were both decreased in p75, TROY, and Nogo-C2/NgRH1a morphants; moreover, dkk1b mRNA injection could rescue the defects in neuromast formation resulting from knockdown of p75 or TROY. We thus suggest that a novel Nogo-C2 complex, consisting of Nogo-C2, NgRH1a, p75, and TROY, regulates Fgf signaling and dkk1b expression, thereby ensuring stable organization of the PLL primordium.

  3. [Studies of the genetic regulation of the Thermomonospora cellulase complex]. Progress report, June 1, 1990--January 10, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, D.B.

    1992-08-01

    The goals of this project are to determine the molecular mechanisms regulating cellulose synthesis in the soil bacterium Thermomonosporafusca and to determine the molecular mechanism by which T.fusca cellulases degrade crystalline cellulose. We have determined a structure for the T.fusca E{sub 2} catalytic subunit (E{sub 2}-30) by x-ray crystallography. This structure is quite similar to that of T.reesei CBHU but there are a number of differences. One is that the E{sub 2} active site is in a cleft while that of CBHII is in a tunnel. This is an expected result since E{sub 2} is an endocellulase. Large amounts of homogenous E{sub 5} catalytic subunit have been prepared and attempts to crystallize it are underway. Crystals of E{sub 2}-30 were soaked in cellobiose and modified crystals detracted well, however difference Fourier analysis showed many changes, so that we could not localize cellobiose in the 3-D structure of E{sub 2}-30. This implies that binding of cellobiose causes a significant change in the structure of E{sub 2}-30. The stereochemistry of the cleavage catalyzed by E{sub l}, E{sub 2} and E{sub 5} was determined in collaboration with Dr. Stephen Withers and E{sub 1} and 2 inverted the glycoside linkage while E{sub 5} does not. The entire E{sub l} and E{sub 4} genes have been induced into Streptomyces lividans where they are expressed at a high level and the E{sub l} and E{sub 4} are completely secreted into the medium. Studies on the synergism between the exocellulase E{sub 3} and the endocellulases E{sub 2} or E{sub 5} show that both exo and endocellulase activities are stimulated when they are assayed together.

  4. Complex control of GABA(A receptor subunit mRNA expression: variation, covariation, and genetic regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K Mulligan

    Full Text Available GABA type-A receptors are essential for fast inhibitory neurotransmission and are critical in brain function. Surprisingly, expression of receptor subunits is highly variable among individuals, but the cause and impact of this fluctuation remains unknown. We have studied sources of variation for all 19 receptor subunits using massive expression data sets collected across multiple brain regions and platforms in mice and humans. Expression of Gabra1, Gabra2, Gabrb2, Gabrb3, and Gabrg2 is highly variable and heritable among the large cohort of BXD strains derived from crosses of fully sequenced parents--C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. Genetic control of these subunits is complex and highly dependent on tissue and mRNA region. Remarkably, this high variation is generally not linked to phenotypic differences. The single exception is Gabrb3, a locus that is linked to anxiety. We identified upstream genetic loci that influence subunit expression, including three unlinked regions of chromosome 5 that modulate the expression of nine subunits in hippocampus, and that are also associated with multiple phenotypes. Candidate genes within these loci include, Naaa, Nos1, and Zkscan1. We confirmed a high level of coexpression for subunits comprising the major channel--Gabra1, Gabrb2, and Gabrg2--and identified conserved members of this expression network in mice and humans. Gucy1a3, Gucy1b3, and Lis1 are novel and conserved associates of multiple subunits that are involved in inhibitory signaling. Finally, proximal and distal regions of the 3' UTRs of single subunits have remarkably independent expression patterns in both species. However, corresponding regions of different subunits often show congruent genetic control and coexpression (proximal-to-proximal or distal-to-distal, even in the absence of sequence homology. Our findings identify novel sources of variation that modulate subunit expression and highlight the extraordinary capacity of biological networks to buffer

  5. Regulation of NADPH oxidase activity in phagocytes: relationship between FAD/NADPH binding and oxidase complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeurme, Franck; Picciocchi, Antoine; Dagher, Marie-Claire; Grunwald, Didier; Beaumel, Sylvain; Fieschi, Franck; Stasia, Marie-José

    2010-10-22

    The X(+)-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X(+)-CGD) variants are natural mutants characterized by defective NADPH oxidase activity but with normal Nox2 expression. According to the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic Nox2 domain, most of the X(+)-CGD mutations are located in/or close to the FAD/NADPH binding regions. A structure/function study of this domain was conducted in X(+)-CGD PLB-985 cells exactly mimicking 10 human variants: T341K, C369R, G408E, G408R, P415H, P415L, Δ507QKT509-HIWAinsert, C537R, L546P, and E568K. Diaphorase activity is defective in all these mutants. NADPH oxidase assembly is normal for P415H/P415L and T341K mutants where mutation occurs in the consensus sequences of NADPH- and FAD-binding sites, respectively. This is in accordance with their buried position in the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic Nox2 domain. FAD incorporation is abolished only in the T341K mutant explaining its absence of diaphorase activity. This demonstrates that NADPH oxidase assembly can occur without FAD incorporation. In addition, a defect of NADPH binding is a plausible explanation for the diaphorase activity inhibition in the P415H, P415L, and C537R mutants. In contrast, Cys-369, Gly-408, Leu-546, and Glu-568 are essential for NADPH oxidase complex assembly. However, according to their position in the three-dimensional model of the cytosolic domain of Nox2, only Cys-369 could be in direct contact with cytosolic factors during oxidase assembly. In addition, the defect in oxidase assembly observed in the C369R, G408E, G408R, and E568K mutants correlates with the lack of FAD incorporation. Thus, the NADPH oxidase assembly process and FAD incorporation are closely related events essential for the diaphorase activity of Nox2.

  6. Isolation of two novel ras genes in Dictyostelium discoideum; evidence for a complex, developmentally regulated ras gene subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J; Bush, J; Cardelli, J; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    1994-02-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, three ras genes (rasD, rasG and rasB) and one ras-related gene (rap1) have been previously isolated and characterized, and the deduced amino acid sequence of their predicted protein products share at least 50% sequence identity with the human H-Ras protein. We have now cloned and characterized two additional members of the ras gene subfamily in Dictyostelium, rasC and rasS. These genes are developmentally regulated and unlike the previously isolated Dictyostelium ras genes, maximum levels of their transcripts were detected during aggregation, suggesting that the encoded proteins have distinct functions during aggregation. The rasC cDNA encodes a 189 amino acid protein that is 65% identical to the Dictyostelium RasD and RasG proteins and 56% identical to the human H-Ras protein. The predicted 194 amino acid gene product encoded by rasS is 60% identical to the Dictyostelium RasD and RasG proteins and 54% identical to the human H-Ras protein. Whereas RasD, RasG, RasB and Rap1 are totally conserved in their putative effector domains relative to H-Ras, RasC and RasS have single amino acid substitutions in their effector domains, consistent with the idea that they have unique functions. In RasC, aspartic acid-38 has been replaced by asparagine (D38N), and in RasS, isoleucine-36 has been replaced by leucine (I36L). In addition, both proteins have several differences in the effector-proximal domain, a domain which is believed to play a role in Ras target activation. In RasC, there is a single conservative amino acid change in the canonical sequence of the binding site for the Ras-specific monoclonal antibody Y13-259, and consequently, RasC is less immunoreactive with the antibody than either of the Dictyostelium RasD or RasG proteins. In contrast, RasS, which has three substitutions in the Y13-259 binding site, does not react with the Y13-259 antibody.

  7. Structure of Peptide Sex Pheromone Receptor PrgX and PrgX/Pheromone Complexes and Regulation of Conjugation in Enterococcus faecalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi,K.; Brown, C.; Gu, Z.; Kozlowicz, B.; Dunny, G.; Ohlendorf, D.; Earhart, C.

    2005-01-01

    Many bacterial activities, including expression of virulence factors, horizontal genetic transfer, and production of antibiotics, are controlled by intercellular signaling using small molecules. To date, understanding of the molecular mechanisms of peptide-mediated cell-cell signaling has been limited by a dearth of published information about the molecular structures of the signaling components. Here, we present the molecular structure of PrgX, a DNA- and peptide-binding protein that regulates expression of the conjugative transfer genes of the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pCF10 in response to an intercellular peptide pheromone signal. Comparison of the structures of PrgX and the PrgX/pheromone complex suggests that pheromone binding destabilizes PrgX tetramers, opening a 70-bp pCF10 DNA loop required for conjugation repression.

  8. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seho [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chunghun [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Jae [Department of Life Science, Kyungwon University, Seongnam-Si, Kyeonggi-Do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo [Division of Biological Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun, E-mail: tseo@dongguk.edu [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  9. ATR, Claspin and the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex regulate Chk1 and Cdc25A in the absence of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Syljuåsen, Randi G; Lukas, Jiri

    2004-01-01

    The ATR and Chk1 kinases are essential to maintain genomic integrity. ATR, with Claspin and the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex, activates Chk1 after DNA damage. Chk1-mediated phosphorylation of the Cdc25A phosphatase is required for the mammalian S-phase checkpoint. Here, we show that during physiological...... S phase the regulation of the Chk1-Cdc25A pathway depends on ATR, Claspin, Rad9, and Hus1. Human cells with chemically or genetically ablated ATR showed inhibition of Chk1-dependent phosphorylation of Cdc25A, and they accumulated Cdc25A without external DNA damage. Furthermore, si......RNA-mediated depletion of Claspin, Rad9 and Hus1 also stabilized Cdc25A. ATR ablation also inhibited the activatory phosphorylation of Chk1 on serine 345. Thus, the ATR-Chk1-Cdc25A pathway represents an integral part of physiological S-phase progression, and interference with this mechanism undermines viability...

  10. Control of a four-color sensing photoreceptor by a two-color sensing photoreceptor reveals complex light regulation in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussell, Adam N; Kehoe, David M

    2013-07-30

    Photoreceptors are biologically important for sensing changes in the color and intensity of ambient light and, for photosynthetic organisms, processing this light information to optimize food production through photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria are an evolutionarily and ecologically important prokaryotic group of oxygenic photosynthesizers that contain cyanobacteriochrome (CBCR) photoreceptors, whose family members sense nearly the entire visible spectrum of light colors. Some cyanobacteria contain 12 to 15 different CBCRs, and many family members contain multiple light-sensing domains. However, the complex interactions that must be occurring within and between these photoreceptors remain unexplored. Here we describe the regulation and photobiology of a unique CBCR called IflA (influenced by far-red light), demonstrating that a second CBCR called RcaE strongly regulates IflA abundance and that IflA uses two distinct photosensory domains to respond to four different light colors: blue, green, red, and far-red. The absorption of red or far-red light by one domain affects the conformation of the other domain, and the rate of relaxation of one of these domains is influenced by the conformation of the other. Deletion of iflA results in delayed growth at low cell density, suggesting that IflA accelerates growth under this condition, apparently by sensing the ratio of red to far-red light in the environment. The types of complex photobiological interactions described here, both between unrelated CBCR family members and within photosensory domains of a single CBCR, may be advantageous for species using these photoreceptors in aquatic environments, where light color ratios are influenced by many biotic and abiotic factors.

  11. Assembly and Regulation of the Membrane Attack Complex Based on Structures of C5b6 and sC5b9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Hadders

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the complement system results in formation of membrane attack complexes (MACs, pores that disrupt lipid bilayers and lyse bacteria and other pathogens. Here, we present the crystal structure of the first assembly intermediate, C5b6, together with a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a soluble, regulated form of the pore, sC5b9. Cleavage of C5 to C5b results in marked conformational changes, distinct from those observed in the homologous C3-to-C3b transition. C6 captures this conformation, which is preserved in the larger sC5b9 assembly. Together with antibody labeling, these structures reveal that complement components associate through sideways alignment of the central MAC-perforin (MACPF domains, resulting in a C5b6-C7-C8β-C8α-C9 arc. Soluble regulatory proteins below the arc indicate a potential dual mechanism in protection from pore formation. These results provide a structural framework for understanding MAC pore formation and regulation, processes important for fighting infections and preventing complement-mediated tissue damage.

  12. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  13. The bHLH factors Dpn and members of the E(spl complex mediate the function of Notch signalling regulating cell proliferation during wing disc development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz P. San Juan

    2012-05-01

    The Notch signalling pathway plays an essential role in the intricate control of cell proliferation and pattern formation in many organs during animal development. In addition, mutations in most members of this pathway are well characterized and frequently lead to tumour formation. The Drosophila imaginal wing discs have provided a suitable model system for the genetic and molecular analysis of the different pathway functions. During disc development, Notch signalling at the presumptive wing margin is necessary for the restricted activation of genes required for pattern formation control and disc proliferation. Interestingly, in different cellular contexts within the wing disc, Notch can either promote cell proliferation or can block the G1-S transition by negatively regulating the expression of dmyc and bantam micro RNA. The target genes of Notch signalling that are required for these functions have not been identified. Here, we show that the Hes vertebrate homolog, deadpan (dpn, and the Enhancer-of-split complex (E(splC genes act redundantly and cooperatively to mediate the Notch signalling function regulating cell proliferation during wing disc development.

  14. Sphingosine kinase 1 serves as a pro-viral factor by regulating viral RNA synthesis and nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein complex upon influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Seo

    Full Text Available Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3, a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1, to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection.

  15. The master regulator for biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis governs the expression of an operon encoding secreted proteins required for the assembly of complex multicellular communities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branda, Steven S. (Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA); Losick, Richard (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Kolter, Roberto (Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA); Kearns, Daniel B. (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA); Chu, Frances (Harvard University, Cambridge, MA)

    2005-08-01

    Wild strains of Bacillus subtilis are capable of forming architecturally complex communities of cells known as biofilms. Critical to biofilm formation is the eps operon, which is believed to be responsible for the biosynthesis of an exopolysaccharide that binds chains of cells together in bundles. We report that transcription of eps is under the negative regulation of SinR, a repressor that was found to bind to multiple sites in the regulatory region of the operon. Mutations in sinR bypassed the requirement in biofilm formation of two genes of unknown function, ylbF and ymcA, and sinI, which is known to encode an antagonist of SinR. We propose that these genes are members of a pathway that is responsible for counteracting SinR-mediated repression. We further propose that SinR is a master regulator that governs the transition between a planktonic state in which the bacteria swim as single cells in liquid or swarm in small groups over surfaces, and a sessile state in which the bacteria adhere to each other to form bundled chains and assemble into multicellular communities.

  16. Differential regulation of acid sphingomyelinase in macrophages stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL immune complexes: role in phagocytosis and cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Al Gadban, Mohammed M; Smith, Kent J; Jenkins, Russell W; Mayroo, Nalini; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Bielawska, Alicja; Hannun, Yusuf A; Hammad, Samar M

    2012-05-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) contribute to the formation of lipid-laden macrophages (foam cells). Fcγ receptors mediate uptake of oxLDL-IC, whereas scavenger receptors internalize oxLDL. We have previously reported that oxLDL-IC, but not free oxLDL, activate macrophages and prolong their survival. Sphingomyelin is a major constituent of cell membranes and lipoprotein particles and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) hydrolyses sphingomyelin to generate the bioactive lipid ceramide. ASMase exists in two forms: lysosomal (L-ASMase) and secretory (S-ASMase). In this study we examined whether oxLDL and oxLDL-IC regulate ASMase differently, and whether ASMase mediates monocyte/macrophage activation and cytokine release. The oxLDL-IC, but not oxLDL, induced early and consistent release of catalytically active S-ASMase. The oxLDL-IC also consistently stimulated L-ASMase activity, whereas oxLDL induced a rapid transient increase in L-ASMase activity before it steadily declined below baseline. Prolonged exposure to oxLDL increased L-ASMase activity; however, activity remained significantly lower than that induced by oxLDL-IC. Further studies were aimed at defining the function of the activated ASMase. In response to oxLDL-IC, heat-shock protein 70B' (HSP70B') was up-regulated and localized with redistributed ASMase in the endosomal compartment outside the lysosome. Treatment with oxLDL-IC induced the formation and release of HSP70-containing and IL-1β-containing exosomes via an ASMase-dependent mechanism. Taken together, the results suggest that oxLDL and oxLDL-IC differentially regulate ASMase activity, and the pro-inflammatory responses to oxLDL-IC are mediated by prolonged activation of ASMase. These findings may contribute to increased understanding of mechanisms mediating macrophage involvement in atherosclerosis.

  17. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637-2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP.

  18. Structure of the nucleotide complex of PyrR, the pyr attenuation protein from Bacillus caldolyticus, suggests dual regulation by pyrimidine and purine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Preethi; Halbig, Kari M; Miller, Jamie K; Fields, Christopher J; Bonner, Heather K S; Grabner, Gail K; Switzer, Robert L; Smith, Janet L

    2005-03-01

    PyrR is a protein that regulates the expression of genes and operons of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (pyr genes) in many bacteria. PyrR acts by binding to specific sequences on pyr mRNA and causing transcriptional attenuation when intracellular levels of uridine nucleotides are elevated. PyrR from Bacillus subtilis has been purified and extensively studied. In this work, we describe the purification to homogeneity and characterization of recombinant PyrR from the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus and the crystal structures of unliganded PyrR and a PyrR-nucleotide complex. The B. caldolyticus pyrR gene was previously shown to restore normal regulation of the B. subtilis pyr operon in a pyrR deletion mutant. Like B. subtilis PyrR, B. caldolyticus PyrR catalyzes the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase reaction but with maximal activity at 60 degrees C. Crystal structures of B. caldolyticus PyrR reveal a dimer similar to the B. subtilis PyrR dimer and, for the first time, binding sites for nucleotides. UMP and GMP, accompanied by Mg2+, bind specifically to PyrR active sites. Nucleotide binding to PyrR is similar to other phosphoribosyltransferases, but Mg2+ binding differs. GMP binding was unexpected. The protein bound specific sequences of pyr RNA 100 to 1,000 times more tightly than B. subtilis PyrR, depending on the RNA tested and the assay method; uridine nucleotides enhanced RNA binding, but guanosine nucleotides antagonized it. The new findings of specific GMP binding and its antagonism of RNA binding suggest cross-regulation of the pyr operon by purines.

  19. Regulation of the Bfa1p-Bub2p complex at spindle pole bodies by the cell cycle phosphatase Cdc14p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gislene; Manson, Claire; Grindlay, Joan; Schiebel, Elmar

    2002-04-29

    The budding yeast mitotic exit network (MEN) is a GTPase-driven signal transduction cascade that controls the release of the phosphatase Cdc14p from the nucleolus in anaphase and thereby drives mitotic exit. We show that Cdc14p is partially released from the nucleolus in early anaphase independent of the action of the MEN components Cdc15p, Dbf2p, and Tem1p. Upon release, Cdc14p binds to the spindle pole body (SPB) via association with the Bfa1p-Bub2p GTPase activating protein complex, which is known to regulate the activity of the G protein Tem1p. Cdc14p also interacts with this GTPase. The association of the MEN component Mob1p with the SPB acts as a marker of MEN activation. The simultaneous binding of Cdc14p and Mob1p to the SPB in early anaphase suggests that Cdc14p initially activates the MEN. In a second, later step, which coincides with mitotic exit, Cdc14p reactivates the Bfa1p-Bub2p complex by dephosphorylating Bfa1p. This inactivates the MEN and displaces Mob1p from SPBs. These data indicate that Cdc14p activates the MEN in early anaphase but later inactivates it through Bfa1p dephosphorylation and so restricts MEN activity to a short period in anaphase.

  20. Yeast H2A.Z, FACT complex and RSC regulate transcription of tRNA gene through differential dynamics of flanking nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Sahasransu; Dewari, Pooran S; Bhardwaj, Anubhav; Bhargava, Purnima

    2011-05-01

    FACT complex is involved in elongation and ensures fidelity in the initiation step of transcription by RNA polymerase (pol) II. Histone variant H2A.Z is found in nucleosomes at the 5'-end of many genes. We report here H2A.Z-chaperone activity of the yeast FACT complex on the short, nucleosome-free, non-coding, pol III-transcribed yeast tRNA genes. On a prototype gene, yeast SUP4, chromatin remodeler RSC and FACT regulate its transcription through novel mechanisms, wherein the two gene-flanking nucleosomes containing H2A.Z, play different roles. Nhp6, which ensures transcription fidelity and helps load yFACT onto the gene flanking nucleosomes, has inhibitory role. RSC maintains a nucleosome abutting the gene terminator downstream, which results in reduced transcription rate in active state while H2A.Z probably helps RSC in keeping the gene nucleosome-free and serves as stress-sensor. All these factors maintain an epigenetic state which allows the gene to return quickly from repressed to active state and tones down the expression from the active SUP4 gene, required probably to maintain the balance in cellular tRNA pool.

