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  1. Vanadium induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase Cdelta dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms: Relevance to etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, Robert; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V 2 O 5 ). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V 2 O 5 was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC 50 was determined to be 37 μM in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (> fourfold) and caspase-3 (> ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKCδ, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKCδ kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKCδ cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V 2 O 5 -induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKCδ knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V 2 O 5 -induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKCδ cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral dopaminergic degeneration.

  2. Protein kinase Cdelta stimulates proteasome-dependent degradation of C/EBPalpha during apoptosis induction of leukemic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The precise regulation and maintenance of balance between cell proliferation, differentiation and death in metazoan are critical for tissue homeostasis. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha has been implicated as a key regulator of differentiation and proliferation in various cell types. Here we investigated the potential dynamic change and role of C/EBPalpha protein during apoptosis induction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Upon onset of apoptosis induced by various kinds of inducers such as NSC606985, etoposide and others, C/EBPalpha expression presented a profound down-regulation in leukemic cell lines and primary cells via induction of protein degradation and inhibition of transcription, as assessed respectively by cycloheximide inhibition test, real-time quantitative RT-PCR and luciferase reporter assay. Applying chemical inhibition, forced expression of dominant negative mutant and catalytic fragment (CF of protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta, which was proteolytically activated during apoptosis induction tested, we showed that the active PKCdelta protein contributed to the increased degradation of C/EBPalpha protein. Three specific proteasome inhibitors antagonized C/EBPalpha degradation during apoptosis induction. More importantly, ectopic expression of PKCdelta-CF stimulated the ubiquitination of C/EBPalpha protein, while the chemical inhibition of PKCdelta action significantly inhibited the enhanced ubiquitination of C/EBPalpha protein under NSC606985 treatment. Additionally, silencing of C/EBPalpha expression by small interfering RNAs enhanced, while inducible expression of C/EBPalpha inhibited NSC606985/etoposide-induced apoptosis in leukemic cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations indicate that the activation of PKCdelta upon apoptosis results in the increased proteasome-dependent degradation of C/EBPalpha, which partially contributes to PKCdelta-mediated apoptosis.

  3. Calcium fluxes cause nuclear shrinkage and the translocation of phospholipase C-delta1 into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masashi; Taguchi, Katsutoshi; Maekawa, Shohei; Fukami, Kiyoko; Yagisawa, Hitoshi

    2010-03-26

    Phospholipase C-delta1 (PLCdelta1) is the most fundamental form of the eukaryotic PLC and thought to play important roles in the regulation of cells. We previously reported that PLCdelta1 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus, and an influx of Ca2+ triggers the nuclear import of PLCdelta1 via Ca2+-dependent interaction with importin beta1, although the physiological meaning of this is unclear. Here we have examined the distribution of PLCdelta1 using primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. Treatment of 7DIV neurons with ionomycin or thapsigargin caused the nuclear localization of PLCdelta1 as has been observed in other cell lines. Similar results were obtained with neurons treated with glutamate, suggesting that the nuclear localization of PLCdelta1 plays some roles in excitotoxicity associated with ischemic stress. Generally, cells undergoing ischemic or hypoxic cell death show nuclear shrinkage. We confirmed that a massive influx of Ca2+ caused similar results. Furthermore, overexpression of GFP-PLCdelta1 facilitated ionomycin-induced nuclear shrinkage in embryonic fibroblasts derived from PLCdelta1 gene-knockout mice (PLCdelta1KO-MEF). By contrast, an E341A mutant that cannot bind with importin beta1 and be imported into the nucleus by ionomycin and also lacks enzymatic activity did not cause nuclear shrinkage in PLCdelta1KO-MEF. Nuclear translocation and the PLC activity of PLCdelta1, therefore, may regulate the nuclear shape by controlling the nuclear scaffold during stress-induced cell death caused by high levels of Ca2+. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Human urinary excretion profile after smoking and oral administration of [14C]delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, E.; Gillespie, H.K.; Halldin, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The urinary excretion profiles of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) metabolites have been evaluated in two chronic and two naive marijuana users after smoking and oral administration of [ 14 C]delta 1-THC. Urine was collected for five days after each administration route and analyzed for total delta 1-THC metabolites by radioactivity determination, for delta 1-THC-7-oic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography, and for cross-reacting cannabinoids by the EMIT d.a.u. cannabinoid assay. The average urinary excretion half-life of 14 C-labeled delta 1-THC metabolites was calculated to be 18.2 +/- 4.9 h (+/- SD). The excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings were similar to the excretion profile of 14 C-labeled metabolites in the naive users. However, in the chronic users the excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings did not resemble the radioactive excretion due to the heavy influence from previous Cannabis use. Between 8-14% of the radioactive dose was recovered in the urine in both user groups after oral administration. Lower urinary recovery was obtained both in the chronic and naive users after smoking--5 and 2%, respectively

  5. Oxidative challenge enhances REGγ-proteasome-dependent protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Shuang; Zuo, Qiuhong; Wu, Lin; Ji, Lei; Zhai, Wanli; Xiao, Jianru; Chen, Jiwu; Li, Xiaotao

    2015-05-01

    Elimination of oxidized proteins is important to cells as accumulation of damaged proteins causes cellular dysfunction, disease, and aging. Abundant evidence shows that the 20S proteasome is largely responsible for degradation of oxidative proteins in both ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent pathways. However, the role of the REGγ-proteasome in degrading oxidative proteins remains unclear. Here, we focus on two of the well-known REGγ-proteasome substrates, p21(Waf1/Cip1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, to analyze the impact of oxidative stress on REGγ-proteasome functions. We demonstrate that REGγ-proteasome is essential for oxidative stress-induced rapid degradation of p21 and HCV proteins. Silencing REGγ abrogated this response in multiple cell lines. Furthermore, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 completely blunted oxidant-induced p21 degradation, indicating a proteasome-dependent action. Cellular oxidation promoted REGγ-proteasome-dependent trypsin-like activity by enhancing the interaction between REGγ and 20S proteasome. Antioxidant could counteract oxidation-induced protein degradation, indicating that REGγ-proteasome activity may be regulated by redox state. This study provides further insights into the actions of a unique proteasome pathway in response to an oxidative stress environment, implying a novel molecular basis for REGγ-proteasome functions in antioxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human urinary excretion profile after smoking and oral administration of ( sup 14 C)delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, E.; Gillespie, H.K.; Halldin, M.M. (BMC, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1990-05-01

    The urinary excretion profiles of delta 1-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) metabolites have been evaluated in two chronic and two naive marijuana users after smoking and oral administration of ({sup 14}C)delta 1-THC. Urine was collected for five days after each administration route and analyzed for total delta 1-THC metabolites by radioactivity determination, for delta 1-THC-7-oic acid by high-performance liquid chromatography, and for cross-reacting cannabinoids by the EMIT d.a.u. cannabinoid assay. The average urinary excretion half-life of {sup 14}C-labeled delta 1-THC metabolites was calculated to be 18.2 +/- 4.9 h (+/- SD). The excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings were similar to the excretion profile of {sup 14}C-labeled metabolites in the naive users. However, in the chronic users the excretion profiles of delta 1-THC-7-oic acid and EMIT readings did not resemble the radioactive excretion due to the heavy influence from previous Cannabis use. Between 8-14% of the radioactive dose was recovered in the urine in both user groups after oral administration. Lower urinary recovery was obtained both in the chronic and naive users after smoking--5 and 2%, respectively.

  7. The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, B.D.

    1998-07-01

    Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies

  8. Soluble and immobilized graphene oxide activates complement system differently dependent on surface oxidation state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibroe, Peter Popp; Petersen, Søren Vermehren; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is believed to become applicable in biomedical products and medicine, thereby necessitating appropriate safety evaluation dependent on their applications and the route of administration. We have examined the effect of GO form (in solution versus immobilized) and oxidation stat...

  9. Novel synthesis and shape-dependent catalytic performance of Cu-Mn oxides for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixun; Wang, Honglei; Wu, Xingxing; Ye, Qinglan; Xu, Xuetang; Li, Bin; Wang, Fan

    2017-05-01

    Transition metal oxides with large specific surface area are attractive for high-activity catalysts, and hierarchical structures of transition metal oxides with porous feature possess the structural advantage in the transfer of gaseous reactant and product. In this work, porous Cu-Mn oxides with high surface area were successfully obtained through low-temperature coprecipitation method in alcohol/water solvent and then post-annealing. The addition of alcohol showed great influences on the shape and catalytic performances for CO oxidation. Dumbbell-like Cu-Mn oxide particles with splitting ends displayed high catalytic activity and a complete conversion of CO was achieved at 45 °C, suggesting a shape-dependent catalytic activity. The oxidative activity was attributed to a combination of factors including specific surface area, active surface oxygen species and Mn(IV) cations. The results may supply a new thought to design high-performance Cu-Mn oxide catalysts.

  10. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell; alcohol. Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in 0.5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated ...

  11. Size dependent reduction-oxidation-reduction behaviour of cobalt oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadasivan, Sajanikumari; Bellabarba, Ronan M.; Tooze, Robert P.

    2013-10-01

    Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal particles led to solid spheres, hollow spheres or core-shell structures depending on the size of the initial metal particle. Further re-reduction of the oxidized structures was also observed to be size dependent. The hollow oxide shells formed by the large particles (29 nm) fragmented into smaller particles on reduction, while the hollow shells of the medium sized particles (11 nm) did not re-disperse on further reduction. Similarly, no re-dispersion was observed in the case of the small particles (6 nm). This model study provides useful insights into the size dependent behavior of metal/metal oxide particles during oxidation/reduction. This has important implications in petrochemical industry where cobalt is used as a catalyst in the Fischer-Tropsch process.Morphologically similar cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4) of four different sizes (3 nm, 6 nm, 11 nm and 29 nm) with narrow size distribution were prepared by subtle variation of synthesis conditions. These nanoparticles were used as model materials to understand the structural and morphological changes that occur to cobalt oxide during sequential reduction, oxidation and further re-reduction process as a function of the initial size of cobalt oxide. On reduction, spherical cobalt nanoparticles were obtained independent of the original size of cobalt oxide. In contrast, subsequent oxidation of the metal

  12. Nitric oxide: Orchestrator of endothelium-dependent responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Félétou, Michel; Köhler, Ralf; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The present review first summarizes the complex chain of events, in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, that leads to endothelium-dependent relaxations (vasodilatations) due to the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and how therapeutic...... interventions may improve the bioavailability of NO and thus prevent/cure endothelial dysfunction. Then, the role of other endothelium-derived mediators (endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing (EDHF) and contracting (EDCF) factors, endothelin-1) and signals (myoendothelial coupling) is summarized also...

  13. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Temperature dependence on the electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol in. 0⋅5 M H2SO4 were investigated with Pt and PtRu electrodes. Tafel slope and apparent activation energy were evaluated from the cyclic voltammetric data in the low potential region (0⋅3–0⋅5 V vs SHE). The. CV results ...

  14. Tirandamycin biosynthesis is mediated by co-dependent oxidative enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jacob C.; Li, Shengying; Gunatilleke, Shamila S.; Anzai, Yojiro; Burr, Douglas A.; Podust, Larissa M.; Sherman, David H.

    2011-08-01

    Elucidation of natural product biosynthetic pathways provides important insights into the assembly of potent bioactive molecules, and expands access to unique enzymes able to selectively modify complex substrates. Here, we show full reconstitution, in vitro, of an unusual multi-step oxidative cascade for post-assembly-line tailoring of tirandamycin antibiotics. This pathway involves a remarkably versatile and iterative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (TamI) and a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent oxidase (TamL), which act co-dependently through the repeated exchange of substrates. TamI hydroxylates tirandamycin C (TirC) to generate tirandamycin E (TirE), a previously unidentified tirandamycin intermediate. TirE is subsequently oxidized by TamL, giving rise to the ketone of tirandamycin D (TirD), after which a unique exchange back to TamI enables successive epoxidation and hydroxylation to afford, respectively, the final products tirandamycin A (TirA) and tirandamycin B (TirB). Ligand-free, substrate- and product-bound crystal structures of bicovalently flavinylated TamL oxidase reveal a likely mechanism for the C10 oxidation of TirE.

  15. Nitrate-Dependent Iron Oxidation: A Potential Mars Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alex; Pearson, Victoria K.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Miot, Jennyfer; Olsson-Francis, Karen

    2018-01-01

    This work considers the hypothetical viability of microbial nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation (NDFO) for supporting simple life in the context of the early Mars environment. This draws on knowledge built up over several decades of remote and in situ observation, as well as recent discoveries that have shaped current understanding of early Mars. Our current understanding is that certain early martian environments fulfill several of the key requirements for microbes with NDFO metabolism. First, abundant Fe2+ has been identified on Mars and provides evidence of an accessible electron donor; evidence of anoxia suggests that abiotic Fe2+ oxidation by molecular oxygen would not have interfered and competed with microbial iron metabolism in these environments. Second, nitrate, which can be used by some iron oxidizing microorganisms as an electron acceptor, has also been confirmed in modern aeolian and ancient sediment deposits on Mars. In addition to redox substrates, reservoirs of both organic and inorganic carbon are available for biosynthesis, and geochemical evidence suggests that lacustrine systems during the hydrologically active Noachian period (4.1–3.7 Ga) match the circumneutral pH requirements of nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing microorganisms. As well as potentially acting as a primary producer in early martian lakes and fluvial systems, the light-independent nature of NDFO suggests that such microbes could have persisted in sub-surface aquifers long after the desiccation of the surface, provided that adequate carbon and nitrates sources were prevalent. Traces of NDFO microorganisms may be preserved in the rock record by biomineralization and cellular encrustation in zones of high Fe2+ concentrations. These processes could produce morphological biosignatures, preserve distinctive Fe-isotope variation patterns, and enhance preservation of biological organic compounds. Such biosignatures could be detectable by future missions to Mars with appropriate

  16. Nitrate-Dependent Iron Oxidation: A Potential Mars Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Price

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work considers the hypothetical viability of microbial nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation (NDFO for supporting simple life in the context of the early Mars environment. This draws on knowledge built up over several decades of remote and in situ observation, as well as recent discoveries that have shaped current understanding of early Mars. Our current understanding is that certain early martian environments fulfill several of the key requirements for microbes with NDFO metabolism. First, abundant Fe2+ has been identified on Mars and provides evidence of an accessible electron donor; evidence of anoxia suggests that abiotic Fe2+ oxidation by molecular oxygen would not have interfered and competed with microbial iron metabolism in these environments. Second, nitrate, which can be used by some iron oxidizing microorganisms as an electron acceptor, has also been confirmed in modern aeolian and ancient sediment deposits on Mars. In addition to redox substrates, reservoirs of both organic and inorganic carbon are available for biosynthesis, and geochemical evidence suggests that lacustrine systems during the hydrologically active Noachian period (4.1–3.7 Ga match the circumneutral pH requirements of nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing microorganisms. As well as potentially acting as a primary producer in early martian lakes and fluvial systems, the light-independent nature of NDFO suggests that such microbes could have persisted in sub-surface aquifers long after the desiccation of the surface, provided that adequate carbon and nitrates sources were prevalent. Traces of NDFO microorganisms may be preserved in the rock record by biomineralization and cellular encrustation in zones of high Fe2+ concentrations. These processes could produce morphological biosignatures, preserve distinctive Fe-isotope variation patterns, and enhance preservation of biological organic compounds. Such biosignatures could be detectable by future missions to Mars with

  17. The oxidative burst reaction in mammalian cells depends on gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Astrid; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Sromicki, Juri; Brungs, Sonja; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Hock, Bertold; Kolanus, Waldemar; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-12-20

    Gravity has been a constant force throughout the Earth's evolutionary history. Thus, one of the fundamental biological questions is if and how complex cellular and molecular functions of life on Earth require gravity. In this study, we investigated the influence of gravity on the oxidative burst reaction in macrophages, one of the key elements in innate immune response and cellular signaling. An important step is the production of superoxide by the NADPH oxidase, which is rapidly converted to H2O2 by spontaneous and enzymatic dismutation. The phagozytosis-mediated oxidative burst under altered gravity conditions was studied in NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages by means of a luminol assay. Ground-based experiments in "functional weightlessness" were performed using a 2 D clinostat combined with a photomultiplier (PMT clinostat). The same technical set-up was used during the 13th DLR and 51st ESA parabolic flight campaign. Furthermore, hypergravity conditions were provided by using the Multi-Sample Incubation Centrifuge (MuSIC) and the Short Arm Human Centrifuge (SAHC). The results demonstrate that release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the oxidative burst reaction depends greatly on gravity conditions. ROS release is 1.) reduced in microgravity, 2.) enhanced in hypergravity and 3.) responds rapidly and reversible to altered gravity within seconds. We substantiated the effect of altered gravity on oxidative burst reaction in two independent experimental systems, parabolic flights and 2D clinostat / centrifuge experiments. Furthermore, the results obtained in simulated microgravity (2D clinorotation experiments) were proven by experiments in real microgravity as in both cases a pronounced reduction in ROS was observed. Our experiments indicate that gravity-sensitive steps are located both in the initial activation pathways and in the final oxidative burst reaction itself, which could be explained by the role of cytoskeletal dynamics in the assembly and function

  18. Directional dependence of the threshold displacement energies in metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Benjamin J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2017-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the directional dependence and the values of the threshold energies (TDEs) for the displacements of the oxygen and metal atoms and for producing stable Frenkel pairs in five metal oxides of Cr2O3, Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and MgO. The TDEs for the Frenkel pairs and atoms displacement are calculated in 66 crystallographic directions, on both the anion and cation sublattices. The performed simulations are for metal and oxygen PKA energies up to 350 and 400 eV, respectively. The calculated probability distributions for the atoms displacement and average number of Frenkel pairs produced in the different oxides are compared. The results revealed unique symmetrical patterns of the TDEs for the displacement of the atoms and the formation of stable Frenkel pairs, confirming the strong dependence on the direction and the crystalline structure of the oxides. Results also showed that the formation of stable Frenkel pairs is associated with the displacements of the PKAs and/or of the SKAs. The probabilities of the TDEs for the displacement of the oxygen and metal PKAs are consistently lower than those of the atoms in the crystal. In SiO2, TDEs for the displacement of oxygen and metal atoms and those for the formation of stable Frenkel pairs are the lowest, while those in TiO2 are among the highest. The results for Cr2O3 and Al2O3, which have the same crystal structure, are similar. The calculated TDEs for MgO, Al2O3 and TiO2 are generally in good agreement with the experimental values and the probability distributions of the TDEs for the PKAs in TiO2 are in good agreement with reported MD simulation results.

  19. Concentration-dependent toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles mediated by increased oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Naqvi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Saba Naqvi1, Mohammad Samim2, MZ Abdin3, Farhan Jalees Ahmed4, AN Maitra5, CK Prashant6, Amit K Dinda61Faculty of Engineering and Interdisciplinary Sciences, 2Department of Chemistry, 3Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, 4Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard University, 5Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, 6Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: Iron oxide nanoparticles with unique magnetic properties have a high potential for use in several biomedical, bioengineering and in vivo applications, including tissue repair, magnetic resonance imaging, immunoassay, drug delivery, detoxification of biologic fluids, cell sorting, and hyperthermia. Although various surface modifications are being done for making these nonbiodegradable nanoparticles more biocompatible, their toxic potential is still a major concern. The current in vitro study of the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of mean diameter 30 nm coated with Tween 80 and murine macrophage (J774 cells was undertaken to evaluate the dose- and time-dependent toxic potential, as well as investigate the role of oxidative stress in the toxicity. A 15–30 nm size range of spherical nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and zeta sizer. MTT assay showed >95% viability of cells in lower concentrations (25–200 µg/mL and up to three hours of exposure, whereas at higher concentrations (300–500 µg/mL and prolonged (six hours exposure viability reduced to 55%–65%. Necrosis-apoptosis assay by propidium iodide and Hoechst-33342 staining revealed loss of the majority of the cells by apoptosis. H2DCFDDA assay to quantify generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS indicated that exposure to a higher concentration of nanoparticles resulted in enhanced ROS generation, leading to cell injury and death. The cell membrane injury

  20. Nitric oxide, cholesterol oxides and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in plasma of patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Moriel

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to identify disturbances of nitric oxide radical (·NO metabolism and the formation of cholesterol oxidation products in human essential hypertension. The concentrations of·NO derivatives (nitrite, nitrate, S-nitrosothiols and nitrotyrosine, water and lipid-soluble antioxidants and cholesterol oxides were measured in plasma of 11 patients with mild essential hypertension (H: 57.8 ± 9.7 years; blood pressure, 148.3 ± 24.8/90.8 ± 10.2 mmHg and in 11 healthy subjects (N: 48.4 ± 7.0 years; blood pressure, 119.4 ± 9.4/75.0 ± 8.0 mmHg.Nitrite, nitrate and S-nitrosothiols were measured by chemiluminescence and nitrotyrosine was determined by ELISA. Antioxidants were determined by reverse-phase HPLC and cholesterol oxides by gas chromatography. Hypertensive patients had reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in response to reactive hyperemia (H: 9.3 and N: 15.1% increase of diameter 90 s after hyperemia, and lower levels of ascorbate (H: 29.2 ± 26.0, N: 54.2 ± 24.9 µM, urate (H: 108.5 ± 18.9, N: 156.4 ± 26.3 µM, ß-carotene (H: 1.1 ± 0.8, N: 2.5 ± 1.2 nmol/mg cholesterol, and lycopene (H: 0.4 ± 0.2, N: 0.7 ± 0.2 nmol/mg cholesterol, in plasma, compared to normotensive subjects. The content of 7-ketocholesterol, 5alpha-cholestane-3ß,5,6ß-triol and 5,6alpha-epoxy-5alpha-cholestan-3alpha-ol in LDL, and the concentration of endothelin-1 (H: 0.9 ± 0.2, N: 0.7 ± 0.1 ng/ml in plasma were increased in hypertensive patients. No differences were found for ·NO derivatives between groups. These data suggest that an increase in cholesterol oxidation is associated with endothelium dysfunction in essential hypertension and oxidative stress, although ·NO metabolite levels in plasma are not modified in the presence of elevated cholesterol oxides.

