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Sample records for cdf ii setup

  1. The CDF Run II disk inventory manager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, Paul; Lammel, Stephan

    2001-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment records and analyses proton-antiproton interactions at a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron started in April of this year. The duration of the run is expected to be over two years. One of the main data handling strategies of CDF for Run II is to hide all tape access from the user and to facilitate sharing of data and thus disk space. A disk inventory manager was designed and developed over the past years to keep track of the data on disk, to coordinate user access to the data, and to stage data back from tape to disk as needed. The CDF Run II disk inventory manager consists of a server process, a user and administrator command line interfaces, and a library with the routines of the client API. Data are managed in filesets which are groups of one or more files. The system keeps track of user access to the filesets and attempts to keep frequently accessed data on disk. Data that are not on disk are automatically staged back from tape as needed. For CDF the main staging method is based on the mt-tools package as tapes are written according to the ANSI standard

  2. CDF run II data file catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalkowski, J.; Lammel, S.; Litvintsev, D.; Wicklund, E.; Ratnikov, F.; Watts, T.

    2001-01-01

    The CDF experiment started data taking in April 2001. The data are organized into datasets which contain events of similar physics properties and reconstruction version. The information about datasets is stored in the Data File Catalog a relational database. This information is presented to the data processing framework as objects which are retrieved using compound keys. The objects and the keys are designed to be the algorithms' view of information stored in the database. Objects may use several DB tables. A database interface management layer exists for the purpose of managing the mapping of persistent data to transient objects that can be used by the framework. This layer exists between the algorithm code and the code which reads directly from database tables. At the user end, it places get/put interface on a top of a transient class for retrieval or storage of objects of this class using a key. Data File Catalog code makes use of this facility and contains all the code needed to manipulate CDF Data File Catalog from a C++ program or from the command prompt. It supports an Oracle interface using OTL, and a mSQL interface. This code and the Oracle implementation of Data File Catalog were subjected to tests during CDF Commissioning Run last fall and during first weeks of Run II in April. It performed exceptionally well

  3. The CDF II eXtremely fast tracker upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; Azzurri, P.; Cochran, E.; Dittmann, J.; Donati, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Fedorko, I.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2006-09-01

    The CDF II Extremely Fast Tracker is the trigger track processor which reconstructs charged particle tracks in the transverse plane of the CDF II central outer tracking chamber. The system is now being upgraded to perform a three dimensional track reconstruction. A review of the upgrade is presented here.

  4. First paper from Tevatron Run II submitted by CDF collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Scientists of the Collider Detector at Fermilab submitted today (March 19) the first scientific publication of Collider Run II to the science journal Physical Review D. The paper titled "Measurement of the Mass Difference m(Ds+)-m(D+) at CDF II" summarizes the results of an analysis carried out by CDF scientists Christoph Paus and Ivan Furic, MIT, describing the mass measurement of particles containing charm quarks" (1 page).

  5. Data acquisition for the CDF SVX II upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, M.

    1994-09-01

    CDF is developing a second generation silicon vertex detector for the Fermilab Tevatron Run II. In order to exploit the high luminosity of the Fermilab Main Injector, the data acquisition system is being designed to accept high trigger rates and accommodate a secondary vertex trigger

  6. Electroweak physics prospects for CDF in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric James

    2003-01-01

    The CDF collaboration will vigorously pursue a comprehensive program of electroweak physics during Run II at the Tevatron based strongly on the successful Run I program. The Run IIa integrated luminosity goal of 2 fb -1 will lead to a CDF dataset twenty times larger than that collected in Run I. In addition, an increase in the energy of the colliding beams from √s = 1.80 TeV to √s = 1.96 TeV for Run II provides a 10% increase in the W and Z boson production cross sections and a corresponding enlargement of the electroweak event samples. In the near term, CDF expects to collect a dataset with 2-3 times the integrated luminosity of Run I by September of 2003. Utilizing these new datasets CDF will be able to make improved, precision measurements of Standard Model electroweak parameters including M W , M top , Λ W , and sin 2 θ W eff . The goal of these measurements will be to improve our understanding of the self-consistency of the Standard Model and knowledge of the Higgs boson mass within the model. The top plot in Fig. 1 illustrates our current knowledge of the Standard Model Higgs mass based on measurements of M W and M top . The constraints imposed by combined CDF and D0 Run I measurements of M W (80.456 ± 0.059GeV/c 2 ) and M top (174.3 ± 5.1GeV/c 2 ) are illustrated by the shaded oval region on the plot. The hatched rectangle shows the additional constraint imposed by the recent LEP2 measurement of M W . The bottom plot in Fig. 1 illustrates the expected improvement in these constraints based on Run II CDF measurements utilizing a 2 fb -1 dataset. The shaded oval region in this plot is based on current estimates of a 40 MeV/c 2 uncertainty for measuring M W and a 2-3 GeV/c 2 uncertainty for measuring M top

  7. Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammel, S.

    1997-05-01

    The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunchspacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II

  8. The CDF-II silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Palmonari et al.

    2002-01-18

    The CDFII silicon tracking system, SVX, for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron has up to 8 cylindrical layers with average radii spanning from {approx} (1.5 to 28.7) cm, and lengths ranging from {approx} (90 to 200) cm for a total active-area of {approx} 6 m{sup 2} and {approx} 7.2 x 10{sup 5} readout channels. SVX will improve the CDFII acceptance and efficiency for both B and high-Pt physics dependent upon b-tagging. Along with the description of the SVX we report some alignment survey data from the SVX assembly phase and the actual status of the alignment as it results from the offline data analysis. The problems encountered are also reviewed.

  9. Entdeckung elektroschwacher Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks mit dem CDF II Experiment; Discovery electroweak production of single top quarks with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luck, Jan [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate s- and t-channel single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron using 3.2 fb-1 of collision data. It is the twelfth thesis dealing with single top-quark production performed within the CDF Collaboration, whereas three have been done in Run I [53–55] and eight in Run II [23, 25, 28, 39, 56–59].

  10. Recent results of high p(T) physics at the CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Soushi; /Okayama U.

    2005-02-01

    The Tevatron Run II program has been in progress since 2001. The CDF experiment has accumulated roughly five times as much data as did Run I, with much improved detectors. Preliminary results from the CDF experiment are presented. The authors focus on recent high p{sub T} physics results in the Tevatron Run II program.

  11. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  12. CDF silicon vertex tracker: tevatron run II preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmanskas, W.; Belforte, S.; Budagov, Yu.

    2002-01-01

    The Online Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is the unique new trigger processor dedicated to the 2-D reconstruction of charged particle trajectories at Level 2 of the CDF trigger. The SVT has been successfully built, installed and operated during the 2000 and 20001 CDF data taking runs. The performance of the SVT is already very close to the design. The SVT is able to find tracks and calculate their impact parameter with high precision (σ d = 35 μm). It is possible to correct the beam position offset and give the beam position feedback to accelerator in real time. In fact, the beam position is calculated online every few seconds with an accuracy of 1 to 5 μm. The beam position is continuously sent to the accelerator control. By using trigger tracks, parent particles such as K S 's and D 0 's are reconstructed, proving that the SVT is ready to be used for physics studies

  13. Measurement of low $p_{T}$ $D^{0}$ meson production cross section at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussini, Manuel [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    In this thesis we present a study of the production of D0 meson in the low transverse momentum region. In particular the inclusive differential production cross section of the D0 meson (in the two-body decay channel D0 → K-π+) is obtained extending the published CDF II measurement to pT as low as 1.5 GeV/c. This study is performed at the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab with the CDF II detector.

  14. Online monitoring for the CDF Run II experiment and the remote operation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Fabiani, D.; /INFN, Pisa; Hirschbuehl, D.; /Karlsruhe U.; Ikado, K.; /Waseda U.; Kubo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Kusakabe, Y.; /Waseda U.; Maeshima, K.; /UCLA; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; /Waseda U.; Plager, C.; /UCLA; Schmidt, E.; /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Karlsruhe U.

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of the CDF Run II online event monitoring framework, placed well before the physics runs start, allowed to develop coherent monitoring software across all the different subsystems which consequently made maintenance and operation simple and efficient. Only one shift person is needed to monitor the entire CDF detector, including the trigger system. High data quality check is assured in real time and well defined monitoring results are propagated coherently to offline datasets used for physics analyzes. We describe the CDF Run II online event monitoring system and operation, with emphasis on the remote monitoring shift operation started since November 2006 with Pisa-INFN as pilot Institution and exploiting the WEB based access to the data.

  15. A Final Review of the Performance of the CDF Run II Data Acquisition System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The CDF Collider Detector at Fermilab ceased data collection on September 30, 2011 after over twenty five years of operation. We review the performance of the CDF Run II data acquisition systems over the last ten of these years while recording nearly 10 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions with a high degree of efficiency. Technology choices in the online control and configuration systems and front-end embedded processing have impacted the efficiency and quality of the data accumulated by CDF, and have had to perform over a large range of instantaneous luminosity values and trigger rates. We identify significant sources of problems and successes. In particular, we present our experience computing and acquiring data in a radiation environment, and attempt to correlate system technical faults with radiation dose rate and technology choices.

  16. Study of the $ZZ$ diboson production at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauce, Matteo [Univ. of Padua (Italy)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this Thesis is the production of a pair of massive Z vector bosons in the proton antiproton collisions at the Tevatron, at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. We measure the ZZ production cross section in two different leptonic decay modes: into four charged leptons (e or μ) and into two charged leptons plus two neutrinos. The results are based on the whole dataset collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of data. The combination of the two cross section measurements gives (p$\\bar{p}$→ZZ) = 1.38+0.28 -0.27 pb, and is the most precise ZZ cross section measurement at the Tevatron to date. We further investigate the four lepton final state searching for the production of the scalar Higgs particle in the decay H →ZZ(*) →ℓℓℓ'ℓ'. No evidence of its production has been seen in the data, hence was set a 95% Confidence Level upper limit on its production cross section as a function of the Higgs particle mass, mH, in the range from 120 to 300 GeV/c2.

  17. A Measurement of the Bs Lifetime at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Sinead [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of the proper lifetime of the B$0\\atop{s}$ mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the CDF experiment at Fermilab. The B$0\\atop{s}$ meson lifetime is measured in its semileptonic decay mode, B$0\\atop{s}$ → ℓ+vD$-\\atop{s}$. The D$-\\atop{s}$ meson candidates are reconstructed in the decay mode D$-\\atop{s}$ → Φπ, with Φ → K+K-, in a trigger sample which requires a muon or an electron and another track which has a large impact parameters. The large impact parameter track is required by the silicon vertex trigger which is an innovative triggering device which has not previously been used in lifetime measurements. A total of 905 ± B$0\\atop{s}$ candidates are reconstructed in a sample which has an integrated luminosity of 140 pb-1 using data gathered between February 2002 and August 2003. The pseudo-proper lifetime distribution of these candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit. This fit takes into account the missing momentum carried by the neutrino and the bias caused by requiring a track with large impact parameter by modeling these effects in simulations. The fit yields the result for the B$0\\atop{s}$ proper lifetime: cτ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 419 ± 28$+16\\atop{-13}$ μm and τ(B$0\\atop{s}$) = 1.397 ± 0.093$+0.053\\atop{-0.043}$ ps where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  18. Operational Experience, Improvements, and Performance of the CDF Run II Silicon Vertex Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Calancha, C; Carron, S.; Cihangir, S.; Corbo, M.; Clark, D.; Di Ruzza, B.; Eusebi, R.; Fernandez, J.P.; Freeman, J.C.; Garcia, J.E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Grinstein, S.; Hartz, M.; Herndon, M.; Hill, C.; Hocker, A.; Husemann, U.; Incandela, J.; Issever, C.; Jindariani, S.; Junk, T.R.; Knoepfel, K.; Lewis, J.D.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.; Merkel, P; Mondragon, M.N.; Moore, R.; Mumford, J.R.; Nahn, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nelson, T.K.; Pavlicek, V.; Pursley, J.; Redondo, I.; Roser, R.; Schultz, K.; Spalding, J.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Stuart, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Tesarek, R.; Treptow, K.; Wallny, R.; Worm, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) pursues a broad physics program at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. Between Run II commissioning in early 2001 and the end of operations in September 2011, the Tevatron delivered 12 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p-pbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. Many physics analyses undertaken by CDF require heavy flavor tagging with large charged particle tracking acceptance. To realize these goals, in 2001 CDF installed eight layers of silicon microstrip detectors around its interaction region. These detectors were designed for 2--5 years of operation, radiation doses up to 2 Mrad (0.02 Gy), and were expected to be replaced in 2004. The sensors were not replaced, and the Tevatron run was extended for several years beyond its design, exposing the sensors and electronics to much higher radiation doses than anticipated. In this paper we describe the operational challenges encountered over the past 10 years of running the CDF silicon detectors, the preventive measures undertaken, an...

  19. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section using the midpoint algorithm in Run II at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Group, Robert Craig [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint jet clustering algorithm in five different rapidity regions. This is the first analysis which measures the inclusive jet cross section using the Midpoint algorithm in the forward region of the detector. The measurement is based on more than 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of Run II data taken by the CDF experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The results are consistent with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  20. Prototype Si microstrip sensors for the CDF-II ISL detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, K; Kanao, K; Kim, S; Ogasawara, M; Ohsugi, T; Shimojima, M; Takikawa, K

    1999-01-01

    Prototype Si microstrip sensors for the CDF-II ISL were fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics and SEIKO Instruments using 4'' technology. The sensor is AC coupled and double-sided forming a stereo angle of 1.207 degree sign . The strip pitch is 112 mu m on both sides. The main differences between the two manufacturers lie on the technologies of passivation and the structure of coupling capacitors. We describe the design of the sensor and evaluation results of the performance. The evaluations include the total and individual strip currents and interstrip capacitance measured before and after sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma irradiation. (author)

  1. Search for anomalous kinematics in tt dilepton events at CDF II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dörr, C; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ehlers, J; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschhbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademachker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Trkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-07-08

    We report on a search for anomalous kinematics of tt dilepton events in pp collisions at square root of s=1.96 TeV using 193 pb(-1) of data collected with the CDF II detector. We developed a new a priori technique designed to isolate the subset in a data sample revealing the largest deviation from standard model (SM) expectations and to quantify the significance of this departure. In the four-variable space considered, no particular subset shows a significant discrepancy, and we find that the probability of obtaining a data sample less consistent with the SM than what is observed is 1.0%-4.5%.

  2. Search for Supersymmetry in the Dilepton Final State with Taus at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Robert David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the results a search for chargino and neutralino supersymmetric particles yielding same signed dilepton final states including one hadronically decaying tau lepton using 6.0 fb-1 of data collected by the the CDF II detector. This signature is important in SUSY models where, at high tan β, the branching ratio of charginos and neutralinos to tau leptons becomes dominant. We study event acceptance, lepton identification cuts, and efficiencies. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of SUSY particle mass for certain generic models.

  3. Top-quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciverez, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-04-21

    We report a measurement of the top-quark mass using events collected by the CDF II detector from pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We calculate a likelihood function for the top-quark mass in events that are consistent with tt --> bl(-)nu(l)bl'+ nu'(l) decays. The likelihood is formed as the convolution of the leading-order matrix element and detector resolution functions. The joint likelihood is the product of likelihoods for each of 33 events collected in 340 pb(-1) of integrated luminosity, yielding a top-quark mass M(t) = 165.2 +/- 6.1(stat) +/- 3.4(syst) GeV/c2. This first application of a matrix-element technique to tt --> bl+ nu(l)bl'- nu(l') decays gives the most precise single measurement of M(t) in dilepton events. Combined with other CDF run II measurements using dilepton events, we measure M(t) = 167.9 +/- 5.2(stat) +/- 3.7(syst) GeV/c2.

  4. Bacterial magnetosome biomineralization--a novel platform to study molecular mechanisms of human CDF-related Type-II diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Zeytuni

    Full Text Available Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF are part of a highly conserved protein family that maintains cellular divalent cation homeostasis in all organisms. CDFs were found to be involved in numerous human health conditions, such as Type-II diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we established the magnetite biomineralizing alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense as an effective model system to study CDF-related Type-II diabetes. Here, we introduced two ZnT-8 Type-II diabetes-related mutations into the M. gryphiswaldense MamM protein, a magnetosome-associated CDF transporter essential for magnetite biomineralization within magnetosome vesicles. The mutations' effects on magnetite biomineralization and iron transport within magnetosome vesicles were tested in vivo. Additionally, by combining several in vitro and in silico methodologies we provide new mechanistic insights for ZnT-8 polymorphism at position 325, located at a crucial dimerization site important for CDF regulation and activation. Overall, by following differentiated, easily measurable, magnetism-related phenotypes we can utilize magnetotactic bacteria for future research of CDF-related human diseases.

  5. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Matthew [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb -1 of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high š. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  6. Search for anomalous kinematics in t anti-t dilepton events at CDF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2004-01-01

    We report on a search for anomalous kinematics of t(bar t) dilepton events in p(bar p) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 193 pb -1 of data collected with the CDF II detector. We developed a new a priori technique designed to isolate the subset in a data sample revealing the largest deviation from standard model (SM) expectations and to quantify the significance of this departure. In the four-variable space considered, no particular subset shows a significant discrepancy and we find that the probability of obtaining a data sample less consistent with the SM than what is observed is 1.0-4.5%

  7. Precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the CDF II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the W-boson mass M{sub W} using data corresponding to 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470 126 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 624 708 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates yield the measurement M{sub W} = 80 387 {+-} 12{sub stat} {+-} 15{sub syst} = 80 387 {+-} 19 MeV/c{sup 2}. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  8. Precision measurement of the top quark mass from dilepton events at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-12-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass, M{sub t}, in the dilepton decay channel of t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{prime}{sup +} {nu}{sub {ell}}, {bar b}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} using an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the CDF II detector. We apply a method that convolutes a leading-order matrix element with detector resolution functions to form event-by-event likelihoods; we have enhanced the leading-order description to describe the effects of initial-state radiation. The joint likelihood is the product of the likelihoods from 78 candidate events in this sample, which yields a measurement of M{sub t} = 164.5 {+-} 3.9(stat.) {+-} 3.9(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, the most precise measurement of M{sub t} in the dilepton channel.

  9. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets topology at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Tsukuba U.

    2007-03-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. They analyze events from the single lepton plus jets final state (t{bar t} {yields} W{sup +}bW{sup -}{bar b} {yields} lvbq{bar q}{bar b}). The top quark mass is extracted using a direct calculation of the probability density that each event corresponds to the t{bar t} final state. The probability is a function of both the mass of the top quark and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, they achieve the single most precise measurement of the top quark mass, 170.8 {+-} 2.2(stat.) {+-} 1.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in the ditau decay channels at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almenar, Cristobal Cuenca [Univ. of Valencia (Spain)

    2008-04-01

    This thesis presents the results on a search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs, with least one of these taus decays leptonically. The search was performed with a sample of 1.8 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron and collected by CDF Run II. No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction was found and a 95% confidence level exclusion limit have been set on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the Higgs boson mass. This limit has been translated into the MSSM Higgs sector parameter plane, tanβ vs. MA, for the four different benchmark scenarios.

  11. Observation of Electroweak Single Top-Quark Production with the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueck, Jan [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (Germany)

    2009-07-24

    The standard model of elementary particle physics (SM) predicts, besides the top-quark pair production via the strong interaction, also the electroweak production of single top-quarks [19]. Up to now, the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton-collider is the only place to produce and study top quarks emerging from hadron-hadron-collisions. Top quarks were directly observed in 1995 during the Tevatron Run I at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.8 TeV simultaneously by the CDF and D0 Collaborations via the strong production of top-quark pairs. Run II of the Tevatron data taking period started 2001 at √s = 1.96 TeV after a five year upgrade of the Tevatron accelerator complex and of both experiments. One main component of its physics program is the determination of the properties of the top quark including its electroweak production. Even though Run II is still ongoing, the study of the top quark is already a successful endeavor, confirmed by dozens of publications from both Tevatron experiments. A comprehensive review of top-quark physics can be found in reference. The reasons for searching for single top-quark production are compelling. As the electroweak top-quark production proceeds via a Wtb vertex, it provides the unique opportunity of the direct measurement of the CKM matrix element |Vtb|, which is expected to be |Vtb| ~ 1 in the SM. Significant deviations from unity could be an indication of a fourth quark generation, a production mode via flavor-changing neutral currents, and other new phenomena, respectively. There are two dominating electroweak top-quark production modes at the Fermilab Tevatron: the t-channel exchange of a virtual W boson striking a b quark and the s-channel production of a timelike W boson via the fusion of two quarks. In proton-antiproton-collisions the third electroweak production mode, the associated Wt production of an on-shell W boson in conjunction with a top quark has a comparatively negligible small

  12. Measurement of the polarization amplitudes of the Bs -> PhiPhi decay at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2009-10-01

    In this thesis we present the first measurement of the polarization amplitudes for the charmless B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} {yields} [K{sup +}K{sup -}][K{sup +}K{sup -}] decay of the B{sub s} meson. The result is achieved using an unbinned Maximum Likelihood fit to the data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Run II (CDFII), in a period starting from March 2001 till April 2008, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 fb{sup -1}. The resulting yield consists of 300 signal events selected by the Two Track Trigger (TTT). Furthermore, our work puts in evidence an original topic, that was never observed until now: an unexpected dependence of the signal acceptance on the proper decay time (t) of the B{sub s} mesons. This specific issue, which is most likely a general feature induced by any signal selection based on the lifetime information, is supposed to be related to the on-line TTT and off-line selections based on the impact parameter. The involved fit, indeed, reproduces the biases observed in large statistics Monte Carlo (MC) samples. The thesis presents the same analysis performed for the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay as well, which is used as a control sample. The polarizations amplitudes we find are consistent with the published ones; this result contributes to enforce the reliability of the analysis. This work is considered ready to begin the procedure for official approval by the CDF collaboration pending the finalization of the systematic uncertainty which has not yet been fully completed.

  13. Search for heavy, long-lived particles that decay to photons at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U.; Affolder, T.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, M.G.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, K.; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Tsukuba U.

    2007-04-01

    The authors present the first search for heavy, long-lived particles that decay to photons at a hadron collider. They use a sample of {gamma} + jet + missing transverse energy events in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV taken with the CDF II detector. Candidate events are selected based on the arrival time of the photon at the detector. Using an integrated luminosity of 570 pb{sup -1} of collision data, they observe 2 events, consistent with the background estimate of 1.3 {+-} 0.7 events. While the search strategy does not rely on model-specific dynamics, they set cross section limits in a supersymmetric model with {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{tilde G} and place the world-best 95% C.L. lower limit on the {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} mass of 101 GeV/c{sup 2} at {tau}{sub {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}} = 5 ns.

  14. Measurement of low-pT D+-meson production cross-section at CDF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchese, L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper I report on a measurement of the low- p T D + -meson production cross-section in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, using the full data set collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider during Run II. The measurement is performed in a yet unexplored low transverse momentum range, down to 1.5 GeV/ c . The actual QCD theory cannot predict the behavior of the strong interactions in the low transferred-four-momentum region because in these kinematic conditions the strong coupling constant is of the order of the unity. Thus, a perturbative expansion is not useful. At present, several phenomenological models have been proposed, but they are able to describe only a few aspects of the observed physical quantities and not the full complexity. Experimental results in these conditions are then crucial to test new QCD models. The measurement of the differential cross section at low- p T plays an important role in this context allowing refinement of current knowledge. While these results lie within the band of theoretical uncertainty, differences in shape suggest that theoretical predictions can benefit from further refinement taking account of them.

  15. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the Dilepton Decay Channel at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayatilaka, Bodhitha A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The top quark, the most recently discovered quark, is the most massive known fundamental fermion. Precision measurements of its mass, a free parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics, can be used to constrain the mass of the Higgs Boson. In addition, deviations in the mass as measured in different channels can provide possible evidence for new physics. We describe a measurement of the top quark mass in the decay channel with two charged leptons, known as the dilepton channel, using data collected by the CDF II detector from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convolving the leading order matrix element describing q$\\bar{q}$ → t$\\bar{t}$ → bℓv$\\bar{b}$ℓ'vℓ' with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, we observe 78 candidate events and measure Mt = 164.5 ± 3.9(stat.) ± 3.9(syst.) GeV/c2, the most precise measurement of the top quark mass in this channel to date.

  16. Search for new physics using high mass tau pairs with ppbar collisions at 1.96 Tev using cdf ii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a search for anomalous resonant production of tau lepton pairs with large invariant mass, the first such search using the CDF II Detector in Run II of the Tevatron p(bar p) collider. Such anomalous production could arise from various new physics processes. In a data sample corresponding to 195 pb -1 of integrated luminosity we predict 2.8 ± 0.5 events from Standard Model background processes and observe 4. We use this result to set limits on the production of heavy scalar and vector particles decaying to tau lepton pairs

  17. Study of Low $p_{T}$ $D^{0}$ Meson Production at CDF II in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramellini, Elena [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis a study of the D0 meson production in proton-antiproton collisions is presented. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This work is part of a specific effort by the CDF Collaboration to measure the inclusive differential cross section of prompt charmed mesons in the low pT kinematic region.

  18. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-antitop quark production with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, Julia; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2006-12-01

    distribution of the top quarks. This leads to large negative values of the charge asymmetry in event samples that contain only events with exactly five, six or more jets. This finding requires a modification of the original analysis strategy, since an asymmetry measured in an inclusive sample will be a composition of the asymmetry in the four-jets and five-jets sub-samples. Therefore, they perform for the first time a measurement of the asymmetry separately in the exclusive four- and five-jets sub-samples to separate the contribution of hard gluon radiation to the asymmetry. They analyze a data sample, collected by the CDF II detector in the years 2002-2006, that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of about 955 pb{sup -1}.

  19. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  20. On-line tracking processors at hadron colliders: The SVT experience at CDF II and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, J.; Annovi, A.; Aoki, M.; Bellinger, J.; Berry, E.; Bitossi, M.; Bogdan, M.; Carosi, R.; Catastini, P.; Cerri, A.; Chappa, S.; Crescioli, F.; Dell Orso, M.; Di Ruzza, B.; Donati, S.; Furic, I.; Giannetti, P.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Liu, T.; Maruyama, T.; Palla, F.; Pedron, I.; Piendibene, M.; Pitkanen, M.; Punzi, G.; Reisert, B.; Rescigno, M.; Ristori, L.; Sanders, H.; Sartori, L.; Schifano, F.; Sforza, F.; Shochet, M.; Spinella, F.; Tang, F.; Torre, S.; Tripiccione, R.; Volpi, G.; Yang, U. K.; Zanetti, A. M.

    2007-10-01

    The Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) provides the CDF experiment with a powerful tool for fast and precise track finding and fitting at trigger level. The system enhances the experiment's reach on B-physics and large PT-physics coupled to b quarks. We review the main design features and the performance of the SVT with particular attention to the recent upgrade that improved its capabilities. Finally, we will focus on additional improvements of the functionality of such a system in a more general experimental context.

  1. On-line tracking processors at hadron colliders The SVT experience at CDF II and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Adelman, J; Aoki, M; Cerri, A

    2007-01-01

    The Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) provides the CDF experiment with a powerful tool for fast and precise track finding and fitting at trigger level. The system enhances the experiment's reach on B-physics and large PT-physics coupled to b quarks. We review the main design features and the performance of the SVT with particular attention to the recent upgrade that improved its capabilities. Finally, we will focus on additional improvements of the functionality of such a system in a more general experimental context.

  2. Measurement of the W Plus N Inclusive Jets Cross-Section at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stentz, Dale James [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we present the study of the production of the W boson in association with hadronic jets at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Along with the electroweak properties the W boson, we examine jet kinematic variables with the aim of studying predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics. We derive several di erential crosssections as a function of the inclusive jet multiplicity and the transverse momenta of each jet. In this analysis, we are using 2.8 fb-1 of data and consider both the electron and muon lepton nal states for the W boson decay.

  3. Experimental setup for generating and probing He II flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chagovets, Tymofiy; Doležal, Ladislav; Dupák, Jan; Gordeev, A. V.; Prachařová, Jarmila; Rotter, M.; Soukup, František; Šindelář, J.; Skrbek, Ladislav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2006), s. 173-176 ISSN 0323-0465. [Conference of Czech and Slovak Physicist /15./. Košice, 05.09.2005-08.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0218 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : He II flow * He II turbulence Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.647, year: 2006

  4. $W$ boson polarization measurement in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton channel using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-05-01

    We present a measurement of W boson polarization in top-quark decays in t{bar t} events with decays to dilepton final states using 5.1 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity in p{bar p} collisions collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron. A simultaneous measurement of the fractions of longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) W bosons yields the results f{sub 0} = 0.71{sub -0.17}{sup +0.18}(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.07 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst). Combining this measurement with our previous result based on single lepton final states, we obtain f{sub 0} = 0.84 {+-} 0.09(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and f{sub +} = -0.16 {+-} 0.05(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst). The results are consistent with standard model expectation.

  5. New measurements from fully reconstructed hadronic final states of the $B^0_2$ meson at CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Ronco, Saverio [Univ. of Padua (Italy)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis reports the reconstruction and lifetime measurement of B+, B$0/atop{d}$ and B$0/atop{s}$ mesons, performed using fully reconstructed hadronic decays collected by a dedicated trigger at CDF II experiment. This dedicated trigger selects significantly displaced tracks from primary vertex of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions generated at Tevatron collider, obtaining, in this way, huge data samples enriched of long-lived particles, and is therefore suitable for reconstruction of B meson in hadronic decay modes. Due to the trigger track impact parameter selections, the proper decay time distributions of the B mesons no longer follow a simply exponential decay law. This complicates the lifetime measurement and requires a correct understanding and treatment of all the involved effects to keep systematic uncertainties under control. This thesis presents a method to extract the lifetime of B mesons in “ct- biased” samples, based on a Monte Carlo approach, to correct for the effects of the trigger and analysis selections. We present the results of this method when applied on fully re- constructed decays of B collected by CDF II in the data taking runs up to August 2004, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 360 pb-1. The lifetimes are extracted using the decay modes B+ → $\\bar{D}$0π+,B$0\\atop{d}$ → D-π+, B$0\\atop{d}$ → D-π+π-π+, B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ and B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$ π+π-π+(and c.c.) and performing combined mass-lifetime unbinned maximum likelihood fits.

  6. A Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in CDF II Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwitz, Sarah E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents a search for the standard model Higgs boson in the associated production process p $\\bar{p}$ → ZH → e+e-b$\\bar{b}$. Data amounting to an integrated luminosity of 7.5 fb-1 at √s = 1.96 TeV collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) at the Tevatron are analyzed. Two objectives are pursued in the methods applied: maximize acceptance, and distinguish the signal from background. The first aim is met by applying a neural-network-based electron identi cation and considering multiple electron triggers in an effort to improve Z acceptance. In an attempt to maximize the Higgs acceptance, three b quark identification schemes are used allowing for varying event conditions. The latter goal is met by employing more multivariate techniques. First, the dijet mass resolution is improved by a neural network. Then, both single variables and boosted decision tree outputs are fed into a segmented final discriminant simultaneously isolating the signal-like events from the Z with additional jets background and the kinematically di erent tt background. Good agreement is seen with the null hypothesis and upper production cross section ( ZH) times branching ratio (BR(H →b $\\bar{b}$)) limits are set for 11 mass hypotheses between 100 and 150 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level. For a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2, this channel sets an observed (expected) upper limit of 3.9 (5.8) times the standard model value of ZH BR(H → b $\\bar{b}$). The inclusion of this channel within the combined CDF and Tevatron limits is discussed.

  7. Search for the Production of Gluinos and Squarks with the CDF II Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lorenzo, Gianluca [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-19

    This thesis reports on two searches for the production of squarks and gluinos, supersymmetric partners of the Standard Model (SM) quarks and gluons, using the CDF detector at the Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collider. An inclusive search for squarks and gluinos pair production is performed in events with large ET and multiple jets in the final state, based on 2 fb-1 of CDF Run II data. The analysis is performed within the framework of minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) and assumes R-parity conservation where sparticles are produced in pairs. The expected signal is characterized by the production of multiple jets of hadrons from the cascade decays of squarks and gluinos and large missing transverse energy ET from the lightest supersymmetric particles (LSP). The measurements are in good agreement with SM predictions for backgrounds. The results are translated into 95% confidence level (CL) upper limits on production cross sections and squark and gluino masses in a given mSUGRA scenario. An upper limit on the production cross section is placed in the range between 1 pb and 0.1 pb, depending on the gluino and squark masses considered. The result of the search is negative for gluino and squark masses up to 392 GeV/c2 in the region where gluino and squark masses are close to each other, gluino masses up to 280 GeV/c2 regardless of the squark mass, and gluino masses up to 423 GeV=c2 for squark masses below 378 GeV/c2. These results are compatible with the latest limits on squark/gluino production obtained by the D0 Collaboration and considerably improve the previous exclusion limits from direct and indirect searches at LEP and the Tevatron. The inclusive search is then extended to a scenario where the pair production of sbottom squarks is dominant. The new search is performed in a generic MSSM scenario with R-parity conservation. A specific SUSY particle mass hierarchy is assumed such that the

  8. Search for the Higgs Boson in the All-Hadronic Final State Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, Francesco [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports the result of a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in events containing four reconstructed jets associated with quarks. For masses below 135 GeV/c2, the Higgs boson decays to bottom-antibottom quark pairs are dominant and result primarily in two hadronic jets. An additional two jets can be produced in the hadronic decay of a W or Z boson produced in association with the Higgs boson, or from the incoming quarks that produced the Higgs boson through the vector boson fusion process. The search is performed using a sample of s = sqrt(1.96) TeV proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb-1 recorded by the CDF II detector. The data are in agreement with the background model and 95% credibility level upper limits on Higgs boson production are set as a function of the Higgs boson mass. The median expected (observed) limit for a 125 GeV/c2 Higgs boson is 11.0 (9.0) times the predicted standard model rate.

  9. The First measurement of the top quark mass at CDF II in the lepton+jets and dilepton channels simultaneously

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab /Purdue U.

    2008-09-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. This is the first measurement of the top quark mass using top-antitop pair candidate events in the lepton + jets and dilepton decay channels simultaneously. They reconstruct two observables in each channel and use a non-parametric kernel density estimation technique to derive two-dimensional probability density functions from simulated signal and background samples. The observables are the top quark mass and the invariant mass of two jets from the W decay in the lepton + jets channel, and the top quark mass and the scalar sum of transverse energy of the event in the diletpon channel. They perform a simultaneous fit for the top quark mass and the jet energy scale, which is constrained in situ by the hadronic W boson mass. using 332 lepton + jets candidate events and 144 diletpon candidate events, they measure the top quark mass to be m{sub top} = 171.9 {+-} 1.7 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.1 (other sys.) GeV/c{sup 2} = 171.9 {+-} 2.0 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Measurements of $\\sigma(V+D^{*})/\\sigma(V)$ in $9.7$ fb$^{-1}$ at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, Keith [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics has been remarkably successful, but the non-perturbative features of quantum chromodynamics must be tested and modeled with data. There have been many such tests, focused primarily on the use of jet-based probes of heavy flavor (bottom and charm quark) production at hadron colliders. In this thesis, we propose and test a strategy for identifying heavy flavor in events containing a W or Z vector boson (a V boson); this technique probes a much lower energy regime than can be explored by jet-based methods. In a sample of W and Z events skimmed from 9.7 fb-1 of high- pT electron and muon data from CDF Run II p p collisions at center of mass energy √s = 1:96 GeV , we identify charm by fully reconstructing D* (2010) → D0(→ Kπ )π s decays at the track level. Using a binned fit of Δm=m(Kππ s) m(Kπ ) to count reconstructed D* candidates, we then unfold these raw counts with acceptance values derived from Monte Carlo, and present measurements of σ(W + D* )/ σ(W) and σ(Z + D* )/ σ(Z) in the W/Z leptonic decay channels. All measurements are found to be in agreement with the predictions of Pythia 6.2 (PDF set CTEQ5L). These results include the first measurement of W/Z + c production in events with zero jet objects at the Tevatron, and the first measurement of W/Z +c production with pT (c) < 15 GeV at the Tevatron.

  11. Searches for New Physics Using High Mass Dimuons at the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagoz Unel, Muge [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2004-12-01

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the D0 experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb-1. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics. This work points out the aspects of the detector which need better understanding to reach Run I precision and to constrain the PDFs.

  12. Hot topics in flavor physics at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Soon Yung; /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2005-01-01

    Hot topics in flavor physics at CDF are reviewed. Selected results of top, beauty, charm physics and exotic states in about 200 pb{sup -1} data collected by the CDF II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron are presented.

  13. Search for [corrected] B0(s) --> mu+ mu- and B0(d) [corrected] --> mu + mu- decays in pp collisions with CDF II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciverez, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortal, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-11-25

    We report on a search for B0(s) --> mu+ mu- and B0(d) --> mu + mu- decays in pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV using 364 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. After applying all selection requirements, we observe no candidates inside the B0(s) or B0(d) mass windows. The resulting upper limits on the branching fractions are B(B0(s) --> mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) < 3.9 x 10(-8) at 90% confidence level.

  14. Analysis of $D^{0} - \\bar{D}^0$ Mixing in $D^{0} - K\\pi$ Decays Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Nagesh P. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2009-01-01

    We presented the first observation of D0-$\\bar{D}$0 mixing in a single analysis. We measured the ratio of doubly Cabibbo suppressed or WS (D0 → K+π-) decay rate to Cabibbo favored or RS (D0 → K-π+) decay rate as a function of D0 decay time. We used an integrated luminosity of 4.0 fb-1 of proton anti-proton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the collider detector at Fermilab (CDF II).

  15. Search for a $Z(4430)^{\\pm} \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^{\\pm}$ resonance in hadron collisions at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubbo, Francesco [Univ. of Turin, Torino (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is the first search for a Z-(4430) resonance in hadron collisions and has been conceived, carried out and concluded entirely by the author. An ad-hoc analysis framework has been developed based on reconstruction code already consolidated in other analysis, adapted and modified for the purpose of this work. The progress of the work has been periodically presented in internal meetings of the CDF B-physics group and documented in internal notes.

  16. New-generation large-area muon scintillation counters with wavelength shifter fiber readout for CDF II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artikov, A.; Budagov, Yu.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.

    2006-01-01

    New scintillation counters have been designed and constructed for upgrading of the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. A novel light collection technique using wavelength shifting fibers, together with a high-quality polystyrene-based scintillator UPS 923A, has resulted in compact counters with good and stable light collection efficiency over their lengths extending up to 320 cm. Design, construction and performance of counters are presented. Properties of the fibers and the scintillator, such as light output, light attenuation, decay time and long-term stability, are investigated. It is found that the polystyrene-based scintillator, unlike the polyvinyltoluene-based one, has better properties adequate for long-term experiments

  17. Forward Tracking with the silicon vertex detector at the CDF experiment in RUN II. Spurrekonstruktion in Vorwärtsrichtung mit dem Silizium-Vertexdetektor des CDF-Experiments in RUN II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidle, Thorsten [Univ. of Karlsruhe (TH) (Germany)

    2007-02-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the fundamental particles of matter and their interactions. In order to test the Standard Model, determine free parameters and search for new particles beyond the Standard Model, large accelerator complexes produce particle collisions which are recorded by large detectors. Until the start of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab provides particle collisions with the highest center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. The two multipurpose detector systems CDF and DØ record the collisions. A multipurpose detector system is built of several specialized sub-detectors to measure different particle properties. A particle which passes the detector deposits energy by interacting with the detector material. A silicon strip detector and a wire drift chamber detect charged particles close to the collision point. The energy loss in these systems is relatively small, instead many different small energy depositions are produced by one passing particle. These so-called hits can be combined to a track, indicating the path of the particle. A homogeneous magnetic field surrounding the tracking system forces a charged particle to a helix path which allows a momentum measurement by measuring the curvature. The reconstruction of particle tracks is a non-trivial task. First all position measurements belonging to a particle along a hypothetical helix have to be found and then all position information has to be combined to a reconstructed track and its parameters. I focused my work on the track reconstruction in the silicon detector which provides a good position resolution of the measurements.

  18. Search for Third Generation Squarks in the Missing Transverse Energy plus Jet Sample at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marono, Miguel Vidal [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain)

    2010-03-01

    lightest SUSY particle (LSP) which would provide a candidate for cold dark matter, that account for 23% of the universe content, as strongly suggested by recent astrophysical data [1]. The Tevatron is a hadron collider operating at Fermilab, USA. This accelerator provides proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions with a center of mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. CDF and D0 are the detectors built to analyse the products of the collisions provided by the Tevatron. Both experiments have produced a very significant scientific output in the last few years, like the discovery of the top quark or the measurement of the Bs mixing. The Tevatron experiments are also reaching sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson. The scientific program of CDF includes a broad spectrum on searches for physics signatures beyond the Standard Model. Tevatron is still the energy frontier, what means an unique opportunity to produce a discovery in physic beyond the Standard Model. The analyses presented in this thesis focus on the search for third generation squarks in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state. The production of sbottom ($\\tilde{b}$) and stop ($\\tilde{t}$) quarks could be highly enhanced at the Tevatron, giving the possibility of discovering new physics or limiting the parameter space available in the theory. No signal is found over the predicted Standard Model background in both searches. Instead, 95% confidence level limits are set on the production cross section, and then translated into the mass plane of the hypothetical particles. This thesis sketches the basic theory concepts of the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Extension in Chapter 2. Chapter 3, describes the Tevatron and CDF. Based on the CDF subsystems information, Chapter 4 and 5 describe the analysis objet reconstruction and the heavy flavor tagging tools. The development of the analyses is shown in Chapter 6 and Chapter 7. Finally, Chapter 8 is devoted to discuss the results and conclusions

  19. Jet results from CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainer, N.

    1991-05-01

    Recent results from CDF in jet physics are presented. Tests of leading order and next to leading order QCD are performed by measuring the dijet invariant mass spectrum, jet shapes and three jet events. Tests the leading logarithm, approximation in QCD are made by comparing the high energy events at CDF with the Herwig Monte Carlo. 10 refs., 7 figs

  20. Search for $B_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B_d \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ Decays with CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-07-01

    A search has been performed for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays using 7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The observed number of B{sup 0} candidates is consistent with background-only expectations and yields an upper limit on the branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 6.0 x 10{sup -9} at 95% confidence level. We observe an excess of B{sub s}{sup 0} candidates. The probability that the background processes alone could produce such an excess or larger is 0.27%. The probability that the combination of background and the expected standard model rate of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} could produce such an excess or larger is 1.9%. These data are used to determine {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (1.8{sub -0.9}{sup +1.1}) x 10{sup -8} and provide an upper limit of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 4.0 x 10{sup -8} at 95% confidence level.

  1. Developement of a same-side kaon tagging algorithm of B^0_s decays for measuring delta m_s at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzemer, Stephanie; /Heidelberg U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors developed a Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm to determine the production flavor of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. Until the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency is clearly observed the performance of the Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm can not be measured on data but has to be determined on Monte Carlo simulation. Data and Monte Carlo agreement has been evaluated for both the B{sub s}{sup 0} and the high statistics B{sup +} and B{sup 0} modes. Extensive systematic studies were performed to quantify potential discrepancies between data and Monte Carlo. The final optimized tagging algorithm exploits the particle identification capability of the CDF II detector. it achieves a tagging performance of {epsilon}D{sup 2} = 4.0{sub -1.2}{sup +0.9} on the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} sample. The Same-Side Kaon Tagging algorithm presented here has been applied to the ongoing B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis, and has provided a factor of 3-4 increase in the effective statistical size of the sample. This improvement results in the first direct measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing frequency.

  2. Search for Supersymmetry using rare B$0\\atop{s(d)}$ → μ+μ- decays at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutelyov, Vyacheslav E. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2005-12-01

    A search for rare B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ- and B$0\\atop{d}$ → μ+μ- decays has been performed in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 364 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The rate of each decay is sensitive to contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). No events pass the optimized selection requirements, consistent with the SM expectation. The resulting upper limits on the branching ratios are B(B$0\\atop{s}$ → μ+μ-) < 1.5 × 10-7 and B(B$0\\atop{d}$ → μ+μ-) < 3.8 × 10-8 at the 90% confidence level. The limits are used to exclude some parameter space for several supersymmetric models.

  3. Measurement of the helicity fractions of W bosons from top quark decays using fully reconstructed t anti-t events with CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys.

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the fractions F{sub 0} and F{sub +} of longitudinally polarized and right-handed W bosons in top quark decays using data collected with the CDF II detector. The data set used in the analysis corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 318 pb{sup -1}. They select t{bar t} candidate events with one lepton, at least four jets, and missing transverse energy. The helicity measurement uses the decay angle {theta}*, which is defined as the angle between the momentum of the charged lepton in the W boson rest frame and the W momentum in the top quark rest frame. The cos {theta}* distribution in the data is determined by full kinematic reconstruction of the t{bar t} candidates. They find F{sub 0} = 0.85{sub -0.22}{sup +0.15}(stat){+-}0.06(syst) and F{sub +} = 0.05{sub -0.05}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst), which is consistent with the standard model prediction. They set an upper limit on the fraction of right-handed W bosons of F{sub +} < 0.26 at the 95% confidence level.

  4. ISTP CDF Skeleton Editor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimiak, Reine; Harris, Bernard; Williams, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    Basic Common Data Format (CDF) tools (e.g., cdfedit) provide no specific support for creating International Solar-Terrestrial Physics/Space Physics Data Facility (ISTP/SPDF) standard files. While it is possible for someone who is familiar with the ISTP/SPDF metadata guidelines to create compliant files using just the basic tools, the process is error-prone and unreasonable for someone without ISTP/SPDF expertise. The key problem is the lack of a tool with specific support for creating files that comply with the ISTP/SPDF guidelines. There are basic CDF tools such as cdfedit and skeletoncdf for creating CDF files, but these have no specific support for creating ISTP/ SPDF compliant files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor is a cross-platform, Java-based GUI editor program that allows someone with only a basic understanding of the ISTP/SPDF guidelines to easily create compliant files. The editor is a simple graphical user interface (GUI) application for creating and editing ISTP/SPDF guideline-compliant skeleton CDF files. The SPDF ISTP CDF skeleton editor consists of the following components: A swing-based Java GUI program, JavaHelp-based manual/ tutorial, Image/Icon files, and HTML Web page for distribution. The editor is available as a traditional Java desktop application as well as a Java Network Launching Protocol (JNLP) application. Once started, it functions like a typical Java GUI file editor application for creating/editing application-unique files.

  5. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Λb Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce Λb baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the Λb baryon in the semileptonic channel Λ$0\\atop{b}$ → Λ$+\\atop{c}$ μ- $\\bar{v}$μ. In total 186 pb-1 of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 Λb candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of Λb baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the Λb is measured to be τ = 1.29 ± 0.11(stat.) ± 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of cτ = 387 ± 33(stat.) ± 21 (syst.) μm.

  6. Charmless b decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donega, Mauro; /Geneva U.

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on the charmless B decays measurements performed on 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper describes: the first observation of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and the measurement of the direct Cp asymmetry in the ({bar B}){sub d} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay; the first evidence of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} and the branching ratio and Cp asymmetry for the B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} decay.

  7. A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, μ) and two neutrino final state in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb-1. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 ± 41 background events and 7.8 ± 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c2 at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1$+1.3\\atop{-0.9}$ with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c2 to 200GeV/c2 are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (ET) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ → llvv channel is 1.2σ. It adds extra significance to the ZZ → 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 σ significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

  8. CDF Top Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartarelli, G. F.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    The authors present the latest results about top physics obtained by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data sample used for these analysis (about 110 pb{sup{minus}1}) represents almost the entire statistics collected by CDF during four years (1992--95) of data taking. This large data size has allowed detailed studies of top production and decay properties. The results discussed here include the determination of the top quark mass, the measurement of the production cross section, the study of the kinematics of the top events and a look at top decays.

  9. Study of orbitally excited B{sub (s)} mesons and evidence for a new Bπ resonance with the CDF II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambeitz, Manuel

    2014-12-05

    In this thesis, the study of excited B{sup 0}, B{sup +} and B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons is presented, providing a test for predictions made by quantum chromodynamics. Data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.6 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron recorded by the CDF II detector are analyzed. Excited B{sup 0} mesons are reconstructed in the decays to B{sup *+}π{sup -} and B{sup +}π{sup -} combinations, B{sup +} mesons in the decays to B{sup *0}π{sup +} and B{sup 0}π{sup +} combinations, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons in the decays to B{sup *+}K{sup -} and B{sup +}K{sup -} combinations. The Q-value spectrum of candidates for excited B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons shows three peaks, interpreted as the three allowed transitions of the two narrow orbitally excited states B{sup 0}{sub s1} and B{sub s2}{sup *0}. The same structure is assumed for the signal in the Q-value spectra of B{sup 0} and B{sup +}-mesons candidates, where at higher masses an excess over the expected background is observed for the first time. It is interpreted as a new Bπ resonance, which could be a radial or orbital excitation of a B meson. It is therefore called B(5970). The presented results include the most precise determination of the properties of the narrow orbitally excited B{sup 0}-meson states, the first measurement of orbitally excited B{sup **+} mesons and first evidence for the B(5970) resonance, as well as the measurement of its properties. For each of the three investigated flavors of B{sub (s)} mesons, the mass and width is determined for the orbitally excited B{sub 1} and B{sub 2}{sup *} state, as well as the relative production rate r{sub prod} of the B{sub 1} state to the B{sub 2}{sup *} state. For excited B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons, first evidence with 4.4σ is found for the new B(5970) resonance, its mass and width are measured and the relative production rate r{sub prod}{sup '} to the reaction B{sub 2}{sup *} → Bπ is determined. The results are

  10. Status report from CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassmann, H.

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses some of the more recent results from CDF. It is based on a talk given at the Desy Theory workshop ''The Standard Model at high Temperature and Density.'' The paper emphasizes processes at parton q 2 which are high from the point of view of experiment. Possible implications on current developments in the analysis on theory and vice versa are discussed

  11. The CDF muon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeCompte, T.J.; Papadimitriou, V.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe the characteristics of the CDF muon system and their experience with it. They explain how the trigger works and how they identify muons offline. They also describe the future upgrades of the system and their trigger plans for Run IB and beyond

  12. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Institute of Physics (Finland); et al.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  13. CDF II production farm project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranovski, A.; Benjamin, D.; Cooper, G.; Farrington, S.; Genser, K.; Hou, S.; Hsieh, T.; Kotwal, A.; Lipeles, E.; Murat, P.; Norman, M.; /Fermilab /Duke U. /Taiwan,

    2006-12-01

    We describe the architecture and discuss our operational experience in running the off-line reconstruction farm of the CDFII experiment. The Linux PC-based farm performs a wide set of tasks,ranging from producing calibrations and primary event reconstruction to large scale ntuple production.The farm control software uses a standard Condor toolkit and the data handling part is based on SAM (Sequential Access via Metadata)software.During its lifetime,the CDFII experiment will integrate a large amount of data (several petabytes)and the data processing chain is one of the key components of the successful physics program of the experiment.