  1. Regulation of lipid droplet dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the Rab7-like Ypt7p, HOPS complex and V1-ATPase

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    Isabelle Bouchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It has now been clearly shown that lipid droplets (LDs play a dynamic role in the cell. This was reinforced by LD proteomics which suggest that a significant number of trafficking proteins are associated with this organelle. Using microscopy, we showed that LDs partly co-localize with the vacuole in S. cerevisiae. Immunoblot experiments confirmed the association of the vacuolar Rab GTPase Rab7-like Ypt7p with LDs. We observed an increase in fatty acid content and LD number in ypt7Δ mutant and also changes in LD morphology and intra LD fusions, revealing a direct role for Ypt7p in LD dynamics. Using co-immunoprecipitation, we isolated potential Ypt7p partners including, Vma13p, the H subunit of the V1 part of the vacuolar (H+ ATPase (V-ATPase. Deletion of the VMA13 gene, as well as deletion of three other subunits of the V1 part of the V-ATPase, also increased the cell fatty acid content and LD number. Mutants of the Homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS complex showed similar phenotypes. Here, we demonstrated that LD dynamics and membrane trafficking between the vacuole and LDs are regulated by the Rab7-like Ypt7p and are impaired when the HOPS complex and the V1 domain of the V-ATPase are defective.

  2. Bicaudal D2, dynein, and kinesin-1 associate with nuclear pore complexes and regulate centrosome and nuclear positioning during mitotic entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël Splinter

    Full Text Available BICD2 is one of the two mammalian homologues of the Drosophila Bicaudal D, an evolutionarily conserved adaptor between microtubule motors and their cargo that was previously shown to link vesicles and mRNP complexes to the dynein motor. Here, we identified a G2-specific role for BICD2 in the relative positioning of the nucleus and centrosomes in dividing cells. By combining mass spectrometry, biochemical and cell biological approaches, we show that the nuclear pore complex (NPC component RanBP2 directly binds to BICD2 and recruits it to NPCs specifically in G2 phase of the cell cycle. BICD2, in turn, recruits dynein-dynactin to NPCs and as such is needed to keep centrosomes closely tethered to the nucleus prior to mitotic entry. When dynein function is suppressed by RNA interference-mediated depletion or antibody microinjection, centrosomes and nuclei are actively pushed apart in late G2 and we show that this is due to the action of kinesin-1. Surprisingly, depletion of BICD2 inhibits both dynein and kinesin-1-dependent movements of the nucleus and cytoplasmic NPCs, demonstrating that BICD2 is needed not only for the dynein function at the nuclear pores but also for the antagonistic activity of kinesin-1. Our study demonstrates that the nucleus is subject to opposing activities of dynein and kinesin-1 motors and that BICD2 contributes to nuclear and centrosomal positioning prior to mitotic entry through regulation of both dynein and kinesin-1.

  3. Regulation of fear extinction versus other affective behaviors by discrete cortical scaffolding complexes associated with NR2B and PKA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, K A; Leaderbrand, K; Jovasevic, V; Guedea, A L; Kassam, F; Radulovic, J

    2015-10-13

    In patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), fear evoked by trauma-related memories lasts long past the traumatic event and it is often complicated by general anxiety and depressed mood. This poses a treatment challenge, as drugs beneficial for some symptoms might exacerbate others. For example, in preclinical studies, antagonists of the NR2B subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) act as potent antidepressants and anxiolytics, but they block fear extinction. Using mice, we attempted to overcome this problem by interfering with individual NR2B and PKA signaling complexes organized by scaffolding proteins. We infused cell-permeable Tat peptides that displaced either NR2B from receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), or PKA from A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) or microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs). The infusions were targeted to the retrosplenial cortex, an area involved in both fear extinction of remotely acquired memories and in mood regulation. Tat-RACK1 and Tat-AKAP enhanced fear extinction, all peptides reduced anxiety and none affected baseline depression-like behavior. However, disruption of PKA complexes distinctively interfered with the rapid antidepressant actions of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors antagonist MK-801 in that Tat-MAP2 blocked, whereas Tat-AKAP completely inverted the effect of MK-801 from antidepressant to depressant. These effects were unrelated to the MK-801-induced changes of brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA levels. Together, the findings suggest that NR2B-RACK1 complexes specifically contribute to fear extinction, and may provide a target for the treatment of PTSD. AKAP-PKA, on the other hand, appears to modulate fear extinction and antidepressant responses in opposite directions.

  4. Kinetic Analysis of a Globin-Coupled Histidine Kinase, AfGcHK: Effects of the Heme Iron Complex, Response Regulator, and Metal Cations on Autophosphorylation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtikova, Veronika; Stranava, Martin; Vos, Marten H; Liebl, Ursula; Hranicek, Jakub; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Shimizu, Toru; Martinkova, Marketa

    2015-08-18

    The globin-coupled histidine kinase, AfGcHK, is a part of the two-component signal transduction system from the soil bacterium Anaeromyxobacter sp. Fw109-5. Activation of its sensor domain significantly increases its autophosphorylation activity, which targets the His183 residue of its functional domain. The phosphate group of phosphorylated AfGcHK is then transferred to the cognate response regulator. We investigated the effects of selected variables on the autophosphorylation reaction's kinetics. The kcat values of the heme Fe(III)-OH(-), Fe(III)-cyanide, Fe(III)-imidazole, and Fe(II)-O2 bound active AfGcHK forms were 1.1-1.2 min(-1), and their Km(ATP) values were 18.9-35.4 μM. However, the active form bearing a CO-bound Fe(II) heme had a kcat of 1.0 min(-1) but a very high Km(ATP) value of 357 μM, suggesting that its active site structure differs strongly from the other active forms. The Fe(II) heme-bound inactive form had kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.4 min(-1) and 78 μM, respectively, suggesting that its low activity reflects a low affinity for ATP relative to that of the Fe(III) form. The heme-free form exhibited low activity, with kcat and Km(ATP) values of 0.3 min(-1) and 33.6 μM, respectively, suggesting that the heme iron complex is essential for high catalytic activity. Overall, our results indicate that the coordination and oxidation state of the sensor domain heme iron profoundly affect the enzyme's catalytic activity because they modulate its ATP binding affinity and thus change its kcat/Km(ATP) value. The effects of the response regulator and different divalent metal cations on the autophosphorylation reaction are also discussed.

  5. Up-regulation of lymphocyte antigen 6 complex expression in side-population cells derived from a human trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tetsunori; Kusunoki, Soshi; Tabu, Kouichi; Okabe, Hitomi; Yamada, Izumi; Taga, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Akemi; Makino, Shintaro; Takeda, Satoru; Kato, Kiyoko

    2016-01-01

    The continual proliferation and differentiation of trophoblasts are critical for the maintenance of pregnancy. It is well known that the tissue stem cells are associated with the development of tissues and pathologies. It has been demonstrated that side-population (SP) cells identified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) are enriched with stem cells. The SP cells in HTR-8/SVneo cells derived from human primary trophoblast cells were isolated by FACS. HTR-8/SVneo-SP cell cultures generated both SP and non-SP (NSP) subpopulations. In contrast, NSP cell cultures produced NSP cells and failed to produce SP cells. These SP cells showed self-renewal capability by serial colony-forming assay. Microarray expression analysis using a set of HTR-8/SVneo-SP and -NSP cells revealed that SP cells overexpressed several stemness genes including caudal type homeobox2 (CDX2) and bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus D (LY6D) gene was the most highly up-regulated in HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. LY6D gene reduced its expression in the course of a 7-day cultivation in differentiation medium. SP cells tended to reduce its fraction by treatment of LY6D siRNA indicating that LY6D had potential to maintain cell proliferation of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. On ontology analysis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway was involved in the up-regulated genes on microarray analysis. HTR-SVneo-SP cells showed enhanced migration. This is the first report that LY6D was important for the maintenance of HTR-8/SVneo-SP cells. EMT was associated with the phenotype of these SP cells.

  6. P-TEFb, the super elongation complex and mediator regulate a subset of non-paused genes during early Drosophila embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Dahlberg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb is a kinase consisting of Cdk9 and Cyclin T that releases RNA Polymerase II (Pol II into active elongation. It can assemble into a larger Super Elongation Complex (SEC consisting of additional elongation factors. Here, we use a miRNA-based approach to knock down the maternal contribution of P-TEFb and SEC components in early Drosophila embryos. P-TEFb or SEC depletion results in loss of cells from the embryo posterior and in cellularization defects. Interestingly, the expression of many patterning genes containing promoter-proximal paused Pol II is relatively normal in P-TEFb embryos. Instead, P-TEFb and SEC are required for expression of some non-paused, rapidly transcribed genes in pre-cellular embryos, including the cellularization gene Serendipity-α. We also demonstrate that another P-TEFb regulated gene, terminus, has an essential function in embryo development. Similar morphological and gene expression phenotypes were observed upon knock down of Mediator subunits, providing in vivo evidence that P-TEFb, the SEC and Mediator collaborate in transcription control. Surprisingly, P-TEFb depletion does not affect the ratio of Pol II at the promoter versus the 3' end, despite affecting global Pol II Ser2 phosphorylation levels. Instead, Pol II occupancy is reduced at P-TEFb down-regulated genes. We conclude that a subset of non-paused, pre-cellular genes are among the most susceptible to reduced P-TEFb, SEC and Mediator levels in Drosophila embryos.

  7. Down regulation of the TCR complex CD3 ζ-chain on CD3+ T cells: a potential mechanism for helminth mediated immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jane Appleby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The CD3ζ forms part of the T cell receptor (TCR where it plays an important role in coupling antigen recognition to several intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to T cell effector functions. Down regulation of CD3ζ leads to impairment of immune responses including reduced cell proliferation and cytokine production. In experimental models helminth parasites have been shown to modulate immune responses directed against them and unrelated antigens, so called bystander antigens, but there is a lack of studies validating these observations in humans. This study focused on investigated the relationship between expression levels of the TCR CD3ζ chain with lymphocyte cell proliferation during human infection with the helminth parasite, Schistosoma haematobium which causes uro-genital schistosomiasis. Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from individuals naturally exposed to S. haematobium in rural Zimbabwe were phenotyped, and expression levels of CD3ζ on T cells were related to intensity of infection. In this population, parasite infection intensity was inversely related to CD3ζ expression levels (p<0.05, consistent with down-regulation of CD3ζ expression during helminth infection. Furthermore, PBMC proliferation was positively related to expression levels of CD3ζ (p<0.05 after allowing for confounding variables (host age, sex, infection level. CD3ζ expression levels had a differing relationship between immune correlates of susceptibility and immunity, measured by antibody responses, indicating a complex relationship between immune activation status and immunity. The relationships between the CD3ζ chain of the TCR and schistosome infection, PBMC proliferation and schistosome-specific antibody responses have not previously been reported, and these results may indicate a mechanism for the impaired T cell proliferative responses observed during human schistosome infection.

  8. Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) protein ESC regulates insect developmental timing by mediating H3K27me3 and activating prothoracicotropic hormone gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2013-08-09

    The decision made by insects to develop into adults or halt development (enter diapause and prolong lifespan) is commonly based on environmental signals that provide reliable predictors of future seasons of adversity. For example, the short day lengths of early autumn accurately foretell the advent of winter, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that preside over the hormonal events dictating whether the insect proceeds with development or enters diapause. In Helicoverpa armigera we show that day length affects H3K27me3 by affecting polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) protein extra sex comb (ESC) and regulates the prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) gene, thus directly influencing developmental timing. ESC expression in brains of developing (nondiapause) pupae is higher than in brains from diapausing pupae. High ESC expression is localized in two pairs of PTTH neurosecretory cells, and H3K27me3 recruits on the PTTH promoter. Double strand ESC and PRC2 inhibitor (DzNep) treatment in vitro show that ESC triggers PTTH promoter activity, which in turn depends on PRC2 methyltransferase activity. Injection of DzNep into pupae programmed for development reduces the H3K27me3 mark and PTTH gene expression, thereby delaying development. Although ESC is best known as a transcriptional repressor, our results show that ESC prompts development and metamorphosis. We believe this is the first report showing that the PRC2 complex functions as an activator and that a low level of H3K27me3 can prolong lifespan (i.e. induce diapause) by controlling PTTH gene expression in insects.

  9. Zipper-interacting protein kinase is involved in regulation of ubiquitination of the androgen receptor, thereby contributing to dynamic transcription complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, A; Brinckmann, D; Landsberg, G; Scheidtmann, K H

    2013-10-10

    We have recently identified apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), tumor-susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) as novel coactivators of the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanisms of coactivation remained obscure, however. Here we investigated the interplay and interdependence between these coactivators and the AR using the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene as model for AR-target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that recruitment of AATF and ZIPK to the PSA enhancer was dependent on AR, whereas recruitment of TSG101 was dependent on AATF. Association of AR and its coactivators with the PSA enhancer or promoter occurred in cycles. Dissociation of AR-transcription complexes was due to degradation because inhibition of the proteasome system by MG132 caused accumulation of AR at enhancer/promoter elements. Moreover, inhibition of degradation strongly reduced transcription, indicating that continued and efficient transcription is based on initiation, degradation and reinitiation cycles. Interestingly, knockdown of ZIPK by siRNA had a similar effect as MG132, leading to reduced transcription but enhanced accumulation of AR at androgen-response elements. In addition, knockdown of ZIPK, as well as overexpression of a dominant-negative ZIPK mutant, diminished polyubiquitination of AR. Furthermore, ZIPK cooperated with the E3 ligase Mdm2 in AR-dependent transactivation, assembled into a single complex on chromatin and phosphorylated Mdm2 in vitro. These results suggest that ZIPK has a crucial role in regulation of ubiquitination and degradation of the AR, and hence promoter clearance and efficient transcription.

  10. Leucine zipper motif in RRS1 is crucial for the regulation of Arabidopsis dual resistance protein complex RPS4/RRS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusaka, Mari; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Iuchi, Satoshi; Takano, Yoshitaka; Shirasu, Ken; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-11

    Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich repeat-containing (NLR) proteins RPS4 and RRS1, known as dual resistance proteins, confer resistance to multiple pathogen isolates, such as the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Ralstonia solanacearum and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. RPS4 is a typical Toll/interleukin 1 Receptor (TIR)-type NLR, whereas RRS1 is an atypical TIR-NLR that contains a leucine zipper (LZ) motif and a C-terminal WRKY domain. RPS4 and RRS1 are localised near each other in a head-to-head orientation. In this study, direct mutagenesis of the C-terminal LZ motif in RRS1 caused an autoimmune response and stunting in the mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that full-length RPS4 and RRS1 are physically associated with one another. Furthermore, virus-induced gene silencing experiments showed that hypersensitive-like cell death triggered by RPS4/LZ motif-mutated RRS1 depends on EDS1. In conclusion, we suggest that the RRS1-LZ motif is crucial for the regulation of the RPS4/RRS1 complex.

  11. Cystoviral polymerase complex protein P7 uses its acidic C-terminal tail to regulate the RNA-directed RNA polymerase P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonse, Sébastien; Arnold, Jamie J; Bhattacharya, Shibani; Wang, Hsin; Kloss, Brian; Cameron, Craig E; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2014-07-15

    In bacteriophages of the cystovirus family, the polymerase complex (PX) encodes a 75-kDa RNA-directed RNA polymerase (P2) that transcribes the double-stranded RNA genome. Also a constituent of the PX is the essential protein P7 that, in addition to accelerating PX assembly and facilitating genome packaging, plays a regulatory role in transcription. Deletion of P7 from the PX leads to aberrant plus-strand synthesis suggesting its influence on the transcriptase activity of P2. Here, using solution NMR techniques and the P2 and P7 proteins from cystovirus ϕ12, we demonstrate their largely electrostatic interaction in vitro. Chemical shift perturbations on P7 in the presence of P2 suggest that this interaction involves the dynamic C-terminal tail of P7, more specifically an acidic cluster therein. Patterns of chemical shift changes induced on P2 by the P7 C-terminus resemble those seen in the presence of single-stranded RNA suggesting similarities in binding. This association between P2 and P7 reduces the affinity of the former toward template RNA and results in its decreased activity both in de novo RNA synthesis and in extending a short primer. Given the presence of C-terminal acidic tracts on all cystoviral P7 proteins, the electrostatic nature of the P2/P7 interaction is likely conserved within the family and could constitute a mechanism through which P7 regulates transcription in cystoviruses.

  12. Structural basis of jasmonate-amido synthetase FIN219 in complex with glutathione S-transferase FIP1 during the JA signal regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Ho, Sih-Syun; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Far-red (FR) light-coupled jasmonate (JA) signaling is necessary for plant defense and development. FR insensitive 219 (FIN219) is a member of the Gretchen Hagen 3 (GH3) family of proteins in Arabidopsis and belongs to the adenylate-forming family of enzymes. It directly controls biosynthesis of jasmonoyl-isoleucine in JA-mediated defense responses and interacts with FIN219-interacting protein 1 (FIP1) under FR light conditions. FIN219 and FIP1 are involved in FR light signaling and are regulators of the interplay between light and JA signaling. However, how their interactions affect plant physiological functions remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate the crystal structures of FIN219–FIP1 while binding with substrates at atomic resolution. Our results show an unexpected FIN219 conformation and demonstrate various differences between this protein and other members of the GH3 family. We show that the rotated C-terminal domain of FIN219 alters ATP binding and the core structure of the active site. We further demonstrate that this unique FIN219–FIP1 structure is crucial for increasing FIN219 activity and determines the priority of substrate binding. We suggest that the increased FIN219 activity resulting from the complex form, a conformation for domain switching, allows FIN219 to switch to its high-affinity mode and thereby enhances JA signaling under continuous FR light conditions. PMID:28223489

  13. Interaction proteins of invertase and invertase inhibitor in cold-stored potato tubers suggested a protein complex underlying post-translational regulation of invertase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Xun; Ou, Yongbin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Huiling; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2013-12-01

    The activity of vacuolar invertase (VI) is vital to potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS). A post-translational regulation of VI activity has been proposed which involves invertase inhibitor (VIH), but the mechanism for the interaction between VI and VIH has not been fully understood. To identify the potential partners of VI and VIH, two cDNA libraries were respectively constructed from CIS-resistant wild potato species Solanum berthaultii and CIS-sensitive potato cultivar AC035-01 for the yeast two-hybrid analysis. The StvacINV1 (one of the potato VIs) and StInvInh2B (one of the potato VIHs), previously identified to be associated with potato CIS, were used as baits to screen the two libraries. Through positive selection and sequencing, 27 potential target proteins of StvacINV1 and eight of StInvInh2B were clarified. The Kunitz-type protein inhibitors were captured by StvacINV1 in both libraries and the interaction between them was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco cells, reinforcing a fundamental interaction between VI and VIH. Notably, a sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 1 was captured by both the baits, suggesting that a protein complex could be necessary for fine turning of the invertase activity. The target proteins clarified in present research provide a route to elucidate the mechanism by which the VI activity can be subtly modulated.

  14. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunit16 positively regulates salicylate-mediated systemic acquired resistance and jasmonate/ethylene-induced defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Chenggang; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a long-lasting plant immunity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Biological induction of SAR requires the signal molecule salicylic acid (SA) and involves profound transcriptional changes that are largely controlled by the transcription coactivator nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1 (NPR1). However, it is unclear how SAR signals are transduced from the NPR1 signaling node to the general transcription machinery. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana Mediator subunit16 (MED16) is an essential positive regulator of SAR. Mutations in MED16 reduced NPR1 protein levels and completely compromised biological induction of SAR. These mutations also significantly suppressed SA-induced defense responses, altered the transcriptional changes induced by the avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst) DC3000/avrRpt2, and rendered plants susceptible to both Pst DC3000/avrRpt2 and Pst DC3000. In addition, mutations in MED16 blocked the induction of several jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-responsive genes and compromised resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. The Mediator complex acts as a bridge between specific transcriptional activators and the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery; therefore, our data suggest that MED16 may be a signaling component in the gap between the NPR1 signaling node and the general transcription machinery and may relay signals from both the SA and the JA/ET pathways.

  15. Vimentin is a component of a complex that binds to the 5'-UTR of human heme-regulated eIF2α kinase mRNA and regulates its translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sangeeta; Panda, Amaresh C; Berwal, Sunil K; Sreejith, R K; Ritvika, Charu; Seshadri, Vasudevan; Pal, Jayanta K

    2013-03-01

    The human heme-regulated eIF2α kinase, also called the human heme-regulated inhibitor (hHRI) is significantly up-regulated particularly at the level of translation during stress. In this report we show that during lead-stress, the regulation of hHRI mRNA translation is mediated through its 5'-untranslated region (UTR) that interacts with specific trans-acting factors. Further, vimentin has been identified as one of the trans-acting factors that contribute to this regulation.