  1. Ghrelin enhances food intake and carbohydrate oxidation in a nitric oxide dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Shayan; Mirza, Aaisha; Howell, Erin; Currie, Paul J

    2017-09-01

    In the present study we sought to investigate interactions between hypothalamic nitric oxide (NO) and ghrelin signaling on food intake and energy substrate utilization as measured by the respiratory exchange ratio (RER). Guide cannulae were unilaterally implanted in either the arcuate (ArcN) or paraventricular (PVN) nuclei of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were pretreated with subcutaneous (2.5-10mg/kg/ml) or central (0-100pmol) N-nitro-l-Arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) followed by 50pmol of ghrelin administered into either the ArcN or PVN. Both l-NAME and ghrelin were microinjected at the onset of the active cycle and food intake and RER were assessed 2h postinjection. RER was measured as the ratio of the volume of carbon dioxide expelled relative to the volume of oxygen consumed (VCO 2 /VO 2 ) using an open-circuit indirect calorimeter. Our results demonstrated that peripheral and central l-NAME pretreatment dose-dependently attenuated ghrelin induced increases in food intake and RER in either the ArcN or PVN. In fact the 100pmol dose largely reversed the metabolic effects of ghrelin in both anatomical regions. These findings suggest that ghrelin enhancement of food intake and carbohydrate oxidation in the rat ArcN and PVN is NO-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dependence of riverine nitrous oxide emissions on dissolved oxygen levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosamond, Madeline S.; Thuss, Simon J.; Schiff, Sherry L.

    2012-10-01

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas, and it destroys stratospheric ozone. Seventeen per cent of agricultural nitrous oxide emissions come from the production of nitrous oxide in streams, rivers and estuaries, in turn a result of inorganic nitrogen input through leaching, runoff and sewage. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and global nitrous oxide budgets assume that riverine nitrous oxide emissions increase linearly with dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads, but data are sparse and conflicting. Here we report measurements over two years of nitrous oxide emissions in the Grand River, Canada, a seventh-order temperate river that is affected by agricultural runoff and outflow from a waste-water treatment plant. Emissions were disproportionately high in urban areas and during nocturnal summer periods. Moreover, annual emission estimates that are based on dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads overestimated the measured emissions in a wet year and underestimated them in a dry year. We found no correlations of nitrous oxide emissions with nitrate or dissolved inorganic nitrogen, but detected negative correlations with dissolved oxygen, suggesting that nitrate concentrations did not limit emissions. We conclude that future increases in nitrate export to rivers will not necessarily lead to higher nitrous oxide emissions, but more widespread hypoxia most likely will.

  3. Soluble and immobilized graphene oxide activates complement system differently dependent on surface oxidation state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibroe, Peter P; Petersen, Søren V; Bovet, Nicolas; Laursen, Bo W; Moghimi, S Moein

    2016-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is believed to become applicable in biomedical products and medicine, thereby necessitating appropriate safety evaluation dependent on their applications and the route of administration. We have examined the effect of GO form (in solution versus immobilized) and oxidation state on two related elements of innate immunity: the complement system and interleukin-6 (IL-6) release in human blood. In solution, there was a decrease in GO-mediated complement activation with decreasing surface oxygen content (and altered oxygen functionality), whereas with immobilized GO complement response were reversed and increased with decreasing oxygen content. GO solutions, at concentrations below complement activating threshold, did not induce IL-6 release from human blood leukocytes, and further dampened lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 release in the whole blood. The latter effect became more profound with GO's having higher oxygen content. This protective role of GO solutions, however, disappeared at higher concentrations above complement-activating threshold. We discuss these results in relation to GO surface structure and properties, and implications for local administration and development of GO-based implantable devices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  5. Reversing Size-Dependent Trends in the Oxidation of Copper Clusters through Support Effects: Reversing Size-Dependent Trends in the Oxidation of Copper Clusters through Support Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammen, Nisha [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, -560064 Bangalore India; Spanu, Leonardo [Shell Technology Center, Shell India Markets Private Limited, -560048 Bangalore India; Tyo, Eric C. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Yang, Bing [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Halder, Avik [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Seifert, Sönke [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Pellin, Michael J. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Vajda, Stefan [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 60439 Argonne IL USA; Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago, 60637 Chicago IL USA; Narasimhan, Shobhana [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, -560064 Bangalore India

    2017-12-22

    Having the ability to tune the oxidation state of Cu nanoparticles is essential for their utility as catalysts. The degree of oxidation that maximizes product yield and selectivity is known to vary, depending on the particular reaction. Using first principles calculations and XANES measurements, we show that for subnanometer sizes in the gas phase, smaller Cu clusters are more resistant to oxidation. However, this trend is reversed upon deposition on an alumina support. We are able to explain this result in terms of strong cluster-support interactions, which differ significantly for the oxidized and elemental clusters. The stable cluster phases also feature novel oxygen stoichiometries. Our results suggest that one can tune the degree of oxidation of Cu catalysts by optimizing not just their size, but also the support they are deposited on.

  6. Temperature dependence studies on the electro-oxidation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    These values increased with the increasing of temperature. The results from two techniques were well agreed that the electro-oxidation of methanol was improved by raising the temperature and ruthenium modification. Keywords. Cyclic voltammetry; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; activation energy; fuel cell;.

  7. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The data obtained provide insight into the mechanism of cell proliferation action of endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the effectiveness of melanoma treatment. Keywords: Apoptosis, Human melanoma cells, Inducible nitric oxide ...

  8. Cellular inactivation of nitric oxide induces p53-dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO•) and influence of p53 status during apoptosis induced by a ... endogenous NO•, based on p53 status, and indicate manipulation of iNOS may offer exciting opportunities to improve the ..... agents, further research will be required to define more specifically the ...

  9. Temperature-dependent phase evolution of copper-oxide thin-films on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Christoph; Fedderwitz, Hanna; Noguera, Claudine; Goniakowski, Jacek; Nilius, Niklas

    2018-02-21

    The formation of ultrathin copper oxide layers on an Au(111) surface is explored with scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory. Depending on the thermal treatment of as-grown Cu-O samples, a variety of thin-film morphologies is observed. Whereas 1D oxide stripes with Au[112[combining macron

  10. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Jagersma, C.G.; Zhang, Y.; Petrillo, M.; Cai, H.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH(4)) and the CH(4) dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, (13)C-labeled CH(4) was anaerobically oxidized to (13)C-labeled CO(2), while net endogenous CH(4) production was observed.

  11. Dose-dependent hepatotoxicity effects of Zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esrafil Mansouri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZNP are increasingly used in sunscreens, biosensors, food additives and pigments. In this study the effects of ZNP on liver of rats was investigated. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups received 5, 50 and 300 mg/kg ZNP respectively for 14 days. Control group received only distilled water. ALT, AST and ALP were considered as biomarkers to indicate hepatotoxicity. Lipid peroxidation (MDA, SOD and GPx were detected for assessment of oxidative stress in liver tissue. Histological studies and TUNEL assay were also done. Results: Plasma concentration of zinc (Zn was significantly increased in 5 mg/kg ZNP-treated rats. Liver concentration of Zn was significantly increased in the 300 mg/kg ZNP-treated animals. Weight of liver was markedly increased in both 5 and 300 mg/kg doses of ZNP. ZNP at the doses of 5 mg/kg induced a significant increase in oxidative stress through the increase in MDA content and a significant decrease in SOD and GPx enzymes activity in the liver tissue. Administration of ZNP at 5 mg/kg induced a significant elevation in plasma AST, ALT and ALP. Histological studies showed that treatment with 5 mg/kg of ZNP caused hepatocytes swelling, which was accompanied by congestion of RBC and accumulation of inflammatory cells. Apoptotic index was also significantly increased in this group. ZNP at the dose of 300 mg/kg had poor hepatotoxicity effect. Conclusion: It is concluded that lower doses of ZNP has more hepatotoxic effects on rats, and recommended to use it with caution if there is a hepatological problem.

  12. Temperature dependent Dielectric studies of Poly(Ethylene Oxide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva Kumar, B. P.; Gurumurthy, T. M.; Praveen, D.

    2018-02-01

    Polymers are known to be better materials for dielectric applications. Various polymers with different molecular weights are being studied for dielectric applications. In the present paper, we report the dielectric measurements of Poly(Ethylene Oxide) {PEO} using Impedance spectroscopy studies. The dielectric studies of PEO were carried out on pellets as a function of temperature. It was found that the dielectric constant seems to be negligibly varying with increase in temperature at high frequencies, however, at low frequencies, dielectric constant varies increases with temperature. This may be due to the fact that with the thermal energy provided to the system, more and more dipoles participate and hence the net dielectric constant of the material is also higher at higher temperature. Also at very high frequencies, due to many non-responsive dipoles for fast switching of the applied signal, net dielectric constant of the material also does vary much with temperatures.

  13. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net endogenous CH4 production was observed. Labeled-CH4 oxidation rates followed CH4 production rates, and the presence of sulfate hampered both labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis. Labeled-CH4 oxidation was therefore linked to methanogenesis. This process is referred to as trace CH4 oxidation and has been demonstrated in methanogenic pure cultures. This study shows that the ratio between labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis is positively affected by the CH4 partial pressure and that this ratio is in methanogenic granular sludge more than 40 times higher than that in pure cultures of methanogens. The CH4 partial pressure also positively affected sulfate reduction and negatively affected methanogenesis: a repression of methanogenesis at elevated CH4 partial pressures confers an advantage to sulfate reducers that compete with methanogens for common substrates, formed from endogenous material. The oxidation of labeled CH 4 and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction are thus not necessarily evidence of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 coupled to sulfate reduction. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  14. Magnetic and transport properties of 214 oxides. Dependence on doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gor' kov, L.P. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States) Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Nicopoulos, V.N.; Kumar, P. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States))

    1994-06-01

    We consider how doping can be described in terms of the charge-transfer insulator concept. We discuss and compare a few models for the band structure for the doped charges. This has led us to the conclusion that the band structure stability problem is one of the main issues in any correspondence between results for the I-J model and, say, the three-band model for the slightly doped layered oxides. The stability criterion is formulated and its implications discussed. Provided a phenomenological conduction band is chosen to satisfy the criterion of stability, a detailed picture of how dopants influence the spin wave spectrum at T=0 is presented. The basic physics for the destruction of the antiferromagnetic (AF) long-range order is rather model-independent: the long-range order (at T=0) disappears due to the Cerenkov effect when the Fermi velocity first exceeds the spin wave velocity. We then discuss the overall spectrum of spin excitations and see that the spin wave attenuation for x < x[sub c] T=0 due to Landau damping appears in the range of magnon momenta k(x) = 2m[sup *] s [+-][alpha][radical][bar x]. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Temperature Dependent Variations of Phonon Interactions in Nanocrystalline Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Dogra Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of nanocrystalline CeO2 was investigated in the temperature range of 80–440 K. The anharmonic constants have been derived from the shift in phonon modes fitted to account for the anharmonic contributions as well as the thermal expansion contribution using the high pressure parameters derived from our own high pressure experimental data reported previously. The total anharmonicity has also been estimated from the true anharmonicity as well as quasiharmonic component. In the line-width variation analysis, the cubic anharmonic term was found to dominate the quartic term. Finally, the phonon lifetime also reflected the trend so observed.

  16. Independence of protein kinase C-delta activity from activation loop phosphorylation: structural basis and altered functions in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Belkina, Natalya V; Graham, Caroline; Shaw, Stephen

    2006-04-28

    Activation loop phosphorylation plays critical regulatory roles for many kinases. Unlike other protein kinase Cs (PKC), PKC-delta does not require phosphorylation of its activation loop (Thr-507) for in vitro activity. We investigated the structural basis for this unusual capacity and its relevance to PKC-delta function in intact cells. Mutational analysis demonstrated that activity without Thr-507 phosphorylation depends on 20 residues N-terminal to the kinase domain and a pair of phenylalanines (Phe-500/Phe-527) unique to PKC-delta in/near the activation loop. Molecular modeling demonstrated that these elements stabilize the activation loop by forming a hydrophobic chain of interactions from the C-lobe to activation loop to N-terminal (helical) extension. In cells PKC-delta mediates both apoptosis and transcription regulation. We found that the T507A mutant of the PKC-delta kinase domain resembled the corresponding wild type in mediating apoptosis in transfected HEK293T cells. But the T507A mutant was completely defective in AP-1 and NF-kappaB reporter assays. A novel assay in which the kinase domain of PKC-delta and its substrate (a fusion protein of PKC substrate peptide with green fluorescent protein) were co-targeted to lipid rafts revealed a major substrate-selective defect of the T507A mutant in phosphorylating the substrate in cells. In vitro analysis showed strong product inhibition on the T507A mutant with particular substrates whose characteristics suggest it contributes to the substrate selective defect of the PKC-delta T507A mutant in cells. Thus, activation loop phosphorylation of PKC-delta may regulate its function in cells in a novel way.

  17. Activity Dependent Synaptic Plasticity Mimicked on Indium-Tin-Oxide Electric-Double-Layer Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Juan; Zhu, Li Qiang; Fu, Yang Ming; Xiao, Hui; Guo, Li Qiang; Wan, Qing

    2017-10-25

    Ion coupling has provided an additional method to modulate electric properties for solid-state materials. Here, phosphorosilicate glass (PSG)-based electrolyte gated protonic/electronic coupled indium-tin-oxide electric-double-layer (EDL) transistors are fabricated. The oxide transistor exhibits good electrical performances due to an extremely strong proton gating behavior for the electrolyte. With interfacial electrochemical doping, channel conductances of the oxide EDL transistor can be regulated to different levels, corresponding to different initial synaptic weights. Thus, activity dependent synaptic responses such as excitatory postsynaptic current, paired-pulse facilitation, and high-pass filtering are discussed in detail. The proposed proton conductor gated oxide EDL synaptic transistors with activity dependent synaptic plasticities may act as fundamental building blocks for neuromorphic system applications.

  18. An unusual temperature dependence in the oxidation of oxycarbide layers on uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Walton P.

    1981-09-01

    An anomalous temperature dependence has been observed for the oxidation kinetics of outermost oxycarbide layers on polycrystalline uranium metal. Normally, oxidation or corrosion reactions are expected to proceed more rapidly as the temperature is elevated. Thus, it came as a surprise when we observed that the removal of the outermost atomic layers of carbon from uranium oxycarbide by O 2 reproducibly proceeds at a much faster rate at 25°C than at 280°C.

  19. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of yttrium oxide nanoparticles on primary osteoblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Guoqiang, E-mail: zhougq1982@163.com; Li, Yunfei; Ma, Yanyan; Liu, Zhu; Cao, Lili; Wang, Da; Liu, Sudan; Xu, Wenshi; Wang, Wenying [Hebei University, Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis of Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Chemical Biology of Hebei Province, College of Chemistry and Environmental Science (China)

    2016-05-15

    Yttrium oxide nanoparticles are an excellent host material for the rare earth metals and have high luminescence efficiency providing a potential application in photodynamic therapy and biological imaging. In this study, the effects of yttrium oxide nanoparticles with four different sizes were investigated using primary osteoblasts in vitro. The results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity generated by yttrium oxide nanoparticles depended on the particle size, and smaller particles possessed higher toxicological effects. For the purpose to elucidate the relationship between reactive oxygen species generation and cell damage, cytomembrane integrity, intracellular reactive oxygen species level, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell apoptosis rate, and activity of caspase-3 in cells were then measured. Increased reactive oxygen species level was also observed in a size-dependent way. Thus, our data demonstrated that exposure to yttrium oxide nanoparticles resulted in a size-dependent cytotoxicity in cultured primary osteoblasts, and reactive oxygen species generation should be one possible damage pathway for the toxicological effects produced by yttrium oxide particles. The results may provide useful information for more rational applications of yttrium oxide nanoparticles in the future.

  20. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show...... that sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr...

  1. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Laskar, Aparna [CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Jana, Madhurya [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pramanik, Panchanan [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Karmakar, Parimal, E-mail: pkarmakar_28@yahoo.co.in [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  2. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain

  3. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Oswald

    Full Text Available Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere.

  4. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  5. Prolonged local forearm hyperinsulinemia induces sustained enhancement of nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Thomas S; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Dominguez, Helena

    2005-01-01

    -dependent and -independent vasodilation.N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) was coinfused to test the degree of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation. Insulin infusion for 60 min enhanced serotonin-induced vasodilation by 37% compared to vehicle, p = .016. This increase was maintained for 4 h and was blocked by L...

  6. Mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase is inactivated upon oxidation and reactivated by thioredoxin-dependent reduction in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke eYoshida

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of mitochondrial metabolism is essential for ensuring cellular growth and maintenance in plants. Based on redox-proteomics analysis, several proteins involved in diverse mitochondrial reactions have been identified as potential redox-regulated proteins. NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, is one such candidate. In this study, we investigated the redox regulation mechanisms of IDH by biochemical procedures. In contrast to mammalian and yeast counterparts reported to date, recombinant IDH in Arabidopsis mitochondria did not show adenylate-dependent changes in enzymatic activity. Instead, IDH was inactivated by oxidation treatment and partially reactivated by subsequent reduction. Functional IDH forms a heterodimer comprising regulatory (IDH-r and catalytic (IDH-c subunits. IDH-r was determined to be the target of oxidative modifications forming an oligomer via intermolecular disulfide bonds. Mass spectrometric analysis combined with tryptic digestion of IDH-r indicated that Cys128 and Cys216 are involved in intermolecular disulfide bond formation. Furthermore, we showed that mitochondria-localized o-type thioredoxin (Trx-o promotes the reduction of oxidized IDH-r. These results suggest that IDH-r is susceptible to oxidative stress, and Trx-o serves to convert oxidized IDH-r to the reduced form that is necessary for active IDH complex.

  7. Microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation in shallow subsurface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K.; Healy, O.; Spanbauer, T. L.; Snow, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic, microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation has been demonstrated in a variety of sediments, soils, and groundwater. To date, studies evaluating U bio-oxidation and mobilization have primarily focused on anthropogenically U contaminated sites. In the Platte River Basin U originating from weathering of uranium-rich igneous rocks in the Rocky Mountains was deposited in shallow alluvial sediments as insoluble reduced uranium minerals. These reduced U minerals are subject to reoxidation by available oxidants, such nitrate, in situ. Soluble uranium (U) from natural sources is a recognized contaminant in public water supplies throughout the state of Nebraska and Colorado. Here we evaluate the potential of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent microbially catalyzed metal/radionuclide oxidation in subsurface sediments near Alda, NE. Subsurface sediments and groundwater (20-64ft.) were collected from a shallow aquifer containing nitrate (from fertilizer) and natural iron and uranium. The reduction potential revealed a reduced environment and was confirmed by the presence of Fe(II) and U(IV) in sediments. Although sediments were reduced, nitrate persisted in the groundwater. Nitrate concentrations decreased, 38 mg/L to 30 mg/L, with increasing concentrations of Fe(II) and U(IV). Dissolved U, primarily as U(VI), increased with depth, 30.3 μg/L to 302 μg/L. Analysis of sequentially extracted U(VI) and U(IV) revealed that virtually all U in sediments existed as U(IV). The presence of U(IV) is consistent with reduced Fe (Fe(II)) and low reduction potential. The increase in aqueous U concentrations with depth suggests active U cycling may occur at this site. Tetravalent U (U(IV)) phases are stable in reduced environments, however the input of an oxidant such as oxygen or nitrate into these systems would result in oxidation. Thus co-occurrence of nitrate suggests that nitrate could be used by bacteria as a U(IV) oxidant. Most probable number

  8. Structural and functional characteristics of cGMP-dependent methionine oxidation in Arabidopsis thaliana proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-01-05

    Background: Increasing structural and biochemical evidence suggests that post-translational methionine oxidation of proteins is not just a result of cellular damage but may provide the cell with information on the cellular oxidative status. In addition, oxidation of methionine residues in key regulatory proteins, such as calmodulin, does influence cellular homeostasis. Previous findings also indicate that oxidation of methionine residues in signaling molecules may have a role in stress responses since these specific structural modifications can in turn change biological activities of proteins. Findings. Here we use tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomics to show that treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana cells with a non-oxidative signaling molecule, the cell-permeant second messenger analogue, 8-bromo-3,5-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), results in a time-dependent increase in the content of oxidised methionine residues. Interestingly, the group of proteins affected by cGMP-dependent methionine oxidation is functionally enriched for stress response proteins. Furthermore, we also noted distinct signatures in the frequency of amino acids flanking oxidised and un-oxidised methionine residues on both the C- and N-terminus. Conclusions: Given both a structural and functional bias in methionine oxidation events in response to a signaling molecule, we propose that these are indicative of a specific role of such post-translational modifications in the direct or indirect regulation of cellular responses. The mechanisms that determine the specificity of the modifications remain to be elucidated. 2013 Marondedze et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Opposing effects of oxidative challenge and carotenoids on antioxidant status and condition-dependent sexual signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomášek, Oldřich; Gabrielová, Barbora; Kačer, Petr; Maršík, Petr; Svobodová, Jana; Syslová, Kamila; Vinkler, Michal; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2016-03-22

    Several recent hypotheses consider oxidative stress to be a primary constraint ensuring honesty of condition-dependent carotenoid-based signalling. The key testable difference between these hypotheses is the assumed importance of carotenoids for redox homeostasis, with carotenoids being either antioxidant, pro-oxidant or unimportant. We tested the role of carotenoids in redox balance and sexual signalling by exposing adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to oxidative challenge (diquat dibromide) and manipulating carotenoid intake. As the current controversy over the importance of carotenoids as antioxidants could stem from the hydrophilic basis of commonly-used antioxidant assays, we used the novel measure of in vivo lipophilic antioxidant capacity. Oxidative challenge reduced beak pigmentation but elicited an increase in antioxidant capacity suggesting resource reallocation from signalling to redox homeostasis. Carotenoids counteracted the effect of oxidative challenge on lipophilic (but not hydrophilic) antioxidant capacity, thereby supporting carotenoid antioxidant function in vivo. This is inconsistent with hypotheses proposing that signalling honesty is maintained through either ROS-induced carotenoid degradation or the pro-oxidant effect of high levels of carotenoid-cleavage products acting as a physiological handicap. Our data further suggest that assessment of lipophilic antioxidant capacity is necessary to fully understand the role of redox processes in ecology and evolution.