  14. Measurement of the CP-violating phase beta(s)J/psi phi in B-s(0) -> J/psi phi decays with the CDF II detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Amerio, S.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 7 (2012), "072002-1"-"072002-32" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : CP violation * B/s0 hadronic decay * statistical analysis * TEVATRON Coll * Bayesian * CDF Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012 http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevD.85.072002

  15. Measurement of the charge asymmetry and the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschbuehl, Dominic [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-12-23

    In 1995 the heaviest elementary particle, top quark, was discovered at the Tevatron collider in top-antitop quark pair production. Since the top quark mass is of the same order as the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, measurements of the properties of the top quark like mass, charge, spin or the production mechanism, offer a good opportunity to test the Standard Model at such high energies. Top quarks at the Tevatron are predominantly pair-produced through light quark-antiquark annihilation. Higher order perturbative QCD calculations predict a sizeable asymmetry between the number of top quarks and antitop quarks produced in forward direction. This asymmetry is induced through radiative corrections. A measurement of the asymmetry can check the perturbative QCD predictions. Due to the high mass of the top quark, nearly the mass of a gold nucleus, the life time of the top quark is much shorter than the hadronization time-scale. This means that the top quark decays before it has a chance to form a bound state. The Standard Model predicts that the top quark decays in nearly 100% of the cases into a W boson and a b quark via a charge-current weak interaction. The measurement of the W boson helicity probes the V-A structure of the weak interaction and differences to the expectation would give evidence for new physics. Until the start of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron is the only experiment where top quarks can be directly produced and their properties be measured. The Tevatron reaches a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton antiproton collisions. The data used in this analysis were taken in Run II of the Tevatron with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in the years 2001-2004 and represent an integrated luminosity of 319 pb{sup -1}. The thesis is organized in the following way: In the first chapter a short overview of the Standard Model is given. The theoretical aspects of the top quark decay are described with particular emphasis on the

  16. Improving acceptance for Higgs events at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sforza, Federico; /INFN, Pisa

    2008-03-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles predicts the existence of the Higgs boson as the responsable of the electroweak symmetry breaking, the process by which fermions and vector bosons acquire mass. The Higgs existence is one of the most important questions in the present high energy physics research. This work concerns the search of W H associate production at the CDF II experiment (Collider Detector at Fermilab).

  17. Top physics at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palencia, Enrique; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-06-01

    The top quark is the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). This article focuses on the latest top physics results from CDF based on 320-750 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. They have also searched for massive t{bar t} resonances.

  18. Pentaquark searches at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvintsev, Dmitry O.; Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Recently there has been revival of interest in exotic baryon spectroscopy triggered by experimental evidence for pentaquarks containing u, d, s and c-quarks. They report results of the searches for pentaquark states in decays to pK{sub S}{sup 0}, {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup {+-}} and D*{sup -} p performed at CDF detector using 220 pb{sup -1} sample of p{bar p} interactions at {radical}s of 1.96 TeV. No evidence for narrow resonances were found in either mode.

  19. An invariance of CDF equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Chou.

    1991-05-01

    It is important but difficult to find the invariant groups for the differential equations. We found a new invariant group for the MKdV equation. In this paper, we present a new invariance for the CDF equation. By using this invariance, we obtain some new solutions of CDF equation. (author). 5 refs

  20. Level 3 filters at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Level 3 stage in CDF online filtering is currently under development. This system should support a flexible division between online and offline software filters within the constraints of the full data acquisition system. Multimicroprocessor (MMP) structures like the ACP system used by CDF could be improved with multi-rank architectures to meet SSC requirements

  1. Online track processor for the CDF upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, C.; Gertenslager, J.; Hoftiezer, J.

    1999-01-01

    A trigger track processor is being designed for the CDF upgrade. This processor identifies high momentum (P T > 1.5 GeV/c) charged tracks in the new central outer tracking chamber for CDF II. The track processor is called the Extremely Fast Tracker (XFT). The XFT design is highly parallel to handle the input rate of 183 Gbits/sec and output rate of 44 Gbits/sec. The processor is pipelined and reports the results for a new event every 132 ns. The processor uses three stages, hit classification, segment finding, and segment linking. The pattern recognition algorithms for the three stages are implemented in programmable logic devices (PLDs) which allow for in-situ modification of the algorithm at any time. The PLDs reside on three different types of modules. Prototypes of each of these modules have been designed and built, and are presently undergoing testing. An overview of the track processor and results of testing are presented

  2. Residual stress analysis of energy-dispersive diffraction data using a two-detector setup: Part II - Experimental implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Daniel; Meixner, Matthias; Liehr, Alexander; Klaus, Manuela; Degener, Sebastian; Wagener, Guido; Franz, Christian; Zinn, Wolfgang; Genzel, Christoph; Scholtes, Berthold

    2018-01-01

    Based on the theoretical concept of a two-detector setup for the energy-dispersive diffraction method (Apel et al., 2017), the experimental implementation of the proposed measurement concepts is demonstrated. The measurement configurations as well as the formalism for data evaluation introduced in the first part of this series are applied to the analysis of in- and out-of-plane near surface residual stress gradients in mechanically surface treated steel. Diffraction experiments carried out with the Bremsstrahlung of a conventional X-ray tube are shown to yield results with a quality comparable to measurements conducted at a synchrotron beamline. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the simultaneous measurement of the positive and the negative ψ-branch can partly compensate for the much higher counting times due to the lower photon flux of the X-ray tube. The results are compared and assessed with those obtained by means of synchrotron radiation (beamline EDDI@BESSY II) and the layer removal method (LRM).

  3. Measurement of the Branching fraction ratio BR (B+ $\\bar{D}$0K+→ [K+π-] K+)/(BR (B+ $\\bar{D}$0π+ [K+π-+) with the CDF II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squillacioti, Paola [Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis the author has described the first measurement performed at a hadron collider of the branching fraction of the Cabibbo-suppressed mode B+ → $\\bar{D}$0 K+. The analysis has been performed with 360 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector.

  4. Search for B⁰s → μ+ μ- and B⁰d → mu+mu- decays in p anti-p collisions with CDF. II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J. -F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.

    2005-08-01

    We report on a search for B⁰s → μ+ μ- and B⁰d → mu+mu- decays in p anti-p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using 364.4 pb -1 of data collected by the CDF II dectector at Fermilab Tevatron Collider. After applying all selection requirements, we observe no candidates inside the B⁰s or B⁰d mass windows. The resulting upper limits on the branching fractions are β(B⁰s → μ+μ-) < 1.5 x 10-7 and β(B⁰d → μ+μ-) < 3.9 x 10-8 at 90 % confidence level. (auth)

  5. Search for Anomalous Production of Photon + Jets + Missing Transverse Energy in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewamanage, Samantha Kaushalya [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A model-independent signature-based search for physics beyond the Standard Model is performed in the photon + jets + missing transverse energy channel in \\ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector. Events with a photon + jets are predicted by the Standard Model and also by many theoretical models beyond the Standard Model. In the Standard Model, the main mechanisms for photon + jets production include quark-antiquark annihilation and quark-gluon scattering. No intrinsic missing transverse energy is present in any of these Standard Model processes. In this search, photon + $\\geq$1 jet and photon + $\\geq$2 jet events are analyzed with and without a minimum requirement on the missing transverse energy. Numerous mass distributions and kinematic distributions are studied and no significant excess over the background prediction is found. All results indicate good agreement with expectations of the Standard Model.

  6. Top physics at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.E. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We report on top physics results using a 100 pb{sup -1} data sample of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We have identified top signals in a variety of decay channels, and used these channels to extract a measurement of the top mass and production cross section. A subset of the data (67 pb{sup -1}) is used to determine M{sub top} = 176 {+-} 8(stat) {+-} 10(syst) and {sigma}(tt) = 7.6 {sub -2.0}{sup +2.4} pb. We present studies of the kinematics of t{bar t} events and extract the first direct measurement of V{sub tb}. Finally, we indicate prospects for future study of top physics at the Tevatron.

  7. Charm and beauty production at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishai, M.; /Brookhaven

    2005-01-01

    Using the data samples collected with the CDF Run II detector during 2002 and early 2003, new measurements of the production cross sections of charm and beauty hadrons at {radical}s = 1960 GeV are presented. New measurements of the cross sections of centrally produced b-hadrons and J/{psi} mesons down to zero transverse momenta have been carried out. The large charm signals made available by the silicon vertex track trigger have enabled the measurement of the cross sections of D{sup 0}, D*, D{sup {+-}}, and D{sub s} mesons.

  8. Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Channel $VH\\to VWW$ with Leptons and Hadronic $\\tau$ in the Full CDF Run II Data Set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoli, Gabriele [Univ. of Trieste (Italy)

    2015-08-27

    We present the results of the CDF search for a Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of W bosons with electrons, muons and hadronically decaying taus in the final state. In particular, we investigate a channel with three objects, two leptons and a tau. In 9.7 fb-1 of data we expect 40.0 ± 5.4 background events and 0.54 ± 0.05 signal events for a Higgs mass hypothesis of 160 GeV/c2, whereas in data we count 28 events. We set a 95% C.L. upper limit on σ/σSM of 12.6 for a Higgs mass hypothesis of 160 GeV/c2. The expected 95% C.L. upper limit for the same mass is 12.4. Results for other ninete 0 GeV/c2 to 200 GeV/c2 are also presented.

  9. Measurement of the Electroweak Single Top Quark Production Cross Section and the CKM Matrix Element $|V_{tb}|$ at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larana, Bruno Casal [Univ. of Cantabria (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    The establishment of the electroweak single top quark production at CDF is experimentally challenging. The small single top signal hidden under large uncertain background processes makes it necessary an excellent understanding of the detector and a detailed study of the processes involved. Moreover, simple counting experiments are not sufficient to extract enough information from the candidate event sample and multivariate analysis techniques are crucial to distinguish signal from background. This thesis presents the world’s most sensitive individual search, together with CDF’s Neural Network analysis, for the combined s- and t-channel single top production. This analysis uses a dataset that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2fb-1, and is based on a Boosted Decision Tree method that combines information from several input variables to construct a final powerful discriminant, reaching a sensitivity to the combined single top quark production equivalent to 5.2σ. The measured combined single top quark production cross section is 2.1+0.7 -0.6 pb assuming a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2. The probability that this result comes from a background-only fluctuation (p-value) is 0.0002, which corresponds to 3.5σ.

  10. CDF experience with monte carlo production using LCG grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griso, S P; Lucchesi, D; Compostella, G; Sfiligoi, I; Cesini, D

    2008-01-01

    The upgrades of the Tevatron collider and CDF detector have considerably increased the demand on computing resources, in particular for Monte Carlo production. This has forced the collaboration to move beyond the usage of dedicated resources and start exploiting the Grid. The CDF Analysis Farm (CAF) model has been reimplemented into LcgCAF in order to access Grid resources by using the LCG/EGEE middleware. Many sites in Italy and in Europe are accessed through this portal by CDF users mainly to produce Monte Carlo data but also for other analysis jobs. We review here the setup used to submit jobs to Grid sites and retrieve the output, including CDF-specific configuration of some Grid components. We also describe the batch and interactive monitor tools developed to allow users to verify the jobs status during their lifetime in the Grid environment. Finally we analyze the efficiency and typical failure modes of the current Grid infrastructure reporting the performances of different parts of the system used

  11. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in the All-Hadronic Channel at Proton Antiproton Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV with CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaroli, Fabrizio [Univ. of Bologna (Italy)

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass in the all-hadronic channel with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab using an integrated luminosity of 1.02 $fb^{-1}$ . Top quarks are produced mostly in pairs at the Tevatron Collider; they subsequently decay almost 100% of the time in a W boson and a b quark each. Final states are classified according to the decays of the W bosons. Here we study only those events in which both W's decay into quark pairs. This channel has the advantage of a large branching ratio and of being fully reconstructed. On the other hand the signal is overwhelmed by a background which surpasses it by three orders of magnitude even after the requirement of a specific trigger. A neural network is thus used to discriminate signal from background events in order to achieve a good signal over background ratio. We look for a variable which is strongly correlated with the top quark mass, and compare the corresponding distribution in the data to signal and background templates in order to measure the top quark mass. Here is an outline of the following of this work: Chapter 1 presents an introduction to the path that lead to the formalization of the Standard Model of fundamental interactions. We discuss in Chapter 2 the need for a 6th quark in the Standard Model, the phenomenology of the top quark and a summary of the current experimental knowledge of its properties, and motivate the need for a precise measurement of its mass. In Chapter 3 we describe the experimental apparatus needed to produce the top quarks, i.e. the Tevatron Collider, and the detector which collects the data analyzed in this work, CDF II. Chapter 4 describes how CDF II interprets the output from the various subdetectors and translate them into the physics objects which are needed for the measurement. In Chapter 5 we present how we overcome the problem of the huge background which overwhelms the top production by using for the first time in this channel a neural network

  12. A Study of Future Measurements of W Boson Helicity in t -> Wb at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tweedie, Brock; /Rochester U.

    2002-02-01

    The interactions of the top quark will soon be coming under greater scrutiny at CDF with Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This investigation gauges CDF's improved ability to measure the helicity of W bosons produced in top quark decays. Such measurements will provide a direct indication of the spin structure of the weak interaction responsible for the top decay process. Simulated CDF Run II data is used to study the W helicity sensitivity of the muon momentum in {mu} + jets events, as limited by both statistical and systematic uncertainties. Optimization of helicity measurements via appropriate choices of event variables and data criteria is also addressed.

  13. A verilog simulation of the CDF DAQ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schurecht, K.; Harris, R.; Sinervo, P.; Grindley, R.

    1991-11-01

    A behavioral simulation of the CDF data acquisition system was written in the Verilog modeling language in order to investigate the effects of various improvements to the existing system. This system is modeled as five separate components that communicate with each other via Fastbus interrupt messages. One component of the system, the CDF event builder, is modeled in substantially greater detail due to its complex structure. This simulation has been verified by comparing its performance with that of the existing DAQ system. Possible improvements to the existing systems were studied using the simulation, and the optimal upgrade path for the system was chosen on the basis of these studies. The overall throughput of the modified system is estimated to be double that of the existing setup. Details of this modeling effort will be discussed, including a comparison of the modeled and actual performance of the existing system

  14. Measurement of the $W+$ jets differential cross-sections in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driutti, Anna [Univ. of Udine (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis the measurements of differential cross sections for the production of the $W$-boson in association with jets in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV are presented. The measurements are based on 9.0 fb$^{-1}$ of CDF Run II data (i.e., the full dataset). Only events in which the W-boson decays leptonically (i.e., W → ev and W → μv)and at least one jet is present are considered. The lepton candidates are required to have a transverse energy $E^{\\ell}_T > 25$GeV and pseudorapidity in the range |n| < 1 whereas, the jets are reconstructed using the JETCLU algorithm with a radius of 0.4 requiring transverse energy $E^{jet}_T > 25$GeV and pseudorapidity in the range |ηjet| < 2. The reconstructed W-boson transverse mass should be greater than 40GeV/c2. The differential cross sections as a function of the jet multiplicity ($N$ > or = to 1, 2, 3, 4) and the leading jet transverse energy, are measured separately for each decay channel and then combined. For a meaningful comparison with theory the measured cross-sections are unfolded to remove detector effects. The resulting particle-level cross-sections are compared to theoretical predictions.

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Diphoton Final State in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV Using the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, Karen Renee [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of photons produced in p$p\\bar{p}$ collisions with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 10 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector. Higgs boson candidate events are identified by reconstructing two photons in either the central or plug regions of the detector. The acceptance for identifying photons is significantly increased by using a new algorithm designed to reconstruct photons in the central region that have converted to an electron-positron pair. In addition, a new neural network discriminant is employed to improve the identification of non-converting central photons. No evidence for the Higgs boson is observed in the data, and we set an upper limit on the cross section for Higgs boson production multiplied by the H → γγ branching ratio. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV/c 2 , we obtain an observed (expected) limit of 12.2 (10.8) times the Standard Model prediction at the 95% credibility level.

  16. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  17. Status of the CDF silicon detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolla, Gino

    CDF is a collider experiment that is running at the Tevatron. The core of the CDF detector is an 8 layer silicon micro strip tracker. There are 722,432 active strips with pitches that range from 25 to 140 μm. This device is an essential part of the heavy flavor tagging and forward tracking capabilities of the experiment and it is one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. A of the experience in commissioning and operating this double-sided detector during the first 2 years of Run II is presented. A description of the encountered failure modes follows a general view of the design. After more than 2 years of data taking, we report on the performance of the tracker and its effect on physics analyses. A short description of the SVT, the level 2 Silicon Vertex Trigger, will be given as well. PACS: 29.40.GX Tracking and position sensitive detectors - 29.40.Wk Solid-state detectors

  18. Rare decay searches at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maestro, Paolo [Siena U.

    2012-07-01

    In the last decade the CDF experiment at the Tevatron clearly demonstrated that it is possible to study extensively heavy flavour physics in hadron collisions and achieve remarkable results, competitive and complementary to $B$-factories. In this paper we report on the indirect searches for physics beyond the standard model via measurements of rare $b$-hadron decays. The final limits, based on the analysis of the full CDF data set, on the branching fraction of the $B^0_{(s)}$ decay into a pair of muons are presented and discussed. Moreover we review the latest measurements, with 6.8 fb$^{-1}$ of collected data, of the total and differential branching fractions and angular observables of rare $b$-hadron decays proceeding via the flavour-changing neutral-current process $b \\rightarrow s \\mu^+ \\mu^-$. PACS numbers: 13.20.He, 13.30.-a, 12.15.Mn

  19. Measurement of the $B_{s} \\to K^{+}K^{−}$ lifetime and extraction of the $\\Delta\\Gamma_{CP}/\\Gamma_{CP}$ at CDF Run II and Development of the ATLAS-SCT endcap modules

    CERN Document Server

    Donega, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of the present work we present the first measurement of the Bd and Bs meson lifetimes in charmless decays (Bd → K+π−, Bd → π+π−, Bs → K+K−) based on 360pb−1 of pp ̄ collision taken at the CDF Run II detector and the extraction of ∆ΓCP\tfor the Bs-meson. to be: cτ(Bd)\t=\t452\t±\t24\t(stat) ±\t6\t(syst) μm τ(Bd)\t=\t1.51\t±\t0.08\t(stat) ±\t0.02\t(syst) ps and the Bs-meson lifetime (in the Bs → K+K− decay mode) to be: cτ(Bs → K+K−)\t=\t458\t±\t53\t(stat) ±\t6\t(syst) μm τ(Bs → K+K−)\t=\t1.53\t±\t0.18\t(stat) ±\t0.02\t(syst) ps Both measurements are consistent with the world averages. We calculate the ∆ΓCP\tfor the Bs meson combining the measured lifetime in the ΓCP cτfs = 441 ± 13μm τfs\t=\t1.472\t±\t0.045 ps We find: ∆ΓCP /ΓCP\t=\t−0.08 ± 0.23 (stat.) ± 0.03 (syst.) that is compatible with the theoretical expectation of (7.2 ± 2.4) × 10−2. In the second part of the present work, a few steps of the final R&D of the ATLAS-SCT endcaps modules will be reported...

  20. B-physics at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.; Fukui, Y.; Mikamo, S.; Mishina, M.; Amidei, D.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Binkley, M.; Booth, A.W.; Carroll, J.T.; Chadwick, K.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A.G.; Cooper, J.; Crane, D.; Day, C.; Elias, J.E.; Foster, G.W.; Freeman, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Huth, J.; Jensen, H.; Johnson, R.P.; Joshi, U.; Kadel, R.W.; Kephart, R.; Maas, P.; Marriner, J.P.; Mukherjee, A.; Nelson, C.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Para, A.; Patrick, J.; Plunkett, R.; Quarrie, D.; Savvoy-Navarro, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Segler, S.; Theriot, D.; Thaczyk, S.; Tollestrup, A.; Vidal, R.; Wagner, R.L.; Yagil, A.; Yeh, G.P.; Yoh, J.; Yun, J.C.; Apollinari, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Cervelli, F.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Dell'Orso, M.; Gianetti, P.; Grassmann, H.; Incagli, M.; Mangano, M.; Menzione, A.; Paoletti, R.; Punzi, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Sestini, P.; Smith, D.A.; Stefanini, A.; Tonelli, G.; Westhusing, T.; Zetti, F.; Auchincloss, P.; Buckley, E.; Devlin, T.; Flaugher, B.; Hu, P.; Kuns, E.; Watts, T.; Baden, A.R.; Bradenburgh, G.; Brown, D.; Carey, R.; Franklin, M.; Geer, S.; Jessop, C.P.; Kearns, E.; Ng, J.S.T.; Pare, E.; Phillips, T.J.; Schwitters, R.; Shapiro, M.; St Denis, R.; Trischuk, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Carithers, W.; Chinowsky, W.; Drucker, R.B.; Ely, R.; Gold, M.; Haber, C.; Harris, R.M.; Hubbard, B.; Siegrist, J.; Tipton, P.; Wester, W.C. III; Winer, B.L.; Barnes, V.E.; Byon, A.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Huffman, B.T.; Laasanen, A.T.; Schub, M.H.; Tonnison, J.; Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Contreras, M.; Demortier, L.; Kesten, P.; Kirsch, L.; Mattingly, R.; Moulding, S.; Nakae, L.F.; Tarem, S.; Bellinger, J.; Byrum, K.L.; Carlsmith, D.; Handler, R.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.A.; Pondrom, L.; Rhoades, J.; Sheaff, M.; Skarha, J.; Wendt, C.; Bertolucci, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Cordelli, M.; Curatolo, M.; Esposito, B.; Giromini, P.; Miscetti, S.; Sansoni, A.; Bhadra, S.; Errede, S.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1988/1989 run at the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF detector collected ≅ 4.1 pb -1 of p bar p data at √s = 1.8 TeV. The main goals of this run being physics at high p t , the CDF trigger was tuned for maximizing signals from Z 0 s, Ws, t-quarks, and etc. As such, compared to the high pt physics, the b-physics program was of secondary importance other than that which would be used for background calculations. Also, CDF had no vertex chamber capability for seeing displaced vertices. However, significant b-quark physics results are evident in two data samples: (1) inclusive electrons; (2) inclusive J/ψ where J/ψ → μ + μ - . In this paper, the author will try to specify the goals for b-physics using the inclusive electrons and J/ψ signals for the 1988/89 data set. He will then provide a brief look at the data, and will finish with some highly speculative guesses as to whether or not experiments at the Tevatron which look for CP violation in the b sector are possible

  1. CDF results on electroweak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, H.J.

    1993-11-01

    The second major run of the bar pp Fermilab Tevatron collider has just ended on June 1. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988--1989 run. We present new results on the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections and on the charge asymmetry in W decay. We give a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988--1989 data on Drell-Yan production and on W γ production are also presented

  2. for the CDF and D0 Collaborations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics. for the CDF and D0 Collaborations. Articles written in Pramana – Journal of Physics. Volume 79 Issue 4 October 2012 pp 703-717 Beyond Standard Model Physics. Searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Tevatron · Alberto Annovi for the CDF and D0 ...

  3. Measurement of the $B_{s} \\to K^{+}K^{-}$ lifetime and extraction of the $\\Delta\\Gamma_{CP}/\\Gamma_{CP}$ at CDF Run II and Development of the ATLAS-SCT endcap modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donega, Mauro [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of the present work we present the first measurement of the Bd and Bs meson lifetimes in charmless decays (Bd → K+π-, Bd → π+π-, Bs → K+K-) based on 360pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collision taken at the CDF Run II detector and the extraction $\\frac{ΔΓCP}{ΓCP}$ for the Bs-meson. We find the Bd-meson lifetime (in the Bd → K+π- and Bd → π+π- decay modes) to be: cτ (Bd) = 452 ± 24 (stat) ± 6 (syst) µm τ (Bd) = 1.51 ± 0.08 (stat) ± 0.02 (syst) ps and the Bs-meson lifetime (in the Bs → K+K- decay mode) to be: cτ (Bs → K+K-) = 458 ± 53 (stat) ± 6 (syst) µm τ (Bs → K+K-) = 1.53 ± 0.18 (stat) ± 0.02 (syst) ps Both measurements are consistent with the world averages. We calculate the ΔΓCP CP for the Bs meson combining the measured lifetime in the Bs → K+K- decay with the world average value of the Bs-meson lifetime in the flavour specific decays: We find: cτfs = 441 ± 13 µm τfs = 1.472 ± 0.045 ps ΔΓCP /ΓCP = -0.08 ± 0.23 (stat.) ± 0.03 (syst.) that is compatible with the theoretical expectation of (7.2 ± 2.4) × 10-2. In the second part of the present work, a few steps of the final R&D of the ATLAS-SCT endcaps modules will be reported. Two module layouts have been developed on two different electrical hybrids de- signs. Both layouts have been produced in small prototype series and tested before and after exposing them to a particle fluence equivalent to that expected at the end of the ATLAS data taking.

  4. CDF GlideinWMS usage in Grid computing of high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvada, Marian; Sfiligoi, Igor; Benjamin, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Many members of large science collaborations already have specialized grids available to advance their research in the need of getting more computing resources for data analysis. This has forced the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) collaboration to move beyond the usage of dedicated resources and start exploiting Grid resources. Nowadays, CDF experiment is increasingly relying on glidein-based computing pools for data reconstruction. Especially, Monte Carlo production and user data analysis, serving over 400 users by central analysis farm middleware (CAF) on the top of Condor batch system and CDF Grid infrastructure. Condor is designed as distributed architecture and its glidein mechanism of pilot jobs is ideal for abstracting the Grid computing by making a virtual private computing pool. We would like to present the first production use of the generic pilot-based Workload Management System (glideinWMS), which is an implementation of the pilot mechanism based on the Condor distributed infrastructure. CDF Grid computing uses glideinWMS for its data reconstruction on the FNAL campus Grid, user analysis and Monte Carlo production across Open Science Grid (OSG). We review this computing model and setup used including CDF specific configuration within the glideinWMS system which provides powerful scalability and makes Grid computing working like in a local batch environment with ability to handle more than 10000 running jobs at a time.

  5. A neural jet charge tagger for the measurement of the B$0\\atop{s}$-$\\bar{B}$$0\\atop{s}$ oscillation frequency at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecci, Claudia [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    A Jet Charge Tagger algorithm for b-flavour tagging for the measurement of Δms at CDF has been presented. The tagger is based on a b-track probability variable and a b-jet probability variable, both obtained by combining the information available in b$\\bar{b}$ events with a Neural Network. The tagging power measured on data is 0.917 ± 0.031% e+SVT sample; 0.938 ± 0.029% μ+SVT sample which is ~30% larger than the cut based Jet Charge Tagger employed for the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis presented by CDF at the Winter Conferences 2005. The improved power of the tagger is due to the selection of the b-jet with a Neural Network variable, which uses correlated jet variables in an optimal way. The development of the track and jet probability has profited from studies performed on simulated events, which allowed to understand better the features of b$\\bar{b}$ events. For the first time in the CDF B group a Monte Carlo sample comprising flavour creation and additional b$\\bar{b}$ production processes has been examined and compared to Run II data. It has been demonstrated that a Monte Carlo sample with only flavour creation b$\\bar{b}$ production processes is not sufficient to describe b$\\bar{b}$ data collected at CDF. The sample with additional processes introduced in this thesis is thus essential for tagging studies. Although the event description is satisfactory, the flavour information in the Monte Carlo sample differs with respect to data. This difference needs to be clarified by further studies. In addition, the track and the jet probabilities are the first official tools based on Neural Networks for B-Physics at CDF. They have proven that the simulation is understood to such an advanced level that Neural Networks can be employed. Further work is going on in this direction: a Soft Electron and a Soft Muon Tagger based on Neural Networks are under development as of now. Several possible tagger setups have been studied and the Jet Charge Tagger reached

  6. Double boson production at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, D.

    1996-07-01

    New measurements of boson pair production in p anti p collisions have been performed by the CDF collaboration using a data sample of approximately 110 pb -1 . The cross sections for WW and WZ production are measured in the pure leptonic decay channel to σ(p anti p → WZ) = 3.2 +5.0 -3. 2 pb and σ(p anti p → W + W - ) = 10.2 +6.5 -5.3 pb, respectively. Limits on anomalous coupling parameters are set in the searches for WW and WZ production. Assuming an energy scale of Λ FF = 2 TeV, we find for the WWZ and WWγ couplings at 95% CL: -0.4 < λ < 0.3 (δκ 0) and -0.5 < δκ < 0.5 (λ = 0)

  7. The CDF level-3 trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has been operating at the Tevatron and collecting data on proton-antiproton interactions with collision rates above 250,000 Hz. Three levels of filtering select events for data logging at a rate of about 4 Hz. The Level 3 trigger provides most of the capabilities of the offline production programs for event reconstruction and physics analysis. The type of physics triggers, application of cuts, and combinations of logical requirements for event selection are controlled at run time by a trigger table using a syntax fully integrated with the Level 1 and Level 2 hardware triggers. The level 3 software operates in 48 RISC/UNIX processors (over 1000 mips) served by four 20-MByte/sec data buses for input, output and control. The system architecture, debugging, code validation, error reporting, analysis capabilities and performance will be described

  8. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfyrla, Anna [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-03-10

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb-1 of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is σWW/WZtheory x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 2.09 ± 0.14 pb. They measured NSignal = 410 ± 212(stat) ± 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section σWW/WZ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) = 1.47 ± 0.77(stat) ± 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be σ x Br(W → ℓv; W/Z → jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels

  9. Diffractive dijet and W production in CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1998-01-01

    Results on diffractive dijet and W-boson production from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on factorization of the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

  10. Evidence for the Heavy Baryon Resonance State $\\Lambda_{b}^{\\ast0}$ Observed with the CDF II Detector, and Studies of New Particle Tracking Technologies Using the LANSCE Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palni, Prabhakar [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-05-01

    To discover and probe the properties of new particles, we need to collide highly energetic particles. The Tevatron at Fermilab has collided protons and anti-protons at very high energies. These collisions produce short lived and stable particles, some known and some previously unknown. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions and discover new elementary particles. To study the interaction between high energy charged particles and the detector materials often requires development of new instruments. Thus this dissertation involves a measurement at a contemporary experiment and development of technologies for related future experiments that will build on the contemporary one.

  11. New particle searches at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    One of the fundamental roles of a general purpose detector exploring, by means of increasing luminosity, higher and higher mass reach, is to search for new particles and exotic phenomena. This is a continuing effort for the CDF collaboration, and will report on several searches using about 20 pb -1 from the 1992/93 run labelled open-quotes run 1aclose quotes and ∼50 of the 90 pb -1 so far from the current open-quotes run 1b.close quotes These are mostly preliminary analyses, typically using a total of 70 pb -1 . Our limits on SUSY using missing E T with jets as well as three leptons are discussed elsewhere; results from the D0 collaboration are similar. I will discuss searches for additional vector bosons Z' and W', second generation scalar leptoquarks, as well as a broad search for objects decaying into jet pairs, including b-tagged jet pairs. I will also describe two events which do not fit in comfortably with either the standard model or a phenomenologically motivated search

  12. Study of the heavy flavour fractions in z+jets events from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at energy √s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrandrea, Paolo [Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2008-06-01

    to provide collisions for the experiments at the end of 2008. In the meanwhile the only running accelerator able to provide collisions suitable for the search of the Higgs boson is the Tevatron at Fermilab, a proton-antiproton collider with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV working at 3 • 1032cm-2s-1 peak luminosity. These features make the Tevatron able for the direct search of the Higgs boson in the 115-200 GeV mass range. Since the coupling of the Higgs boson is proportional to the masses of the particles involved, the decay in b{bar b} has the largest branching ratio for Higgs mass < 135 GeV and thus the events Z/W + $b\\bar{b}$ are the main background to the Higgs signal in the most range favored by Standard Model fits. In this thesis a new technique to identify Heavy Flavour quarks inside high - PT jets is applied to events with a reconstructed Z boson to provide a measurement of the Z+b and Z+c inclusive cross sections. The study of these channels represent also a test of QCD in high transferred momentum regime, and can provide information on proton pdf. This new Heavy Flavour identication technique (tagger) provides an increased statistical separation between b, c and light flavours, using a new vertexing algorithm and a chain of artificial Neural Networks to exploit as much information as possible in each event. For this work I collaborated with the Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza' group working in the CDF II experiment at Tevatron, that has at first developed this tagger. After a brief theoretical introduction (chapter 1) and a description of the experimental apparatus (chapter 2), the tagger itself and its calibration procedure are described in chapter 3 and 4. The chapter 5 is dedicated to the event selection and the chapter 6 contains the results of the measurement and the study of the systematic errors.

  13. Top quark pair production and top quark properties at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang-Seong [INFN, Pisa

    2016-06-02

    We present the most recent measurements of top quark pairs production and top quark properties in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using CDF II detector at the Tevatron. The combination of top pair production cross section measurements and the direct measurement of top quark width are reported. The test of Standard Model predictions for top quark decaying into $b$-quarks, performed by measuring the ratio $R$ between the top quark branching fraction to $b$-quark and the branching fraction to any type of down quark is shown. The extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the ratio $R$ is discussed. We also present the latest measurements on the forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in top anti-top quark production. With the full CDF Run II data set, the measurements are performed in top anti-top decaying to final states that contain one or two charged leptons (electrons or muons). In addition, we combine the results of the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry in $t\\bar t$ system between the two final states. All the results show deviations from the next-to-leading order (NLO) standard model (SM) calculation.

  14. Searches for new phenomena at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.J.

    1997-07-01

    We present recent results of searches for new physics in 110 pb - 1 of p anti p collisions at √s = 1800 GeV using the CDF detector. Presented are searches for third generation leptoquarks, charged and neutral Higgs bosons and the supersymmetric partner of the top quark (t). A search for new physics in diphoton events tests some models attempting to explain the CDF ''eeγγE T '' event. Finding no signal in any of these channels, production limits are presented

  15. Setup planning for machining

    CERN Document Server

    Hazarika, Manjuri

    2015-01-01

    Professionals as well as researchers can benefit from this comprehensive introduction into the topic of setup planning, which reflects the latest state of research and gives hands-on examples. Starting with a brief but thorough introduction, this book explains the significance of setup planning in process planning and includes a reflection on its external constraints. Step-by-step the different phases of setup planning are outlined and traditional as well as modern approaches, such as fuzzy logic based setup planning, on the solution of setup planning problems are presented. Three detailed examples of applications provide a clear and accessible insight into the up-to-date techniques and various approaches in setup planning.

  16. Activity on improving performance of time-of-flight detector at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzione, A.; Cerri, C.; Vataga, E.; Prokoshin, F.; Tokar, S.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes activity on improving the time resolution of the Time-of-Flight detector at CDF. The main goal of the detector is the identification of kaons and pions for b-quark (B-meson) flavour tagging. Construction of the detector has been described as well as proposals on detector design changes to improve its time resolution. Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response to MIP was performed. The results of the simulation showed that the proposed modifications (at least with currently available materials) bring modest or no improvement of the detector time resolution. An automated set-up was assembled to test and check out the changes in the electronic readout system of the detector. Sophisticated software has been developed for this set-up to provide control of the system as well as processing and presentation of data from the detector. This software can perform various tests using different implementations of the hardware set-up

  17. W Boson Mass Measurement at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-03-27

    This is the closeout report for the grant for experimental research at the energy frontier in high energy physics. The report describes the precise measurement of the W boson mass at the CDF experiment at Fermilab, with an uncertainty of ≈ 12 MeV, using the full dataset of ≈ 9 fb-1 collected by the experiment up to the shutdown of the Tevatron in 2011. In this analysis, the statistical and most of the experimental systematic uncertainties have been reduced by a factor of two compared to the previous measurement with 2.2 fb-1 of CDF data. This research has been the culmination of the PI's track record of producing world-leading measurements of the W boson mass from the Tevatron. The PI performed the first and only measurement to date of the W boson mass using high-rapidity leptons using the D0 endcap calorimeters in Run 1. He has led this measurement in Run 2 at CDF, publishing two world-leading measurements in 2007 and 2012 with total uncertainties of 48 MeV and 19 MeV respectively. The analysis of the final dataset is currently under internal review in CDF. Upon approval of the internal review, the result will be available for public release.

  18. Scaling behavior of jet production at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrends, S.

    1992-11-01

    Inclusive jet cross-sections have been measured in bar pp collisions at √s = 546 and 1800 GeV, using the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The ratio of jet cross-sections is compared to predictions from simple scaling and 0(α s 3 ) QCD

  19. Eurogrid: a new glideinWMS based portal for CDF data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerio, S; Compostella, G; Lucchesi, D; Benjamin, D; Dost, J; Sfiligoi, I

    2012-01-01

    The CDF experiment at Fermilab ended its Run-II phase on September 2011 after 11 years of operations and 10 fb −1 of collected data. CDF computing model is based on a Central Analysis Farm (CAF) consisting of local computing and storage resources, supported by OSG and LCG resources accessed through dedicated portals. At the beginning of 2011 a new portal, Eurogrid, has been developed to effectively exploit computing and disk resources in Europe: a dedicated farm and storage area at the TIER-1 CNAF computing center in Italy, and additional LCG computing resources at different TIER-2 sites in Italy, Spain, Germany and France, are accessed through a common interface. The goal of this project is to develop a portal easy to integrate in the existing CDF computing model, completely transparent to the user and requiring a minimum amount of maintenance support by the CDF collaboration. In this paper we will review the implementation of this new portal, and its performance in the first months of usage. Eurogrid is based on the glideinWMS software, a glidein based Workload Management System (WMS) that works on top of Condor. As CDF CAF is based on Condor, the choice of the glideinWMS software was natural and the implementation seamless. Thanks to the pilot jobs, user-specific requirements and site resources are matched in a very efficient way, completely transparent to the users. Official since June 2011, Eurogrid effectively complements and supports CDF computing resources offering an optimal solution for the future in terms of required manpower for administration, support and development.

  20. The CDF Run IIb Silicon Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Aoki; N. Bacchetta; S. Behari et al.

    2004-02-25

    Fermilab plans to deliver 5-15 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity to the CDF and D0 experiments. The current inner silicon detectors at CDF (SVXIIa and L00) will not tolerate the radiation dose associated with high luminosity running and will need to be replaced. A new readout chip (SVX4) has been designed in radiation-hard 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology. Single sided sensors are arranged in a compact structure, called a stave, with integrated readout and cooling systems. This paper describes the general design of the Run IIb system, testing results of prototype electrical components (staves), and prototype silicon sensor performance before and after irradiation.

  1. Electroweak measurements from CDF and D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuberger, D.

    1996-07-01

    This paper highlights results from electroweak measurements recently obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations in 1.8 TeV pp collisions. The W decay width was extracted from the measurement of W/Z cross section times leptonic branching ratios, and in a direct measurement from a fit of the high-mass tail of the transverse mass spectrum of the W system. Various limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings were obtained in studies of W/Z + γ processes, single leptonic WW, WZ production and double leptonic WW production. Values for σB(Wγ→lνγ), σB(Zγ→l + l - γ), and σ(pp→WW + X) were measured. CDF also reports on the observation of an asymmetry in photon rapidity distributions as predicted by the Standard Model. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. CDF End Plug calorimeter Upgrade Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apollinari, G.; de Barbaro, P.; Mishina, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the status of the CDF End Plug Upgrade Project. In this project, the CDF calorimeters in the end plug and the forward regions will be replaced by a single scintillator based calorimeter. After an extensive R ampersand D effort on the tile/fiber calorimetry, we have now advanced to a construction phase. We review the results of the R ampersand D leading to the final design of the calorimeters and the development of tooling devised for this project. The quality control program of the production of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters is described. A shower maximum detector for the measurement of the shower centroid and the shower profile of electrons, γ and π 0 has been designed. Its performance requirements, R ampersand D results and mechanical design are discussed

  3. Collider detector at Fermilab - CDF. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theriot, D.

    1985-06-01

    CDF, the Collider Detector at Fermilab, is a collaboration of almost 180 physicists from ten US universities (University of Chicago, Brandeis University, Harvard University, University of Illinois, University of Pennsylvania, Purdue University, Rockefeller University, Rutgers University, Texas A and M University, and University of Wisconsin), three US DOE supported national laboratories (Fermilab, Argonne National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Italy (Frascati National Laboratory and University of Pisa), and Japan (KEK National Laboratory and University of Tsukuba). The primary physics goal for CDF is to study the general features of proton-antiproton collisions at 2 TeV center-of-mass energy. On general grounds, we expect that parton subenergies in the range 50 to 500 GeV will provide the most interesting physics at this energy. Work at the present CERN Collider has already demonstrated the richness of the 100 GeV scale in parton subenergies. 7 refs., 14 figs

  4. The CDF central and endwall hadron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; Eposito, B.; Curatolo, M.; Giromini, P.; Miscetti, S.; Sansoni, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Di Virgilio, A.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; Laasanen, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    The CDF central and endwall hadron calorimeter covers the polar region between 30 0 and 150 0 and a full 2π in azimuth. It consists of 48 steel-scintillator central modules with 2.5 cm sampling and 48 steel-scintillator endwall modules with 5.0 cm sampling. A general description of the detector is given. Calibration techniques and performance are discussed. Some results of the test beam studies are shown. (orig.)

  5. Log(s) physics results from CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a large, azimuthally symmetric detector designed to study bar pp interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Results are presented from data taken with a minimum bias trigger at √s = 630 and 1800 GeV during the 1987 run. The topics include the current analysis of dn/dη and some very preliminary results on short range pseudorapidity correlations and Bose-Einstein correlations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Initial experience with the CDF SVT trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Ashmanskas, B; Bardi, A; Bari, M; Baumgart, M; Belforte, S; Berryhill, J W; Bogdan, M; Carosi, R; Cerri, A; Chlachidze, G; Culberston, R; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Donati, S; Fiori, I; Frisch, H; Galeotti, S; Giannetti, P; Glagolev, V; Léger, A; Liu, Y; Meschi, E; Moneta, L; Morsani, F; Nakaya, T; Punzi, G; Rescigno, M; Ristori, L; Sanders, H; Sarkar, S; Semenov, A; Shochet, M; Speer, T; Spinella, F; Vataga, H; Wu, X; Yang, U; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A M

    2003-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is a device that works inside the CDF Level 2 trigger to find and fit tracks in real time using the central silicon vertex detector information. SVT starts from tracks found by the Level 1 central chamber fast trigger and adds the silicon information to compute transverse track parameters with offline quality in about 15 mu s. The CDF SVT is fully installed and functional and has been exercised with real data during the spring and summer 2001. It is a complex digital device of more than 100 VME boards that performs a dramatic data reduction (only about one event in a thousand is accepted by the trigger). Diagnosing rare failures poses a special challenge and SVT internal data flow is monitored by dedicated hardware and software. This paper briefly covers the SVT architecture and design and reports on the SVT building/commissioning experience (hardware and software) and on the first results from the initial running.

  7. Initial experience with the CDF SVT trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmanskas, B.; Barchiesi, A.; Bardi, A.; Bari, M.; Baumgart, M.; Belforte, Stefano; Berryhill, J.; Bogdan, M.; Carosi, R.; Cerri, A.; Chlachidze, G.; Culberston, R.; Dell'Orso, M.; Donati, S.; Fiori, I.; Frisch, H.; Galeotti, S.; Giannetti, P.; Glagolev, V.; Leger, A.; Liu, Y.; Meschi, E.; Moneta, L.; Morsani, F.; Nakaya, T.; Punzi, G.; Rescigno, M.; Ristori, L.; Sanders, H.; Sarkar, S.; Semenov, A.; Shochet, M.; Speer, T.; Spinella, F.; Vataga, H.; Wu, X.; Yang, U.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A. M.

    2003-03-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) is a device that works inside the CDF Level 2 trigger to find and fit tracks in real time using the central silicon vertex detector information. SVT starts from tracks found by the Level 1 central chamber fast trigger and adds the silicon information to compute transverse track parameters with offline quality in about 15 μs. The CDF SVT is fully installed and functional and has been exercised with real data during the spring and summer 2001. It is a complex digital device of more than 100 VME boards that performs a dramatic data reduction (only about one event in a thousand is accepted by the trigger). Diagnosing rare failures poses a special challenge and SVT internal data flow is monitored by dedicated hardware and software. This paper briefly covers the SVT architecture and design and reports on the SVT building/commissioning experience (hardware and software) and on the first results from the initial running.

  8. Measurement of the W± + b$\\bar{b}$ cross-section in 695-pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF II.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderberg, Mitchell Paul [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2006-01-01

    W± + b$\\bar{b}$ events contain the associated production of a W± boson, a pair of bottom quarks (b$\\bar{b}$), and any number of additional partons. This process is of much importance at hadron collider experiments due to its role as a background source in searches for Standard Model Higgs boson and single top-quark production. In this thesis the results are presented for a measurement of the b-jet cross-section in W± + b$\\bar{b}$ events containing 1 or 2 jets in 695 pb-1 of √s =1.96 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at the CDF experiment. This is the first measurement of the cross-section of W± b$\\bar{b}$ performed in any experiment. The cross-section is defined to be proportional to the number of b-jets from W± b$\\bar{b}$ events with one or two jets, and a leptonically decaying W± with decay products passing kinematics cuts (pT(ℓ±) ≥ 20.0 GeV, |η(ℓ±)| ≤ 1.1, pT(v) ≥ 25.0 GeV). The invariant mass distribution of jets identified as containing a long-lived hadron is fit with components for bottom, charm, and light-flavor to find the fraction due to true b-decays. Background b-jet sources are subtracted to isolate the contribution of W± b$\\bar{b}$ to the data. The cross-section is measured to be 0.90 ± 0.20(stat.) ± 0.26(syst.)pb, which compares well with the leading order theoretical prediction of 0.74 ± 0.18 pb.

  9. MR-CDF: Managing multi-resolution scientific data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    MR-CDF is a system for managing multi-resolution scientific data sets. It is an extension of the popular CDF (Common Data Format) system. MR-CDF provides a simple functional interface to client programs for storage and retrieval of data. Data is stored so that low resolution versions of the data can be provided quickly. Higher resolutions are also available, but not as quickly. By managing data with MR-CDF, an application can be relieved of the low-level details of data management, and can easily trade data resolution for improved access time.

  10. CDF-XL: computing cumulative distribution functions of reaction time data in Excel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, George; Grange, James A

    2011-12-01

    In experimental psychology, central tendencies of reaction time (RT) distributions are used to compare different experimental conditions. This emphasis on the central tendency ignores additional information that may be derived from the RT distribution itself. One method for analysing RT distributions is to construct cumulative distribution frequency plots (CDFs; Ratcliff, Psychological Bulletin 86:446-461, 1979). However, this method is difficult to implement in widely available software, severely restricting its use. In this report, we present an Excel-based program, CDF-XL, for constructing and analysing CDFs, with the aim of making such techniques more readily accessible to researchers, including students (CDF-XL can be downloaded free of charge from the Psychonomic Society's online archive). CDF-XL functions as an Excel workbook and starts from the raw experimental data, organised into three columns (Subject, Condition, and RT) on an Input Data worksheet (a point-and-click utility is provided for achieving this format from a broader data set). No further preprocessing or sorting of the data is required. With one click of a button, CDF-XL will generate two forms of cumulative analysis: (1) "standard" CDFs, based on percentiles of participant RT distributions (by condition), and (2) a related analysis employing the participant means of rank-ordered RT bins. Both analyses involve partitioning the data in similar ways, but the first uses a "median"-type measure at the participant level, while the latter uses the mean. The results are presented in three formats: (i) by participants, suitable for entry into further statistical analysis; (ii) grand means by condition; and (iii) completed CDF plots in Excel charts.

  11. First Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Β(Λb → Λc+μ-¯νμ)/Β(Λb → Λc+π-) at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shin-Shan [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2005-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Β(Λb → Λc+μ-¯νμ)/Β(Λb → Λc+π-) based on 171.5 pb-1 of p¯p collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV taken with the CDF-II detector. In addition, we present measurements of Β(¯Β0 → D*+μ-¯νμ)/Β(¯Β0 → D*+π-) and Β(¯Β0 → D+μ-¯νμ/Β(¯Β0 → D+π-), which serve as control samples to understand the data and Monte Carlo used for the Λb analysis.

  12. The search for top at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liss, T.M.

    1991-08-01

    We present results on the search for the top quark in bar pp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV. The data sample collected during the 1988--89 run with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) includes more than 4 pb -1 . We report here on an extension of previously published searches for the top quark in electron + jets and the dilepton channel electron-muon. The 95% confidence level limit on the top mass is 89 GeV/c 2

  13. Lifetime of B hadrons from CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Ting.

    1996-08-01

    A review of the lifetimes of B hadrons measured by the CDF collaboration at Fermilab is presented. The data corresponds to 110 pb -1 of p anti p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV. The inclusive B hadron lifetime is measured using a high statistics sample of B → J/ΨΧ decays. Species specific lifetimes of the B + , B 0 , B 0 s , and Λ 0 b are determined using both fully reconstructed decays and partially reconstructed decays consisting of a lepton associated with a charm hadron

  14. Searching for new physics at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shreyber, Irina; /Moscow, ITEP

    2006-11-01

    We present recent results on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model obtained from the analysis of 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF Collaboration. We report on model-independent studies for anomalous production of {ell}{gamma} + X, {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} and {gamma}{gamma} + E{sub T}, Standard Model t{bar t}{gamma} production. We also present results for the Randall-Sundrum Gravitons, the same-sign dileptons and the trileptons searches. No significant excess of data over the predicted background is observed.