  16. Evolutionary Landscape of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex from the Viewpoint of PhoPR: Implications for Virulence Regulation and Application to Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broset, Esther

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Different members of the Mycobacterium genus have evolved to cause tuberculosis in diverse human populations and in a variety of animal species. Our cumulative knowledge of mycobacterial genomes indicates that mutations in the PhoPR two-component virulence system were acquired not only during the natural evolution of mycobacterial species but also during in vitro subculture, which has given rise to the attenuated reference strain H37Ra or to different daughter strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PhoPR is a well-known regulator of pathogenic phenotypes, including secretion of the virulence factor ESAT-6, biosynthesis of acyltrehalose-based lipids, and modulation of antigen export, in members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Evolutionarily conserved polymorphisms in PhoPR from Mycobacterium africanum, M. bovis, or M. tuberculosis H37Ra result in loss of functional phenotypes. Interestingly, some members of the MTBC have acquired compensatory mutations to counteract these polymorphisms and, probably, to maintain their pathogenic potential. Some of these compensatory mutations include the insertion of the IS6110 element upstream from phoPR in a particular M. bovis strain that is able to transmit between humans or polymorphisms in M. africanum and M. bovis that affect the regulatory region of the espACD operon, allowing PhoPR-independent ESAT-6 secretion. This review highlights the increasing knowledge of the significance of PhoPR in the evolution of the MTBC and its potential application in the construction of new attenuated vaccines based on phoPR inactivation. In this context, the live attenuated vaccine MTBVAC, based on a phoP fadD26 deletion mutant of M. tuberculosis, is the first vaccine of this kind to successfully enter into clinical development, representing a historic milestone in the field of human vaccinology. PMID:26489860

  17. Orp1, a member of the Cdc18/Cdc6 family of S-phase regulators, is homologous to a component of the origin recognition complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi-Falconi, M; Kelly, T J

    1995-01-01

    cdc18+ of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a periodically expressed gene that is required for entry into S phase and for the coordination of S phase with mitosis. cdc18+ is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene CDC6, which has also been implicated in the control of DNA replication. We have identified a new Sch. pombe gene, orp1+, that encodes an 80-kDa protein with amino acid sequence motifs conserved in the Cdc18 and Cdc6 proteins. Genetic analysis indicates that orp1+ is essential for viability. Germinating spores lacking the orp1+ gene are capable of undergoing one or more rounds of DNA replication but fail to progress further, arresting as long cells with a variety of deranged nuclear structures. Unlike cdc18+, orp1+ is expressed constitutively during the cell cycle. cdc18+, CDC6, and orp1+ belong to a family of related genes that also includes the gene ORC1, which encodes a subunit of the origin recognition complex (ORC) of S. cerevisiae. The products of this gene family share a 250-amino acid domain that is highly conserved in evolution and contains several characteristic motifs, including a consensus purine nucleotide-binding motif. Among the members of this gene family, orp1+ is most closely related to S. cerevisiae ORC1. Thus, the protein encoded by orp1+ may represent a component of an Sch. pombe ORC. The orp1+ gene is also closely related to an uncharacterized putative human homologue. It is likely that the members of the cdc18/CDC6 family play key roles in the regulation of DNA replication during the cell cycle of diverse species from archaebacteria to man. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8618924

  18. The regulation of TiO2 nanoparticles on the expression of light-harvesting complex II and photosynthesis of chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ze, Yuguan; Liu, Chao; Wang, Ling; Hong, Mengmeng; Hong, Fashui

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) could significantly promote photosynthesis and plant growth, but its mechanism is still unclear. In this article, we studied the mechanism of light absorption and transfer of chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana caused by TiO2 NPs treated. The results showed that TiO2 NPs could induce significant increases of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) b gene expression and LHCII II content on the thylakoid membrane in A. thaliana, and the increases in LHCII were higher than the non-nano TiO2 (bulk-TiO2) treatment. Meanwhile, spectroscopy assays indicated that TiO2 NPs obviously increased the absorption peak intensity of the chloroplast in red and blue region, the fluorescence quantum yield near 680 nm, the excitation peak intensity near 440 and 480 nm and/or near 650 and 680 nm of the chloroplast. TiO2 NPs treatment could reduce F480/F440 ratio and increase F650/F680 ratio and accelerate the rate of whole chain electron transport and oxygen evolution of the chloroplast. However, the photosynthesis improvement of the non-nanoTiO2 treatment was far less effective than TiO2 NPs treatment. Taken together, TiO2 NPs could promote the light absorption of chloroplast, regulate the distribution of light energy from PS I to PS II by increasing LHCII and accelerate the transformation from light energy to electronic energy, water photolysis, and oxygen evolution.

  19. A Cytostatic Ruthenium(II)-Platinum(II) Bis(terpyridyl) Anticancer Complex That Blocks Entry into S Phase by Up-regulating p27(KIP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Vadde; Gill, Martin R; Jarman, Paul J; Turton, David; Thomas, Jim A; Das, Amitava; Smythe, Carl

    2015-06-15

    Cytostatic agents that interfere with specific cellular components to prevent cancer cell growth offer an attractive alternative, or complement, to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new binuclear Ru(II) -Pt(II) complex [Ru(tpy)(tpypma)Pt(Cl)(DMSO)](3+) (tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and tpypma=4-([2,2':6',2''-terpyridine]-4'-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)aniline), VR54, which employs the extended terpyridine tpypma ligand to link the two metal centres. In cell-free conditions, VR54 binds DNA by non-intercalative reversible mechanisms (Kb =1.3×10(5)  M(-1) ) and does not irreversibly bind guanosine. Cellular studies reveal that VR54 suppresses proliferation of A2780 ovarian cancer cells with no cross-resistance in the A2780CIS cisplatin-resistant cell line. Through the preparation of mononuclear Ru(II) and Pt(II) structural derivatives it was determined that both metal centres are required for this anti-proliferative activity. In stark contrast to cisplatin, VR54 neither activates the DNA-damage response network nor induces significant levels of cell death. Instead, VR54 is cytostatic and inhibits cell proliferation by up-regulating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) and inhibiting retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation, which blocks entry into S phase and results in G1 cell cycle arrest. Thus, VR54 inhibits cancer cell growth by a gain of function at the G1 restriction point. This is the first metal-coordination compound to demonstrate such activity.

  20. Molecular organization of the complex between the muscarinic M3 receptor and the regulator of G protein signaling, Gbeta(5)-RGS7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Simone L; Wang, Qiang; Levay, Konstantin; Buchwald, Peter; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2010-06-22

    The complex of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS), Gbeta(5)-RGS7, can inhibit signal transduction via the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3R). RGS7 consists of three distinct structural entities: the DEP domain and its extension DHEX, the Ggamma-like (GGL) domain, which is permanently bound to Gbeta subunit Gbeta(5), and the RGS domain responsible for the interaction with Galpha subunits. Inhibition of the M3R by Gbeta(5)-RGS7 is independent of the RGS domain but requires binding of the DEP domain to the third intracellular loop of the receptor. Recent studies identified the dynamic intramolecular interaction between the Gbeta(5) and DEP domains, which suggested that the Gbeta(5)-RGS7 dimer could alternate between the "open" and "closed" conformations. Here, we identified point mutations that weaken DEP-Gbeta(5) binding, presumably stabilizing the open state, and tested their effects on the interaction of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 with the M3R. We found that these mutations facilitated binding of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 to the recombinant third intracellular loop of the M3R but did not enhance its ability to inhibit M3R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization. This led us to the idea that the M3R can effectively induce the Gbeta(5)-RGS7 dimer to open; such a mechanism would require a region of the receptor distinct from the third loop. Indeed, we found that the C-terminus of M3R interacts with Gbeta(5)-RGS7. Truncation of the C-terminus rendered the M3R insensitive to inhibition by wild-type Gbeta(5)-RGS7; however, the open mutant of Gbeta(5)-RGS7 was able to inhibit signaling by the truncated M3R. The GST fusion of the M3R C-tail could not bind to wild-type Gbeta(5)-RGS7 but could associate with its open mutant as well as with the separated recombinant DEP domain or Gbeta(5). Taken together, our data are consistent with the following model: interaction of the M3R with Gbeta(5)-RGS7 causes the DEP domain and Gbeta(5) to dissociate from each other and bind to the C-tail, and the DEP

  1. Do Different Goal-Setting Conditions Facilitate Students' Ability to Regulate Their Learning of Complex Science Topics with RiverWeb?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Roger; Ragan, Susan; Cromley, Jennifer G.; Pritchett, Stacy

    This study examined the role of different goal setting instructional interventions in facilitating high school students' regulation of their conceptual understanding of ecological systems while using a Web-based water quality simulation environment. Building on the information processing theory of self-regulated learning (SRL) of P. Winne and…

  2. Dynamic Modeling as a Cognitive Regulation Scaffold for Developing Complex Problem-Solving Skills in an Educational Massively Multiplayer Online Game Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseryel, Deniz; Ge, Xun; Ifenthaler, Dirk; Law, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Following a design-based research framework, this article reports two empirical studies with an educational MMOG, called "McLarin's Adventures," on facilitating 9th-grade students' complex problem-solving skill acquisition in interdisciplinary STEM education. The article discusses the nature of complex and ill-structured problem solving…

  3. Dynamic Modeling as a Cognitive Regulation Scaffold for Developing Complex Problem-Solving Skills in an Educational Massively Multiplayer Online Game Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eseryel, Deniz; Ge, Xun; Ifenthaler, Dirk; Law, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Following a design-based research framework, this article reports two empirical studies with an educational MMOG, called "McLarin's Adventures," on facilitating 9th-grade students' complex problem-solving skill acquisition in interdisciplinary STEM education. The article discusses the nature of complex and ill-structured problem solving and,…

  4. Ternary complex formation between AmtB, GlnZ and the nitrogenase regulatory enzyme DraG reveals a novel facet of nitrogen regulation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huergo, Luciano F; Merrick, Mike; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S; Araujo, Luíza M; Souza, Emanuel M

    2007-12-01

    Ammonium movement across biological membranes is facilitated by a class of ubiquitous channel proteins from the Amt/Rh family. Amt proteins have also been implicated in cellular responses to ammonium availability in many organisms. Ammonium sensing by Amt in bacteria is mediated by complex formation with cytosolic proteins of the P(II) family. In this study we have characterized in vitro complex formation between the AmtB and P(II) proteins (GlnB and GlnZ) from the diazotrophic plant-associative bacterium Azospirillum brasilense. AmtB-P(II) complex formation only occurred in the presence of adenine nucleotides and was sensitive to 2-oxoglutarate when Mg(2+) and ATP were present, but not when ATP was substituted by ADP. We have also shown in vitro complex formation between GlnZ and the nitrogenase regulatory enzyme DraG, which was stimulated by ADP. The stoichiometry of this complex was 1:1 (DraG monomer : GlnZ trimer). We have previously reported that in vivo high levels of extracellular ammonium cause DraG to be sequestered to the cell membrane in an AmtB and GlnZ-dependent manner. We now report the reconstitution of a ternary complex involving AmtB, GlnZ and DraG in vitro. Sequestration of a regulatory protein by the membrane-bound AmtB-P(II) complex defines a new regulatory role for Amt proteins in Prokaryotes.

  5. Dynamic Regulation of a GPCR-Tetraspanin-G Protein Complex on Intact Cells: Central Role of CD81 in Facilitating GPR56-Gαq/11 Association

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Kevin D.; Hemler, Martin E; Stipp, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    By means of a variety of intracellular scaffolding proteins, a vast number of heterotrimeric G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) may achieve specificity in signaling through a much smaller number of heterotrimeric G proteins. Members of the tetraspanin family organize extensive complexes of cell surface proteins and thus have the potential to act as GPCR scaffolds; however, tetraspanin-GPCR complexes had not previously been described. We now show that a GPCR, GPR56/TM7XN1, and heterotrimeric ...

  6. Role of the complex upstream region of the GDH2 gene in nitrogen regulation of the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, S. M; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    We analyzed the upstream region of the GDH2 gene, which encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for elements important for the regulation of the gene by the nitrogen source. The levels of this enzyme are high in cells grown with glutamate as the sole source of nitrogen and low in cells grown with glutamine or ammonium. We found that this regulation occurs at the level of transcription and that a total of six sites are required to cause a CYC1-lacZ fusion to...

  7. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the HMG domain of the chondrogenesis master regulator Sox9 in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified DNA element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekanandan, Saravanan; Moovarkumudalvan, Balasubramanian; Lescar, Julien; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2015-11-01

    Sox9 is a fundamental sex-determining gene and the master regulator of chondrogenesis, and is involved in the development of various vital organs such as testes, kidney, heart and brain, and in skeletal development. Similar to other known Sox transcription factors, Sox9 recognizes and binds DNA with the consensus sequence C(T/A)TTG(T/A)(T/A) through the highly conserved HMG domain. Nonetheless, the molecular basis of the functional specificity of Sox9 in key developmental processes is still unclear. As an initial step towards a mechanistic understanding of Sox9 transcriptional regulation, the current work describes the details of the purification of the mouse Sox9 HMG domain (mSox9HMG), its crystallization in complex with a ChIP-Seq-identified FOXP2 promoter DNA element and the X-ray diffraction data analysis of this complex. The mSox9HMG-FOXP2 promoter DNA complex was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 20% PEG 3350 in 200 mM sodium/potassium phosphate with 100 mM bis-tris propane at pH 8.5. The crystals diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution and the complex crystallized in the tetragonal space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 99.49, c = 45.89 Å. Crystal-packing parameters revealed that asymmetric unit contained one mSox9HMG-FOXP2 promoter DNA complex with an estimated solvent content of 64%.

  8. Managing Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  9. Genome-wide binding analysis of the transcription activator ideal plant architecture1 reveals a complex network regulating rice plant architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zefu; Yu, Hong; Xiong, Guosheng; Wang, Jing; Jiao, Yongqing; Liu, Guifu; Jing, Yanhui; Meng, Xiangbing; Hu, Xingming; Qian, Qian; Fu, Xiangdong; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-10-01

    Ideal plant architecture1 (IPA1) is critical in regulating rice (Oryza sativa) plant architecture and substantially enhances grain yield. To elucidate its molecular basis, we first confirmed IPA1 as a functional transcription activator and then identified 1067 and 2185 genes associated with IPA1 binding sites in shoot apices and young panicles, respectively, through chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing assays. The Squamosa promoter binding protein-box direct binding core motif GTAC was highly enriched in IPA1 binding peaks; interestingly, a previously uncharacterized indirect binding motif TGGGCC/T was found to be significantly enriched through the interaction of IPA1 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter binding factor1 or promoter binding factor2. Genome-wide expression profiling by RNA sequencing revealed IPA1 roles in diverse pathways. Moreover, our results demonstrated that IPA1 could directly bind to the promoter of rice teosinte branched1, a negative regulator of tiller bud outgrowth, to suppress rice tillering, and directly and positively regulate dense and erect panicle1, an important gene regulating panicle architecture, to influence plant height and panicle length. The elucidation of target genes of IPA1 genome-wide will contribute to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant architecture and to facilitating the breeding of elite varieties with ideal plant architecture.

  10. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) assembles a macromolecular complex regulating growth and survival of prostate cancer cells "in vitro" and correlating with progression "in vivo".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Maria Elisa; Grasso, Silvia; Brunelli, Matteo; Martignoni, Guido; Munari, Enrico; Moiso, Enrico; Fracasso, Giulio; Cestari, Tiziana; Naim, Hassan Y; Bronte, Vincenzo; Colombatti, Marco; Ramarli, Dunia

    2016-11-08

    The expression of Prostate Specific-Membrane Antigen (PSMA) increases in high-grade prostate carcinoma envisaging a role in growth and progression. We show here that clustering PSMA at LNCaP or PC3-PSMA cell membrane activates AKT and MAPK pathways thus promoting proliferation and survival. PSMA activity was dependent on the assembly of a macromolecular complex including filamin A, beta1 integrin, p130CAS, c-Src and EGFR. Within this complex beta1 integrin became activated thereby inducing a c-Src-dependent EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086 and Y1173 EGF-independent residues. Silencing or blocking experiments with drugs demonstrated that all the complex components were required for full PSMA-dependent promotion of cell growth and/or survival in 3D culture, but that p130CAS and EGFR exerted a major role. All PSMA complex components were found assembled in multiple samples of two high-grade prostate carcinomas and associated with EGFR phosphorylation at Y1086. The expression of p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 was thus analysed by tissue micro array in 16 castration-resistant prostate carcinomas selected from 309 carcinomas and stratified from GS 3+4 to GS 5+5. Patients with Gleason Score ≤5 resulted negative whereas those with GS≥5 expressed p130CAS and pEGFRY1086 in 75% and 60% of the cases, respectively.Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that PSMA recruits a functionally active complex which is present in high-grade patients. In addition, two components of this complex, p130CAS and the novel pEGFRY1086, correlate with progression in castration-resistant patients and could be therefore useful in therapeutic or surveillance strategies of these patients.

  11. DEAD-box helicase DDX27 regulates 3′ end formation of ribosomal 47S RNA and stably associates with the PeBoW-complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellner, Markus; Rohrmoser, Michaela [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Forné, Ignasi [Adolf Butenandt Institute, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Schillerstr. 44, Munich 80336 (Germany); Voss, Kirsten; Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Gruber-Eber, Anita [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Kremmer, Elisabeth [Institute of Molecular Immunology, Helmholtz Center Munich, Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany); Imhof, Axel [Adolf Butenandt Institute, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Schillerstr. 44, Munich 80336 (Germany); Eick, Dirk, E-mail: eick@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Department of Molecular Epigenetics, Helmholtz Center Munich, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich (CIPSM), Marchioninistr. 25, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    PeBoW, a trimeric complex consisting of pescadillo (Pes1), block of proliferation (Bop1), and the WD repeat protein 12 (WDR12), is essential for processing and maturation of mammalian 5.8S and 28S ribosomal RNAs. Applying a mass spectrometric analysis, we identified the DEAD-box helicase DDX27 as stably associated factor of the PeBoW-complex. DDX27 interacts with the PeBoW-complex via an evolutionary conserved F×F motif in the N-terminal domain and is recruited to the nucleolus via its basic C-terminal domain. This recruitment is RNA-dependent and occurs independently of the PeBoW-complex. Interestingly, knockdown of DDX27, but not of Pes1, induces the accumulation of an extended form of the primary 47S rRNA. We conclude that DDX27 can interact specifically with the Pes1 and Bop1 but fulfils critical function(s) for proper 3′ end formation of 47S rRNA independently of the PeBoW-complex. - Highlights: • DEAD-box helicase DDX27 is a new constituent of the PeBoW-complex. • The N-terminal F×F motif of DDX27 interacts with the PeBoW components Pes1 and Bop1. • Nucleolar anchoring of DDX27 via its basic C-terminal domain is RNA dependent. • Knockdown of DDX27 induces a specific defect in 3′ end formation of 47S rRNA.

  12. Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) kinase activity is regulated by ATP-driven conformational changes in the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-H. Lee (Ji-Hoon); M.R. Mand (Michael); R.A. Deshpande (Rajashree); E. Kinoshita (Eri); S.-H. Yang (Soo-Hyun); C. Wyman (Claire); T.T. Paull

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) protein kinase is recruited to sites of double-strand DNA breaks by the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex, which also facilitates ATM monomerization and activation. MRN exists in at least two distinct conformational states, dependent on ATP binding an

  13. A complex photoreceptor system mediates the regulation by light of the conidiation genes con-10 and con-6 in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, María; Ruger-Herreros, Carmen; Luque, Eva M; Corrochano, Luis M

    2010-04-01

    Genes con-10 and con-6 in Neurospora crassa are activated during conidiation or after illumination of vegetative mycelia. Light activation requires the white-collar complex (WCC), a transcription factor complex composed of the photoreceptor WC-1 and its partner WC-2. We have characterized the photoactivation of con-10 and con-6, and we have identified 300bp required for photoactivation in the con-10 promoter. A complex stimulus-response relationship for con-10 and con-6 photoactivation suggested the activity of a complex photoreceptor system. The WCC is the key element for con-10 activation by light, but we suggest that other photoreceptors, the cryptochrome CRY-1, the rhodopsin NOP-1, and the phytochrome PHY-2, modify the activity of the WCC for con-10 photoactivation, presumably through a repressor. In addition we show that the regulatory protein VE-1 is required for full photocarotenogenesis. We propose that these proteins may modulate the WCC in a gene-specific way.

  14. A protein complex of SCRIB, NOS1AP and VANGL1 regulates cell polarity and migration, and is associated with breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastas, J N; Biechele, T L; Robitaille, M; Muster, J; Allison, K H; Angers, S; Moon, R T

    2012-08-09

    By analyzing public data sets of gene expression in human breast cancers we observed that increased levels of transcripts encoding the planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins SCRIB and VANGL1 correlate with increased risk of patient relapse. Experimentally, we found that reducing expression of SCRIB by short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) reduces the growth of human breast cancer cells in xenograft assays. To investigate SCRIB-associated proteins that might participate in the responses of breast cancer cells to altered levels of SCRIB, we used mass spectrometry and confocal microscopy. These studies reveal that SCRIB is present in at least two unique protein complexes: (1) a complex of SCRIB, ARHGEF, GIT and PAK (p21-activated kinase), and (2) a complex of SCRIB, NOS1AP and VANGL. Focusing on NOS1AP, we observed that NOS1AP colocalizes with both SCRIB and VANGL1 along cellular protrusions in metastatic breast cancer cells, but does not colocalize with either SCRIB or VANGL1 at cell junctions in normal breast cells. We investigated the effects of shRNA-mediated knockdown of NOS1AP and SCRIB in vitro, and found that reducing NOS1AP and SCRIB slows breast cancer cell migration and prevents the establishment of leading-trailing polarity. We also find that reduction of NOS1AP enhances anchorage-independent growth. Collectively these data point to the relevance of NOS1AP and SCRIB protein complexes in breast cancer.