  10. Oxidant-Dependent Thermoelectric Properties of Undoped ZnO Films by Atomic Layer Deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyunho

    2017-02-27

    Extraordinary oxidant-dependent changes in the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been observed. Specifically, deionized water and ozone oxidants are used in the growth of ZnO by ALD using diethylzinc as a zinc precursor. No substitutional atoms have been added to the ZnO films. By using ozone as an oxidant instead of water, a thermoelectric power factor (σS) of 5.76 × 10 W m K is obtained at 705 K for undoped ZnO films. In contrast, the maximum power factor for the water-based ZnO film is only 2.89 × 10 W m K at 746 K. Materials analysis results indicate that the oxygen vacancy levels in the water- and ozone-grown ZnO films are essentially the same, but the difference comes from Zn-related defects present in the ZnO films. The data suggest that the strong oxidant effect on thermoelectric performance can be explained by a mechanism involving point defect-induced differences in carrier concentration between these two oxides and a self-compensation effect in water-based ZnO due to the competitive formations of both oxygen and zinc vacancies. This strong oxidant effect on the thermoelectric properties of undoped ZnO films provides a pathway to improve the thermoelectric performance of this important material.

  11. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of insulating single crystal oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Langenberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of 27 different single crystal oxides is reported from ≈20 K to 350 K. These crystals have been selected among the most common substrates for growing epitaxial thin-film oxides, spanning over a range of lattice parameters from ≈3.7 Å to ≈12.5 Å. Different contributions to the phonon relaxation time are discussed on the basis of the Debye model. This work provides a database for the selection of appropriate substrates for thin-film growth according to their desired thermal properties, for applications in which heat management is important.

  12. Data of oxygen- and pH-dependent oxidation of resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabell Plauth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We show here if under physiologically relevant conditions resveratrol (RSV remains stable or not. We further show under which circumstances various oxidation products of RSV such as ROS can be produced. For example, in addition to the widely known effect of bicarbonate ions, high pH values promote the decay of RSV. Moreover, we analyse the impact of reduction of the oxygen partial pressure on the pH-dependent oxidation of RSV. For further interpretation and discussion of these focused data in a broader context we refer to the article “Hormetic shifting of redox environment by pro-oxidative resveratrol protects cells against stress” (Plauth et al., in press [1].

  13. Temperature dependence of the acid base equilibrium constants of substituted pyridine N-oxides in acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Ewa; Wróbel, Roman; Liwo, Adam; Chmurzyński, Lech

    1999-03-01

    Temperature dependence of acid-base equilibrium constants in systems consisting of substituted pyridine N-oxides was studied in acetonitrile, a strongly ionizing polar protophobic aprotic solvent. N-oxides, which have an enhanced tendency towards formation of cationic homo- and heteroconjugates, (OHO +) as a result of their relatively strong basicity, were investigated. For the sake of comparison, also aliphatic trimethylamine N-oxide and pyridine, the parent compound of its N-oxide, were included. Of particular interest were acid dissociation constants of cations of the protonated bases, homoconjugation equilibria of the cationic acids with conjugate bases, as well as cationic heteroconjugation equilibria of the protonated bases with non-conjugated bases. The constants were determined at three temperatures, 292.1, 298.1 and 304.1 K. On the basis of the temperature dependence of the constants, enthalpy changes were calculated for the acid dissociation of the cationic acids, as well as for cationic homo- and heteroconjugation. These values were derived from the known thermodynamic relationships, Δ G = - RTln K and Δ G = Δ H - TΔ S. It has been found that enthalpy changes for the dissociation reactions of the cationic acids and for cationic homoconjugation reactions are consistent with the variations of the protonation and homoconjugation energies, respectively calculated by both the semi-empirical and the ab initio methods on the 4-31G level.

  14. Urolithins display both antioxidant and pro-oxidant activities depending on assay system and conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Tuija; Kallio, Johanna; Jaakkola, Mari; Mäki, Marianne; Kilpeläinen, Pekka; Virtanen, Vesa

    2013-11-13

    The biological effects of polyphenolic ellagitannins are mediated by their intestinal metabolites, urolithins. This study investigated redox properties of urolithins A and B using ORAC assay, three cell-based assays, copper-initiated pro-oxidant activity (CIPA) assay, and cyclic voltammetry. Urolithins were strong antioxidants in the ORAC assay, but mostly pro-oxidants in cell-based assays, although urolithin A was an antioxidant in cell culture medium. Parent compound ellagic acid was a strong extracellular antioxidant, but showed no response in the intracellular assay. The CIPA assay confirmed the pro-oxidant activity of ellagitannin metabolites. In the cell proliferation assay, urolithins but not ellagic acid decreased growth and metabolism of HepG2 liver cells. In cyclic voltammetry, the oxidation of urolithin A was partly reversible, but that of urolithin B was irreversible. These results illustrate how strongly measured redox properties depend on the employed assay system and conditions and emphasize the importance of studying pro-oxidant and antioxidant activities in parallel.

  15. The Role of Mitochondrial Oxidation in Endotoxin-Induced Liver-Dependent Swine Pulmonary Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siore, Amsel M.; Parker, Richard E.; Cuppels, Chris; Thorn, Natalie; Hansen, Jason M.; Stecenko, Arlene A.; Brigham, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously studies in an in situ perfused swine preparation demonstrating that endotoxemia induced lung injury required the presence of the liver and that the response was accompanied by oxidative stress. To determine whether lung and liver mitochondrial oxidative stress was important to the response, we compared the effects of equimolar amounts of two antioxidants, n-acetylcysteine, which does not replenish mitochondrial glutathione, and procysteine which does, on endotoxemia induced lung injury in the swine preparation. In a swine perfused liver-lung preparation, we measured physiologic, biochemical and cellular responses of liver and lung to endotoxemia with and without the drugs. Endotoxemia caused oxidation of the mitochondria-specific protein, thioredoxin-2, in both the lungs and the liver. Procysteine reduced thioredoxin-2 oxidation, attenuated hemodynamic, gas exchange, hepatocellular dysfunction, and cytokine responses and prevented lung edema. n-acetylcysteine had more modest effects and did not prevent lung edema. Conclusions: We conclude that mitochondrial oxidation may be critical to the pathogenesis of endotoxemia-induced liver-dependent lung injury and that choices of antioxidant therapy for such conditions must consider the desired subcellular target in order to be optimally effective. PMID:22925572

  16. Environment-dependent photochromism of silver nanoparticles interfaced with metal-oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Shencheng; Sun, Shiyu; Zhang, Xintong; Zhang, Cen; Zhao, Xiaoning; Liu, Yichun

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We prepared silver/mental-oxide nanocomposite films by physical sputtering technology to investigate the environment-dependent photo-dissolution of silver nanoparticles. • We built up an airtight and in situ monitorable system to measure photochromism of different films in various atmospheres. • Silver nanoparticles were found to be more easily photo-dissolved on the n-type metal oxide films compared with that on the p-type one, conductor and insulator. • Oxygen and humidity were verified to accelerate the photochromism of silver nanoparticles. - Abstract: Different metal-oxide films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Further, a layer of silver nanoparticles (NPs) was deposited on the surface of the substrate by physical sputtering. Photochromism of the silver/metal-oxide nanocomposite films were investigated in situ under the irradiation of a linearly-polarized green laser beam (532 nm). Silver NPs were found to be easily photo-dissolved on the n-type metal-oxide films. By changing experimental conditions, it was also verified that both oxygen and humidity accelerate the photochromism of silver NPs. The corresponding micro-mechanism on charge separation and Ag + -ions mobility was also discussed. These results provided theoretical basis for the application of silver NPs in biological, chemical and medical areas.

  17. Dose-Dependent Protective and Inductive Effects of Xanthohumol on Oxidative DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of xanthohumol, a prenylflavonoid isolated from the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L., on Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA oxidative damage and viability was evaluated. Yeast cultures under oxidative stress, induced by H2O2, displayed stronger growth in the presence of 5 mg/L of xanthohumol than cultures with only H2O2. Likewise, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay was significantly lower in cells co-incubated with xanthohumol and H2O2. Accordingly, fluorescence of dichlorofluorescein in cells treated with H2O2 and xanthohumol was considerably lower than in cells exclusively treated with H2O2, indicative of a reactive oxygen species scavenging mechanism and consequent formation of oxidation products, as detected by mass spectrometry. However, at concentrations above 5 mg/L, xanthohumol elicited an opposite effect, leading to a slower growth rate and significant increase in DNA damage. A yeast yap1 deletion mutant strain sensitive to oxidative stress grew more slowly in the presence of at least 5 mg/L of xanthohumol than cultures of the wild type, suggesting that xanthohumol toxicity is mediated by oxidative stress. This evidence provides further insight into the impact of xanthohumol on yeast cells, supporting dose-dependent antioxidant/antigenotoxic and prooxidant/genotoxic effects.

  18. Temperature dependence of Cu2O orientations in the oxidation of Cu (111)/ZnO (0001) by oxygen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jun-Qiang; Mei Zeng-Xia; Ye Da-Qian; Hou Yao-Nan; Liu Yao-Ping; Du Xiao-Long; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The role of temperature on the oxidation dynamics of Cu 2 O on ZnO (0001) was investigated during the oxidation of Cu (111)/ZnO (0001) by using oxygen plasma as the oxidant. A transition from single crystalline Cu 2 O (111) orientation to micro-zone phase separation with multiple orientations was revealed when the oxidation temperature increased above 300 °C. The experimental results clearly show the effect of the oxidation temperature with the assistance of oxygen plasma on changing the morphology of Cu (111) film and enhancing the lateral nucleation and migration abilities of cuprous oxides. A vertical top-down oxidation mode and a lateral migration model were proposed to explain the different nucleation and growth dynamics of the temperature-dependent oxidation process in the oxidation of Cu (111)/ZnO (0001). (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  19. A Reactive Oxide Overlayer on Rh Nanoparticles during CO Oxidation and Its Size Dependence Studied by in Situ Ambient Pressure XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael E.; Zhang, Yawen; Butcher, Derek R.; Park, Jeong Y.; Li, Yimin; Bluhm, Hendrik; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Zhang, Tianfu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-09-15

    CO oxidation is one of the most studied heterogeneous reactions, being scientifically and industrially important, particularly for removal of CO from exhaust streams and preferential oxidation for hydrogen purification in fuel cell applications. The precious metals Ru, Rh, Pd, Pt, and Au are most commonly used for this reaction because of their high activity and stability. Despite the wealth of experimental and theoretical data, it remains unclear what is the active surface for CO oxidation under catalytic conditions for these metals. In this communication, we utilize in situ synchrotron ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) to monitor the oxidation state at the surface of Rh nanoparticles during CO oxidation and demonstrate that the active catalyst is a surface oxide, the formation of which is dependent on particle size. The amount of oxide formed and the reaction rate both increase with decreasing particle size.

  20. Genome-enabled studies of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation in the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry R Beller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV and Fe(II oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation, namely (a whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b Fe(II oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III, which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. A transposon mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  1. Gut flora-dependent metabolite Trimethylamine-N-oxide accelerates endothelial cell senescence and vascular aging through oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yilang; Li, Dang; Zhao, Mingming; Liu, Changjie; Liu, Jia; Zeng, Aiping; Shi, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Si; Pan, Bing; Zheng, Lemin; Hong, Huashan

    2018-02-20

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), gut microbiota-dependent metabolites, has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the relationship between TMAO and vascular aging. Here, we observed a change in TMAO during the aging process and the effects of TMAO on vascular aging and endothelial cell (EC) senescence. We analyzed age-related plasma levels of TMAO in young adults (18-44 years old), older adults (≥ 65 years old), and 1-month-old, 3-month-old, 6-month-old and 10-month-old senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and age-matched senescence-accelerated mouse resistance 1 (SAMR1) models. We found that circulating TMAO increased with age both in humans and mice. Next, we observed that a TMAO treatment for 16 weeks induced vascular aging in SAMR1 mice and accelerated the process in SAMP8 mice, as measured by an upregulation of senescence markers including senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), p53, and p21, vascular dysfunction and remodeling. In vitro, we demonstrated that prolonged TMAO treatment induced senescence in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), characterized by reduced cell proliferation, increased expressions of senescence markers, stagnate G0/G1, and impaired cell migration. Furthermore, TMAO suppressed sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expression and increased oxidative stress both in vivo and in vitro and then activated the p53/p21/Rb pathway resulting in increased p53, acetylation of p53, p21, and decreased CDK2, cyclinE1, and phosphorylation of Rb. In summary, these data suggest that elevated circulating TMAO during the aging process may deteriorate EC senescence and vascular aging, which is probably associated with repression of SIRT1 expression and increased oxidative stress, and, thus, the activation of the p53/p21/Rb pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitric oxide prevents axonal degeneration by inducing HIF-1-dependent expression of erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keswani, Sanjay C; Bosch-Marcé, Marta; Reed, Nicole; Fischer, Angela; Semenza, Gregg L; Höke, Ahmet

    2011-03-22

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that can trigger adaptive (physiological) or maladaptive (pathological) responses to stress stimuli in a context-dependent manner. We have previously reported that NO may signal axonal injury to neighboring glial cells. In this study, we show that mice deficient in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-/-) are more vulnerable than WT mice to toxin-induced peripheral neuropathy. The administration of NO donors to primary dorsal root ganglion cultures prevents axonal degeneration induced by acrylamide in a dose-dependent manner. We demonstrate that NO-induced axonal protection is dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription of erythropoietin (EPO) within glial (Schwann) cells present in the cultures. Transduction of Schwann cells with adenovirus AdCA5 encoding a constitutively active form of HIF-1α results in amelioration of acrylamide-induced axonal degeneration in an EPO-dependent manner. Mice that are partially deficient in HIF-1α (HIF-1α+/-) are also more susceptible than WT littermates to toxic neuropathy. Our results indicate that NO→HIF-1→EPO signaling represents an adaptive mechanism that protects against axonal degeneration.

  3. Shape-Dependent Activity of Ceria for Hydrogen Electro-Oxidation in Reduced-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ting; Meng, Xie; Wu, Hao; Li, Junliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ji, Xiaona; Wang, Jianqiang; Chen, Chusheng; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2015-11-04

    Single crystalline ceria nanooctahedra, nanocubes, and nanorods are hydrothermally synthesized, colloidally impregnated into the porous La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) scaffolds, and electrochemically evaluated as the anode catalysts for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Well-defined surface terminations are confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy--(111) for nanooctahedra, (100) for nanocubes, and both (110) and (100) for nanorods. Temperature-programmed reduction in H2 shows the highest reducibility for nanorods, followed sequentially by nanocubes and nanooctahedra. Measurements of the anode polarization resistances and the fuel cell power densities reveal different orders of activity of ceria nanocrystals at high and low temperatures for hydrogen electro-oxidation, i.e., nanorods > nanocubes > nanooctahedra at T ≤ 450 °C and nanooctahedra > nanorods > nanocubes at T ≥ 500 °C. Such shape-dependent activities of these ceria nanocrystals have been correlated to their difference in the local structure distortions and thus in the reducibility. These findings will open up a new strategy for design of advanced catalysts for reduced-temperature SOFCs by elaborately engineering the shape of nanocrystals and thus selectively exposing the crystal facets. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The oxidative costs of reproduction are group-size dependent in a wild cooperative breeder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Dominic L; Blount, Jonathan D; Young, Andrew J

    2015-11-22

    Life-history theory assumes that reproduction entails a cost, and research on cooperatively breeding societies suggests that the cooperative sharing of workloads can reduce this cost. However, the physiological mechanisms that underpin both the costs of reproduction and the benefits of cooperation remain poorly understood. It has been hypothesized that reproductive costs may arise in part from oxidative stress, as reproductive investment may elevate exposure to reactive oxygen species, compromising survival and future reproduction and accelerating senescence. However, experimental evidence of oxidative costs of reproduction in the wild remains scarce. Here, we use a clutch-removal experiment to investigate the oxidative costs of reproduction in a wild cooperatively breeding bird, the white-browed sparrow weaver, Plocepasser mahali. Our results reveal costs of reproduction that are dependent on group size: relative to individuals in groups whose eggs were experimentally removed, individuals in groups that raised offspring experienced an associated cost (elevated oxidative damage and reduced body mass), but only if they were in small groups containing fewer or no helpers. Furthermore, during nestling provisioning, individuals that provisioned at higher rates showed greater within-individual declines in body mass and antioxidant protection. Our results provide rare experimental evidence that reproduction can negatively impact both oxidative status and body mass in the wild, and suggest that these costs can be mitigated in cooperative societies by the presence of additional helpers. These findings have implications for our understanding of the energetic and oxidative costs of reproduction, and the benefits of cooperation in animal societies. © 2015 The Authors.

  5. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S., E-mail: knordgre@d.umn.edu; Wallace, Kendall B., E-mail: kwallace@d.umn.edu

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  6. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  7. Morphology-dependent activity of Pt nanocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in acidic media: Nanowires versus nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weiping; Li Meng; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Ma Chao; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We demonstrate the morphology effect of Pt catalysts in electrooxidation of ethanol and CO in an acidic solution. → Pt nanowires and nanoparticles were used as catalysts. → Pt nanowires display a higher catalytic activity by a factor of at least two relative to those nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation. → The rate for CO monolayer oxidation exhibits similar morphology-dependent behavior with a markedly enhanced rate on the Pt nanowires. - Abstract: The morphology of nanostructured Pt catalysts is known to affect significantly the kinetics of various reactions. Herein, we report on a pronounced morphology effect in the electrooxidation of ethanol and carbon monoxide (CO) on Pt nanowires and nanoparticles in an acidic solution. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis showed the inherent morphology difference between these two nanostructured catalysts. Voltammetric and chronoamperometric studies of the ethanol electrooxidation revealed that these nanowires had a higher catalytic activity by a factor of two relative to these nanoparticles. The rate for CO monolayer oxidation exhibits similar morphology-dependent behavior with a markedly enhanced rate on the Pt nanowires. In situ infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy measurements revealed a different trend for chemisorbed CO formation and CO 2 -to-acetic acid reaction product ratios on these two nanostructures. The morphology-induced change in catalytic activity and selectivity in ethanol electrocatalysis is discussed in detail.

  8. Coating-dependent induction of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdolenova, Zuzana; Drlickova, Martina; Henjum, Kristi; Rundén-Pran, Elise; Tulinska, Jana; Bilanicova, Dagmar; Pojana, Giulio; Kazimirova, Alena; Barancokova, Magdalena; Kuricova, Miroslava; Liskova, Aurelia; Staruchova, Marta; Ciampor, Fedor; Vavra, Ivo; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Collins, Andrew; Rinna, Alessandra; Fjellsbø, Lise; Volkovova, Katarina; Marcomini, Antonio; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Surface coatings of nanoparticles (NPs) are known to influence advantageous features of NPs as well as potential toxicity. Iron oxide (Fe3O4) NPs are applied for both medical diagnostics and targeted drug delivery. We investigated the potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of uncoated iron oxide (U-Fe3O4) NPs in comparison with oleate-coated iron oxide (OC-Fe3O4) NPs. Testing was performed in vitro in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells and in primary human blood cells. For cytotoxicity testing, relative growth activity, trypan blue exclusion, (3)H-thymidine incorporation and cytokinesis-block proliferation index were assessed. Genotoxicity was evaluated by the alkaline comet assay for detection of strand breaks and oxidized purines. Particle characterization was performed in the culture medium. Cellular uptake, morphology and pathology were evaluated by electron microscopy. U-Fe3O4 NPs were found not to be cytotoxic (considering interference of NPs with proliferation test) or genotoxic under our experimental conditions. In contrast, OC-Fe3O4 NPs were cytotoxic in a dose-dependent manner, and also induced DNA damage, indicating genotoxic potential. Intrinsic properties of sodium oleate were excluded as a cause of the toxic effect. Electron microscopy data were consistent with the cytotoxicity results. Coating clearly changed the behaviour and cellular uptake of the NPs, inducing pathological morphological changes in the cells.

  9. GDH-Dependent Glutamate Oxidation in the Brain Dictates Peripheral Energy Substrate Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaca, Melis; Frigerio, Francesca; Migrenne, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity. Here, we investigated the significance of glutamate as energy substrate for the brain. Upon glutamate exposure, astrocytes generated ATP in a GDH-dependent way. The observed lack of glutamate oxidation in brain-specific GDH null CnsGlud1(-/-) mice resulted......Glucose, the main energy substrate used in the CNS, is continuously supplied by the periphery. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, is foreseen as a complementary energy contributor in the brain. In particular, astrocytes actively take up glutamate and may use it through oxidative....... Our data reveal the importance of glutamate as necessary energy substrate for the brain and the role of central GDH in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis....

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Seebeck Coefficient in Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Amirreza; Masoumi, Saeed; Hashemi, Najmeh

    2017-12-01

    Thermoelectric devices are reliable tools for converting waste heat into electricity as they last long, produce no noise or vibration, have no moving elements, and their light weight makes them suitable for the outer space usage. Materials with high thermoelectric figure of merit (zT) have the most important role in the fabrication of efficient thermoelectric devices. Metal oxide semiconductors, specially zinc oxide has recently received attention as a material suitable for sensor, optoelectronic and thermoelectric device applications because of their wide direct bandgap, chemical stability, high-energy radiation endurance, transparency and acceptable zT. Understanding the thermoelectric properties of the undoped ZnO thin films can help design better ZnO-based devices. Here, we report the results of our experimental work on the thermoelectric properties of the undoped polycrystalline ZnO thin films. These films are deposited on alumina substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc in vacuum followed by a controlled oxidation process in air carried out at the 350-500 °C temperature range. The experimental setup including gradient heaters, thermometry system and Seebeck voltage measurement equipment for high resistance samples is described. Seebeck voltage and electrical resistivity of the samples are measured at different conditions. The observed temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient is discussed.