  15. Luminosity monitoring and measurement at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Beretvas, A.; Derwent, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Using two telescopes of beam-beam counters, CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) has measured the luminosity to an accuracy of 4.1% (3.6%) in run Ib (Ia). For run Ib (Ia) the average luminosity was 9.1(3.3)x10 30 cm -2 s -1 . For a typical data set the integrated luminosity was 86.47 (19.65) pb -1 in run Ib (Ia) resulting in a total integrated luminosity of 106.1±4.1 pb -1 . This paper shows how we have determined the accuracy of our results

  16. Recent Top Properties Measurements at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarelli, Giorgio [INFN, Pisa

    2014-11-26

    We present the most recent CDF results on the measurements of the decay and production vertex of the top-quark. New results on forward-backward asymmetry in top-antitop events are presented. Also, recent measurements of the branching fractions of top-quark are discussed. Finally, measurements in single top events, where top-quark is produced through electroweak processes, are presented. Despite the much larger number of top events collected at the LHC, due to the symmetric initial state and the better signal-to-background ratio in specific channels, some results will be lasting heritage of the Tevatron.

  17. Performance of the CDF Silicon VerteX detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, O.

    1992-11-01

    The current status of the online and offline performance of the CDF Silicon VerteX detector is presented. So far, at low radiation dose, the device delivers good quality data. After the latest alignment using collision data, a spatial resolution of 13 pm is achieved in the transverse plane, demonstrating that CDF has a powerful tool to detect b decay vertices

  18. Update on the di-jet mass spectrum in W+2jet events at CDF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 CDF reported an excess of events with respect to SM background expectations in the W + 2 jet final state, potentially consistent with a resonance in the dijet invariant mass spectrum in the neighborhood of 145 GeV/c^2. Here, we report on updated CDF results for this channel using the full Run II data set and incorporating improvements in the techniques used to model SM background contributions. In addition, we report on searches performed in orthogonal final states where one might also expect to observe contributions from a non-SM production mechanism if this was in fact the explanation for the previously observed excess in the W + 2 jet final state.

  19. Enhancing the CDF's B physics program with a faster data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimovic, Petar

    2011-01-01

    The physics program of Run II at the Tevatron includes precision electroweak measurements such as the determination of the top quark and W boson masses; bottom and charm physics including the determination of the B s and D 0 mixing parameters; studies of the strong interaction; and searches for the Higgs particle, supersymmetric particles, hidden space-time dimensions and quark substructure. All of these measurements benefit from a high-resolution tracking detector. Most of them rely heavily on the efficient identification of heavy flavored B hadrons by detection of displaced secondary vertices, and are enhanced by the capability to trigger on tracks not coming from the primary vertex. This is uniquely provided by CDF's finely-segmented silicon detectors surrounding the interaction region. Thus CDF experiment's physics potential critically depends on the performance of its silicon detectors. The CDF silicon detectors were designed to operate up to 2-3 fb -1 of accumulated pji collisions, with an upgrade planned thereafter. However, the upgrade project was canceled in 2003 and Run II has been extended through 2011, with an expected total delivered integrated luminosity of 12 fb -1 or more. Several preventive measures were taken to keep the original detector operational and maintain its performance. The most important of these are the decrease in the operating temperature of the detector, which reduces the impact of radiation exposure, and measures to minimize damage due to integrated radiation dose, thermal cycles, and wire bond resonance conditions. Despite these measures the detectors operating conditions continue to change with issues arising from radiation damage to the sensors, aging infrastructure and electronics. These, together with the basic challenges posed by the inaccessibility of the detector volume and large number (about 750 thousand) of readout channels, make the silicon detector operations the single most complex and high priority job in the CDF

  20. Enhancing the CDF's B physics program with a faster data acquisition system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Petar Maksimovic

    2011-03-02

    The physics program of Run II at the Tevatron includes precision electroweak measurements such as the determination of the top quark and W boson masses; bottom and charm physics including the determination of the B{sub s} and D{sup 0} mixing parameters; studies of the strong interaction; and searches for the Higgs particle, supersymmetric particles, hidden space-time dimensions and quark substructure. All of these measurements benefit from a high-resolution tracking detector. Most of them rely heavily on the efficient identification of heavy flavored B hadrons by detection of displaced secondary vertices, and are enhanced by the capability to trigger on tracks not coming from the primary vertex. This is uniquely provided by CDF's finely-segmented silicon detectors surrounding the interaction region. Thus CDF experiment's physics potential critically depends on the performance of its silicon detectors. The CDF silicon detectors were designed to operate up to 2-3 fb{sup -1} of accumulated pji collisions, with an upgrade planned thereafter. However, the upgrade project was canceled in 2003 and Run II has been extended through 2011, with an expected total delivered integrated luminosity of 12 fb{sup -1} or more. Several preventive measures were taken to keep the original detector operational and maintain its performance. The most important of these are the decrease in the operating temperature of the detector, which reduces the impact of radiation exposure, and measures to minimize damage due to integrated radiation dose, thermal cycles, and wire bond resonance conditions. Despite these measures the detectors operating conditions continue to change with issues arising from radiation damage to the sensors, aging infrastructure and electronics. These, together with the basic challenges posed by the inaccessibility of the detector volume and large number (about 750 thousand) of readout channels, make the silicon detector operations the single most complex and

  1. A setup for synchrotron-radiation-induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near-edge structure recently commissioned at BESSY II BAMline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittschen, U; Guilherme, A; Böttger, S; Rosenberg, D; Menzel, M; Jansen, W; Busker, M; Gotlib, Z P; Radtke, M; Riesemeier, H; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2016-05-01

    An automatic sample changer chamber for total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis in TXRF geometry was successfully set up at the BAMline at BESSY II. TXRF and TXRF-XANES are valuable tools for elemental determination and speciation, especially where sample amounts are limited (TXRF requires a well defined geometry regarding the reflecting surface of a sample carrier and the synchrotron beam. The newly installed chamber allows for reliable sample positioning, remote sample changing and evacuation of the fluorescence beam path. The chamber was successfully used showing accurate determination of elemental amounts in the certified reference material NIST water 1640. Low limits of detection of less than 100 fg absolute (10 pg ml(-1)) for Ni were found. TXRF-XANES on different Re species was applied. An unknown species of Re was found to be Re in the +7 oxidation state.

  2. An edge over diagnostic setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Kannan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic setup proposed by H.D. Kingsley serves as a practical aid in treatment planning and diagnosis. These setups have some inherent shortcomings. A simple technique of duplication of the setups in dental stone can solve problems encountered before as well as provide many other advantages over the conventional procedure. The diagnostic setup is prepared by the conventional method [Figure 1]. An alginate impression is then taken of the setups and poured in dental stone to obtain the derived treatment model [Figure 2]. The same setup can now be further modified for alternate lines of treatment. Subsequently models could then be obtained as required [Figure 3].

  3. Measurement of the Inclusive Jet Cross Section using the k(T) algorithm in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV with the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abulencia, A.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Affolder, Anthony Allen; /UC, Santa Barbara; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Albrow, Michael G.; /Fermilab; Ambrose, D.; /Fermilab; Amerio, S.; /Padua U.; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Anikeev, Konstantin; /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Comenius U.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on measurements of the inclusive jet production cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using the k{sub T} algorithm and a data sample corresponding to 1.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II. The measurements are carried out in five different jet rapidity regions with |y{sup jet}| < 2.1 and transverse momentum in the range 54 < p{sub T}{sup jet} < 700 GeV/c. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions are in good agreement with the measured cross sections.

  4. Central exclusive production of hadrons in CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M. G. [Fermilab; Lontkovskyi, D. [Unlisted, PL; Makarenko, I. [Unlisted, PL; Swiech, A. [Unlisted, PL; Zurek, M. [Unlisted, PL

    2012-01-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron with $\\sqrt{s}$ = 900 and 1960 GeV, we have studied exclusive double pomeron exchange in the Collider Detector at Fermilab, CDF. With $\\sim$300,000 events we present the mass spectrum of two hadrons, $h^+h^-$, assumed to be pions, with $|\\eta(\\pi)| <$ 1.3 and two rapidity gaps $\\Delta \\eta > 4.6$. The mass spectrum shows resonance structures, including $f_0(980),f_2(1270),$ and$ f_0(1370)$. The cross section ratio 1960 GeV/900 GeV and the mean $p_T(pair)$ show mass-dependent structures, even above $M$ = 2 GeV where there are no established $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ resonances. The data extend above $M$ = 5 GeV. We place an upper limit on exclusive $\\chi_{c0} \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $K^+K^-$.

  5. Search for new phenomena with the CDF detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzi, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present the results of the searches for new phenomena in pp collisions at √s=1.8 TeV with the CDF detector using the full data sample of 110 pb -1 collected between 1992 and 1995. We have searched for new physics in events with two photons, testing some of the hypotheses proposed to explain the appearance of the CDF eeγγ E T event. New results on the search for a heavy neutral scalar object, charged Higgs bosons (H ± ) and the scalar top quark are presented. Finally we summarize the CDF results on the search for third generation leptoquarks

  6. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  7. Direct top-quark width measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T

    2010-12-03

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt events produced in p p collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson that comes from the top-quark decay are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths (Γ(t)) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale (Δ(JES)) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where Δ(JES) is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of Γ(t) quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c(2), which are consistent with the standard model prediction.

  8. Precision top-quark mass measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A

    2012-10-12

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1). Using a sample of tt¯ candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, M(top)=172.85±0.71(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV/c(2).

  9. Scintillation properties of CdF2 crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Koshimizu, Masanori; Fukuda, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    CdF 2 single crystal was prepared by Tokuyama Corp. with the μ-PD method to investigate Auger free luminescence of this material. From optical transmittance spectrum, bandgap wavelength was around 280 nm. In X-ray induced radioluminescence spectrum, emission lines appeared around 350 nm and 420 nm. Excitation wavelength was investigated and excitation peak was around 250 nm. Photoluminescence and scintillation decay times were evaluated and decay time was few ns. Temperature dependence of X-ray induced radioluminescence was compared with conventional BaF 2 scintillator and scintillation of CdF 2 decreased when the temperature increased. Consequently, scintillation of CdF 2 is possibly emission at color centers or exciton related one. - Highlights: • CdF 2 crystal scinitillator was synthesized. • Emission wavelengths of CdF 2 appeared around 350 and 420 nm. • Scintillation decay time of CdF 2 was quite fast, 1.75 ns. • Excitation bands were investigated by using Synchrotron facility, UVSOR

  10. Entwicklungsarbeit am Spurendetektor fur das CDF Experiment am Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Frank [Univ. of Karlsruhe (TH) (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Silicon, the element, which revolutionized the development of electronics, is known as an important and multiusable material, dominating todays electronic technology. It's properties are well investigated and today well known. Silicon is used in solar cells, computers and telecommunications. Since the Sixties semiconductors have been used as particle detectors. Initially they were operated in fixed- target experiments as calorimeters and as detectors with a high precision track reconstruction. Since the Eighties they are widely used in collider experiments as silicon microstrip or silicon pixel detectors near the primary vertex. Silicon sensors have a very good intrinsic energy resolution: for every 3.6 eV released by a particle crossing the medium, one electron-hole pair is produced. Compared to 30 eV required to ionize a gas molecule in a gaseous detector, one gets 10 times the number of particles. The average energy loss and high ionized particle number with 390 e V / μm ~ 108 (electron - hole pairs)/ μm is effectively high due to the high density of silicon. These detectors allow a high precision reconstruction of tracks, primary and secondary vertices, which are especially important for b flavour tagging. The Tevatron and its detectors are being upgraded for the next data taking run starting in 2001 (RUN II). The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) [2] for the upcoming Run II and its upgraded components are described in chapter 2. The main upgrade project is the design and construction of a completely new inner tracking system.

  11. Search for Charged Higgs in CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    We present results of a search for charged Higgs production from pbarp collisions at √s=1.8 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron collider using the CDF detector. An expanded Higgs sector containing charged Higgs bosons is a persistent feature of candidate theories to replace the Standard Model. The minimal supersymmetric extention of the Standard Model, for example, predicts that the dominant decay mode of the top quark is tarrow H+barrow τ+ν b for large values of tanβ. We use the hadronic decays of the tau lepton in this channel to set a new limit on charged Higgs production. *We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation. Supported by U.S. NSF NSF-94-17820.

  12. CDF software distribution on the grid using Parrot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compostella, G.; /INFN, CNAF; Pagan Griso, S.; /Padua U.; Lucchesi, D.; /Padua U.; Sfiligoi, I.; /Fermilab; Thain, D.; /Notre Dame U.

    2010-01-01

    Large international collaborations that use decentralized computing models are becoming a custom rather than an exception in High Energy Physics. A good computing model for such big collaborations has to deal with the distribution of the experiment-specific software around the world. When the CDF experiment developed its software infrastructure, most computing was done on dedicated clusters. As a result, libraries, configuration files and large executables were deployed over a shared file system. In order to adapt its computing model to the Grid, CDF decided to distribute its software to all European Grid sites using Parrot, a user-level application capable of attaching existing programs to remote I/O systems through the filesystem interface. This choice allows CDF to use just one centralized source of code and a scalable set of caches all around Europe to efficiently distribute its code and requires almost no interaction with the existing Grid middleware or with local system administrators. This system has been in production at CDF in Europe since almost two years. Here, we present CDF implementation of Parrot and some comments on its performances.

  13. Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

    1996-01-01

    This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb -1 /week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb -1 for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent 'components': procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don't directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components

  14. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson in 7.9 fb.sup.−1./sup. of p¯p collisions at √ s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Amerio, S.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 715, 1-3 (2012), s. 98-104 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : Higgs boson search * multivariate techniques * Z0 leptonic decay * Batavia TEVATRON * CDF * hadronic decay Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.569, year: 2012 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1203.5815

  15. Server farms with setup costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandhi, A.; Harchol-Balter, M.; Adan, I.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider server farms with a setup cost. This model is common in manufacturing systems and data centers, where there is a cost to turn servers on. Setup costs always take the form of a time delay, and sometimes there is additionally a power penalty, as in the case of data centers.

  16. Level-3 Calorimetric Resolution available for the Level-1 and Level-2 CDF Triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Canepa, A.; Liu, T.; Cortiana, G.; Flanagan, G.; Frisch, H.; Krop, D.; Pilcher, C.; Rusu, V.; Cavaliere, V.; Greco, V.; Giannetti, P.; Piendibene, M.; Sartori, L.; Vidal, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    As the Tevatron luminosity increases sophisticated selections are required to be efficient in selecting rare events among a very huge background. To cope with this problem, CDF has pushed the offline calorimeter algorithm reconstruction resolution up to Level 2 and, when possible, even up to Level 1, increasing efficiency and, at the same time, keeping under control the rates. The CDF Run II Level 2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on a simple algorithm that was used in Run I. This system has worked well for Run II at low luminosity. As the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitation due to this simple algorithm starts to become clear: some of the most important jet and MET (Missing ET) related triggers have large growth terms in cross section at higher luminosity. In this paper, we present an upgrade of the Level 2 Calorimeter system which makes the calorimeter trigger tower information available directly to a CPU allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be impleme...

  17. Analysis of Bs flavor oscillations at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerreiro Leonardo, Nuno Teotonio Viegas [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-09-01

    The search for and study of flavor oscillations in the neutral BsBs meson system is an experimentally challenging task. It constitutes a flagship analysis of the Tevatron physics program. In this dissertation, they develop an analysis of the time-dependent Bs flavor oscillations using data collected with the CDF detector. The data samples are formed of both fully and partially reconstructed B meson decays: Bs → Dsπ(ππ) and Bs → Dslv. A likelihood fitting framework is implemented and appropriate models and techniques developed for describing the mass, proper decay time, and flavor tagging characteristics of the data samples. The analysis is extended to samples of B+ and B0 mesons, which are further used for algorithm calibration and method validation. The B mesons lifetimes are extracted. The measurement of the B0 oscillation frequency yields Δmd = 0.522 ± 0.017 ps-1. The search for Bs oscillations is performed using an amplitude method based on a frequency scanning procedure. Applying a combination of lepton and jet charge flavor tagging algorithms, with a total tagging power ϵ'D2 of 1.6%, to a data sample of 355 pb-1, a sensitivity of 13.0 ps-1 is achieved. They develop a preliminary same side kaon tagging algorithm, which is found to provide a superior tagging power of about 4.0% for the Bs meson species. A study of the dilution systematic uncertainties is not reported. From its application as is to the Bs samples the sensitivity is significantly increased to about 18 ps-1 and a hint of a signal is seen at about 175. ps-1. They demonstrate that the extension of the analysis to the increasing data samples with the inclusion of the same side tagging algorithm is capable of providing an observation of Bs mixing beyond the

  18. The CDF and D-zero B physics upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, A.K.A.

    1997-06-01

    The CDF and D0 detector upgrades are reviewed with an emphasis on their B physics capabilities. Projections for the observability of CP- violation and for the resolution of rapid B s oscillations are made, based on upgrade simulations and on CDF performance from the last run. It is shown that measurements of sin(2β) and sin(2α) can be achieved with uncertainties less than 0.15. For fully reconstructed (non-leptonic) B s decays, both detectors have vertexing and momentum determination able to resolve x s ∼20

  19. Choledochoduodenal fistula (CDF): a compication of chronic peptic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bilio-enteric fistulas have been reported though not common. They are usually incidental findings during certain investigative procedures. It is mostly associated with gallstones or penetrating abdominal injury. A case of choledochoduodenal fistula (CDF) complicating chronic duodenal ulcer disease picked up on upper ...

  20. SVT: an online silicon vertex tracker for the CDF upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardi, A.; Belforte, S.; Berryhill, J.

    1997-07-01

    The SVT is an online tracker for the CDF upgrade which will reconstruct 2D tracks using information from the Silicon VerteX detector (SVXII) and Central Outer Tracker (COT). The precision measurement of the track impact parameter will then be used to select and record large samples of B hadrons. We discuss the overall architecture, algorithms, and hardware implementation of the system

  1. Long term data preservation for CDF at INFN-CNAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerio, S; Chiarelli, L; Dell'Agnello, L; Girolamo, D De; Gregori, D; Pezzi, M; Prosperini, A; Ricci, P; Rosso, F; Zani, S

    2014-01-01

    Long-term preservation of experimental data (intended as both raw and derived formats) is one of the emerging requirements coming from scientific collaborations. Within the High Energy Physics community the Data Preservation in High Energy Physics (DPHEP) group coordinates this effort. CNAF is not only one of the Tier-1s for the LHC experiments, it is also a computing center providing computing and storage resources to many other HEP and non-HEP scientific collaborations, including the CDF experiment. After the end of data taking in 2011, CDF is now facing the challenge to both preserve the large amount of data produced during several years of data taking and to retain the ability to access and reuse it in the future. CNAF is heavily involved in the CDF Data Preservation activities, in collaboration with the Fermilab National Laboratory (FNAL) computing sector. At the moment about 4 PB of data (raw data and analysis-level ntuples) are starting to be copied from FNAL to the CNAF tape library and the framework to subsequently access the data is being set up. In parallel to the data access system, a data analysis framework is being developed which allows to run the complete CDF analysis chain in the long term future, from raw data reprocessing to analysis-level ntuple production. In this contribution we illustrate the technical solutions we put in place to address the issues encountered as we proceeded in this activity.

  2. Determination of Top Quark charge in CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednar, Peter [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with the problematic of top quark charge measurement in CDF experiment at Fermilab. The goal is to determine if the top quark observed on Tevatron experiments is the Standard Model particle with the predicted charge 2/3 or it is some exotic 4th generation quark with the charge of -4/3 as suggested by some alternative theories.

  3. The spectral imaging facility: Setup characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, Simone, E-mail: simone.deangelis@iaps.inaf.it; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Manzari, Paola Olga [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Ammannito, Eleonora [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States); Di Iorio, Tatiana [ENEA, UTMEA-TER, Rome (Italy); Liberati, Fabrizio [Opto Service SrL, Campagnano di Roma (RM) (Italy); Tarchi, Fabio; Dami, Michele; Olivieri, Monica; Pompei, Carlo [Selex ES, Campi Bisenzio (Italy); Mugnuolo, Raffaele [Italian Space Agency, ASI, Spatial Geodesy Center, Matera (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The SPectral IMager (SPIM) facility is a laboratory visible infrared spectrometer developed to support space borne observations of rocky bodies of the solar system. Currently, this laboratory setup is used to support the DAWN mission, which is in its journey towards the asteroid 1-Ceres, and to support the 2018 Exo-Mars mission in the spectral investigation of the Martian subsurface. The main part of this setup is an imaging spectrometer that is a spare of the DAWN visible infrared spectrometer. The spectrometer has been assembled and calibrated at Selex ES and then installed in the facility developed at the INAF-IAPS laboratory in Rome. The goal of SPIM is to collect data to build spectral libraries for the interpretation of the space borne and in situ hyperspectral measurements of planetary materials. Given its very high spatial resolution combined with the imaging capability, this instrument can also help in the detailed study of minerals and rocks. In this paper, the instrument setup is first described, and then a series of test measurements, aimed to the characterization of the main subsystems, are reported. In particular, laboratory tests have been performed concerning (i) the radiation sources, (ii) the reference targets, and (iii) linearity of detector response; the instrumental imaging artifacts have also been investigated.

  4. Hadronic final states in high -pT QCD at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, Keith [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2013-11-18

    The heavy quark content of gauge boson events is of great interest to studies of QCD. These events probe the gluon and heavy-quark parton distribution functions of the proton, and also provide a measurement of the rate of final state gluon splitting to heavy flavor. In addition, gauge boson plus heavy quark events are representative of backgrounds to Higgs, single top, and supersymmetric particle searches. Recent work with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron has measured the cross-section of several gauge boson plus heavy flavor production processes, including the first Tevatron observation of specific charm process p{p bar} → W +c. Results are found to be in agreement with NLO predictions that include an enhanced rate of g → {cc bar}/bb splitting. Lastly, a new analysis promises to probe a lower pT (c) region than has been previously explored, by fully reconstructing D* → D0(Kπ)π decays in the full CDF dataset (9.7 fb-1).

  5. Study of the top quark electric charge at the cdf experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, P.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy ps = 1.96 TeV . There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb -1 of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2 · ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis. (author)

  6. Study of the top quark electric charge at the CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, Pavol [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb-1 of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis.

  7. Two reports: (i) Correlation properties of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission. (ii) Method and set-up for measurements of trace level content of heavy fissionable elements based on delayed neutron counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piksaikin, V.M.; Isaev, S.G.; Goverdovski, A.A.; Pshakin, G.M.

    1998-10-01

    The document includes the following two reports: 'Correlation properties of delayed neutrons from fast neutron induced fission' and 'Method and set-up for measurements of trace level content of heavy fissionable elements based on delayed neutron counting. A separate abstract was prepared for each report

  8. Setup reduction approaches for machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1997-04-01

    Rapid setup is a common improvement approach in press working operations such as blanking and shearing. It has paid major dividends in the sheet metal industry. It also has been a major improvement thrust for high-production machining operations. However, the literature does not well cover all the setup operations and constraints for job shop work. This review provides some insight into the issues involved. It highlights the floor problems and provides insights for further improvement. The report is designed to provide a quick understanding of the issues.

  9. Heavy flavor decay of Zγ at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington-Taber, Timothy M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Diboson production is an important and frequently measured parameter of the Standard Model. This analysis considers the previously neglected p$\\bar{p}$ →Z γ→ b$\\bar{b}$ channel, as measured at the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Using the entire Tevatron Run II dataset, the measured result is consistent with Standard Model predictions, but the statistical error associated with this method of measurement limits the strength of this correlation.

  10. Production and Electrical Characterization Tests of the ISL Detector and a Trigger Design for Higgs Boson Searches at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munar Ara, Antoni [Valencia U.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is structured as follows: Chapter 1. gives a brief review of the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model and the electroweak symmetry breaking. The Standard Model Higgs boson phenomenology at Tevatron energies is reviewed. Chapter 2. describes the upgraded Fermilab laboratory accelerator complex, and the upgraded CDF detector. Chapter 3. gives a brief overview of the more relevant aspects of the silicon detectors, and the ISL is described in detail. Chapter 4. describes the construction of the ISL ladders, the full custom testing setup (functionality tests, laser test, burn-in test and $\\beta$-source measurements), and the problems encountered during the ISL ladders construction. The procedures for ladder grading are also discussed. Chapter 5. describes the multilevel trigger system of the CDF detector, and the trigger primitives available at each level. The most relevant offine event observables are briefly discussed. In Chapter 6 the procedures to estimate the trigger rate and trigger effciency calculation are described. The particularities of triggering in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at high luminosities are discussed. Chapter 7. and Chapter 8. are dedicated to study an effcient trigger strategy for the $H + W/Z \\to b\\bar{b}jj$ channel and the $H + Z \\to b\\bar{b} \

  11. NetCDF-CF: Supporting Earth System Science with Data Access, Analysis, and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E.; Zender, C. S.; Arctur, D. K.; O'Brien, K.; Jelenak, A.; Santek, D.; Dixon, M. J.; Whiteaker, T. L.; Yang, K.

    2017-12-01

    NetCDF-CF is a community-developed convention for storing and describing earth system science data in the netCDF binary data format. It is an OGC recognized standard with numerous existing FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) and commercial software tools can explore, analyze, and visualize data that is stored and described as netCDF-CF data. To better support a larger segment of the earth system science community, a number of efforts are underway to extend the netCDF-CF convention with the goal of increasing the types of data that can be represented as netCDF-CF data. This presentation will provide an overview and update of work to extend the existing netCDF-CF convention. It will detail the types of earth system science data currently supported by netCDF-CF and the types of data targeted for support by current netCDF-CF convention development efforts. It will also describe some of the tools that support the use of netCDF-CF compliant datasets, the types of data they support, and efforts to extend them to handle the new data types that netCDF-CF will support.

  12. Measurement of the Mass Difference Between Top and Anti-top Quarks at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J.E.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, Y.J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-03-18

    We present a measurement of the mass difference between top ($t$) and anti-top ($\\bar{t}$) quarks using $t\\bar{t}$ candidate events reconstructed in the final state with one lepton and multiple jets. We use the full data set of Tevatron $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb$^{-1}$. We estimate event-by-event the mass difference to construct templates for top-quark signal events and background events. The resulting mass difference distribution of data compared to signal and background templates using a likelihood fit yields $\\Delta M_{top} = {M}_{t} - {M}_{\\bar{t}} = -1.95 $pm$ 1.11 (stat) $pm$ 0.59 (syst)$ and is in agreement with the standard model prediction of no mass difference.

  13. Precision top-quark mass measurements at CDF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Amerio, S.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 15 (2012), "152003-1"-"152003-7" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : top mass * top pair production * dijet mass spectrum * CDF * Batavia TEVATRON Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.943, year: 2012 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1207.6758

  14. Rapidity gaps between jets at D0 and CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, I.

    1995-08-01

    Results are presented from analyses of particle multiplicity distributions between high transverse energy jets produced at the Fermilab Tevatron p bar p collider at √s = 1.8 Tev. D0 and CDF examine the particle multiplicity distribution between the two highest transverse energy jets. Both experiments observe a significant excess of events at low tagged particle multiplicity which is consistent with a strongly interacting color-singlet exchange process

  15. Software development tools for the CDF MX scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuermer, W.; Turner, K.; Littleton-Sestini, S.

    1991-11-01

    This paper discuses the design of the high level assembler and diagnostic control program developed for the MX, a high speed, custom designed computer used in the CDF data acquisition system at Fermilab. These programs provide a friendly productive environment for the development of software on the MX. Details of their implementation and special features, and some of the lessons learned during their development are included

  16. Measurement of the $s$-channel Single Top Quark Cross Section at the CDF Experiment and Contributions to the Evidence of $H\\rightarrow bb$ at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    In this thesis, we present the measurement of the s-channel single top quark production cross section. In the cross section measurement we use data generated by protonantiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF Run II detector. The total data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb-1.

  17. Extensions of cutting problems: setups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Henn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Even though the body of literature in the area of cutting and packing is growing rapidly, research seems to focus on standard problems in the first place, while practical aspects are less frequently dealt with. This is particularly true for setup processes which arise in industrial cutting processes whenever a new cutting pattern is started (i.e. a pattern is different from its predecessor and the cutting equipment has to be prepared in order to meet the technological requirements of the new pattern. Setups involve the consumption of resources and the loss of production time capacity. Therefore, consequences of this kind must explicitly be taken into account for the planning and control of industrial cutting processes. This results in extensions to traditional models which will be reviewed here. We show how setups can be represented in such models, and we report on the algorithms which have been suggested for the determination of solutions of the respective models. We discuss the value of these approaches and finally point out potential directions of future research.

  18. Measurements of the top-quark decay width and mass at CDF using the template method.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jian [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-10

    Measurements of the top quark decay width and mass are presented using the tt events produced in p p collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. A data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity is used for the top quark width measurement. Two estimators, the reconstructed top quark mass and the mass of hadronically decaying W boson that comes from the top-quark decay are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different input top quark widths and deviations from nominal CDF jet energy scale (ΔJES) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters. ΔJES is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale at CDF. By applying a Feldman-Cousins limit-setting approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of Γtop < 7.6 GeV and a two-sided 68% CL interval of (0.3 GeV, 4.4) GeV assuming a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c2, which are consistent with the standard model prediction. The measurement of the top quark mass uses a data sample of tt events in 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the same detector. Candidate events in the top quark mass measurement are required to have large missing transverse energy, no identified charged leptons, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet tagged as coming from a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons. The measurement is based on a multidimensional template method, in a similar way to the top quark width measurement, and the top quark mass is measured to be Mtop = 172.32 ± 2.37 ± 0.98 GeV/c2 .

  19. Representing Simple Geometry Types in NetCDF-CF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, D. L.; Koziol, B. W.; Whiteaker, T. L.; Simons, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention is well-suited for representing gridded and point-based observational datasets. However, CF currently has no accepted mechanism for representing simple geometry types such as lines and polygons. Lack of support for simple geometries within CF has unintentionally excluded a broad set of geoscientific data types from NetCDF-CF data encodings. For example, hydrologic datasets often contain polygon watershed catchments and polyline stream reaches in addition to point sampling stations and water management infrastructure. The latter has an associated CF specification. In the interest of supporting all simple geometry types within CF, a working group was formed following an EarthCube workshop on Advancing NetCDF-CF [1] to draft a CF specification for simple geometries: points, lines, polygons, and their associated multi-geometry representations [2]. The draft also includes parametric geometry types such as circles and ellipses. This presentation will provide an overview of the scope and content of the proposed specification focusing on mechanisms for representing coordinate arrays using variable length or continuous ragged arrays, capturing multi-geometries, and accounting for type-specific geometry artifacts such as polygon holes/interiors, node ordering, etc. The concepts contained in the specification proposal will be described with a use case representing streamflow in rivers and evapotranspiration from HUC12 watersheds. We will also introduce Python and R reference implementations developed alongside the technical specification. These in-development, open source Python and R libraries convert between commonly used GIS software objects (i.e. GEOS-based primitives) and their associated simple geometry CF representation. [1] http://www.unidata.ucar.edu/events/2016CFWorkshop/[2] https://github.com/bekozi/netCDF-CF-simple-geometry

  20. Direct photon cross section with conversions at CDF

    OpenAIRE

    CDF collaboration

    2004-01-01

    We present a measurement of the isolated direct photon cross section in p (p) over bar collisions at roots=1.8 TeV and \\eta\\ lt 0.9 using data collected between 1994 and 1995 by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The measurement is based on events where the photon converts into an electron-positron pair in the material of the inner detector, resulting in a two track event signature. To remove pi(0)→gammagamma and eta→gammagamma events from the data we use a new background subtraction te...

  1. New results on W and Z0 at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassmann, H.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the progress made by W and Z 0 analysis at CDF are reported. Besides W and Z 0 mass measurements, W production cross section measurements, Z 0 and W charge asymmetry measurements are also described which makes it possible to determine the Weinberg angle. The preliminary result for the Weinberg angle is sin 2 Θ W =0.216±0.015±0.010. The results can be utilized to apply vector bosons increasingly as probes or tags for new investigations. (K.A.) 16 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Personal extrapolation of CDF test beam use to the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.

    1986-01-01

    The author's personal experience in test beam usage at CDF is used to predict SSC needs at the point of turn-on. It is concluded that the test beam demand will reflect the scale of effort involved in SSC detectors rather than the total number of them. Provision for later expansion is recommended. It is also recommended that the test beam facilities, as well as detector electronics, should reflect the available dynamic range; particularly, a single high energy beam derived from the SSC could be shared by several groups

  3. Search for new charged massive stable particles at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    We report on a general search at CDF for new particles which are electrically charged and sufficiently long-lived to allow detection (γ c τ >= 1m). Examples of such particles include free quarks, 4th generation leptons which are lighter than their neutrino, and sextet quarks. Their signature would be particles with high momentum but relatively low velocity, β Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation. Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03000.

  4. Inclusive jet cross sections and jet shapes at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainer, N.

    1991-09-01

    The inclusive jet cross section and jet shapes at √s = 1.8 TeV have been measured by CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. results are compared to recent next-to-leading order QCD calculations, which predict variation of the cross section with cone size, as well as variation of the jet shape with energy. A lower limit on the parameter Λ c , which characterize a contact interaction associated with quark sub-structure is determined to be 1400 GeV at the 95% confidence level. 3 refs., 4 figs

  5. Setup Analysis: Combining SMED with Other Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadnicka Dorota

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to propose the methodology for the setup analysis, which can be implemented mainly in small and medium enterprises which are not convinced to implement the setups development. The methodology was developed after the research which determined the problem. Companies still have difficulties with a long setup time. Many of them do nothing to decrease this time. A long setup is not a sufficient reason for companies to undertake any actions towards the setup time reduction. To encourage companies to implement SMED it is essential to make some analyses of changeovers in order to discover problems. The methodology proposed can really encourage the management to take a decision about the SMED implementation, and that was verified in a production company. The setup analysis methodology is made up of seven steps. Four of them concern a setups analysis in a chosen area of a company, such as a work stand which is a bottleneck with many setups. The goal is to convince the management to begin actions concerning the setups improvement. The last three steps are related to a certain setup and, there, the goal is to reduce a setup time and the risk of problems which can appear during the setup. In this paper, the tools such as SMED, Pareto analysis, statistical analysis, FMEA and other were used.

  6. The CDF calorimeter upgrade for RunIIb

    CERN Document Server

    Huston, J; Kuhlmann, S; Lami, S; Miller, R; Paoletti, R; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F

    2004-01-01

    The physics program at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider will continue to explore the high energy elementary particle physics until the LHC commissioning. The upgrade of the CDF calorimeter opens a new window for improving the jet energy resolution, important in finding various signals such as Higgs by correcting the energy loss in the dead material and adding information in the jet algorithms using charged particles. It plays an important role in soft electron tagging of b- jets and photon identification in SUSY. The upgrade of the CDF calorimeter includes: a) the replacement of slow gas detector on the front face of the Central Calorimeter with Preshower (CPR) based on 2cm thick scintillator tiles segmented in eta and Phi and read out by WLS fibers running into a groove on the surface of each tiles. The WLS fibers are placed to clear fibers after leaving the tiles; b) the replacement of the Central Crack Chamber (CCR) with 5mm thick scintillator tiles read with the same technique: To finalize the design parame...

  7. Measurement of ttbar forward-backward asymmetry at CDF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Early measurements of the forward-backward ttbar production asymmetry at CDF and D0 suggested significant asymmetries that have been interpreted as evidence for exotic gluon partners or new t-channel interactions. We present new measurements performed with 5 fb-1 of Tevatron ppbar collisions at Ecm = 1.96 TeV, recorded and analyzed at CDF. Significant inclusive asymmetries are observed in both the lepton+jets and the dilepton decay modes of the ttbar pair. In the dilepton mode, the asymmetry is observed in the reconstructed top rapidity, and in the lepton rapidity difference, which is independent of any top reconstruction. In the lepton plus jets sample, the full reconstruction of the top kinematics is used to measure the dependence of the asymmetry on the tt bar rapidity difference Delta(y) and the invariant mass M_(ttbar ) of the ttbar system. The asymmetry is found to be most significant at large Delta(y) and M_(ttbar) . For M_(ttbar) > 450 GeV/c2, the parton-level asymmetry in the t-tbar rest frame is...

  8. Search for new physics in trilepton events and limits on the associated chargino-neutralino production at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D’Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Vázquez, F.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2014-07-23

    We perform a search for new physics using final states consisting of three leptons and a large imbalance in transverse momentum resulting from proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. We use data corresponding to 5.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. Our main objective is to investigate possible new low-momentum (down to 5 GeV/c) multi-leptonic final states not investigated by LHC experiments. Relative to previous CDF analyses, we expand the geometric and kinematic coverage of electrons and muons and utilize tau leptons that decay hadronically. Inclusion of tau leptons is particularly important for supersymmetry (SUSY) searches. The results are consistent with standard-model predictions. By optimizing our event selection to increase sensitivity to the minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) SUSY model, we set limits on the associated production of chargino and neutralino, the SUSY partners of the electroweak gauge bosons. We exclude cross sections up to 0.1 pb and chargino masses up to 168 GeV/c2 at 95% CL, for a suited set of mSUGRA parameters. We also exclude a region of the two-dimensional space of the masses of the neutralino and the supersymmetric partner of the tau lepton, not previously excluded at the Tevatron.

  9. Filtering NetCDF Files by Using the EverVIEW Slice and Dice Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzelmann, Craig; Romañach, Stephanie S.

    2010-01-01

    Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) is a self-describing, machine-independent file format for storing array-oriented scientific data. It was created to provide a common interface between applications and real-time meteorological and other scientific data. Over the past few years, there has been a growing movement within the community of natural resource managers in The Everglades, Fla., to use NetCDF as the standard data container for datasets based on multidimensional arrays. As a consequence, a need surfaced for additional tools to view and manipulate NetCDF datasets, specifically to filter the files by creating subsets of large NetCDF files. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Joint Ecosystem Modeling (JEM) group are working to address these needs with applications like the EverVIEW Slice and Dice Tool, which allows users to filter grid-based NetCDF files, thus targeting those data most important to them. The major functions of this tool are as follows: (1) to create subsets of NetCDF files temporally, spatially, and by data value; (2) to view the NetCDF data in table form; and (3) to export the filtered data to a comma-separated value (CSV) file format. The USGS and JEM will continue to work with scientists and natural resource managers across The Everglades to solve complex restoration problems through technological advances.

  10. Visualizing NetCDF Files by Using the EverVIEW Data Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conzelmann, Craig; Romañach, Stephanie S.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, modelers in South Florida have started using Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) as the standard data container format for storing hydrologic and ecologic modeling inputs and outputs. With its origins in the meteorological discipline, NetCDF was created by the Unidata Program Center at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, in conjunction with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other organizations. NetCDF is a portable, scalable, self-describing, binary file format optimized for storing array-based scientific data. Despite attributes which make NetCDF desirable to the modeling community, many natural resource managers have few desktop software packages which can consume NetCDF and unlock the valuable data contained within. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Joint Ecosystem Modeling group, an ecological modeling community of practice, are working to address this need with the EverVIEW Data Viewer. Available for several operating systems, this desktop software currently supports graphical displays of NetCDF data as spatial overlays on a three-dimensional globe and views of grid-cell values in tabular form. An included Open Geospatial Consortium compliant, Web-mapping service client and charting interface allows the user to view Web-available spatial data as additional map overlays and provides simple charting visualizations of NetCDF grid values.

  11. System software design for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.; Bailey, M.

    1991-11-01

    An automated system for testing and performance evaluation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) data acquisition electronics is described. The SVX data acquisition chain includes the Fastbus Sequencer and the Rabbit Crate Controller and Digitizers. The Sequencer is a programmable device for which we developed a high level assembly language. Diagnostic, calibration and data acquisition programs have been developed. A distributed software package was developed in order to operate the modules. The package includes programs written in assembly and Fortran languages that are executed concurrently on the SVX Sequencer modules and either a microvax or an SSP. Test software was included to assist technical personnel during the production and maintenance of the modules. Details of the design of different components of the package are reported

  12. A Precise Measurement of the W Boson Mass with CDF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The W boson mass measurement probes quantum corrections to the W propagator, such as those arising from supersymmetric particles or Higgs bosons. The new measurement from CDF is more precise than the previous world average, providing a stringent constraint on the mass of the Higgs boson in the context of the Standard Model. I describe this measurement, performed with 2.2/fb of data using 1.1 million candidates in the electron and muon decay channels, with three kinematic fits in each channel. The measurement uses in-situ calibrations from cosmic rays, J/psi and Upsilon data, and W- and Z-boson decays, with multiple cross-checks including independent determinations of the Z boson mass in both channels. The W-boson mass is measured to be 80387 +- 19 MeV/c^2.

  13. CDF electroweak studies and the search for the top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, H.J.

    1994-02-01

    The second major run of the bar pp Fermilab Tevatron Collider ended on May 30. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988-1989 run. The author presents new results on electroweak physics, including the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections, and the charge asymmetry in W decay. He gives a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988-1989 data on W-γ production are also presented. The status of the search for the top quark in the dilepton modes is described. In addition a status report of the ongoing search in the lepton + jets mode is given

  14. Search for Penguin Decays of $B$ Mesons at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordas, Kostas [McGill U.

    2000-01-01

    Using a data sample of integrated luminosity $\\int$ Ldt = 28.9 $\\pm$ 1.2 $pb^{-1}$ of proton antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 TeV collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, we searched for "penguin" radiative decays of $B^0_d$ and $B^0_s$ mesons which involve the flavor-changing neutral-current transition of a $b$ quark into an $s$ quark with the emission of a photon, $b \\to s\\gamma$ . Speciffcally, we searched for the decays $B^0_d \\to K^{*0}$, $K^{*0} \\to K^+ \\pi^-$ and $B^0_s \\to \\phi\\gamma, \\phi \\to K^+ K^-$, as well as for the charge conjugate chains....

  15. Control of a high temperature DLTS setup

    OpenAIRE

    Marklund, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with a DLTS-setup and how this can be controlled. The controlling program is constructed in LABVIEW, where a previous built program measuring transients at varying pulses been handled and tried to be implemented for this setup. Parts of the program was implemented successfully, other part needs more work. The heater in the setup has further been connected directly to the sample. This one has been tested to see that the setup can handle the heat and that the difference betwee...

  16. Combination of CDF and D0 measurements of the $W$ boson helicity in top quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Michigan U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /INFN, Padua

    2012-02-01

    We report the combination of recent measurements of the helicity of the W boson from top quark decay by the CDF and D0 collaborations, based on data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of 2.7-5.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Combining measurements that simultaneously determine the fractions of W bosons with longitudinal (f{sub 0}) and right-handed (f{sub +}) helicities, we find f{sub 0} = 0.722 {+-} 0.081 [{+-} 0.062 (stat.) {+-} 0.052 (syst.)] and f{sub +} = -0.033 {+-} 0.046 [{+-} 0.034 (stat.) {+-} 0.031 (syst.)]. Combining measurements where one of the helicity fractions is fixed to the value expected in the standard model, we find f{sub 0} = 0.682 {+-} 0.057 [{+-} 0.035 (stat.) {+-} 0.046 (syst.)] and f{sub +} = ?0.015 {+-} 0.035 [{+-} 0.018 (stat.) {+-} 0.030 (syst.)]. The results are consistent with standard model expectations.

  17. CDF central detector installation. An efficient merge of digital photogrammetry and laser tracker metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, John A.; Wojcik, George J.

    2003-01-01

    Metrology for Run II at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) required a very complex geodetic survey. The Collision Hall network, surveyed with a Laser Tracker and digital level, provides a constraining network for the positioning of the Central Detector (CD). A part-based Laser Tracker network, which surrounded the 2,000-ton CD, was used as control for assembly. Subassembly surveys of the Detector's major components were measured as independent networks using Laser Tracker, V-STARS/S (Video-Simultaneous Triangulation And Resection System/Single camera) digital photogrammetry system, and BETS (Brunson Electronic Theodolite System) theodolite triangulation system. Each subassembly survey was transformed into and constrained by the part-based network. For roll-in, the CD part-based network was transformed into the Collision Hall network coordinate system. The CD was positioned in the Collision Hall using two Laser Trackers in 'stakeout mode.' This paper discusses the survey, adjustment, transformation, and precision of the various networks. (author)

  18. Search for WZ+ZZ Production with Missing Transverse Energy and b Jets at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poprocki, Stephen [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Observation of diboson processes at hadron colliders is an important milestone on the road to discovery or exclusion of the standard model Higgs boson. Since the decay processes happen to be closely related, methods, tools, and insights obtained through the more common diboson decays can be incorporated into low-mass standard model Higgs searches. The combined WW + WZ + ZZ diboson cross section has been measured at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes. In this thesis we take this one step closer to the Higgs by measuring just the WZ + ZZ cross section, exploiting a novel arti cial neural network based b-jet tagger to separate the WW background. The number of signal events is extracted from data events with large ET using a simultaneous t in events with and without two jets consistent with B hadron decays. Using 5:2 fb-1 of data from the CDF II detector, we measure a cross section of (p $\\bar{p}$ → WZ,ZZ) = 5:8+3.6 -3.0 pb, in agreement with the standard model.

  19. Event-building and PC farm based level-3 trigger at the CDF experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Anikeev, K; Furic, I K; Holmgren, D; Korn, A J; Kravchenko, I V; Mulhearn, M; Ngan, P; Paus, C; Rakitine, A; Rechenmacher, R; Shah, T; Sphicas, Paris; Sumorok, K; Tether, S; Tseng, J

    2000-01-01

    In the technical design report the event building process at Fermilab's CDF experiment is required to function at an event rate of 300 events/sec. The events are expected to have an average size of 150 kBytes (kB) and are assembled from fragments of 16 readout locations. The fragment size from the different locations varies between 12 kB and 16 kB. Once the events are assembled they are fed into the Level-3 trigger which is based on processors running programs to filter events using the full event information. Computing power on the order of a second on a Pentium II processor is required per event. The architecture design is driven by the cost and is therefore based on commodity components: VME processor modules running VxWorks for the readout, an ATM switch for the event building, and Pentium PCs running Linux as an operation system for the Level-3 event processing. Pentium PCs are also used to receive events from the ATM switch and further distribute them to the processing nodes over multiple 100 Mbps Ether...

  20. Search for resonances decaying to top and bottom quarks with the CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero [Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland). et al.

    2015-08-03

    We report on a search for charged massive resonances decaying to top (t) and bottom (b) quarks in the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.5 fb–1. No significant excess above the standard model background prediction is observed. We set 95% Bayesian credibility mass-dependent upper limits on the heavy charged-particle production cross section times branching ratio to tb. Using a standard model extension with a W' → tb and left-right-symmetric couplings as a benchmark model, we constrain the W' mass and couplings in the 300–900 GeV/c2 range. As a result, the limits presented here are the most stringent for a charged resonance with mass in the range 300–600 GeV/c2 decaying to top and bottom quarks.

  1. Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurwitz, Martina [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section in a semileptonic decay mode is presented. The measurement is carried out with 4.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. The main experimental challenge is identifying the signal in the overwhelming background from W+jets production. The modeling of the W+jets background is carefully studied and a matrix element technique is used to build a discriminant to separate signal and background. The cross section of WW + WZ production is measured to be σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → WW + WZ) = 16.5-3.0+3.3 pb, in agreement with the next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of 15.1 ± 0.9 pb. The significance of the signal is evaluated to be 5.4σ. This measurement is an important milestone in the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at the Tevatron.

  2. Improved mortar set-up technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, D

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available of the most cumbersome aspects of a mortar set-up, namely the use of aiming posts. The prismatic mirror and bearing dials is described as well as the required setup procedures. The measurement of effectiveness, of a mortar system, showed that the concept has...

  3. Virtual setup: application in orthodontic practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camardella, L.T.; Rothier, E.K.; Vilella, O.V.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Breuning, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A plaster dental model is a patient's traditional three-dimensional (3D) record. If the dental crowns from a plaster model are separated and positioned in wax, this setup of the crowns can be used to simulate orthodontic treatment. The traditional way to make this dental setup requires

  4. Split Scheduling with Uniform Setup Times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalekamp, F.; Sitters, R.A.; van der Ster, S.L.; Stougie, L.; Verdugo, V.; van Zuylen, A.

    2015-01-01

    We study a scheduling problem in which jobs may be split into parts, where the parts of a split job may be processed simultaneously on more than one machine. Each part of a job requires a setup time, however, on the machine where the job part is processed. During setup, a machine cannot process or

  5. Split scheduling with uniform setup times.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Schalekamp; R.A. Sitters (René); S.L. van der Ster; L. Stougie (Leen); V. Verdugo; A. van Zuylen

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a scheduling problem in which jobs may be split into parts, where the parts of a split job may be processed simultaneously on more than one machine. Each part of a job requires a setup time, however, on the machine where the job part is processed. During setup, a

  6. CRED 20m Gridded bathymetry of Necker Islands, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Necker Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Hawaii, USA. This netCDF includes multibeam bathymetry from...

  7. MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector quarterly Product in netCDF format V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector quarterly Product in netCDF format (Suggested Usage: This file contains one quarter of MISR Level 2 TC_STEREO...

  8. Measurement of the $b\\bar{b}$ di-jet cross section at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallecorsa, Sofia [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2007-01-01

    The dominant b production mechanism at the Tevatron is pair production through strong interactions. The lowest order QCD diagrams contain only b and $\\bar{b}$ quarks in the final state, for which momentum conservation requires the quarks to be produced back-to-back in azimuthal opening angle. When higher order QCD processes are considered, the presence of additional light quarks and gluons in the final state allows the azimuthal angle difference, Δφ, to spread. The next to leading order QCD calculation includes diagrams up to O(α$3\\atop{s}$) some of which, commonly known as flavor excitation and gluon splitting, provide a contribution of approximately the same magnitude as the lowest order diagrams. The study of b$\\bar{b}$ angular correlation gives predictions on the effective b quark production mechanisms and on the different contributions of the leading order and next-to-leading order terms. The first experimental results on inclusive bottom production at the Tevatron were strongly underestimated by the exact NLO QCD prediction. Later on this disagreement had been explained and reduced by theoretical and experimental improvements: new QCD calculations that implement the Fixed Order with Next-to- Leading-Logarithms calculation (FONLL); updated parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions; and more precise measurements. Previous measurements of b$\\bar{b}$ azimuthal angle correlation have, instead, reached various level of agreement with parton shower Monte Carlo and NLO predictions. Here we present a measurement of the b$\\bar{b}$ jet cross section and azimuthal angle correlation performed on about 260 pb-1 of data collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab from March 2002 to September 2004. This study extends the energy range investigated by previous analyses, measuring jet transverse energies (ET) up to values of about 220 GeV. It relies on the good tracking capabilities of the CDF detector both at the trigger level and

  9. Set-up for differential manometers testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratushnyj, M.I.; Galkin, Yu.V.; Nechaj, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    Set-up characteristic for controlling and testing metrological characteristics of TPP and NPP differential manometers with extreme pressure drop upto 250 kPa is briefly described. The set-up provides with automatic and manual assignment of values of gauge air pressure with errors of 0.1 and 0.25% correspondingly. The set-up is supplied with standard equipment to measure output signals. Set-up supply is carried out by a one-phase alternating current circuit with 220 V. Air supply is carried out by O.4-0.6 MPa. pressure of a pneumatic system. Application of the set-up increases operating efficiency 5 times while checking and turning differential manometers

  10. A study of tau decays of the W boson at CDF [Collider Detector at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, L.D.