  15. A multi-repeat adhesin of the phytopathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum, is secreted by a Type I pathway and is subject to complex regulation involving a non-canonical diguanylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Coulthurst, Sarah J; Humphris, Sonia; Campbell, Emma; Welch, Martin; Toth, Ian K; Salmond, George P C

    2011-11-01

    Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger controlling many important bacterial processes. The phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 (Pba1043) possesses a Type I secretion system (T1SS) essential for the secretion of a proteinaceous multi-repeat adhesin (MRP) required for binding to the host plant. The genes encoding the MRP and the T1SS are tightly linked to genes encoding several putative c-di-GMP regulatory components. We show that c-di-GMP regulates secreted MRP levels in Pba1043 through the action of two genes encoding predicted diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and phosphodiesterase proteins (ECA3270 and ECA3271). Phenotypic analyses and quantification of c-di-GMP levels demonstrated that ECA3270 and ECA3271 regulate secreted MRP levels by increasing and decreasing, respectively, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP. Moreover, ECA3270 represents the first active DGC reported to have an alternative active-site motif from the 'canonical' GG[D/E]EF. ECA3270 has an A-site motif of SGDEF and analysis of single amino acid replacements demonstrated that the first position of this motif can tolerate functional substitution. Serine in position one of the A-site is also observed in many other DGCs. Finally, another T1SS-linked regulator (ECA3265) also plays an important role in regulating secreted MRP, with an altered localization of MRP observed in an ECA3265 mutant background. Mutants defective in these three T1SS-linked regulators exhibit a reduction in root binding and virulence, confirming that this complex, finely tuned regulation system is crucial in the interaction with host plants.

  16. N-Acetyl-D-Glucosamine Kinase Interacts with Dynein-Lis1-NudE1 Complex and Regulates Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Syeda Ridita; Islam, Ariful; Moon, Il Soo

    2016-09-01

    N-acetyl-D-glucosamine kinase (GlcNAc kinase or NAGK) primarily catalyzes phosphoryl transfer to GlcNAc during amino sugar metabolism. Recently, it was shown NAGK interacts with dynein light chain roadblock type 1 (DYNLRB1) and upregulates axo-dendritic growth, which is an enzyme activity-independent, non-canonical structural role. The authors examined the distributions of NAGK and NAGK-dynein complexes during the cell cycle in HEK293T cells. NAGK was expressed throughout different stages of cell division and immunocytochemistry (ICC) showed NAGK was localized at nuclear envelope, spindle microtubules (MTs), and kinetochores (KTs). A proximity ligation assay (PLA) for NAGK and DYNLRB1 revealed NAGK-dynein complex on nuclear envelopes in prophase cells and on chromosomes in metaphase cells. NAGK-DYNLRB1 PLA followed by Lis1/NudE1 immunostaining showed NAGK-dynein complexes were colocalized with Lis1 and NudE1 signals, and PLA for NAGK-Lis1 showed similar signal patterns, suggesting a functional link between NAGK and dynein-Lis1 complex. Subsequently, NAGK-dynein complexes were found in KTs and on nuclear membranes where KTs were marked with CENP-B ICC and nuclear membrane with lamin ICC. Furthermore, knockdown of NAGK by small hairpin (sh) RNA was found to delay cell division. These results indicate that the NAGK-dynein interaction with the involvements of Lis1 and NudE1 plays an important role in prophase nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) and metaphase MT-KT attachment during eukaryotic cell division.

  17. The stardust family protein MPP7 forms a tripartite complex with LIN7 and DLG1 that regulates the stability and localization of DLG1 to cell junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Joanna; Brimer, Nicole; Lyons, Charles; Vande Pol, Scott B

    2007-03-30

    MPP7, a previously uncharacterized member of the p55 Stardust family of membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins, was found in a tripartite complex with DLG1 and LIN7A or LIN7C. MPP7 dimerizes with all three LIN7 family members (LIN7A, -B, and -C) through interaction of the single L27 domain of LIN7 with the carboxyl-terminal L27 domain of MPP7, thereby stabilizing both proteins. The dimer of MPP7 with LIN7A or LIN7C associates with DLG1 through an interaction requiring the amino-terminal L27 domain of MPP7. The amino-terminal L27 domain of MPP7 is not sufficient for interaction with DLG1 but interacts efficiently only if MPP7 is in a complex with LIN7A or -C. Thus the specificity of interaction of DLG1 with the LIN7-MPP7 complex is determined by L27 interactions with both MPP7 and LIN7. The tripartite complex forms in a ratio of 1:1:1 and localizes to epithelial adherens junctions in a manner dependent upon MPP7. Expression of MPP7 stabilizes DLG1 in an insoluble compartment. Expression of MPP7 deleted of the PDZ or Src homology 3 domain redistributes MPP7, DLG1, and LIN7 out of adherens junctions and into the soluble cytoplasmic fraction without changing the localization of E-cadherin. Thus, the stability and localization of DLG1 to cell-cell junctions are complex functions determined by the expression and association of particular Stardust family members together with particular LIN7 family members.

  18. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Ko, Michael Lee; Ko, Gladys Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs) are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT) signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  19. Complexity for Artificial Substrates (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loke, L.H.L.; Jachowski, N.R.; Bouma, T.J.; Ladle, R.J.; Todd, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Physical habitat complexity regulates the structure and function of biological communities, although the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. Urbanisation, pollution, unsustainable resource exploitation and climate change have resulted in the widespread simplification (and loss) o

  20. Complex evolutionary relationships among four classes of modular RNA-binding splicing regulators in eukaryotes: the hnRNP, SR, ELAV-like and CELF proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yue Hang; Han, Siew Ping; Kassahn, Karin S; Skarshewski, Adam; Rothnagel, Joseph A; Smith, Ross

    2012-12-01

    Alternative RNA splicing in multicellular organisms is regulated by a large group of proteins of mainly unknown origin. To predict the functions of these proteins, classification of their domains at the sequence and structural level is necessary. We have focused on four groups of splicing regulators, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), serine-arginine (SR), embryonic lethal, abnormal vision (ELAV)-like, and CUG-BP and ETR-like factor (CELF) proteins, that show increasing diversity among metazoa. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses were used to obtain a broader understanding of their evolutionary relationships. Surprisingly, when we characterised sequence similarities across full-length sequences and conserved domains of ten metazoan species, we found some hnRNPs were more closely related to SR, ELAV-like and CELF proteins than to other hnRNPs. Phylogenetic analyses and the distribution of the RRM domains suggest that these proteins diversified before the last common ancestor of the metazoans studied here through domain acquisition and duplication to create genes of mixed evolutionary origin. We propose that these proteins were derived independently rather than through the expansion of a single protein family. Our results highlight inconsistencies in the current classification system for these regulators, which does not adequately reflect their evolutionary relationships, and suggests that a domain-based classification scheme may have more utility.

  1. Calpain regulates thymidylate synthase-5-fluoro-dUMP complex levels associated with response to 5-fluorouracil in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Takao; Furuya, Aki; Koide, Naoki; Ohkoshi, Motohiro; Takiguchi, Masaki; Ochiai, Takenori; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Hiwasa, Takaki

    2011-08-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) plays a major role in the response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by binding directly to the 5-FU metabolite, 5-fluoro-dUMP (FdUMP). The change in the TS expression levels after 5-FU administration was examined in parallel to 5-FU responsiveness in six human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines to elucidate the source of variability of 5-FU sensitivity. MKN-1, SH-10-TC and MKN-74 cells were more resistant to 5-FU than MKN-28, KATO III and MKN-45 cells. Western blotting analysis revealed that the 5-FU sensitivity of these cells did not correlate with the basal TS expression levels but did correlate with rapid detection of the TS-FdUMP complex after exposure to 5-FU. In 5-FU-resistant cells, very low levels of the TS-FdUMP complex early after 5-FU exposure were elevated by pretreatment with calpain inhibitors such as benzyloxycarbonyl-leucyl-leucinal (ZLLH), benzyloxycarbonyl-leucyl-leucyl-leucinal (ZLLLH) and ALLN, but not by other protease inhibitors. In contrast, ONO-3403, which causes calpain activation, stimulated downregulation of the TS-FdUMP complex in 5-FU-sensitive cells. The expression levels of calpastatin, an endogenous calpain inhibitor, were higher in 5-FU-sensitive cells than in 5-FU-resistant cells. ZLLH increased the 5-FU sensitivity of 5-FU-resistant cells, whereas ONO-3403 decreased the sensitivity of 5-FU-sensitive cells. In addition, knockdown of m-calpain by siRNA increased the 5-FU sensitivity in 5-FU-resistant cells, while knockdown of calpastatin reduced the sensitivity in 5-FU-sensitive cells. These results suggest that calpain might reduce the chemosensitivity of human gastric cancer cells to 5-FU possibly by rapid degradation of the TS-FdUMP complex, a finding that is considered to have novel therapeutic implications.

  2. Regulation of oxidative phosphorylation complex activity: effects of tissue-specific metabolic stress within an allometric series and acute changes in workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Darci; Covian, Raul; Aponte, Angel M; Glancy, Brian; Taylor, Joni F; Chess, David; Balaban, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    The concentration of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes (MOPCs) is tuned to the maximum energy conversion requirements of a given tissue; however, whether the activity of MOPCs is altered in response to acute changes in energy conversion demand is unclear. We hypothesized that MOPCs activity is modulated by tissue metabolic stress to maintain the energy-metabolism homeostasis. Metabolic stress was defined as the observed energy conversion rate/maximum energy conversion rate. The maximum energy conversion rate was assumed to be proportional to the concentration of MOPCs, as determined with optical spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. The resting metabolic stress of the heart and liver across the range of resting metabolic rates within an allometric series (mouse, rabbit, and pig) was determined from MPOCs content and literature respiratory values. The metabolic stress of the liver was high and nearly constant across the allometric series due to the proportional increase in MOPCs content with resting metabolic rate. In contrast, the MOPCs content of the heart was essentially constant in the allometric series, resulting in an increasing metabolic stress with decreasing animal size. The MOPCs activity was determined in native gels, with an emphasis on Complex V. Extracted MOPCs enzyme activity was proportional to resting metabolic stress across tissues and species. Complex V activity was also shown to be acutely modulated by changes in metabolic stress in the heart, in vivo and in vitro. The modulation of extracted MOPCs activity suggests that persistent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) alter MOPCs activity both chronically and acutely, specifically in the heart. Protein phosphorylation of Complex V was correlated with activity inhibition under several conditions, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may contribute to activity modulation with energy metabolic stress. These data are consistent with the notion that metabolic

  3. Nephrocystin-1 forms a complex with polycystin-1 via a polyproline motif/SH3 domain interaction and regulates the apoptotic response in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claas Wodarczyk

    Full Text Available Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2. Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3. A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1 as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP. We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation.

  4. Nephrocystin-1 forms a complex with polycystin-1 via a polyproline motif/SH3 domain interaction and regulates the apoptotic response in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarczyk, Claas; Distefano, Gianfranco; Rowe, Isaline; Gaetani, Massimiliano; Bricoli, Barbara; Muorah, Mordi; Spitaleri, Andrea; Mannella, Valeria; Ricchiuto, Piero; Pema, Monika; Castelli, Maddalena; Casanova, Ariel E; Mollica, Luca; Banzi, Manuela; Boca, Manila; Antignac, Corinne; Saunier, Sophie; Musco, Giovanna; Boletta, Alessandra

    2010-09-14

    Mutations in PKD1, the gene encoding for the receptor Polycystin-1 (PC-1), cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The cytoplasmic C-terminus of PC-1 contains a coiled-coil domain that mediates an interaction with the PKD2 gene product, Polycystin-2 (PC-2). Here we identify a novel domain in the PC-1 C-terminal tail, a polyproline motif mediating an interaction with Src homology domain 3 (SH3). A screen for interactions using the PC-1 C-terminal tail identified the SH3 domain of nephrocystin-1 (NPHP1) as a potential binding partner of PC-1. NPHP1 is the product of a gene that is mutated in a different form of renal cystic disease, nephronophthisis (NPHP). We show that in vitro pull-down assays and NMR structural studies confirmed the interaction between the PC-1 polyproline motif and the NPHP1 SH3 domain. Furthermore, the two full-length proteins interact through these domains; using a recently generated model system allowing us to track endogenous PC-1, we confirm the interaction between the endogenous proteins. Finally, we show that NPHP1 trafficking to cilia does not require PC-1 and that PC-1 may require NPHP1 to regulate resistance to apoptosis, but not to regulate cell cycle progression. In line with this, we find high levels of apoptosis in renal specimens of NPHP patients. Our data uncover a link between two different ciliopathies, ADPKD and NPHP, supporting the notion that common pathogenetic defects, possibly involving de-regulated apoptosis, underlie renal cyst formation.

  5. N-glycosylation of asparagine 8 regulates surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) alleles dependent on threonine 24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maiken Mellergaard; Skovbakke, Sarah Line; Schneider, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    -glycosylation and the retention was rescued by T24A substitution. Our study reveals N-glycosylation as an allele-specific regulatory mechanism important for regulation of surface expression of MICA018 and we pinpoint the residues essential for this N-glycosylation dependency. In addition we show that this regulatory mechanism...... for cell-surface expression and sought to identify the essential residues. We found that a single N-glycosylation site (N8) was important for MICA018 surface expression. The frequently expressed MICA allele 008, with an altered transmembrane and intracellular domain, was not affected by mutation of this N...

  6. PIAS1 regulates CP2c localization and active promoter complex formation in erythroid cell-specific α-globin expression

    OpenAIRE

    Chul Kang, Ho; Hyung Chae, Ji; Jeon, Jinseon; Kim, Won; Hyun Ha, Dae; Ho Shin, June; Gil Kim, Chan; Geun Kim, Chul

    2010-01-01

    Data presented here extends our previous observations on α-globin transcriptional regulation by the CP2 and PIAS1 proteins. Using RNAi knockdown, we have now shown that CP2b, CP2c and PIAS1 are each necessary for synergistic activation of endogenous α-globin gene expression in differentiating MEL cells. In this system, truncated PIAS1 mutants lacking the ring finger domain recruited CP2c to the nucleus, as did wild-type PIAS1, demonstrating that this is a sumoylation-independent process. In v...

  7. Radiological evaluation of an industrial complex of phosphate fertilizer production in response to the current regulations on health protection against ionizing radiation; Evaluacion radiologica de un complejo industrial de produccion de fertilizantes fosfatado al actual reglamento sobre proteccion sanitaria contra radiaciones ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosqueda Pena, F.; Bolivar Raya, J. P.

    2011-07-01

    We performed a comprehensive study of the radioactive and radiological follow NORM industrial complex, in addition to that regulation, the Criteria for radiological protection against exposure to natural radiation issued by the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN).

  8. SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL AREAS AS A MAIN DIRECTION OF GOVERNMENT REGULATION OF AGRO-INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX IN THE KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkovskiy P. V.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to evaluation and analysis of basic trends, that revealing modern situation and current level of the development of social sphere in rural areas in the Krasnodar region. We have carried out a theoretical view to current problems in gasification, water supply, and development infrastructure objects in rural areas of the region. The authors have considered main attention is a social standards when developing targeted programs for the social development of rural areas. The article provides a specific list of normative values still indicators as the presence of a central gas supply, the central and the local water supply (hot and cold, the length of the street and objects known telephone. We have explained the mechanism of government regulations aimed at social infrastructure in rural areas of the Krasnodar region and the organization work of municipal institutions to protect and maintenance local roads. Based on the above authors’ suggestions, it is planned to achieve more definable and justifiable opinion in the implementation of municipal regulation social development rural areas designed on the basis targeted programs in the subject area. Actual and significant to readers are measures of gap consumer budget and the level of monetary income between urban and rural areas presented in the article

  9. Proteomic identification of C/EBP-DBD multiprotein complex: JNK1 activates stem cell regulator C/EBPalpha by inhibiting its ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, A K; Bararia, D; Christopeit, M; Peerzada, A A; Singh, S M; Kieser, A; Hiddemann, W; Behre, H M; Behre, G

    2007-03-15

    Functional inactivation of transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development is involved in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Stem cell regulator C/enhancer binding protein (EBP)alpha is among such transcription factors known to be inactive in AML. This is either due to mutations or inhibition by protein-protein interactions. Here, we applied a mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach to systematically identify putative co-activator proteins interacting with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of C/EBP transcription factors. In our proteomic screen, we identified c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1 among others such as PAK6, MADP-1, calmodulin-like skin proteins and ZNF45 as proteins interacting with DBD of C/EBPs from nuclear extract of myelomonocytic U937 cells. We show that kinase JNK1 physically interacts with DBD of C/EBPalpha in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we show that active JNK1 inhibits ubiquitination of C/EBPalpha possibly by phosphorylating in its DBD. Consequently, JNK1 prolongs C/EBPalpha protein half-life leading to its enhanced transactivation and DNA-binding capacity. In certain AML patients, however, the JNK1 mRNA expression and its kinase activity is decreased which suggests a possible reason for C/EBPalpha inactivation in AML. Thus, we report the first proteomic screen of C/EBP-interacting proteins, which identifies JNK1 as positive regulator of C/EBPalpha.

  10. On the Complexity of the Tragedy of Anti-commons Caused by Government Regulation%论政府管制的反公地悲剧的复杂性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高洁

    2012-01-01

    政府管制造成的反公地悲剧比公地悲剧更为复杂:一是反公地悲剧可能看不见从而难以发现;二是腐败的存在将使反公地悲剧更难以克服和解决;三是政府管制既可能造成资源利用不足的反公地悲剧,也可能造成资源利用过度的悲剧,此时调整交易成本可能比整合产权更为重要。因此,政府在实施管制时要尽量避免制造出反公地悲剧。%The tragedy of anti-commons caused by government regulation is more complex than the tragedy of commons for three reasons.First,the tragedy of anti-commons may be invisible,therefore,hard to detect.Second,the existence of corruption makes such tragedy difficult to tackle.And thirdly,government regulation may lead to both underuse and overuse of resources,under this circumstance,it may be more appropriate to lower transaction cost than to delineate property rights.Due to the complexity of the tragedy of anti-commons,the best way to avoid the tragedy is not to create it.

  11. Structural Studies of Potassium Transport Protein KtrA Regulator of Conductance of K+ (RCK) C Domain in Complex with Cyclic Diadenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henna; Youn, Suk-Jun; Kim, Seong Ok; Ko, Junsang; Lee, Jie-Oh; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2015-06-26

    Although it was only recently identified as a second messenger, c-di-AMP was found to have fundamental importance in numerous bacterial functions such as ion transport. The potassium transporter protein, KtrA, was identified as a c-di-AMP receptor. However, the co-crystallization of c-di-AMP with the protein has not been studied. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the KtrA RCK_C domain in complex with c-di-AMP. The c-di-AMP nucleotide, which adopts a U-shaped conformation, is bound at the dimer interface of RCK_C close to helices α3 and α4. c-di-AMP interacts with KtrA RCK_C mainly by forming hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. c-di-AMP binding induces the contraction of the dimer, bringing the two monomers of KtrA RCK_C into close proximity. The KtrA RCK_C was able to interact with only c-di-AMP, but not with c-di-GMP, 3',3-cGAMP, ATP, and ADP. The structure of the KtrA RCK_C domain and c-di-AMP complex would expand our understanding about the mechanism of inactivation in Ktr transporters governed by c-di-AMP.

  12. The emergence of the mitochondrial genome as a partial regulator of nuclear function is providing new insights into the genetic mechanisms underlying age-related complex disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Martin P; Cooper, David N

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction appears to be intimately associated with age and age-related complex disorders but the precise pathological relevance of such malfunction remains unclear. Mitochondrial, and more specifically bioenergetic, malfunction is commonly encountered in cancer, degenerative disorders and aging. The identification of a mitochondrial-nuclear retrograde signaling pathway in yeast has facilitated the study of the corresponding retrograde signaling mechanisms induced in response to mitochondrial malfunction in mammals including human. Mitochondrial-nuclear crosstalk is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and some mitochondrial DNA mutations may perturb crosstalk signaling. However, ascertaining whether mitochondrial malfunction is a cause or a consequence of disease development will be key to determining whether or not impaired crosstalk signaling is of direct pathological and hence therapeutic relevance. Here, we review what is known about the nuclear adaptive compensatory mechanisms induced in response to mitochondrial malfunction. We discuss the role of mitochondrial DNA variants in modulating the penetrance of human inherited disease caused by mutations in the nuclear genome and explore the underlying mechanisms by which they influence the retrograde response. We conclude that mitochondrial DNA variants have the potential to induce molecular signals through the mitochondrial-nuclear crosstalk mechanism, thereby promoting nuclear compensation in response to mitochondrial malfunction. The implications for the development of genetic or pharmaceutical interventions for the treatment of mitochondrial malfunction in complex disease are also explored.