  11. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide increases nitric oxide production from endothelial cells by an Akt-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo J Cardounel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO are both gasotransmitters that can elicit synergistic vasodilatory responses in the in the cardiovascular system, but the mechanisms behind this synergy are unclear. In the current study we investigated the molecular mechanisms through which H2S regulates endothelial NO production. Initial studies were performed to establish the temporal and dose-dependent effects of H2S on NO generation using EPR spin trapping techniques. H2S stimulated a two-fold increase in NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, which was maximal 30 min after exposure to 25-150 µM H2S. Following 30 min H2S exposure, eNOS phosphorylation at Ser 1177 was significantly increased compared to control, consistent with eNOS activation. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt, the kinase responsible for Ser 1177 phosphorylation, attenuated the stimulatory effect of H2S on NO production. Taken together, these data demonstrate that H2S up-regulates NO production from eNOS through an Akt-dependent mechanism. These results implicate H2S in the regulation of NO in endothelial cells, and suggest that deficiencies in H2S signaling can directly impact processes regulated by NO.

  13. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu [Department of Urology, Urological Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung Hwa [Department of Urology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam 463-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung-Sup, E-mail: KYUNGSUP59@yuhs.ac [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Sciences, Institute of Genetic Science, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-03

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  14. Mitochondrial Sirt3 supports cell proliferation by regulating glutamine-dependent oxidation in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jieun; Koh, Eunjin; Lee, Yu Shin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Hyeok Gu; Yoon, Young Eun; Han, Woong Kyu; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell renal carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy arising in the adult kidney, exhibits increased aerobic glycolysis and low mitochondrial respiration due to von Hippel-Lindau gene defects and constitutive hypoxia-inducible factor-α expression. Sirt3 is a major mitochondrial deacetylase that mediates various types of energy metabolism. However, the role of Sirt3 as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in cancer depends on cell types. We show increased Sirt3 expression in the mitochondrial fraction of human RCC tissues. Sirt3 depletion by lentiviral short-hairpin RNA, as well as the stable expression of the inactive mutant of Sirt3, inhibited cell proliferation and tumor growth in xenograft nude mice, respectively. Furthermore, mitochondrial pyruvate, which was used for oxidation in RCC, might be derived from glutamine, but not from glucose and cytosolic pyruvate, due to depletion of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier and the relatively high expression of malic enzyme 2. Depletion of Sirt3 suppressed glutamate dehydrogenase activity, leading to impaired mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Our findings suggest that Sirt3 plays a tumor-progressive role in human RCC by regulating glutamine-derived mitochondrial respiration, particularly in cells where mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised. -- Highlights: •Sirt3 is required for the maintenance of RCC cell proliferation. •Mitochondrial usage of cytosolic pyruvate is severely compromised in RCC. •Sirt3 supports glutamine-dependent oxidation in RCC.

  15. Size-dependent cytotoxicity and inflammatory responses of PEGylated silica-iron oxide nanocomposite size series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injumpa, Wishulada; Ritprajak, Patcharee; Insin, Numpon

    2017-04-01

    Iron oxides nanoparticles have been utilized in biological systems and biomedical applications for many years because they are relatively safe and stable comparing to other magnetic nanomaterials. In some applications, iron oxide nanoparticles were modified with silica in order to be more stable in biological systems and able to be functionalized with various functional groups. Moreover, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was one on the most used polymer to graft onto the nanoparticles in order to increase their biocompatibility, dispersibility and stability in aqueous solutions. Therefore, the nanocomposites comprising iron oxide nanoparticles, silica, and PEG could become multifunctional carriers combining superparamagnetic character, multi-functionality and high stability in biological environments. Herein, we reported the preparation of the nanocomposites and effects of their sizes on cytotoxicity and inflammatory responses. The PEGylated silica-iron oxide nanocomposites were prepared by coating of poly(poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether methacrylate) (PPEGMA) on magnetic nanoparticle-silica nanocomposites via Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP). The iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using a thermal decomposition method. The silica shells were then coated on iron oxides nanoparticles using reverse microemulsion and sol-gel methods. The size series of the nanocomposites with the diameter of 24.86±4.38, 45.24±5.00, 98.10±8.88 and 202.22±6.70 nm as measured using TEM were obtained. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used for the determination of % weight of PPEGMA on the nanocomposites showing the weight loss of ranging from 65% for smallest particles to 30% for largest particles. The various sizes (20, 40, 100, 200 nm) and concentrations (10, 100, 1000 μg/mL) of the nanocomposites were tested for their cytotoxicity in fibroblast and macrophage cell lines using MTT assay. The different sizes did not affect cell viability of fibroblast, albeit

  16. Melatonin ameliorates myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury through SIRT3-dependent regulation of oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Mengen; Li, Buying; Duan, Weixun; Jing, Lin; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Liming; Liu, Zhenhua; Yu, Bo; Ren, Kai; Gao, Erhe; Yang, Yang; Liang, Hongliang; Jin, Zhenxiao; Yu, Shiqiang

    2017-09-01

    Sirtuins are a family of highly evolutionarily conserved nicotinamide adenine nucleotide-dependent histone deacetylases. Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) is a member of the sirtuin family that is localized primarily to the mitochondria and protects against oxidative stress-related diseases, including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Melatonin has a favorable effect in ameliorating MI/R injury. We hypothesized that melatonin protects against MI/R injury by activating the SIRT3 signaling pathway. In this study, mice were pretreated with or without a selective SIRT3 inhibitor and then subjected to MI/R operation. Melatonin was administered intraperitoneally (20 mg/kg) 10 minutes before reperfusion. Melatonin treatment improved postischemic cardiac contractile function, decreased infarct size, diminished lactate dehydrogenase release, reduced the apoptotic index, and ameliorated oxidative damage. Notably, MI/R induced a significant decrease in myocardial SIRT3 expression and activity, whereas the melatonin treatment upregulated SIRT3 expression and activity, and thus decreased the acetylation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). In addition, melatonin increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased Bax, Caspase-3, and cleaved Caspase-3 levels in response to MI/R. However, the cardioprotective effects of melatonin were largely abolished by the selective SIRT3 inhibitor 3-(1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridine (3-TYP), suggesting that SIRT3 plays an essential role in mediating the cardioprotective effects of melatonin. In vitro studies confirmed that melatonin also protected H9c2 cells against simulated ischemia/reperfusion injury (SIR) by attenuating oxidative stress and apoptosis, while SIRT3-targeted siRNA diminished these effects. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that melatonin treatment ameliorates MI/R injury by reducing oxidative stress and apoptosis via activating the SIRT3 signaling pathway. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons

  17. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  18. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  19. Implication of oxidative stress in size-dependent toxicity of silica nanoparticles in kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passagne, Isabelle; Morille, Marie; Rousset, Marine; Pujalté, Igor; L’Azou, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (nano-SiO 2 ) are one of the most popular nanomaterials used in industrial manufacturing, synthesis, engineering and medicine. While inhalation of nanoparticles causes pulmonary damage, nano-SiO 2 can be transported into the blood and deposit in target organs where they exert potential toxic effects. Kidney is considered as such a secondary target organ. However, toxicological information of their effect on renal cells and the mechanisms involved remain sparse. In the present study, the cytotoxicity of nano-SiO 2 of different sizes was investigated on two renal proximal tubular cell lines (human HK-2 and porcine LLC-PK 1 ). The molecular pathways involved were studied with a focus on the involvement of oxidative stress. Nanoparticle characterization was performed (primary nanoparticle size, surface area, dispersion) in order to investigate a potential relationship between their physical properties and their toxic effects. Firstly, evidence of particle internalization was obtained by transmission electron microscopy and conventional flux cytometry techniques. The use of specific inhibitors of endocytosis pathways showed an internalization process by macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis for 100 nm nano-SiO 2 nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were localized in vesicles. Toxicity was size- and time-dependent (24 h, 48 h, 72 h). Indeed, it increased as nanoparticles became smaller. Secondly, analysis of oxidative stress based on the assessment of ROS (reactive oxygen species) production (DHE, dihydroethidium) or lipid peroxidation (MDA, malondialdehyde) clearly demonstrated the involvement of oxidative stress in the toxicity of 20 nm nano-SiO 2 . The induction of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, GSTpi, thioredoxin reductase) could explain their lesser toxicity with 100 nm nano-SiO 2 .

  20. Surface structure-dependent pyrite oxidation in relatively dry and moist air: Implications for the reaction mechanism and sulfur evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianxi; Xian, Haiyang; Lin, Xiaoju; Tang, Hongmei; Du, Runxiang; Yang, Yiping; Zhu, Runliang; Liang, Xiaoliang; Wei, Jingming; Teng, H. Henry; He, Hongping

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite oxidation not only is environmentally significant in the formation of acid mine (or acid rock) drainage and oxidative acidification of lacustrine sediment but also is a critical stage in geochemical sulfur evolution. The oxidation process is always controlled by the reactivity of pyrite, which in turn is controlled by its surface structure. In this study, the oxidation behavior of naturally existing {1 0 0}, {1 1 1}, and {2 1 0} facets of pyrite was investigated using a comprehensive approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry with periodic density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations. The experimental results show that (i) the initial oxidation rates of both pyrite {1 1 1} and {2 1 0} are much greater than that of pyrite {1 0 0}; (ii) the initial oxidation rate of pyrite {2 1 0} is greater than that of pyrite {1 1 1} in low relative humidity, which is reversed in high relative humidity; and (iii) inner sphere oxygen-bearing sulfur species are originally generated from surface reactions and then converted to outer sphere species. The facet dependent rate law can be expressed as: r{hkl} =k{hkl}haP0.5(t + 1) - 0.5 , where r{hkl} is the orientation dependent reaction rate, k{hkl} is the orientation dependent rate constant, h is the relative humidity, P is the oxygen partial pressure, and t is the oxidation time in seconds. {1 1 1} is the most sensitive facet for pyrite oxidation. Combined with DFT theoretical investigations, water catalyzed electron transfer is speculated as the rate-limiting step. These findings disclose the structure-reactivity dependence of pyrite, which not only presents new insight into the mechanism of pyrite oxidation but also provides fundamental data to evaluate sulfur speciation evolution, suggesting that the surface structure sensitivity should be considered to estimate the reactivity at the mineral

  1. The mechanism of formate oxidation by metal-dependent formate dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Cristiano S; Rivas, Maria G; Brondino, Carlos D; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G; González, Pablo J; Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A

    2011-12-01

    Metal-dependent formate dehydrogenases (Fdh) from prokaryotic organisms are members of the dimethyl sulfoxide reductase family of mononuclear molybdenum-containing and tungsten-containing enzymes. Fdhs catalyze the oxidation of the formate anion to carbon dioxide in a redox reaction that involves the transfer of two electrons from the substrate to the active site. The active site in the oxidized state comprises a hexacoordinated molybdenum or tungsten ion in a distorted trigonal prismatic geometry. Using this structural model, we calculated the catalytic mechanism of Fdh through density functional theory tools. The simulated mechanism was correlated with the experimental kinetic properties of three different Fdhs isolated from three different Desulfovibrio species. Our studies indicate that the C-H bond break is an event involved in the rate-limiting step of the catalytic cycle. The role in catalysis of conserved amino acid residues involved in metal coordination and near the metal active site is discussed on the basis of experimental and theoretical results.

  2. Photo-isomerization and oxidation of bilirubin in mammals is dependent on albumin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Iryna; Jašprová, Jana; Vítek, Libor; Urbanová, Marie

    2015-12-01

    The bilirubin (BR) photo-conversion in the human body is a protein-dependent process; an effective photo-isomerization of the potentially neurotoxic Z,Z-BR as well as its oxidation to biliverdin in the antioxidant redox cycle is possible only when BR is bound on serum albumin. We present a novel analytical concept in the study of linear tetrapyrroles metabolic processes based on an in-depth mapping of binding sites in the structure of human serum albumin (HSA). A combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods was used for recognition of the binding site for BR, its derivatives (mesobilirubin and bilirubin ditaurate), and the products of the photo-isomerization and oxidation (lumirubin, biliverdin, and xanthobilirubic acid) on HSA. The CD spectra and fluorescent quenching of the Trp-HSA were used to calculate the binding constants. The results of the CD displacement experiments performed with hemin were interpreted together with the findings of molecular docking performed on the pigment-HSA complexes. We estimated that Z,Z-BR and its metabolic products bind on two independent binding sites. Our findings support the existence of a reversible antioxidant redox cycle for BR and explain an additional pathway of the photo-isomerization process (increase of HSA binding capacity; the excess free [unbound] BR can be converted and also bound to HSA). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transparent thin films of indium tin oxide: Morphology-optical investigations, inter dependence analyzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prepelita, P.; Filipescu, M.; Stavarache, I.; Garoi, F.; Craciun, D.

    2017-12-01

    Using a fast and eco-friendly deposition method, ITO thin films with different thicknesses (0.5 μm-0.7 μm) were deposited on glass substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. A comparative analysis of these oxide films was then carried out. AFM investigations showed that the deposited films were smooth, uniform and having a surface roughness smaller than 10 nm. X-ray diffraction investigations showed that all samples were polycrystalline and the grain sizes of the films, corresponding to (222) cubic reflection, were found to increase with the increasing film thickness. The optical properties, evaluated by UV-VIS-NIR (190-3000 nm) spectrophotometer, evidenced that the obtained thin films were highly transparent, with a transmission coefficient between 90 and 96%, depending on the film thickness. Various methods (Swanepoel and Drude) were employed to appreciate the optimal behaviour of transparent oxide films, in determining the dielectric optical parameters and refractive index dispersion for ITO films exhibiting interference patterns in the optical transmission spectra. The electrical conductivity also increased as the film thickness increased.

  4. GDH-Dependent Glutamate Oxidation in the Brain Dictates Peripheral Energy Substrate Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis Karaca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose, the main energy substrate used in the CNS, is continuously supplied by the periphery. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, is foreseen as a complementary energy contributor in the brain. In particular, astrocytes actively take up glutamate and may use it through oxidative glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH activity. Here, we investigated the significance of glutamate as energy substrate for the brain. Upon glutamate exposure, astrocytes generated ATP in a GDH-dependent way. The observed lack of glutamate oxidation in brain-specific GDH null CnsGlud1−/− mice resulted in a central energy-deprivation state with increased ADP/ATP ratios and phospho-AMPK in the hypothalamus. This induced changes in the autonomous nervous system balance, with increased sympathetic activity promoting hepatic glucose production and mobilization of substrates reshaping peripheral energy stores. Our data reveal the importance of glutamate as necessary energy substrate for the brain and the role of central GDH in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis.

  5. Hydroxylamine-dependent Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) by “ Candidatus Brocadia sinica”

    KAUST Repository

    Oshiki, Mamoru

    2016-04-26

    Although metabolic pathways and associated enzymes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) of “Ca. Kuenenia stuttgartiensis” have been studied, those of other anammox bacteria are still poorly understood. NO2- reduction to NO is considered to be the first step in the anammox metabolism of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”, however, “Ca. Brocadia” lacks the genes that encode canonical NO-forming nitrite reductases (NirS or NirK) in its genome, which is different from “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”. Here, we studied the anammox metabolism of “Ca. Brocadia sinica”. 15N-tracer experiments demonstrated that “Ca. B. sinica” cells could reduce NO2- to NH2OH, instead of NO, with as yet unidentified nitrite reductase(s). Furthermore, N2H4 synthesis, downstream reaction of NO2- reduction, was investigated using a purified “Ca. B. sinica” hydrazine synthase (Hzs) and intact cells. Both the “Ca. B. sinica” Hzs and cells utilized NH2OH and NH4+, but not NO and NH4+, for N2H4 synthesis and further oxidized N2H4 to N2 gas. Taken together, the metabolic pathway of “Ca. B. sinica” is NH2OH-dependent and different from the one of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”, indicating metabolic diversity of anammox bacteria. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Metformin decreases glucose oxidation and increases the dependency of prostate cancer cells on reductive glutamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Bell, Eric L; Keibler, Mark A; Davidson, Shawn M; Wirth, Gregory J; Fiske, Brian; Mayers, Jared R; Schwab, Matthias; Bellinger, Gary; Csibi, Alfredo; Patnaik, Akash; Blouin, Marie Jose; Cantley, Lewis C; Guarente, Leonard; Blenis, John; Pollak, Michael N; Olumi, Aria F; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-07-15

    Metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation, and epidemiology studies suggest an association with increased survival in patients with cancer taking metformin; however, the mechanism by which metformin improves cancer outcomes remains controversial. To explore how metformin might directly affect cancer cells, we analyzed how metformin altered the metabolism of prostate cancer cells and tumors. We found that metformin decreased glucose oxidation and increased dependency on reductive glutamine metabolism in both cancer cell lines and in a mouse model of prostate cancer. Inhibition of glutamine anaplerosis in the presence of metformin further attenuated proliferation, whereas increasing glutamine metabolism rescued the proliferative defect induced by metformin. These data suggest that interfering with glutamine may synergize with metformin to improve outcomes in patients with prostate cancer. ©2013 AACR.

  7. The hyperaemic response to passive leg movement is dependent on nitric oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Askew, Christopher D; Walker, Meegan

    2012-01-01

    interstitial space. Inhibition of NO synthesis lowered the vasodilatory response to passive leg movement by ~90%. The increase in leg blood flow was lower in elderly subjects compared to young subjects and leg blood flow did not increase when passive leg movement was performed by elderly with peripheral artery...... disease. The results suggest that the hyperaemia induced by passive leg movement is NO dependent. The hyperaemic response to passive leg movement and to ACh was also assessed in elderly subjects and patients with peripheral artery disease.......Key points Passive leg movement is associated with a ~3-fold increase in blood flow to the leg, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Passive leg movement increased venous levels of metabolites of nitric oxide (NO) in young subjects, whereas they remained unaltered in the muscle...

  8. Size-dependent cytotoxicity and inflammatory responses of PEGylated silica-iron oxide nanocomposite size series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Injumpa, Wishulada [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Ritprajak, Patcharee [Department of Microbiology, and RU in Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Insin, Numpon, E-mail: Numpon.I@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2017-04-01

    incubation with the highest concentration of 1000 μg/mL. Although 1000 μg/mL of all sizes of the nanocomposites decreased macrophage viability, the cytotoxicity of the nanocomposites was notably less than silica. The inflammatory response of macrophage was also observed by ELISA, and we found that the size of 20 and 40 nm, but not 100 and 200 nm, obviously stimulated IL-6 production. From this study, the preparations of multifunctional superparamagnetic nanocomposites of different sizes along with the size-dependent effects on cellular toxicity and inflammatory response were demonstrated and could be applied for designing of new drug carriers. - Highlights: • Magnetic iron oxide-silica nanocomposites (MNCs) size series were synthesized. • PPEGMA-MNCs exhibited low cytotoxicity against fibroblast and macrophage lines. • The effects on the sizes of PPEGMA-coated MNCs on immune responses were observed.

  9. Chlorine gas exposure causes systemic endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Samal, Andrey A; Bradley, Kelley M; Brandon, Angela; Balanay, Joann; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Maheshwari, Akhil; Postlethwait, Edward M; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2011-08-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl(2)) exposure during accidents or in the military setting results primarily in injury to the lungs. However, the potential for Cl(2) exposure to promote injury to the systemic vasculature leading to compromised vascular function has not been studied. We hypothesized that Cl(2) promotes extrapulmonary endothelial dysfunction characterized by a loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived signaling. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to Cl(2) for 30 minutes, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation of aorta as a function of Cl(2) dose (0-400 ppm) and time after exposure (0-48 h) were determined. Exposure to Cl(2) (250-400 ppm) significantly inhibited eNOS-dependent vasodilation (stimulated by acetycholine) at 24 to 48 hours after exposure without affecting constriction responses to phenylephrine or vasodilation responses to an NO donor, suggesting decreased NO formation. Consistent with this hypothesis, eNOS protein expression was significantly decreased (∼ 60%) in aorta isolated from Cl(2)-exposed versus air-exposed rats. Moreover, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was up-regulated in circulating leukocytes and aorta isolated 24 hours after Cl(2) exposure, suggesting stimulation of inflammation in the systemic vasculature. Despite decreased eNOS expression and activity, no changes in mean arterial blood pressure were observed. However, injection of 1400W, a selective inhibitor of iNOS, increased mean arterial blood pressure only in Cl(2)-exposed animals, suggesting that iNOS-derived NO compensates for decreased eNOS-derived NO. These results highlight the potential for Cl(2) exposure to promote postexposure systemic endothelial dysfunction via disruption of vascular NO homeostasis mechanisms.