    1990-01-01

    A report is given of a search for tau decays of the W boson in p bar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). A description of a hardware trigger specifically designed to enhance the number of events with tau decays is presented along with the results of a preliminary analysis of data taken during the 1988--89 run of CDF. 10 refs., 4 figs

  11. Implementing Network Common Data Form (netCDF) for the 3DWF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Form (netCDF) software package for Windows distributed by the Unidata Program Center at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) in...standard ASCII format, while the provided WRF model results are often in netCDF format. Therefore, the 3DWF model and its GUI needed to be modified so...Garvey D, Chang S, Cogan J. Application of a multigrid method to a mass consistent diagnostic wind model. J. Appl . Meteorology. 2005;44:1078–1089

  12. Search for $B_c \\to B_s \\pi$, $B_s \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ decay with the CDF Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Edwin Lloyd [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This analysis details the search for B$+\\atop{c}$ → B$0\\atop{s}$ π+, B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ decays, and the charge conjugate mode, using the CDF II detector at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The search is derived from a sample of 5.84 fb-1 of data from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions of √s = 1.96 TeV collected via J/Ψ trigger paths.

  13. Combination of CDF and D0 results on the mass of the top quark using up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tevatron Electroweak Working Group, Tevatron Group

    2014-07-10

    We summarize the current top-quark mass measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. We combine published Run I (1992--1996) results with the most precise published and preliminary Run II (2001--2011) measurements based on data corresponding to up to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions. Taking correlations of uncertainties into account, and combining the statistical and systematic uncertainties, the resulting preliminary Tevatron average mass of the top quark is $M_{top} = 174.34 \\pm 0.64 ~GeV/c^2$, corresponding to a relative precision of 0.37%.

  14. First Observation of Charmed Resonances in the $\\Lambda^0_b \\to \\Lambda^+_c \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ Inclusive Decay and Measurement of Their Relative Branching Ratios at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barria, Patrizia [Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2012-01-01

    We present the observation of the $\\Lambda^0_b$ decay into a $\\Lambda^+_c \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ final state, in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1:96 TeV. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, and correspond to 2:4 $fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. We fit the invariant mass distribution of the reconstructed candidates to extract a signal yield of 848 $\\pm$ 93 $\\Lambda^0_b$ into $\\Lambda^+_c \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$....

  15. Exclusion of exotic top-like quarks with -4/3 electric charge using jet-charge tagging in single-lepton ttbar events at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Luca, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-08-05

    We report on a measurement of the top-quark electric charge in ttbar events in which one W boson originating from the top-quark pair decays into leptons and the other into hadrons. The event sample was collected by the CDF II detector in sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and corresponds to 5.6 fb^(-1). We find the data to be consistent with the standard model and exclude the existence of an exotic quark with -4/3 electric charge and mass of the conventional top quark at the 99% confidence level.

  16. Digital setup for Doppler broadening spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizek, J; Vlcek, M; Prochazka, I

    2011-01-01

    New digital spectrometer for measurement of the Doppler shift of annihilation photons was developed and tested in this work. Digital spectrometer uses a fast 12-bit digitizer for direct sampling of signals from HPGe detectors. Analysis of sampled waveforms is performed off-line in software. Performance of the new digital setup was compared with its traditional analogue counterpart. Superior energy resolution was achieved in the digital setup. Moreover, the digital setup allows for a better control of the shape of detector signals. This enables to eliminate undesired signals damaged by pile-up effects or by ballistic deficit.

  17. A NEW MEASUREMENT OF THE W BOSON MASS FROM CDF

    CERN Multimedia

    Ashutosh Kotwal

    CDF has measured the W boson mass using approx. 200pb-1 of data collected at  s = 1.96 TeV. The preliminary result mW = 80.413 ± 0.034(stat) ± 0.034(syst) GeV supports and strengthens the hypothesis of a light Higgs boson, based on the global electroweak fit in the standard model framework. The total measurement uncertainty of 48 MeV makes this result the most precise single measurement of the W boson mass to date. The mass of the W boson is a very interesting quantity. Experimentally, it can be measured precisely because of the two-body decay of the W boson into a charged lepton and a neutrino. Theoretically, it receives self-energy corrections due to vacuum fluctuations involving virtual particles. Thus the W boson mass probes the particle spectrum in nature, including those particles that have yet to be observed directly. The hypothetical particle of most immediate interest is the Higgs boson, representing the quantum of the Higgs field that spontaneously acquires a vacuu...

  18. Error handling for the CDF Silicon Vertex Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Belforte, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Donati, S; Galeotti, S; Giannetti, P; Morsani, F; Punzi, G; Ristori, L; Spinella, F; Zanetti, A M

    2000-01-01

    The SVT online tracker for the CDF upgrade reconstructs two- dimensional tracks using information from the Silicon Vertex detector (SVXII) and the Central Outer Tracker (COT). The SVT has an event rate of 100 kHz and a latency time of 10 mu s. The system is composed of 104 VME 9U digital boards (of 8 different types) and it is implemented as a data driven architecture. Each board runs on its own 30 MHz clock. Since the data output from the SVT (few Mbytes/sec) are a small fraction of the input data (200 Mbytes/sec), it is extremely difficult to track possible internal errors by using only the output stream. For this reason several diagnostic tools have been implemented: local error registers, error bits propagated through the data streams and the Spy Buffer system. Data flowing through each input and output stream of every board are continuously copied to memory banks named Spy Buffers which act as built in logic state analyzers hooked continuously to internal data streams. The contents of all buffers can be ...

  19. The programmable analog circuitry of the CDF trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, H.; Amidei, D.; Campbell, M.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible trigger has been partially built to trigger the CDF, Colliding Detector at Fermilab. A programmable analog system can yield a large dynamic range of outputs. With suitable management it will control noise to achieve the high resolution and fast process necessary for such a trigger. The first level output will be delivered in three microseconds after a beam crossing. The system is designed to have a resolution of one part in one thousand. Analog processing, where just summing is involved, can handle many channels faster than an equivalent digital processor exhibiting the same resolution. As a result, this system will be much simpler with far less components. Digital intervention controls channel gain and bias. It also sets a comparison level, and includes or excludes individual channels in the various output summing networks that will determine the trigger result. The results of the analog processing which are input to the digital control include the value of the channel magnitude comparison, the sign of the results of the various sums and finally the fast flash analog to digital converter output values. A set of DACS are used to control the pedestal of the respective various sum networks

  20. Search for New Heavy Charged Vector Bosons at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    CDF Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    We present the preliminary results of a search for new heavy charged vector bosons using 110 pb-1 of data collected with the CDF detector during the 1992--95 Tevatron collider runs at Fermilab. We identify candidate events which contain an electron and a neutrino with high transverse energies and search for mass peaks in the eν transverse mass spectra. We also identify candidate events which contain a W boson decaying via W arrow e ν and at least two jets with transverse energy ET >= 20 GeV. The invariant mass spectra for the W + two jets and jet-jet combinations are searched for peaks. We obtain upper limits on σ cdot Br for new heavy charged vector boson production. *We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation. Supported by U.S. NSF PHY-9406402.

  1. Search for New Particles Decaying to Dijets at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Fortney, Lloyd R.; Harris, Robert M.

    1996-05-01

    We present a search for new particles decaying to dijets using CDF data from the 1992-3 and 1993-5 runs. The dijet mass spectrum extends from 180 GeV/c^2 to about 1 TeV/c^2. Fitting the data to a smooth background function plus a mass resonance, we obtain prelimary upper limits on the cross section for new particles as a function of mass. We use this to set mass limits on axigluons, excited quarks, technirhos and other new particles. We also search the dijet angular distributions for indications of new physics. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG05-91ER40665. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03000. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  2. Measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon production cross section at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deluca Silberberg, Carolina [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-04-01

    In this thesis we present the measurement of the inclusive isolated prompt photon cross section with a total integrated luminosity of 2.5 fb-1 of data collected with the CDF Run II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The prompt photon cross section is a classic measurement to test perturbative QCD (pQCD) with potential to provide information on the parton distribution function (PDF), and sensitive to the presence of new physics at large photon transverse momentum. Prompt photons also constitute an irreducible background for important searches such as H → γγ, or SUSY and extra-dimensions with energetic photons in the final state. The Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, U.S.A.) is currently the hadron collider that operates at the highest energies in the world. It collides protons and antiprotons with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The CDF and the D0 experiments are located in two of its four interaction regions. In Run I at the Tevatron, the direct photon production cross section was measured by both CDF and DO, and first results in Run II have been presented by the DO Collaboration based on 380 pb-1. Both Run I and Run II results show agreement with the theoretical predictions except for the low pTγ region, where the observed and predicted shapes are different. Prompt photon production has been also extensively measured at fixed-target experiments in lower pTγ ranges, showing excess of data compared to the theory, particularly at high xT. From an experimental point of view, the study of the direct photon production has several advantages compared to QCD studies using jets. Electromagnetic calorimeters have better energy resolution than hadronic calorimeters, and the systematic uncertainty on the photon absolute energy scale is smaller. Furthermore, the determination of the photon kinematics does not require the use of jet algorithms. However, the measurements using photons

  3. Regulation of HIF-1-Alpha, miR-200, and Markers of Cancer Stem Cells by CDF Under Hypoxic Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    the formation of prostaspheres, and CSC signature genes in PCa cells. Furthermore, we examined the effect of a novel curcumin -derived analogue (CDF...LNCap) cells. The treatment with CDF, a novel Curcumin -derived analog previously showing an anti-tumor effect in vivo, inhibits the productions of...condition. ● Our novel curcumin -derived analog CDF inhibits cell survival, clonogenicity, cell migration, invasion, angiogenesis, and the self

  4. A setup for active fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    A setup for active fault diagnosis (AFD) of parametric faults in dynamic systems is formulated in this paper. It is shown that it is possible to use the same setup for both open loop systems, closed loop systems based on a nominal feedback controller as well as for closed loop systems based...... on a reconfigured feedback controller. This will make the proposed AFD approach very useful in connection with fault tolerant control (FTC). The setup will make it possible to let the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant controller remain unchanged after a change in the feedback controller. The setup for AFD...... is based on the YJBK (after Youla, Jabr, Bongiorno and Kucera) parameterization of all stabilizing feedback controllers and the dual YJBK parameterization. It is shown that the AFD is based directly on the dual YJBK transfer function matrix. This matrix will be named the fault signature matrix when...

  5. Experimental Setups for Single Event Effect Studies

    OpenAIRE

    N. H. Medina; V. A. P. Aguiar; N. Added; F. Aguirre; E. L. A. Macchione; S. G. Alberton; M. A. G. Silveira; J. Benfica; F. Vargas; B. Porcher

    2016-01-01

    Experimental setups are being prepared to test and to qualify electronic devices regarding their tolerance to Single Event Effect (SEE). A multiple test setup and a new beam line developed especially for SEE studies at the São Paulo 8 UD Pelletron accelerator were prepared. This accelerator produces proton beams and heavy ion beams up to 107Ag. A Super conducting Linear accelerator, which is under construction, may fulfill all of the European Space Agency requirements to qualify electronic...

  6. NCWin — A Component Object Model (COM) for processing and visualizing NetCDF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxun; Chen, J.M.; Price, D.T.; Liu, S.

    2005-01-01

    NetCDF (Network Common Data Form) is a data sharing protocol and library that is commonly used in large-scale atmospheric and environmental data archiving and modeling. The NetCDF tool described here, named NCWin and coded with Borland C + + Builder, was built as a standard executable as well as a COM (component object model) for the Microsoft Windows environment. COM is a powerful technology that enhances the reuse of applications (as components). Environmental model developers from different modeling environments, such as Python, JAVA, VISUAL FORTRAN, VISUAL BASIC, VISUAL C + +, and DELPHI, can reuse NCWin in their models to read, write and visualize NetCDF data. Some Windows applications, such as ArcGIS and Microsoft PowerPoint, can also call NCWin within the application. NCWin has three major components: 1) The data conversion part is designed to convert binary raw data to and from NetCDF data. It can process six data types (unsigned char, signed char, short, int, float, double) and three spatial data formats (BIP, BIL, BSQ); 2) The visualization part is designed for displaying grid map series (playing forward or backward) with simple map legend, and displaying temporal trend curves for data on individual map pixels; and 3) The modeling interface is designed for environmental model development by which a set of integrated NetCDF functions is provided for processing NetCDF data. To demonstrate that the NCWin can easily extend the functions of some current GIS software and the Office applications, examples of calling NCWin within ArcGIS and MS PowerPoint for showing NetCDF map animations are given.

  7. СЦИНТИЛЛЯЦИОННЫЕ ДЕТЕКТОРЫ УСТАНОВКИ CDF П В ЭКСПЕРИМЕНТАХ ПО ФИЗИКЕ ТЯЖЁЛЫХ КВАРКОВ НА ТЭВА ТРОНЕ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chokheli, Davit [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2007-01-01

    The author presents the following: 1) Development and creation from scratch of scintillation detectors system for CDF II muon trigger using more than 1140 scintillation counters different type and size; development of the contol and monitoring software/hardware systems; 2) Development and creation of updgraded preshower CPR II for electromagnet calorimeter CDF II with better segmentation by pseydorapidity (10 times more against previous version) to be able collect the data with increased Tevatron luminosity; 3) Aging study for scintillation counters used at CDF II and its long-term efficiency estimation; and 4) Research of the possibility to use the proposed new muon trigger at $1.0 \\leq \\mu \\leq 1.25$ region by pseudorapidity by creation of additional layers of muon scintillation detectors.

  8. Determination of Delta m(d) and absolute calibration of flavor taggers for the Delta m(s) analysis, in fully reconstructed decays at the CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Jonatan Piedra [University of Cantabria, (Spain). Inst. of Physics

    2005-04-21

    The new trigger processor, the Silicon Vertex Tracking (SVT), has dramatically improved the B physics capabilities of the upgraded CDF II Detector; for the first time in a hadron collider, the SVT has enabled the access to non-lepton-triggered B meson decays. Within the new available range of decay modes, the B$0\\atop{s}$ → D$-\\atop{s}$π+ signature is of paramount importance in the measurement of the Δms mixing frequency. The analysis reported here is a step towards the measurement of this frequency; two where our goals: carrying out the absolute calibration of the opposite side flavor taggers, used in the Δms measurement; and measuring the B$0\\atop{d}$ mixing frequency in a B → Dπ sample, establishing the feasibility of the mixing measurement in this sample whose decay-length is strongly biased by the selective SVT trigger. We analyze a total integrated luminosity of 355 pb-1 collected with the CDF II Detector. By triggering on muons, using the conventional di-muon trigger; or displaced tracks, using the SVT trigger, we gather a sample rich in bottom and charm mesons.

  9. Dipole orientation effects in rare-earth doped CdF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capelletti, R.; Fermi, F.; Okuno, E.

    1974-01-01

    A number of experiences carried out by means of ITC technique in the temperature range 80-200K shows unequivocally that n.n. Rare Earth-Fluorine Insterstitial (RE-FI) dipole reorientation occurs in CdF 2 : Eu, resolving the puzzle of the lack of this kind of relaxation in trivalent ions doped CdF 2 . The activation energy for orientation (epsilon = 0,40 eV) and the preexponential factor (Tauo = 10 -12 s) are evaluated for the principal ITC peak (T(sub) M = 152.5K) discussed and compared with the analogous parameters in Eu doped Ca and Sr fluorides. Other ITC peaks at 168 and 186 K are also analyzed. A parallel study on CdF 2 : Gd shows that eletronic effects are not negligible and can mask dispolar relaxations. The difference between Eu and Gd is discussed

  10. A Study of NetCDF as an Approach for High Performance Medical Image Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnus, Marcone; Prado, Thiago Coelho; Von Wangenhein, Aldo; De Macedo, Douglas D J; Dantas, M A R

    2012-01-01

    The spread of telemedicine systems increases every day. The systems and PACS based on DICOM images has become common. This rise reflects the need to develop new storage systems, more efficient and with lower computational costs. With this in mind, this article discusses a study for application in NetCDF data format as the basic platform for storage of DICOM images. The study case comparison adopts an ordinary database, the HDF5 and the NetCDF to storage the medical images. Empirical results, using a real set of images, indicate that the time to retrieve images from the NetCDF for large scale images has a higher latency compared to the other two methods. In addition, the latency is proportional to the file size, which represents a drawback to a telemedicine system that is characterized by a large amount of large image files.

  11. Optymisation of equipment setup processes in enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Grzybowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast equipment setup in a machine on production line is the key precondition to increase the fl exibility of the production. Methodology of SMED (Single Minute Exchange of Die is an example which allows reducing the time of setup practically to the minimum. The article presents the theoretical bases and required rules as well as case study conducted in one of chosen enterprises. This paper also answers the question if SMED methodology is applicable in metallurgical sector, presenting the example of shortening the time between the production of various metallurgical products manufactured in the machine for continuous casting of steel (COS in Polish.

  12. Braneworld setup and embedding in teleparallel gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behboodi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct the setup of a five-dimensional braneworld scenario in teleparallel gravity. Both cases of Minkowski and Friedmann–Robertson–Walker branes embedded in anti-de Sitter bulk are studied and the effective 4D action were studied. 4-dimensional local Lorentz invariance is found to be recovered in both cases. However, due to different junction conditions, the equations governing the 4D cosmological evolution differ from general relativistic case. Using the results of Ref. [13], we consider a simple inflationary scenario in this setup. The inflation parameters are found to be modified compared to general relativistic case.

  13. Testing the Technicolor Interpretation of CDF's Dijet Excess at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichten, Estia; Lane, Kenneth; Martin, Adam; Pilon, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Under the assumption that the dijet excess seen by the CDF Collaboration near 150 Gev in Wjj production is due to the lightest technipion of the low-scale technicolor process $\\rho_T \\rightarrow W \\pi_T$, we study its observability in LHC detectors with 1--20 inverse femtobarns of data. We describe interesting new kinematic tests that can provide independent confirmation of this LSTC hypothesis. We find that cuts similar to those employed by CDF, and recently by ATLAS, cannot confirm the dijet signal. We propose cuts tailored to the LSTC hypothesis and its backgrounds at the LHC that may reveal $\\rho_T \\rightarrow \\ell\

  14. Investigation of tt in the full hadronic final state at CDF with a neural network approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; Busetto, G; Castro, A; Dusini, S; Lazzizzera, I; Wyss, J

    2001-01-01

    In this work we present the results of a neural network (NN) approach to the measurement of the tt production cross-section and top mass in the all-hadronic channel, analyzing data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. We have used a hardware implementation of a feedforward neural network, TOTEM, the product of a collaboration of INFN (Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare)-IRST (Istituto per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica)-University of Trento, Italy. Particular attention has been paid to the evaluation of the systematics specifically related to the NN approach. The results are consistent with those obtained at CDF by conventional data selection techniques. (38 refs).

  15. Bs Physics at LEP, SLD, and CDF Delta m_s and Delta Gamma_s

    CERN Document Server

    Boix, G

    2001-01-01

    The current status of the experimental knowledge of $\\Bs$ meson physics is reviewed. Results from LEP and CDF on the width difference $\\dgs$ are presented, the corresponding average is found to be in good agreement with the present theoretical estimation. The $\\Bs$ oscillations have not yet been resolved, despite the progress recently achieved by SLD and ALEPH. The world combination, including results from the LEP experiments, SLD and CDF, is presented, together with the expected and observed lower limit on the $\\Bs$ oscillation frequency. A tantalizing hint of an oscillation is observed around $\\dms\\sim17 \\psin$, near future results could increase the significance of this hint.

  16. The Top...is it There? A Survey of the CDF and D0 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollestrup, A. V.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes: (1) features that the top quark must have if it exists, and how those features are inferred from various experiments; (2) how top quarks may be produced; (3) what must be accomplished to directly establish that the top quark has been produced in an experiment. Relevant features of the CDF and D0 detectors are described, as are methods useful in a top-quark search for identifying and detecting various kinds of particles. The author reviews data found by both CDF and D0, and discusses differences between the detectors and the data found with each.

  17. Combination of the CDF and D0 Effective Leptonic Electroweak Mixing Angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The Tevatron Electroweak Working Group

    2016-07-31

    CDF and D0 have measured the effective leptonic weak mixing angle $sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_{eff}$ , using their full Tevatron datasets. This note describes the Tevatron combination of these measurements, and the zfitter standard model-based inference of the on-shell electroweak mixing angle $sin^2 \\theta_W$, or equivalently, the W-boson mass. The combination of CDF and D0 results yields: $sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_ {eff}$ = 0.23179 ± 0.00035, and $sin^2 \\theta_W$ = 0.22356 ± 0.00035, or equivalently, $M_W$(indirect) = 80.351 ± 0.018 GeV/$c^2$.

  18. Inclusive Jet Production from Pbar P Collisions at SQRTS=630 GEV in the Cdf Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopian, Alexander

    1996-05-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the inclusive jet cross section from pbar p collisions at √ s= 630 GeV, measured using the CDF detector. We compare these results with previous CDF measurements at 546 and 1800 GeV. ^Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG02-91ER-40651. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy; the National Science Foundation; the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy; the Ministry of Science, Culture and Education of Japan; the A.P. Sloan Foundation, and the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung.

  19. Mixing and CP violation in the BS0 meson system at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giovanni, G.P.

    2008-01-01

    The two analyses presented in the thesis, the B s 0 mixing analysis and the B s 0 → J/ψφ angular analysis, share most of the technical implementations and features. Thus, my choice was to pursue in parallel the common aspects of the analyses, avoiding, whenever possible, repetitions. Each Chapter is split in two parts, the first one dedicated to the B s 0 mixing analysis and the second one describing the angular analysis on the B s 0 → J/ψφ decay mode. They are organized as follows. In Chapter 1 we present the theoretical framework of the B s 0 neutral mesons system. After a general introduction on the Standard Model, we focus on the quantities which are relevant to the Δm s measurement and the CP violation phenomena, underlying the details concerning the study of pseudo-scalar to vector vector decays, P → VV, which allow to carry out an angular analysis. A discussion on the implication of the measurements performed in the search of physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. The accelerator facilities and the CDF-II detector are reported in Chapter 2. While describing the detector, more emphasis is given to the components fundamental to perform B physics analyses at CDF. The Chapter 3 is focused on the reconstruction and selection of the data samples. The Chapter starts with a description of the on-line trigger requirements, according to the B s 0 sample considered, followed by the offline selection criteria implemented to reconstruct B s 0 semileptonic and hadronic decays, fully and partially reconstructed, for the B s 0 mixing analysis, as well as the B s 0 → J/ψφ decay mode for the angular analysis. The subsequent Chapter 4 is dedicated to the revision of the technical ingredients needed in the final analyses. The B s 0 mixing elements are firstly described. The methodology historically used in the oscillation searches, the 'amplitude scan', is here introduced together with the calibration of the proper-decay-time resolution and the flavor

  20. ASD FieldSpec Calibration Setup and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Dan

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) Fieldspec Calibration Setup and Techniques. The topics include: 1) ASD Fieldspec FR Spectroradiometer; 2) Components of Calibration; 3) Equipment list; 4) Spectral Setup; 5) Spectral Calibration; 6) Radiometric and Linearity Setup; 7) Radiometric setup; 8) Datadets Required; 9) Data files; and 10) Field of View Measurement. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  1. The CDF Central Electromagnetic Calorimeter for Proton - Anti-proton Collision Experiment at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamon, Teruki [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    1986-06-01

    The CDF central electromagnetic calorimeter modules were calibrated with test beam and cosmic ray muons. It is found that (a) the modules are identical to each other by 1 % on the response map and (b) the uncertaity on the measurement of the energy of showering particle is better than 1.1 % in the 85 % of whole area.

  2. Recent results on QCD at the Tevatron (CDF and D0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meschi, E.

    1993-11-01

    In the last run the Tevatron collider delivered an integrated luminosity of 29.9 pb -1 to CDF and D0. We describe here some preliminary result from analyses of relevant QCD processes in the 1992--1993 data from the two experiments

  3. Search for the Higgs Boson in the $ZH\\to\\mu^+\\mu^- b\\bar{b}$ Channel at CDF Using Novel Multivariate Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilot, Justin R. [Ohio State U.

    2011-01-01

    We present a search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson using the process $ZH\\to\\mu^+\\mu^- b\\bar{b}$. We use a dataset corresponding to 9.2 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity from proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, collected with the CDF II detector. This analysis benefits from several new multivariate techniques that have not been used in previous analyses at CDF. We use a multivariate function to select muon candidates, increasing signal acceptance while simultaneously keeping fake rates small. We employ an inclusive trigger selection to further increase acceptance. To enhance signal discrimination, we utilize a multi-layer approach consisting of expert discriminants. This multi-layer discriminant method helps isolate the two main classes of background events, $t\\bar{t}$ and $Z$+jets production. It also includes a flavor separator, to distinguish light flavor jets from jets consistent with the decay of a $B$-hadron. Wit h this novel multi-layer approach, we proceed to set limits on the $ZH$ production cross section times branching ratio. For a Higgs boson with mass 115 GeV/$c^2$, we observe (expect) a limit of 8.0 (4.9) times the Standard Model prediction.

  4. The Remote NetCDF Invocation (RNI) middleware platform. Making Scientific Datasets Available for Ubiquitous Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zednik, S. T.; Garcia, J. H.; Fox, P.; West, P.

    2007-12-01

    Large holding of NetCDF data, such as in the Earth System Grid (ESG) or the Community Spectro-Polarimetric Analysis Center (CSAC) are vast repositories of data, making it if not impossible, but impractical for users to download and replicate the complete database. Furthermore, each individual dataset is a combination of hundreds of individual NetCDF files. Therefore requesting such dataset for analysis is an expensive transaction for individuals seeking ubiquitous computing. Since the current state of networks can provide for access to individual pieces of the dataset with enough reliability and speed, we seek a solution that will avoid the bulk download of the dataset required a priori, and will instead request needed portions of the dataset just-in-time. In order to achieve this, we modify the NetCDF C library to execute Remote NetCDF Invocation (RNI), that is, to operate on remote dataset, over HTTPS and gsiFTP protocols, individual NetCDF Application Programming Interface (API) calls as if they were local. This mechanism resembles the well known Remote Procedure Call (RPC) yet it radically differs on the binding between local and remote operations. Our design is based on the extensibility mechanism provided by the popular OPeNDAP Back-End Server (BES) middleware platform with Globus GridFTP and Apache modules acting as the proxy transport mechanism (binding) between the local and remote transactions. This paper describes the architecture as well as how we address the technical challenges for the complete system.

  5. Aligning the μs-ALEX Setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapanidis, Achillefs; Majumdar, Devdoot; Heilemann, Mike; Nir, Eyal; Weiss, Shimon

    2015-11-02

    To achieve single-molecule sensitivity and thus have the ability to detect single diffusing fluorophores, careful alignment of the microsecond-alternating laser excitation (μs-Alex) setup is crucial. The following protocol describes routine alignment for 2c-ALEX (532 nm/635 nm) with spectral windows G(550-620)R(650-750). © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Measurements of operator performance - an experimental setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netland, K.

    1980-01-01

    The human has to be considered as an important element in a process control system, even if the degree of automation is extremely high. Other elements, e.g. computer, displays, etc., can to a large extent be described and quantified. The human (operator), is difficult to describe in a precise way, and it is just as difficult to predict his thinking and acting in a control room environment. Many factors influence his performance, such as: experience, motivation, level of knowledge, training, control environment, job organization, etc. These factors have to a certain degree to be described before guidelines for design of the man-process interfaces and the control room layout can be developed. For decades, the psychological science has obtained knowledge of the human mind and behaviour. This knowledge should have the potential of a positive input on our effort to describe the factors influencing the operator performance. Even if the human is complex, a better understanding of his thinking and acting, and a more precise description of the factors influencing his performance can be obtained. At OECD Halden Reactor Project an experimental set-up for such studies has been developed and implemented in the computer laboratory. The present set-up includes elements as a computer- and display-based control room, a simulator representing a nuclear power plant, training programme for the subjects, and methods for the experiments. Set-up modules allow reconfiguration of experiments. (orig./HP)

  7. The current status of the MASHA setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedeneev, V. Yu., E-mail: vvedeneyev@gmail.com; Rodin, A. M.; Krupa, L.; Belozerov, A. V.; Chernysheva, E. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Gulyaev, A. V.; Gulyaeva, A. V.; Kamas, D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (Russian Federation); Kliman, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Slovakia); Komarov, A. B.; Motycak, S.; Novoselov, A. S.; Salamatin, V. S.; Stepantsov, S. V.; Podshibyakin, A. V.; Yukhimchuk, S. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (Russian Federation); Granja, C.; Pospisil, S. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics (Czech Republic)

    2017-11-15

    The MASHA setup designed as the mass-separator with the resolving power of about 1700, which allows mass identification of superheavy nuclides is described. The setup uses solid ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) method. In the present article the upgrade of some parts of MASHA are described: target box (rotating target + hot catcher), ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance, data acquisition, beam diagnostics and control systems. The upgrade is undertaken in order to increase the total separation efficiency, reduce the separation time, of the installation and working stability and make possible continuous measurements at high beam currents. Ion source efficiency was measured in autonomous regime with using calibrated gas leaks of Kr and Xe injected directly to ion source. Some results of the first experiments for production of radon isotopes using the multi-nucleon transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca+{sup 242}Pu are described in the present article. The using of TIMEPIX detector with MASHA setup for neutron-rich Rn isotopes identification is also described.

  8. Spectroscopy of Orbitally Excited $B_{s}$ Mesons with the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heck, Martin [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany)

    2009-07-17

    The aim of particle physics is to understand the properties of matter on the most fundamental level. The two main questions are: ’What are the constituents of matter?’ and ’How do those constituents interact with one another?’ One approach used throughout the experimental testing of theories of matter, that aim to answer these questions, is the study of the energy spectrum of excited states. Especially in cases of simple configurations as found in the hydrogenium atom, the potential energy related to an interaction can be studied. In chapter 2 I describe basics of the Standard Model related to the study of orbitally excited mesons made of a b- and an s-quark [Bs], theoretical predictions, and results of previous experiments. In chapter 3 one can find a description of the experiment used to collect the data. In chapter 4 the important tools used in my analysis are explained. The following chapter 5 describes the first core of the analysis, the reconstruction and selection, before in chapter 6 the fits to the data, and the considered systematic uncertainties are presented.

  9. B Flavour Tagging with Artificial Neural Networks for the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Andreas [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (Germany)

    2010-01-29

    One of the central questions arising from human curiosity has always been what matter is ultimately made of, with the idea of some kind of elementary building-block dating back to the ancient greek philosophers. Scientific activities of multiple generations have contributed to the current best knowledge about this question, the Standard Model of particle physics. According to it, the world around us is composed of a small number of stable elementary particles: Electrons and two different kinds of quarks, called up and down quarks. Quarks are never observed as free particles, but only as bound states of a quark-antiquark pair (mesons) or of three quarks (baryons), summarized as hadrons. Protons and Neutrons, the constituents forming the nuclei of all chemical elements, are baryons made of up and down quarks. The electron and the electron neutrino - a nearly massless particle without electric charge - belong to a group called leptons. These two quarks and two leptons represent the first generation of elementary particles. There are two other generations of particles, which seem to have similar properties as the first generation except for higher masses, so there are six quarks and six leptons altogether. They were around in large amounts shortly after the beginning of the universe, but today they are only produced in high energetic particle collisions. Properties of particles are described by quantum numbers, for example charge or spin. For every type of particle, a corresponding antiparticle exists with the sign of all charges swapped, but similar properties otherwise. The Standard Model is a very successful theory, describing the properties of all known particles and the interactions between them. Many of its aspects have been tested in various experiments at very high precision. Although none of these experimental tests has shown a significant deviation from the corresponding Standard Model prediction, the theory can not be complete yet: Cosmological aspects like gravity, dark matter and dark energy are not described, and open questions remain in the sector of neutrino masses and neutrino oscillations. Also no answer has been given to the question of matter-antimatter asymmetry observed in the contemporary universe. Assuming that the Big Bang created equal amounts of matter and antimatter, there must be effects where nature treats matter and antimatter somehow different. This can happen through a mechanism called CP violation, which has been observed within the Standard Model, but not in the necessary order of magnitude. For all these reasons, the search for New Physics - theories beyond the Standard Model - is one of the main objectives of modern particle physics. In this global effort, flavour physics is the field of transitions between the different types of quarks, called quark flavours, wherein the examination of B meson oscillations and the search for CP violation in B{sub s}{sup 0} meson decays set the stage for the work presented in this thesis.

  10. Trigger Strategies for the Measurement of CP Violation in CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerri, Alessandro [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy)

    2001-10-01

    Measuring CP violation in its manifestations and comparing the results with the Standard Model predictions is one of the most important consistency tests of the standard model itself. This fact is so clear that contributing to this effort has become one of the main objectives in practically all the new generation experiments. Moreover, experiments have been specifically designed for this purpose. A few studies, which will be outlined in the following chapters have been detailed at a level sufficient to produce a well defined proposal for the trigger algorithm. The goal of our work will be that of investigating the use of these trigger templates as starting points for new analyses.

  11. Measurement of bottom-quark hadron masses in exclusive J/psi decays with the CDF detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachocou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Depedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Muelmenstaedt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nielsen, J; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stanitzki, M; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-05-26

    We measure the masses of b hadrons in exclusively reconstructed final states containing a J/psi --> mu-mu+ decay using 220 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II experiment. We find: m(B+) = 5279.10 +/- 0.41(stat.) +/- 0.36(sys.) MeV/c2, m(B0) = 5279.63 +/- 0.53(stat.) +/- 0.33(sys.) MeV/c2, m(B(s)0) = 5366.01 +/- 0.73(stat.) +/- 0.33(sys.) MeV/c2, m(lambda(b)0) = 5619.7 +/- 1.2(stat.) +/- 1.2(sys.) MeV/c2. m(B+) - m(B0) = -0.53 +/- 0.67(stat.) +/- 0.14(sys.) MeV/c2, m(B(s)0) - m(B0) = 86.38 +/- 0.90(stat.) +/- 0.06(sys.) MeV/c2, m(lambda(b)0) - m(B0) = 339.2 +/- 1.4(stat.) +/- 0.1(sys.) MeV/c2. The measurements of the B(s)0, lambda(b)0 mass, m(B(s)0) - m(B0) and m(lambda(b)0) - m(B0) mass difference are of better precision than the current world averages.

  12. MISR Level 3 Component Global Land product in netCDF format covering a day V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 Component Global Land Product in netCDF contains a daily statistical summary of directional hemispherical reflectance (DHR), photosynthetically...

  13. MISR Level 3 Component Global Land product in netCDF format covering a year V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 Yearly Component Global Land Product in netCDF contains a yearly statistical summary of directional hemispherical reflectance (DHR),...

  14. MISR Level 3 Component Global Land product in netCDF format covering a month V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 Monthly Component Global Land Product in netCDF contains a monthly statistical summary of directional hemispherical reflectance (DHR),...

  15. MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Global Albedo product in netCDF format covering a day V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Component Global Albedo Product in netCDF covering a day contains a statistical summary of column albedo 555 nanometer optical depth, and...

  16. MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Global Aerosol product in netCDF format covering a month V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Global Aerosol Product in netCDF format covering a month contains a statistical summary of column aerosol 555 nanometer optical depth, and...

  17. MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Global Albedo product in netCDF format covering a month V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Component Global Albedo Product in netCDF format covering a month contains a statistical summary of column albedo 555 nanometer optical...

  18. MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Global Cloud public Product in netCDF covering a month V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 Monthly FIRSTLOOK Component Global Cloud Product in netCDF format is a global summary of the Level 1 and Level 2 cloud parameters of interest...

  19. MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Global Aerosol product in netCDF format covering a day V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MISR Level 3 FIRSTLOOK Global Aerosol Product in netCDF format covering a day contains a statistical summary of column aerosol 555 nanometer optical depth, and a...

  20. Laboratory setup for temperature and humidity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Eimre, Kristjan

    2015-01-01

    In active particle detectors, the temperature and humidity conditions must be under constant monitoring and control, as even small deviations from the norm cause changes to detector characteristics and result in a loss of precision. To monitor the temperature and humidity, different kinds of sensors are used, which must be calibrated beforehand to ensure their accuracy. To calibrate the large number of sensors that are needed for the particle detectors and other laboratory work, a calibration system is needed. The purpose of the current work was to develop a laboratory setup for temperature and humidity sensor measurements and calibration.

  1. Advanced Laboratory Setup for Testing Offshore Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Dam; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a test setup for testing small-scale offshore foundations under realistic conditions of high pore-water pressure and high impact loads. The actuator, used for loading has enough capacity to apply sufficient force and displacement to achieve both drained and undrained failure...... modes for small-scale offshore foundations. Results from trial tests on two small-scale bucket foundations, subjected to transient or cyclic loading, are presented. Tests showed that cavitation limits the undrained bearing capacity. Hence, a high pore-water pressure is important for simulating offshore...

  2. Probe Selection in Multiprobe OTA Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Sun, Fan; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2014-01-01

    is costly, so finding ways to limit the number of probes while still reproducing the target channels accurately could make the test system both cheaper and simpler to implement. Several probe selection algorithms are presented in this paper to address this issue. The proposed techniques provide a probe...... selection framework for the channel emulation techniques published in the literature. Simulation results show that good channel emulation accuracy can be achieved with the selected subset of probes for the considered target channel models. The probe selection algorithm is further supported by measurement...... results in a practical multiprobe setup...

  3. Composite Inflation Setup and Glueball Inflation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bezrukov, Fedor; Channuie, Phongpichit; Jark Joergensen, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    We explore the paradigm according to which inflation is driven by a four-dimensional strongly coupled dynamics coupled non-minimally to gravity. We start by introducing the general setup, both in the metric and Palatini formulation, for generic models of composite inflation. We then analyze......-minimally to gravity. We demonstrate that it is possible to achieve successful inflation with the confining scale of the underlying Yang-Mills theory naturally of the order of the grand unified energy scale. We also argue that within the metric formulation models of composite inflation lead to a more consistent...

  4. Combination of CDF and D0 results on the mass of the top quark using up $9.7\\:{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tevatron Electroweak Working Group, Tevatron Group [Fermilab; Aaltonen, T. [Fermilab

    2016-08-05

    We summarize the current top quark mass (mt) measurements from the CDF and D0 experiments at Fermilab. We combine published results from Run I (1992–1996) with the most precise published and preliminary Run II (2001–2011) measurements based on $p\\bar{p}$ data corresponding to up to 9.7 fb$-$1 of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions. Taking correlations of uncertainties into account, and combining the statistical and systematic contributions in quadrature, the preliminary Tevatron average mass value for the top quark is mt = 174.30 ± 0.65 GeV/c2, corresponding to a relative precision of 0.37%.

  5. Search for gluino and squark production in multi-jets plus missing transverse energy final states at the Tevatron using the CDF detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portell i Bueso, Xavier [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain). Inst. for High Energy Physics

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of the search for squarks and gluinos in multiple jets plus missing transverse energy final states have been presented. No evidence of these new particles have been found in 371 pb-1 of CDF Run II data. New limits have been set which exclude gluino masses below 220 GeV and, in the region where M$\\tilde{g}$ ~ M$\\tilde{q}$, masses below 380 GeV/c2 are excluded. These limits are valid in a mSUGRA scenario with tan β = 5, A = 0 and μ < 0 assuming the lightest four squark flavours degenerate in mass. To obtain these results a careful study of the beam conditions and their contribution to events with ET final states has been performed. Special attention has been taken in studying the different SM backgrounds and their normalizations at NLO. Dedicated cuts have been introduced to remove the background processes and main discriminating variables have been optimized for different signal regions. The different systematic uncertainties have also been considered. This is the first time that this search is performed at CDF Run II and the results presented here show significant improvements with respect to the constraints from previous experiments. Thus, this analysis has established the procedure to continue searching for squarks and gluinos with the new data samples that CDF is collecting from Tevatron. Some improvements may also be implemented by considering other hadron final states with different jet multiplicities. This could help extending the sensitivity of the analysis to regions where gluino and squark masses are not similar. At the forthcoming LHC, the search for squarks and gluinos in this inclusive channel constitutes one of the first analyses to be performed. The ET and multiple jets final states are present in multiple decay modes of many models beyond the SM. The experience from Tevatron in working on an hadron collider environment will be useful for these kind of

  6. Updated Search for $B_s \\to \\mu^+$ mu- at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhr, Thomas; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol. /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2011-11-01

    The decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is very sensitive to contributions from new physics processes. Thus the Tevatron and LHC experiments are hunting for an observation of a B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} signal. In this article the updated search for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} by the CDF experiment is presented. The CDF result was received with great interest because an excess over the background expectation is seen, although of modest statistical significance and still consistent with the prediction of a standard model signal and other experimental results.

  7. B-physics at CDF and prospects for the next run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzel, H.

    1991-09-01

    Current CDF b-physics results are presented. The analysis is based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.4 pb -1 recorded with the CDF detector in 88--89 at the Fermilab Tevatron p bar p collider (√ bar s = 1.8 TeV). Preliminary results include the differential cross section dPt / dσ(b) , some reconstructed exclusive B-decays, a limit for the rare decay B 0 → μ + μ - and a measurement of B bar B-mixing parameters. Finally we will discuss the prospects concerning b-physics for the next data run which will start in February 1992. 12 refs., 8 figs

  8. GigaFitter: Performance at CDF and perspective for future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerio, S.; Annovi, A.; Basile, M.; Bettini, M.; Bucciantonio, M.; Catastini, P.; Cenni, J.; Crescioli, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Giannetti, P.; Giuliani, E.; Lucchesi, D.; Nicoletto, M.; Piendibene, M.; Rafanelli, N.; Volpi, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) at CDF is made of two pipelined processors: the Associative Memory finding low precision tracks and the Track Fitter refining the track quality with high-precision fits. We will describe the performance of a next generation track fitter, the GigaFitter, that performs more than a fit per nanosecond. It is going to be inserted parasitically in SVT to study its capabilities to improve data taking during the high luminosity CDF runs. This device is based on modern FPGA technology, rich of powerful DSP arrays, to reduce the track parameter reconstruction to few clock cycles and perform many fits in parallel. The goal of the design was to reduce significantly the processing time required for fitting and thus allow more time for the subsequent high resolution track-fitting. Preliminary results on the algorithm latency are presented. A future more power-full version of the GigaFitter intended for LHC experiments is also discussed.

  9. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40 Ca + and 88 Sr + ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40 Ca + is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10 -15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40 Ca + ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  10. A measurement of the b bar b cross section at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, I.

    1994-08-01

    We report a measurement of the b bar b cross section at CDF from the 1992--1993 run of the Tevatron Collider. Dimuon events from inclusive b → μ decays of b bar b pairs are used to obtain the cross section as a function of P T (b 1 ) and P T (b 2 ). The results are compared to the predictions of next-to-leading order QCD and are found to be consistent

  11. Has the substructure of quarks been found by the CDF experiment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akama, Keiichi [Saitama Medical Coll., Moroyama (Japan); Terazawa, Hidezumi

    1996-08-01

    The significant excess recently found by the CDF Collaboration in the inclusive jet cross section for jet transverse energies E{sub T} {>=} 200 GeV over current QCD predictions can be explained either by possible production of excited bosons (excited gluons, weak bosons, Higgs scalars, etc.) or by that of excited quarks. The masses of the excited boson and the excited quark are estimated to be around 1600 GeV and 500 GeV, respectively. (author)

  12. Search for anomalous production of multiple leptons in association with W and Z bosons at CDF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Amerio, S.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 9 (2012), "092001-1"-"092001-17" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : Z0 associated production * W associated production * TEVATRON * CDF * low momentum Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1202.1260

  13. Measurement of the top quark mass in the all-hadronic mode at CDF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Amerio, S.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 714, č. 1 (2012), s. 24-31 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : top mass * neural network * anti-p p scattering * Batavia TEVATRON * CDF * top pair production Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.569, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0370269312006338

  14. Unbinned maximum likelihood fit for the CP conserving couplings for W + photon production at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannon, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present an unbinned maximum likelihood fit as an alternative to the currently used fit for the CP conserving couplings W plus photon production studied at CDF. We show that a four parameter double exponential fits the E T spectrum of the photon very well. We also show that the fit parameters can be related to and by a second order polynomial. Finally, we discuss various conclusions we have reasoned from our results to the fit so far

  15. Has the substructure of quarks been found by the CDF experiment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi; Terazawa, Hidezumi.

    1996-08-01

    The significant excess recently found by the CDF Collaboration in the inclusive jet cross section for jet transverse energies E T ≥ 200 GeV over current QCD predictions can be explained either by possible production of excited bosons (excited gluons, weak bosons, Higgs scalars, etc.) or by that of excited quarks. The masses of the excited boson and the excited quark are estimated to be around 1600 GeV and 500 GeV, respectively. (author)

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson associated with a W Boson using Matrix Element Technique in the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez [Univ. of Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    In this thesis a direct search for the Standard Model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson at the CDF detector in the Tevatron is presented. This search contributes predominantly in the region of low mass Higgs region, when the mass of Higgs boson is less than about 135 GeV. The search is performed in a final state where the Higgs boson decays into two b quarks, and the W boson decays leptonically, to a charged lepton (it can be an electron or a muon) and a neutrino. This work is organized as follows. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the Standard Model theory of particle physics and presents the SM Higgs boson search results at LEP, and the Tevatron colliders, as well as the prospects for the SM Higgs boson searches at the LHC. The dataset used in this analysis corresponds to 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. That is the luminosity acquired between the beginning of the CDF Run II experiment, February 2002, and May 2009. The relevant aspects, for this analysis, of the Tevatron accelerator and the CDF detector are shown in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4 the particles and observables that make up the WH final state, electrons, muons, ET, and jets are presented. The CDF standard b-tagging algorithms to identify b jets, and the neural network flavor separator to distinguish them from other flavor jets are also described in Chapter 4. The main background contributions are those coming from heavy flavor production processes, such as those coming from Wbb, Wcc or Wc and tt. The signal and background signatures are discussed in Chapter 5 together with the Monte CArlo generators that have been used to simulate almost all the events used in this thesis. WH candidate events have a high-pT lepton (electron or muon), high missing transverse energy, and two or more than two jets in the final state. Chapter 6 describes the event selection applied in this analysis and the

  17. Developing a Hadoop-based Middleware for Handling Multi-dimensional NetCDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Yang, C. P.; Schnase, J. L.; Duffy, D.; Lee, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate observations and model simulations are collecting and generating vast amounts of climate data, and these data are ever-increasing and being accumulated in a rapid speed. Effectively managing and analyzing these data are essential for climate change studies. Hadoop, a distributed storage and processing framework for large data sets, has attracted increasing attentions in dealing with the Big Data challenge. The maturity of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) of cloud computing further accelerates the adoption of Hadoop in solving Big Data problems. However, Hadoop is designed to process unstructured data such as texts, documents and web pages, and cannot effectively handle the scientific data format such as array-based NetCDF files and other binary data format. In this paper, we propose to build a Hadoop-based middleware for transparently handling big NetCDF data by 1) designing a distributed climate data storage mechanism based on POSIX-enabled parallel file system to enable parallel big data processing with MapReduce, as well as support data access by other systems; 2) modifying the Hadoop framework to transparently processing NetCDF data in parallel without sequencing or converting the data into other file formats, or loading them to HDFS; and 3) seamlessly integrating Hadoop, cloud computing and climate data in a highly scalable and fault-tolerance framework.