  13. Structure of the Dual-Mode Wnt Regulator Kremen1 and Insight into Ternary Complex Formation with LRP6 and Dickkopf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebisch, Matthias; Jackson, Verity A; Zhao, Yuguang; Jones, E Yvonne

    2016-09-01

    Kremen 1 and 2 have been identified as co-receptors for Dickkopf (Dkk) proteins, hallmark secreted antagonists of canonical Wnt signaling. We present here three crystal structures of the ectodomain of human Kremen1 (KRM1ECD) at resolutions between 1.9 and 3.2 Å. KRM1ECD emerges as a rigid molecule with tight interactions stabilizing a triangular arrangement of its Kringle, WSC, and CUB structural domains. The structures reveal an unpredicted homology of the WSC domain to hepatocyte growth factor. We further report the general architecture of the ternary complex formed by the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5/6, Dkk, and Krm, determined from a low-resolution complex crystal structure between β-propeller/EGF repeats (PE) 3 and 4 of the Wnt co-receptor LRP6 (LRP6PE3PE4), the cysteine-rich domain 2 (CRD2) of DKK1, and KRM1ECD. DKK1CRD2 is sandwiched between LRP6PE3 and KRM1Kringle-WSC. Modeling studies supported by surface plasmon resonance suggest a direct interaction site between Krm1CUB and Lrp6PE2.

  14. Can the financialized atmosphere be effectively regulated? A critical analysis of the proposed Australian carbon pollution reduction scheme as a complex market solution to global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windsor, C. [Bond Univ. (Australia); McNicholas, P. [Monash Univ. (Australia)

    2009-07-01

    A large body of scientific evidence indicates that global warming from human induced greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions is producing harmful climate change that will lead to global environmental and economic catastrophe within 10 years. The threat of human induced global warming has been on the international and public policy agenda for several years; for example on 11 December 1998, government representatives of 108 countries signed the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) an international agreement to reduce global warming or the Kyoto Protocol, with the then exception of the Australian and the United States (U.S.) governments. International action on GHG emissions reduction was thwarted by U.S. and Australian goverments. The then Australian government (1996-2007) surreptitiously funding by vested interests such as the coal industry, had no intention to act even though scientific evidence reported that Australia had begun to experience the detrimental effects of global warming. To fulfil an electoral promise, the center left Labor government signed the Kyoto Protocol on 3 December 2007. To deal with the global warming crisis, the Australian government has proposed an emissions trading scheme now officially called the 'Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme' or CPRS. The proposed scheme is a cap and trade market mechanism that purportedly encourages businesses to operate more efficiently, thus reducing GHG emissions through price signalling in a government instigated market. Hence credible, transparent and efficient information underpins such a market in a post-Keynes deregulated world. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the integrity of using current financial and reporting regulation that will oversee and monitor the veracity of newly commoditized carbon financial products, particularly since the global financial crisis has exposed significant financial regulatory weaknesses. Further we contend that current corporate

  15. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  16. Protein phosphatase complex PP5/PPP2R3C dephosphorylates P-glycoprotein/ABCB1 and down-regulates the expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Miho; Noguchi, Kohji; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2014-04-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/ABCB1 is a key molecule of multidrug resistance in cancer. Protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, regulatory subunit B, gamma (PPP2R3C), which is a regulatory subunit of PP2A and PP5, was identified as a binding candidate to P-gp. Immunoprecipitation-western blotting revealed that PP5 and PPP2R3C were coprecipitated with P-gp, while PP2A was not. PP5/PPP2R3C dephosphorylated protein kinase A/protein kinase C-phosphorylation of P-gp. Knockdown of PP5 and/or PPP2R3C increased P-gp expression and lowered the sensitivity to vincristine and doxorubicin. Consequently, our results indicate that PP5/PPP2R3C negatively regulates P-gp expression and function.

  17. A myriad of functions and complex regulation of the CCR7/CCL19/CCL21 chemokine axis in the adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comerford, Iain; Harata-Lee, Yuka; Bunting, Mark D; Gregor, Carly; Kara, Ervin E; McColl, Shaun R

    2013-06-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 and its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 control a diverse array of migratory events in adaptive immune function. Most prominently, CCR7 promotes homing of T cells and DCs to T cell areas of lymphoid tissues where T cell priming occurs. However, CCR7 and its ligands also contribute to a multitude of adaptive immune functions including thymocyte development, secondary lymphoid organogenesis, high affinity antibody responses, regulatory and memory T cell function, and lymphocyte egress from tissues. In this survey, we summarise the role of CCR7 in adaptive immunity and describe recent progress in understanding how this axis is regulated. In particular we highlight CCX-CKR, which scavenges both CCR7 ligands, and discuss its emerging significance in the immune system.

  18. Helix 8 and the i3 loop of the muscarinic M3 receptor are crucial sites for its regulation by the Gβ5-RGS7 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinsky-Semper, Darla; Tayou, Junior; Levay, Konstantin; Schuchardt, Brett J; Bhat, Vikas; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Farooq, Amjad; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2015-02-01

    The muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) is a Gq-coupled receptor and is known to interact with many intracellular regulatory proteins. One of these molecules is Gβ5-RGS7, the permanently associated heterodimer of G protein β-subunit Gβ5 and RGS7, a regulator of G protein signaling. Gβ5-RGS7 can attenuate M3R-stimulated release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores or enhance the influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane. Here we show that deletion of amino acids 304-345 from the central portion of the i3 loop renders M3R insensitive to regulation by Gβ5-RGS7. In addition to the i3 loop, interaction of M3R with Gβ5-RGS7 requires helix 8. According to circular dichroism spectroscopy, the peptide corresponding to amino acids 548-567 in the C-terminus of M3R assumes an α-helical conformation. Substitution of Thr553 and Leu558 with Pro residues disrupts this α-helix and abolished binding to Gβ5-RGS7. Introduction of the double Pro substitution into full-length M3R (M3R(TP/LP)) prevents trafficking of the receptor to the cell surface. Using atropine or other antagonists as pharmacologic chaperones, we were able to increase the level of surface expression of the TP/LP mutant to levels comparable to that of wild-type M3R. However, M3R-stimulated calcium signaling is still severely compromised. These results show that the interaction of M3R with Gβ5-RGS7 requires helix 8 and the central portion of the i3 loop.

  19. Up-regulation of the ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1) gene, a downstream target of the beta-catenin/T-cell factor complex, in colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Furukawa, Y; Tsunoda, T; Tanaka, T; Ogawa, M; Nakamura, Y

    2001-11-01

    To clarify the molecular mechanisms of human carcinogenesis associated with abnormal Wnt/wingless signaling, we searched for genes the expression of which was significantly altered by introduction of wild-type AXIN1 into LoVo colon cancer cells. By means of a cDNA microarray, we compared expression profiles of LoVo cells infected with either adenoviruses expressing wild-type AXIN1 (Ad-Axin) or those expressing a control gene (Ad-LacZ). Among the genes showing altered expression, the ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1) gene was down-regulated in response to Ad-Axin. The promoter activity of ENC1 was elevated approximately 3-fold by transfection of an activated form of beta-catenin together with wild-type T-cell factor (Tcf)4 in HeLa cells. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR experiments revealed that expression of ENC1 was increased in more than two-thirds of 24 primary colon cancer tissues that we examined compared with corresponding noncancerous mucosae. Introduction of exogenous ENC1 increased the growth rate of HCT116 colon cancer cells in serum-depleted medium. In other experiments, overexpression of ENC1 in HT-29 colon cancer cells suppressed the usual increase of two differentiation markers, in response to treatment with sodium butyrate, a differentiation-inducible agent. These data suggest that ENC1 is regulated by the beta-catenin/Tcf pathway and that its altered expression may contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis by suppressing differentiation of colonic cells.

  20. mTOR Hyperactivation by Ablation of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 in the Mouse Heart Induces Cardiac Dysfunction with the Increased Number of Small Mitochondria Mediated through the Down-Regulation of Autophagy.

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    Taneike, Manabu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Omiya, Shigemiki; Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Misaka, Tomofumi; Kitazume-Taneike, Rika; Austin, Ruth; Takaoka, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Gambello, Michael J; Shah, Ajay M; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a key regulator of cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. mTORC1 regulates protein synthesis positively and autophagy negatively. Autophagy is a major system to manage bulk degradation and recycling of cytoplasmic components and organelles. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 and 2 form a heterodimeric complex and inactivate Ras homolog enriched in brain, resulting in inhibition of mTORC1. Here, we investigated the effects of hyperactivation of mTORC1 on cardiac function and structure using cardiac-specific TSC2-deficient (TSC2-/-) mice. TSC2-/- mice were born normally at the expected Mendelian ratio. However, the median life span of TSC2-/- mice was approximately 10 months and significantly shorter than that of control mice. TSC2-/- mice showed cardiac dysfunction and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy without considerable fibrosis, cell infiltration or apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. Ultrastructural analysis of TSC2-/- hearts revealed misalignment, aggregation and a decrease in the size and an increase in the number of mitochondria, but the mitochondrial function was maintained. Autophagic flux was inhibited, while the phosphorylation level of S6 or eukaryotic initiation factor 4E -binding protein 1, downstream of mTORC1, was increased. The upregulation of autophagic flux by trehalose treatment attenuated the cardiac phenotypes such as cardiac dysfunction and structural abnormalities of mitochondria in TSC2-/- hearts. The results suggest that autophagy via the TSC2-mTORC1 signaling pathway plays an important role in maintenance of cardiac function and mitochondrial quantity and size in the heart and could be a therapeutic target to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis in failing hearts.

  1. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

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    Cathy Chia-Yu Huang

    Full Text Available In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  2. The Arabidopsis KINβγ Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Regulates Pollen Hydration on the Stigma by Mediating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Qi; Liu, Chang Zhen; Li, Dan Dan; Zhao, Ting Ting; Li, Fei; Jia, Xiao Na; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Pollen-stigma interactions are essential for pollen germination. The highly regulated process of pollen germination includes pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination on the stigma. However, the internal signaling of pollen that regulates pollen-stigma interactions is poorly understood. KINβγ is a plant-specific subunit of the SNF1-related protein kinase 1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of plant development. Here, we showed that KINβγ was a cytoplasm- and nucleus-localized protein in the vegetative cells of pollen grains in Arabidopsis. The pollen of the Arabidopsis kinβγ mutant could not germinate on stigma, although it germinated normally in vitro. Further analysis revealed the hydration of kinβγ mutant pollen on the stigma was compromised. However, adding water to the stigma promoted the germination of the mutant pollen in vivo, suggesting that the compromised hydration of the mutant pollen led to its defective germination. In kinβγ mutant pollen, the structure of the mitochondria and peroxisomes was destroyed, and their numbers were significantly reduced compared with those in the wild type. Furthermore, we found that the kinβγ mutant exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pollen. The addition of H2O2 in vitro partially compensated for the reduced water absorption of the mutant pollen, and reducing ROS levels in pollen by overexpressing Arabidopsis CATALASE 3 resulted in compromised hydration of pollen on the stigma. These results indicate that Arabidopsis KINβγ is critical for the regulation of ROS levels by mediating the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes in pollen, which is required for pollen-stigma interactions during pollination.

  3. Peroxide sensing and signaling in the Sporothrix schenckii complex: an in silico analysis to uncover putative mechanisms regulating the Hog1 and AP-1 like signaling pathways.

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    Ortega, Ivy; Soares Felipe, Maria Sueli; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Lopes Bezerra, Leila Maria; Da Silva Dantas, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how fungal pathogens can survive inside the host, we must analyze how they evade the fungicidal mechanisms mounted by the host's immune system, such as generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Studies have shown that infections caused by Sporothrix brasiliensis can be more aggressive than those due to Sporothrix schenckii. Therefore, we propose to analyze and compare the ability of these two pathogenic species to counteract oxidative stress, which, as noted, can be relevant in the host response to infection. We have shown that S. brasiliensis is more resistant to different oxidants, such as H2O2 and menadione, when compared with S. schenckii. Furthermore, our results suggest that the molecular mechanisms by which Sporothrix spp. AP-1 like transcription factors are regulated probably differs from the one seen in other fungal pathogens. Interestingly, comparison between sequences of SbHog1 and SsHog1 stress activated protein kinases suggest that S. brasiliensis Hog1 display mutations that could account for the differences seen in stress sensitivities of these two species. In summary, this is the first study to our knowledge to investigate oxidative stress responses of Sporothrix spp. and provided a model that can be employed in vivo to address how these fungal pathogens can surmount the oxidative stress generated by the host.

  4. A core component of the CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complexes, DDB1, regulates spermatogenesis in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, AnYu; Li, XueJie; Wang, YuanLi; Pan, DiYue; Wang, Qun

    2017-02-15

    Studies in mammals have shown that damaged DNA-binding protein 1 (DDB1) is a multifunctional protein that recognizes UV-induced DNA lesions and activates nucleotide excision repair process, and could also be a linker protein for Cullin4 in ubiquitination to regulate cell cycle progression. However, there are few studies of DBB1 in crustaceans. In this study, a cDNA representing the DDB1 gene from Eriocheir sinensis (Es-DDB1) was cloned successfully. The full length Es-DDB1 cDNA comprises 4871 nucleotides, and encodes an open-reading frame (ORF) of 1137 amino acid residues. Bioinformatics' analysis showed that the domains and structure of Es-DDB1 have been highly conserved during evolution. Antibodies against Es-DDB1 and Es-Cul4 were raised using a prokaryotic expression system. Moreover, a co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that Es-DDB1 could bind Es-Cul4 in the testis of Eriocheir sinensis. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting showed high expression in the testis, particularly during the spermatocyte stage. Immunofluorescence assays showed that Es-DDB1 was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm in the early and middle developmental stages. These results indicated that Es-DDB1 might play a key role in spermatogenesis of E. sinensis.

  5. WAVE2-Abi2 complex controls growth cone activity and regulates the multipolar-bipolar transition as well as the initiation of glia-guided migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Kuroda, Kazuki; Wang, Chen-Chi; Komada, Munekazu; Zhao, Hong; Sakakibara, Akira; Miyata, Takaki; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Oka, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Sato, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    Glia-guided migration (glia-guided locomotion) during radial migration is a characteristic yet unique mode of migration. In this process, the directionality of migration is predetermined by glial processes and not by growth cones. Prior to the initiation of glia-guided migration, migrating neurons transform from multipolar to bipolar, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this multipolar-bipolar transition and the commencement of glia-guided migration are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that the multipolar-bipolar transition is not solely a cell autonomous event; instead, the interaction of growth cones with glial processes plays an essential role. Time-lapse imaging with lattice assays reveals the importance of vigorously active growth cones in searching for appropriate glial scaffolds, completing the transition, and initiating glia-guided migration. These growth cone activities are regulated by Abl kinase and Cdk5 via WAVE2-Abi2 through the phosphorylation of tyrosine 150 and serine 137 of WAVE2. Neurons that do not display such growth cone activities are mispositioned in a more superficial location in the neocortex, suggesting the significance of growth cones for the final location of the neurons. This process occurs in spite of the "inside-out" principle in which later-born neurons are situated more superficially.

  6. Combinatorial analysis of lupulin gland transcription factors from R2R3Myb, bHLH and WDR families indicates a complex regulation of chs_H1 genes essential for prenylflavonoid biosynthesis in hop (Humulus Lupulus L.

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    Matoušek Jaroslav

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lupulin glands of hop produce a specific metabolome including hop bitter acids valuable for the brewing process and prenylflavonoids with promising health-beneficial activities. The detailed analysis of the transcription factor (TF-mediated regulation of the oligofamily of one of the key enzymes, i.e., chalcone synthase CHS_H1 that efficiently catalyzes the production of naringenin chalcone, a direct precursor of prenylflavonoids in hop, constitutes an important part of the dissection of the biosynthetic pathways leading to the accumulation of these compounds. Results Homologues of flavonoid-regulating TFs HlMyb2 (M2, HlbHLH2 (B2 and HlWDR1 (W1 from hop were cloned using a lupulin gland-specific cDNA library from the hop variety Osvald's 72. Using a "combinatorial" transient GUS expression system it was shown that these unique lupulin-gland-associated TFs significantly activated the promoter (P of chs_H1 in ternary combinations of B2, W1 and either M2 or the previously characterized HlMyb3 (M3. The promoter activation was strongly dependent on the Myb-P binding box TCCTACC having a core sequence CCWACC positioned on its 5' end region and it seems that the complexity of the promoter plays an important role. M2B2W1-mediated activation significantly exceeded the strength of expression of native chs_H1 gene driven by the 35S promoter of CaMV, while M3B2W1 resulted in 30% of the 35S:chs_H1 expression level, as quantified by real-time PCR. Another newly cloned hop TF, HlMyb7, containing a transcriptional repressor-like motif pdLNLD/ELxiG/S (PDLNLELRIS, was identified as an efficient inhibitor of chs_H1-activating TFs. Comparative analyses of hop and A. thaliana TFs revealed a complex activation of Pchs_H1 and Pchs4 in combinatorial or independent manners. Conclusions This study on the sequences and functions of various lupulin gland-specific transcription factors provides insight into the complex character of the regulation of the

  7. Axon Regeneration Is Regulated by Ets-C/EBP Transcription Complexes Generated by Activation of the cAMP/Ca2+ Signaling Pathways.

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    Chun Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of specific neurons to regenerate their axons after injury is governed by cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways are important for axon regeneration. Axonal injury induces expression of the svh-2 gene encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, stimulation of which by the SVH-1 growth factor leads to activation of the JNK pathway. Here, we identify ETS-4 and CEBP-1, related to mammalian Ets and C/EBP, respectively, as transcriptional activators of svh-2 expression following axon injury. ETS-4 and CEBP-1 function downstream of the cAMP and Ca2+-p38 MAPK pathways, respectively. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of ETS-4 promotes its complex formation with CEBP-1. Furthermore, activation of both cAMP and Ca2+ signaling is required for activation of svh-2 expression. Thus, the cAMP/Ca2+ signaling pathways cooperatively activate the JNK pathway, which then promotes axon regeneration.

  8. Candidate gene screen in the red flour beetle Tribolium reveals six3 as ancient regulator of anterior median head and central complex development.

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    Nico Posnien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Several highly conserved genes play a role in anterior neural plate patterning of vertebrates and in head and brain patterning of insects. However, head involution in Drosophila has impeded a systematic identification of genes required for insect head formation. Therefore, we use the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum in order to comprehensively test the function of orthologs of vertebrate neural plate patterning genes for a function in insect head development. RNAi analysis reveals that most of these genes are indeed required for insect head capsule patterning, and we also identified several genes that had not been implicated in this process before. Furthermore, we show that Tc-six3/optix acts upstream of Tc-wingless, Tc-orthodenticle1, and Tc-eyeless to control anterior median development. Finally, we demonstrate that Tc-six3/optix is the first gene known to be required for the embryonic formation of the central complex, a midline-spanning brain part connected to the neuroendocrine pars intercerebralis. These functions are very likely conserved among bilaterians since vertebrate six3 is required for neuroendocrine and median brain development with certain mutations leading to holoprosencephaly.

  9. Axon Regeneration Is Regulated by Ets-C/EBP Transcription Complexes Generated by Activation of the cAMP/Ca2+ Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Hisamoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-10-01

    The ability of specific neurons to regenerate their axons after injury is governed by cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways are important for axon regeneration. Axonal injury induces expression of the svh-2 gene encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, stimulation of which by the SVH-1 growth factor leads to activation of the JNK pathway. Here, we identify ETS-4 and CEBP-1, related to mammalian Ets and C/EBP, respectively, as transcriptional activators of svh-2 expression following axon injury. ETS-4 and CEBP-1 function downstream of the cAMP and Ca2+-p38 MAPK pathways, respectively. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of ETS-4 promotes its complex formation with CEBP-1. Furthermore, activation of both cAMP and Ca2+ signaling is required for activation of svh-2 expression. Thus, the cAMP/Ca2+ signaling pathways cooperatively activate the JNK pathway, which then promotes axon regeneration.

  10. The negative feedback molecular mechanism which regulates excitation level in the plant photosynthetic complex LHCII: towards identification of the energy dissipative state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubik, Monika; Luchowski, Rafal; Puzio, Michal; Janik, Ewa; Bednarska, Joanna; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2013-03-01

    Overexcitation of the photosynthetic apparatus is potentially dangerous because it can cause oxidative damage. Photoprotection realized via the feedback de-excitation in the pigment-protein light-harvesting complex LHCII, embedded in the chloroplast lipid environment, was studied with use of the steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Illumination of LHCII results in the pronounced singlet excitation quenching, demonstrated by decreased quantum yield of the chlorophyll a fluorescence and shortening of the fluorescence lifetimes. Analysis of the 77K chlorophyll a fluorescence emission spectra reveals that the light-driven excitation quenching in LHCII is associated with the intensity increase of the spectral band in the region of 700nm, relative to the principal band at 680nm. The average chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetime at 700nm changes drastically upon temperature decrease: from 1.04ns at 300K to 3.63ns at 77K. The results of the experiments lead us to conclude that: (i) the 700nm band is associated with the inter-trimer interactions which result in the formation of the chlorophyll low-energy states acting as energy traps and non-radiative dissipation centers; (ii) the Arrhenius analysis, supported by the results of the FTIR measurements, suggests that the photo-reaction can be associated with breaking of hydrogen bonds. Possible involvement of photo-isomerization of neoxanthin, reported previously (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1807 (2011) 1237-1243) in generation of the low-energy traps in LHCII is discussed.