  10. Chlorine Gas Exposure Causes Systemic Endothelial Dysfunction by Inhibiting Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase–Dependent Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honavar, Jaideep; Samal, Andrey A.; Bradley, Kelley M.; Brandon, Angela; Balanay, Joann; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Maheshwari, Akhil; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2011-01-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl2) exposure during accidents or in the military setting results primarily in injury to the lungs. However, the potential for Cl2 exposure to promote injury to the systemic vasculature leading to compromised vascular function has not been studied. We hypothesized that Cl2 promotes extrapulmonary endothelial dysfunction characterized by a loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived signaling. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to Cl2 for 30 minutes, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation of aorta as a function of Cl2 dose (0–400 ppm) and time after exposure (0–48 h) were determined. Exposure to Cl2 (250–400 ppm) significantly inhibited eNOS-dependent vasodilation (stimulated by acetycholine) at 24 to 48 hours after exposure without affecting constriction responses to phenylephrine or vasodilation responses to an NO donor, suggesting decreased NO formation. Consistent with this hypothesis, eNOS protein expression was significantly decreased (∼ 60%) in aorta isolated from Cl2–exposed versus air-exposed rats. Moreover, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA was up-regulated in circulating leukocytes and aorta isolated 24 hours after Cl2 exposure, suggesting stimulation of inflammation in the systemic vasculature. Despite decreased eNOS expression and activity, no changes in mean arterial blood pressure were observed. However, injection of 1400W, a selective inhibitor of iNOS, increased mean arterial blood pressure only in Cl2–exposed animals, suggesting that iNOS-derived NO compensates for decreased eNOS-derived NO. These results highlight the potential for Cl2 exposure to promote postexposure systemic endothelial dysfunction via disruption of vascular NO homeostasis mechanisms. PMID:21131444

  11. Nitric oxide dilates rat retinal blood vessels by cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Naoto; Mori, Asami; Hasebe, Masami; Hoshino, Maya; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2009-10-01

    It has been suggested that nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent mechanisms in the ocular vasculature; however, the importance of the pathway in regulating retinal circulation in vivo remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the role of COX-dependent mechanisms in NO-induced vasodilation of retinal blood vessels in thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats with and without neuronal blockade (tetrodotoxin treatment). Fundus images were captured with a digital camera that was equipped with a special objective lens. The retinal vascular response was assessed by measuring changes in diameter of the retinal blood vessel. The localization of COX and soluble guanylyl cyclase in rat retina was examined using immunohistochemistry. The NO donors (sodium nitroprusside and NOR3) increased the diameter of the retinal blood vessels but decreased systemic blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of rats with indomethacin, a nonselective COX inhibitor, or SC-560, a selective COX-1 inhibitor, markedly attenuated the vasodilation of retinal arterioles, but not the depressor response, to the NO donors. However, both the vascular responses to NO donors were unaffected by the selective COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 and nimesulide. Indomethacin did not change the retinal vascular and depressor responses to hydralazine, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-guanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (a membrane-permeable cGMP analog) and 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (a membrane-permeable cAMP analog). Treatment with SQ 22536, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, but not ODQ, a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the NOR3-induced vasodilation of retinal arterioles. The COX-1 immunoreactivity was found in retinal blood vessels. The retinal blood vessel was faintly stained for soluble guanylyl cyclase, although the apparent immunoreactivities on mesenteric and choroidal blood vessels were observed. These results suggest

  12. Final Report: Molecular mechanisms and kinetics of microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Day, Peggy A. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Asta, Maria P. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Kanematsu, Masakazu [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Beller, Harry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhou, Peng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-02-27

    In this project, we combined molecular genetic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques with kinetic and reactive transport studies to describe and quantify biotic and abiotic mechanisms underlying anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, which influences the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium at DOE sites. In these studies, Thiobacillus denitrificans, an autotrophic bacterium that catalyzes anaerobic U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, was used to examine coupled oxidation-reduction processes under either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic conditions in batch and column experiments with biogenically produced UIVO2(s). Synthesis and quantitative analysis of coupled chemical and transport processes were done with the reactive transport modeling code Crunchflow. Research focused on identifying the primary redox proteins that catalyze metal oxidation, environmental factors that influence protein expression, and molecular-scale geochemical factors that control the rates of biotic and abiotic oxidation.

  13. Particle Size-Dependent Antibacterial Activity and Murine Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated that graphene and its derivative graphene oxide (GO engage in a wide range of antibacterial activities with limited toxicity to human cells. Here, we systematically evaluate the dependence of GO toxicity on the size of the nanoparticles used in treatments: we compare the cytotoxic effects of graphene quantum dots (GQDs, <15 nm, small GOs (SGOs, 50–200 nm, and large GOs (LGOs, 0.5–3 μm. We synthesize the results of bacterial colony count assays and SEM-based observations of morphological changes to assess the antibacterial properties that these GOs bring into effect against E. coli. We also use Live/Dead assays and morphological analysis to investigate changes to mammalian (Murine macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells induced by the presence of the various GO particle types. Our results demonstrate that LGOs, SGOs, and GQDs possess antibacterial activities and cause mammalian cell cytotoxicity at descending levels of potency. Placing our observations in the context of previous simulation results, we suggest that both the lateral size and surface area of GO particles contribute to cytotoxic effects. We hope that the size dependence elucidated here provides a useful schematic for tuning GO-cell interactions in biomedical applications.

  14. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy.

  15. Cellular localization and detergent dependent oligomerization of rice allene oxide synthase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoeun, Sereyvath; Kim, Jeong-Il; Han, Oksoo

    2015-01-01

    Allene oxide synthase-1 from Oryza sativa (OsAOS1) localizes to the chloroplast, but lacks a putative chloroplast targeting sequence typically found in dicot AOS. Here, kinetic parameters and the oligomerization state/subunit composition of OsAOS1 were characterized in vitro in the absence or presence of detergent micelles. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of OsAOS1 reached a maximum near the critical micelle concentration for polyoxyethylene 10 tridecyl ether. Native gel analysis showed that OsAOS1 exists as a multimer in the absence of detergent micelles. The multimeric form of OsAOS1 was stably cross-linked in the absence of detergents, while only monomeric OsAOS1 was detected in the presence of detergent micelles. Gel filtration analysis indicated that the oligomeric state of OsAOS1 depends strongly on the detergents and that the monomer becomes the predominant form in the presence of detergent micelles. These data suggest that the detergent-dependent oligomeric state of OsAOS1 is an important factor for the regulation of its catalytic efficiency.

  16. Size dependence of the magnetic relaxation and specific power absorption in iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, E. [CONICET and Instituto de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia and Centro Atomico Bariloche (Argentina); Torres, T. E. [University of Zaragoza, Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon (INA) and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas (LMA) (Spain); Rossi, L. M. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rechenberg, H. R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil); Berquo, T. S. [Institute of Rock Magnetism, University of Minnesota (United States); Ibarra, A. [University of Zaragoza, INA and LMA (Spain); Marquina, C. [CSIC, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA) (Spain); Ibarra, M. R. [University of Zaragoza, INA and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada and LMA (Spain); Goya, G. F., E-mail: goya@unizar.es [University of Zaragoza, INA and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    In this study, magnetic and power absorption properties of a series of iron oxide nanoparticles with average sizes Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket d Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket ranging from 3 to 23 nm were reported. The nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Iron(III) acetylacetonate in organic media. From the careful characterization of the magnetic and physicochemical properties of these samples, the specific power absorption (SPA) values experimentally found were numerically reproduced, as well as their dependence with particle size, using a simple model of Brownian and Neel relaxation at room temperature. SPA experiments in ac magnetic fields (H{sub 0} = 13 kA/m and f = 250 kHz) indicated that the magnetic and rheological properties played a crucial role determining the heating efficiency at different conditions. A maximum SPA value of 344 W/g was obtained for a sample containing nanoparticles with Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket d Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket = 12 nm and dispersion {sigma} = 0.25. The observed SPA dependence with particle diameter and their magnetic parameters indicated that, for the size range and experimental conditions of f and H studied in this study, both Neel and Brown relaxation mechanisms are important to the heat generation observed.

  17. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J. Orphan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2 found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to

  18. Nitric oxide donors enhance the frequency dependence of dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1-100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine-DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals.

  19. Nitric Oxide Mediates Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Retinal Bipolar Cell Output via S-Nitrosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Ryan E.; Lipin, Mikhail Y.; Leuranguer, Valerie; Rozsa, Eva; Bramley, Jayne R.; Harding, Jacqueline L.; Reynolds, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Coding a wide range of light intensities in natural scenes poses a challenge for the retina: adaptation to bright light should not compromise sensitivity to dim light. Here we report a novel form of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, specifically, a “weighted potentiation” that selectively increases output of Mb-type bipolar cells in the goldfish retina in response to weak inputs but leaves the input–output ratio for strong stimuli unaffected. In retinal slice preparation, strong depolarization of bipolar terminals significantly lowered the threshold for calcium spike initiation, which originated from a shift in activation of voltage-gated calcium currents (ICa) to more negative potentials. The process depended upon glutamate-evoked retrograde nitric oxide (NO) signaling as it was eliminated by pretreatment with an NO synthase blocker, TRIM. The NO-dependent ICa modulation was cGMP independent but could be blocked by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), indicating that NO acted via an S-nitrosylation mechanism. Importantly, the NO action resulted in a weighted potentiation of Mb output in response to small (≤−30 mV) depolarizations. Coincidentally, light flashes with intensity ≥2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s lowered the latency of scotopic (≤2.4 × 108 photons/cm2/s) light-evoked calcium spikes in Mb axon terminals in an NEM-sensitive manner, but light responses above cone threshold (≥3.5 × 109 photons/cm2/s) were unaltered. Under bright scotopic/mesopic conditions, this novel form of Mb output potentiation selectively amplifies dim retinal inputs at Mb → ganglion cell synapses. We propose that this process might counteract decreases in retinal sensitivity during light adaptation by preventing the loss of visual information carried by dim scotopic signals. PMID:24305814

  20. Age-dependent exacerbation of white matter stroke outcomes: a role for oxidative damageand inflammatory mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Shira; Carmichael, S. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Subcortical white matter stroke (WMS) constitutes up to 30% of all stroke subtypes. Mechanisms of oligodendrocyte and axon injury and repair play a central role in the damage and recovery following this type of stroke, and a comprehensive study of these processes requires a specialized experimental model that is different from common large artery, “gray matter” stroke models. Diminished recovery from stroke in aged patients implies that damage and repair processes are affected by advanced age, but such effects have not been studied in WMS. Methods WMS was produced with focal microinjection of the vasoconstrictor L-NIO into the subcortical white matter ventral to the mouse forelimb motor cortex in young adult (2 months), middle aged (15 months) and aged mice (24 months). Results WMS produced localized oligodendrocyte cell death with higher numbers of apoptotic cells and greater oxidative damage in aged brains than in young-adult brains. Increased expression of MCP1 and TNFα in motor cortex neurons correlated with a more distributed microglial activation in aged brains 7 days after WMS. At 2 months aged mice displayed increased white matter atrophy and greater loss of corticostriatal connections compared to young-adult mice. Behavioral testing revealed an age-dependent exacerbation of forelimb motor deficits caused by the stroke, with decreased long-term functional recovery in aged animals. Conclusions Age has a profound effect on the outcome of WMS, with more prolonged cell death and oxidative damage, increased inflammation, greater secondary white matter atrophy and a worse behavioral effect in aged vs young-adult mice. PMID:23868277

  1. TiO(2) crystal facet-dependent antimony adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiaying; Yan, Li; Duan, Jinming; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-06-15

    Anatase TiO 2 crystal facets are garnering increasing attention due to their unique surface property. However, no specific linear relationship had been derived between the facet exposed on TiO 2 and the surface adsorption capacity as well as photocatalytic performance. This study systematically explored the facet effects on antimony (Sb) adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation using high-index {201} and low-index {101}, {001}, and {100} TiO 2 . The results suggest that high-index {201} TiO 2 exhibits the best Sb(III) adsorption and photocatalytic activity compared to the low-index TiO 2 . Both the Sb(III) adsorption density and the amount of OH and O 2 - generated in solution were correlated to the magnitude of surface energy on TiO 2 facets. Photocatalytically generated OH and O 2 - were responsible for Sb(III) photooxidation as evidenced by radical-trapping experiments. The great contribution of OH was observed only on {201}, not on low-index TiO 2 . This phenomenon was found to be attributable to the high surface energy on {201}, which enables the generation of a large amount of photogeneration OH to compensate for the fast rate of OH dissipation. Therefore, the predominant participation of OH in Sb(III) photooxidation was only possible on high-index {201} TiO 2 , which resulted in an enhanced photocatalytic rate. On the other hand, O 2 - dominated the Sb(III) photocatalytic oxidation on low-index TiO 2 . The intrinsic facet-dependent adsorption and photocatalytic mechanism obtained from this study would be useful for developing TiO 2 -based environmental technologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Temperature dependence of nickel oxide effect on the optoelectronic properties of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, R.; Derbali, L.; Ouertani, B.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the effect of Nickel oxide (NiO) on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon (PS). Our investigations showed an obvious improvement of porous silicon optoelectronique properties after coating the PS with NiO thin film as a passivating process. The as-prepared NiO/PS thin film was subjected to a thermal annealing to study the effect of temperature on the efficiency of this treatment. The deposition of NiO onto the porous silicon layer was performed using the spray pyrolysis method. The surface modification of the as-prepared NiO/PS samples was investigated after annealing at various temperatures, using an infrared furnace, ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. The X-ray Diffraction results showed that obtained films show cubic structure with preferred (200) plane orientation. We found an obvious dependence of the PS nanocrystallites size (nc-Si) to the annealing temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) is directly related to the electronic structure and transitions. The characteristic change of the band gap with decrease in size of the nanostructures can be pointed out by the observed blue shift in the photoluminescence spectra. Nickel oxide treatment of Porous silicon led to a significant increase of photoluminescence with a resulting blue-shift at higher annealing temperature. The surface morphology was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of the films. Moreover, the total reflectivity of NiO/PS samples decreases noticeably comparing to an untreated PS layer due to an enhanced light absorption.

  3. Neonatal oxidative stress depends on oxygen blood pressure in umbilical artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, F; De Bernardo, G; Longini, M; Sordino, D; Scaramuzzini, G; Tataranno, M L; Belvisi, E; Bazzini, F; Perrone, S; Buonocore, G

    2016-01-01

    With advancing gestation, partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and pH fall significantly. Hypoxia is a main factor inducing free radical generation and thereby oxidative stress (OS). Placental and fetal tissue response when oxygen becomes restricted is complex and partially known. We tested the hypothesis that changes in umbilical artery and vein blood gas concentrations modulate OS occurrence in the newborn. Seventy umbilical artery and vein plasma samples were collected from healthy term newborns immediately after delivery. F2 Isoprostanes (F2-Isop) were measured in all samples as reliable markers of lipid peroxidation. Significantly lower pCO2 and higher pO2 and pH were found in umbilical vein than in artery, as expected. A positive correlation was detected between pH and pO2 only in umbilical artery (p=0.019). F2-Isop levels were no different between artery and vein in cord blood. Significant correlations were found between F2-Isop and pCO2 (p=0.025) as well as between F2-Isop and pH in umbilical vein (p=0.027). F2-Isop correlated with pCO2 (p=0.007) as well as with pO2 values (p=0.005) in umbilical artery blood. Oxidative stress (OS) in newborns depends on oxygen concentrations in umbilical artery. OS biomarkers significantly correlate with pO2 and in umbilical artery but not in umbilical vein. In normoxic conditions fetal-maternal gas exchanges occurring in placenta re-establish normal higher oxygen levels in umbilical vein than artery, with a normal production of free radicals without any deleterious effects.

  4. Dependence of Heterogeneous OH Kinetics with Biomass Burning Aerosol Proxies on Oxidant Concentration and Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H.; Knopf, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical transformations of aerosol particles by heterogeneous reactions with trace gases such as OH radicals can influence particle physicochemical properties and lifetime, affect cloud formation, light scattering, and human health. Furthermore, OH oxidation can result in degradation of particle mass by volatilization reactions, altering the budget of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, the reactive uptake coefficient (γ) and particle oxidation degree can vary depending on several factors including oxidant concentration and relative humidity (RH). While RH can influence the extent of dissociation/ionization, it can also affect particle phase and thus oxidant diffusivity. Only one study so far has investigated the effect of RH on the rate of OH uptake to organic surfaces; however, the underlying processes affecting OH reactivity with organic aerosol under humidified conditions still remains elusive. Here, we determine the effect of RH on OH reactivity with laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles: levoglucosan and 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol. The effect of OH concentration on γ for three common BBA molecular markers (levoglucosan, abietic acid, and nitroguaiacol) under dry conditions was investigated from [OH]≈107-1011 molecule cm-3, covering both [OH] in biomass burning plumes and [OH] commonly used in particle aging studies. Furthermore, key VOC reaction products and their production pathways resulting from BBA volatilization by OH were identified. OH radicals are produced using a microwave induced plasma (MIP) of H2 in He or Ar followed by reaction with O2, or by photolysis of O3 in the presence of H2O. A cylindrical rotating wall flow-tube reactor and fast-flow aerosol flow reactor are used for conducting kinetic studies. OH is detected using a Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) and a Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) is employed for VOC analysis. γ decreases from 0.2-0.5 at

  5. Accessibility of Myofilament Cysteines and Effects on ATPase Depend on the Activation State during Exposure to Oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sean M.; Lehman, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Signaling by reactive oxygen species has emerged as a major physiological process. Due to its high metabolic rate, striated muscle is especially subject to oxidative stress, and there are multiple examples in cardiac and skeletal muscle where oxidative stress modulates contractile function. Here we assessed the potential of cysteine oxidation as a mechanism for modulating contractile function in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Analyzing the cysteine content of the myofilament proteins in striated muscle, we found that cysteine residues are relatively rare, but are very similar between different muscle types and different vertebrate species. To refine this list of cysteines to those that may modulate function, we estimated the accessibility of oxidants to cysteine residues using protein crystal structures, and then sharpened these estimates using fluorescent labeling of cysteines in cardiac and skeletal myofibrils. We demonstrate that cysteine accessibility to oxidants and ATPase rates depend on the contractile state in which preparations are exposed. Oxidant exposure of skeletal and cardiac myofibrils in relaxing solution exposes myosin cysteines not accessible in rigor solution, and these modifications correspond to a decrease in maximum ATPase. Oxidant exposure under rigor conditions produces modifications that increase basal ATPase and calcium sensitivity in ventricular myofibrils, but these effects were muted in fast twitch muscle. These experiments reveal how structural and sequence variations can lead to divergent effects from oxidants in different muscle types. PMID:23894416

  6. Temperature dependence of nickel oxide effect on the optoelectronic properties of porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riahi, R., E-mail: riahirim01@gmail.com [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Faculty of Sciences Tunis–El Manar University (Tunisia); Derbali, L. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Ouertani, B. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Higher Institute of Environment Science and Technology of Borj-Cedria (Tunisia); Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratory of Semiconductors, Nanostructures and Advanced Technology (LSNTA), Research and Technology Center of Energy, Tourist Road Soliman, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The treatment of porous silicon (PS) with nickel oxide (NiO) decreases the reflectivity significantly. • FTIR analysis showed a substitution of Si−H bonds to Si−O−Si and Si−O−Ni after the thermal annealing. • Annealing the treated NiO/PS at 400 °C leads to a noticeable improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity. • A blueshift was obtained in the PL spectra due to the decrease of silicon nanocrystallites size after exceeding 400 °C. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effect of Nickel oxide (NiO) on the structural and optical properties of porous silicon (PS). Our investigations showed an obvious improvement of porous silicon optoelectronique properties after coating the PS with NiO thin film as a passivating process. The as-prepared NiO/PS thin film was subjected to a thermal annealing to study the effect of temperature on the efficiency of this treatment. The deposition of NiO onto the porous silicon layer was performed using the spray pyrolysis method. The surface modification of the as-prepared NiO/PS samples was investigated after annealing at various temperatures, using an infrared furnace, ranging between 300 °C and 600 °C. The X-ray Diffraction results showed that obtained films show cubic structure with preferred (200) plane orientation. We found an obvious dependence of the PS nanocrystallites size (nc-Si) to the annealing temperature. Photoluminescence (PL) is directly related to the electronic structure and transitions. The characteristic change of the band gap with decrease in size of the nanostructures can be pointed out by the observed blue shift in the photoluminescence spectra. Nickel oxide treatment of Porous silicon led to a significant increase of photoluminescence with a resulting blue-shift at higher annealing temperature. The surface morphology was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of the films. Moreover, the total

  7. Very long chain fatty acid β-oxidation in astrocytes: contribution of the ABCD1-dependent and -independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masashi; Shinbo, Saori; Asahi, Akiko; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2012-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism in astrocytes is important for the maintenance of myelin structure in central nervous system. To analyze the contribution of the ABCD1-dependent and -independent pathways to VLCFA metabolism in astrocytes, we prepared human glioblastoma U87 cells with a silencing of ABCD1 and primary astrocytes from abcd1-deficient mice, and measured fatty acid β-oxidation in the presence or absence of a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, 2-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (POCA). In U87 cells, C24:0 β-oxidation was decreased to ca. 70% of the control in the presence of POCA, and the activity was further decreased to ca. 20% by the silencing of ABCD1. In mouse primary astrocytes, C24:0 β-oxidation was also decreased to ca. 70% of the control in the presence of POCA. The C24:0 β-oxidation in Abcd1-deficient primary astrocytes was ca. 60% of the wild-type cells and the activity was further decreased to ca. 25% in the presence of POCA. Compared to human skin fibroblasts, in which VLCFA β-oxidation is not significantly inhibited by POCA, approximately one-third of the overall VLCFA β-oxidation was inhibited in both types of astrocytic cells. These results suggest that VLCFA is indeed β-oxidized in ABCD1-dependent pathway, but the ABCD1-independent peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation pathways significantly contribute to VLCFA β-oxidation in astrocytic cells.