  18. High precision neutron interferometer setup S18b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Lemmel, H.

    2011-01-01

    The present setup at S18 is a multi purpose instrument. It is used for both interferometry and a Bonse-Hart camera for USANS (Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering) spectroscopy with wide range tunability of wavelength. Some recent measurements demand higher stability of the instrument, which made us to propose a new setup dedicated particularly for neutron interferometer experiments requiring high phase stability. To keep both options available, we suggest building the new setup in addition to the old one. By extending the space of the present setup by 1.5 m to the upstream, both setups can be accommodated side by side. (authors)

  19. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  20. NetCDF4/HDF5 and Linked Data in the Real World - Enriching Geoscientific Metadata without Bloat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Alex; Car, Nicholas; Druken, Kelsey; Poudjom-Djomani, Yvette; Butcher, Stirling; Evans, Ben; Wyborn, Lesley

    2017-04-01

    NetCDF4 has become the dominant generic format for many forms of geoscientific data, leveraging (and constraining) the versatile HDF5 container format, while providing metadata conventions for interoperability. However, the encapsulation of detailed metadata within each file can lead to metadata "bloat", and difficulty in maintaining consistency where metadata is replicated to multiple locations. Complex conceptual relationships are also difficult to represent in simple key-value netCDF metadata. Linked Data provides a practical mechanism to address these issues by associating the netCDF files and their internal variables with complex metadata stored in Semantic Web vocabularies and ontologies, while complying with and complementing existing metadata conventions. One of the stated objectives of the netCDF4/HDF5 formats is that they should be self-describing: containing metadata sufficient for cataloguing and using the data. However, this objective can be regarded as only partially-met where details of conventions and definitions are maintained externally to the data files. For example, one of the most widely used netCDF community standards, the Climate and Forecasting (CF) Metadata Convention, maintains standard vocabularies for a broad range of disciplines across the geosciences, but this metadata is currently neither readily discoverable nor machine-readable. We have previously implemented useful Linked Data and netCDF tooling (ncskos) that associates netCDF files, and individual variables within those files, with concepts in vocabularies formulated using the Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) ontology. NetCDF files contain Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) links to terms represented as SKOS Concepts, rather than plain-text representations of those terms, so we can use simple, standardised web queries to collect and use rich metadata for the terms from any Linked Data-presented SKOS vocabulary. Geoscience Australia (GA) manages a large volume of diverse

  1. Effect of patient setup errors on simultaneously integrated boost head and neck IMRT treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Wu Qiuwen; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine dose delivery errors that could result from random and systematic setup errors for head-and-neck patients treated using the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients who participated in an intramural Phase I/II parotid-sparing IMRT dose-escalation protocol using the SIB treatment technique had their dose distributions reevaluated to assess the impact of random and systematic setup errors. The dosimetric effect of random setup error was simulated by convolving the two-dimensional fluence distribution of each beam with the random setup error probability density distribution. Random setup errors of σ = 1, 3, and 5 mm were simulated. Systematic setup errors were simulated by randomly shifting the patient isocenter along each of the three Cartesian axes, with each shift selected from a normal distribution. Systematic setup error distributions with Σ = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis were simulated. Combined systematic and random setup errors were simulated for σ = Σ = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis. For each dose calculation, the gross tumor volume (GTV) received by 98% of the volume (D 98 ), clinical target volume (CTV) D 90 , nodes D 90 , cord D 2 , and parotid D 50 and parotid mean dose were evaluated with respect to the plan used for treatment for the structure dose and for an effective planning target volume (PTV) with a 3-mm margin. Results: Simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT head-and-neck treatment plans were found to be less sensitive to random setup errors than to systematic setup errors. For random-only errors, errors exceeded 3% only when the random setup error σ exceeded 3 mm. Simulated systematic setup errors with Σ = 1.5 mm resulted in approximately 10% of plan having more than a 3% dose error, whereas a Σ = 3.0 mm resulted in half of the plans having more than a 3% dose error and 28% with a 5% dose error

  2. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt, Michael; Harneit, Wolfgang; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule

  3. Current status of GALS setup in JINR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemlyanoy, S., E-mail: zemlya@jinr.ru; Avvakumov, K., E-mail: kavvakumov@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (Russian Federation); Fedosseev, V. [CERN (Switzerland); Bark, R. [Nat. Research Foundation, iThemba LABS (South Africa); Blazczak, Z. [A. Mickiewicz University, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics (Poland)

    2017-11-15

    This is a brief report on the current status of the new GAs cell based Laser ionization Setup (GALS) at the Flerov Laboratory for Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna. GALS will exploit available beams from the U-400M cyclotron in low energy multi-nucleon transfer reactions to study exotic neutron-rich nuclei located in the “north-east” region of nuclear map. Products from 4.5 to 9 MeV/nucleon heavy-ion collisions, such as {sup 136}Xe on {sup 208}Pb, are thermalized and neutralized in a high pressure gas cell and subsequently selectively laser re-ionized. In order to choose the best scheme of ion extraction the results of computer simulations of two different systems are presented. The first off- and online experiment will be performed on osmium atoms that is regarded as a most convenient element for producing isotopes with neutron number in the vicinity of the magic N = 126.

  4. Simple optical setup implementation for digital Fourier transform holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Oliveira, G N; Rodrigues, D M C; Dos Santos, P A M

    2011-01-01

    In the present work a simple implementation of Digital Fourier Transform Holography (DFTH) setup is discussed. This is obtained making a very simple modification in the classical setup arquiteture of the Fourier Transform holography. It is also demonstrated the easy and practical viability of the setup in an interferometric application for mechanical parameters determination. The work is also proposed as an interesting advanced introductory training for graduated students in digital holography.

  5. NetCDF based data archiving system applied to ITER Fast Plant System Control prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.; Vega, J.; Ruiz, M.; De Arcas, G.; Barrera, E.; López, J.M.; Sanz, D.; Gonçalves, B.; Santos, B.; Utzel, N.; Makijarvi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Implementation of a data archiving solution for a Fast Plant System Controller (FPSC) for ITER CODAC. ► Data archiving solution based on scientific NetCDF-4 file format and Lustre storage clustering. ► EPICS control based solution. ► Tests results and detailed analysis of using NetCDF-4 and clustering technologies on fast acquisition data archiving. - Abstract: EURATOM/CIEMAT and Technical University of Madrid (UPM) have been involved in the development of a FPSC (Fast Plant System Control) prototype for ITER, based on PXIe (PCI eXtensions for Instrumentation). One of the main focuses of this project has been data acquisition and all the related issues, including scientific data archiving. Additionally, a new data archiving solution has been developed to demonstrate the obtainable performances and possible bottlenecks of scientific data archiving in Fast Plant System Control. The presented system implements a fault tolerant architecture over a GEthernet network where FPSC data are reliably archived on remote, while remaining accessible to be redistributed, within the duration of a pulse. The storing service is supported by a clustering solution to guaranty scalability, so that FPSC management and configuration may be simplified, and a unique view of all archived data provided. All the involved components have been integrated under EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), implementing in each case the necessary extensions, state machines and configuration process variables. The prototyped solution is based on the NetCDF-4 (Network Common Data Format) file format in order to incorporate important features, such as scientific data models support, huge size files management, platform independent codification, or single-writer/multiple-readers concurrency. In this contribution, a complete description of the above mentioned solution is presented, together with the most relevant results of the tests performed, while focusing in the

  6. NetCDF based data archiving system applied to ITER Fast Plant System Control prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R., E-mail: rodrigo.castro@visite.es [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid (Spain); Ruiz, M.; De Arcas, G.; Barrera, E.; Lopez, J.M.; Sanz, D. [Grupo de Investigacion en Instrumentacion y Acustica Aplicada, UPM, Madrid (Spain); Goncalves, B.; Santos, B. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, IPFN - Laboratorio Associado, IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Utzel, N.; Makijarvi, P. [ITER Organization, St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Implementation of a data archiving solution for a Fast Plant System Controller (FPSC) for ITER CODAC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data archiving solution based on scientific NetCDF-4 file format and Lustre storage clustering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPICS control based solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tests results and detailed analysis of using NetCDF-4 and clustering technologies on fast acquisition data archiving. - Abstract: EURATOM/CIEMAT and Technical University of Madrid (UPM) have been involved in the development of a FPSC (Fast Plant System Control) prototype for ITER, based on PXIe (PCI eXtensions for Instrumentation). One of the main focuses of this project has been data acquisition and all the related issues, including scientific data archiving. Additionally, a new data archiving solution has been developed to demonstrate the obtainable performances and possible bottlenecks of scientific data archiving in Fast Plant System Control. The presented system implements a fault tolerant architecture over a GEthernet network where FPSC data are reliably archived on remote, while remaining accessible to be redistributed, within the duration of a pulse. The storing service is supported by a clustering solution to guaranty scalability, so that FPSC management and configuration may be simplified, and a unique view of all archived data provided. All the involved components have been integrated under EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System), implementing in each case the necessary extensions, state machines and configuration process variables. The prototyped solution is based on the NetCDF-4 (Network Common Data Format) file format in order to incorporate important features, such as scientific data models support, huge size files management, platform independent codification, or single-writer/multiple-readers concurrency. In this contribution, a complete description of the above mentioned solution

  7. A new setup for the underground study of capture reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, C.; Costantini, H.; Lemut, A.; Limata, B.; Bemmerer, D.; Bonetti, R.; Broggini, C.; Campajola, L.; Cocconi, P.; Corvisiero, P.; Cruz, J.; D' Onofrio, A.; Formicola, A.; Fueloep, Z.; Gervino, G.; Gialanella, L.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyurky, G.; Loiano, A.; Imbriani, G.; Jesus, A.P.; Junker, M.; Musico, P.; Ordine, A.; Parodi, F.; Parolin, M.; Pinto, J.V.; Prati, P. E-mail: prati@ge.infn.it; Ribeiro, J.P.; Roca, V.; Rogalla, D.; Rolfs, C.; Romano, M.; Rossi-Alvarez, C.; Rottura, A.; Schuemann, F.; Somorjai, E.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H.P.; Vomiero, A.; Zavatarelli, S

    2002-08-21

    For the study of astrophysically relevant capture reactions in the underground laboratory LUNA a new setup of high sensitivity has been implemented. The setup includes a windowless gas target, a 4{pi} BGO summing crystal, and beam calorimeters. The setup has been recently used to measure the d(p,{gamma}){sup 3}He cross-section for the first time within its solar Gamow peak, i.e. down to 2.5 keV c.m. energy. The features of the optimized setup are described.

  8. A new setup for the underground study of capture reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Casella, C; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Bemmerer, D; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Campajola, L; Cocconi, P; Corvisiero, P; Cruz, J; D'Onofrio, A; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Gialanella, L; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, G; Loiano, A; Imbriani, G; Jesus, A P; Junker, M; Musico, P; Ordine, A; Parodi, F; Parolin, M; Pinto, J V; Prati, P; Ribeiro, J P; Roca, V; Rogalla, D; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Rossi-Alvarez, C; Rottura, A; Schuemann, F; Somorjai, E; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A; Zavatarelli, S

    2002-01-01

    For the study of astrophysically relevant capture reactions in the underground laboratory LUNA a new setup of high sensitivity has been implemented. The setup includes a windowless gas target, a 4 pi BGO summing crystal, and beam calorimeters. The setup has been recently used to measure the d(p,gamma) sup 3 He cross-section for the first time within its solar Gamow peak, i.e. down to 2.5 keV c.m. energy. The features of the optimized setup are described.

  9. Commissioning of the control and data acquisition electronics for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkaczyk, S.M.; Turner, K.J.; Nelson, C.A.; Shaw, T.M.; Wesson, T.R.; Bailey, M.W.; Kruse, M.C.; Castro, A.

    1991-11-01

    The SVX data acquisition system includes three components: a Fastbus Sequencer, an SVX Rabbit Crate Controller and a Digitizer. These modules are integrated into the CDF DAQ system and operate the readout chips. The results of the extensive functional tests of the SVX modules are reported. We discuss the stability of the Sequencers, systematic differences between them and methods of synchronization with the Tevatron beam crossings. The Digitizer ADC calibration procedure run on the microsequencer is described. The microsequencer code used for data taking and SVX chip calibration modes is described. Measurements of the SVX data scan time are discussed

  10. Electron identification in the CDF [Collider Detector at Fermilab] central calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proudfoot, J.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient identification of electrons both from W decay and QCD heavy flavour production has been achieved with the CDF Central Calorimeter, which is a lead -- scintillator plate calorimeter incorporating tower geometry. The fine calorimetry granularity (0.1 /times/ 0.26 in /eta/, /phi/ space) allows identification of electrons well within the typical jet cone and is wholly sufficient for the measurement of the isolation of electrons from W decay. With minor improvements, such a detector is a realistic option for electron identification in the central rapidity region at the SSC. 1 ref., 7 figs

  11. Mixing and CP violation in the B$0\\atop{s}$ meson system at CDF; Mélange et violation de CP dans le système des mésons B$0\\atop{s}$ à CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero [Univ. of Paris VI-VII (France)

    2008-01-01

    The two analyses presented in the thesis, the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ angular analysis, share most of the technical implementations and features. Thus, my choice was to pursue in parallel the common aspects of the analyses, avoiding, whenever possible, repetitions. Each Chapter is split in two parts, the first one dedicated to the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis and the second one describing the angular analysis on the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode. They are organized as follows. In Chapter 1 we present the theoretical framework of the B$0\\atop{s}$ neutral mesons system. After a general introduction on the Standard Model, we focus on the quantities which are relevant to the Δms measurement and the CP violation phenomena, underlying the details concerning the study of pseudo-scalar to vector vector decays, P → VV, which allow to carry out an angular analysis. A discussion on the implication of the measurements performed in the search of physics beyond the Standard Model is presented. The accelerator facilities and the CDF-II detector are reported in Chapter 2. While describing the detector, more emphasis is given to the components fundamental to perform B physics analyses at CDF. The Chapter 3 is focused on the reconstruction and selection of the data samples. The Chapter starts with a description of the on-line trigger requirements, according to the B$0\\atop{s}$ sample considered, followed by the offline selection criteria implemented to reconstruct B$0\\atop{s}$ semileptonic and hadronic decays, fully and partially reconstructed, for the B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing analysis, as well as the B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ψφ decay mode for the angular analysis. The subsequent Chapter 4 is dedicated to the revision of the technical ingredients needed in the final analyses. The B$0\\atop{s}$ mixing elements are firstly described. The methodology historically used in the oscillation searches, the 'amplitude scan', is here

  12. A Measurement of the B0$\\bar{B}$0 mixing Using Muon Pairs at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meschi, E. [Scuola Normale Superiore (SNS), Pisa (Italy)

    1995-10-01

    This thesis concerns the experimental study of B mesons (mesons containing a b quark) produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy of 1800 GeV. This work has been performed within the CDF collaboration. CDF is a general purpose detector located at Fermilab, in Batavia, which exploits the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider.

  13. Multifaceted role of cycling DOF factor 3 (CDF3) in the regulation of flowering time and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Alba-Rocio; Carrillo, Laura; Lasierra, Pilar; Nebauer, Sergio G; Dominguez-Figueroa, Jose; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Pollmann, Stephan; Granell, Antonio; Molina, Rosa-Victoria; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús; Medina, Joaquín

    2017-05-01

    DNA-binding with one finger (DOF)-type transcription factors are involved in many fundamental processes in higher plants, from responses to light and phytohormones to flowering time and seed maturation, but their relation with abiotic stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here, we identify the roles of CDF3, an Arabidopsis DOF gene in abiotic stress responses and developmental processes like flowering time. CDF3 is highly induced by drought, extreme temperatures and abscisic acid treatment. The CDF3 T-DNA insertion mutant cdf3-1 is much more sensitive to drought and low temperature stress, whereas CDF3 overexpression enhances the tolerance of transgenic plants to drought, cold and osmotic stress and promotes late flowering. Transcriptome analysis revealed that CDF3 regulates a set of genes involved in cellular osmoprotection and oxidative stress, including the stress tolerance transcription factors CBFs, DREB2A and ZAT12, which involve both gigantea-dependent and independent pathways. Consistently, metabolite profiling disclosed that the total amount of some protective metabolites including γ-aminobutyric acid, proline, glutamine and sucrose were higher in CDF3-overexpressing plants. Taken together, these results indicate that CDF3 plays a multifaceted role acting on both flowering time and abiotic stress tolerance, in part by controlling the CBF/DREB2A-CRT/DRE and ZAT10/12 modules. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. An experimental set-up to test heatmoisture exchangers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Ünal (N.); J.C. Pompe (Jan); W.P. Holland (Wim); I. Gultuna; P.E.M. Huygen; K. Jabaaij (K.); C. Ince (Can); B. Saygin (B.); H.A. Bruining (Hajo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The purpose of this study was to build an experimental set-up to assess continuously the humidification, heating and resistance properties of heat-moisture exchangers (HMEs) under clinical conditions. Design: The experimental set-up consists of a patient model, measurement

  15. Fault tolerant control - a residual based set-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    A new set-up for fault tolerant control (FTC) for stable systems is presented in this paper. The new set-up is based on a simple implementation of the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization. This implementation of the YJBK parameterization will allow a direct and simple reconfigurati...

  16. Experimental Setup for Studying Guiding of Proton Microbeam

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, G. U. L.; Rajta, I.; Bereczky, R. J.; Tőkési, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present the design and construction of our experimental setup for studying the transmission of proton microbeam through a single, cylindrical shape, macroscopic insulating capillary. The intensity as a function of time, the energy distribution as a function of the transmission and the deflection of the transmitted particles can be measured with the new setup.

  17. A Search for the Higgs Boson Using Very Forward Tracking Detectors with CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M. G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Atac, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Booth, P. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Crosby, P. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Dunietz, I. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Finley, D. A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heinemann, B. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Lancaster, M. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Lauhakangas, R. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics (Finland); Litvintsev, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Liu, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Marti-Garcia, S. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McGivern, D. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Moore, C. D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Orava, R. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Inst. of Physics (Finland); Rostovtsev, A. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Snihur, R. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Tapprogge, S. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics (Finland); Wester, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wyatt, A. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Oesterberg, K. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2001-03-01

    The authors propose to add high precision track detectors 55 m downstream on both (E and W) sides of CDF, to measure high Feynman-x protons and antiprotons in association with central states. A primary motivation is to search for the Higgs boson, and if it is seen to measure its mass precisely. The track detectors will be silicon strip telescopes backed up by high resolution time-of-flight counters. They will have four spectrometer arms, for both sides of the p and {bar p} beams. The addition of these small detectors effectively converts the Tevatron into a gluon-gluon collider with {radical}s from 0 to {approx} 200 GeV. This experiment also measures millions/year clean high- |t| elastic p{bar p} scattering events and produce millions of pure gluon jets. Besides a wealth of other unique QCD studies they will search for signs of exotic physics such as SUSY and Large Extra Dimensions. They ask the Director to ask the PAC to take note of this Letter of Intent at its April meeting, to consider a proposal at the June meeting and to make a decision at the November 2001 meeting. They request that the Directorage ask the Beams Division to evaluate the consequences and cost of the proposed Tevatron modifications, and CDF to evaluate any effect on its baseline program and to review the technical aspects of the detectors, DAQ and trigger integration.

  18. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES IN MID FORMAT CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pivnicka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of mid-format cameras are used for aerial surveying projects. To achieve a reliable and geometrically precise result also in the photogrammetric workflow, awareness on the sensitive parts is important. The use of direct referencing systems (GPS/IMU, the mounting on a stabilizing camera platform and the specific values of the mid format camera make a professional setup with various calibration and misalignment operations necessary. An important part is to have a proper camera calibration. Using aerial images over a well designed test field with 3D structures and/or different flight altitudes enable the determination of calibration values in Bingo software. It will be demonstrated how such a calibration can be performed. The direct referencing device must be mounted in a solid and reliable way to the camera. Beside the mechanical work especially in mounting the camera beside the IMU, 2 lever arms have to be measured in mm accuracy. Important are the lever arms from the GPS Antenna to the IMU's calibrated centre and also the lever arm from the IMU centre to the Camera projection centre. In fact, the measurement with a total station is not a difficult task but the definition of the right centres and the need for using rotation matrices can cause serious accuracy problems. The benefit of small and medium format cameras is that also smaller aircrafts can be used. Like that, a gyro bases stabilized platform is recommended. This causes, that the IMU must be mounted beside the camera on the stabilizer. The advantage is, that the IMU can be used to control the platform, the problematic thing is, that the IMU to GPS antenna lever arm is floating. In fact we have to deal with an additional data stream, the values of the movement of the stabiliser to correct the floating lever arm distances. If the post-processing of the GPS-IMU data by taking the floating levers into account, delivers an expected result, the lever arms between IMU and

  19. An Improved Automated Setup for Solubility Determination of Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghanbari 1, Yashar Sarbaz, Vahid Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Karim Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Jafar Soleymani, Abolghasem Jouyban

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Solubility of a drug/drug candidate is an essential information in the pharmaceutical area. Classical solubility determination method used in the laboratories are expensive and time-consuming. Attempts were made to provide an automated solubility determination setup based on a laser monitoring technique. Methods: In a previously developed setup, drug powder was added to a given quantity of the solvent which made some troubles in practical applications. The present work reports another setup which adds solvent to a given mass of the drug. The validity of the measured solubilities is checked by comparing the measured solubilities of acetaminophen at two temperatures in water and ethanol mixtures with the corresponding data from the literature. Results: The results reveal that the improved setup could overcome the limitations of the previously developed setup and could be used for drug solubility determination. Conclusion: The improved setup overcomes the troubles made in the previous setup and could be used in generating large amount of solubility data to be used in the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Introduction to HOBIT, a b-jet identification tagger at the CDF experiment optimized for light Higgs boson searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.; Junk, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kirby, M., E-mail: kirby@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Oksuzian, Y. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22906 (United States); Phillips, T.J. [Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Snider, F.D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Trovato, M. [Isituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Vizan, J. [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain la Neuve, B-1348 (Belgium); Yao, W.M. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We present the development and validation of the Higgs Optimized b Identification Tagger (HOBIT), a multivariate b-jet identification algorithm optimized for Higgs boson searches at the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. At collider experiments, b taggers allow one to distinguish particle jets containing B hadrons from other jets; these algorithms have been used for many years with great success at CDF. HOBIT has been designed specifically for use in searches for light Higgs bosons decaying via H{yields}bb{sup Macron }. This fact combined with the extent to which HOBIT synthesizes and extends the best ideas of previous taggers makes HOBIT unique among CDF b-tagging algorithms. Employing feed-forward neural network architectures, HOBIT provides an output value ranging from approximately -1 ('light-jet like') to 1 ('b-jet like'); this continuous output value has been tuned to provide maximum sensitivity in light Higgs boson search analyses. When tuned to the equivalent light jet rejection rate, HOBIT tags 54% of b jets in Monte Carlo simulated Higgs boson events (m{sub H}=120 GeV/c{sup 2}) compared to 39% for SecVtx, the most commonly used b tagger at CDF. We present features of the tagger as well as its characterization in the form of b-jet finding efficiencies and false (light-jet) tag rates.

  1. Introduction to HOBIT, a b-jet identification tagger at the CDF experiment optimized for light Higgs boson searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.; Junk, T.; Kirby, M.; Oksuzian, Y.; Phillips, T. J.; Snider, F. D.; Trovato, M.; Vizan, J.; Yao, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the development and validation of the Higgs Optimized b Identification Tagger (HOBIT), a multivariate b-jet identification algorithm optimized for Higgs boson searches at the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. At collider experiments, b taggers allow one to distinguish particle jets containing B hadrons from other jets; these algorithms have been used for many years with great success at CDF. HOBIT has been designed specifically for use in searches for light Higgs bosons decaying via H ! b\\bar{b}. This fact combined with the extent to which HOBIT synthesizes and extends the best ideas of previous taggers makes HOBIT unique among CDF b-tagging algorithms. Employing feed-forward neural network architectures, HOBIT provides an output value ranging from approximately -1 ("light-jet like") to 1 ("b-jet like"); this continuous output value has been tuned to provide maximum sensitivity in light Higgs boson search analyses. When tuned to the equivalent light jet rejection rate, HOBIT tags 54% of b jets in simulated 120 GeV/c2 Higgs boson events compared to 39% for SecVtx, the most commonly used b tagger at CDF. We present features of the tagger as well as its characterization in the form of b-jet finding efficiencies and false (light-jet) tag rates.

  2. The OPeNDAP and Remote NetCDF Invocation (RNI) middleware platform for Scientific Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, P.; Zednik, S.; West, P.

    2009-04-01

    Across geosciences, there are large data holdings being made available via the D AP protocol by means of OPeNDAP software. A lot of the underlying data are in th e NetCDF format. Often, each individual dataset is a combination of hundreds of individual NetCDF files. Requesting such datasets for analysis is an expensive d ata fusion transaction, especially as the number and size of datasets increase. We present a set of solutions that instead request needed portions of the datase t fused just-in-time. The fusion includes both subsetting and agreggation operat ions as well as analysis and data manipulation steps. We have modified the NetCD F C library for Remote NetCDF Invocation (RNI), that is, to operate on remote da taset, over HTTP, HTTPS or gsiFTP (or any) protocols, individual NetCDF Applicat ion Programming Interface (API) calls as if they were local. This invocation mod el also can be applied to OPeNDAP data streams and local files. This mechanism r esembles the well known Remote Procedure Call (RPC) yet it radically differs on the binding between local and remote operations. We describe our current approac h, implementation and benefits obtained from this approach and indicate how it a ids data fusion.

  3. CfRadial - CF NetCDF for Radar and Lidar Data in Polar Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, M. J.; Lee, W. C.; Michelson, D.; Curtis, M.

    2016-12-01

    Since 1990, NCAR has supported over 20 different data formats for radar and lidar data in polar coordinates. Researchers, students and operational users spend unnecessary time handling a multitude of unique formats. CfRadial grew out of the need to simplify the use of these data and thereby to improve efficiency in research and operations. CfRadial adopts the well-known NetCDF framework, along with the Climate and Forecasting (CF) conventions such that data and metadata are accurately represented. Mobile platforms are also supported. The first major release, CfRadial version 1.1, occurred in February 2011, followed by minor updates. CfRadial has been adopted by NCAR as well as other agencies in the US and the UK. CfRadial development was boosted in 2015 through a two-year NSF EarthCube grant to improve CF in general. Version 1.4 was agreed upon in May 2016, adding explicit support for quality control fields and spectra. In Europe and Australia, EUMETNET OPERA's HDF5-based ODIM_H5 standard has been rapidly embraced as the modern standard for exchanging weather radar data for operations. ODIM_H5 exploits data groups, hierarchies, and built-in compression, characteristics that have been added to NetCDF4. A meeting of the WMO Task Team on Weather Radar Data Exchange (TT-WRDE) was held at NCAR in Boulder in July 2016, with a goal of identifying a single global standard for radar and lidar data in polar coordinates. CfRadial and ODIM_H5 were considered alongside the older and more rigid table-driven WMO BUFR and GRIB2 formats. TT-WRDE recommended that CfRadial 1.4 be merged with the sweep-oriented structure of ODIM_H5, making use of NetCDF groups, to produce a single format that will encompass the best ideas of both formats. That has led to the emergence of the CfRadial 2.0 standard. This format should meet the objectives of both the NSF EarthCube CF 2.0 initiative and the WMO TT-WRDE. It has the added benefit of improving data exchange between operational and research

  4. Impact of the frequency of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy and set-up margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudat, Volker; Hammoud, Mohamed; Pillay, Yogin; Alaradi, Abdul Aziz; Mohamed, Adel; Altuwaijri, Saleh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the patient set-up error of different anatomical sites, to estimate the effect of different frequencies of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy, and to calculate margins to accommodate for the patient set-up error (ICRU set-up margin, SM). Alignment data of 148 patients treated with inversed planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of the head and neck (n = 31), chest (n = 72), abdomen (n = 15), and pelvis (n = 30) were evaluated. The patient set-up accuracy was assessed using orthogonal megavoltage electronic portal images of 2328 fractions of 173 planning target volumes (PTV). In 25 patients, two PTVs were analyzed where the PTVs were located in different anatomical sites and treated in two different radiotherapy courses. The patient set-up error and the corresponding SM were retrospectively determined assuming no online verification, online verification once a week and online verification every other day. The SM could be effectively reduced with increasing frequency of online verifications. However, a significant frequency of relevant set-up errors remained even after online verification every other day. For example, residual set-up errors larger than 5 mm were observed on average in 18% to 27% of all fractions of patients treated in the chest, abdomen and pelvis, and in 10% of fractions of patients treated in the head and neck after online verification every other day. In patients where high set-up accuracy is desired, daily online verification is highly recommended

  5. Impact of the frequency of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy and set-up margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Adel

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The purpose of the study was to evaluate the patient set-up error of different anatomical sites, to estimate the effect of different frequencies of online verifications on the patient set-up accuracy, and to calculate margins to accommodate for the patient set-up error (ICRU set-up margin, SM. Methods and materials Alignment data of 148 patients treated with inversed planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT of the head and neck (n = 31, chest (n = 72, abdomen (n = 15, and pelvis (n = 30 were evaluated. The patient set-up accuracy was assessed using orthogonal megavoltage electronic portal images of 2328 fractions of 173 planning target volumes (PTV. In 25 patients, two PTVs were analyzed where the PTVs were located in different anatomical sites and treated in two different radiotherapy courses. The patient set-up error and the corresponding SM were retrospectively determined assuming no online verification, online verification once a week and online verification every other day. Results The SM could be effectively reduced with increasing frequency of online verifications. However, a significant frequency of relevant set-up errors remained even after online verification every other day. For example, residual set-up errors larger than 5 mm were observed on average in 18% to 27% of all fractions of patients treated in the chest, abdomen and pelvis, and in 10% of fractions of patients treated in the head and neck after online verification every other day. Conclusion In patients where high set-up accuracy is desired, daily online verification is highly recommended.

  6. Search for anomalous production of multiple leptons in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a search for anomalous production of multiple low-energy leptons in association with a W or Z boson using events collected at the CDF experiment corresponding to 5.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This search is sensitive to a wide range of topologies with low-momentum leptons, including those with the leptons near one another. The observed rates of production of additional electrons and muons are compared with the standard model predictions. No indications of phenomena beyond the standard model are found. A 95% confidence level limit is presented on the production cross section for a benchmark model of supersymmetric hidden-valley Higgs production. Particle identification efficiencies are also provided to enable the calculation of limits on additional models.

  7. Measurement of the CP asymmetry parameter sin(2β) at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeCompte, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent asymmetry in the rate for bar B d 0 versus B d 0 decays to J/ψK S 0 . In the context of the Standard Model this is interpreted as a measurement of the CP-violation parameter sin(2β). A total of 198 ± 17 B d 0 /bar B d 0 decays were observed in pbar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The initial b-flavor is determined by a same side flavor tagging technique. Our analysis results in sin(2β) = 1.8 ± 1.1(stat) ± 0.3(syst)

  8. Search for diboson production in final states with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a search for diboson production in final states with missing transverse energy and jets using the latest amount of data collected by the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We select events containing two jets with transverse energies above 25 GeV and significant missing transverse energy (MET). Observing a signal in this event topology is challenging due to the large backgrounds from W + jet and QCD multi - jet production. We present new methods for significantly reducing the QCD multi-jet background in which mis-measured jets lead to large, fake MET within the events. An event by event calculation of MET significance, taking into account the energy resolution of the jets within each event, allows for the removal of events in which the determined significance is below that expected for signal. (author)

  9. Search for the Higgs-Boson with the CDF experiment at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennecke, Martin [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-06-10

    A search for a low-mass SM Higgs-Boson in the channel WH → lvb$\\bar{b}$ has been performed using neural networks. The data were taken by the CDF experiment at the p-$\\bar{p}$ collider Tevatron from 2000-2003, corresponding to in integrated luminosity of Lint = 162 pb-1 at a CMS-energy of √s = 1.96 TeV. 95% confidence level upper limits are set on σ × BR, the product of the production cross section times the Branching ratio, as a function of the Higgs boson mass. Cross sections above 8 pb are excluded for six different Higgs masses between 110 GeV/c2 and 150 GeV/c2. The required integrated luminosities for a 95% C.L. exclusion, 3σ evidence and 5σ discovery are calculated.

  10. IMPLEMENTATION OF INDUSTRIAL ROBOT-MANIPULATOR SETUPS IN EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bobtsov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the most important aspects of industrial robot-manipulator setups implementation as an educational tool for the workshop part of advanced technologies in robotics and control engineering courses.

  11. The COMPASS Setup for Physics with Hadron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, Ph.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Hoppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, Ana Sofia; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Rousse, J.Y.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This article describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

  12. Measurement of the inclusive b-lifetime using Jp's at the CDF-experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Hans; Benjamin, Doug

    1996-05-01

    We present the measurement of the average lifetime of b-hadrons produced in pbarp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV weighted by their branching ratios into J/ψ We use dimuon data which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ≈ 90 pb-1 recorded with the CDF-detector during the 1994 to 95 running period. After all selection cuts and background subtraction we are left with a high statistics sample of 62656 J/ψ decaying into μ^+μ^- reconstructed in the CDF Silicon VerteX detector (SVX) where 17.8% of these events come from b-decays. We measure the average B lifetime to be 1.52 ; ± 0.015; (stat);^+0.038_-0.027;(sys); ps (preliminary). The precision of this measurement is significantly improved compared to the inclusive lifetime measurement published previously using ≈ 10 pb-1 of data recorded in 91-92. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC03-76SF00098. ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DEFG03-95-ER-40938. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  13. netCDF Operators for Rapid Analysis of Measured and Modeled Swath-like Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, C. S.

    2015-12-01

    Swath-like data (hereafter SLD) are defined by non-rectangular and/or time-varying spatial grids in which one or more coordinates are multi-dimensional. It is often challenging and time-consuming to work with SLD, including all Level 2 satellite-retrieved data, non-rectangular subsets of Level 3 data, and model data on curvilinear grids. Researchers and data centers want user-friendly, fast, and powerful methods to specify, extract, serve, manipulate, and thus analyze, SLD. To meet these needs, large research-oriented agencies and modeling center such as NASA, DOE, and NOAA increasingly employ the netCDF Operators (NCO), an open-source scientific data analysis software package applicable to netCDF and HDF data. NCO includes extensive, fast, parallelized regridding features to facilitate analysis and intercomparison of SLD and model data. Remote sensing, weather and climate modeling and analysis communities face similar problems in handling SLD including how to easily: 1. Specify and mask irregular regions such as ocean basins and political boundaries in SLD (and rectangular) grids. 2. Bin, interpolate, average, or re-map SLD to regular grids. 3. Derive secondary data from given quality levels of SLD. These common tasks require a data extraction and analysis toolkit that is SLD-friendly and, like NCO, familiar in all these communities. With NCO users can 1. Quickly project SLD onto the most useful regular grids for intercomparison. 2. Access sophisticated statistical and regridding functions that are robust to missing data and allow easy specification of quality control metrics. These capabilities improve interoperability, software-reuse, and, because they apply to SLD, minimize transmission, storage, and handling of unwanted data. While SLD analysis still poses many challenges compared to regularly gridded, rectangular data, the custom analyses scripts SLD once required are now shorter, more powerful, and user-friendly.

  14. A Test Setup for Quality Assurance of Front End Hybrids

    CERN Document Server

    Axer, Markus; Camps, Clemens; Commichau, Volker; Flügge, Günter; Franke, Torsten; Hangarter, Klaus; Ilgin, Can; Mnich, Joachim; Niehusmann, Jan; Poettgens, Michael; Schorn, Peter; Schulte, Reiner; Struczinski, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The APV Readout Control (ARC) Test Setup is a compact, cost efficient test and diagnostic tool which is suited for full operation and characterisation of FE hybrids and Si-Detector modules. This note gives an overview of the construction and the features of the test facility. Based on the ARC setup and the experience gained with one prototype FE hybrid, possible quality assurance scenarios for short and long term tests of FE hybrids are also presented.

  15. Measurement of WW + WZ production cross section and study of the dijet mass spectrum in the ℓν + jets final state at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, Viviana [Univ. of Siena (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    We present the measurement of the WW and WZ production cross section in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, in a final state consisting of an electron or muon, neutrino and jets. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider and correspond to 4.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. The analysis uses a fit to the dijet mass distribution to extract the diboson contribution. We observe 1582 ± 275(stat.) ± 107(syst.) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section of σWW/WZ = 18.1 ± 3.3(stat.) ± 2.5(syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 15.9 ± 0.9 pb. The best fit to the dijet mass of the known components shows a good agreement with the data except for the [120, 160] GeV/c2 mass range, where an excess is observed. We perform detailed checks of our background model and study the significance of the excess, assuming an additional gaussian component with a width compatible with the expected dijet mass resolution. A standard Δχ2 test of the presence of the additional component, returns a p-value of 4.2 x 10-4 when standard sources of systematics are considered, corresponding to a significance of 3.3{sigma}.

  16. Charmed Baryon Spectroscopy and Search for $CP$ Violation in $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$ at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Felix [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (Germany)

    2011-10-28

    In this thesis two different analyses are presented, namely the measurements of the properties of $\\Lambda_c(2595)^+$, $\\Lambda_c(2625)^+$, $\\Sigma_c(2455)^{++,0}$, and $\\Sigma_c(2520)^{++,0}$ baryons as well as the search for $CP$ violation in the Dalitz plot of the decay $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$. Both studies are performed using data corresponding to 5.2\\,\\invfb respective 6.0\\,\\invfb of integrated luminosity from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96\\,TeV, collected with the CDF~II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The masses and decay widths of the mentioned charmed baryon resonances are measured with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for $\\Sigma_c$ states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited $\\Lambda_c^+$ states. No hints for any $CP$ violating effects in the resonant substructure of $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$ are found.

  17. Measurements of the Top Anti-Top Production Cross Section and Top Quark Mass in the Hadronically Decaying Tau + Jets Decay Channel at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, Daryl Curtis [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the first exclusive observation of the t-t → hadronic τ + jets decay channel. Using these events, we measure the t-t pair production cross section and the top quark mass in 2.2 fb-1 of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab provides collisions of protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV and is one of only two accelerators in the world with enough energy to produce top quarks. With a branching fraction of nearly 10%, the hadronic τ + jets decay channel is the third largest t-t decay mode, and it has only been minimally explored. This the first measurement of the t-t pair production cross section in this decay channel at CDF and the first measurement of the top quark mass in this decay channel in the world. The analysis introduces a new method to recover the total momentum of the ν produced in the τ decay and an artificial neural network to reduce the contribution from the largest background source, QCD multijet background. The t-t pair production cross section is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function which compares the number of observed events to the number of expected events for a given t-t cross section. The top quark mass is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function built from signal and ii background probabilities which are based on the matrix elements for t-t production and decay and W + 4 parton production, respectively. Using events selected with exactly 1 hadronically decaying τ, exactly 4 jets with at least 1 identified as having originated from a b quark, and large missing transverse energy, we measure the t-t pair production cross section to be 8.8 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 2.2 (syst.) pb and the top quark mass to be 172.7±9.3 (stat.) ±3.7 (syst.) GeV. We find both values to be in good agreement with

  18. Measurement of relative branching fractions for $D^{0}$ meson Cabibbo suppressed hadronic decays, from the CDF secondary vertex trigger sample at the Tevatron collider.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Cecco, Sandro [Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    2003-01-01

    The analysis presented in this thesis are first strong evidences for both the new CDF Secondary Vertex Trigger ability in the on-line selection of heavy flavour hadronic decays in $p\\bar{p}$ interactions and for the $CDF$ potentials, in particular on charm physics. The result of the relative BR measurements for $D^0$ mesons two-body decays presented in this thesis is at this time competitive with best single measurement obtained by the CLEO experiment. Analysis and reconstruction tools developed for charm mesons are tuned and validated at a very refined level and constitute the framework for B mesons analysis in hadronic final states like $B_{s} → D_{s}\\pi$. As prospected in final sections, competitive measurements and limits on $D^0$ mixing and direct CP violation in $D^0$ mesons decays will be possible with the luminosity integrated in the future of $CDF$ operations. Also, studies on particle ID with $dE/dx$ and CDF Time-of-Flight, are presented and their validat ion on high statistic sample of charmed mesons will allow a precise knowledge of $CDF$ PID global performance. This will be of particular relevance for flavour tagging techniques and especially those based on Kaon tagging will benefit of this study. This point will be crucial, as underlined in final section for $B_s$ oscillation mixing frequency measurement at $CDF$.

  19. Characterization of textile electrodes and conductors using standardized measurement setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, L; Neuhaus, C; Medrano, G; Walter, M; Leonhardt, S; Jungbecker, N; Gries, T

    2010-01-01

    Textile electrodes and conductors are being developed and used in different monitoring scenarios, such as ECG or bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements. Compared to standard materials, conductive textile materials offer improved wearing comfort and enable long-term measurements. Unfortunately, the development and investigation of such materials often suffers from the non-reproducibility of the test scenarios. For example, the materials are generally tested on human skin which is difficult since the properties of human skin differ for each person and can change within hours. This study presents two test setups which offer reproducible measurement procedures for the systematic analysis of textile electrodes and conductors. The electrode test setup was designed with a special skin dummy which allows investigation of not only the electrical properties of textile electrodes but also the contact behavior between electrode and skin. Using both test setups, eight textile electrodes and five textile conductors were analyzed and compared

  20. Characterization of textile electrodes and conductors using standardized measurement setups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, L; Neuhaus, C; Medrano, G; Jungbecker, N; Walter, M; Gries, T; Leonhardt, S

    2010-02-01

    Textile electrodes and conductors are being developed and used in different monitoring scenarios, such as ECG or bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements. Compared to standard materials, conductive textile materials offer improved wearing comfort and enable long-term measurements. Unfortunately, the development and investigation of such materials often suffers from the non-reproducibility of the test scenarios. For example, the materials are generally tested on human skin which is difficult since the properties of human skin differ for each person and can change within hours. This study presents two test setups which offer reproducible measurement procedures for the systematic analysis of textile electrodes and conductors. The electrode test setup was designed with a special skin dummy which allows investigation of not only the electrical properties of textile electrodes but also the contact behavior between electrode and skin. Using both test setups, eight textile electrodes and five textile conductors were analyzed and compared.

  1. Measurement Uncertainty Investigation in the Multi-probe OTA Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Szini, Istvan Janos; Foegelle, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive efforts are underway to standardize over the air (OTA) testing of the multiple input multiple output (MIMO) capable terminals in COST IC1004, 3GPP RAN4 and CTIA. Due to the ability to reproduce realistic radio propagation environments inside the anechoic chamber and evaluate end user me...... chamber setup. This contribution presents the results of uncertainty measurements carried out in three practical multi-probe setups. Some sources of measurement errors, i.e. cable effect, cable termination, etc. are identified based on the measurement results....... metrics in real world scenarios, the multi-probe based method has attracted huge interest from both industry and academia. This contribution attempts to identify some of the measurement uncertainties of the practical multi-probe setups and provide some guidance to establish the multi-probe anechoic...

  2. A cryogenic measurement setup for characterization microwave devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybalko, Oleksandr

    2017-01-01

    A cryogenic measurement setup for characterization microwave devices from room to cryogenic temperatures is presented. The setup allows testing microwave devices at variable temperatures ranging from 300 to 77 K. Frequency doubler (94/188 GHz) has been cooled to 77 K and peak efficiency of 32......% at an input-power level of 207 mW is achieved. For verification experimental results the millimeter-wave GaAs Schottky barrier diode model is developed for CAD simulator. The simulated peak efficiency is 37% at 77 K. The estimation of simulated and measured data of the doubler efficiency versus temperature...... has the same trend from 77 to 300 K which confirmed the cryogenic measurement setup applicability....

  3. Eye-in-Hand Manipulation for Remote Handling: Experimental Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Longchuan; Suominen, Olli; Aref, Mohammad M.; Mattila, Jouni; Ruiz, Emilio; Esque, Salvador

    2018-03-01

    A prototype for eye-in-hand manipulation in the context of remote handling in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)1 is presented in this paper. The setup consists of an industrial robot manipulator with a modified open control architecture and equipped with a pair of stereoscopic cameras, a force/torque sensor, and pneumatic tools. It is controlled through a haptic device in a mock-up environment. The industrial robot controller has been replaced by a single industrial PC running Xenomai that has a real-time connection to both the robot controller and another Linux PC running as the controller for the haptic device. The new remote handling control environment enables further development of advanced control schemes for autonomous and semi-autonomous manipulation tasks. This setup benefits from a stereovision system for accurate tracking of the target objects with irregular shapes. The overall environmental setup successfully demonstrates the required robustness and precision that remote handling tasks need.

  4. Die Funktion der CDF-Transporter MamB und MamM beim magnetosomalen Eisentransport in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense

    OpenAIRE

    Junge, Katja

    2008-01-01

    The ability of M. gryphiswaldense to orient along magnetic field lines is based on magnetosomes, which are magnetite crystals surrounded by a membrane. The specific biomineralization of magnetite particles implies a complex mechanism, involving the uptake, accumulation and precipitation of large amounts of iron. Two putative transporters, MamM and MamB, belonging to the Cation Diffusion Facilitators (CDF) proteins of heavy metal transporters have been found in the subproteom of the magnetosom...

  5. Search for anomalous couplings in WW and WZ measurements at the Tevatron (D0 and CDF results)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, H.T.

    1995-06-01

    The search for WW and WZ production in p anti p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV using the CDF and D0 detectors is presented. Three analyses, one concentrating on the leptons + jets decay channels and two concentrating on the dilepton decay channels are described in detail. Limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ trilinear gauge boson couplings are presented. Prospects for further study of diboson production and anomalous couplings with the Upgraded Tevatron are also presented

  6. Measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in D-0 -> pi(+) pi(-) and D-0 -> K+ K- decays at CDF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Amerio, S.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2012), "012009-1"-"012009-28" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : D0 hadronic decay * CP violation * K- decay * asymmetry CP measure d * CDF * D0 --> pi+ pi- * D0 --> K+ K- Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012

  7. A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelin Zhuang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A NetCDF version of the two-dimensional energy balance model based on the full multigrid method in Fortran is introduced for both pedagogical and research purposes. Based on the land–sea–ice distribution, orbital elements, greenhouse gases concentration, and albedo, the code calculates the global seasonal surface temperature. A step-by-step guide with examples is provided for practice.

  8. Why IV Setup for Stream Ciphers is Difficult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenner, Erik

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the initialization vector (IV) setup has proven to be the most vulnerable point when designing secure stream ciphers. In this paper, we take a look at possible reasons why this is the case, identifying numerous open research problems in cryptography.......In recent years, the initialization vector (IV) setup has proven to be the most vulnerable point when designing secure stream ciphers. In this paper, we take a look at possible reasons why this is the case, identifying numerous open research problems in cryptography....

  9. Luminescence properties of Eu3+ doped CdF2 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubekri, H.; Diaf, M.; Guerbous, L.; Jouart, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the photoluminescence properties of Eu3+ doped CdF2 single crystals. The pulled crystals were prepared by use of the Bridgman technique from a vacuum furnace in fluoride atmosphere. Absorption, excitation and emission spectra of the crystal doped with three Eu3+ concentrations (0.02%, 0.1% and 0.6% mol.) were recorded at room temperature. The emission spectra exhibit a strong yellow and red emissions in the spectral range 550-720 nm which are assigned to 5D0 → 7FJ (J = 1, 2, 4) transitions and a weak infrared emission around 816 nm corresponding to 5D0 → 7F6 transition. The magnetic dipole emission (5D0 → 7F1) is the most intense for each Eu3+ concentration. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters Ω2, Ω4, Ω6 for 4f-4f transitions of Eu3+ ions were computed from the emission spectra using the 5D0 → 7FJ (J = 1, 2, 4, 6) transitions. Via these phenomenological intensity parameters, the spontaneous emission probabilities, branching ratios, radiative lifetimes, quantum efficiencies and emission cross-sections for the main Eu3+ emitting levels are evaluated.

  10. PDF and QCD effects in the precision measurement of the W boson mass at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beecher, Daniel [Univ. of College London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    A sample of W → ev (W → μν) and Z0 → e+e- (Z0 → μ+μ-) events recorded by the CDF detector for p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV are used to evaluate the systematic uncertainty in the determination of the W boson mass arising from uncertainties in the parton distribution functions and higher-order QCD effects. The systematic contribution of PDFs is determined to be 10 MeV/c2 for MSTW2008 NLO and 12 MeV/c2 for CTEQ6.6. The total systematic contribution arising from higher-order QCD effects in 9 MeV/c2. The Z0 events are used to extract improved estimates of the phenomenological parameters in the BLNY model that describes low transverse momentum.

  11. Precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Sarah Alam [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-01

    A precision measurement of the mass and width of the W boson is presented. The W bosons are produced in proton antiproton collisions occurring at a centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron accelerator. The data used for the analyses is collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and corresponds to an average integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 for the W width analysis for the electron and muon channels and an average integrated luminosity of 2350 pb-1 for the W mass analysis. The mass and width of the W boson is extracted by fitting to the transverse mass distribution, with the peak of the distribution being most sensitive to the mass and the tail of the distribution sensitive to the width. The W width measurement in the electron and muon channels is combined to give a final result of 2032 ± 73 MeV. The systematic uncertainty on the W mass from the recoil of the W boson against the initial state gluon radiation is discussed. A systematic study of the recoil in Z → e+e- events where one electron is reconstructed in the central calorimeter and the other in the plug calorimeter and its effect on the W mass is presented for the first time in this thesis.

  12. 'energy plus transmutation' set-up for neutron production and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The set-up 'energy plus transmutation', consisting of a thick lead target and a natural uranium blanket, was irradiated by relativistic proton beams with the energy from 0.7 GeV up to 2 GeV. Neutron field was measured in different places of this set- up using different activation detectors. The possibilities of using the ...

  13. Comparison of Channel Emulation Techniques in Multiprobe Anechoic Chamber Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llorente, Ines Carton; Fan, Wei; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares two different techniques for channel emulation in multiprobe anechoic chamber based setups, which is a candidate solution for the standardization of MIMO OTA performance testing of mobile devices. The comparison is performed via simulations of the field distribution, temporal ...

  14. IBM PC based automatic drive system for Bulat setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchaninov, A.A.; Tolok, V.T.

    1999-01-01

    Non-expensive computer drive system for Bulat setup is described. System's hardware consists of IBM PC and conjunction block, providing 12 output channels, Software includes the main program, utilities and technology processes database. System may be used at surface modification processes, especially multilayer multicomponent coatings deposition

  15. View of the WA10 set-up

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    The WA10 experiment by the Geneva-Lausanne Collaboration was set-up in the H5 beam (unseparated, up to 50 GeV/c) to study K+-p --> K0pi+-p and other reactions of similar topology, and the energy dependence of resonance production.

  16. MATLAB simulation for an experimental setup of digital feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Lifang; Liu Songqiang

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the digital feedback simulation using MATLAB for an experimental accelerator control setup. By analyzing the plant characteristic in time-domain and frequency-domain, a guideline for design of digital filter and PID controller is derived. (authors)

  17. The setup of a mobile mobility panel for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurs, Karst Teunis; Veenstra, Sander; Thomas, Tom

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the setup of the Dutch Mobile Mobility Panel project, in which GPS-enabled mobile phones (smartphones) are used as a passive multiple-week and multiple-year travel behaviour data collection tool. The data collection methodology used in the Dutch Mobile Mobility Panel comprised

  18. Rician Channel Modeling for Multiprobe Anechoic Chamber Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Kyösti, Pekka; Hentilä, Lassi

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses over the air (OTA) testing for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) capable terminals, with emphasis on modeling Rician channel models in the multi-probe anechoic chamber setups. A technique to model Rician channels is proposed. The line-of-sight (LOS) component, with an arb...

  19. 3D Channel Model Emulation in a MIMO OTA Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Kyösti, Pekka; Sun, Fan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new channel reconstruction technique for 3D geometry-based channels in a multi-probe based MIMO OTA setup. The proposed method provides a general channel reconstruction framework for any spherical power spectrum. The channel reconstruction is formed as convex optimization...