  11. The three-dimensional structure of TrmB, a transcriptional regulator of dual function in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus in complex with sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Michael; Lee, Sung-Jae; Boos, Winfried; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram

    2013-06-01

    TrmB is a repressor that binds maltose, maltotriose, and sucrose, as well as other α-glucosides. It recognizes two different operator sequences controlling the TM (Trehalose/Maltose) and the MD (Maltodextrin) operon encoding the respective ABC transporters and sugar-degrading enzymes. Binding of maltose to TrmB abrogates repression of the TM operon but maintains the repression of the MD operon. On the other hand, binding of sucrose abrogates repression of the MD operon but maintains repression of the TM operon. The three-dimensional structure of TrmB in complex with sucrose was solved and refined to a resolution of 3.0 Å. The structure shows the N-terminal DNA binding domain containing a winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain followed by an amphipathic helix with a coiled-coil motif. The latter promotes dimerization and places the symmetry mates of the putative recognition helix in the wHTH motif about 30 Å apart suggesting a canonical binding to two successive major grooves of duplex palindromic DNA. This suggests that the structure resembles the conformation of TrmB recognizing the pseudopalindromic TM promoter but not the conformation recognizing the nonpalindromic MD promoter.

  12. Complexes containing activating transcription factor (ATF)/cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein (CREB) interact with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP)-ATF composite site to regulate Gadd153 expression during the stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, T W; Martindale, J L; Guyton, K Z; Hai, T; Holbrook, N J

    1999-01-01

    Gadd153, also known as chop, encodes a member of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factor family and is transcriptionally activated by cellular stress signals. We recently demonstrated that arsenite treatment of rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells results in the biphasic induction of Gadd153 mRNA expression, controlled in part through binding of C/EBPbeta and two uncharacterized protein complexes to the C/EBP-ATF (activating transcription factor) composite site in the Gadd153 promoter. In this report, we identified components of these additional complexes as two ATF/CREB (cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein) transcription factors having differential binding activities dependent upon the time of arsenite exposure. During arsenite treatment of PC12 cells, we observed enhanced binding of ATF4 to the C/EBP-ATF site at 2 h as Gadd153 mRNA levels increased, and enhanced binding of ATF3 complexes at 6 h as Gadd153 expression declined. We further demonstrated that ATF4 activates, while ATF3 represses, Gadd153 promoter activity through the C/EBP-ATF site. ATF3 also repressed ATF4-mediated transactivation and arsenite-induced activation of the Gadd153 promoter. Our results suggest that numerous members of the ATF/CREB family are involved in the cellular stress response, and that regulation of stress-induced biphasic Gadd153 expression in PC12 cells involves the ordered, sequential binding of multiple transcription factor complexes to the C/EBP-ATF composite site. PMID:10085237

  13. Key role of LaeA and velvet complex proteins on expression of β-lactam and PR-toxin genes in Penicillium chrysogenum: cross-talk regulation of secondary metabolite pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Juan F

    2016-08-26

    Penicillium chrysogenum is an excellent model fungus to study the molecular mechanisms of control of expression of secondary metabolite genes. A key global regulator of the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites is the LaeA protein that interacts with other components of the velvet complex (VelA, VelB, VelC, VosA). These components interact with LaeA and regulate expression of penicillin and PR-toxin biosynthetic genes in P. chrysogenum. Both LaeA and VelA are positive regulators of the penicillin and PR-toxin biosynthesis, whereas VelB acts as antagonist of the effect of LaeA and VelA. Silencing or deletion of the laeA gene has a strong negative effect on penicillin biosynthesis and overexpression of laeA increases penicillin production. Expression of the laeA gene is enhanced by the P. chrysogenum autoinducers 1,3 diaminopropane and spermidine. The PR-toxin gene cluster is very poorly expressed in P. chrysogenum under penicillin-production conditions (i.e. it is a near-silent gene cluster). Interestingly, the downregulation of expression of the PR-toxin gene cluster in the high producing strain P. chrysogenum DS17690 was associated with mutations in both the laeA and velA genes. Analysis of the laeA and velA encoding genes in this high penicillin producing strain revealed that both laeA and velA acquired important mutations during the strain improvement programs thus altering the ratio of different secondary metabolites (e.g. pigments, PR-toxin) synthesized in the high penicillin producing mutants when compared to the parental wild type strain. Cross-talk of different secondary metabolite pathways has also been found in various Penicillium spp.: P. chrysogenum mutants lacking the penicillin gene cluster produce increasing amounts of PR-toxin, and mutants of P. roqueforti silenced in the PR-toxin genes produce large amounts of mycophenolic acid. The LaeA-velvet complex mediated regulation and the pathway cross-talk phenomenon has great relevance for improving the

  14. The mouse nac1 gene, encoding a cocaine-regulated Bric-a-brac Tramtrac Broad complex/Pox virus and Zinc finger protein, is regulated by AP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackler, S A; Homan, Y X; Korutla, L; Conti, A C; Blendy, J A

    2003-01-01

    NAC1 cDNA was identified as a novel transcript induced in the nucleus accumbens from rats chronically treated with cocaine. NAC1 is a member of the Bric-a-brac Tramtrac Broad complex/Pox virus and Zinc finger family of transcription factors and has been shown by overexpression studies to prevent the development of behavioral sensitization resulting from repeated cocaine treatment. This paper reports the cloning and characterization of the corresponding gene. The mouse Nac1 gene consist of six exons, with exon 2 containing an alternative splice donor, providing a molecular explanation of the splice variants observed in mouse and rat. Transcripts of Nac1 were ubiquitously detected in different mouse tissues with prominent expression in the brain. The mouse Nac1 gene was localized to chromosome 8, suggesting a highly plausible candidate gene to explain differences in cocaine-induced behaviors between C57BL6/J and DBA/2J mice that had previously been mapped to the area. In addition, a functional AP1 binding site has been identified in an intron 1 enhancer of the Nac1 gene that plays an essential role in the activation of the gene in differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. Co-transfection with c-jun and c-fos expression plasmids, which encode the two subunits of AP1, activated the wild type Nac1 intron 1 enhancer two-fold over basal, nearly at the level of NAC1 enhancer activity seen in differentiated N2A cells. Mutation of the AP1 site completely abrogated all activation of the NAC1 enhancer in differentiated N2A cells. Activation of immediate early genes such as c-fos and c-jun following chronic drug treatments has been well characterized. The present data describe one potential regulatory cascade involving these transcription factors and activation of NAC1. Identification of drug induced alterations in gene expression is key to understanding the types of molecular adaptations underlying addiction.

  15. Carney Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of Cancer > Carney Complex Request Permissions Carney Complex Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is Carney complex? Carney complex is a hereditary condition associated with: ...

  16. Deciphering the cryptic genome: genome-wide analyses of the rice pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi reveal complex regulation of secondary metabolism and novel metabolites.

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    Philipp Wiemann

    Full Text Available The fungus Fusarium fujikuroi causes "bakanae" disease of rice due to its ability to produce gibberellins (GAs, but it is also known for producing harmful mycotoxins. However, the genetic capacity for the whole arsenal of natural compounds and their role in the fungus' interaction with rice remained unknown. Here, we present a high-quality genome sequence of F. fujikuroi that was assembled into 12 scaffolds corresponding to the 12 chromosomes described for the fungus. We used the genome sequence along with ChIP-seq, transcriptome, proteome, and HPLC-FTMS-based metabolome analyses to identify the potential secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and to examine their regulation in response to nitrogen availability and plant signals. The results indicate that expression of most but not all gene clusters correlate with proteome and ChIP-seq data. Comparison of the F. fujikuroi genome to those of six other fusaria revealed that only a small number of gene clusters are conserved among these species, thus providing new insights into the divergence of secondary metabolism in the genus Fusarium. Noteworthy, GA biosynthetic genes are present in some related species, but GA biosynthesis is limited to F. fujikuroi, suggesting that this provides a selective advantage during infection of the preferred host plant rice. Among the genome sequences analyzed, one cluster that includes a polyketide synthase gene (PKS19 and another that includes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (NRPS31 are unique to F. fujikuroi. The metabolites derived from these clusters were identified by HPLC-FTMS-based analyses of engineered F. fujikuroi strains overexpressing cluster genes. In planta expression studies suggest a specific role for the PKS19-derived product during rice infection. Thus, our results indicate that combined comparative genomics and genome-wide experimental analyses identified novel genes and secondary metabolites that contribute to the evolutionary

  17. American Better Business Bureaus, the Truth-in-Advertising Movement, and the Complexities of Legitimizing Business Self-Regulation over the Long Term

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    Edward J. Balleisen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers the question of how strategies of legitimatizing private regulatory governance evolve over the long term. It focuses on the century-long history of the American Better Business Bureau (BBB network, a linked set of business-funded non-governmental organizations devoted to promoting truthful marketing. The BBBs took on important roles in standard-setting, monitoring, public education, and enforcement, despite never enjoying explicit delegation of authority from Congress or state legislatures. This effort depended on building legitimacy with three separate groups with very different perspectives and interests—the business community, a fractured American state, and the American public, in their roles as consumers and investors. The BBBs initially managed to build a strong reputation with each constituency during its founding period, from 1912 to 1933. The Bureaus then in many ways adapted successfully to the emergence of a more assertive regulatory state from the New Deal through the mid 1970s. Eventually, however, the resurgence of conservative politics in the United States exposed the challenges of satisfying such divergent stakeholders, and led the BBBs to focus resolutely on shoring up its support from the business establishment. That choice, over time, undercut the Bureaus standing with other stakeholders, and especially the wider public. This history illustrates: the salience of generational amnesia within private regulatory institutions; the profound impact that the shifting nature of public faith in government can have on the strategies and reputation of private regulatory bodies; and the extent to which private regulators face long-term trade-offs among strategies to sustain legitimacy with different audiences. It also suggests a rich set of research questions for longer-term histories of other private regulatory institutions, in the United States, other societies, and at the international level.

  18. SUMO: regulating the regulator

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    Bossis Guillaume

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Post-translational modifiers of the SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier family have emerged as key regulators of protein function and fate. While the past few years have seen an enormous increase in knowledge on SUMO enzymes, substrates, and consequences of modification, regulation of SUMO conjugation is far from being understood. This brief review will provide an overview on recent advances concerning (i the interplay between sumoylation and other post-translational modifications at the level of individual targets and (ii global regulation of SUMO conjugation and deconjugation.

  19. Regulation of Hxt3 and Hxt7 turnover converges on the Vid30 complex and requires inactivation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Snowdon

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells adjust their intracellular protein complement as a mechanism to adapt to changing environmental signals. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the hexose transporters Hxt3 and Hxt7 are expressed and function on the plasma membrane in high and low glucose abundance, respectively. By contrast, Hxt3 is endocytosed and degraded in the vacuole when cells are starved of glucose and Hxt7 in response to rapamycin treatment or when nitrogen is limiting. Yeast uses several signaling pathways, including the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/Protein Kinase A (PKA pathways, to adapt to nutrient changes in the environment. The multi-protein Vid30 complex (Vid30c, an E3 ubiquitin ligase required for the degradation of FBPase, assists in this adaptation process in a mechanism that is poorly understood. Here we show the endocytosis and the subsequent degradation of both Hxt3 and Hxt7, in response to different nutrient signals, is dependent on components of the Vid30c. Additionally, we define the signaling events required for the turnover of Hxt3 and Hxt7 by showing that Hxt3 turnover requires Ras2 and PKA inactivation, whereas Hxt7 turnover requires TORC1 and Ras2 inactivation. Further investigation led us to identify Rim15, a kinase that is inhibited by both the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/PKA pathways, as a key downstream effector in signaling both turnover events. Finally, we show that the turnover of both Hxt3 and Hxt7 is dependent on the essential E3 ubiquitin ligase, Rsp5, indicating that the role of the Vid30c might be indirect of Hxt ubiquitylation.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the nuclear gene encoding the alpha-subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial F1F0 ATP synthase complex: role for the orphan nuclear receptor, COUP-TFII/ARP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Elzora M; Worley, Teri; Breen, Gail A M

    2003-03-11

    Our laboratory has been studying the transcriptional regulation of the nuclear gene (ATPA) that encodes the alpha-subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial F1F0 ATP synthase complex. We have previously determined that the regulatory factor, upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), can stimulate transcription of the ATPA gene through the cis-acting regulatory element 1 in the upstream promoter of this gene. In this study, we used the yeast one-hybrid screening method to identify another factor, COUP-TFII/ARP-1, which also binds to the ATPA cis-acting regulatory element 1. Binding of the orphan nuclear receptor, COUP-TFII/ARP-1, to the ATPA regulatory element 1 was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift experiments, and COUP-TFII/ARP-1-containing complexes were detected in HeLa cell nuclear extracts. A mutational analysis indicated that the binding site for COUP-TFII/ARP-1 in the ATPA regulatory element 1 is an imperfect direct repeat of a nuclear receptor response element (A/GGGTCA) with a spacer of three nucleotides. Functional assays in HeLa cells showed that COUP-TFII/ARP-1 represses the ATPA promoter activity in a dose- and sequence-dependent manner. Furthermore, cotransfection assays demonstrated that COUP-TFII/ARP-1 inhibits the USF2-mediated activation of the wild-type ATPA gene promoter but not a mutant promoter that is defective in COUP-TFII/ARP-1-binding. Overexpression of USF2 reversed the COUP-TFII/ARP-1-mediated repression of the ATPA promoter. Mobility shift assays revealed that COUP-TFII/ARP-1 and USF2 compete for binding to the ATPA regulatory element 1. Thus, the ATPA gene is regulated by a multifunctional binding site through which the transcription factors, COUP-TFII/ARP-1 and USF2, bind and exert their antagonistic effects.

  1. Phosphodiesterase 4B in the cardiac L-type Ca²⁺ channel complex regulates Ca²⁺ current and protects against ventricular arrhythmias in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Jérôme; Richter, Wito; Mika, Delphine; Castro, Liliana R V; Abi-Gerges, Aniella; Xie, Moses; Scheitrum, Colleen; Lefebvre, Florence; Schittl, Julia; Mateo, Philippe; Westenbroek, Ruth; Catterall, William A; Charpentier, Flavien; Conti, Marco; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2011-07-01

    β-Adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) enhance cardiac contractility by increasing cAMP levels and activating PKA. PKA increases Ca²⁺-induced Ca²⁺ release via phosphorylation of L-type Ca²⁺ channels (LTCCs) and ryanodine receptor 2. Multiple cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate local cAMP concentration in cardiomyocytes, with PDE4 being predominant for the control of β-AR-dependent cAMP signals. Three genes encoding PDE4 are expressed in mouse heart: Pde4a, Pde4b, and Pde4d. Here we show that both PDE4B and PDE4D are tethered to the LTCC in the mouse heart but that β-AR stimulation of the L-type Ca²⁺ current (ICa,L) is increased only in Pde4b-/- mice. A fraction of PDE4B colocalized with the LTCC along T-tubules in the mouse heart. Under β-AR stimulation, Ca²⁺ transients, cell contraction, and spontaneous Ca²⁺ release events were increased in Pde4b-/- and Pde4d-/- myocytes compared with those in WT myocytes. In vivo, after intraperitoneal injection of isoprenaline, catheter-mediated burst pacing triggered ventricular tachycardia in Pde4b-/- mice but not in WT mice. These results identify PDE4B in the CaV1.2 complex as a critical regulator of ICa,L during β-AR stimulation and suggest that distinct PDE4 subtypes are important for normal regulation of Ca²⁺-induced Ca²⁺ release in cardiomyocytes.

  2. Activation of the MAPK11/12/13/14 (p38 MAPK) pathway regulates the transcription of autophagy genes in response to oxidative stress induced by a novel copper complex in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wu; Zhu, Haichuan; Sheng, Fugeng; Tian, Yonglu; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Yingyu; Li, Song; Lin, Jian

    2014-07-01

    Transition metal copper (Cu) can exist in oxidized or reduced states in cells, leading to cytotoxicity in cancer cells through oxidative stress. Recently, copper complexes are emerging as a new class of anticancer compounds. Here, we report that a novel anticancer copper complex (HYF127c/Cu) induces oxidative stress-dependent cell death in cancer cells. Further, transcriptional analysis revealed that oxidative stress elicits broad transcriptional changes of genes, in which autophagy-related genes are significantly changed in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells. Consistently, autophagy was induced in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells and inhibitors of autophagy promoted cell death induced by HYF127c/Cu. Further analysis identified that the MAPK11/12/13/14 (formerly known as p38 MAPK) pathway was also activated in HYF127c/Cu-treated cells. Meanwhile, the MAPK11/12/13/14 inhibitor SB203580 downregulated autophagy by inhibiting the transcription of the autophagy genes MAP1LC3B, BAG3, and HSPA1A, and promoted HYF127c/Cu-induced cell death. These data suggest that copper-induced oxidative stress will induce protective autophagy through transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes by activation of the MAPK11/12/13/14 pathway in HeLa cells.

  3. Complex Beauty

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschet, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Complex systems and their underlying convoluted networks are ubiquitous, all we need is an eye for them. They pose problems of organized complexity which cannot be approached with a reductionist method. Complexity science and its emergent sister network science both come to grips with the inherent complexity of complex systems with an holistic strategy. The relevance of complexity, however, transcends the sciences. Complex systems and networks are the focal point of a philosophical, cultural ...

  4. Advances in network complexity

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A well-balanced overview of mathematical approaches to describe complex systems, ranging from chemical reactions to gene regulation networks, from ecological systems to examples from social sciences. Matthias Dehmer and Abbe Mowshowitz, a well-known pioneer in the field, co-edit this volume and are careful to include not only classical but also non-classical approaches so as to ensure topicality. Overall, a valuable addition to the literature and a must-have for anyone dealing with complex systems.

  5. Market, Regulation, Market, Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Galland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the European Regulatory system which was settled both for opening the Single Market for products and ensuring the consumers' safety. It claims that the New Approach and Standardization, and the Global Approach to conformity assessment, which suppressed the last technical...... barriers to trade in Europe, realized the free movement of products by organizing progressively several orders of markets and regulation. Based on historical and institutional documents, on technical publications, and on interviews, this article relates how the European Commission and the Member States had...... alternatively recourse to markets and to regulations, at the three main levels of the New Approach Directives implementation. The article focuses also more specifically on the Medical Devices sector, not only because this New Approach sector has long been controversial in Europe, and has recently been concerned...

  6. Bucolic Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Brešar, Bostjan; Chepoi, Victor; Gologranc, Tanja; Osajda, Damian

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we introduce and investigate bucolic complexes, a common generalization of systolic complexes and of CAT(0) cubical complexes. This class of complexes is closed under Cartesian products and amalgamations over some convex subcomplexes. We study various approaches to bucolic complexes: from graph-theoretic and topological viewpoints, as well as from the point of view of geometric group theory. Bucolic complexes can be defined as locally-finite simply connected prism complexes satisfying some local combinatorial conditions. We show that bucolic complexes are contractible, and satisfy some nonpositive-curvature-like properties. In particular, we prove a version of the Cartan-Hadamard theorem, the fixed point theorem for finite group actions, and establish some results on groups acting geometrically on such complexes. We also characterize the 1-skeletons (which we call bucolic graphs) and the 2-skeletons of bucolic complexes. In particular, we prove that bucolic graphs are precisely retracts of Ca...

  7. Proteasomes: a complex story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendil, Klavs B; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    Protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is important for regulation of metabolism, progression through the division cycle, in cell signalling pathways, and in mammals also for generation of antigen fragments for presentation on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Most cell proteins...

  8. The Structure of the Transcriptional Repressor KstR in Complex with CoA Thioester Cholesterol Metabolites Sheds Light on the Regulation of Cholesterol Catabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Dawes, Stephanie S; Crowe, Adam M; Casabon, Israël; Gao, Chen; Kendall, Sharon L; Baker, Edward N; Eltis, Lindsay D; Lott, J Shaun

    2016-04-01

    Cholesterol can be a major carbon source forMycobacterium tuberculosisduring infection, both at an early stage in the macrophage phagosome and later within the necrotic granuloma. KstR is a highly conserved TetR family transcriptional repressor that regulates a large set of genes responsible for cholesterol catabolism. Many genes in this regulon, includingkstR, are either induced during infection or are essential for survival ofM. tuberculosis in vivo In this study, we identified two ligands for KstR, both of which are CoA thioester cholesterol metabolites with four intact steroid rings. A metabolite in which one of the rings was cleaved was not a ligand. We confirmed the ligand-protein interactions using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and showed that ligand binding strongly inhibited KstR-DNA binding using surface plasmon resonance (IC50for ligand = 25 nm). Crystal structures of the ligand-free form of KstR show variability in the position of the DNA-binding domain. In contrast, structures of KstR·ligand complexes are highly similar to each other and demonstrate a position of the DNA-binding domain that is unfavorable for DNA binding. Comparison of ligand-bound and ligand-free structures identifies residues involved in ligand specificity and reveals a distinctive mechanism by which the ligand-induced conformational change mediates DNA release.