  8. Mechanisms of pH-dependent activity for water oxidation to molecular oxygen by MnO2 electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2012-01-25

    Manganese oxides function as efficient electrocatalysts for water oxidation to molecular oxygen in strongly alkaline conditions, but are inefficient at neutral pH. To provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the pH-dependent activity of the electrooxidation reaction, we performed UV-vis spectroelectrochemical detection of the intermediate species for water oxidation by a manganese oxide electrode. Layered manganese oxide nanoparticles, δ-MnO(2) (K(0.17)[Mn(4+)(0.90)Mn(3+)(0.07)□(0.03)]O(2)·0.53H(2)O) deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide electrodes were shown to catalyze water oxidation at pH from 4 to 13. At this pH range, a sharp rise in absorption at 510 nm was observed with a concomitant increase of anodic current for O(2) evolution. Using pyrophosphate as a probe molecule, the 510 nm absorption was attributable to Mn(3+) on the surface of δ-MnO(2). The onset potential of the water oxidation current was constant at approximately 1.5 V vs SHE from pH 4 to pH 8, but sharply shifted to negative at pH > 8. Strikingly, this behavior was well reproduced by the pH dependence of the onset of 510 nm absorption, indicating that Mn(3+) acts as the precursor of water oxidation. Mn(3+) is unstable at pH reaction resulting in the formation of Mn(2+) and Mn(4+), whereas it is effectively stabilized by the comproportionation of Mn(2+) and Mn(4+) in alkaline conditions. Thus, the low activity of manganese oxides for water oxidation under neutral conditions is most likely due to the inherent instability of Mn(3+), whose accumulation at the surface of catalysts requires the electrochemical oxidation of Mn(2+) at a potential of approximately 1.4 V. This new model suggests that the control of the disproportionation and comproportionation efficiencies of Mn(3+) is essential for the development of Mn catalysts that afford water oxidation with a small overpotential at neutral pH. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of human neuroblastoma cells via oxidative stress dependent of TXNIP upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Cunjin; Shi, Aiming; Cao, Guowen [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Chen, Ruidong [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Hu, Zhanhong; Shen, Zhu; Tao, Hong; Cao, Bin [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Hu, Duanmin, E-mail: hudmsdfey@sina.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Bao, Junjie, E-mail: baojjsdfey@sina.com [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China)

    2015-05-15

    There are no appropriate drugs for metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), which is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor for childhood. Thioredoxin binding protein (TXNIP), the endogenous inhibitor of ROS elimination, has been identified as a tumor suppressor in various solid tumors. It reported that fenofibrate exerts anti-tumor effects in several human cancer cell lines. However, its detail mechanisms remain unclear. The present study assessed the effects of fenofibrate on NB cells and investigated TXNIP role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to detect cells proliferation, starch wound test to investigate cells migration, H{sub 2}DCF-DA to detect intracellular ROS, siRNA to interfere TXNIP and peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) expression, western blot to determine protein levels, flow cytometry to analyze apoptosis. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells, remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, promoted cell apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells by exacerbating oxidative stress and inducing apoptosis was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells. • We found that fenofibrate remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, and promoted cell apoptosis. • Inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. • Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP.

  10. Evaluation of the energy dependence of a zinc oxide nanofilm X-ray detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenca, C.P.V., E-mail: claudia.cpvv@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Silveira, M.A.L.; Macedo, M.A., E-mail: odecamm@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFSE), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Santos, L.A.P, E-mail: lasantos@scients.com.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    International organizations of human health and radiation protection have recommended certain care for using of the X-ray as a diagnosis tool to avoid any type of radiological accident or overdose to the patient. This can be done assessing the parameters of the X-ray equipment and there are various types of detectors available for that: ionizing chamber, electronic semiconductor devices, etc. These detectors must be calibrated so that they can be used for any energy range and such a procedure is correlated with what is called the energy dependence of the detector. In accordance with the stated requirements of IEC 61267, the standard radiation quality beams and irradiation conditions (RQRs) are the tools and techniques for calibrating diagnostic X-Ray instruments and detectors. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the behavior of the energy dependence of a detector fabricated from a zinc oxide (ZnO) nanofilm. A Pantak industrial X-ray equipment was used to generate the RQR radiation quality beams and test three ZnO detector samples. A 6430 sub-femto-ammeter, Keithley, was used to bias the ZnO detector and simultaneously perform the output readings. The results showed that the ZnO device has some increase in its sensitivity to the ionizing radiation as the X-ray effective energy decreases unlike other types of semiconductor electronic devices typically used as an X-ray detector. We can conclude that the ZnO device can be used as a diagnostic X-ray detector with an appropriate calibration. (author)

  11. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of human neuroblastoma cells via oxidative stress dependent of TXNIP upregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Cunjin; Shi, Aiming; Cao, Guowen; Tao, Tao; Chen, Ruidong; Hu, Zhanhong; Shen, Zhu; Tao, Hong; Cao, Bin; Hu, Duanmin; Bao, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    There are no appropriate drugs for metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), which is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor for childhood. Thioredoxin binding protein (TXNIP), the endogenous inhibitor of ROS elimination, has been identified as a tumor suppressor in various solid tumors. It reported that fenofibrate exerts anti-tumor effects in several human cancer cell lines. However, its detail mechanisms remain unclear. The present study assessed the effects of fenofibrate on NB cells and investigated TXNIP role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to detect cells proliferation, starch wound test to investigate cells migration, H 2 DCF-DA to detect intracellular ROS, siRNA to interfere TXNIP and peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) expression, western blot to determine protein levels, flow cytometry to analyze apoptosis. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells, remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, promoted cell apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells by exacerbating oxidative stress and inducing apoptosis was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells. • We found that fenofibrate remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, and promoted cell apoptosis. • Inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. • Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP

  12. Structure dependent electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered oxides in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Fang; Yao, Yuze; Wang, Haiyan; Xu, Gui-Liang; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Shi-Gang; Shao, Minhua

    2017-04-08

    Rational and precise control of the structure and dimension of electrode materials is an efficient way to improve their electrochemical performance. In this work, solvothermal or co-precipitation method is used to synthesize lithium-rich layered oxide materials of Li1.2Mn0.56Co0.12Ni0.12O2 (LLO) with various morphologies and structures, including microspheres, microrods, nanoplates, and irregular nanoparticles. These materials exhibit strong structure- dependent electrochemical properties. The porous hierarchical structured LLO microrods exhibit the best performance, delivering a discharge capacity of 264.6 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 C with over 91% retention after 100 cycles. At a high rate of 5 C, a high discharge capacity of 173.6 mAh g(-1) can be achieved. This work reveals the relationship between the morphologies and electrochemical properties of LLO cathode materials, and provides a feasible approach to fabricating robust and high-performance electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Vegetation type and layer depth influence nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria in constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengxi; Guo, Qingwei; Tong, Tianli; Li, Ningning; Xie, Shuguang; Long, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process might be an important methane sink in wetland system. However, information on n-damo microorganisms in constructed wetland (CW) system for water treatment is still lacking. The present study investigated the n-damo communities in five full-scale vertical-flow CW systems with different plants. N-damo bacterial abundance did not show a considerable shift in CW planted with Cyperus papyrus, but varied greatly in other CW systems. However, the evident vertical change of n-damo community diversity occurred in each CW system. These CW systems displayed the different vertical change trends for either n-damo community abundance or diversity. In addition, CW n-damo community structure could change with wetland layer depth. At a given wetland layer depth, the evident difference of n-damo community abundance, diversity and structure could be observed in the five different CW systems. Both wetland layer depth and vegetation type could contribute to the shift of n-damo bacterial abundance and community structure in CWs.

  14. Nitrite regulates hypoxic vasodilation via myoglobin-dependent nitric oxide generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Luedike, Peter; Berenbrink, Michael; Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Semmler, Dominik; Shiva, Sruti; Williams, Daryl; Kipar, Anja; Gladwin, Mark T; Schrader, Juergen; Kelm, Malte; Cossins, Andrew R; Rassaf, Tienush

    2012-07-17

    Hypoxic vasodilation is a physiological response to low oxygen tension that increases blood supply to match metabolic demands. Although this response has been characterized for >100 years, the underlying hypoxic sensing and effector signaling mechanisms remain uncertain. We have shown that deoxygenated myoglobin in the heart can reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO·) and thereby contribute to cardiomyocyte NO· signaling during ischemia. On the basis of recent observations that myoglobin is expressed in the vasculature of hypoxia-tolerant fish, we hypothesized that endogenous nitrite may contribute to physiological hypoxic vasodilation via reactions with vascular myoglobin to form NO·. We show in the present study that myoglobin is expressed in vascular smooth muscle and contributes significantly to nitrite-dependent hypoxic vasodilation in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of NO· from nitrite reduction by deoxygenated myoglobin activates canonical soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP signaling pathways. In vivo and ex vivo vasodilation responses, the reduction of nitrite to NO·, and the subsequent signal transduction mechanisms were all significantly impaired in mice without myoglobin. Hypoxic vasodilation studies in myoglobin and endothelial and inducible NO synthase knockout models suggest that only myoglobin contributes to systemic hypoxic vasodilatory responses in mice. Endogenous nitrite is a physiological effector of hypoxic vasodilation. Its reduction to NO· via the heme globin myoglobin enhances blood flow and matches O(2) supply to increased metabolic demands under hypoxic conditions.

  15. Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity in Unipolar Silicon Oxide RRAM Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarudnyi, Konstantin; Mehonic, Adnan; Montesi, Luca; Buckwell, Mark; Hudziak, Stephen; Kenyon, Anthony J

    2018-01-01

    Resistance switching, or Resistive RAM (RRAM) devices show considerable potential for application in hardware spiking neural networks (neuro-inspired computing) by mimicking some of the behavior of biological synapses, and hence enabling non-von Neumann computer architectures. Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is one such behavior, and one example of several classes of plasticity that are being examined with the aim of finding suitable algorithms for application in many computing tasks such as coincidence detection, classification and image recognition. In previous work we have demonstrated that the neuromorphic capabilities of silicon-rich silicon oxide (SiO x ) resistance switching devices extend beyond plasticity to include thresholding, spiking, and integration. We previously demonstrated such behaviors in devices operated in the unipolar mode, opening up the question of whether we could add plasticity to the list of features exhibited by our devices. Here we demonstrate clear STDP in unipolar devices. Significantly, we show that the response of our devices is broadly similar to that of biological synapses. This work further reinforces the potential of simple two-terminal RRAM devices to mimic neuronal functionality in hardware spiking neural networks.

  16. Time-dependent postirradiation oxidative chemical changes in dehydrated egg products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katusin-Razem, B.; Mihaljevic, B.; Razem, D.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxidative chemical changes in whole egg and egg yolk powder were followed in time after irradiation as a function of dose, dose rate, and storage atmosphere. In evacuated samples of whole egg powder the decay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) was pseudo-first order (kappa = 0.088 day-1), while carotenoids did not decay at all. In the presence of air both lipid hydroperoxides and carotenoids decayed during postirradiation storage. The decay of LOOH could be treated by dispersive kinetics with the measure of dispersion, alpha = 0.51 +/- 0.05, independent of dose, and the effective lifetime tau inversely related to dose. The decay of carotenoids could also be treated by dispersive kinetics, with the values of alpha decreasing with increasing dose. The effective lifetimes of carotenoids did not depend on dose in samples irradiated in vacuum. In samples irradiated and stored in air the effective lifetimes decreased with dose, faster in egg yolk than in whole egg powder. The complex nature of postirradiation kinetics in solid food systems is discussed

  17. Sulfate-dependent acetate oxidation under extremely natron-alkaline conditions by syntrophic associations from hypersaline soda lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Abbas, B.; Tourova, T.P.; Bumazhkin, B.K.; Kolganova, T.V.; Muyzer, G.

    2014-01-01

    So far, anaerobic sulfate-dependent acetate oxidation at high pH has only been demonstrated for a low-salt-tolerant syntrophic association of a clostridium ‘Candidatus Contubernalis alkalaceticum’ and its hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing partner Desulfonatronum cooperativum. Anaerobic enrichments

  18. Unravelling the dependence of hydrogen oxidation kinetics on the size of Pt nanoparticles by in operando nanoplasmonic temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wettergren, Kristina; Hellman, Anders; Cavalca, Filippo Carlo

    2015-01-01

    We use a noninvasive nanoscale optical-temperature measurement method based on localized surface plasmon resonance to investigate the particle size-dependence of the hydrogen oxidation reaction kinetics on model supported Pt nanocatalysts at atmospheric pressure in operando. With decreasing average...

  19. Oxidative stress impairs cGMP-dependent protein kinase activation and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein serine-phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees A; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2018-02-09

    Reactive oxygen species induce vascular dysfunction and hypertension by directly interacting with nitric oxide (NO) which leads to NO inactivation. In addition to a decrease in NO bioavailability, there is evidence that oxidative stress can also modulate NO signaling during hypertension. Here, we investigated the effect of oxidative stress on NO signaling molecules cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) which are known to mediate vasodilatory actions of NO. Male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were provided with tap water (control), 30 mM L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, a pro-oxidant), 1 mM tempol (T, an antioxidant) and BSO + T for 3 wks. BSO-treated rats exhibited high blood pressure and oxidative stress. Incubation of mesenteric arterial rings with NO donors caused concentration-dependent relaxation in control rats. However, the response to NO donors was significantly lower in BSO-treated rats with a marked decrease in pD2. In control rats, NO donors activated mesenteric PKG, increased VASP phosphorylation and its interaction with transient receptor potential channels 4 (TRPC4) and inhibited store-operated Ca 2+ influx. NO failed to activate these signaling molecules in mesenteric arteries from BSO-treated rats. Supplementation of BSO-treated rats with tempol reduced oxidative stress and blood pressure and normalized the NO signaling. These data suggest that oxidative stress can reduce NO-mediated PKG activation and VASP-TRPC4 interaction which leads to failure of NO to reduce Ca 2+ influx in smooth muscle cells. The increase in intracellular Ca 2+ contributes to sustained vasoconstriction and subsequent hypertension. Antioxidant supplementation decreases oxidative stress, normalizes NO signaling and reduces blood pressure.

  20. Characterization of vanadate-dependent NADH oxidation activity and isolation of yeast DNA which complements a class 1 vanadate resistance mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minasi, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    A vanadate-dependent NADH oxidation activity has been characterized in plasma membranes from the yeast S cerevisiae. NADH oxidation activity was maximally stimulated at pH 5.0 in phosphate buffer. NADH oxidation was not dependent on the concentration of plasma membranes. The vanadate-dependent NADH oxidation activity was abolished under anaerobic conditions and the concomitant uptake of oxygen occurred during NADH oxidation. The activity was inhibited by superoxide dismutase and stimulated by the presence of paraquat. These results indicate that the vanadate stimulation of NADH oxidation in yeast plasma membranes occurs as a result of the vanadate-dependent oxidation of NADH by superoxide, generated by a plasma membrane NADH oxidase. 51 V-NMR results indicated that a phosphate-vanadate anhydride was the stimulatory species in pH 5.0 and pH 7.0 phosphate buffer. Yeast DNA has been isolated which complements a class 1 vanadate resistance mutation

  1. Individual whey protein components influence lipid oxidation dependent on pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    In emulsions, lipid oxidation is expected to be initiated at the oil-water interface. The properties of the emulsifier used and the composition at the interface is therefore expected to be of great importance for the resulting oxidation. Previous studies have shown that individual whey protein...... by affecting the preferential adsorption of whey protein components at the interface. The aim of the study was to compare lipid oxidation in 10% fish oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 1% whey protein having either a high concentration of α-lactalbumin, a high concentration of β-lactoglobulin or equal...... amounts of the two. Emulsions were prepared at pH4 and pH7. Emulsions were characterized by their droplet sizes, viscosities, and contents of proteins in the water phase. Lipid oxidation was assessed by PV and secondary volatile oxidation products. Results showed that pH greatly influenced the oxidative...

  2. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase

  3. Synthesis, Characterization and Shape-Dependent Catalytic CO Oxidation Performance of Ruthenium Oxide Nanomaterials: Influence of Polymer Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antony Ananth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium oxide nano-catalysts supported on mesoporous γ-Al2O3 have been prepared by co-precipitation method and tested for CO oxidation. The effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG on the properties of the catalyst was studied. Addition of the PEG surfactant acted as a stabilizer and induced a change in the morphology of ruthenium oxide from spherical nanoparticles to one-dimensional nanorods. Total CO conversion was measured as a function of morphology at 175 °C and 200 °C with 1.0 wt.% loading for PEG-stabilized and un-stabilized catalysts, respectively. Conversion routinely increased with temperature but in each case, the PEG-stabilized catalyst exhibited a notably higher catalytic activity as compared to the un-stabilized equivalent. It can be assumed that the increase in the activity is due to the changes in porosity, shape and dispersion of the catalyst engendered by the use of PEG.

  4. Composition dependence of the kinetics and mechanisms of thermal oxidation of titanium-tantalum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.S.; Butt, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of titanium-tantalum alloys was investigated with respective concentrations of each element ranging from 0 to 100 wt.%. Alloys were exposed to argon-20% oxygen at 800 to 1400 C. The slowest oxidation rates were observed in alloys with 5--20% Ta. The oxidation kinetics of alloys containing less than approximately 40% Ta were approximately parabolic. Pure Ta exhibited nearly linear kinetics. Alloys containing 50% or more Ta exhibited paralinear kinetics. The activation energies for oxidation ranged between 232 kJ/mole for pure Ti and 119 kJ/mole for pure Ta, with the activation energies of the alloys falling between these values and generally decreasing with increasing Ta content. The activation energies for oxidation of the end members, Ti and Ta, agree well with published values for the activation energies for diffusion of oxygen in α-Ti and Ta. Scale formation in the alloys was found to be complex exhibiting various layers of Ti-, Ta-, and TiTa-oxides. The outermost layer of the oxidized alloys was predominantly rutile (TiO 2 ). Beneath the TiO 2 grew a variety of other oxides with the Ta content generally increasing with proximity to the metal-oxide interface. It was found that the most oxidation-resistant alloys had compositions falling between Ti-5Ta and Ti-15Ta. Although Ta stabilizes the β-phase of Ti, the kinetics of oxidation appeared to be rate limited by oxygen transport through the oxygen-stabilized α-phase. However, the kinetics are complicated by the formation of a complex oxide, which cracks periodically. Tantalum appears to increase the compositional range of oxygen-stabilized α-phase and reduces both the solubility of oxygen and diffusivity of Ti in the α- and β-phases

  5. Networks of enzymatically oxidized membrane lipids support calcium-dependent coagulation factor binding to maintain hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, Sarah N; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Slatter, David A; Aldrovandi, Maceler; O'Connor, Anne; Farewell, Daniel; Percy, Charles L; Molhoek, Jessica E; Rannikko, Sirpa; Tyrrell, Victoria J; Ferla, Salvatore; Milne, Ginger L; Poole, Alastair W; Thomas, Christopher P; Obaji, Samya; Taylor, Philip R; Jones, Simon A; de Groot, Phillip G; Urbanus, Rolf T; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Uderhardt, Stefan; Ackermann, Jochen; Vince Jenkins, P; Brancale, Andrea; Krönke, Gerhard; Collins, Peter W; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2017-11-28

    Blood coagulation functions as part of the innate immune system by preventing bacterial invasion, and it is critical to stopping blood loss (hemostasis). Coagulation involves the external membrane surface of activated platelets and leukocytes. Using lipidomic, genetic, biochemical, and mathematical modeling approaches, we found that enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPLs) generated by the activity of leukocyte or platelet lipoxygenases (LOXs) were required for normal hemostasis and promoted coagulation factor activities in a Ca 2+ - and phosphatidylserine (PS)-dependent manner. In wild-type mice, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid-phospholipids (HETE-PLs) enhanced coagulation and restored normal hemostasis in clotting-deficient animals genetically lacking p12-LOX or 12/15-LOX activity. Murine platelets generated 22 eoxPL species, all of which were missing in the absence of p12-LOX. Humans with the thrombotic disorder antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had statistically significantly increased HETE-PLs in platelets and leukocytes, as well as greater HETE-PL immunoreactivity, than healthy controls. HETE-PLs enhanced membrane binding of the serum protein β2GP1 (β2-glycoprotein 1), an event considered central to the autoimmune reactivity responsible for APS symptoms. Correlation network analysis of 47 platelet eoxPL species in platelets from APS and control subjects identified their enzymatic origin and revealed a complex network of regulation, with the abundance of 31 p12-LOX-derived eoxPL molecules substantially increased in APS. In summary, circulating blood cells generate networks of eoxPL molecules, including HETE-PLs, which change membrane properties to enhance blood coagulation and contribute to the excessive clotting and immunoreactivity of patients with APS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  6. Substrate dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires with remarkable pseudocapacitance

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2012-05-09

    A scheme of current collector dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires has been used to create unique supercapacitor electrodes, with each nanowire making direct contact with the current collector. The fabricated electrodes offer the desired properties of macroporosity to allow facile electrolyte flow, thereby reducing device resistance and nanoporosity with large surface area to allow faster reaction kinetics. Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on carbon fiber paper collectors self-organize into a brush-like morphology with the nanowires completely surrounding the carbon microfiber cores. In comparison, Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on planar graphitized carbon paper collectors self-organize into a flower-like morphology. In three electrode configuration, brush-like and flower-like morphologies exhibited specific capacitance values of 1525 and 1199 F/g, respectively, at a constant current density of 1 A/g. In two electrode configuration, the brush-like nanowire morphology resulted in a superior supercapacitor performance with high specific capacitances of 911 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 784 F/g at 40 A/g. In comparison, the flower-like morphology exhibited lower specific capacitance values of 620 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 423 F/g at 40 A/g. The Co 3O 4 nanowires with brush-like morphology exhibited high values of specific power (71 kW/kg) and specific energy (81 Wh/kg). Maximum energy and power densities calculated for Co 3O 4 nanowires with flower-like morphology were 55 Wh/kg and 37 kW/kg respectively. Both electrode designs exhibited excellent cycling stability by retaining ∼91-94% of their maximum capacitance after 5000 cycles of continuous charge-discharge. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elks, Philip M; Brizee, Sabrina; van der Vaart, Michiel; Walmsley, Sarah R; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Renshaw, Stephen A; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB) remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for therapeutic

  8. Nitrite Regulates Hypoxic Vasodilation via Myoglobin–Dependent Nitric Oxide Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Luedike, Peter; Berenbrink, Michael; Klare, Johann P.; Steinhoff, Heinz-Juergen; Semmler, Dominik; Shiva, Sruti; Williams, Daryl; Kipar, Anja; Gladwin, Mark T.; Schrader, Juergen; Kelm, Malte; Cossins, Andrew R.; Rassaf, Tienush

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypoxic vasodilation is a physiological response to low oxygen (O2) tension that increases blood supply to match metabolic demands. While this response has been characterized for more than 100 years, the underlying hypoxic sensing and effector signaling mechanisms remain uncertain. We have shown that deoxygenated myoglobin (deoxyMb) in the heart can reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO˙) and thereby contribute to cardiomyocyte NO˙ signaling during ischemia. Based on recent observations that Mb is expressed in the vasculature of hypoxia-tolerant fish, we hypothesized that endogenous nitrite may contribute to physiological hypoxic vasodilation via reactions with vascular Mb to form NO˙. Methods and Results We here show that Mb is expressed in vascular smooth muscle and contributes significantly to nitrite-dependent hypoxic vasodilation in vivo and ex vivo. The generation of NO˙ from nitrite reduction by deoxyMb activates canonical soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathways. In vivo and ex vivo vasodilation responses, the reduction of nitrite to NO˙ and the subsequent signal transduction mechanisms were all significantly impaired in mice without myoglobin (Mb−/−). Hypoxic vasodilation studies in Mb, endothelial and inducible NO synthase knockout models (eNOS−/−, iNOS−/−) suggest that only Mb contributes to systemic hypoxic vasodilatory responses in mice. Conclusions Endogenous nitrite is a physiological effector of hypoxic vasodilation. Its reduction to NO˙ via the heme globin Mb enhances blood flow and matches O2 supply to increased metabolic demands under hypoxic conditions. PMID:22685116