  20. Characterization of a neutron imaging setup at the INES facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durisi, E.A., E-mail: elisabettaalessandra.durisi@unito.it [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Visca, L. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Albertin, F.; Brancaccio, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Corsi, J. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Dughera, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ferrarese, W. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giovagnoli, A.; Grassi, N. [Fondazione Centro per la Conservazione ed il Restauro dei Beni Culturali “La Venaria Reale”, Piazza della Repubblica, 10078 Venaria Reale, Torino (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Lo Giudice, A.; Mila, G. [Università di Torino, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Sezione di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); and others

    2013-10-21

    The Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) located at the ISIS pulsed neutron source (Didcot, United Kingdom) provides a thermal neutron beam mainly used for diffraction analysis. A neutron transmission imaging system was also developed for beam monitoring and for aligning the sample under investigation. Although the time-of-flight neutron diffraction is a consolidated technique, the neutron imaging setup is not yet completely characterized and optimized. In this paper the performance for neutron radiography and tomography at INES of two scintillator screens read out by two different commercial CCD cameras is compared in terms of linearity, signal-to-noise ratio, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution. In addition, the results of neutron radiographies and a tomography of metal alloy test structures are presented to better characterize the INES imaging capabilities of metal artifacts in the cultural heritage field. -- Highlights: A full characterization of the present INES imaging set-up was carried out. Two CCD cameras and two scintillators (ZnS/{sup 6}LiF) of different thicknesses were tested. Linearity, effective dynamic range and spatial resolution were determined. Radiographies of steep wedges were performed using the highest dynamic range setup. Tomography of a bronze cube was performed using the best spatial resolution setup.

  1. Development of a new experimental setup for studying collisions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Development of a new electron-recoil ion/photon coincidence setup for investigating some of the electron ... quisition system consisting of a 200 MHz Pentium based 8K-multichannel analyzer and a standard network of a .... electron gun via a differential pumping while the other one couples a Faraday cup. A de- tachable ...

  2. Practical considerations for coil-wrapped Distributed Temperature Sensing setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcerova, Anna; van Emmerik, Tim; Hilgersom, Koen; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) has been applied widely in hydrological and meteorological systems. For example, DTS has been used to measure streamflow, groundwater, soil moisture and temperature, air temperature, and lake energy fluxes. Many of these applications require a spatial monitoring resolution smaller than the minimum resolution of the DTS device. Therefore, measuring with these resolutions requires a custom made setup. To obtain both high temporal and high spatial resolution temperature measurements, fiber-optic cable is often wrapped around, and glued to, a coil, for example a PVC conduit. For these setups, it is often assumed that the construction characteristics (e.g., the coil material, shape, diameter) do not influence the DTS temperature measurements significantly. This study compares DTS datasets obtained during four measurement campaigns. The datasets were acquired using different setups, allowing to investigate the influence of the construction characteristics on the monitoring results. This comparative study suggests that the construction material, shape, diameter, and way of attachment can have a significant influence on the results. We present a qualitative and quantitative approximation of errors introduced through the selection of the construction, e.g., choice of coil material, influence of solar radiation, coil diameter, and cable attachment method. Our aim is to provide insight in factors that influence DTS measurements, which designers of future DTS measurements setups can take into account. Moreover, we present a number of solutions to minimize these errors for improved temperature retrieval using DTS.

  3. Laboratory Test Setup for Cyclic Axially Loaded Piles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2017-01-01

    conditions for all tests. For verifications purposes six static tension tests conducted at three different vertical effective stress levels of 0, 35 and 70 kPa. The load-displacement curves showed that the test setup provides repeatable test results. A preliminary comparison between the unit shaft friction...

  4. A Magnetic Set-Up to Help Teach Newton's Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panijpan, Bhinyo; Sujarittham, Thanida; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Tanamatayarat, Jintawat; Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai

    2009-01-01

    A set-up comprising a magnetic disc, a solenoid and a mechanical balance was used to teach first-year physics students Newton's third law with the help of a free body diagram. The image of a floating magnet immobilized by the solenoid's repulsive force should help dispel a common misconception of students as regards the first law: that stationary…

  5. Development of a new experimental setup for studying collisions of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Development of a new electron-recoil ion/photon coincidence setup for investigating some of the electron induced collision processes, such as electron bremsstrahlung, electron backscattering, innershell excitation and multiple ionization of target atoms/molecules in bombardment of electrons having energies from 2.0 keV ...

  6. Off-line software for large experimental setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyant, F.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to emphasize the importance of Off-line software for large experimental setups in High Energy Physics. Simple notions of program structuring, data structuring and software organization are discussed in the context of the software developped for the European Hybrid Spectrometer. (author)

  7. Novel Experimental Setups for In Situ Neutron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; H. Gjørup, Frederik; Mørch, Mathias

    Modern synchrotron and neutron sources provide the intensities needed for performing never-before-seen experiments. With the imminent launch of the scattering facilities MAX IV & ESS, it is interesting to explore novel setups that enable new experiments at these sites. X-ray and neutron technique...

  8. Experimental setup for rapid crystallization using favoured chemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    sent paper we describe a small scale experimental setup for rapid crystallization in which growth is favoured by chemical potential and hydrodynamic conditions. Using this we have grown KH2PO4 (KDP) single crystals up to. 40 × 43 × 66 mm3 in dimensions on a point seed in a glass crystallizer of 5 l capacity in about 72 h.

  9. Toxicity and disposition of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4PeCDF) in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewster, D.W.; Elwell, M.R.; Birnbaum, L.S.

    1988-04-01

    The toxicity and disposition of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (4PeCDF), a ubiquitous and acutely toxic environmental contaminant, was examined in three adult male Rhesus monkeys administered a single iv dose of 34 micrograms (0.1 mumol)/kg. Within 20 min, 4PeCDF was eliminated from the blood and was distributed to the liver, skin, adipose, and muscle tissues. Excretion occurred primarily via the feces with a minimum whole body half-life approximately 38 days. Within 7-14 days after administration, the packed cell volume and serum triglyceride and bile acid concentrations were significantly increased while serum cholesterol, protein, and albumin concentrations were decreased relative to pretreatment levels. Thyroid hormone levels were also altered with an increase in TSH and a decrease in T3 and T4 concentrations. After 28 days, two monkeys began exhibiting alopecia, hyperkeratinization of the toe and finger nails, facial chloracne-like lesions, and loss of body weight. They subsequently died 40 and 48 days after treatment. Similar symptoms of toxicity were observed in the third animal 58 days after 4PeCDF administration, but this animal appeared to fully recover and was administered 4PeCDF orally and (3H)1,2,3,7,8-pentachloro-dibenzofuran (1PeCDF) dermally 238 days after the initial iv dose. In this animal, approximately 2% of an oral dose of (14C)-4PeCDF was absorbed from the stomach and small intestine in 6 hr and was distributed mainly to the muscle and skin and less than 99% of a dermal dose of 1PeCDF remained at the site of application. Pathological findings in the monkeys that died indicated hyperplastic and metaplastic changes in the gastric mucosa, the Meibomian glands of the eyelid, and the ceruminous glands of the ear. Regression of these lesions was present in the surviving animal.

  10. Search for the Higgs Boson in the ZH → vvb$\\bar{b}$ Channel at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Brandon Scott [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This analysis focuses on a low mass Higgs boson search with 1.7 fb-1 of data. The focus is on Higgs events in which it is produced in association with a W or Z boson. Such events are expected to leave a distinct signature of large missing transverse energy for either a Z → vv decay or a leptonic W decay in which the lepton goes undetected, as well as jets with taggable secondary vertices from the H → b$\\bar{b}$ decay. Utilizing a new track based technique for removing QCD multi-jet processes as well as a neural network discriminant, an expected limit of 8.3 times the Standard Model prediction at the 95% CL for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c2 is calculated, with an observed limit of 8.0*SM.

  11. Measurement of the Branching Fractions of $B \\to D_s^{(*)+}D_s^{(*)-}$ Meson Decays at CDF II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Dominik Emmanuel [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (Germany)

    2008-08-01

    The variety of phenomena occurring in the world surrounding us always has been stirring up curiosity of men. Based on empirical observations of nature and on experiments becoming more and more complex in the course of time, a variety of models concerning the structure of matter have been conceived. In this analysis Br[Bs→D$+\\atop{s}$D$-\\atop{s}$] is determined by measuring the relative branching fraction Br[Bs→D$+\\atop{s}$D$-\\atop{s}$]/Br[B0→D$+\\atop{s}$D$-\\atop{s}$].

  12. Using Drell-Yan to probe the underlying event in Run II at Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Deepak [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2008-12-01

    We study the behavior of charged particles produced in association with Drell-Yan lepton-pairs in the region of the Z-boson in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV. We use the direction of the Z-boson in each event to define 'toward', 'away', and 'transverse' regions. For Drell-Yan production (excluding the leptons) both the 'toward' and 'transverse' regions are very sensitive to the 'underlying event', which is defined as everything except the two hard scattered components. The data are corrected to the particle level and are then compared with several PYTHIA models (with multiple parton interactions) and HERWIG (without multiple parton interactions) at the particle level (i.e. generator level). The data are also compared with a previous analysis on the behavior of the 'underlying event' in high transverse momentum jet production. The goal is to produce data that can be used by the theorists to tune and improve the QCD Monte-Carlo models of the 'underlying event' that are used to simulate hadron-hadron collisions.

  13. Search for Excited or Exotic Electron Production Using the Dielectron + Photon Signature at CDF in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerberich, Heather Kay [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The author presents a search for excited or exotic electrons decaying to an electron and a photon with high transverse momentum. An oppositely charged electron is produced in association with the excited electron, yielding a final state dielectron + photon signature. The discovery of excited electrons would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. They use ~ 202 pb-1 of data collected in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during March 2001 through September 2003. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. Upper limits are set on the experimental cross-section σ($\\bar{p}$p → ee* → eeγ) at the 95% confidence level in a contact-interaction model and a gauge-mediated interaction model. Limits are also presented as exclusion regions in the parameter space of the excited electron mass (Me*) and the compositeness energy scale (Λ). In the contact-interaction model, for which there are no previously published limits, they find Me* < 906 GeV is excluded for Me* = Λ. In the gauge-mediated model, the exclusion region in the Me* versus the phenomenological coupling f/Λ parameter space is extended to M{sub e*} < 430 GeV for f/Λ ~ 10-2 GeV-1. In comparison, other experiments have excluded Me* < 280 GeV for f/Λ ~ 10-2 GeV-1.

  14. Measurement of $Z/\\gamma^* + b$-jet Production Cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= 1.96$ TeV with the CDF detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortolan, Lorenzo [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Inst. Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Inst. de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE)

    2012-07-01

    Processes at hadron colliders, such as the production of jets, are described by the Quantum Chromodynamics theory (QCD). Precise descriptions of processes involving jets in association with a vector boson have nowadays large relevance as they represent irreducible background to other Standard Model (SM) processes and searches for new physics. The experimental study and understanding of the b-jet production in association with a Z boson are crucial for many reasons. For one side, it is the most important background for a light Higgs boson decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair and produced in the ZH mode.This is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs search at Tevatron in particular since the latest results have excluded the high mass region (MH > 127 GeV/c2 ). For another side the signature of b-jets and a Z boson is also background to new physics searches, such as supersymmetry, where a large coupling of the Higgs boson to bottom quarks is allowed. The produ ction cross section measurement of b-jets in events with a Z boson has already been performed at hadron colliders, at the Tevatron by CDF and D0 experiments and are now pursued at the LHC by ATLAS and CMS. In particular the CDF measurement was performed with only 2 fb-1 and was limited by the statistical uncertainty. This PhD thesis presents a new measurement of the $Z/\\gamma^* + b$-jet production cross section using the complete dataset collected by CDF during the Run II. $Z/\\gamma^*$ bosons are selected in the electron and muon decay modes and are required to have 66 < MZ < 116 GeV/c2 while jets, reconstructed with the MidPoint algorithm, have to be central (|Y| < 1.5) with pT > 20 GeV/c . The per jet cross section is measured with respect to the $Z/\\gamma^*$ inclusive and the $Z/\\gamma^* +$ jets cross sections. Results are compared to leading order (LO) event generator plus parton shower and next-to-leading order (NLO) predictions corrected for non

  15. A new small-angle X-ray scattering set-up on the crystallography beamline I711 at MAX-lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knaapila, M.; Svensson, C.; Barauskas, J.

    2009-01-01

    A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) set-up has recently been developed at beamline I711 at the MAX II storage ring in Lund (Sweden). An overview of the required modifications is presented here together with a number of application examples. The accessible q range in a SAXS experiment is 0.009-0...

  16. Measurement of the top pair production cross section at CDF using neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marginean, Radu [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab protons and antiprotons are collided at a 1.96 TeV center of mass energy. CDF and D0 are the two experiments currently operating at the Tevatron. At these energies top quark is mostly produced via strong interactions as a top anti-top pair (t$\\bar{t}$). The top quark has an extremely short lifetime and according to the Standard Model it decays with ~ 100% probability into a b quark and a W boson. In the ''lepton+jets'' channel, the signal from top pair production is detected for those events where one of the two W bosons decays hadronically in two quarks which we see as jets in the detector, and the other W decays into an electrically charged lepton and a neutrino. A relatively unambiguous identification in the detector is possible when we require that the charged lepton must be an electron or muon of either charge. The neutrino does not interact in the detector and its presence is inferred from an imbalance in the transverse energy of the event. They present a measurement of the top pair production cross section in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at 1.96 TeV, from a data sample collected at CDF between March 2002 and September 2003 with an integrated luminosity of 193.5 pb-1. In order to bring the signal to background ratio at manageable levels, measurements in this channel traditionally use precision tracking information to identify at least one secondary vertex produced in the decay of a long lived b hadron. A different approach is taken here. Because of the large mass of the top quark, t$\\bar{t}$ events tend to be more spherical and more energetic than most of the background processes which otherwise mimic the t$\\bar{t}$ signature in the ''lepton+jets'' channel. A number of energy based and event shape variables can be used to statistically discriminate between signal and background events. Monte Carlo simulation is used to model the kinematics of t$\\bar{t}$ and most of the

  17. Toxicity studies on the radioprotective agent WR-2721 in CDF1 mice and beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, T.E.; Glaza, S.M.; Dickie, B.C.; Weltman, R.H.; Greenspun, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    WR-2721, S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid, is used extensively to protect normal cells during the irradiation of neoplastic cells. Dose levels for human radiotherapy are based on results obtained from laboratory animal lethality and toxicity studies. WR-2721 was administered intravenously to CDF1 mice and beagle dogs. Single dose lethality studies in mice showed the average 1/10 of the lethal dose, the median lethal dose and 9/10 the lethal dose to be 508 (1523 mg/m2), 589 (1766 mg/m2), and 682 mg/kg (2047 mg/m2), respectively. The lethal dose for female mice was lower than that for males. The 1/10 lethal dose in mice was slightly toxic to dogs; 1/10 of that dose was nontoxic. The lethal dose for dogs (6000 mg/m2) was higher than that for mice (2000 mg/m2). Clinical signs of toxicosis in the single-dose mouse toxicity study were evident in the 1st week following treatment and declined during the recovery period; signs of toxicosis were transient in dogs. Acute drug-induced pathologic changes included elevated BUN and SGOT levels, lymphoid necrosis, and renal tubular degeneration in mice. These changes were evident in the 1st week following treatment, but had dissipated by study termination. Generalized vascular changes (congestion, hemorrhage, and edema) and renal tubular degeneration occurred in treated dogs that had died or were killed moribund 7 days postinjection. These findings indicate sex-dependent and interspecies variation in the toxicity of WR-2721 with acute, but reversible, pathologic changes

  18. Measurement of Inclusive Jet Cross Sections in Z/γ*(→e+e-) + jets Production in p$\\bar{p}$ Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauza, Oriol Salto [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-04-01

    This Ph.D. thesis presents the measurement of inclusive jet cross sections in Z/γ*→ e+e- events using 1.7 fb-1 of data collected by the upgraded CDF detector during the Run II of the Tevatron. The Midpoint cone algorithm is used to search for jets in the events after identifying the presence of a Z/γ* boson through the reconstruction of its decay products. The measurements are compared to next-to-LO (NLO) pQCD predictions for events with one and two jets in the final state. The perturbative predictions are corrected for the contributions of non-perturbative processes, like the underlying event and the fragmentation of the partons into jets of hadrons. These processes are not described by perturbation theory and must be estimated from phenomenological models. In this thesis, a number of measurements are performed to test different models of underlying event and hadronization implemented in LO plus parton shower Monte Carlo generator programs. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the theory of strong interactions and jet phenomenology at hadron colliders. Chapter 3 contains the description of the Tevatron collider and the CDF detector. The analysis is described in detail in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 shows the measurement of those observables sensitive to non-perturbative effects compared to the predictions from several Monte Carlo programs. Chapter 6 discusses the final results and the comparison with theoretical expectations. Finally, Chapter 7 is devoted to the conclusions.

  19. ASSIST: the test setup for the VLT AO facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuik, Remko; Arsenault, Robin; Conzelmann, Ralf; Deep, Atul; Delabre, Bernard; Hallibert, Pascal; Jolissaint, Laurent; Hubin, Norbert; Kendrew, Sarah; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Molster, Frank; Paufique, Jerome; Pauwels, Evert; Stroebele, Stefan; Wiegers, Emiel

    2008-07-01

    ASSIST: The Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument STimulator is the test setup for the verification and calibration of three elements of the VLT Adaptive Optics Facility.; the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) the AO system for MUSE and HAWK-I (GALACSI and GRAAL). In the DSM testing mode the DSM will be tested using both interferometry and fast wave front sensing. In full AO mode, ASSIST will allow testing of the AO systems under realistic atmospheric conditions and optically equivalent to the conditions on the telescope. ASSIST is nearing its final design review and in this paper we present the current optical and mechanical design of ASSIST. In this paper we highlight some of the specific aspects of ASSIST that we are developing for ASSIST.

  20. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  1. Search for hybrid baryons with CLAS12 experimental setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanza, Lucille [Univ. degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    It is crucial to study the meson electroproduction in the kinematic region dominated by the formation of resonances. CLAS12 setup in Hall B at Jefferson Lab is particularly suitable for this task, since it is able to detect scattered electrons at low polar angles thanks to the Forward Tagger (FT) component. The process that we propose to study is ep → e'K+Λ, where the electron beam will be provided by the CEBAF accelerator with energies of 6.6, 8.8, and 11 GeV. This thesis work describes the setup and calibration of the FT calorimeter and the studies related to the search of hybrid baryons through the measurement of the K+ Λ electroproduction cross section.

  2. Development of an advanced electropolishing setup for multicell high gradient niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éozénou, F.; Chel, S.; Gasser, Y.; Servouin, C.; Visentin, B.; Charrier, J.-P.; Wang, Z.

    2012-08-01

    Reproducible operation at high performances of superconducting cavities is required for linear accelerators. High beta elliptical cavities are thus of concern and, to achieve required performances for such resonators, surface preparation including electropolishing is recommended. We have designed and operate a setup for electropolishing in the vertical position of multicell cavities in order to: (i) obtain high yield with large elliptical cavities for Superconducting Linac (SPL) or European Spallation Source projects; (ii) develop a reference installation demonstrating that this process is appropriate for the large scale treatment of cavities in industry. The setup described here is the first one able to electropolish vertically multicell cavities with circulating acid and high safety standards. This equipment makes it possible to use a wide range of parameters such as voltage, acid flow rate, temperature, and nitrogen injection with an R&D purpose in mind. Optimization is studied using modeling with COMSOL software for different cavities. As examples, we present some results for the 704 MHz high-beta SPL cavity and the 1300 MHz International Linear Collider cavity and show the influence of cathode shape on both acid flow and electric field distribution during the process. Importance of the size of the cavity and first results achieved on single-cell and nine-cell cavities will be discussed.

  3. Development of an advanced electropolishing setup for multicell high gradient niobium cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Éozénou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproducible operation at high performances of superconducting cavities is required for linear accelerators. High beta elliptical cavities are thus of concern and, to achieve required performances for such resonators, surface preparation including electropolishing is recommended. We have designed and operate a setup for electropolishing in the vertical position of multicell cavities in order to: (i obtain high yield with large elliptical cavities for Superconducting Linac (SPL or European Spallation Source projects; (ii develop a reference installation demonstrating that this process is appropriate for the large scale treatment of cavities in industry. The setup described here is the first one able to electropolish vertically multicell cavities with circulating acid and high safety standards. This equipment makes it possible to use a wide range of parameters such as voltage, acid flow rate, temperature, and nitrogen injection with an R&D purpose in mind. Optimization is studied using modeling with COMSOL software for different cavities. As examples, we present some results for the 704 MHz high-beta SPL cavity and the 1300 MHz International Linear Collider cavity and show the influence of cathode shape on both acid flow and electric field distribution during the process. Importance of the size of the cavity and first results achieved on single-cell and nine-cell cavities will be discussed.

  4. Stochastic integrated vendor–buyer model with unstable lead time and setup cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra K. Jaggi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new vendor-buyer system where there are different objectives for both sides. The proposed method of this paper is different from the other previously published works since it considers different objectives for both sides. In this paper, the vendor’s emphasis is on the crashing of the setup cost, which not only helps him compete in the market but also provides better services to his customers; and the buyer’s aim is to reduce the lead time, which not only facilitates the buyer to fulfill the customers’ demand on time but also enables him to earn a good reputation in the market or vice versa. In the light of the above stated facts, an integrated vendor-buyer stochastic inventory model is also developed. The propsed model considers two cases for demand during lead time: Case (i Complete demand information, Case (ii Partial demand information. The proposed model jointly optimizes the buyer’s ordered quantity and lead time along with vendor’s setup cost and the number of shipments. The results are demonstrated with the help of numerical examples.

  5. Multiparametric Experiments and Multiparametric Setups for Metering Explosive Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.; Del Bello, E.

    2016-12-01

    Explosive eruptions are multifaceted processes best studied by integrating a variety of observational perspectives. This need marries well with the continuous stream of new means that technological progress provides to volcanologists to parameterize these eruptions. Since decades, new technologies have been tested and integrated approaches have been attempted during so-called multiparametric experiments, i.e., short field campaigns with many, different instruments (and scientists) targeting natural laboratory volcanoes. Recently, portable multiparametric setups have been developed, including a few, highly complementary instruments to be rapidly deployed at any erupting volcano. Multiparametric experiments and setups share most of their challenges, like technical issues, site logistics, and data processing and interpretation. Our FAMoUS (FAst MUltiparametric Setup) setup pivots around coupled, high-speed imaging (visible and thermal) and acoustic (infrasonic to audible) recording, plus occasional seismic recording and sample collection. FAMoUS provided new insights on pyroclasts ejection and settling and jet noise dynamics at volcanoes worldwide. In the last years we conducted a series of BAcIO (Broadband ACquisition and Imaging Operation) experiments at Stromboli (Italy). These hosted state-of-the-art and prototypal eruption-metering technologies, including: multiple high-speed high-definition cameras for 3-D imaging; combined visible-infrared-ultraviolet imaging; in-situ and remote gas measurements; UAV aerial surveys; Doppler radar, and microphone arrays. This combined approach provides new understandings of the fundamental controls of Strombolian-style activity, and allows for crucial cross-validation of instruments and techniques. Several documentary expeditions participated in the BAcIO, attesting its tremendous potential for public outreach. Finally, sharing field work promotes interdisciplinary discussions and cooperation like nothing in the world.

  6. Construction of orthodontic setup models on a computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Takuya; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Michida, Masahiko; Yoshimi, Yuki; Nagasaki, Toshikazu; Murayama, Takeshi; Tanne, Kazuo; Nikawa, Hiroki

    2012-06-01

    Orthodontic setup models are usually limited to the display of teeth, with no information about the roots. The purpose of this article is to present a method for visualizing the tooth roots in setup models by integrating information from cone-beam computed tomography and a laser scanner. The reproducibility of the integration was evaluated. The records of 5 patients were used in this study. Three-dimensional digital models were generated from the dental casts. Tooth models were generated from the cone-beam computed tomography slices. The 3-dimensional models were superimposed on the crowns of the teeth in the tooth models and integrated. The integrated 3-dimensional tooth model and 3-dimensional setup model were registered. The reproducibility of the integration was evaluated for each tooth. Unpaired Student t tests were performed on the data between the anterior and posterior teeth, and between the right and left teeth. The discrepancy among the integrated 3-dimensional models at the final positions after we used this technique was 0.025 ± 0.007 mm. There was a significant difference in the distance between the anterior and posterior teeth (P <0.05). However, the average distances between the anterior and posterior teeth were small: 0.023 ± 0.007 and 0.028 ± 0.007 mm, respectively. No significant difference was found between the right and left teeth (P = 0.831). The methods presented in this study provide a reproducible visualization of tooth roots in virtual setup models by registering accurate crown models to cone-beam computed tomography scans. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Setup accuracy for prone and supine whole breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulliez, Thomas; Vercauteren, Tom; Greveling, Annick van; Speleers, Bruno; Neve, Wilfried de; Veldeman, Liv; Gulyban, Akos

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) based setup accuracy and margins for prone and supine whole breast irradiation (WBI). Setup accuracy was evaluated on 3559 CBCT scans of 242 patients treated with WBI and uncertainty margins were calculated using the van Herk formula. Uni- and multivariate analysis on individual margins was performed for age, body mass index (BMI) and cup size. The population-based margin in vertical (VE), lateral (LA) and longitudinal (LO) directions was 10.4/9.4/9.4 mm for the 103 supine and 10.5/22.4/13.7 mm for the 139 prone treated patients, being significantly (p < 0.01) different for the LA and LO directions. Multivariate analysis identified a significant (p < 0.05) correlation between BMI and the LO margin in supine position and the VE/LA margin in prone position. In this series, setup accuracy is significantly worse in prone compared to supine position for the LA and LO directions. However, without proper image-guidance, uncertainty margins of about 1 cm are also necessary for supine WBI. For patients with a higher BMI, larger margins are required. (orig.) [de

  8. Quick setup of test unit for accelerator control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, W.; D'Ottavio, T.; Gassner, D.; Nemesure, S.; Morris, J.

    2011-01-01

    Testing a single hardware unit of an accelerator control system often requires the setup of a program with graphical user interface. Developing a dedicated application for a specific hardware unit test could be time consuming and the application may become obsolete after the unit tests. This paper documents a methodology for quick design and setup of an interface focused on performing unit tests of accelerator equipment with minimum programming work. The method has three components. The first is a generic accelerator device object (ADO) manager which can be used to setup, store, and log testing controls parameters for any unit testing system. The second involves the design of a TAPE (Tool for Automated Procedure Execution) sequence file that specifies and implements all te testing and control logic. The sting third is the design of a PET (parameter editing tool) page that provides the unit tester with all the necessary control parameters required for testing. This approach has been used for testing the horizontal plane of the Stochastic Cooling Motion Control System at RHIC.

  9. Extending netCDF and CF conventions to support enhanced Earth Observation Ontology services: the Prod-Trees project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Paolo; Valentin, Bernard; Koubarakis, Manolis; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Access to Earth Observation products remains not at all straightforward for end users in most domains. Semantically-enabled search engines, generally accessible through Web portals, have been developed. They allow searching for products by selecting application-specific terms and specifying basic geographical and temporal filtering criteria. Although this mostly suits the needs of the general public, the scientific communities require more advanced and controlled means to find products. Ranges of validity, traceability (e.g. origin, applied algorithms), accuracy, uncertainty, are concepts that are typically taken into account in research activities. The Prod-Trees (Enriching Earth Observation Ontology Services using Product Trees) project will enhance the CF-netCDF product format and vocabulary to allow storing metadata that better describe the products, and in particular EO products. The project will bring a standardized solution that permits annotating EO products in such a manner that official and third-party software libraries and tools will be able to search for products using advanced tags and controlled parameter names. Annotated EO products will be automatically supported by all the compatible software. Because the entire product information will come from the annotations and the standards, there will be no need for integrating extra components and data structures that have not been standardized. In the course of the project, the most important and popular open-source software libraries and tools will be extended to support the proposed extensions of CF-netCDF. The result will be provided back to the respective owners and maintainers for ensuring the best dissemination and adoption of the extended format. The project, funded by ESA, has started in December 2012 and will end in May 2014. It is coordinated by Space Applications Services, and the Consortium includes CNR-IIA and the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. The first activities included

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption of uranium ions diluted in CdF2 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, J.J.C.R.

    1976-08-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has been studied in conection with the optical absortion spectra of Uranium ions diluted in CdF 2 single crystals. Analyses of the EPR and optical absorption spectra obtained experimentally, and a comparison with known results in the isomorfic CaF 2 , SrF 2 and BaF 2 , allowed the identification of two paramagnetic centers associated with Uranium ions. These are the U(2+) ion in cubic symmetry having the triplet γ 5 as ground state, and the U(3+) ion in cubic symmetry having the dublet γ 6 as ground state. (Author) [pt

  11. Infrared-Guided Patient Setup for Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyatskaya, Yulia; James, Steven; Killoran, Joseph H.; Soto, Ricardo; Mamon, Harvey J.; Chin, Lee; Allen, Aaron M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of an infrared-guided patient setup (iGPS) system to reduce the uncertainties in the setup of lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 patients were setup for lung irradiation using skin tattoos and lateral leveling marks. Daily electronic portal device images and iGPS marker locations were acquired and retrospectively reviewed. The iGPS-based shifts were compared with the daily electronic portal device image shifts using both the central axis iGPS marker and all five iGPS markers. For shift calculation using the five markers, rotational misalignment was included. The level of agreement between the iGPS and portal imaging to evaluate the setup was evaluated as the frequency of the shift difference in the range of 0-5 mm, 5-10 mm, and >10 mm. Results: Data were obtained for 450 treatment sessions for 15 patients. The difference in the isocenter shifts between the weekly vs. daily images was 0-5 mm in 42%, 5-10 mm in 30%, and >10 mm in 10% of the images. The shifts seen using the iGPS data were 0-5 mm in 81%, 5-10 mm in 14%, and >10 mm in 5%. Using only the central axis iGPS marker, the difference between the iGPS and portal images was 10 mm in 7% in the left-right direction and 73%, 18%, and 9% in the superoinferior direction, respectively. When all five iGPS markers were used, the disagreements between the iGPS and portal image shifts >10 mm were reduced from 7% to 2% in the left-right direction and 9% to 3% in the superoinferior direction. Larger reductions were also seen (e.g., a reduction from 50% to 0% in 1 patient). Conclusion: The daily iGPS-based shifts correlated well with the daily electronic portal device-based shifts. When patient movement has nonlinear rotational components, a combination of surface markers and portal images might be particularly beneficial to improve the setup for lung cancer patients

  12. Dedicated OO expertise applied to Run II software projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amidei, D.

    2000-01-01

    The change in software language and methodology by CDF and D0 to object-oriented from procedural Fortran is significant. Both experiments requested dedicated expertise that could be applied to software design, coding, advice and review. The Fermilab Run II offline computing outside review panel agreed strongly with the request and recommended that the Fermilab Computing Division hire dedicated OO expertise for the CDF/D0/Computing Division joint project effort. This was done and the two experts have been an invaluable addition to the CDF and D0 upgrade software projects and to the Computing Division in general. These experts have encouraged common approaches and increased the overall quality of the upgrade software. Advice on OO techniques and specific advice on C++ coding has been used. Recently a set of software reviews has been accomplished. This has been a very successful instance of a targeted application of computing expertise, and constitutes a very interesting study of how to move toward modern computing methodologies in HEP

  13. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – bis(benzoin)ethylenediiminato have been prepared and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and solubility. The potentiometric, and elemental analyses studies of the complexes revealed 1:1 ...

  14. Automated quality control system for LC-SRM setups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleman, Johan; Waldemarson, Sofia; Malmström, Johan; Levander, Fredrik

    2013-12-16

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is emerging as a standard tool for high-throughput protein quantification. For reliable and reproducible SRM protein quantification it is essential that system performance is stable. We present here a quality control workflow that is based on repeated analysis of a standard sample to allow insight into the stability of the key properties of a SRM setup. This is supported by automated software to monitor system performance and display information like signal intensities and retention time stability over time, and alert upon deviations from expected metrics. Utilising the software to evaluate 407 repeated injections of a standard sample during half a year, outliers in relative peptide signal intensities and relative peptide fragment ratios are identified, indicating the need for instrument maintenance. We therefore believe that the software could be a vital and powerful tool for any lab regularly performing SRM, increasing the reliability and quality of the SRM platform. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry is becoming established as a standard technique for accurate protein quantification. However, to achieve the required quantification reproducibility of the liquid chromatography (LC)-SRM setup, system performance needs to be monitored over time. Here we introduce a workflow with associated software to enable automated monitoring of LC-SRM setups. We believe that usage of the presented concepts will further strengthen the role of SRM as a reliable tool for protein quantification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Standardization and Quality Control in Proteomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Programming for controlling of pulse radiolysis setup. Program RADIO96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirkowski, J.; Grodkowski, J.

    1998-01-01

    Program RADIO96 was written in Pascal using DELPHI 1.0 (Borland) programming platform. It can operate on IBM PC compatible computers in WINDOWS 3x or WINDOWS'95 environment. The program is dedicated to the pulse radiolysis setup based on the linear electron accelerator LAE 13/9 of the Department of Radiation Chemistry and Technology of the INCT. This work was based on apparatus and results described before and also on programming manuals of used equipment and technical data of programming platform. (author)

  16. Development of a Laser Driver test setup for SLHC experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meroli, S.; Cazzorla, A.; Checcucci, B.; Mazza, G.; Moschitta, A.; Servoli, L.

    2011-06-01

    Future experiments at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) will increase the demand for high-bandwidth optical links due to the growing amounts of data to be treated by the data-transmission and acquisition systems. The development of the Giga Bit Laser Driver (GBLD) chip-set addresses this issue providing a means to increase the bandwidth available to transmit data to and from the counting room. This paper describes some aspect of test setup implementation and the protocol test used to evaluate and qualify the GBLD.

  17. Development of a Laser Driver test setup for SLHC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meroli, S., E-mail: Stefano.Meroli@pg.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Universita' degli Studi di Perugia (Italy); Cazzorla, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Universita' degli Studi di Perugia (Italy); Checcucci, B. [Universita' degli Studi di Perugia (Italy); Mazza, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Torino (Italy); Moschitta, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Universita' degli Studi di Perugia (Italy); Servoli, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Future experiments at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) will increase the demand for high-bandwidth optical links due to the growing amounts of data to be treated by the data-transmission and acquisition systems. The development of the Giga Bit Laser Driver (GBLD) chip-set addresses this issue providing a means to increase the bandwidth available to transmit data to and from the counting room. This paper describes some aspect of test setup implementation and the protocol test used to evaluate and qualify the GBLD.

  18. Problems with ink skin markings for radiation field setups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, Masaru; Saeki, Mituaki; Ishida, Yusei

    1982-01-01

    Ink skin markings are used in radiation therapy to aid in reproduction of treatment field setups or to indelibly outline field markings or tumors. We reported two cases of indelible ink skin for radiation field septa with minimal discomfort and dermatitis have been experienced for 6 months and above since end of radiotherapy. These indelible ink skin markings look like tattoo that will be big problems in the case of young female. We improved these problems by using of 10 percent silver nitrate instead of habitual skin ink. (author)

  19. Interfacing of high temperature Z-meter setup using python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashutosh; Sisodia, Shashank; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we interface high temperature Z-meter setup to automize the whole measurement process. A program is built on open source programming language `Python' which convert the manual measurement process into fully automated process without any cost addition. Using this program, simultaneous measurement of Seebeck coefficient (α), thermal conductivity (κ) and electrical resistivity (ρ), are performed and using all three, figure-of-merit (ZT) is calculated. Developed program is verified by performing measurement over p-type Bi0.36Sb1.45Te3 sample and the data obtained are found to be in good agreement with the reported data.

  20. Wideband MIMO Channel Capacity Analysis in Multiprobe Anechoic Chamber Setups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Kyosti, Pekka; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses over the air (OTA) testing for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) capable terminals with emphasis on wideband MIMO channel capacity analysis in a multi-probe anechoic chamber setup. In the literature, the spatial correlation simulation accuracy at the receiver (Rx) side has...... been used to determine the test area size for a limited number of probes. However, it is desirable that the test area size is defined in terms of data rate deviation of the simulated channel in the laboratory from that of the target channel model. This paper reports MIMO capacity analysis results...

  1. Four point bending setup for characterization of semiconductor piezoresistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Jacob; Arnoldus, Morten Berg; Hansen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    characterization. As a proof of concept, we show measurements of the piezocoefficient pi44 in p-type silicon at three different doping concentrations in the temperature range from T=30 °C to T=80 °C. The extracted piezocoefficients are determined with an uncertainty of 1.8%. ©2008 American Institute of Physics...... bending fixture is manufactured in polyetheretherketon and a dedicated silicon chip with embedded piezoresistors fits in the fixture. The fixture is actuated by a microstepper actuator and a high sensitivity force sensor measures the applied force on the fixture and chip. The setup includes heaters...

  2. Automated assembly of micro mechanical parts in a Microfactory setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gegeckaite, Asta

    2006-01-01

    Many micro products in use today are manufactured using semi-automatic assembly. Handling, assembly and transport of the parts are especially labour intense processes. Automation of these processes holds a large potential, especially if flexible, modular microfactories can be developed. This paper...... focuses on the issues that have to be taken into consideration in order to go from a semi-automatic production into an automated microfactory. The application in this study is a switch consisting of 7 parts. The development of a microfactory setup to take care of the automated assembly of the switch...

  3. Development of a Laser Driver test setup for SLHC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meroli, S.; Cazzorla, A.; Checcucci, B.; Mazza, G.; Moschitta, A.; Servoli, L.

    2011-01-01

    Future experiments at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) will increase the demand for high-bandwidth optical links due to the growing amounts of data to be treated by the data-transmission and acquisition systems. The development of the Giga Bit Laser Driver (GBLD) chip-set addresses this issue providing a means to increase the bandwidth available to transmit data to and from the counting room. This paper describes some aspect of test setup implementation and the protocol test used to evaluate and qualify the GBLD.

  4. A new compact self-referenced holographic setup tested on a fluorescent target

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss, Márton Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new self-referenced holographic microscope setup based on a special bifocal lens. This setup can detect and visualize fluorescent objects. The new principle and the experimental results of the imaging are also presented.

  5. An improved method/setup for extended testing after the Cigre, Method II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim; Rygal, Roman

    1992-01-01

    protection of the different test objects, and the sample production and preparation, among others, were of the utmost importance for the end results of this test. Results of using the system on epoxy with and without fillers are presented. Based on these results, the critical points of the method...... are discussed. The application of the system showed typical behavior of the discharges and lifetimes that was strongly dependent on the filler type...

  6. Tests with beam setup of the TileCal Phase-II upgrade electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Hlaluku, Dingane Reward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The LHC has planned a series of upgrades culminating in the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) which will have an average luminosity 5-7 times larger than the nominal Run-2 value. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) will undergo an upgrade to accommodate to the HL-LHC parameters. The TileCal electronics both on- and off-detector will be completely redesigned and a new readout architecture will be adopted. The photomultiplier signals will be digitised and transferred to the TileCal PreProcessors (PPr) located off-detector for every bunch crossing. Then, the PPr will provide preprocessed digital data to the first level trigger with improved spatial granularity and energy resolution with respect to the current analog trigger signals. We plan to insert one TileCal module instrumented with the new electronics in the real detector to evaluate and qualify the new readout and trigger concepts in the overall ATLAS data acquisition system. This new drawer, so-called Hybrid Demonstrator, must provide analog trigger signal fo...

  7. A HPMT based set-up to characterize scintillating crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosio, C.; Ercoli, C.; Jaaskelainen, S.; Lecoeur, G.; Leutz, H.; Loos, R.; Piedigrossi, D.; Puertolas, D.; Rosso, E.; Schomaker, R.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a fully automatic measurement set-up, capable of measuring light yields arising from scintillating crystals in a linear range of about four orders of magnitude. The photodetector is a hybrid photomultiplier tube specially developed to optimize linear range and photon detection. Crystal and photodetector are temperature controlled by a closed water circuit, as this is essential when measuring low light yield scintillating crystals with a marked temperature dependence of their light yield. Gamma sources can be placed either on top or on the side of the crystal. In this latter case, the source can be automatically moved by a computer-controlled step motor to provide a uniformity profile of the light yield along the crystal. Tagged and not-tagged operation modes are possible. The whole set-up is computer-controlled in an effort to provide fast and reliable measurements, to characterize many crystals per day. This is important for the quality control of the lead tungstate crystals that will be applied in the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS-detector at the LHC at CERN. (author)

  8. A HPMT based set-up to characterize scintillating crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Ambrosio, C.; Ercoli, C.; Jaaskelainen, S.; Lecoeur, G.; Leutz, H.; Loos, R.; Piedigrossi, D.; Puertolas, D.; Rosso, E.; Schomaker, R

    1999-09-21

    We have developed a fully automatic measurement set-up, capable of measuring light yields arising from scintillating crystals in a linear range of about four orders of magnitude. The photodetector is a hybrid photomultiplier tube specially developed to optimize linear range and photon detection. Crystal and photodetector are temperature controlled by a closed water circuit, as this is essential when measuring low light yield scintillating crystals with a marked temperature dependence of their light yield. Gamma sources can be placed either on top or on the side of the crystal. In this latter case, the source can be automatically moved by a computer-controlled step motor to provide a uniformity profile of the light yield along the crystal. Tagged and not-tagged operation modes are possible. The whole set-up is computer-controlled in an effort to provide fast and reliable measurements, to characterize many crystals per day. This is important for the quality control of the lead tungstate crystals that will be applied in the electromagnetic calorimeter of the CMS-detector at the LHC at CERN. (author)

  9. Improvements of the optical detection setup of COLLAPS

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In Collinear Laser Spectroscopy of rare isotopes it is crucial to keep the background of the measurements low. Using photomultiplier tubes for those measurements, the dark count rate should be as low as possible and the signal gain high. Therefore, it is important to use the right type of photomultiplier tubes for the purpose of single photon detection with a low signal rate. Thus, I tested several different types of photomultiplier tubes for their dark count rates and noise to signal separation. The results have identified the most suitable type of photomultiplier tubes, but further measuring for verification might be necessary. Therefore, it is very important to keep the photomultiplier tubes shut from light. Exposing the photocathode to light implies life-long damage and increased background for several days. So far, when dismounting one of these photomultiplier tubes from the setup, a big cage around the optical detection setup was covered into black sheets to keep it as dark as possible inside. Still, th...

  10. A HPMT based set-up to characterize scintillating crystals

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C; Jääskeläinen, S; Lecoeur, Gérard; Leutz, H; Loos, R; Piedigrossi, D; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E; Schomaker, R

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a fully automatic measurement set-up, capable of measuring light yields arising from scintillating crystals in a linear range of about four orders of magnitude. The photodetector is a Hybrid Photomultiplier Tube especially developed to optimize linear range and photon detection. Crystal and photodetector are temperature controlled by a closed water circuit, as this is essential when measuring low light yield scintillating crystals with a marked temperature dependence of their light yield. Gamma sources can be placed either on top or on the side of the crystal. In this latter case, the source can be automatically moved by a computer-controlled step motor to provide a uniformity profile of the light yield along the crystal. Tagged and not-tagged operation modes are possible. The whole set-up is computer-controlled in an effort to provide fast and reliable measurements, to characterize many crystals per day. This is important for the quality control of the Lead Tungstate crystals that will be a...

  11. First search at CDF for the Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Shan-Huei S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2006-01-01

    By way of retaining the gauge invariance of the Standard Model (SM) and giving masses to the W± and Z0 bosons and the fermions, the Higgs mechanism predicts the existence of a neutral scalar bosonic particle, whose mass is not exactly known. The Higgs boson is the only experimentally unconfirmed SM particle to date. This thesis documents a search for the Higgs boson in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron, using 360 ± pb -1 data collected by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II), as part of the most important quest for contemporary particle physicists. The search was for a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of W± bosons, where each W boson decays to an electron, a muon or a tau that further decays to an electron or a muon with associated neutrinos. Events with two charged leptons plus large missing energy were selected in data triggered on a high p$\\bar{p}$ lepton and compared to the signal and backgrounds modeled using Monte Carlo and jet data. No signal-like excess was observed in data. Therefore, upper limits on the HWW production cross-section in the analyzed mass range were extracted using the binned likelihood maximum from distributions of dilepton azimuthal angle at 95% Bayesian credibility level (CL), as shown in the table below.

  12. Measurement of the inclusive-isolated prompt-photon cross section in pp¯ collisions using the full CDF data set

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Amerio, S.; Lysák, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 9 (2017), s. 1-9, č. článku 092003. ISSN 2470-0010 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Batavia TEVATRON Coll * photon * inclusive production * numerical calculations * Monte Carlo * rapidity dependence * CDF * experimental results Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 4.568, year: 2016

  13. Setup accuracy for prone and supine whole breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulliez, Thomas; Vercauteren, Tom; Greveling, Annick van; Speleers, Bruno; Neve, Wilfried de; Veldeman, Liv [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Gulyban, Akos [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); University Hospital Liege, Department of Radiotherapy, Liege (Belgium)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) based setup accuracy and margins for prone and supine whole breast irradiation (WBI). Setup accuracy was evaluated on 3559 CBCT scans of 242 patients treated with WBI and uncertainty margins were calculated using the van Herk formula. Uni- and multivariate analysis on individual margins was performed for age, body mass index (BMI) and cup size. The population-based margin in vertical (VE), lateral (LA) and longitudinal (LO) directions was 10.4/9.4/9.4 mm for the 103 supine and 10.5/22.4/13.7 mm for the 139 prone treated patients, being significantly (p < 0.01) different for the LA and LO directions. Multivariate analysis identified a significant (p < 0.05) correlation between BMI and the LO margin in supine position and the VE/LA margin in prone position. In this series, setup accuracy is significantly worse in prone compared to supine position for the LA and LO directions. However, without proper image-guidance, uncertainty margins of about 1 cm are also necessary for supine WBI. For patients with a higher BMI, larger margins are required. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Arbeit war es, die interfraktionelle Repositionierungsgenauigkeit in Bauchlage (BL) versus Rueckenlage (RL) bei Ganzbrustbestrahlung (GBB) mittels Cone-Beam-CT (CBCT) zu bestimmen, um die notwendigen PTV-Sicherheitsabstaende zu definieren. Die Repositionierungsgenauigkeit wurde basierend an 3559 CBCT-Scans von 242 mit GBB behandelten Patienten ausgewertet. Die PTV-Sicherheitsabstaende wurden unter Verwendung der ''van-Herk''-Formel berechnet. Uni- und multivariable Analysen wurden fuer Sicherheitsabstaende in jede Richtung auf Basis von Alter, Body-Mass-Index (BMI) und Koerbchengroesse durchgefuehrt. Die basierend auf den taeglichen CBCT-Verschiebungen berechneten PTV-Sicherheitsabstaende betrugen in anteroposteriorer (AP), lateraler (LT oder links-rechts) und kraniokaudaler (CC) Richtung 10,4/9,4/9,4 mm fuer die RL (103 Patienten) und

  14. Developing and implementing a high precision setup system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lee-Cheng

    The demand for high-precision radiotherapy (HPRT) was first implemented in stereotactic radiosurgery using a rigid, invasive stereotactic head frame. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a frameless device was developed along a growing interest in sophisticated treatment with a tight margin and high-dose gradient. This dissertation establishes the complete management for HPRT in the process of frameless SRT, including image-guided localization, immobilization, and dose evaluation. The most ideal and precise positioning system can allow for ease of relocation, real-time patient movement assessment, high accuracy, and no additional dose in daily use. A new image-guided stereotactic positioning system (IGSPS), the Align RT3C 3D surface camera system (ART, VisionRT), which combines 3D surface images and uses a real-time tracking technique, was developed to ensure accurate positioning at the first place. The uncertainties of current optical tracking system, which causes patient discomfort due to additional bite plates using the dental impression technique and external markers, are found. The accuracy and feasibility of ART is validated by comparisons with the optical tracking and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems. Additionally, an effective daily quality assurance (QA) program for the linear accelerator and multiple IGSPSs is the most important factor to ensure system performance in daily use. Currently, systematic errors from the phantom variety and long measurement time caused by switching phantoms were discovered. We investigated the use of a commercially available daily QA device to improve the efficiency and thoroughness. Reasonable action level has been established by considering dosimetric relevance and clinic flow. As for intricate treatments, the effect of dose deviation caused by setup errors remains uncertain on tumor coverage and toxicity on OARs. The lack of adequate dosimetric simulations based on the true treatment coordinates from

  15. Analysis of Daily Setup Variation With Tomotherapy Megavoltage Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jining; Uhl, Barry; Dewit, Kelly; Young, Mark; Taylor, Brian; Fei Dingyu; Lo, Y-C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate different setup uncertainties for various anatomic sites with TomoTherapy (registered) pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) and to provide optimal margin guidelines for these anatomic sites. Ninety-two patients with tumors in head and neck (HN), brain, lung, abdominal, or prostate regions were included in the study. MVCT was used to verify patient position and tumor target localization before each treatment. With the anatomy registration tool, MVCT provided real-time tumor shift coordinates relative to the positions where the simulation CT was performed. Thermoplastic facemasks were used for HN and brain treatments. Vac-Lok TM cushions were used to immobilize the lower extremities up to the thighs for prostate patients. No respiration suppression was administered for lung and abdomen patients. The interfractional setup variations were recorded and corrected before treatment. The mean interfractional setup error was the smallest for HN among the 5 sites analyzed. The average 3D displacement in lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions for the 5 sites ranged from 2.2-7.7 mm for HN and lung, respectively. The largest movement in the lung was 2.0 cm in the longitudinal direction, with a mean error of 6.0 mm and standard deviation of 4.8 mm. The mean interfractional rotation variation was small and ranged from 0.2-0.5 deg., with the standard deviation ranging from 0.7-0.9 deg. Internal organ displacement was also investigated with a posttreatment MVCT scan for HN, lung, abdomen, and prostate patients. The maximum 3D intrafractional displacement across all sites was less than 4.5 mm. The interfractional systematic errors and random errors were analyzed and the suggested margins for HN, brain, prostate, abdomen, and lung in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions were between 4.2 and 8.2 mm, 5.0 mm and 12.0 mm, and 1.5 mm and 6.8 mm, respectively. We suggest that TomoTherapy (registered) pretreatment

  16. Analysis of daily setup variation with tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jining; Uhl, Barry; Dewit, Kelly; Young, Mark; Taylor, Brian; Fei, Ding-Yu; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate different setup uncertainties for various anatomic sites with TomoTherapy pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) and to provide optimal margin guidelines for these anatomic sites. Ninety-two patients with tumors in head and neck (HN), brain, lung, abdominal, or prostate regions were included in the study. MVCT was used to verify patient position and tumor target localization before each treatment. With the anatomy registration tool, MVCT provided real-time tumor shift coordinates relative to the positions where the simulation CT was performed. Thermoplastic facemasks were used for HN and brain treatments. Vac-Lok cushions were used to immobilize the lower extremities up to the thighs for prostate patients. No respiration suppression was administered for lung and abdomen patients. The interfractional setup variations were recorded and corrected before treatment. The mean interfractional setup error was the smallest for HN among the 5 sites analyzed. The average 3D displacement in lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions for the 5 sites ranged from 2.2-7.7 mm for HN and lung, respectively. The largest movement in the lung was 2.0 cm in the longitudinal direction, with a mean error of 6.0 mm and standard deviation of 4.8 mm. The mean interfractional rotation variation was small and ranged from 0.2-0.5 degrees, with the standard deviation ranging from 0.7-0.9 degrees. Internal organ displacement was also investigated with a posttreatment MVCT scan for HN, lung, abdomen, and prostate patients. The maximum 3D intrafractional displacement across all sites was less than 4.5 mm. The interfractional systematic errors and random errors were analyzed and the suggested margins for HN, brain, prostate, abdomen, and lung in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions were between 4.2 and 8.2 mm, 5.0 mm and 12.0 mm, and 1.5 mm and 6.8 mm, respectively. We suggest that TomoTherapy pretreatment MVCT can be used to

  17. An unconventional set-up for fluxless brazing of aluminium

    CERN Document Server

    Loos, Robert

    1999-01-01

    In order to successfully braze aluminium alloy assemblies without the use of oxide-removing fluxes, an evironment with very low contaminant level is mandatory. This is mostly achieved by using a vacuum furnace. Brazing under inert gas of sufficient purity is also possible. The method reported upon here makes use of a stainless steel bag which can enter a traditional air furnace. The bag is evacuated, giving a well distributed mechanical pressure on the parts to join. The intrinsic handicap of poor vacuum is compensated by regular inert gas flushing, even at high temperatures. The set-up works rather well, and the idea is believed to yield a valuable strategic and economic option, for the realization of special equipment as well as for prototyping work. We intend to use the principle for the CMS Preshower cooling screens.