  9. Taming Dynamical Complexity and Managing High Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANGJin-qing; CHENGuan-rong; ZHAOGeng

    2003-01-01

    Variability is one of the most important features of complexity m complex networks anu systems,which usually depends sensitively on small perturbations. Various possible competing behaviours in a system may provide great flexibility in regulating or taming dynamical complexity, through which the designer may be able to better select and manage a desired behaviour for a specific application. In many high-tech fields, how to regulate or manage complexity is a very important but challenge issue.

  10. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wulp, Mariette Y. M.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Groen, Albert K.

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-codin

  11. Multi-Timescale Complex Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    interconnected gene and biochemical regulatory networks. Attempts at reverse engineering the gene regulatory networks from microarray data alone...are considered as potentially regulating all the other genes and the suboptimal and nonunique results are subsequently pruned either by setting...postulate that systems engineering techniques developed for complex chemical processes may be applicable to complex cell biological processes is very

  12. Complexity Plots

    KAUST Repository

    Thiyagalingam, Jeyarajan

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique for assisting the observation and analysis of algorithmic complexity. In comparison with conventional line graphs, this new technique is not sensitive to the units of measurement, allowing multivariate data series of different physical qualities (e.g., time, space and energy) to be juxtaposed together conveniently and consistently. It supports multivariate visualization as well as uncertainty visualization. It enables users to focus on algorithm categorization by complexity classes, while reducing visual impact caused by constants and algorithmic components that are insignificant to complexity analysis. It provides an effective means for observing the algorithmic complexity of programs with a mixture of algorithms and black-box software through visualization. Through two case studies, we demonstrate the effectiveness of complexity plots in complexity analysis in research, education and application. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Engaging complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gys M. Loubser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss studies in complexity and its epistemological implications for systematic and practical theology. I argue that engagement with complexity does not necessarily assurea non-reductionist approach. However, if complexity is engaged transversally, it becomes possible to transcend reductionist approaches. Moreover, systematic and practical the ologians can draw on complexity in developing new ways of understanding and, therefore, new ways of describing the focus, epistemic scope and heuristic structures of systematic and practical theology. Firstly, Edgar Morin draws a distinction between restricted and general complexity based on the epistemology drawn upon in studies in complexity. Moving away from foundationalist approaches to epistemology, Morin argues for a paradigm of systems. Secondly,I discuss Kees van Kooten Niekerk�s distinction between epistemology, methodology andontology in studies in complexity and offer an example of a theological argument that drawson complexity. Thirdly, I argue for the importance of transversality in engaging complexity by drawing on the work of Wentzel van Huyssteen and Paul Cilliers. In conclusion, I argue that theologians have to be conscious of the epistemic foundations of each study in complexity, and these studies illuminate the heart of Reformed theology.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Therefore, this article has both intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary implications. When theologians engage studies incomplexity, the epistemological roots of these studies need to be considered seeing thatresearchers in complexity draw on different epistemologies. Drawing on transversality wouldenhance such considerations. Furthermore, Edgar Morin�s and Paul Cilliers� approach tocomplexity will inform practical and theoretical considerations in church polity and unity.

  14. Focus on PTEN regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eBermudez-Brito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of PTEN as a tumour suppressor has been for a long time attributed to its lipid phosphatase activity against PI(3,4,5P3, the phospholipid product of the class I PI3Ks. Besides its traditional role as a lipid phosphatase at the plasma membrane, a wealth of data has shown that PTEN can function independently of its phosphatase activity and that PTEN also exists and plays a role in the nucleus, in cytoplasmic organelles and extracellularly. Accumulating evidence has shed light on diverse physiological functions of PTEN which are accompanied by a complex regulation of its expression and activity. PTEN levels and function are regulated transcriptionally, post-transcriptionally and post-translationally. PTEN is also sensitive to regulation by its interacting proteins and its localization. Herein, we summarize the current knowledge on mechanisms that regulate the expression and enzymatic activity of PTEN and its role in human diseases.

  15. Nitrate Reductase: Properties and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate Reductase (NR) is a rating-limit and key enzyme of nitrate assimilation in plants ,so ,NR activity is important for growth,development and the dry matter accumulation of plants. The regulation of NR activity appears to be rather complex and many studies have been devoted to the description of regulation and properties,but in this paper we focus on the properties and regulation of NR in higher plants.

  16. Simplifying complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemput, van de I.A.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I use mathematical models to explore the properties of complex systems ranging from microbial nitrogen pathways and coral reefs to the human state of mind. All are examples of complex systems, defined as systems composed of a number of interconnected parts, where the systemic behavior

  17. Complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetha, A; Balikai, Bharati S; Sujatha, D; Pai, Anuradha; Ganapathy, K S

    2010-01-01

    Odontomas are hamartomatous lesions or malformations composed of mature enamel, dentin, and pulp. They may be compound or complex, depending on the extent of morphodifferentiation or their resemblance to normal teeth. The etiology of odontoma is unknown, although several theories have been proposed. This article describes a case of a large infected complex odontoma in the residual mandibular ridge, resulting in considerable mandibular expansion.

  18. Complex narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper brings together narratology, game theory, and complexity theory to untangle the intricate nature of complex narratives in contemporary cinema. It interrogates the different terms - forking-path narratives, mind-game films, modular narratives, multiple-draft films, database narratives, puz

  19. Computational Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems (CS involve many elements that interact at different scales in time and space. The challenges in modeling CS led to the development of novel computational tools with applications in a wide range of scientific areas. The computational problems posed by CS exhibit intrinsic difficulties that are a major concern in Computational Complexity Theory. [...

  20. Complexity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, John H

    2014-01-01

    The importance of complexity is well-captured by Hawking's comment: "Complexity is the science of the 21st century". From the movement of flocks of birds to the Internet, environmental sustainability, and market regulation, the study and understanding of complex non-linear systems has become highly influential over the last 30 years. In this Very Short Introduction, one of the leading figures in the field, John Holland, introduces the key elements and conceptual framework of complexity. From complex physical systems such as fluid flow and the difficulties of predicting weather, to complex adaptive systems such as the highly diverse and interdependent ecosystems of rainforests, he combines simple, well-known examples - Adam Smith's pin factory, Darwin's comet orchid, and Simon's 'watchmaker' - with an account of the approaches, involving agents and urn models, taken by complexity theory. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost eve...

  1. Managing Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maylath, Bruce; Vandepitte, Sonia; Minacori, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the largest and most complex international learning-by-doing project to date- a project involving translation from Danish and Dutch into English and editing into American English alongside a project involving writing, usability testing, and translation from English into Dut...... and into French. The complexity of the undertaking proved to be a central element in the students' learning, as the collaboration closely resembles the complexity of international documentation workplaces of language service providers. © Association of Teachers of Technical Writing....

  2. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  3. Modeling Complex Time Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Svatos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze complexity of time limits we can find especially in regulated processes of public administration. First we review the most popular process modeling languages. There is defined an example scenario based on the current Czech legislature which is then captured in discussed process modeling languages. Analysis shows that the contemporary process modeling languages support capturing of the time limit only partially. This causes troubles to analysts and unnecessary complexity of the models. Upon unsatisfying results of the contemporary process modeling languages we analyze the complexity of the time limits in greater detail and outline lifecycles of a time limit using the multiple dynamic generalizations pattern. As an alternative to the popular process modeling languages there is presented PSD process modeling language, which supports the defined lifecycles of a time limit natively and therefore allows keeping the models simple and easy to understand.

  4. Regulating Transplants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Legislation to determine brain death is viewed as essential in controlling the organ transplant industry Organ transplant represents a very sensitive and complicated issue. Experts say the temporary administrative regulations recently promulgated by the Central Government are an important step, but relevant laws and regulations must follow. Among these, the

  5. Complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Freitag, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    The guiding principle of this presentation of ``Classical Complex Analysis'' is to proceed as quickly as possible to the central results while using a small number of notions and concepts from other fields. Thus the prerequisites for understanding this book are minimal; only elementary facts of calculus and algebra are required. The first four chapters cover the essential core of complex analysis: - differentiation in C (including elementary facts about conformal mappings) - integration in C (including complex line integrals, Cauchy's Integral Theorem, and the Integral Formulas) - sequences and series of analytic functions, (isolated) singularities, Laurent series, calculus of residues - construction of analytic functions: the gamma function, Weierstrass' Factorization Theorem, Mittag-Leffler Partial Fraction Decomposition, and -as a particular highlight- the Riemann Mapping Theorem, which characterizes the simply connected domains in C. Further topics included are: - the theory of elliptic functions based on...

  6. Standard types of regulation loops; Chaines de regulation types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, M. [ENSAM, Centre d`Enseignement et de Recherche de Lille, 59 - Lille (France)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to give help in the analysis of industrial regulation problems using different types of real installations. The increasing complexity of industrial systems requires the use of a decomposition-recomposition procedure using a scheme with different blocs. Examples are given to help the non-specialist users in the mastery of essential choices and in the distinction between operational and material separations. The examples concern: the heating loop of a central heating installation, the sensors and actuators of industrial systems (the temperature regulation of a tubular furnace, the electro-hydraulic positioning systems used in machine tools, forming, aeronautics etc.., the regulation of a mixing system for hot and cold fluids, and the regulation of a fluidizing system. The usual types of regulation loops are presented with the different steps of the resolution of a regulation problem. (J.S.) 7 refs.

  7. Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Evsukoff, Alexandre; González, Marta

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade we have seen the emergence of a new inter-disciplinary field focusing on the understanding of networks which are dynamic, large, open, and have a structure sometimes called random-biased. The field of Complex Networks is helping us better understand many complex phenomena such as the spread of  deseases, protein interactions, social relationships, to name but a few. Studies in Complex Networks are gaining attention due to some major scientific breakthroughs proposed by network scientists helping us understand and model interactions contained in large datasets. In fact, if we could point to one event leading to the widespread use of complex network analysis is the availability of online databases. Theories of Random Graphs from Erdös and Rényi from the late 1950s led us to believe that most networks had random characteristics. The work on large online datasets told us otherwise. Starting with the work of Barabási and Albert as well as Watts and Strogatz in the late 1990s, we now know th...

  8. Complex chemistry with complex compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichler Robert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years gas-phase chemical studies assisted by physical pre-separation allowed for the investigation of fragile single molecular species by gas-phase chromatography. The latest success with the heaviest group 6 transactinide seaborgium is highlighted. The formation of a very volatile hexacarbonyl compound Sg(CO6 was observed similarly to its lighter homologues molybdenum and tungsten. The interactions of these gaseous carbonyl complex compounds with quartz surfaces were investigated by thermochromatography. Second-generation experiments are under way to investigate the intramolecular bond between the central metal atom of the complexes and the ligands addressing the influence of relativistic effects in the heaviest compounds. Our contribution comprises some aspects of the ongoing challenging experiments as well as an outlook towards other interesting compounds related to volatile complex compounds in the gas phase.

  9. Regulation of the power sector

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of the Power Sector is a unified, consistent and comprehensive treatment of the theories and practicalities of regulation in modern power-supply systems. The need for generation to occur at the time of use occasioned by the impracticality of large-scale electricity storage coupled with constant and often unpredictable changes in demand make electricity-supply systems large, dynamic and complex and their regulation a daunting task. Conceptually arranged in four parts, this book addresses both traditional regulatory frameworks and also liberalized and re-regulated environments. First, an introduction gives a full characterization of power supply including engineering, economic and regulatory viewpoints. The second part presents the fundamentals of regulation and the third looks at the regulation of particular components of the power sector in detail. Advanced topics and subjects still open or subject to dispute form the content of the fourth part. In a sector where regulatory design is the key driver...

  10. Mammalian NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt) together regulate the mitochondrial production of H(2)O (2)-Implications for their role in disease, especially cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albracht, S.P.J.; Meijer, A.J.; Rydström, J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) in the mitochondrial inner membrane catalyzes the oxidation of NADH in the matrix. Excess NADH reduces nine of the ten prosthetic groups of the enzyme in bovine-heart submitochondrial particles with a rate of at least 3,300 s(-1). This results in

  11. Mammalian NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt) together regulate the mitochondrial production of H₂O₂--implications for their role in disease, especially cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albracht, S.P.J.; Meijer, A.J.; Rydström, J.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) in the mitochondrial inner membrane catalyzes the oxidation of NADH in the matrix. Excess NADH reduces nine of the ten prosthetic groups of the enzyme in bovine-heart submitochondrial particles with a rate of at least 3,300 s−1. This results in an

  12. NORM regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  13. Polycomb complexes and silencing mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2004-01-01

    Advances in the past couple of years have brought important new knowledge on the mechanisms by which Polycomb-group proteins regulate gene expression and on the consequences of their actions. The discovery of histone methylation imprints specific for Polycomb and Trithorax complexes has provided...

  14. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  15. Immune complex stimulation of human neutrophils involves a novel Ca2+/H+ exchanger that participates in the regulation of cytoplasmic pH: flow cytometric analysis of Ca2+/pH responses by subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, John; Hartlaub, Hilary; Yu, Xin; Long, Heidi; Simons, Elizabeth R

    2002-12-01

    The activation of human phagocytic leukocytes by immune complexes (IC) or opsonized microbes via their Fc and complement receptors has been well-described. The mechanisms involved in this process are complex and depend on the receptors involved. The biochemical events that lead to the destruction of invading organisms in turn display varying degrees of interdependence, but the controlling elements that lead to the ultimate killing of ingested organisms within phagosomes by lysosomal enzymes and reactive oxygen intermediates are still not completely understood. We have addressed these mechanisms by following and correlating the kinetics of responses by individual cells, using multiparameter flow cytometry. Using nonopsonized IC as stimuli, we document here the presence of a novel Ca(2)(+)/H(+) voltage-independent channel in human neutrophils, which helps to control their cytoplasmic pH.

  16. Complex dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carleson, Lennart

    1993-01-01

    Complex dynamics is today very much a focus of interest. Though several fine expository articles were available, by P. Blanchard and by M. Yu. Lyubich in particular, until recently there was no single source where students could find the material with proofs. For anyone in our position, gathering and organizing the material required a great deal of work going through preprints and papers and in some cases even finding a proof. We hope that the results of our efforts will be of help to others who plan to learn about complex dynamics and perhaps even lecture. Meanwhile books in the field a. re beginning to appear. The Stony Brook course notes of J. Milnor were particularly welcome and useful. Still we hope that our special emphasis on the analytic side will satisfy a need. This book is a revised and expanded version of notes based on lectures of the first author at UCLA over several \\Vinter Quarters, particularly 1986 and 1990. We owe Chris Bishop a great deal of gratitude for supervising the production of cour...

  17. PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) protein regulates phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3)-specific activation of somatostatin by forming a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and somatostatin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Kwon, Ohman; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Park, Hye Kyung; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, Kyung Lock; Choi, Jung Woong; Lim, Seyoung; Seok, Heon; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Choi, Jang Hyun; Kang, Byoung Heon; Kim, Sanguk; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2012-06-15

    Phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) is a key molecule in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling. Many studies have shown that the four PLC-β subtypes have different physiological functions despite their similar structures. Because the PLC-β subtypes possess different PDZ-binding motifs, they have the potential to interact with different PDZ proteins. In this study, we identified PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) as a PDZ protein that specifically interacts with PLC-β3. To elucidate the functional roles of PDZK1, we next screened for potential interacting proteins of PDZK1 and identified the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) as another protein that interacts with PDZK1. Through these interactions, PDZK1 assembles as a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and SSTRs. Interestingly, the expression of PDZK1 and PLC-β3, but not PLC-β1, markedly potentiated SST-induced PLC activation. However, disruption of the ternary complex inhibited SST-induced PLC activation, which suggests that PDZK1-mediated complex formation is required for the specific activation of PLC-β3 by SST. Consistent with this observation, the knockdown of PDZK1 or PLC-β3, but not that of PLC-β1, significantly inhibited SST-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which further attenuated subsequent ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the formation of a complex between SSTRs, PDZK1, and PLC-β3 is essential for the specific activation of PLC-β3 and the subsequent physiologic responses by SST.

  18. Assembly and cell surface expression of TAP-independent, chloroquine-sensitive and interferon-gamma-inducible class I MHC complexes in transformed fibroblast cell lines are regulated by tapasin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Sharon Vigodman; Duady-Ben Yaakov, Shirly; Schechter, Chana; Ehrlich, Rachel

    2002-02-01

    Antigen processing and presentation by class I MHC molecules generally require assembly with peptide epitopes generated by the proteasome and transported into the ER by the transporters associated with antigen presentation (TAP). Recently, TAP-independent pathways supporting class I MHC-mediated presentation of exogenous antigens, as well as of endogenously synthesized viral antigens, were described. We now characterize a TAP-independent pathway that is operative in both TAP1- and TAP2-deficient Adenovirus (Ad)-transformed fibroblast cell lines. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the existence of such a pathway has been described in non-infected cells that do not belong to the hematopoietic lineage. We show that this pathway is proteasome-independent and chloroquine-sensitive. Cell surface expression of these TAP-independent class I complexes is modulated by tapasin levels and is enhanced by IFN-gamma. The data imply that IFN-gamma increases the relative level of TAP-independent high affinity class I complexes that exit the ER on their way to the cell surface and to vacuolar compartments where peptide cleavage/exchange might take place before recycling to the cell surface. Since both TAP and tapasin expression are altered in numerous tumors and in virus-infected cells, TAP-independent class I complexes may be a valuable target source for immune responses.

  19. Complex I deficiencies in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Sergio; De Rasmo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Complex I is the point of entry in the mitochondrial electron transport chain for NADH reducing equivalents, and it behaves as a regulatable pacemaker of respiratory ATP production in human cells. Defects in complex I are associated with several human neurological disorders, including primary mitochondrial diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and Down syndrome, and understanding the activity and regulation of complex I may reveal aspects of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Complex I is regulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and the protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway, and elucidating the role of the cAMP/PKA system in regulating complex I and oxygen free radical production provides new perspectives for devising therapeutic strategies for neurological diseases.

  20. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  1. Cosmic Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  2. Supra-optimal expression of the cold-regulated OsMyb4 transcription factor in transgenic rice changes the complexity of transcriptional network with major effects on stress tolerance and panicle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Ryoul; Yun, Kil-Young; Mohanty, Bijayalaxmi; Herath, Venura; Xu, Fuyu; Wijaya, Edward; Bajic, Vladimir B; Yun, Song-Joong; De Los Reyes, Benildo G

    2010-12-01

    The R2R3-type OsMyb4 transcription factor of rice has been shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic adjustment in heterologous overexpression studies. However, the exact composition and organization of its underlying transcriptional network has not been established to be a robust tool for stress tolerance enhancement by regulon engineering. OsMyb4 network was dissected based on commonalities between the global chilling stress transcriptome and the transcriptome configured by OsMyb4 overexpression. OsMyb4 controls a hierarchical network comprised of several regulatory sub-clusters associated with cellular defense and rescue, metabolism and development. It regulates target genes either directly or indirectly through intermediary MYB, ERF, bZIP, NAC, ARF and CCAAT-HAP transcription factors. Regulatory sub-clusters have different combinations of MYB-like, GCC-box-like, ERD1-box-like, ABRE-like, G-box-like, as1/ocs/TGA-like, AuxRE-like, gibberellic acid response element (GARE)-like and JAre-like cis-elements. Cold-dependent network activity enhanced cellular antioxidant capacity through radical scavenging mechanisms and increased activities of phenylpropanoid and isoprenoid metabolic processes involving various abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), ethylene and reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsive genes. OsMyb4 network is independent of drought response element binding protein/C-repeat binding factor (DREB/CBF) and its sub-regulons operate with possible co-regulators including nuclear factor-Y. Because of its upstream position in the network hierarchy, OsMyb4 functions quantitatively and pleiotrophically. Supra-optimal expression causes misexpression of alternative targets with costly trade-offs to panicle development.