  9. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip M Elks

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for

  10. Fe biomineralization mirrors individual metabolic activity in a nitrate-dependent Fe(II-oxidizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennyfer eMIOT

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biomineralization sometimes leads to periplasmic encrustation, which is predicted to enhance microorganism preservation in the fossil record. Mineral precipitation within the periplasm is however thought to induce death, as a result of permeability loss preventing nutrient and waste transit across the cell wall. This hypothesis had however never been investigated down to the single cell level. Here, we cultured the nitrate reducing Fe(II oxidizing bacteria Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 that have been previously shown to promote the precipitation of a diversity of Fe minerals (lepidocrocite, goethite, Fe phosphate encrusting the periplasm. We investigated the connection of Fe biomineralization with carbon assimilation at the single cell level, using a combination of electron microscopy and Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS. Our analyses revealed strong individual heterogeneities of Fe biomineralization. Noteworthy, a small proportion of cells remaining free of any precipitate persisted even at advanced stages of biomineralization. Using pulse chase experiments with 13C-acetate, we provide evidences of individual phenotypic heterogeneities of carbon assimilation, correlated with the level of Fe biomineralization. Whereas non- and moderately encrusted cells were able to assimilate acetate, higher levels of periplasm encrustation prevented any carbon incorporation. Carbon assimilation only depended on the level of Fe encrustation and not on the nature of Fe minerals precipitated in the cell wall. Carbon assimilation decreased exponentially with increasing cell-associated Fe content. Persistence of a small proportion of non-mineralized and metabolically active cells might constitute a strategy of survival in highly ferruginous environments. Eventually, our results suggest that periplasmic Fe biomineralization may provide a signature of individual metabolic status, which could be looked for in the fossil record and in modern

  11. Nitric oxide regulates input specificity of long-term depression and context dependence of cerebellar learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ogasawara

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that multiple internal models are acquired in the cerebellum and that these can be switched under a given context of behavior. It has been proposed that long-term depression (LTD of parallel fiber (PF-Purkinje cell (PC synapses forms the cellular basis of cerebellar learning, and that the presynaptically synthesized messenger nitric oxide (NO is a crucial "gatekeeper" for LTD. Because NO diffuses freely to neighboring synapses, this volume learning is not input-specific and brings into question the biological significance of LTD as the basic mechanism for efficient supervised learning. To better characterize the role of NO in cerebellar learning, we simulated the sequence of electrophysiological and biochemical events in PF-PC LTD by combining established simulation models of the electrophysiology, calcium dynamics, and signaling pathways of the PC. The results demonstrate that the local NO concentration is critical for induction of LTD and for its input specificity. Pre- and postsynaptic coincident firing is not sufficient for a PF-PC synapse to undergo LTD, and LTD is induced only when a sufficient amount of NO is provided by activation of the surrounding PFs. On the other hand, above-adequate levels of activity in nearby PFs cause accumulation of NO, which also allows LTD in neighboring synapses that were not directly stimulated, ruining input specificity. These findings lead us to propose the hypothesis that NO represents the relevance of a given context and enables context-dependent selection of internal models to be updated. We also predict sparse PF activity in vivo because, otherwise, input specificity would be lost.

  12. Control of the neurovascular coupling by nitric oxide-dependent regulation of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling

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    Manuel Francisco Muñoz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity must be tightly coordinated with blood flow to keep proper brain function, which is achieved by a mechanism known as neurovascular coupling. Then, an increase in synaptic activity leads to a dilation of local parenchymal arterioles that matches the enhanced metabolic demand. Neurovascular coupling is orchestrated by astrocytes. These glial cells are located between neurons and the microvasculature, with the astrocytic endfeet ensheathing the vessels, which allows fine intercellular communication. The neurotransmitters released during neuronal activity reach astrocytic receptors and trigger a Ca2+ signaling that propagates to the endfeet, activating the release of vasoactive factors and arteriolar dilation. The astrocyte Ca2+ signaling is coordinated by gap junction channels and hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx43 and Cx30 and channels formed by pannexins (Panx-1. The neuronal activity-initiated Ca2+ waves are propagated among neighboring astrocytes directly via gap junctions or through ATP release via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels. In addition, Ca2+ entry via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels may participate in the regulation of the astrocyte signaling-mediated neurovascular coupling. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO can activate connexin hemichannel by S-nitrosylation and the Ca2+-dependent NO-synthesizing enzymes endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS are expressed in astrocytes. Therefore, the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling triggered in neurovascular coupling may activate NO production, which, in turn, may lead to Ca2+ influx through hemichannel activation. Furthermore, NO release from the hemichannels located at astrocytic endfeet may contribute to the vasodilation of parenchymal arterioles. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling that mediates neurovascular coupling, with a special emphasis in the possible participation of NO in

  13. Nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation and Ca2+ signalling induced by erythrodiol in rat aorta

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    Fidèle Ntchapda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the pharmacological property of erythrodiol, a natural triterpenoid contained in propolis, as vasodilatory agent, and to determine its mechanism of action. Methods: Rats aortic rings were isolated and suspended in organ baths, and the effects of erythrodiol were studied by means of isometric tension recording experiments. Nitric oxide (NO was detected by ozone-induced chemiluminescence. The technique used to evaluate changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in intact endothelium was opened aortic ring and loaded with 16 µmol Fura-2/AM for 60 min at room temperature, washed and fixed by small pins with the luminal face up. In situ, ECs were visualized by an upright epifluorescence Axiolab microscope (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany equipped with a Zeiss×63 Achroplan objective (water immersion, 2.0 mm working distance, 0.9 numerical apertures. ECs were excited alternately at 340 and 380 nm, and the emitted light was detected at 510 nm. Results: In aortic rings with intact endothelium pre-contracted with norepinephrine (10-4 mol/L, the addition of erythrodiol (10-8-10-4 mol/L induced vasorelaxation in a concentration-dependent manner; in endothelium-denuded rings, the relaxant response induced by erythrodiol was almost completely abolished suggesting that vasorelaxation was endothelium-dependent. They had almost no relaxant effect on depolarised or endothelium-denuded aortic segments. The relaxation was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with the NO synthase inhibitor Nvnitro-L-arginine-methylester. Erythrodiol (10-4 mol/L was able to significantly increase NOx levels. This effect was completely abolished after removal of the vascular endothelium. Erythrodiol (100 µmol/L caused a slow, long-lasting increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These results further supported the hypothesis that erythrodiol can induce activation of the NO/soluble guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway, as

  14. Precipitants of hepatic encephalopathy induce rapid astrocyte swelling in an oxidative stress dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachmann, Vera; Görg, Boris; Bidmon, Hans Jürgen; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is seen as the clinical manifestation of a low grade cerebral edema with formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS). Astrocyte swelling is a crucial event and in cultured astrocytes HE-relevant factors almost instantaneously induce the formation of RNOS. However, short term effects of ammonia, inflammatory cytokines and RNOS on the volume of astrocytes and other brain cells as well as the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, although a pathogenic link between RNOS formation and swelling in HE has been proposed. This issue was addressed in the present study by means of live-cell volume microscopy of brain cells in vitro. Ammonia, diazepam and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ, interleukin-1β induced within 20min astrocyte swelling by about 25% accompanied by nuclear swelling of similar magnitude. Astrocyte swelling in response to NH4Cl, TNF-α or diazepam was abolished by the antioxidant epigallocatechin-gallate pointing to an involvement of RNOS. NH4Cl-induced astrocyte swelling was sensitive to inhibition of glutamine synthetase, NADPH oxidase or nitric oxide synthases. In line with a NMDA receptor-, prostanoid- and Ca(2+)-dependence of NH4Cl-induced RNOS formation, Ca(2+) chelation and inhibition of NMDA receptors or cyclooxygenase suppressed NH4Cl-induced astrocyte swelling, whereas the Ca(2+)-ionophore ionomycin, NMDA, glutamate and prostanoids induced rapid astrocyte swelling. NH4Cl also induced swelling of cultured microglia in a glutamine-synthesis dependent way, but had no effect on cell volume of cultured neurons. It is concluded that the pathways which trigger RNOS formation in astrocytes also trigger astrocyte swelling, whereas conversely and as shown previously hypoosmotic astrocyte swelling can induce RNOS formation. This establishes a complex interplay with an auto-amplificatory loop between RNOS formation and astrocyte swelling as an important event in

  15. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  16. Nitrous oxide-related postoperative nausea and vomiting depends on duration of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Philip J; Wu, Christine Yx

    2014-05-01

    Inclusion of nitrous oxide in the gas mixture has been implicated in postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in numerous studies. However, these studies have not examined whether duration of exposure was a significant covariate. This distinction might affect the future place of nitrous oxide in clinical practice. PubMed listed journals reporting trials in which patients randomized to a nitrous oxide or nitrous oxide-free anesthetic for surgery were included, where the incidence of PONV within the first 24 postoperative hours and mean duration of anesthesia was reported. Meta-regression of the log risk ratio for PONV with nitrous oxide (lnRR PONVN2O) versus duration was performed. Twenty-nine studies in 27 articles met the inclusion criteria, randomizing 10,317 patients. There was a significant relationship between lnRR PONVN2O and duration (r = 0.51, P = 0.002). Risk ratio PONV increased 20% per hour of nitrous oxide after 45 min. The number needed to treat to prevent PONV by avoiding nitrous oxide was 128, 23, and 9 where duration was less than 1, 1 to 2, and over 2 h, respectively. The risk ratio for the overall effect of nitrous oxide on PONV was 1.21 (CIs, 1.04-1.40); P = 0.014. This duration-related effect may be via disturbance of methionine and folate metabolism. No clinically significant effect of nitrous oxide on the risk of PONV exists under an hour of exposure. Nitrous oxide-related PONV should not be seen as an impediment to its use in minor or ambulatory surgery.

  17. Size-Dependent Neurotoxicity of Aluminum Oxide Particles: a Comparison Between Nano- and Micrometer Size on the Basis of Mitochondrial Oxidative Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshafa, Atefeh; Nazari, Mehdi; Jahani, Daniel; Shaki, Fatemeh

    2017-08-30

    Aluminum nanoparticles (AlNPs) are among the most abundantly produced nanosized particles in the market. There is limited information about the potential harmful effects of aluminum oxide due to its particle size on human health. Considering the toxic effects of Al on brain as its target tissue, in this study, the toxicity of nanoparticles, microparticles, and ionic forms of Al on rat brain and isolated mitochondria was evaluated. Sixty male Wistar rats were divided into ten groups (six rats each), in which group I was the control, and the other groups were administered different doses of Al nanoparticles, Al microparticles (AlMP), and Al ionic forms (2, 4, and 8 mg/kg, i.p.) for 28 days. After 24 h, the animals were killed, brain tissue was separated, the mitochondrial fraction was isolated, and oxidative stress markers were measured. Also, mitochondrial function was assayed by MTT test. The results showed that all forms of Al particles induced ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, and gait abnormalities in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Al particles decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. These data indicated that oxidative stress might contribute to the toxicity effects of Al. Comparison of oxidative stress markers between all forms of Al revealed that the toxic effect of AlNP on brain tissue was substantially more than that caused by AlMP and bulk form. This study showed more neurotoxicity of AlNPs compared to other forms on brain oxidative damage that probably is due to more penetration into the brain.

  18. Resveratrol induces pro-oxidant effects and time-dependent resistance to cytotoxicity in activated hepatic stellate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Leo A Meira; Coelho, Bárbara P; Behr, Guilherme; Pettenuzzo, Letícia F; Souza, Izabel C C; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Borojevic, Radovan; Gottfried, Carmem; Guma, Fátima Costa Rodrigues

    2014-03-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is known for its antioxidant properties; however, this compound has been proposed to have cytotoxic and pro-oxidant effects depending on its concentration and time of exposure. We previously reported the cell cycle arrest effect of low doses of RSV in GRX cells, an activated hepatic stellate cell model. Here, we evaluated the effects of RSV treatment (0.1-50 μM) for 24 and 120 h on GRX viability and oxidative status. Only treatment with 50 μM of RSV reduced the amount of live cells. However, even low doses of RSV induced an increased reactive species production at both treatment times. While being diminished within 24 h, RSV induced an increase in the SOD activity in 120 h. The cellular damage was substantially increased at 24 h in the 50 μM RSV-treated group, as indicated by the high lipoperoxidation, which may be related to the significant cell death and low proliferation. Paradoxically, this cellular damage and lipoperoxidation were considerably reduced in this group after 120 h of treatment while the surviving cells proliferated. In conclusion, RSV induced a dose-dependent pro-oxidant effect in GRX cells. The highest RSV dose induced oxidative-related damage, drastically reducing cell viability; but this cytotoxicity seems to be attenuated during 120 h of treatment.

  19. Time-dependent change of in vivo optical imaging of oxidative stress in a mouse stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yumiko; Yamashita, Toru; Li, Qian; Sato, Kota; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Morihara, Ryuta; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Abe, Koji

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a pivotal role in cellular defense against oxidative stress damage after ischemic stroke. In the present study, we examined the time-dependent change of in vivo optical imaging of oxidative stress after stroke with Keap1-dependent oxidative stress detector (OKD) mice. OKD mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) for 45 min, and in vivo optical signals were detected during the pre-operative period, 12 h, 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d after tMCAO. Ex vivo imaging was performed immediately after obtaining in vivo optical signals at 1 d after tMCAO. Immunohistochemical analyses and infarct volume were also examined after in vivo imaging at each period. The in vivo signals showed a peak at 1 d after tMCAO that was slightly correlated to infarct volume. The strong ex vivo signals, which were detected in the peri-ischemic area, corresponded to endogenous Nrf2 expression. Moreover, endogenous Nrf2 expression was detected mainly in neurons followed by oligodendrocytes and pericytes, but only slightly in astrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells. The present study successfully demonstrated the temporal change of in vivo imaging of oxidative stress after tMCAO, which is consistent with strong expression of endogenous Nrf2 in the peri-ischemic area with a similar time course. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The induction of the oxidative burst in Elodea densa by sulfhydryl reagent does not depend on de novo protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amicucci, Enrica [Milan, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisiologia e Biochimica delle Piante

    1997-12-31

    In Elodea densa Planchon leaves, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and other sulfhydryl-binding reagents induce a marked and temporary increase of respiration that is insensitive to cyanide, hydroxamate and propylgallate and completely inhibited by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and by quinacrine. In this paper the author investigates whether the mechanism that causes the oxidative burst depends on the activation of preexisting oxidative systems or on the activation of de novo protein synthesis. The inhibitors used were cycloheximide (CHI) which inhibits protein synthesis in plant cells by depressing the incorporation of aminoacids into proteins and cordycepin, an effective inhibitor of mRNA synthesis. The data support the idea that the mechanism investigated depends on the activation of a long lived protein(s) and not on de novo protein synthesis.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of size-dependent Pt in Pt/MWCNTs nanocomposites for methanol electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liang; Lu Gongxuan

    2008-01-01

    A hydrothermal method has been developed to prepare size-controlled Pt nanoparticles dispersed highly on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pt/MWCNTs). It was found that the size of Pt nanoparticles was strongly dependent on the solution pH in synthesis. The Pt nanoparticles with mean size of 3.0, 4.2 and 9.1 nm were obtained at pHs 13, 12 and 10 separately. After Pt/MWCNTs composites were fabricated, the different properties of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry in electro-oxidation of methanol were found. The results showed that the smaller diameter Pt deposited Pt/MWCNTs nanocomposites exhibited higher electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. By characterization of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), size-dependent activities were identified

  2. Increasing the Fungicidal Action of Amphotericin B by Inhibiting the Nitric Oxide-Dependent Tolerance Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Vriens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphotericin B (AmB induces oxidative and nitrosative stresses, characterized by production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, in fungi. Yet, how these toxic species contribute to AmB-induced fungal cell death is unclear. We investigated the role of superoxide and nitric oxide radicals in AmB’s fungicidal activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using a digital microfluidic platform, which enabled monitoring individual cells at a spatiotemporal resolution, and plating assays. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME was used to interfere with nitric oxide radical production. L-NAME increased and accelerated AmB-induced accumulation of superoxide radicals, membrane permeabilization, and loss of proliferative capacity in S. cerevisiae. In contrast, the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione inhibited AmB’s action. Hence, superoxide radicals were important for AmB’s fungicidal action, whereas nitric oxide radicals mediated tolerance towards AmB. Finally, also the human pathogens Candida albicans and Candida glabrata were more susceptible to AmB in the presence of L-NAME, pointing to the potential of AmB-L-NAME combination therapy to treat fungal infections.

  3. Age-dependent oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in Down's lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zana, Marianna; Szecsenyi, Anita; Czibula, Agnes; Bjelik, Annamaria; Juhasz, Anna; Rimanoczy, Agnes; Szabo, Krisztina; Vetro, Agnes; Szucs, Peter; Varkonyi, Agnes; Pakaski, Magdolna; Boda, Krisztina; Rasko, Istvan; Janka, Zoltan; Kalman, Janos

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the oxidative status of lymphocytes from children (n = 7) and adults (n = 18) with Down's syndrome (DS). The basal oxidative condition, the vulnerability to in vitro hydrogen peroxide exposure, and the repair capacity were measured by means of the damage-specific alkaline comet assay. Significantly and age-independently elevated numbers of single strand breaks and oxidized bases (pyrimidines and purines) were found in the nuclear DNA of the lymphocytes in the DS group in the basal condition. These results may support the role of an increased level of endogenous oxidative stress in DS and are similar to those previously demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease. In the in vitro oxidative stress-induced state, a markedly higher extent of DNA damage was observed in DS children as compared with age- and gender-matched healthy controls, suggesting that young trisomic lymphocytes are more sensitive to oxidative stress than normal ones. However, the repair ability itself was not found to be deteriorated in either DS children or DS adults

  4. Current advances in molecular methods for detection of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria in natural environments

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing; Dick, Richard; Lin, Jih-Gaw; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process uniquely links microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. Research on n-damo bacteria progresses quickly with experimental evidences through enrichment cultures. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detecting them in various natural ecosystems and engineered systems play a very important role in the discovery of their distribution, abundance, and biodiversity in the ecosystems. Important characteristics of n-damo enrichmen...

  5. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hien, Tran Thi [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Myung Ho [Heart Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyungsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  6. Isocitrate protects DJ-1 null dopaminergic cells from oxidative stress through NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsung; Kim, Min Ju; Yoon, Woongchang; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Hyunjin; Lee, Yoonjeong; Min, Boram; Kang, Kyung Shin; Son, Jin H; Park, Hwan Tae; Chung, Jongkyeong; Koh, Hyongjong

    2017-08-01

    DJ-1 is one of the causative genes for early onset familiar Parkinson's disease (PD) and is also considered to influence the pathogenesis of sporadic PD. DJ-1 has various physiological functions which converge on controlling intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In RNA-sequencing analyses searching for novel anti-oxidant genes downstream of DJ-1, a gene encoding NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), which converts isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate, was detected. Loss of IDH induced hyper-sensitivity to oxidative stress accompanying age-dependent mitochondrial defects and dopaminergic (DA) neuron degeneration in Drosophila, indicating its critical roles in maintaining mitochondrial integrity and DA neuron survival. Further genetic analysis suggested that DJ-1 controls IDH gene expression through nuclear factor-E2-related factor2 (Nrf2). Using Drosophila and mammalian DA models, we found that IDH suppresses intracellular and mitochondrial ROS level and subsequent DA neuron loss downstream of DJ-1. Consistently, trimethyl isocitrate (TIC), a cell permeable isocitrate, protected mammalian DJ-1 null DA cells from oxidative stress in an IDH-dependent manner. These results suggest that isocitrate and its derivatives are novel treatments for PD associated with DJ-1 dysfunction.

  7. Dependence of SOA oxidation on organic aerosol mass concentration and OH exposure: experimental PAM chamber studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA is studied with mass spectra analysis of SOA formed in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM chamber, a small flow-through photo-oxidation chamber with extremely high OH and ozone levels. The OH exposure from a few minutes in the PAM chamber is similar to that from days to weeks in the atmosphere. The mass spectra were measured with a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS for SOA formed from oxidation of α-pinene, m-xylene, p-xylene, and a mixture of the three. The organic mass fractions of m/z 44 (CO2+ and m/z 43 (mainly C2H3O+, named f44 and f43 respectively, are used as indicators of the degree of organic aerosol (OA oxidation that occurs as the OA mass concentration or the OH exposure are varied. The degree of oxidation is sensitive to both. For a fixed OH exposure, the degree of oxidation initially decreases rapidly and then more slowly as the OA mass concentration increases. For fixed initial precursor VOC amounts, the degree of oxidation increases linearly with OH exposure, with f44 increasing and f43 decreasing. In this study, the degree of SOA oxidation spans much of the range observed in the atmosphere. These results, while sensitive to the determination of f44 and f43, provide evidence that some characteristics of atmospheric OA oxidation can be generated in a PAM chamber. For all measurements in this study, the sum of f44 and f43 is 0.25 ± 0.03, so that the slope of a linear regression is approximately −1 on an f44 vs. f43 plot. This constancy of the sum suggests that these ions are complete proxies for organic mass in the OA studied.