  18. Magnet Test Setup of the CMS Tracker ready for installation

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The pieces of the Tracker that will be operated in the forthcoming Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) have been transported inside the dummy tracker support tube to the CMS experimental hall (Point 5, Cessy). The operation took place during the night of 12th May, covering the ~15km distance in about three hours. The transport was monitored for shocks, temperature and humidity with the help of the CERN TS-IC section. The Tracker setup comprises segments of the Tracker Inner Barrel (TIB), the Tracker Outer Barrel (TOB) and Tracker EndCaps (TEC) detectors. It represents roughly 1% of the final CMS Tracker. Installation into the solenoid is foreseen to take place on Wednesday 17th May.

  19. Report on the set-up of a holographic interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.N.

    1977-10-01

    Holographic interferometry is well suited for visualizing temperature, density, pressure and concentration fields in transparent fluids. The holographic real-time interferometer allows a continuous observation of stationary and instationary flow processes. After the explanation of the measuring technique, the problems arising during the interferometer set-up as well as the necessary adjusting operations are described. For heat transfer problems new possibilities for the application of holographic interferometry are revealed. Convection in boxes, temperature fields around heated or cooled bodies, concentration and diffusion processes in two phase-flows, mixtures and solutions as well as melting and freezing processes may be investigated. On the basis of particular examples some applications are presented. (orig.) [de

  20. Comparison of two setups for induction heating in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menotti, Stefano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    To eliminate defects and improve the quality of molded parts, increasing the mold temperature is one of the applicable solutions. A high mold temperature can increase the path flow of the polymer inside the cavity allowing reduction of the number of injection points, reduction of part thickness......, and moulding of smaller and more complex geometries. The last two aspects are very important in micro injection molding. In this paper, a new embedded induction heating system is proposed and validated and two different coil setups were tested and compared. An experimental investigation was performed based...... on a test geometry integrating different aspect ratios of small structures. Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) was used as material, and different mold temperatures were tested. The replicated test objects were measured by means of an optical coordinate measuring machine (CMM). On the basis...

  1. Optimizing the application of entomopathogenic nematodes: experimental set-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusselman, E; Steurbaut, W; Sonck, B

    2007-01-01

    The complex issue concerning the spray application of Entomopathogenic Nematodes (EPNs) with a hydraulic sprayer is still not solved. This research project focuses on the effect of spray application technique on the viability and deposition of EPNs. In this paper the experimental set-up used for this evaluation is described. A modular spray application system has been developed and is currently used to evaluate the effect of different parts of a sprayer on the viability of the EPNs. Based on the results of experiments using this modular spray application system, recommendations regarding pump type, mixing system, nozzle type and filter size will be formulated. Because of the large number of experiments in this research project, an image analysis system for the determination of the viability of the nematodes is developed. This paper describes two experiments comparing the new developed image processing technique with the standard microscopic counting technique.

  2. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  3. CACTUS - a multidetector set-up at the Oslo Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Bjerke, B.; Messelt, S.; Olsen, E.A.; Ramsoey, T.; Rekstad, J.; Tveter, T.S.; Wikne, J.C.; Kownacki, J.

    1989-06-01

    The design and construction of the multidetector system CACTUS is discussed, and its operation in the context of the Oslo Cyclotron is described. The multidetector system has been initiated to meet the requirements at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory in the experimental work on nuclear structure at high intrinsic excitation energy. The laboratory has developed a promising technique based on measuring γ-decay after single nucleon transfer reactions with the use of pγ coincidences. However, a proper interpretation of the experimental results has often been difficult due to low counting rates. One of the most important aims for the new experimental set-up has been to obtain pγ as well as pγγ coincidence spectra with high statistics. The CACTUS detector system which is mounted on the 90 o beam line of the cyclotron, consists of 28 NaI and 2 Ge detectors in combination with 8 Si particle telescopes

  4. Distributed Drives Monitoring and Control: A Laboratory Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini Sreejeth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory setup of distributed drives system comprising a three-phase induction motor (IM drive and a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM drive is modeled, designed, and developed for the monitoring and control of the individual drives. The integrated operation of IM and PMSM drives system has been analyzed under different operating conditions, and their performance has been monitored through supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA system. The necessary SCADA graphical user interface (GUI has also been created for the display of drive parameters. The performances of IM and PMSM under parametric variations are predicted through sensitivity analysis. An integrated operation of the drives is demonstrated through experimental and simulation results.

  5. The new cold neutron tomography set-up at SINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Baechler, S; Cauwels, P; Dierick, M; Jolie, J; Materna, T; Mondelaers, W

    2002-01-01

    A new cold neutron tomography set-up is operational at the neutron spallation source SINQ of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland. The detection system is based on a sup 6 LiF/ZnS:Ag conversion screen and a CCD camera. Several tests have been carried out to characterize the quality of the tomography system, such as homogeneity, reproducibility, L/D-ratio and spatial resolution. The high flux and the good efficiency of the detector lead to very short exposure times. Thus, a typical set of tomography scans can be performed in only 20 min. Then, 3D computed tomography objects were calculated using the filtered back-projection reconstruction method. Initial results of various samples show that cold neutron tomography can be a useful tool for industry, geology and dentistry. Furthermore, suitable applications can be found in the field of archaeology.

  6. Anti-tumor activity of a novel compound-CDF is mediated by regulating miR-21, miR-200, and PTEN in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Bao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs or cancer stem-like cells in a tumor mass is believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence because of their intrinsic and extrinsic drug-resistance characteristics. Therefore, targeted killing of CSCs would be a newer strategy for the prevention of tumor recurrence and/or treatment by overcoming drug-resistance. We have developed a novel synthetic compound-CDF, which showed greater bioavailability in animal tissues such as pancreas, and also induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, which was mediated by inactivation of NF-κB, COX-2, and VEGF in pancreatic cancer (PC cells.In the current study we showed, for the first time, that CDF could significantly inhibit the sphere-forming ability (pancreatospheres of PC cells consistent with increased disintegration of pancreatospheres, which was associated with attenuation of CSC markers (CD44 and EpCAM, especially in gemcitabine-resistant (MIAPaCa-2 PC cells containing high proportion of CSCs consistent with increased miR-21 and decreased miR-200. In a xenograft mouse model of human PC, CDF treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth, which was associated with decreased NF-κB DNA binding activity, COX-2, and miR-21 expression, and increased PTEN and miR-200 expression in tumor remnants.These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumor activity of CDF is associated with inhibition of CSC function via down-regulation of CSC-associated signaling pathways. Therefore, CDF could be useful for the prevention of tumor recurrence and/or treatment of PC with better treatment outcome in the future.

  7. Setup of Mössbauer spectrometers at RCPTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechoušek, J.; Jančík, D.; Frydrych, J.; Navařík, J.; Novák, P.

    2012-10-01

    Setup of Mössbauer spectrometers (MS) for structural, phase, and magnetic characterization of iron-or tin-containing samples is presented. This comprehensive line of 57Fe and 119Sn Mössbauer spectrometers covers transmission spectrometers (TMS) for roomtemperature (RT) measurements, temperature dependent measurements and measurements in an external magnetic field. An RT Conversion Electron/Conversion X-ray Mössbauer technique (CEMS/CXMS) is also available. The main concept of the RT MS is a table-top spectrometric bench with a control unit based on special-purpose hardware or standard PC platform. The first way offers a compact design and PC independent spectra collection system. The second setup, a PC-based system, which uses commercial devices and LabVIEW software, offers easy customization and enables advancement in spectrometer construction. The both types of control systems are able to operate special parts (velocity transducers, gamma-ray detectors) of unusual spectrometric benches. The standard velocity axis range is up to ±20 mm/s with a maximum nonlinearity of 0.1%. Applicable measuring conditions of presented TMSs cover a cryogenic temperature range from 1.5 up to 300 K and high temperature range from RT up to 1000 °C. With in-field low-temperature MS, we are able to analyze samples normally in the external magnetic fields up to 8 T (in temperature interval from 1.5 up to 300 K). In addition, special modes of measurements can be applied including backscattering gamma-ray geometry or measurement in an inert or controlled-humidity atmosphere. Technical details and construction aspects of spectrometers are presented.

  8. Introduction to heat transfer test setup for the SCRAP receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubkoll, Matti; Harms, Thomas M.; von Backström, Theodor W.

    2017-06-01

    The Spiky Central Receiver Air Pre-heater (SCRAP) receiver is a novel external tubular metallic central receiver concept. The SCRAP receiver is designed to increase an air-receivers solar-thermal performance. This is aimed to be achieved by enhancing heat transfer to the pressurized air-stream within the absorber assemblies (spikes) by utilizing an internally finned tube geometry. The fin shape is defined to create rectangular ducts as passages for the air flow, therewith a high heat transfer coefficient. The spikes are arranged in such a way that they trap incoming concentrated radiation (reduce reflection losses) and minimize thermal radiation losses from the receiver to ambient. In previous work, the modeling of a SCRAP receiver was discussed on. This included the modeling of the internal air flow and heat transfer within a spike, analysis of the optical characteristics of a SCRAP receiver and the impingement heat transfer capabilities in the spike tip (exposed to the highest flux). Further, analysis of the thermal interaction of spikes with one another and with ambient (convective and radiative heat loss) permitted drawing of first conclusions of the receiver performance potential. To validate the models predicting the pressurized air flow and heat transfer within a spike, an experimental test setup was designed, constructed and built at the heat transfer laboratories at Stellenbosch University. This work introduces the design of the test setup and will discuss preliminary results obtained during its commissioning. From first analysis the predictions made for the pressure drop within the internally finned section appear adequate. The heat transfer behavior will require further detailed analysis to develop sufficient confidence to allow for conclusions. Initial results, however, show good general agreement between measured and simulated data.

  9. Competencies Setup for Nuclear Regulatory Staff in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingish, Panupong; Siripirom, Lopchai; Nakkaew, Pongpan; Manuwong, Theerapatt; Wongsamarn, Vichian

    2010-01-01

    Competencies setup for regulatory bodies oversee a research reactor and nuclear power reactors in Thailand, concentrating on staff development in areas of review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, authorization, and development of regulations and guides. The regulatory body in Thailand is the Bureau of Nuclear Safety Regulation (BNSR) which belongs to the Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP). The BNSR is divided into 4 groups according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). These groups are the nuclear safety administration group, nuclear safety technical support group, nuclear safety assessment and licensing group, and the nuclear installations inspection group. Each group is divided into senior and junior positions. The competencies model was used for implementation of staff qualification, career planning and professional progression by BNSR. Competencies are related to knowledge, skills and attitudes (KSAs) needed to perform their job. A key issue is obtaining competencies for the regulatory bodies. The systematic approach to training (SAT) has been used in several countries for improvement regulator performance. The SAT contains 5 steps, including analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation, to achieve competencies. The SAT provides a logical progression from the identification of competencies required to perform a job to the design, development and implementation of training using the competencies model. In the first step, BNSR performs an operating analysis of training needs assessment (TNA) by using gap analysis technique, as suggested by IAEA. Individual regulatory bodies address the gap using appropriate training program, after comparing the actual and desired competency profiles to determine the gap. This paper examines competencies setup for regulatory staff of BNSR as a result of gaps analysis to establish a scheme for design characteristics of regulatory staff and training courses, thereby enhancing the regulatory

  10. Woods Hole Image Processing System Software implementation; using NetCDF as a software interface for image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    The Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in the collection, processing and digital mosaicking of high, medium and low-resolution side-scan sonar data during the past 6 years. In the past, processing and digital mosaicking has been accomplished with a dedicated, shore-based computer system. With the need to process sidescan data in the field with increased power and reduced cost of major workstations, a need to have an image processing package on a UNIX based computer system which could be utilized in the field as well as be more generally available to Branch personnel was identified. This report describes the initial development of that package referred to as the Woods Hole Image Processing System (WHIPS). The software was developed using the Unidata NetCDF software interface to allow data to be more readily portable between different computer operating systems.

  11. MK3TOOLS & NetCDF - storing VLBI data in a machine independent array oriented data format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, T.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2007-07-01

    In the beginning of 2002 the International VLBI Service (IVS) has agreed to introduce a Platform-independent VLBI exchange format (PIVEX) which permits the exchange of observational data and stimulates the research across different analysis groups. Unfortunately PIVEX has never been implemented and many analysis software packages are still depending on prior processing (e.g. ambiguity resolution and computation of ionosphere corrections) done by CALC/SOLVE. Thus MK3TOOLS which handles MK3 databases without CALC/SOLVE being installed has been developed. It uses the NetCDF format to store the data and since interfaces exist for a variety of programming languages (FORTRAN, C/C++, JAVA, Perl, Python) it can be easily incorporated in existing and upcoming analysis software packages.

  12. Measurement of B0 and B+ Lifetimes using Semileptonic Decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David K. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Lifetime measurements for B0 and B+ are presented using semileptonic decays of B mesons from 360 pb-1 of data collected by CDF's lepton plus displaced track trigger. The decays B → ℓνDX, where D is either D +, D0, or D* +, are partially reconstructed from a muon or electron, a displaced track, and a fully reconstructed charm meson. The B 0 and B+ lifetimes are obtained from an unbinned maximum-likelihood fit to the proper decay length distributions. The measured lifetimes are τB 0 = 1.527 ± 0.012(stat.) ± 0.023( syst.)ps and τB + = 1.629 ± 0.013(stat.) ± 0.025( syst.)ps.

  13. The PRESHOWER - a New Multichnnel Detector for the CDF. The Scintillator Plates of the New Detector: Design, Production, Quality Control

    CERN Document Server

    Artikov, A M; Chocheli, D; Danilov, V; Grinyov, B; Lebedev, V; Senchyshyn, V G

    2005-01-01

    To increase the CDF efficiency when studying heavy quark processes there was designed, constructed and put into operation a new multichannel detector --- the so called Central Preshower. It was positioned before the central electromagnetic calorimeter and increased the photon, lepton and hadron identification efficiency. JINR in cooperation with the Institute of Scintillating Materials (Kharkiv) has created a sensitive element of the new detector: about 2800 units of the scintillation tiles; the specially developed quality control procedure guaranteed the necessary high light yield for tiles mass production. The chosen tiles were equipped at FNAL by two loops (about 1 m long) of WLS fibers positioned inside the $\\Omega $-shape groove; it guaranteed a light yield of $\\sim$ 25--35 photoelectrons/MIP.

  14. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at CDF Using the Template Method in the Lepton + Jets Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelman, Jahred A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-06-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The analysis uses a template method, in which the overconstrained kinematics of the Lepton+Jets channel of the t$\\bar{t}$ system are used to measure a single quantity, the reconstructed top quark mass, that is strongly correlated with the true top quark mass. in addition, the dijet mass of the hadronically decaying W boson is used to constrain in situ the uncertain jet energy scale in the CDF detector. Two-dimensional probability density functions are derived using a kernel density estimate-based machinery. Using 1.9 fb-1 of data, the top quark mass is measured to be 171.8$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(stat.) ± 1.0(syst.)GeV/c2.

  15. NetCDF-CF-OPeNDAP: Standards for ocean data interoperability and object lessons for community data standards processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Steven C.; Blower, Jon D.; Carval, Thierry; Casey, Kenneth S.; Donlon, Craig; Lauret, Olivier; Loubrieu, Thomas; Srinivasan, Ashwanth; Trinanes, Joaquin; Godøy, Øystein; Mendelssohn, Roy; Signell, Richard P.; de La Beaujardiere, Jeff; Cornillon, Peter; Blanc, Frederique; Rew, Russ; Harlan, Jack; Hall, Julie; Harrison, D.E.; Stammer, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    It is generally recognized that meeting society's emerging environmental science and management needs will require the marine data community to provide simpler, more effective and more interoperable access to its data. There is broad agreement, as well, that data standards are the bedrock upon which interoperability will be built. The path that would bring the marine data community to agree upon and utilize such standards, however, is often elusive. In this paper we examine the trio of standards 1) netCDF files; 2) the Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention; and 3) the OPeNDAP data access protocol. These standards taken together have brought our community a high level of interoperability for "gridded" data such as model outputs, satellite products and climatological analyses, and they are gaining rapid acceptance for ocean observations. We will provide an overview of the scope of the contribution that has been made. We then step back from the information technology considerations to examine the community or "social" process by which the successes were achieved. We contrast the path by which the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has advanced the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) - netCDF/CF/OPeNDAP exemplifying a "bottom up" standards process whereas GTS is "top down". Both of these standards are tales of success at achieving specific purposes, yet each is hampered by technical limitations. These limitations sometimes lead to controversy over whether alternative technological directions should be pursued. Finally we draw general conclusions regarding the factors that affect the success of a standards development effort - the likelihood that an IT standard will meet its design goals and will achieve community-wide acceptance. We believe that a higher level of thoughtful awareness by the scientists, program managers and technology experts of the vital role of standards and the merits of alternative standards processes can help us as a community to

  16. Measurement of the branching fraction ${\\mathcal{B}}(\\Lambda^0_b\\rightarrow \\Lambda^+_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    We report an analysis of the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay in a data sample collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron corresponding to 2.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We reconstruct the currently largest samples of the decay modes {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}), {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}), and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (with {Sigma}{sub c}(2455)0 {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) and measure the branching fractions relative to the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} branching fraction. We measure the ratio {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/ {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=3.04 {+-} 0.33(stat){sub -0.55}{sup +0.70}(syst) which is used to derive {Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(26.8{sub -11.2}{sup +11.9}) x 10{sup -3}.

  17. Simulation of the $\\beta$ setup of the SSD group

    CERN Document Server

    Barron, Jared

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to first implement a simulation in GEANT4 of the setup used by the SSD group to conduct measurements of the response of silicon detectors to ionizing radiation. This simulation was then compared to theoretical results on energy deposition in silicon sensors of varying thickness by ionizing radiation, as well as measurements of the energy deposition distribution taken using the apparatus being simulated. Simulation was also used to calibrate the trigger, estimating that a peak trigger signal of 1V corresponds to an energy deposited of 0.744 MeV. It was found that for the most probable value (MPV) of the energy deposition distribution, simulation coincides with theory within 5%, but the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) is underestimated by 15%. Measurements were conducted on a 280$\\mu$m sensor and compared to simulation. The MPV was 10% lower in observation than simulation, and the FWHM was 10-15% higher.

  18. Numerical and experimental dosimetry of petri dish exposure setups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, M.; Pokovic, K.; Gnos, M.; Schmid, T.; Kuster, N. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    Crawford TEM cells are often used to exposure cell cultures or small animals in order to study the effects caused by high-frequency fields. They are self-contained, easy-to-use setups that provide a rather homogeneous field distribution in a large area around its center, corresponding approximately to far-field conditions. However, a number of conditions must be met if such TEM cells are intended to be used for in vitro experiments. For instance, poor interaction with the incident field must be maintained to avoid significant field disturbances in the TEM cell. This is best achieved with E-polarization, i.e., when the E-field vector is normal to the investigated cell layer lining the bottom of a synthetic Petri dish. In addition, E-polarization provides the most homogeneous field distribution of all polarizations within the entire layer of cells. In this paper, the authors present a detailed dosimetric assessment for 60 and 100 mm Petri dishes as well as for a 48-well titer plate at 835 MHz. The dosimetry was performed by using numerical computations. The modeling and the simplifications are validated by a second numerical technique and by experimental measurements. For thin liquid layers, an approximation formula is provided with which the induced field strength for many other experiments conducted in Petri dishes can be assessed reliably.

  19. A Low Cost Approach to Large Smart Shelf Setups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOGA, D.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent years showed a growing interest in the use of RFID technology in applications like distribution and storage of goods, supply chain and inventory. This paper analyses the current smart shelf solutions and presents the experience of developing an automatic reading system for smart shelves. The proposed system addresses the problem of reading RFID tags from items placed on multiple shelves. It allows the use of standard low cost readers and tags and uses a single antenna that can be positioned in specific locations at repeatable positions. The system proposes an alternative to the approaches with multiple antennas placed in fixed position inside the shelf or around the shelves, offering a lower cost solution by means of dedicated electromechanical devices able to carry the antenna and the reader to the locations of interest along a rail system. Moreover, antenna position can be controlled for three axis of movement allowing for extra flexibility and complete coverage of the shelves. The proposed setup is a fully wireless one. It contains a standard reader, electromechanical positioning actuators and wireless communication and control hardware offering power from integrated batteries.

  20. SR-Site groundwater flow modelling methodology, setup and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    As a part of the license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken three groundwater flow modelling studies. These are performed within the SR-Site project and represent time periods with different climate conditions. The simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. Three time periods are addressed; the Excavation and operational phases, the Initial period of temperate climate after closure, and the Remaining part of the reference glacial cycle. The present report is a synthesis of the background reports describing the modelling methodology, setup, and results. It is the primary reference for the conclusions drawn in a SR-Site specific context concerning groundwater flow during the three climate periods. These conclusions are not necessarily provided explicitly in the background reports, but are based on the results provided in these reports. The main results and comparisons presented in the present report are summarised in the SR-Site Main report.

  1. Development of a Low Cost MQL Setup for Turning Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Sumaiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of MQL application on the tool wear, surface roughness and chip formation in turning Aluminum alloy 6061 is investigated. Experiments were carried out by plain turning of an Aluminum bar with varying depth of cut, cutting speeds (spindle speed and cutting environments (Dry, Wet and MQL. A newly designed, cost efficient and portable MQL setup was developed for this study. For each experimental trial, five passes were carried out in order to promote the formation of tool wear. After each pass, the tool surface was examined under a microscope and the surface roughness was measured using a stylus based surface tester. The extent of tool wear from each pass is measured by using ImageJ software. Chips were collected after the five passes and were physically examined. The newly designed MQL delivery system was successful in delivering a fine mist of lubricant at the cutting point. MQL lubrication provided lower surface roughness and tool wear values compared to wet and dry conditions due to effective temperature reduction and improved lubrication penetration of cutting zones, as well as better chip flushing. Chip formed under MQL conditions had reduced chip thickness due to reduced temperatures. MQL was found to have the greatest positive impact on tool wear and surface roughness parameters based on ANOVA results.

  2. Setup time reduction in pvc boots production through smed technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Herculano da Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The competition imposed by the market requires of the organizations the continuous improvement of its processes, products and offered services, with lower production costs. This article addresses this issue describing the resulting improvements from the implementation of Single Minute Exchange of Die (SMED in the process of exchange the mold of the injection machine of PVC during the boots manufacturing. The case study was conducted in a large company of footwear, located in the state of Paraiba. In order to find the best alternative to the problem of the setup of the molds, were used the SMED and the methodology for problem resolution, and then was implemented the solution that generated greater productivity for the company. Among the improvements made, we should emphasize the reduction of inactive time of 11.56 minutes to 5 minutes, reducing the time needed for the adjustments of the molds with the implementation of guides for centering and shims to standardize the heights of the molds.

  3. Solid Effect DNP in a Rapid-melt setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bentum, P. J. M.; Sharma, M.; van Meerten, S. G. J.; Kentgens, A. P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has become a key element in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Recently, we developed a novel approach to DNP enhanced liquid-state NMR based on rapid melting of a solid hyperpolarized sample followed by 'in situ' liquid-state NMR detection. This method allows 1 H detection with fast cycling options for signal averaging. In nonpolar solvents, doped with BDPA radicals, proton enhancement factors were achieved of up to 400. A short recycling delay of about 5 s allows for a fast determination of the hyper-polarization dynamics as function of the microwave frequency and power. Here, we use the rapid melt dnp method to study the mechanisms for DNP in the solid phase in more detail. Solid Effect, Cross Effect, Solid Overhauser and Liquid-state (supercritical) Overhauser DNP enhancement can be observed in the same setup. In this paper, we concentrate on Solid Effect DNP observed with both homogeneous narrow line radicals such as BDPA and with wide line anisotropic nitroxide radicals such as TEMPOL. We find indications that BDPA protons play an important role in Solid Effect DNP with this radical. A simplified spin diffusion model for BDPA can give a semi-quantitative description of the enhancements as function of the microwave power and as function of the proton concentration in the solid solution. For aqueous frozen samples we observe a similar Solid Effect DNP enhancement, which is analyzed within the simplified spin diffusion model.

  4. Engineering Electrochemical Setups for Electron Microscopy of Liquid Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Eric; Burrows, Andrew

    This work focuses on creating tools for imaging liquid samples at atmospheric pressure and room temperature in two different electron microscopes; the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The main focus of the project was the fabrication of the two sy......-SEM cell. In TEM, holography of graphene multi-layer sheets has been performed and the phase change per sheet has been determined as a step towards in-situ holography of liquid through graphene.......-transparent window and built-in electrodes was placed above a reservoir, sealing off the liquid from the vacuum, but allowing imaging through the window in the chip. In-situ electrochemical experiments have been performed with this setup: imaging the electron beam (e-beam) deposition of nickel on the window......This work focuses on creating tools for imaging liquid samples at atmospheric pressure and room temperature in two different electron microscopes; the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The main focus of the project was the fabrication of the two...

  5. A Low Cost Rokkaku Kite Setup for Aerial Photogrammetric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. F.; Khurshid, K.; Saleh, N.; Yousuf, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Orthogonally Projected Area (OPA) of a geographical feature has primarily been studied utilizing rather time consuming field based sampling techniques. Remote sensing on the contrary provides the ability to acquire large scale data at a snapshot of time and lets the OPA to be calculated conveniently and with reasonable accuracy. Unfortunately satellite based remote sensing provides data at high cost and limited spatial resolution for scientific studies focused at small areas such as micro lakes micro ecosystems, etc. More importantly, recent satellite data may not be readily available for a particular location. This paper describes a low cost photogrammetric system to measure the OPA of a small scale geographic feature such as a plot of land, micro lake or an archaeological site, etc. Fitted with a consumer grade digital imaging system, a Rokkaku kite aerial platform with stable flight characteristics is designed and fabricated for image acquisition. The data processing procedure involves automatic Ground Control Point (GCP) detection, intelligent target area shape determination with minimal human input. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) is built from scratch in MATLAB to allow the user to conveniently process the acquired data, archive and retrieve the results. Extensive on-field experimentation consists of multiple geographic features including flat land surfaces, buildings, undulating rural areas, and an irregular shaped micro lake, etc. Our results show that the proposed system is not only low cost, but provides a framework that is easy and fast to setup while maintaining the required constraints on the accuracy.

  6. Developing a beta source based setup for pixel sensor characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Schouwenberg, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this project is to provide mono-energetic minimum ionizing electrons from a $^{90}$Sr source using a magnetic monochromator, and thus provide a useful tool for in-lab sensor characterization. The monochromator is calibrated using a setup, with a heavy inorganic scintillator and a PMT, which has been calibrated with a $^{22}$Na gamma source. The average energy of the electrons as a function of the current in the monochromator coil is found to be $1.38\\pm0.01$ keV/mA, taking into consideration the effect of the magnetic field on the signal of the PMT. For integration into the pixel sensor test bench, scintillator-counters (a plastic scintillator connected to a PMT) are used. Their response to the electron energies is observed to follow a saturation curve, which leads to a more identical response for high energetic electrons. A preliminary pixel sensor test bench has been set up and properties such as voltage and discriminator settings have been studied as well as count rates for coincidence cou...

  7. Search for New Physics in the B02→J/ΨΦ and B02→ΦΦ Decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorigo, Mirco [Univ. of Trieste (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    We present a search for physics beyond the standard model (SM) through a measurement of the violation of the charge-parity (CP) symmetry in two decays of the B02 meson using data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. We exploit the decays B02→J/Ψ(→ μ+μ-)(→ K+K-) and B02→Φ (→ K+K-)Φ(→ K+K-), for which the SM accurately predicts very small or vanishing CP violation; both decay modes are very sensitive to new sources of CP violation expected in a broad class of SM extensions. We analyze the time-dependent CP asymmetry of the B02→J/ΨΦ decays collected in the full CDF Run II dataset for providing the final measurement of the B02 -¯B02 mixing phase, 2βs, and we present the first measurement of CP violation in B02→ΦΦ decays, through the determination of two time-integrated CP asymmetries, Av and Au, using an original method developed in this work. We find: -0.06 < βs < 0.30 at the 68% confidence level; Av = (-12.0 ± 6.4(stat) ± 1.6(syst))%; and Au = (-0.7 ± 6.4(stat) ± 1.8(syst))%. In addition, we provide measurements of the decay width difference between the light and heavy mass eigenstates of the B02 meson,ΔΓs 0.068 ± 0.026(stat) ± 0.009(syst) ps-1; and of their mean lifetime, τs = 1.528 ± 0.019(stat) ± 0.009(syst) ps. All results are among the most precise determinations from a single experiment and exhibit an excellent agreement with the SM predictions.

  8. A search for charged higgs boson decays of the top quark using hadronic decays of the tau lepton in proton-antiproton collisions at square √s = 1.8 TeV at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groer, Leslie Stevan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    1999-01-26

    The Standard Model predicts the existence of one neutral scalar Higgs boson, which is a remnant of the mechanism that breaks the SU(2)LxU(1)Y electroweak symmetry and generates masses for the heavy vector bosons and fermions. Many extensions to the Standard Model predict two or more Higgs doublets, resulting in a larger spectrum of Higgs bosons including a charged Higgs boson (H±). For a light charged Higgs boson mass, the top decay into a charged Higgs boson and bottom quark might occur. This thesis presents results of a direct search for this top quark decay mode via the charged Higgs decay to a tau lepton and tau-neutrino, using the hadronic decays of the tau leptons. The search data consist of 100 pb-1 of Run 1 data collected between 1992-1995 at the CDF detector, from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV produced at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator. A total of seven events are observed in two search channels with an expected background contribution of 7.4±2.0 events coming from fake taus (5.4±1.5), heavy vector boson decays with jets (1.9±1.3) and dibosons(0.08±0.06). Lacking evidence for a signal, we set limits on charged Higgs production at the 95% confidence level in the charged Higgs mass plane versus tanβ(a parameter of the theory) for a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2 and for top production cross sections (σ t$\\bar{t}$) of 5.0 and 7.5 pb, assuming the Type-II Two-Higgs-Doublet-Model. For large tanβ, this analysis excludes a charged Higgs boson of mass below 147(158)GeV/c2 for σ t$\\bar{t}$=5.0(7.5)pb. Using the Standard Model measured top quark cross section from CDF, this limit increases to 168 GeV/c2 and we also exclude a branching fraction of top decays via this charged Higgs mode of greater than 43% for charged Higgs masses below 168 GeV/c2.

  9. Integrating Organ Motion and Setup Uncertainty into Optimization of Modulated Electron Beam Treatment of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pawlicki, Todd

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the research accomplishments of the Department of Defense funded research to develop, implement, and evaluate models of organ motion and setup uncertainty for dose calculation...

  10. Setup Time Reduction On Solder Paste Printing Machine – A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Dhake

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lean manufacturing envisages the reduction of the seven deadly wastes referred to as MUDA. Setup time forms a major component of the equipment downtime. It leads to lower machine utilization and restricts the output and product variety. This necessitates the requirement for quick setups. Single Minute Exchange of Die philosophy (a lean manufacturing tool here after referred as “SMED” is one of the important tool which aims at quick setups driving smaller lot sizes, lower production costs, improve productivity in terms of increased output, increased utilization of machine and labor hours, make additional capacity available (often at bottleneck resources, reduce scrap and rework, and increase flexibility[3]. This paper focuses on the application of Single Minute Exchange of Die[1] and Quick Changeover Philosophy[2] for reducing setup time on Solder Past Printing Machine (bottleneck machine in a electronic speedo-cluster manufacturing company. The four step SMED philosophy was adopted to effect reduction in setup time. The initial step was gathering information about the present setup times and its proportion to the total productive time. A detailed video based time study of setup activities was done to classify them into external and internal setup activities in terms of their need (i.e. preparation, replacement or adjustment, time taken and the way these could be reduced, simplified or eliminated. The improvements effected were of three categories viz., mechanical, procedural and organizational. The paper concludes by comparing the present and proposed (implemented methods of setup procedures.

  11. Мюонный комплекс и преконвертор электромагнитного калориметра установки CDF II в экспериментах по физике тяжелых кварков на Тэватроне

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-01

    The object of this investigation is to understand processes with c,b,t-quarks, muon system and trigger preshower of the electromagnetic calorimeter, plastic scintillation detectors of the CDFII setup.

  12. Search for Rare Decays of the B Meson at 1.8-TeV $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anway-Wiese, Carol Elizabeth [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    With the observation of a clear B hadron signal in the exclusive decay channels B → ΨK± and B → ΨK*0 in 1.8 TeV p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at CDF, it is feasible to look for the non-resonant decays B →μ+μ-K± and B →μ+μ-K*0, which have not been seen. To reduce the amount of background in the data I use precise tracking information from the CDF silicon vertex detector to pinpoint the location of the decay vertex of the B candidate, and accept only events which have a large decay time. I compare this data to B meson signals obtained in a similar fashion, but where the muon pairs originate from Ψ decays, and calculate the relative branching ratios.

  13. Setups for in vitro assessment of RFID interference on pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattei, E; Censi, F; Delogu, A; Ferrara, A; Calcagnini, G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to propose setups for in vitro assessment of RFID (radiofrequency identification) interference on pacemakers (PM). The voltage induced at the input stage of the PM by low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) RFID transmitters has been used to quantify the amount of the interference. A commercial PM was modified in order to measure the voltage at its input stage when exposed to a sinusoidal signal at 125 kHz and 13.56 MHz. At both frequencies, two antennas with different dimensions (diameter = 10 cm and 30 cm, respectively) were used to generate the interfering field, and the induced voltage was measured between the lead tip and the PM case (unipolar voltage), and between the tip and ring electrodes (bipolar voltage). The typical lead configurations adopted in similar studies or proposed by international standards, as well as lead paths closer to actual physiological implants were tested. At 125 kHz, the worst-case condition differs for the two antennas: the 10 cm antenna induced the highest voltage in the two-loop spiral configuration, whereas the 30 cm antenna in the 225 cm 2 loop configuration. At 13.56 MHz, the highest voltage was observed for both the antennas in the 225 cm 2 loop configuration. Bipolar voltages were found to be lower than the unipolar voltages induced in the same configurations, this difference being not as high as one could expect from theoretical considerations. The worst-case scenario, in terms of the induced voltage at the PM input stage, has been identified both for LF and HF readers, and for two sizes of transmitting antennas. These findings may provide the basis for the definition of a standard implant configuration and a lead path to test the EMI effects of LF and HF RFID transmitters on active implantable devices. (paper)

  14. Deducing software process improvement areas from a COCOMO II-based productivity measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rore, L.; Snoeck, M.; Poels, G.; Dedene, G.; Dekkers, T.

    2008-01-01

    At the SMEF2006 conference, we presented our experiences with the set-up of a measurement environment using the COCOMO II-model for software development projects in a company in the banking and insurance area. The set-up was part of a larger research project on managing efficiency aspects of

  15. An experimental set-up to test heat-moisture exchangers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, N.; Pompe, J. C.; Holland, W. P.; Gültuna, I.; Huygen, P. E.; Jabaaij, K.; Ince, C.; Saygin, B.; Bruining, H. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to build an experimental set-up to assess continuously the humidification, heating and resistance properties of heat-moisture exchangers (HMEs) under clinical conditions. The experimental set-up consists of a patient model, measurement systems and a ventilator. Surgical

  16. An experimental set-up for carbon isotopic analysis of atmospheric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present here, an experimental set-up developed for the first time in India for the determination of mixing ratio and carbon isotopic ratio of air-CO2. The set-up includes traps for collection and extraction of CO2 from air samples using cryogenic procedures, followed by the measurement of CO2 mixing ratio using an MKS ...

  17. Design of excitation signals for active system monitoring in a performance assessment setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates how the excitation signal should be chosen for a active performance setup. The signal is used in a setup where the main purpose is to detect whether a parameter change of the controller has changed the global performance significantly. The signal has to be able to excite t...

  18. Development of group setup strategies for makespan minimization in PCB assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yilmaz, I.O.; Grunow, M.; Günther, H.-O.

    2007-01-01

    Balancing setup effort and actual production time is an important issue in medium-variety, medium-volume printed circuit board (PCB) assembly. By grouping batches of similar PCB types to be processed with a common machine setup, the total time required for setting up the component feeders...

  19. On SIP Session setup delay for VoIP services over correlated fading channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi, Hanane; Chakraborty, Shyam S.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the session setup delay of the session initiation protocol (SIP) is studied. The transmissions on both the forward and reverse channel are assumed to experience Markovian errors. The session setup delay is evaluated for different transport protocols, and with the use of the radio l...

  20. Impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer. A study of 2940 setup deviations in 980 MVCTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, Kilian; Specht, Hanno; Kampfer, Severin; Duma, Marciana Nona; Petrucci, Alessia; Geinitz, Hans; Schuster, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the impact of different setup approaches in image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) of the prostatic gland. In all, 28 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this study. After the placement of an endorectal balloon, the planning target volume (PTV) was treated to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. A simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction and per day) was delivered to a smaller target volume. All patients underwent daily prostate-aligned IGRT by megavoltage CT (MVCT). Retrospectively, three different setup approaches were evaluated by comparison to the prostate alignment: setup by skin alignment, endorectal balloon alignment, and automatic registration by bones. A total of 2,940 setup deviations were analyzed in 980 fractions. Compared to prostate alignment, skin mark alignment was associated with substantial displacements, which were ≥ 8 mm in 13 %, 5 %, and 44 % of all fractions in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions, respectively. Endorectal balloon alignment yielded displacements ≥ 8 mm in 3 %, 19 %, and 1 % of all setups; and ≥ 3 mm in 27 %, 58 %, and 18 % of all fractions, respectively. For bone matching, the values were 1 %, 1 %, and 2 % and 3 %, 11 %, and 34 %, respectively. For prostate radiotherapy, setup by skin marks alone is inappropriate for patient positioning due to the fact that, during almost half of the fractions, parts of the prostate would not be targeted successfully with an 8-mm safety margin. Bone matching performs better but not sufficiently for safety margins ≤ 3 mm. Endorectal balloon matching can be combined with bone alignment to increase accuracy in the vertical direction when prostate-based setup is not available. Daily prostate alignment remains the gold standard for high-precision radiotherapy with small safety margins. (orig.) [de

  1. Evaluation of overall setup accuracy and adequate setup margins in pelvic image-guided radiotherapy: Comparison of the male and female patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksomaa, Marko; Kapanen, Mika; Tulijoki, Tapio; Peltola, Seppo; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated adequate setup margins for the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors based on overall position errors of bony landmarks. We also estimated the difference in setup accuracy between the male and female patients. Finally, we compared the patient rotation for 2 immobilization devices. The study cohort included consecutive 64 male and 64 female patients. Altogether, 1794 orthogonal setup images were analyzed. Observer-related deviation in image matching and the effect of patient rotation were explicitly determined. Overall systematic and random errors were calculated in 3 orthogonal directions. Anisotropic setup margins were evaluated based on residual errors after weekly image guidance. The van Herk formula was used to calculate the margins. Overall, 100 patients were immobilized with a house-made device. The patient rotation was compared against 28 patients immobilized with CIVCO's Kneefix and Feetfix. We found that the usually applied isotropic setup margin of 8 mm covered all the uncertainties related to patient setup for most RT treatments of the pelvis. However, margins of even 10.3 mm were needed for the female patients with very large pelvic target volumes centered either in the symphysis or in the sacrum containing both of these structures. This was because the effect of rotation (p ≤ 0.02) and the observer variation in image matching (p ≤ 0.04) were significantly larger for the female patients than for the male patients. Even with daily image guidance, the required margins remained larger for the women. Patient rotations were largest about the lateral axes. The difference between the required margins was only 1 mm for the 2 immobilization devices. The largest component of overall systematic position error came from patient rotation. This emphasizes the need for rotation correction. Overall, larger position errors and setup margins were observed for the female patients with pelvic cancer than for the male patients

  2. HVI-Test Setup for Debris Detector Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Waldemar; Romberg, Oliver; Wiedemann, Carsten; Putzar, Robin; Drolshagen, Gerhard; Vorsmann, Peter

    2013-08-01

    concerning space debris and micrometeoroids. In this way, the SOLID method will allow the generation of a large amount of impact data for environmental model validation. The ground verification of the SOLID method was performed at Fraunhofer EMI. For this purpose, a test model was developed. This paper focuses on the test methodology and development of the Hypervelocity Impact (HVI) test setup, including pretesting at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Bremen. Foreseen hardware and software for the automatic damage assessment of the detector after the impact are also presented.

  3. THE CDF ARCHIVE: HERSCHEL PACS AND SPIRE SPECTROSCOPIC DATA PIPELINE AND PRODUCTS FOR PROTOSTARS AND YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Joel D.; Yang, Yao-Lun; II, Neal J. Evans; Larson, Rebecca L. [The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Astronomy, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Karska, Agata [Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Sloneczna 36, 60-286 Poznan (Poland); Herczeg, Gregory [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, 100871 Beijing (China); Dishoeck, Ewine F. van [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University (Netherlands); Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Bouwman, Jeroen [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    We present the COPS-DIGIT-FOOSH (CDF) Herschel spectroscopy data product archive, and related ancillary data products, along with data fidelity assessments, and a user-created archive in collaboration with the Herschel-PACS and SPIRE ICC groups. Our products include datacubes, contour maps, automated line fitting results, and best 1D spectra products for all protostellar and disk sources observed with PACS in RangeScan mode for two observing programs: the DIGIT Open Time Key Program (KPOT-nevans-1 and SDP-nevans-1; PI: N. Evans), and the FOOSH Open Time Program (OT1-jgreen02-2; PI: J. Green). In addition, we provide our best SPIRE-FTS spectroscopic products for the COPS Open Time Program (OT2-jgreen02-6; PI: J. Green) and FOOSH sources. We include details of data processing, descriptions of output products, and tests of their reliability for user applications. We identify the parts of the data set to be used with caution. The resulting absolute flux calibration has improved in almost all cases. Compared to previous reductions, the resulting rotational temperatures and numbers of CO molecules have changed substantially in some sources. On average, however, the rotational temperatures have not changed substantially (<2%), but the number of warm (T{sub rot} ∼ 300 K) CO molecules has increased by about 18%.

  4. Development of a multivariate tool to reject background in a WZ diboson search for the CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Matteo [Univ. of of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy)

    2015-08-27

    In the frame of the strong on-going data analysis effort of the CDF collaboration at Fermilab, a method was developed by the candidate to improve the background rejection efficiency in the search for associated pair production of electroweak W, Z bosons. The performaces of the method for vetoing the tt background in a WZ/ZZ → fνq$\\bar{q}$ diboson search are reported. The method was developed in the inclusive 2-jets sample and applied to the “tag-2 jets" region, the subsample defined by the request that the two jets carry beauty flavor. In this region the tt production is one of the largest backgrounds. The tt veto proceeds in two steps: first, a set of pre-selection cuts are applied in a candidate sample where up to two leptons are accepted in addition to a jet pair, and the ZZ component of the signal is thus preserved; next, a Neural Network is trained to indicate the probability that the event be top-pair production. To validate the the method as developed in the inclusive 2-jets sample, it is applied to veto region providing a significant rejection of this important background.

  5. Approaching the CDF Top Quark Mass Legacy Measurement in the Lepton+Jets channel with the Matrix Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosciri, Cecilia [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the bottom quark in 1977 at the Tevatron Collider triggered the search for its partner in the third fermion isospin doublet, the top quark, which was discovered 18 years later in 1995 by the CDF and D=0 experiments during the Tevatron Run I. By 1990, intensive efforts by many groups at several accelerators had lifted to over 90 GeV=c2 the lower mass limit, such that since then the Tevatron became the only accelerator with high-enough energy to possibly discover this amazingly massive quark. After its discovery, the determination of top quark properties has been one of the main goals of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and more recently also of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Since the mass value plays an important role in a large number of theoretical calculations on fundamental processes, improving the accuracy of its measurement has been at any time a goal of utmost importance. The present thesis describes in detail the contributions given by the candidate to the massive preparation work needed to make the new analysis possible, during her 8 months long stay at Fermilab.

  6. Evaluation of Setup Error Correction for Patients Using On Board Imager in Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Soo Man

    2008-01-01

    To reduce side effects in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and to improve the quality of life of patients, also to meet accurate SETUP condition for patients, the various SETUP correction conditions were compared and evaluated by using on board imager (OBI) during the SETUP. Each 30 cases of the head, the neck, the chest, the belly, and the pelvis in 150 cases of IGRT patients was corrected after confirmation by using OBI at every 2-3 day. Also, the difference of the SETUP through the skin-marker and the anatomic SETUP through the OBI was evaluated. General SETUP errors (Transverse, Coronal, Sagittal) through the OBI at original SETUP position were Head and Neck: 1.3 mm, Brain: 2 mm, Chest: 3 mm, Abdoman: 3.7 mm, Pelvis: 4 mm. The patients with more that 3 mm in the error range were observed in the correction devices and the patient motions by confirming in treatment room. Moreover, in the case of female patients, the result came from the position of hairs during the Head and Neck, Brain tumor. Therefore, after another SETUP in each cases of over 3 mm in the error range, the treatment was carried out. Mean error values of each parts estimated after the correction were 1 mm for the head, 1.2 mm for the neck, 2.5 mm for the chest, 2.5 mm for the belly, and 2.6 mm for the pelvis. The result showed the correction of SETUP for each treatment through OBI is extremely difficult because of the importance of SETUP in radiation treatment. However, by establishing the average standard of the patients from this research result, the better patient satisfaction and treatment results could be obtained.

  7. Evaluation of Setup Error Correction for Patients Using On Board Imager in Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Soo Man [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To reduce side effects in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and to improve the quality of life of patients, also to meet accurate SETUP condition for patients, the various SETUP correction conditions were compared and evaluated by using on board imager (OBI) during the SETUP. Each 30 cases of the head, the neck, the chest, the belly, and the pelvis in 150 cases of IGRT patients was corrected after confirmation by using OBI at every 2-3 day. Also, the difference of the SETUP through the skin-marker and the anatomic SETUP through the OBI was evaluated. General SETUP errors (Transverse, Coronal, Sagittal) through the OBI at original SETUP position were Head and Neck: 1.3 mm, Brain: 2 mm, Chest: 3 mm, Abdoman: 3.7 mm, Pelvis: 4 mm. The patients with more that 3 mm in the error range were observed in the correction devices and the patient motions by confirming in treatment room. Moreover, in the case of female patients, the result came from the position of hairs during the Head and Neck, Brain tumor. Therefore, after another SETUP in each cases of over 3 mm in the error range, the treatment was carried out. Mean error values of each parts estimated after the correction were 1 mm for the head, 1.2 mm for the neck, 2.5 mm for the chest, 2.5 mm for the belly, and 2.6 mm for the pelvis. The result showed the correction of SETUP for each treatment through OBI is extremely difficult because of the importance of SETUP in radiation treatment. However, by establishing the average standard of the patients from this research result, the better patient satisfaction and treatment results could be obtained.

  8. Electronic portal image assisted reduction of systematic set-up errors in head and neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Hans C.J. de; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Visser, Andries G.; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify systematic and random patient set-up errors in head and neck irradiation and to investigate the impact of an off-line correction protocol on the systematic errors. Material and methods: Electronic portal images were obtained for 31 patients treated for primary supra-glottic larynx carcinoma who were immobilised using a polyvinyl chloride cast. The observed patient set-up errors were input to the shrinking action level (SAL) off-line decision protocol and appropriate set-up corrections were applied. To assess the impact of the protocol, the positioning accuracy without application of set-up corrections was reconstructed. Results: The set-up errors obtained without set-up corrections (1 standard deviation (SD)=1.5-2 mm for random and systematic errors) were comparable to those reported in other studies on similar fixation devices. On an average, six fractions per patient were imaged and the set-up of half the patients was changed due to the decision protocol. Most changes were detected during weekly check measurements, not during the first days of treatment. The application of the SAL protocol reduced the width of the distribution of systematic errors to 1 mm (1 SD), as expected from simulations. A retrospective analysis showed that this accuracy should be attainable with only two measurements per patient using a different off-line correction protocol, which does not apply action levels. Conclusions: Off-line verification protocols can be particularly effective in head and neck patients due to the smallness of the random set-up errors. The excellent set-up reproducibility that can be achieved with such protocols enables accurate dose delivery in conformal treatments

  9. Poster - 33: Dosimetry Comparison of Prone Breast Forward and Inverse Treatment planning considering daily setup variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Runqing; Zhan, Lixin; Osei, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of daily setup variations on prone breast forward field-in-field (FinF) and inverse IMRT treatment planning. Methods: Rando Phantom (Left breast) and Pixy phantom (Right breast) were built and CT scanned in prone position. The treatment planning (TP) is performed in Eclipse TP system. Forward FinF plan and inverse IMRT plan were created to satisfy the CTV coverage and OARs criteria. The daily setup variations were assumed to be 5 mm at left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions. The DVHs of CTV coverage and OARs were compared for both forward FinF plan and inverse IMRT plans due to 5mm setup variation. Results and Discussions: DVHs of CTV coverage had fewer variations for 5m setup variation for forward FinF and inverse IMRT plan for both phantoms. However, for the setup variations in the left-right direction, the DVH of CTV coverage of IMRT plan showed the worst variation due to lateral setup variation for both phantoms. For anterior-posterior variation, the CTV could not get full coverage when the breast chest wall is shallow; however, with the guidance of MV imaging, breast chest wall will be checked during the MV imaging setup. So the setup variations have more effects on inverse IMRT plan, compared to forward FinF plan, especially in the left-right direction. Conclusions: The Forward FinF plan was recommended clinically considering daily setup variation.