  3. Supra-optimal expression of the cold-regulated OsMyb4 transcription factor in transgenic rice changes the complexity of transcriptional network with major effects on stress tolerance and panicle development

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Myoungryoul

    2010-09-28

    The R2R3-type OsMyb4 transcription factor of rice has been shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic adjustment in heterologous overexpression studies. However, the exact composition and organization of its underlying transcriptional network has not been established to be a robust tool for stress tolerance enhancement by regulon engineering. OsMyb4 network was dissected based on commonalities between the global chilling stress transcriptome and the transcriptome configured by OsMyb4 overexpression. OsMyb4 controls a hierarchical network comprised of several regulatory sub-clusters associated with cellular defense and rescue, metabolism and development. It regulates target genes either directly or indirectly through intermediary MYB, ERF, bZIP, NAC, ARF and CCAAT-HAP transcription factors. Regulatory sub-clusters have different combinations of MYB-like, GCC-box-like, ERD1-box-like, ABRE-like, G-box-like, as1/ocs/TGA-like, AuxRE-like, gibberellic acid response element (GARE)-like and JAre-like cis-elements. Cold-dependent network activity enhanced cellular antioxidant capacity through radical scavenging mechanisms and increased activities of phenylpropanoid and isoprenoid metabolic processes involving various abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid (SA), ethylene and reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsive genes. OsMyb4 network is independent of drought response element binding protein/C-repeat binding factor (DREB/CBF) and its sub-regulons operate with possible co-regulators including nuclear factor-Y. Because of its upstream position in the network hierarchy, OsMyb4 functions quantitatively and pleiotrophically. Supra-optimal expression causes misexpression of alternative targets with costly trade-offs to panicle development. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  5. Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2 and RGS4 form distinct G protein-dependent complexes with protease activated-receptor 1 (PAR1 in live cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Ghil

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR that is activated by natural proteases to regulate many physiological actions. We previously reported that PAR1 couples to Gi, Gq and G12 to activate linked signaling pathways. Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins serve as GTPase activating proteins to inhibit GPCR/G protein signaling. Some RGS proteins interact directly with certain GPCRs to modulate their signals, though cellular mechanisms dictating selective RGS/GPCR coupling are poorly understood. Here, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET, we tested whether RGS2 and RGS4 bind to PAR1 in live COS-7 cells to regulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling. We report that PAR1 selectively interacts with either RGS2 or RGS4 in a G protein-dependent manner. Very little BRET activity is observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven and either RGS2-Luciferase (RGS2-Luc or RGS4-Luc in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of specific Gα subunits, BRET activity was markedly enhanced between PAR1-RGS2 by Gαq/11, and PAR1-RGS4 by Gαo, but not by other Gα subunits. Gαq/11-YFP/RGS2-Luc BRET activity is promoted by PAR1 and is markedly enhanced by agonist (TFLLR stimulation. However, PAR1-Ven/RGS-Luc BRET activity was blocked by a PAR1 mutant (R205A that eliminates PAR1-Gq/11 coupling. The purified intracellular third loop of PAR1 binds directly to purified His-RGS2 or His-RGS4. In cells, RGS2 and RGS4 inhibited PAR1/Gα-mediated calcium and MAPK/ERK signaling, respectively, but not RhoA signaling. Our findings indicate that RGS2 and RGS4 interact directly with PAR1 in Gα-dependent manner to modulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling, and highlight a cellular mechanism for selective GPCR/G protein/RGS coupling.

  6. A PWM Rectifier Control Strategy for Four-quadrant Cascade Converters Based on Complex Vector PI regulators%基于复矢量PI调节器的四象限级联型变频器PWM整流控制策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱长青; 黄声华; 林珍君; 王正昊

    2015-01-01

    Based on the mathematical model of power cells in four-quadrant cascade converters, a current control strategy for PWM rectifier was proposed with the control target being the balance of the input and output instantaneous power. The complex vector PI (CVPI) regulators were introduced to track various frequency currents and decoupled control completely. CVPI regulators were proved to have better robustness than traditional regulators with the resonant frequency change. Moreover, the DC bus output current model based on Kalman filter was established to identify the current magnitude and frequency in real time. The proposed control strategy was validated by the experimental results based on the platform of power cells.%在分析四象限级联型变频器功率单元数学模型的基础上,以输入和输出瞬时有功功率平衡为控制目标,给出了PWM整流电流指令.为保证各频率电流的准确跟踪,提出了复矢量PI(complex vector PI,CVPI)调节器,实现了各频率电流的完全解耦控制,论证了CVPI调节器相比传统调节器,对谐振频率变化具有更好的鲁棒性.同时,建立了基于卡尔曼(Kalman)滤波的直流母线输出电流辨识模型,实时地辨识电流大小及其频率.构建了功率单元实验平台,对所提控制策略的正确性与可行性进行了实验验证.

  7. Unitarity and Complex Mass Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, C. G.; Oxman, L. E.

    We consider a field obeying a simple higher order equation with a real mass and two complex conjugate mass parameters. The evaluation of vacuum expectation values leads to the propagators, which are (resp.) a Feynman causal function and two complex conjugate Wheeler-Green functions (half retarded plus half advanced). By means of the computation of convolutions, we are able to show that the total self-energy has an absorptive part which is only due to the real mass. In this way it is shown that this diagram is compatible with unitarity and the elimination of free complex-mass asymptotic states from the set of external legs of the S-matrix. It is also shown that the complex masses act as regulators of ultraviolet divergences.

  8. [On health regulation of synthetic detergents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, A D; Sidorin, G I; Lukovnikova, L V; Skhodkina, N I; D'iakova, L I; Shaposhnikova, E S

    1999-01-01

    The authors present materials on hygienic regulation of such synthetic detergents as "Losk", "Dixan" in air of workplace and populated area, demonstrate results concerning evaluation of "Losk" effects. Discussion covers ways to evaluate chemical load caused by simultaneous emission of synthetic detergents from various environmental objects. For testing reliability of hygienic regulation for complex emission exemplified by "Losk", the authors suggest a model for express evaluation of complex exposure to chemicals.

  9. How the nucleus and mitochondria communicate in energy production during stress: nuclear MtATP6, an early-stress responsive gene, regulates the mitochondrial F₁F₀-ATP synthase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Ali Asghar; Ebrahimie, Eemaeil; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen; Niazi, Ali; Babgohari, Mahbobeh Zamani; Deihimi, Tahereh; Djavaheri, Mohammad; Ramezani, Amin

    2013-07-01

    A small number of stress-responsive genes, such as those of the mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase complex, are encoded by both the nucleus and mitochondria. The regulatory mechanism of these joint products is mysterious. The expression of 6-kDa subunit (MtATP6), a relatively uncharacterized nucleus-encoded subunit of F0 part, was measured during salinity stress in salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive cultivated wheat genotypes, as well as in the wild wheat genotypes, Triticum and Aegilops using qRT-PCR. The MtATP6 expression was suddenly induced 3 h after NaCl treatment in all genotypes, indicating an early inducible stress-responsive behavior. Promoter analysis showed that the MtATP6 promoter includes cis-acting elements such as ABRE, MYC, MYB, GTLs, and W-boxes, suggesting a role for this gene in abscisic acid-mediated signaling, energy metabolism, and stress response. It seems that 6-kDa subunit, as an early response gene and nuclear regulatory factor, translocates to mitochondria and completes the F1F0-ATP synthase complex to enhance ATP production and maintain ion homeostasis under stress conditions. These communications between nucleus and mitochondria are required for inducing mitochondrial responses to stress pathways. Dual targeting of 6-kDa subunit may comprise as a mean of inter-organelle communication and save energy for the cell. Interestingly, MtATP6 showed higher and longer expression in the salt-tolerant wheat and the wild genotypes compared to the salt-sensitive genotype. Apparently, salt-sensitive genotypes have lower ATP production efficiency and weaker energy management than wild genotypes; a stress tolerance mechanism that has not been transferred to cultivated genotypes.

  10. The ciliary Evc/Evc2 complex interacts with Smo and controls Hedgehog pathway activity in chondrocytes by regulating Sufu/Gli3 dissociation and Gli3 trafficking in primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparrós-Martín, Jose A; Valencia, María; Reytor, Edel; Pacheco, María; Fernandez, Margarita; Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Gean, Esther; Lapunzina, Pablo; Peters, Heiko; Goodship, Judith A; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is involved in patterning and morphogenesis of most organs in the developing mammalian embryo. Despite many advances in understanding core components of the pathway, little is known about how the activity of the Hh pathway is adjusted in organ- and tissue-specific developmental processes. Mutations in EVC or EVC2 disrupt Hh signaling in tooth and bone development. Using mouse models, we show here that Evc and Evc2 are mutually required for localizing to primary cilia and also for maintaining their normal protein levels. Consistent with Evc and Evc2 functioning as a complex, the skeletal phenotypes in either single or double homozygous mutant mice are virtually indistinguishable. Smo translocation to the cilium was normal in Evc2-deficient chondrocytes following Hh activation with the Smo-agonist SAG. However, Gli3 recruitment to cilia tips was reduced and Sufu/Gli3 dissociation was impaired. Interestingly, we found Smo to co-precipitate with Evc/Evc2, indicating that in some cells Hh signaling requires direct interaction of Smo with the Evc/Evc2 complex. Expression of a dominantly acting Evc2 mutation previously identified in Weyer's acrodental dysostosis (Evc2Δ43) caused mislocalization of Evc/Evc2Δ43 within the cilium and also reproduced the Gli3-related molecular defects observed in Evc2(-/-) chondrocytes. Moreover, Evc silencing in Sufu(-/-) cells attenuated the output of the Hh pathway, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 also promote Hh signaling in the absence of Sufu. Together our data reveal that the Hh pathway involves Evc/Evc2-dependent modulations that are necessary for normal endochondral bone formation.

  11. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA.

  12. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA. PMID:26046386

  13. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Processing of the NY-ESO-1 Antigen Is Regulated by Rpn10 and Rpn13 Proteins and Immunoproteasomes following Non-lysine Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Richard; Lehmann, Andrea; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Ebstein, Frédéric

    2016-04-15

    The supply of MHC class I-restricted peptides is primarily ensured by the degradation of intracellular proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Depending on the target and the enzymes involved, ubiquitination is a process that may dramatically vary in terms of linkages, length, and attachment sites. Here we identified the unique lysine residue at position 124 of the NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen as the acceptor site for the formation of canonical Lys-48-linkages. Interestingly, a lysine-less form of NY-ESO-1 was as efficient as its wild-type counterpart in supplying the HLA-A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1157-165 antigenic peptide. In fact, we show that the regulation of NY-ESO-1 processing by the ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 as a well as by the standard and immunoproteasome is governed by non-canonical ubiquitination on non-lysine sites. In summary, our data underscore the significance of atypical ubiquitination in the modulation of MHC class I antigen processing.

  14. The complex interplay between ERK1/2, TGFβ/Smad, and Jagged/Notch signaling pathways in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Chen

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells is a major pathologic change in the development of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR, which leads to severe visual impairment. ERK1/2 pathway has been reported to play a key role in the carcinogenesis, cancer metastasis, and multiple fibrotic diseases. We hypothesized that ERK1/2 signaling could cross-interact with transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2/Smad and Notch signaling pathways in the regulation of EMT in RPE cells. Here, we demonstrated that ERK1/2 signaling was activated in TGFβ2-induced EMT in human RPE cells, while blockade of the canonical TGFβ2/Smad2/3 signaling with SB431542 could not inhibit TGFβ2-induced the activation of ERK1/2. Meanwhile, blockade of ERK1/2 signaling with a specific MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 strongly prevented TGFβ2-induced the downregulation of P-cadherin, and the upregulation of α-SMA, collagen type IV, N-cadherin and fibronectin in RPE cells. In addition, we also identified that blockade of ERK1/2 signaling could inhibit not only the canonical TGFβ/Smad signaling, but also the Jagged/Notch pathway. Finally, we found that blockade of Notch pathway with a specific inhibitor DAPT could inhibit TGFβ2-induced the activation of ERK1/2 pathway conversely. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ERK1/2 signaling can cross-interact with the canonical TGFβ/Smad and the Jagged/Notch signaling pathways in RPE cells EMT. ERK1/2 inhibitor may have therapeutic value in the prevention and treatment of PVR and other fibrotic diseases.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of protein glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoldoš, Vlatka; Grgurević, Srđana; Lauc, Gordan

    2010-10-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is an ancient metabolic pathway that still exists in all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya). The covalent addition of one or more complex oligosaccharides (glycans) to protein backbones greatly diversifies their structures and makes the glycoproteome several orders of magnitude more complex than the proteome itself. Contrary to polypeptides, which are defined by a sequence of nucleotides in the corresponding genes, the glycan part of glycoproteins are encoded in a complex dynamic network of hundreds of proteins, whereby activity is defined by both genetic sequence and the regulation of gene expression. Owing to the complex nature of their biosynthesis, glycans are particularly versatile and apparently a large part of human variation derives from differences in protein glycosylation. Composition of the individual glycome appears to be rather stable, and thus differences in the pattern of glycan synthesis between individuals could originate either from genetic polymorphisms or from stable epigenetic regulation of gene expression in different individuals. Studies of epigenetic modification of genes involved in protein glycosylation are still scarce, but their results indicate that this process might be very important for the regulation of protein glycosylation.

  16. Tuberous sclerosis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henske, Elizabeth P; Jóźwiak, Sergiusz; Kingswood, J Christopher; Sampson, Julian R; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-26

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder that affects multiple organ systems and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in one of two genes: TSC1 or TSC2. The disorder can affect both adults and children. First described in depth by Bourneville in 1880, it is now estimated that nearly 2 million people are affected by the disease worldwide. The clinical features of TSC are distinctive and can vary widely between individuals, even within one family. Major features of the disease include tumours of the brain, skin, heart, lungs and kidneys, seizures and TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which can include autism spectrum disorder and cognitive disability. TSC1 (also known as hamartin) and TSC2 (also known as tuberin) form the TSC protein complex that acts as an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway, which in turn plays a pivotal part in regulating cell growth, proliferation, autophagy and protein and lipid synthesis. Remarkable progress in basic and translational research, in addition to several randomized controlled trials worldwide, has led to regulatory approval of the use of mTOR inhibitors for the treatment of renal angiomyolipomas, brain subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis, but further research is needed to establish full indications of therapeutic treatment. In this Primer, we review the state-of-the-art knowledge in the TSC field, including the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, medical management, major knowledge gaps and ongoing research towards a cure.

  17. Tobacco Transcription Factors NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b Form Nuclear Complexes with the NtJAZ1 Repressor and Regulate Multiple Jasmonate-Inducible Steps in Nicotine Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Bo Zhang; Marta T. Bokowiec; Paul J. Rushton; Sheng-Cheng Han; Michael P. Timko

    2012-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stress lead to elevated levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivatives and activation of the biosynthesis of nicotine and related pyridine alkaloids in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).Among the JAresponsive genes is NtPMT1a,encoding putrescine N-methyl transferase,a key regulatory enzyme in nicotine formation.We have characterized three genes (NtMYC2a,b,c) encoding basic helix-loop-helix (bH LH) transcription factors (TFs) whose expression is rapidly induced by JA and that specifically activate JA-inducible NtPMT1a expression by binding a G-box motif within the NtPMT1a promoter in in vivo and in vitro assays.Using split-YFP assays,we further show that,in the absence of JA,NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b are present as nuclear complexes with the NtJAZ1 repressor.RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b expression results in significant decreases in JA-inducible NtPMT1a transcript levels,as well as reduced levels of transcripts encoding other enzymes involved in nicotine and minor alkaloid biosynthesis,including an 80-90% reduction in the level of transcripts encoding the putative nicotine synthase gene NtA662.In contrast,ectopic overexpression of NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b had no effect on NtPMT1a expression in the presence or absence of exogenously added JA.These data suggest that NtMYC2a,b,c are required components of JA-inducible expression of multiple genes in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway and may act additively in the activation of JA responses.

  18. Politics of public utility regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gormley, W.T. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, energy and telecommunications policies have emerged as increasingly complex and conflictual issues in state government and have, consequently, brought about change in the politics of public utilities regulation. In this analysis, Gormley shows that state public utilities commissions, in determining the rates that can be charged by private utility companies, must confront elected government officials, members of the state bureaucracy, citizens' groups, and the regulated industries themselves in a very visible, highly technical, costly, and controversial process that pits investors against consumers, business groups against residential consumers, consumer groups against environmentalists, and low-income consumers against consumers as a whole.

  19. Mitosis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías Vázquez Sara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell division by mitosis is essential for the development of organisms and their reproduction; it is also neces- sary that each new cell is genetically identical to that from which it comes. In eukaryotes this is achieved by the presence of complex mechanisms that ensure the integrity of genomic material and their proper segregation during mitosis. The traditional view of mitosis has been divided into different stages that were characterized by morphological studies in dividing cells; advances in molecular biology have led beyond this characterization, so that we now know a range of participant molecules. This article will discuss the process of mitosis, both at the cellular and molecular level and a brief summary of the molecular players that regulate this process.

  20. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wulp, Mariëtte Y M; Verkade, Henkjan J; Groen, Albert K

    2013-04-10

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-coding RNA's. The last two decades insight into underlying mechanisms has increased vastly but there are still a lot of unknowns, particularly regarding intracellular cholesterol transport. After decades of concentration on the liver, in recent years the intestine has come into focus as an important control point in cholesterol homeostasis. This review will discuss current knowledge of cholesterol physiology, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and new (possible) therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  1. Modelisation of the regulation of protein synthesis following fertilization in sea urchin shows requirement of two processes: a destabilization of eIF4E:4E-BP complex and a great stimulation of the 4E-BP-degradation mechanism, both rapamycin-sensitive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eLaurent

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization of sea urchin eggs involves an increase in protein synthesis associated with a decrease in the amount of the translation initiation inhibitor 4E-BP. A highly simple reaction model for the regulation of protein synthesis was built and was used to simulate the physiological changes in the total 4E-BP amount observed during time after fertilization. Our study evidenced that two changes occurring at fertilization are necessary to fit with experimental data. The first change was an 8 fold increase in the dissociation parameter (koff1 of the eIF4E:4E-BP complex. The second was an important 32.5 fold activation of the degradation mechanism of the protein 4E-BP. Additionally, the changes in both processes should occur in five minutes time interval post fertilization. To validate the model, we checked that the kinetic of the predicted 4.2 fold increase of eIF4E:eIF4G complex concentration at fertilization matched the increase of protein synthesis experimentally observed after fertilization (6.6 fold, SD=2.3, n=8. The minimal model was also used to simulate changes observed after fertilization in the presence of rapamycin, a FRAP/mTOR inhibitor. The model showed that the eIF4E:4E-BP complex destabilization was impacted and, surprisingly, that the mechanism of 4E-BP degradation was also strongly affected, therefore suggesting that both processes are controlled by the protein kinase FRAP/mTOR.

  2. Food Regulation in Biblical Law

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkenfeld, Wendy A.

    1998-01-01

    Everyone needs to eat, yet most societies and many world religions limit the available food supply by practicing some form of dietary restriction. However, biblical law presents a special case because "few [societies] systematically define all animals as permitted or forbidden and invoke divine authority for the instructions." For at least two thousand years, people have wondered why such a complex and comprehensive system of food regulation as is found in biblical law would fail to offer any...

  3. New perspectives for the regulation of acetyltransferase MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangzhi; Dou, Yali

    2010-04-01

    In higher eukaryotes, histone acetyltransferase MOF (male absent on the first) is the major enzyme that acetylates histone H4 lysine 16, a prevalent mark associated with chromatin decondensation. Recent studies show that MOF resides in two different but evolutionarily conserved complexes, MSL and MOF-MSL1v1. Although these two MOF complexes have indistinguishable activity on histone H4 K16, they differ dramatically in acetylating non-histone substrate p53. The regulation of MOF activity in these complexes remains elusive. Given the evolution conservation of MOF and the importance of H4 K16 acetylation in maintaining higher order chromatin structures, understanding the function and regulation of MOF bears great significance. Here, we discussed the key differences in two MOF complexes that may shed light on the regulation of their distinct acetyltransferase activities. We also discussed coordinated functions of two MOF complexes with different histone methyltransferase complexes in transcription regulation.

  4. Cellular regulation by protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Edmond H

    2013-01-11

    A historical account of the discovery of reversible protein phosphorylation is presented. This process was uncovered in the mid 1950s in a study undertaken with Edwin G. Krebs to elucidate the complex hormonal regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase. Contrary to the known activation of this enzyme by AMP which serves as an allosteric effector, its hormonal regulation results from a phosphorylation of the protein by phosphorylase kinase following the activation of the latter by Ca(2+) and ATP. The study led to the establishment of the first hormonal cascade of successive enzymatic reactions, kinases acting on kinases, initiated by cAMP discovered by Earl Sutherland. It also showed how two different physiological processes, carbohydrate metabolism and muscle contraction, could be regulated in concert.

  5. Mathematical-logical modeling of regulations on mining safety. [Boolean algebra analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajkos, A.; Suchan, L.

    1979-09-01

    Complexity of the logical structure of mine safety regulations results from the complexity of mining problems. This complexity sometimes makes it difficult to precisely formulate mining safety regulations and to monitor their observance by the miners. It is suggested that mathematical- logical modeling can be an efficient tool in analyzing mine safety regulations. A short description of the method based on Boolean algebra, and three examples of its use in the field of mine safety regulations are presented. (2 refs.) (In Czech)

  6. Histamine and the regulation of body weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Emilie A; Knigge, Ulrich; Warberg, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Energy intake and expenditure is regulated by a complex interplay between peripheral and central factors. An exhaustive list of peptides and neurotransmitters taking part in this complex regulation of body weight exists. Among these is histamine, which acts as a central neurotransmitter. In the p......Energy intake and expenditure is regulated by a complex interplay between peripheral and central factors. An exhaustive list of peptides and neurotransmitters taking part in this complex regulation of body weight exists. Among these is histamine, which acts as a central neurotransmitter....... In the present article we review current evidence pointing at an important role of histamine in the regulation of appetite and metabolism. Studies using both knockout mouse models as well as pharmacological studies have revealed that histamine acts as an anorexigenic agent via stimulation of histamine H(1......) receptors. One effect of histamine in the regulation of appetite is to act as a mediator of the inhibitory effect of leptin on appetite. It seems that histamine may attenuate and delay the development of leptin resistance in high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Furthermore, histamine may also act to accelerate...

  7. Polycomb repressive com