  10. Benchmark test cases for evaluation of computer-based methods for detection of setup errors: realistic digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, Daniel S.; Raghavan, Suraj; Boxwala, Aziz; Earnhart, Jon; Tracton, Gregg; Cullip, Timothy; Chaney, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to develop methods and software for computing realistic digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors for use as benchmark test cases for evaluation and intercomparison of computer-based methods for image matching and detecting setup errors in electronic portal images. Methods and Materials: An existing software tool for computing digitally reconstructed radiographs was modified to compute simulated megavoltage images. An interface was added to allow the user to specify which setup parameter(s) will contain computer-induced random and systematic errors in a reference beam created during virtual simulation. Other software features include options for adding random and structured noise, Gaussian blurring to simulate geometric unsharpness, histogram matching with a 'typical' electronic portal image, specifying individual preferences for the appearance of the 'gold standard' image, and specifying the number of images generated. The visible male computed tomography data set from the National Library of Medicine was used as the planning image. Results: Digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors have been generated and used to evaluate our methods for automatic image matching and error detection. Any number of different sets of test cases can be generated to investigate setup errors involving selected setup parameters and anatomic volumes. This approach has proved to be invaluable for determination of error detection sensitivity under ideal (rigid body) conditions and for guiding further development of image matching and error detection methods. Example images have been successfully exported for similar use at other sites. Conclusions: Because absolute truth is known, digitally reconstructed electronic portal images with known setup errors are well suited for evaluation of computer-aided image matching and error detection methods. High-quality planning images, such as

  11. An economic production model for time dependent demand with rework and multiple production setups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Singh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a model for time dependent demand with multiple productions and rework setups. Production is demand dependent and greater than the demand rate. Production facility produces items in m production setups and one rework setup (m, 1 policy. The major reason of reverse logistic and green supply chain is rework, so it reduces the cost of production and other ecological problems. Most of the researchers developed a rework model without deteriorating items. A numerical example and sensitivity analysis is shown to describe the model.

  12. Building and commissioning of a setup to study ageing phenomena in gaseous detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abuhoza, A., E-mail: aabuhoza@kacst.edu.sa [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, H.R. [Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen (Germany); Biswas, S. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni 752050 (India); Frankenfeld, U.; Hehner, J.; Schmidt, C.J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2016-07-11

    In high-rate heavy-ion experiments, gaseous detectors encounter big challenges in terms of degradation of their performance due to a phenomenon called ageing. A setup for high precision ageing studies has been constructed and commissioned at the GSI detector laboratory. The setup as well as the gas system have been carefully optimized to reach a high sensitivity for ageing effects. Two different materials have been examined for their influence on gaseous detectors: RTV-3145 and Gerband 705. The details of the construction of the ageing test setup and the test results will be presented.

  13. Study of the production of the Σ b with the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calancha Paredes, Constantino [Complutense Univ. of Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    understanding of the Standard Model and its limitations. In particular, it is very important the measurement of those observables which they are not able to be calculated from theory by perturbation theory. Particle accelerators have played and play nowadays a major role for past and new physics discoverements and has been for many years the source of many precision measurements. Unprecedent discoveries have been made and are yet to come. These measurements allow to select the models that best fit the results and also they can be used as input for those models to get further predictions. Tevatron has been for many years the highest energy particle collider operational in the world. It is located in the high energy physics laboratory Fermilab in Batavia, in the State of Illinois (USA). Tevatron produce proton-antiproton collisions with an energy of 1.96 TeV at the center of the mass. This thesis is based on the data taken by the CDF II detector, one of the two multipurpose detectors located in the two interaction points at Tevatron. In this thesis a precise measurement of the mass and width of four heavy baryon states are performed. These states are described together by the symbol Σ b. They are built by two light quarks and one heavy b quark as it is shown in Fig. 1.2. Baryons containing one bottom quark and two light quarks are described by Heavy Quark Effective Theories (HQET).

  14. Experimental Study of W Z Intermediate Bosons Associated Production with the CDF Experiment at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzobon, Nicola; /Pisa U.

    2007-09-01

    heavy flavor jets in the dominant W+multijet background is assumed as predicted by theory. This technique was originally developed in CDF to measure the t{bar t} production cross section in the final state with W + 3 or more jets. This thesis was conceived as the first attempt within CDF to apply a customized version of it to look for evidence of diboson production in the final state with aW and two jets. Extracting the signal in this channel is very hard since with such a small number of jets the background is two orders of magnitude greater than the signal. Moreover, since the signal to background ratio is very small, the expected sensitivity depends critically on the theoretical uncertainties on the amount of background. While work is in progress to understand this background more reliably, this analysis provides an estimate of the achievable upper limit on the WZ production cross section.

  15. Measurements of the Ratio of W and Z Production and the W Boson Decay Width at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copic, Katherine Ann [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-03-01

    We present a new method of measuring the ratio of W and Z production and de- cay (R) at the CDF experiment. We analyze 307 pb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. A single sample containing both W and Z boson candidates is selected by requiring at least one high-energy electron in an event with low hadronic activity. We estimate that less than one percent of our sample is made up of background events after a cut on the recoil energy. A maximum likelihood fits is performed on the missing transverse energy spectrum of the events to determine the relative rates of W and Z production in the common sample. This ratio is defined as: R = Z · → Z Γ(W → £ν) 1 Γ(W ) Br(Z → ££) We have obtained the fi result using this method for the electron channel. R = 10.55 ± 0.09(stat) ± 0.12(syst) We then extract the Branching Ratio of W → £ν using the Branching Ratio of Z → £+£- measured at LEP and a theoretical value for the ratio of the cross sections. σZ Br(W → £ν) = R · W Br(Z → £+ £-) = 0.1054 ± 0.0016 We also obtain an indirect measurement of the W width of Γtot = 2148 ± 32 MeV. This width gives us information about all the possible decays of the W boson. The W width also constrains the sum of the CKM elements involved in W decays. We find the following value for Vcs , the least constrained element: |Vcs | = 1.008 ± 0.029.

  16. Technical Note: Introduction of variance component analysis to setup error analysis in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this technical note is to introduce variance component analysis to the estimation of systematic and random components in setup error of radiotherapy. Methods: Balanced data according to the one-factor random effect model were assumed. Results: Analysis-of-variance (ANOVA)-based computation was applied to estimate the values and their confidence intervals (CIs) for systematic and random errors and the population mean of setup errors. The conventional method overestimates systematic error, especially in hypofractionated settings. The CI for systematic error becomes much wider than that for random error. The ANOVA-based estimation can be extended to a multifactor model considering multiple causes of setup errors (e.g., interpatient, interfraction, and intrafraction). Conclusions: Variance component analysis may lead to novel applications to setup error analysis in radiotherapy.

  17. Advanced setup for high-pressure and low-temperature neutron diffraction at hydrostatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokshin, Konstantin A.; Zhao Yusheng

    2005-01-01

    We describe a design of the experimental setup for neutron diffraction studies at low temperatures and hydrostatic pressure. The significant benefit of the setup, compared to the previous methods, is that it makes possible the simultaneous collection of neutrons diffracted at the 30 deg. -150 deg. range with no contamination by the primary scattering from the sample surroundings and without cutting out the incident and diffracted beams. The suggested design is most useful for third-generation time-of-flight diffractometers and constant wavelength instruments. Application of the setup expands the capabilities of high-pressure neutron diffraction, allowing time-resolved kinetics and structural studies, multihistogram Rietveld, and pair distribution function and texture analyses. The high efficiency of the setup was proven for the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center under pressures up to 10 kbar and temperatures from 4 to 300 K

  18. A new tribological experimental setup to study confined and sheared monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, L; Favier, D; Charitat, T; Gauthier, C; Rubin, A

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an original experimental setup, coupling tribology, and velocimetry experiments together with a direct visualization of the contact. The significant interest of the setup is to measure simultaneously the apparent friction coefficient and the velocity of confined layers down to molecular scale. The major challenge of this experimental coupling is to catch information on a nanometer-thick sheared zone confined between a rigid spherical indenter of millimetric radius sliding on a flat surface at constant speed. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of this setup to investigate nanometer-scale sliding layers, we studied a model lipid monolayer deposited on glass slides. It shows that our experimental setup will, therefore, help to highlight the hydrodynamic of such sheared confined layers in lubrication, biolubrication, or friction on solid polymer.

  19. Integrated Diagnostic/Prognostic Experimental Setup for Capacitor Degradation and Health Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper proposes the experiments and setups for studying diagnosis and prognosis of electrolytic capacitors in DC-DC power converters. Electrolytic capacitors and...

  20. Experiment Setup for Focused Learning of Advanced Servo Control of DC-motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag A. H. Samuelsen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote laboratories are normally developed for giving students and others remote access to physical laboratory facilities. In contradiction to this, the main objective of the setup presented in this paper is to create a controlled environment where unwanted side activities like hardware setup, driver problems, troubleshooting faulty components, and struggles with special software for configuring DSP systems, are removed as much as possible, in order for the students to have their full focus on the tasks that is considered relevant for the module: modeling of non-linear systems, synthetisation of controllers, and stability and performance analysis. A secondary objective is to significantly reduce the setup and maintenance cost associated with complex laboratory setups involving DSPs and expensive hardware.

  1. A setup for measurement of beam stability and position using position sensitive detector for Indus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathwani, R.K.; Joshi, D.K.; Tyagi, Y.; Soni, R.S.; Puntambekar, T.A.; Pithawa, C.K.

    2009-01-01

    The 450 MeV electron synchrotron radiation source Indus-1 is operational at RRCAT. A set-up has been developed to measure the relative transverse positional stability of the electron beam and its position with microns resolution using position sensitive photodiodes. The set-up has been installed at the diagnostics beam line of Indus-1. Synchrotron light from photo physics beamline was reflected out by inserting a Ni coated mirror and was focused onto a duo-lateral position sensitive photodiode by using two mirrors of 1.25 meter focal length to obtain unity magnification. The set-up consists of a duo-lateral position sensitive detector (PSD), precision processing electronics and a PC based data acquisition system. A computer program captures the processed signals on to a PC using GPIB interface and displays vertical position of the beam in real time. The paper describes the salient features of the setup developed for measurement of beam stability. (author)

  2. Technical Note: Introduction of variance component analysis to setup error analysis in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to introduce variance component analysis to the estimation of systematic and random components in setup error of radiotherapy. Balanced data according to the one-factor random effect model were assumed. Analysis-of-variance (anova)-based computation was applied to estimate the values and their confidence intervals (CIs) for systematic and random errors and the population mean of setup errors. The conventional method overestimates systematic error, especially in hypofractionated settings. The CI for systematic error becomes much wider than that for random error. The anova-based estimation can be extended to a multifactor model considering multiple causes of setup errors (e.g., interpatient, interfraction, and intrafraction). Variance component analysis may lead to novel applications to setup error analysis in radiotherapy.

  3. Recreating Riser Slugging Flow Based on an Economic Lab-sized Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lasse; Pedersen, Simon; Yang, Zhenyu

    2013-01-01

    slug model, besides extensive experimental tests. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that this simple setup can recreate the key features of slugging flow phenomenon reasonably precise, and it serves as a good platform for further slug control study.......As a kind of periodic phenomenon, the slugging flow in the offshore oil & gas production addresses a lot of attentions, due to its limitation of production rate, periodic overload processing facilities, and even direct cause of emergent shutdown. This work studies the emulation of the riser...... slugging flow in the offshore oil & gas production, by constructing an economical lab-sized setup in the university campus. Firstly, the construction and used components for the lab setup are illustrated; then, the constructed setup is validated by checking the consistency with some existing typical riser...

  4. Pragmatic setup for bioparticle responses by dielectrophoresis for resource limited environment application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohd Anuar Md; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin; Kayani, Aminuddin Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Various dielectrophoretic responses of bioparticles, including cell-chain, spinning, rotation and clustering, are of high interest in the field due to their benefit into application for biomedical and clinical implementation potential. Numerous attempts using sophisticated equipment setup have been studied to perform those dielectrophoretic responses, however, for development into resource limited environment application, such as portable, sustainable and environmental friendly diagnostic tools, establishment of pragmatic setup using standard, non-sophisticated and low-cost equipment is of important task. Here we show the advantages in the judicious design optimization of tip microelectrode, also with selection of suspending medium and optimization of electric signal configuration in establishing setup that can promote the aforementioned dielectrophoretic responses within standard equipments, i.e. pragmatic setup.

  5. The use of adaptive radiation therapy to reduce setup error: a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Di; Wong, John; Vicini, Frank; Robertson, John; Horwitz, Eric; Brabbins, Donald; Cook, Carla; Gustafson, Gary; Stromberg, Jannifer; Martinez, Alvaro

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) is a closed-loop feedback process where each patients treatment is adaptively optimized according to the individual variation information measured during the course of treatment. The process aims to maximize the benefits of treatment for the individual patient. A prospective study is currently being conducted to test the feasibility and effectiveness of ART for clinical use. The present study is limited to compensating the effects of systematic setup error. Methods and Materials: The study includes 20 patients treated on a linear accelerator equipped with a computer controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) and a electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Alpha cradles are used to immobilize those patients treated for disease in the thoracic and abdominal regions, and thermal plastic masks for the head and neck. Portal images are acquired daily. Setup error of each treatment field is quantified off-line every day. As determined from an earlier retrospective study of different clinical sites, the measured setup variation from the first 4 to 9 days, are used to estimate systematic setup error and the standard deviation of random setup error for each field. Setup adjustment is made if estimated systematic setup error of the treatment field was larger than or equal to 2 mm. Instead of the conventional approach of repositioning the patient, setup correction is implemented by reshaping MLC to compensate for the estimated systematic error. The entire process from analysis of portal images to the implementation of the modified MLC field is performed via computer network. Systematic and random setup errors of the treatment after adjustment are compared with those prior to adjustment. Finally, the frequency distributions of block overlap cumulated throughout the treatment course are evaluated. Results: Sixty-seven percent of all treatment fields were reshaped to compensate for the estimated systematic errors. At the time of this writing

  6. SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; St. Denis, R.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.

    2004-01-01

    SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid

  7. Application of video imaging for improvement of patient set-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploeger, Lennert S.; Frenay, Michel; Betgen, Anja; Bois, Josien A. de; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A.; Herk, Marcel van

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: For radiotherapy of prostate cancer, the patient is usually positioned in the left-right (LR) direction by aligning a single marker on the skin with the projection of a room laser. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a room-mounted video camera in combination with previously acquired CT data to improve patient set-up along the LR axis. Material and methods: The camera was mounted in the treatment room at the caudal side of the patient. For 22 patients with prostate cancer 127 video and portal images were acquired. The set-up error determined by video imaging was found by matching video images with rendered CT images using various techniques. This set-up error was retrospectively compared with the set-up error derived from portal images. It was investigated whether the number of corrections based on portal imaging would decrease if the information obtained from the video images had been used prior to irradiation. Movement of the skin with respect to bone was quantified using an analysis of variance method. Results: The measurement of the set-up error was most accurate for a technique where outlines and groins on the left and right side of the patient were delineated and aligned individually to the corresponding features extracted from the rendered CT image. The standard deviations (SD) of the systematic and random components of the set-up errors derived from the portal images in the LR direction were 1.5 and 2.1 mm, respectively. When the set-up of the patients was retrospectively adjusted based on the video images, the SD of the systematic and random errors decreased to 1.1 and 1.3 mm, respectively. From retrospective analysis, a reduction of the number of set-up corrections (from nine to six corrections) is expected when the set-up would have been adjusted using the video images. The SD of the magnitude of motion of the skin of the patient with respect to the bony anatomy was estimated to be 1.1 mm. Conclusion: Video

  8. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Esophageal Cancer: Evaluation by Daily Megavoltage Computed Tomographic Localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Han Chunhui; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Kernstine, Kemp H.; Shibata, Stephen; Vora, Nayana L.; Pezner, Richard D.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To use pretreatment megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans to evaluate setup variations in anterior-posterior (AP), lateral, and superior-inferior (SI) directions and rotational variations, including pitch, roll, and yaw, for esophageal cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation using helical tomotherapy were selected. After patients were positioned using their skin tattoos/marks, MVCT scans were performed before every treatment and automatically registered to planning kilovoltage CT scans according to bony landmarks. Image registration data were used to adjust patient setups before treatment. A total of 250 MVCT scans were analyzed. Correlations between setup variations and body habitus, including height, weight, relative weight change, body surface area, and patient age, were evaluated. Results: The standard deviations for systematic setup corrections in AP, lateral, and SI directions and pitch, roll, and yaw rotations were 1.5, 3.7, and 4.8 mm and 0.5 deg., 1.2 deg., and 0.8 deg., respectively. The appropriate averages of random setup variations in AP, lateral, and SI directions and pitch, roll, and yaw rotations were 2.9, 5.2, and 4.4 mm, and 1.0 deg., 1.2 deg., and 1.1 deg., respectively. Setup variations were stable throughout the entire course of radiotherapy in all three translational and three rotational displacements, with little change in magnitude. No significant correlations were found between setup variations and body habitus variables. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup errors and thereby reduce planning target volume (PTV) margins. This will reduce radiation dose to critical organs and may translate into lower treatment-related toxicities

  9. Intrafractional Target Motions and Uncertainties of Treatment Setup Reference Systems in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Ning J.; Goyal, Sharad; Zhou Jinghao; Khan, Atif J.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the magnitude of intrafractional motion and level of accuracy of various setup strategies in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: At lumpectomy, gold fiducial markers were strategically sutured to the surrounding walls of the cavity. Weekly fluoroscopy imaging was conducted at treatment to investigate the respiration-induced target motions. Daily pre- and post-RT kV imaging was performed, and images were matched to digitally reconstructed radiographs based on bony anatomy and fiducial markers, respectively, to determine the intrafractional motion magnitudes over the course of treatment. The positioning differences of the laser tattoo- and the bony anatomy-based setups compared with those of the marker-based setup (benchmark) were also determined. The study included 21 patients. Results: Although lung exhibited significant motion, the average marker motion amplitude on the fluoroscopic image was about 1 mm. Over a typical treatment time period, average intrafractional motion magnitude was 4.2 mm and 2.6 mm based on the marker and bony anatomy matching, respectively. The bony anatomy- and laser tattoo-based interfractional setup errors, with respect to the fiducial marker-based setup, were 7.1 and 9.0 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Respiration has limited effects on the target motion during APBI. Bony anatomy-based treatment setup improves the accuracy relative to that of the laser tattoo-based setup approach. Since fiducial markers are sutured directly to the surgical cavity, the marker-based approach can further improve the interfractional setup accuracy. On average, a seroma cavity exhibits intrafractional motion of more than 4 mm, a magnitude that is larger than that which is otherwise derived based on bony anatomy matching. A seroma-specific marker-based approach has the potential to improve treatment accuracy by taking the true inter

  10. A bias-corrected CMIP5 dataset for Africa using the CDF-t method - a contribution to agricultural impact studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise Famien, Adjoua; Janicot, Serge; Delfin Ochou, Abe; Vrac, Mathieu; Defrance, Dimitri; Sultan, Benjamin; Noël, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a new dataset of bias-corrected CMIP5 global climate model (GCM) daily data over Africa. This dataset was obtained using the cumulative distribution function transform (CDF-t) method, a method that has been applied to several regions and contexts but never to Africa. Here CDF-t has been applied over the period 1950-2099 combining Historical runs and climate change scenarios for six variables: precipitation, mean near-surface air temperature, near-surface maximum air temperature, near-surface minimum air temperature, surface downwelling shortwave radiation, and wind speed, which are critical variables for agricultural purposes. WFDEI has been used as the reference dataset to correct the GCMs. Evaluation of the results over West Africa has been carried out on a list of priority user-based metrics that were discussed and selected with stakeholders. It includes simulated yield using a crop model simulating maize growth. These bias-corrected GCM data have been compared with another available dataset of bias-corrected GCMs using WATCH Forcing Data as the reference dataset. The impact of WFD, WFDEI, and also EWEMBI reference datasets has been also examined in detail. It is shown that CDF-t is very effective at removing the biases and reducing the high inter-GCM scattering. Differences with other bias-corrected GCM data are mainly due to the differences among the reference datasets. This is particularly true for surface downwelling shortwave radiation, which has a significant impact in terms of simulated maize yields. Projections of future yields over West Africa are quite different, depending on the bias-correction method used. However all these projections show a similar relative decreasing trend over the 21st century.

  11. Implementation of a combined SAXS/WAXS/QEXAFS set-up for time-resolved in situ experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikitenko, S.; Beale, A.M.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Jacques, S.D.M.; Leynaud, O.; O'Brien, M.; Detollenaere, D.; Kaptein, Reinier; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Bras, W.

    2008-01-01

    It has previously been shown that there are many benefits to be obtained in combining several techniques in one in situ set-up to study chemical processes in action. Many of these combined set-ups make use of two techniques, but in some cases it is possible and useful to combine even more. A set-up

  12. Adaptive modification of treatment planning to minimize the deleterious effects of treatment setup errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Di; Wong, John; Vicini, Frank; Michalski, Jeff; Pan Cheng; Frazier, Arthur; Horwitz, Eric; Martinez, Alvaro

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Using daily setup variation measured from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), radiation treatment of the individual patient can be adaptively reoptimized during the course of therapy. In this study, daily portal images were retrospectively examined to: (a) determine the number of initial days of portal imaging required to give adequate prediction of the systematic and random setup errors; and (b) explore the potential of using the prediction as feedback to reoptimize the individual treatment part-way through the treatment course. Methods and Materials: Daily portal images of 64 cancer patients, whose treatment position was not adjusted during the course of treatment, were obtained from two independent clinics with similar setup procedures. Systematic and random setup errors for each patient were predicted using different numbers of initial portal measurements. The statistical confidence of the predictions was tested to determine the number of daily portal measurements needed to give reasonable predictions. Two treatment processes were simulated to examine the potential opportunity for setup margin reduction and dose escalation. The first process mimicked a conventional treatment. A constant margin was assigned to each treatment field to compensate for the average setup error of the patient population. A treatment dose was then prescribed with reference to a fixed normal tissue tolerance, and then fixed in the entire course of treatment. In the second process, the same treatment fields and prescribed dose were used only for the initial plan and treatment. After several initial days of treatments, the treatment field shape and position were assumed to be adaptively modified using a computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) in light of the predicted systematic and random setup errors. The prescribed dose was then escalated until the same normal tissue tolerance, as determined in the first treatment process, was reached. Results: The systematic

  13. Search for $ZW/ZZ \\to \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ + Jets Production in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchum, Wesley Robert [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes weak interactions mediated by massive gauge bosons that interact with each other in well-defined ways. Observations of the production and decay of WW, WZ, and ZZ boson pairs are an opportunity to check that these self-interactions agree with the Standard Model predictions. Furthermore, final states that include quarks are very similar to the most prominent final state of Higgs bosons produced in association with a W or Z boson. Diboson production where WW is a significant component has been observed at the Tevatron collider in semi-hadronic decay modes. We present a search for ZW and ZZ production in a final state containing two charged leptons and two jets using 8.9 fb-1 of data recorded with the CDF detector at the Tevatron. We select events by identifying those that contain two charged leptons, two hadronic jets, and low transverse missing energy (ET ). We increase our acceptance by using a wide suite of high-pT lepton triggers and by relaxing many lepton identification requirements. We develop a new method for calculating corrections to jet energies based on whether the originating parton was a quark or gluon to improve the agreement between data and the Monte Carlo simulations used to model our diboson signal and dominant backgrounds. We also make use of neural-network-based discriminants that are trained to pick out jets originating from b quarks and light-flavor quarks, thereby increasing our sensitivity to Z → b$\\bar{b}$ and W=Z → q$\\bar{p'}$0 decays, respectively. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three channels: a heavy-flavor tagged channel, a light-flavor tagged channel, and an untagged channel. We measure σZW/ZZ= 2.5+2.0 -1.0 pb, which is consistent with the SM cross section of 5.1 pb. We establish an upper limit on the cross section of σZW/ZZ < 6.1 pb

  14. Interfractional Variations in Patient Setup and Anatomic Change Assessed by Daily Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X. Allen; Qi, X. Sharon; Pitterle, Marissa; Kalakota, Kapila; Mueller, Kevin; Erickson, Beth A.; Wang Dian; Schultz, Christopher J.; Firat, Selim Y.; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the interfractional variations in patient setup and anatomic changes at seven anatomic sites observed in image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 152 patients treated at seven anatomic sites using a Hi-Art helical tomotherapy system were analyzed. Daily tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography images acquired before each treatment were fused to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography images to determine the daily setup errors and organ motions and deformations. The setup errors were corrected before treatment and were used, along with the organ motions, to determine the clinical target volume/planning target volume margins. The organ motions and deformations for 3 representative patient cases (pancreas, uterus, and soft-tissue sarcoma) and for 14 kidneys of 7 patients are presented. Results: Interfractional setup errors in the skull, brain, and head and neck are significantly smaller than those in the chest, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. These site-specific relationships are statistically significant. The margins required to account for these setup errors range from 3 to 8 mm for the seven sites. The margin to account for both setup errors and organ motions for kidney is 16 mm. Substantial interfractional anatomic changes were observed. For example, the pancreas moved up to ±20 mm and volumes of the uterus and sarcoma varied ≤30% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: The interfractional variations in patient setup and in shapes, sizes, and positions of both targets and normal structures are site specific and may be used to determine the site-specific margins. The data presented in this work dealing with seven anatomic sites may be useful in developing adaptive radiotherapy

  15. A Modernized UDM-600 Dynamometer-Based Setup for the Cutting Force Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. I. Shuliak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers development of a modernized UDM-600 dynamometer-based setup for measuring the cutting force components. Modernization of existing equipment to improve the method of recording the cutting force components in the automated mode is of relevance. The measuring setup allows recording the cutting force components in turning and milling, as well as the axial force and the torque in the drilling and milling operations.The article presents a block diagram and a schematic diagram of the setup to measure the cutting force components, and describes a basic principle of measuring units within the modernized setup. The developed setup uses a half-bridge strain gauge measuring circuit to record the cutting forces. To enhance the measuring circuit output voltage is used a 16-channel amplifier of LA-UN16 model with a discretely adjustable gain. To record and process electrical signals is used a data acquisition device of NI USB-6009 model, which enables transmitting the received data to a PC via USB-interface. The data acquisition device has a built-in stabilized DC power supply that is used to power the strain gauge bridges. A developed schematic diagram of the measuring setup allows us to realize this measuring device and implement its modernization.Final processing of recorded data is provided through the software developed in visual programming environment LabVIEW 9.0. The program allows us to show the real-time measuring values of the cutting force components graphically and to record the taken data to a text file.The measuring setup modernization enabled increasing measurement accuracy and reducing time for processing and analysis of experimental data obtained when measuring the cutting force components. The MT2 Department of BMSTU uses it in education and research activities and in experimental efforts and laboratory classes.

  16. Residual stress analysis of energy-dispersive diffraction data using a two-detector setup: Part I - Theoretical concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Daniel; Meixner, Matthias; Liehr, Alexander; Klaus, Manuela; Degener, Sebastian; Wagener, Guido; Franz, Christian; Zinn, Wolfgang; Genzel, Christoph; Scholtes, Berthold

    2018-01-01

    A new goniometer setup for energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction is introduced which is based on simultaneous data acquisition with two detectors D1 and D2, both of them freely movable in a horizontal as well as in a vertical plane. From the multitude of measurement configurations that can be realised with this setup, we figured out three efficient concepts which aim at the fast analysis of residual stress depth profiles by combining the diffraction data gathered with the two detectors. The characteristic feature of the first two configurations consists in the vertical (horizontal) positioning of the first (second) detector, which results in a diffraction geometry where the two scattering vectors span a plane that coincides with the X-circle used for sample tilt. Because each detector does see the sample under another viewing angle, both the positive and the negative ψ-branch are covered by just one χ-tilt between 0°and 90°(configuration 1) and 0°and 60°(configuration 2), thus allowing for the simultaneous analysis of the in- and out-of-plane residual stress depth gradients σii(τ) and σi3(τ) (i = 1 , 2), respectively, from data sets dD1hkl(χ) and dD2hkl(χ). The third configuration introduced in this paper is based on a ϕ-rotation of the sample under a constant tilt angle χ and enables a fast and reliable tracing of shear stress fields σi3(τ) (i = 1, 2).

  17. B physics constraints on a flavor symmetric scalar model to account for the t t ¯ asymmetry and Wjj excess at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guohuai

    2011-09-01

    Recently Nelson et al. proposed an interesting flavor symmetric model to account for the top quark forward-backward asymmetry and the dijet anomaly at CDF simultaneously with just three parameters: a coupling constant of order one, and two scalar masses of 160 GeV and 220 GeV. However these fiducial values of the parameters lead to the branching ratio of a almost pure penguin B → πK decay about one hundred times larger than the experimental results. Consider also the precision electroweak constraints, the scalar masses should be at least around 500 GeV. Actually with the coupling constant larger than one, it is impossible to explain either of the two CDF measurements consistently in this model. But one may raise the charged scalar mass to, for example, 250 GeV and reduce the coupling strength to 0.6 to meet the B physics constraints. With this parameter set, the Wjj cross section is found to be in the right range. But due to the scalar mass splitting, its correction to T-parameter is about 3σ away from the precision electroweak constraints. In addition, the top quark forward-backward asymmetry should be well below 0.1 with this small coupling constant.

  18. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    ., 2009) biomaterials. However, the ..... reported for various microorganisms by various researchers (Gong et al., 2005). At biomass ... the increase in initial Pb (II) was also observed for removal of Pb (II) by loofa sponge immobilized Aspergillus.

  19. SU-F-T-519: Is Geometry Based Setup Sufficient for All of the Head and Neck Treatment Cases?: A Feasibility Study Towards the Dose Based Setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S; Chen, S; Zhang, B; Xu, H; Prado, K; D’Souza, W; Yi, B [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study compares the geometric-based setup (GBS) which is currently used in the clinic to a novel concept of dose-based setup (DBS) of head and neck (H&N) patients using cone beam CT (CBCT) of the day; and evaluates the clinical advantages. Methods: Ten H&N patients who underwent re-simulation and re-plan due to noticeable anatomic changes during the course of the treatments were retrospectively reviewed on dosimetric changes in the assumption of no plan modification was performed. RayStation planning system (RaySearch Laboratories AB, Sweden) was used to match (ROI fusion module) between prescribed isodoseline (IDL) in the CBCT imported along with ROIs from re-planned CT and the IDL of original plan (Dose-based setup: DBS). Then, the CBCT plan based on daily setup using the GBS (previously used for a patient) and the DBS CBCT plan recalculated in RayStation compared against the original CT-sim plan. Results: Most of patients’ tumor coverage and OAR doses got generally worsen when the CBCT plans were compared with original CT-sim plan with GBS. However, when DBS intervened, the OAR dose and tumor coverage was better than the GBS. For example, one of patients’ daily average doses of right parotid and oral cavity increased to 26% and 36%, respectively from the original plan to the GBS planning. However, it only increased by 13% and 24%, respectively with DBS. GTV D95 coverage also decreased by 16% with GBS, but only 2% decreased with DBS. Conclusion: DBS method is superior to GBS to prevent any abrupt dose changes to OARs as well as PTV/CTV or GTV at least for some H&N cases. Since it is not known when the DBS is beneficial to the GBS, a system which enables the on-line DBS may be helpful for better treatment of H&N.

  20. Virtual instrument automation of ion channeling setup for 1.7 MV tandetron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, K.; Sundaravel, B.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.; Viswanathan, B.

    2004-01-01

    A virtual instrument based automated ion channeling experimental setup has been developed and implemented in a 1.7 MV tandetron accelerator. Automation of the PC based setup is done using a windows based virtual instrument software allowing the setup to be easily ported between different computer operating systems. The virtual instrument software has been chosen to achieve quick and easy development of versatile, multi-purpose user friendly graphical interface for carrying out channeling experiments. The software has been modular designed to provide independent control of the stepper motors for fixing the sample at any user defined orientation, running and on-line display of azimuthal and tilt angular scans, auto storage of the angular scan data. Using this automated setup, the crystallographic axis of the sample can be aligned with the incident ion beam rapidly minimizing the beam damages to the sample. A standard single crystalline GaAs(100) has been characterized with this set up using 2 MeV He ++ ion beam. The crystalline quality (χ min ) and channeling half angle (ψ 1sol2 ) are measured to be 3.7% and 0.48 deg., respectively, which are close to the theoretical values. Salient features, working principles and design details of the automated setup are discussed in this paper

  1. Three-dimensional patient setup errors at different treatment sites measured by the Tomotherapy megavoltage CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, S.K.; Lusczek, E.; Dusenbery, K. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology - Radiation Oncology; DeFor, T. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Biostatistics and Informatics Core; Levitt, S. [Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology - Radiation Oncology; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Onkol-Patol

    2012-04-15

    Reduction of interfraction setup uncertainty is vital for assuring the accuracy of conformal radiotherapy. We report a systematic study of setup error to assess patients' three-dimensional (3D) localization at various treatment sites. Tomotherapy megavoltage CT (MVCT) images were scanned daily in 259 patients from 2005-2008. We analyzed 6,465 MVCT images to measure setup error for head and neck (H and N), chest/thorax, abdomen, prostate, legs, and total marrow irradiation (TMI). Statistical comparisons of the absolute displacements across sites and time were performed in rotation (R), lateral (x), craniocaudal (y), and vertical (z) directions. The global systematic errors were measured to be less than 3 mm in each direction with increasing order of errors for different sites: H and N, prostate, chest, pelvis, spine, legs, and TMI. The differences in displacements in the x, y, and z directions, and 3D average displacement between treatment sites were significant (p < 0.01). Overall improvement in patient localization with time (after 3-4 treatment fractions) was observed. Large displacement (> 5 mm) was observed in the 75{sup th} percentile of the patient groups for chest, pelvis, legs, and spine in the x and y direction in the second week of the treatment. MVCT imaging is essential for determining 3D setup error and to reduce uncertainty in localization at all anatomical locations. Setup error evaluation should be performed daily for all treatment regions, preferably for all treatment fractions. (orig.)

  2. Development of a fatigue testing setup for dielectric elastomer membrane actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M.; Rizzello, G.; Seelecke, S.

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE's) represent a transduction technology with high potential in many fields, including industries, due to their low weight, flexibility, and small energy consumption. For industrial applications, it is of fundamental importance to quantify the lifetime of DE technology, in terms of electrical and mechanical fatigue, when operating in realistic environmental conditions. This work contributes toward this direction, by presenting the development of an experimental setup which permits systematic fatigue testing of DE membranes. The setup permits to apply both mechanical and electrical stimuli to several membranes simultaneously, while measuring at the same time their mechanical (force, deformation) and electrical response (capacitance, resistance). In its final state, the setup will allow to test up to 15 DE membranes at the same time for several thousands of cycles. Control of the modules, monitoring of the actuators, and data acquisition are realized on a cRio FPGA-system running with LabVIEW. The setup is located in a climate chamber, in order to investigate the fatigue mechanisms at different environmental conditions, i.e., in terms of temperature and humidity. The setup consists of two main parts, namely a fatigue group and a measurement group. The fatigue group stays permanently in the climate chamber, while the measurement group is assembled to the fatigue group and allows to perform measurements at 20°C.

  3. Implementing of the offline setup correction protocol in pelvic radiotherapy. Safety margins and number of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasabasic, M.; Faj, D.; Belaj, N.; Tomas, I.; Faj, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Patient positioning errors in pelvic radiotherapy at Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy in Osijek are explored in order to establish the offline setup correction protocol and determine the safety margins. Film portal imaging is used during the whole treatment in order to find patient positioning errors. Eleven patients are included in the study and 420 images are analyzed. Setup errors are found by measuring distances between the center of the field and bony landmarks. Systematic and random errors are analyzed. Safety margins that should be employed at our department are 11 mm, 13 mm and 14 mm in mediolateral, craniocaudal and anteroposterior direction, respectively. Time trend is found only in an aged, obese patient with a hip problem. No action level offline setup protocol was employed by taking and averaging first four images in mediolateral and craniocaudal and 5 images in anteroposterior direction. Since time trend is found only in a patient who was hard to position because of his age, obesity and the hip problem, we decided that such patients are to be positioned without a bellyboard and in supine position. Time trends are not found in all of the other patients so we employed the offline setup error protocol by averaging setup errors from the first few consecutive images. Safety margins that will ensure 90 % probability of depositing at least 95 % of the prescribed dose in the target are calculated. Safety margins and number of images that should be taken showed that the most inaccurate positioning was in the anteroposterior direction. (author)

  4. An optimised set-up for total reflection particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Vis, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    MeV proton beams at small angles of incidence (0-35 mrad) are used to analyse trace elements on flat surfaces such as Si wafers or quartz substrates. In these experiments, the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) signal is used in a new optimized set-up. This set-up is constructed in such a way that the X-ray detector can reach very large solid angles, larger than 1 sr. Use of these large detector solid angles, combined with the reduction of bremsstrahlung background, affords limits of detection (LOD) of the order of 10 10 at cm -2 using total reflection particle induced X-ray emission (TPIXE). The LODs from earlier TPIXE measurements in a non-optimized set-up are used to estimate LODs in the new TPIXE set-up. Si wafers with low surface concentrations of V, Ni, Cu and Ag are used as standards to calibrate the LODs found with this set-up. The metal concentrations are determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). The TPIXE measurements are compared with TXRF measurements on the same wafers. (Author)

  5. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  6. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in association with b quarks in the tau-tau decay channels at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Charles A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to ττ with 5.9 fb.–1 of data. The analysis requires at least one of the taus to decay leptonically, and explores three detection modes in two channels: τeτ μ, τeτhad, and τμτhad, where the index denotes the type of tau decay. In all modes we explore the tagged and untagged channel. No signal is observed limits were set on σ( p$\\bar{p}$ → Φ + X) × BR(Φ → ττ) as a function of Higgs mass. The results are also interpreted as exclusions of parameter space in the tanβ vs mA plane for several benchmark scenarios.

  7. Study of Orbitally Excited $B_{(s)}$ Mesons and Evidence for a New $B\\pi$ Resonance with the CDF II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambeitz, Manuel [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    This thesis presents an analysis of excited states of B0, B+ and B0 s mesons, decaying to B mesons while emitting a pion or kaon. They are reconstructed from their decay products and a selection is performed to discard wrongly reconstructed B(s) mesons with the multivariate analysis software NeuroBayes, as described in chapter 5. In the training process, the sPlot method and measured and simulated data are used. Chapter 6 describes how the properties of excited B(s) are determined by an unbinned maximum likelihood t to their mass spectra. The systematic uncertainties determined in this analysis are described in chapter 7. The results of this thesis are presented in chapter 8 and a conclusion is given in chapter 9. The results shown in this thesis have been published before in [1].

  8. Search for the Higgs boson in the ZH to ℓ+-b$\\bar{b}$ channel at CDF Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efron, Jonathan Zvi [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is in excellent agreement with the observed phenomena of particle physics. Within the Standard Model, the weak and electromagnetic forces are successfully combined. However, this combination is only valid if the masses of the force carriers of the weak force, the Z and W bosons, are massless. In fact, these two particles are the second and third most massive observed elementary particles. Within the minimal Standard Model, the Higgs mechanism is introduced to reconcile this contradiction. Conclusive proof of this theory would come with the discovery of the Higgs boson.

  9. Measurement of the top quark mass using the template method in the lepton plus jets channel with in situ W → jj calibration at CDF-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Kim, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton plus jets channel of tt bar events from pp bar collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 318 pb -1 data, which brings 138 tt bar candidates separated into four subsamples. A top quark mass is reconstructed for each event by using energy and momentum constraints on the top-quark pair decay products. We also employ the reconstructed mass of hadronic W boson decays W→jj to constrain in situ the largest systematic uncertainty of the top quark mass measurement: the jet energy scale. Monte Carlo templates of the reconstructed top quark and W boson masses are produced as a function of the true top quark mass and the jet energy scale. The distribution of reconstructed top quark and W boson masses in the data are compared to the Monte Carlo templates using a likelihood fit to obtain: M top =173.5 - 3 .8 +3.9 GeV/c 2 . This constitutes the most precise measurement of the top quark mass up to date

  10. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    A controlled atmosphere setup designed for long-term degradation studies of organic solar cells under illumination is presented. The setup was designed with ease-of-use and compactness in mind and allows for multiple solar cells distributed on four glass substrates to be studied in four different...... chambers with temperature and atmosphere control. The four chambers are situated at close proximity in the setup thereby allowing the solar cells to be subjected to as uniform an illumination distribution as possible for the given solar simulator employed. The cell substrates serve as the front window...... and present a tight seal. Hence no illumination correction needs to be performed due to transmission and reflection losses as otherwise seen with test chambers employing a window as a seal. The solar cells in each chamber are continuously and individually electrically monitored under biased conditions...

  11. A photovoltaic module diagnostic setup for lock-in-thermography and lock-in electroluminescence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parikh, Harsh; Spataru, Sergiu; Sera, Dezso

    2018-01-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) imaging and infrared (IRT) thermography techniques have become indispensable tools in recent years for health diagnostic of PV modules in solar industry application. Complementary to these imaging methods, lock-in techniques can effectively remove noise by periodically......, for developing new light noise removal techniques. The purpose of the diagnostic setup is to support research in PV failure quantification though aerial drone imaging of PV plants. With this intention, along with the principle of lock in thermography (LIT), a flexible setup is designed and described to carry out...... experimental work on a (36/72) cell solar module using combined (EL) or (IRT) lock-in-thermography. The setup allows one to investigate the different technological problems that can occur when performing PV diagnostics in drone-based inspections....

  12. Setup of a drift tube muon tracker and calibration of muon tracking in Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bick, Daniel

    2011-04-15

    In this work the setup and commissioning of a drift tube based 3D muon tracking detector are described and its use for the solar neutrino experiment Borexino is presented. After a brief introduction to neutrino physics, the general layout of the detector is presented. It is followed by the description of the reconstruction and calibration algorithms. The performance of the muon tracker is presented and results from the commissioning in Hamburg are shown. The detector is currently operated in the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy at the Borexino experiment. After an introduction to Borexino, the modifications of the muon tracker for its setup at LNGS are described. The setup is used as a reference system to determine the resolution of the Borexino muon tracking which is essential for the tagging of cosmogenic induced {sup 11}C background. Finally, first results are presented. (orig.)

  13. Setup of a drift tube muon tracker and calibration of muon tracking in Borexino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bick, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    In this work the setup and commissioning of a drift tube based 3D muon tracking detector are described and its use for the solar neutrino experiment Borexino is presented. After a brief introduction to neutrino physics, the general layout of the detector is presented. It is followed by the description of the reconstruction and calibration algorithms. The performance of the muon tracker is presented and results from the commissioning in Hamburg are shown. The detector is currently operated in the LNGS underground laboratory in Italy at the Borexino experiment. After an introduction to Borexino, the modifications of the muon tracker for its setup at LNGS are described. The setup is used as a reference system to determine the resolution of the Borexino muon tracking which is essential for the tagging of cosmogenic induced 11 C background. Finally, first results are presented. (orig.)

  14. ESR spectrometer based setup for microwave investigation of high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Aliev, M K; Muminov, A T; Olimov, B A; Usmanov, R R; Kholbaev, I

    2002-01-01

    The experimental setup adjusted for investigation of non-resonant microwave absorption in high-temperature superconductors has been developed on the basis of ESR spectrometer. Having original temperature system-of-art the setup has made it possible to study not only the field spectrum of detected signal partial deriv R/partial deriv H but the temperature spectrum of one. In the region of superconducting transition the setup allows one to measure the temperature derivative partial deriv R/partial deriv T as well. Using the multi-layer magnetic cylindrical shield ensures the conduction for precise measurements in the weak magnetic fields. Acquisition, processing and visual presentation of experimental data are fulfilled by CAMAC on-line IBM PC. (author)

  15. A pdpa laser-based measuring set-up for the characterisation of spray nozzles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyttens, D; Sonck, B; de Schampheleire, M; Steurbaut, W; Baetens, K; Verboven, P; Nicolaï, B; Ramon, H

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of agricultural sprays belong to the most critical factors affecting spray drift, deposition on plants, spray coverage and biological efficacy. Hence, within the framework of a research project about agricultural spray drift, a measuring set-up for the characterisation of spray nozzles using a Phase Doppler Particle Analyser (PDPA) was developed. This set-up is able to measure droplet sizes and velocities based on light-scattering principles. It is composed of different parts i.e.: a climate room, a spray unit, a three-dimensional automated positioning system and an Aerometrics PDPA 1D system. This paper presents a detailed description of this measuring set-up along with some first measuring results. These measurements will be used as an input for a Computational Fluid Dynamics drift-prediction model and to classify nozzles based on their driftability.

  16. Mathematical Model of the Electronuclear Set-Up on the Beam of the JINR Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S; Kumawat, H; Lobanova, V A

    2004-01-01

    On the base of the Monte Carlo code CASCADE, developed at JINR, a mathematical model of the deep-subcritical set-up with uranium blanket used in experiments underway at JINR using a 0.6-4 GeV proton beam, is created. The neutron spectra, yields and energies of generated particles are calculated and compared for several modifications of the set-up. The influence of paraffin and graphite moderators on the characteristics of particles escaping lead target is studied. The modelled set-up can be considered as a first step to experiments with the designed at JINR U-Pu ADS SAD with heat power of several tens of kW.

  17. A dedicated AMS setup for medium mass isotopes at the Cologne FN tandem accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, M.; Altenkirch, R.; Feuerstein, C.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Hackenberg, G.; Herb, S.; Bhandari, P.; Heinze, S.; Stolz, A.; Dewald, A.

    2017-09-01

    AMS measurements of medium mass isotopes, e.g. of 53Mn and 60Fe, are gaining interest in various fields of operation, especially geoscience. Therefore a dedicated AMS setup has been built at the Cologne 10 MV FN tandem accelerator. This setup is designed to obtain a sufficient suppression of the stable isobars at energies around 100 MeV. In this contribution we report on the actual status of the new setup and the first in-beam tests of its individual components. The isobar suppression is done with (dE/dx) techniques using combinations of energy degrader foils with an electrostatic analyzer (ESA) and a time of flight (ToF) system, as well as a (dE/dx),E gas ionization detector. Furthermore, the upgraded ion source and its negative ion yield measurement for MnO- are presented.

  18. Beta-spectroscopy of long lived nuclides with a PIPS detector-setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domula Alexander R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several applications in modern nuclear physics, research and engineering are limited by a lack of precise knowledge in spectral shape data for beta-decays. Specifically the interest aims to study spectral data for forbidden decays with respectively long half-lives, which is one of the central activities of our group. For the investigation of those rare beta-decays the group operates a setup of six PIPS detectors in a vacuum chamber built out of low-radioactivity materials. In the long term the setup will be used as low-background-detector for the investigation of rare beta-decays. In order to reduce the measuring-background a muon veto was installed. The characterization of the setup in the energy-range from 20..1000 keV using conversion-electrons is described. A set of useful calibration-nuclides was established to determine energy calibration and efficiencies.

  19. The experimental setup for studying the molecular composition of nanoscale films and coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turiev A M; Butkhuzi T G; Ramonova A G; Magkoev T T; Tsidaeva N I

    2011-01-01

    It is offered the method of measurement and design of the experimental setup, allowing to control the flow of particles from the surface of organic films during annealing by pulsed laser radiation. The method is based on the TOF(Time Of Flight) principle of detecting particles, desorbed from the surface by laser pulses, used for annealing. The principle of registration and the structure (block- scheme) of the experimental setup and its constituent parts are detailed in the work The setup consists of the analytical part, the system of laser irradiation and computer measurement system. The basis of the analytical part of the installation is a TOF(Time Of Flight) mass spectrometer of original construction.

  20. Inter-treatment compensation of treatment setup variation to enhance the radiotherapeutic ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Yan; John, Wong; Michalski, Jeff; Pan, Cheng; Frazier, Arthur; Bosch, Walter; Martinez, Alvaro

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, treatment setup error has been one of the major causes of dose variation in the treated volume. With the data acquired from on-line electronic portal imaging, it is now possible not only to adjust the patient setup, but also to modify the treatment plan during the course of clinical treatment based on the setup error measured for each individual patient. In this work, daily clinical portal images were retrospectively analyzed to study (1) the number of initial daily portal images required to give adequate prediction of the systematic and random deviations of treatment setup, and (2) the potential therapeutic gain when the inter-treatment planning modification was established using the setup error of each individual patient. Methods and Materials: Only those patients whose treatment positions had not been adjusted during the course of treatment were selected for the retrospective study. Daily portal images of 27 lung, 25 pelvis, and 12 head and neck (h and n) cancer patients were obtained from two independent clinics with similar setup procedures. The anterior-to-posterior field was analyzed for the pelvis and lung treatments, and the right lateral field for the h and n treatments. Between 13 to 30 daily portal images were acquired for each patient and were analyzed using a 2D alignment tool. Systematic and random deviations of the treatment setup were calculated for each individual patient. The statistical confidence on the convergence of both systematic and random deviations with time were tested to determine the number of initial daily portal images needed to predict these deviations. In addition, a mean deviation for each site was also calculated using the setup errors from all patients. Two treatment planning schemes were simulated to evaluate margin design and prescription dose adjustment. Therapeutic scores were quantified in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). In the first