  8. Adaptations to endurance training depend on exercise-induced oxidative stress: exploiting redox interindividual variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritelis, N V; Theodorou, A A; Paschalis, V; Veskoukis, A S; Dipla, K; Zafeiridis, A; Panayiotou, G; Vrabas, I S; Kyparos, A; Nikolaidis, M G

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in exercise adaptations under physiological in vivo conditions and without the interference from other exogenous redox agents (e.g. a pro-oxidant or antioxidant). We invented a novel methodological set-up that exploited the large redox interindividual variability in exercise responses. More specifically, we used exercise-induced oxidative stress as the 'classifier' measure (i.e. low, moderate and high) and investigated the physiological and redox adaptations after a 6-week endurance training protocol. We demonstrated that the group with the low exercise-induced oxidative stress exhibited the lowest improvements in a battery of classic adaptations to endurance training (VO 2 max, time trial and Wingate test) as well as in a set of redox biomarkers (oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidants), compared to the high and moderate oxidative stress groups. The findings of this study substantiate, for the first time in a human in vivo physiological context, and in the absence of any exogenous redox manipulation, the vital role of RONS produced during exercise in adaptations. The stratification approach, based on a redox phenotype, implemented in this study could be a useful experimental strategy to reveal the role of RONS and antioxidants in other biological manifestations as well. © 2017 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Enhanced Strain-Dependent Electrical Resistance of Polyurethane Composites with Embedded Oxidized Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Benlikaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different chemical oxidation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with H2O2, HNO3, and KMnO4 on the change of electrical resistance of polyurethane composites with embedded oxidized nanotube networks subjected to elongation and bending has been studied. The testing has shown about twenty-fold increase in the electrical resistance for the composite prepared from KMnO4 oxidized nanotubes in comparison to the composites prepared from the pristine and other oxidized nanotubes. The evaluated sensitivity of KMnO4 treated composite in terms of the gauge factor increases with strain to nearly 175 at the strain 11%. This is a substantial increase, which ranks the composite prepared from KMnO4 oxidized nanotubes among materials as strain gauges with the highest electromechanical sensitivity. The observed differences in electromechanical properties of the composites are discussed on basis of their structure which is examined by the measurements of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope. The possible practical use of the composites is demonstrated by monitoring of elbow joint flexion during two different physical exercises.

  10. Temperature dependent thermoelectric property of reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, Mousumi, E-mail: mousumimitrabesu@gmail.com; Banerjee, Dipali, E-mail: dipalibanerjeebesu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology (IIEST), Howrah-711103 (India); Kargupta, Kajari, E-mail: karguptakajari2010@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Kolkata (India); Ganguly, Saibal, E-mail: gangulysaibal2011@gmail.com [Chemical Engineering department, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Perak, Tronoh (Malaysia)

    2016-05-06

    A composite material of reduced graphene oxide (rG) nanosheets with polyaniline (PANI) protonated by 5-sulfosalicylic acid has been synthesized via in situ oxidative polymerization method. The morphological and spectral characterizations have been done using FESEM and XRD measurements. The thermoelectric (TE) properties of the reduced graphene oxide-polyaniline composite (rG-P) has been studied in the temperature range from 300-400 K. The electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient of rG-P is higher than the of pure PANI, while the thermal conductivity of the composite still keeps much low value ensuing an increase in the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) in the whole temperature range.

  11. Nanofibrous web quality in dependence on the preparation of poly(ethylene oxide) aqueous solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peer, Petra; Filip, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 12 (2017), s. 2021-2026 ISSN 0040-5000 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-26808S Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : nanofibrous web * poly(ethylene oxide) solution * magnetic stirring * vibrational shaking Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 1.007, year: 2016

  12. Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant mediated by phospholipid oxidation is cholesterol-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saiedy, Mustafa; Pratt, Ryan; Lai, Patrick; Kerek, Evan; Joyce, Heidi; Prenner, Elmar; Green, Francis; Ling, Chang-Chun; Veldhuizen, Ruud; Ghandorah, Salim; Amrein, Matthias

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary surfactant forms a cohesive film at the alveolar air-lung interface, lowering surface tension, and thus reducing the work of breathing and preventing atelectasis. Surfactant function becomes impaired during inflammation due to degradation of the surfactant lipids and proteins by free radicals. In this study, we examine the role of reactive nitrogen (RNS) and oxygen (ROS) species on surfactant function with and without physiological cholesterol levels (5-10%). Surface activity was assessed in vitro in a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). Surfactant chemistry, monolayer fluidity and thermodynamic behavior were also recorded before and after oxidation. We report that physiologic amounts of cholesterol combined with oxidation results in severe impairment of surfactant function. We also show that surfactant polyunsaturated phospholipids are the most susceptible to oxidative alteration. Membrane thermodynamic experiments showed significant surfactant film stiffening after free radical exposure in the presence of cholesterol. These results point to a previously unappreciated role for cholesterol in amplifying defects in surface activity caused by oxidation of pulmonary surfactant, a finding that may have implications for treating several lung diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Orientation-dependent recrystallization in an oxide dispersion strengthened steel after dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Tao, N.R.; Mishin, Oleg V.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of the oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel PM2000 has been investigated after compression by dynamic plastic deformation to a strain of 2.1 and after subsequent annealing at 715 °C. Nanoscale lamellae, exhibiting a strong 〈100〉 + 〈111〉 duplex fibre texture, form during...

  14. Nrf2-dependent persistent oxidative stress results in stress-induced vulnerability to depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, E; Brouillard, F; Molet, J; Claverie, D; Cabungcal, J-H; Cresto, N; Doligez, N; Rivat, C; Do, K Q; Bernard, C; Benoliel, J-J; Becker, C

    2017-12-01

    Stressful life events produce a state of vulnerability to depression in some individuals. The mechanisms that contribute to vulnerability to depression remain poorly understood. A rat model of intense stress (social defeat (SD), first hit) produced vulnerability to depression in 40% of animals. Only vulnerable animals developed a depression-like phenotype after a second stressful hit (chronic mild stress). We found that this vulnerability to depression resulted from a persistent state of oxidative stress, which was reversed by treatment with antioxidants. This persistent state of oxidative stress was due to low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, which characterized the vulnerable animals. We found that BDNF constitutively controlled the nuclear translocation of the master redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2, which activates antioxidant defenses. Low BDNF levels in vulnerable animals prevented Nrf2 translocation and consequently prevented the activation of detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes, ultimately resulting in the generation of sustained oxidative stress. Activating Nrf2 translocation restored redox homeostasis and reversed vulnerability to depression. This mechanism was confirmed in Nrf2-null mice. The mice displayed high levels of oxidative stress and were inherently vulnerable to depression, but this phenotype was reversed by treatment with antioxidants. Our data reveal a novel role for BDNF in controlling redox homeostasis and provide a mechanistic explanation for post-stress vulnerability to depression while suggesting ways to reverse it. Because numerous enzymatic reactions produce reactive oxygen species that must then be cleared, the finding that BDNF controls endogenous redox homeostasis opens new avenues for investigation.

  15. Solvent-dependent regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones using aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Wang; Jiabin, Yang; Lushen, Li, E-mail: jimin@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering; Jin, Cai; Chunlong, Sun; Min, Ji [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2013-03-15

    A novel method for regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones with hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile to afford cinnamic acids is reported. Only trans-b-arylacrylic acids were observed. A wide range of functionalized products can be effectively produced from various chalcones in good to excellent yields. (author)

  16. Study on the Size-Dependent Oxidation Reaction Kinetics of Nanosized Zinc Sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Shan Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous oxidation problems of nanoparticles are often involved during the preparation and application of nanomaterials. The oxidation rate of nanomaterials is much faster than bulk materials due to nanoeffect. Nanosized zinc sulfide (nano-ZnS and oxygen were chosen as a reaction system. The influence regularities were discussed and the influence essence was elucidated theoretically. The results indicate that the particle size can remarkably influence the oxidation reaction kinetics. The rate constant and the reaction order increase, while the apparent activation energy and the preexponential factor decrease with the decreasing particle size. Furthermore, the logarithm of rate constant, the apparent activation energy and the logarithm of preexponential factor are linearly related to the reciprocal of particle diameter, respectively. The essence is that the rate constant is influenced by the combined effect of molar surface energy and molar surface entropy, the reaction order by the molar surface area, the apparent activation energy, by the molar surface energy, and the preexponential factor by the molar surface entropy. The influence regularities and essence can provide theoretical guidance to solve the oxidation problems involved in the process of preparation and application of nanomaterials.

  17. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Anantharam, Vellareddy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kanthasamy, Anumantha G., E-mail: akanthas@iastate.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles

  18. On calculation of dependence of ion sorption by oxides and hydroxides on ph of medium from logistic curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artyukhin, P.I.

    1988-01-01

    Critical consideration of the earlier suggested method for calculation of dependences of relative sorption (S) of microcomponents (MC) with oxides and hydroxides on the pH solution by the so-called logistic curve is given, and it is concluded that the presented equation for the curve does not have properties of the logistic function and contradicts the experiment. The equation really describing the dependence of S on pH and complying with criteria imposed for logistic functions is shown to proceed from existing model representations on MC sorption with hydroxides, and this problem may be easily solved graphically by drawing the dependence lg (S/1-S)=A+mpH, where A-constant, m + -MC aqua-ion charge. The made conclusions are illustrated on the example of 14m In, 91 Y, 64 Cu coprecipitation with iron hydroxide

  19. Colloidally Synthesized Monodisperse Rh Nanoparticles Supported on SBA-15 for Size- and Pretreatment-Dependent Studies of CO Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Michael E.; Joo, Sang Hoon; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-02-12

    A particle size dependence for CO oxidation over rhodium nanoparticles of 1.9-11.3 nm has been investigated and determined to be modified by the existence of the capping agent poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). The particles were prepared using a polyol reduction procedure with PVP as the capping agent. The Rh nanoparticles were subsequently supported on SBA-15 during hydrothermal synthesis to produce Rh/SBA-15 supported catalysts for size-dependent catalytic studies. CO oxidation by O{sub 2} at 40 Torr CO and 100 Torr O{sub 2} was investigated over two series of Rh/SBA-15 catalysts: as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15 covering the full range of Rh sizes and the same set of catalysts after high temperature calcination and reduction. The turnover frequency at 443 K increases from 0.4 to 1.7 s{sup -1} as the particle size decreases from 11.3 to 1.9 nm for the as-synthesized catalysts. After calcination and reduction, the turnover frequency is between 0.1 and 0.4 s{sup -1} with no particle size dependence. The apparent activation energy for all catalysts is {approx}30 kcal mol{sup -1} and is independent of particle size and thermal treatment. Infrared spectroscopy of CO on the Rh nanoparticles indicates that the heat treatments used influence the mode of CO adsorption. As a result, the particle size dependence for CO oxidation is altered after calcination and reduction of the catalysts. CO adsorbs at two distinct bridge sites on as-synthesized Rh/SBA-15, attributable to metallic Rh(0) and oxidized Rh(I) bridge sites. After calcination and reduction, however, CO adsorbs only at Rh(0) atop sites. The change in adsorption geometry and oxidation activity may be attributable to the interaction between PVP and the Rh surface. This capping agent affect may open new possibilities for the tailoring of metal catalysts using solution nanoparticle synthesis methods.

  20. Pronounced Size Dependence in Structure and Morphology of Gas-Phase Produced, Partially Oxidized Cobalt Nanoparticles under Catalytic Reaction Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, Stephan; Yin, Chunrong; Barke, Ingo; Oldenburg, Kevin; Hartmann, Hannes; von Oeynhausen, Viola; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Houben, Kelly; Tyo, Eric C; Seifert, Sönke; Lievens, Peter; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-06-23

    It is generally accepted that optimal particle sizes are key for efficient nanocatalysis. Much less attention is paid to the role of morphology and atomic arrangement during catalytic reactions. Here, we unravel the structural, stoichiometric, and morphological evolution of gas-phase produced and partially oxidized cobalt nanoparticles in a broad size range. Particles with diameters between 1.4 and 22 nm generated in cluster sources are size selected and deposited on amorphous alumina (Al2O3) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. A combination of different techniques is employed to monitor particle properties at the stages of production, exposure to ambient conditions, and catalytic reaction, in this case, the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane at elevated temperatures. A pronounced size dependence is found, naturally classifying the particles into three size regimes. While small and intermediate clusters essentially retain their compact morphology, large particles transform into hollow spheres due to the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. Depending on the substrate, an isotropic (Al2O3) or anisotropic (UNCD) Kirkendall effect is observed. The latter results in dramatic lateral size changes. Our results shed light on the interplay between chemical reactions and the catalyst's structure and provide an approach to tailor the cobalt oxide phase composition required for specific catalytic schemes.

  1. Developmental Arrest of Caenorhabditis elegans BRAP-2 Mutant Exposed to Oxidative Stress Is Dependent on BRC-1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Janet C.; Kubiseski, Terrance J.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species is believed to be a contributor to the development of cancer and the physiological deterioration associated with aging. In this report, we describe the effect of reactive oxygen species exposure to a developing Caenorhabditis elegans organism containing a deletion in the homolog of BRCA1-associated protein 2 (BRAP-2). A mutant containing a deletion of brap-2 was highly sensitive to oxidizing conditions and demonstrated early larval arrest and lethality at low concentrations of the oxidative stress-inducing drug paraquat compared with the wild-type. This developmental arrest occurred early in the L1 stage and was dependent specifically on the function of the C. elegans ortholog of BRCA-1 tumor suppressor brc-1. We also show that developmental arrest in brap-2 mutants when exposed to oxidative stress was due to enhanced expression levels of the cell cycle inhibitor cki-1, and this increase in the expression levels of cki-1 requires brc-1 in brap-2 mutant animals. Our findings demonstrate that BRAP-2 is necessary for preventing an inappropriate response to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species by countering premature activation of BRC-1 and CKI-1. PMID:20207739

  2. Hepatoprotective properties of kombucha tea against TBHP-induced oxidative stress via suppression of mitochondria dependent apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Gachhui, Ratan; Sil, Parames C

    2011-06-01

    Kombucha, a fermented tea (KT) is claimed to possess many beneficial properties. Recent studies have suggested that KT prevents paracetamol and carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity. We investigated the beneficial role of KT was against tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) induced cytotoxicity and cell death in murine hepatocytes. TBHP is a well known reactive oxygen species (ROS) inducer, and it induces oxidative stress in organ pathophysiology. In our experiments, TBHP caused a reduction in cell viability, enhanced the membrane leakage and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries while simultaneous treatment of the cells with KT and this ROS inducer maintained membrane integrity and prevented the alterations in the cellular antioxidant status. These findings led us to explore the detailed molecular mechanisms involved in the protective effect of KT. TBHP introduced apoptosis as the primary phenomena of cell death as evidenced by flow cytometric analyses. In addition, ROS generation, changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, activation of caspases (3 and 9) and Apaf-1 were detected confirming involvement of mitochondrial pathway in this pathophysiology. Simultaneous treatment of KT with TBHP, on the other hand, protected the cells against oxidative injury and maintained their normal physiology. In conclusion, KT was found to modulate the oxidative stress induced apoptosis in murine hepatocytes probably due to its antioxidant activity and functioning via mitochondria dependent pathways and could be beneficial against liver diseases, where oxidative stress is known to play a crucial role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Oxidative Stress in Lung Epithelial Cells Depends on Pneumococcal Autolysis and Is Reversible by Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahlten, Janine; Kim, Ye-Ji; Doehn, Jan-Moritz; Pribyl, Thomas; Hocke, Andreas C; García, Pedro; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Hübner, Ralf-Harto

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. During pneumococcal pneumonia, the human airway epithelium is exposed to large amounts of H2O2 as a product of host and pathogen oxidative metabolism. Airway cells are known to be highly vulnerable to oxidant damage, but the pathophysiology of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae and the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant systems of the host are not well characterized. For gluthation/gluthathion disulfide analysis BEAS-2B cells, primary broncho-epithelial cells (pBEC), explanted human lung tissue and mouse lungs were infected with different S. pneumoniae strains (D39, A66, R6x, H2O2/pneumolysin/LytA- deficient mutants of R6x). Cell death was proven by LDH assay and cell viability by IL-8 ELISA. The translocation of Nrf2 and the expression of catalase were shown via Western blot. The binding of Nrf2 at the catalase promoter was analyzed by ChIP. We observed a significant induction of oxidative stress induced by S. pneumoniae in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Upon stimulation, the oxidant-responsive transcription factor Nrf2 was activated, and catalase was upregulated via Nrf2. The pneumococci-induced oxidative stress was independent of S. pneumoniae-derived H2O2 and pneumolysin but depended on the pneumococcal autolysin LytA. The Nrf2 inducer resveratrol, as opposed to catalase, reversed oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. These observations indicate a H2O2-independent induction of oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells via the release of bacterial factors of S. pneumoniae. Resveratrol might be an option for prevention of acute lung injury and inflammatory responses observed in pneumococcal pneumonia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Analog memory and spike-timing-dependent plasticity characteristics of a nanoscale titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Kyungah; Park, Sangsu; Lee, Kwanghee; Lee, Byounghun; Hwang, Hyunsang [Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Insung; Jung, Seungjae; Jo, Minseok; Park, Jubong; Shin, Jungho; Biju, Kuyyadi P; Kong, Jaemin, E-mail: kyseo@gist.ac.kr, E-mail: hwanghs@gist.ac.kr [School of Material Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-24

    We demonstrated analog memory, synaptic plasticity, and a spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) function with a nanoscale titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device with a simple fabrication process and good yield uniformity. We confirmed the multilevel conductance and analog memory characteristics as well as the uniformity and separated states for the accuracy of conductance change. Finally, STDP and a biological triple model were analyzed to demonstrate the potential of titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device as synapses in neuromorphic devices. By developing a simple resistive switching device that can emulate a synaptic function, the unique characteristics of synapses in the brain, e.g. combined memory and computing in one synapse and adaptation to the outside environment, were successfully demonstrated in a solid state device.

  5. Selenium-Dependent Regulation of Oxidative Stress and Immunity in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordillo, Lorraine M.

    2013-01-01

    Uncontrolled or impaired immune and inflammatory responses in periparturient dairy cows are associated with increased incidence and severity of infectious diseases. The progressive development of oxidative stress during the transition from late gestation to peak lactation is thought to be a significant underlying factor leading to dysfunctional immune cell responses. Certain trace minerals, such as selenium (Se), can ameliorate oxidative stress and reduce the severity of several economically important diseases in dairy cattle including mastitis and metritis. Many of the health benefits of Se can be attributed to the antioxidant functions of selenoproteins. Changes in selenoprotein activity as a consequence of Se nutritional status can directly alter a number of critical cellular functions involved in the inflammatory response. A better understanding of how Se can optimize immune cell responses may facilitate the design of nutritional regimes that will reduce health disorders during the periparturient period. PMID:23401850

  6. Selenium-Dependent Regulation of Oxidative Stress and Immunity in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine M. Sordillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled or impaired immune and inflammatory responses in periparturient dairy cows are associated with increased incidence and severity of infectious diseases. The progressive development of oxidative stress during the transition from late gestation to peak lactation is thought to be a significant underlying factor leading to dysfunctional immune cell responses. Certain trace minerals, such as selenium (Se, can ameliorate oxidative stress and reduce the severity of several economically important diseases in dairy cattle including mastitis and metritis. Many of the health benefits of Se can be attributed to the antioxidant functions of selenoproteins. Changes in selenoprotein activity as a consequence of Se nutritional status can directly alter a number of critical cellular functions involved in the inflammatory response. A better understanding of how Se can optimize immune cell responses may facilitate the design of nutritional regimes that will reduce health disorders during the periparturient period.

  7. Review Paper: Role of Nitric Oxide on Dopamine Release and Morphine-Dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Arash Motahari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The catastrophic effects of opioids use on public health and the economy are documented clearly in numerous studies. Repeated morphine administration can lead to either a decrease (tolerance or an increase (sensitization in its behavioral and rewarding effects. Morphine-induced sensitization is a major problem and plays an important role in abuse of the opioid drugs. Studies reported that morphine may exert its effects by the release of nitric oxide (NO. NO is a potent neuromodulator, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS. However, the exact role of NO in the opioid-induced sensitization is unknown. In this study, we reviewed the role of NO on opioid-induced sensitization in 2 important, rewarding regions of the brain: nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmentum. In addition, we focused on the contribution of NO on opioid-induced sensitization in the limbic system.

  8. A chronic increase of corticosterone age-dependently reduces systemic DNA damage from oxidation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Kalliokoski, Otto; Forsberg, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    differences. In old animals, CORT caused a borderline significant reduction of RNA oxidation in CNS, which was paralleled by a normalization of performance in an object location memory test. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that chronic stress-associated levels of CORT can reduce nucleic acid......Stress and depression are associated with an acceleration of brain and bodily aging; effects which have been attributed to chronic elevations of glucocorticoids. We tested the hypothesis that a three week administration of stress-associated levels of corticosterone (CORT, the principal rodent...... glucocorticoid) would increase systemic and CNS DNA and RNA damage from oxidation; a phenomenon known to be centrally involved in the aging process. We also hypothesized that older individuals would be more sensitive to this effect and that the chronic CORT administration would exacerbate age-related memory...

  9. Post-Translational Nitric Oxide-Dependent Modifications In Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Nitric oxide non classical signalling is exerted through a series of covalent protein post-translational modifications, which include modification of cysteine residues by S-nitrosylation and S-glutathionylation. A key process in adaptive immunity is the immune synapse that tightly couples T cells with antigen presenting cells, triggering antigen recognition by T cells. In this highly regulated process, we have shown that eNOS is activated, inducing protein S-nitrosylation. While both N-Ras and K-Ras are present in T cells, only N-Ras, which colocalizes in the Golgi with eNOS, is S-nitrosylated and activated during the immune synapse, providing an example of short-range selectivity of NO signalling through S-nitrosylation. We have developed proteomic methods to detect S-nitrosylation and reversible cysteine oxidations. We have applied them to detecting S-nitrosylated proteins in macrophage activation, highlighting the role of denitrosylase mechanism, particularly the thioredoxin pathway, in protecting macrophages from self-modification. We have also applied these proteomic methods to studying protein modification in acute hypoxia. In endothelial cells, there is an increase in cysteine oxidation in several proteins that can mediate acute responses to hypoxia prior to the activation of the HIF pathway, and we are currently studying in more detail the role of protein S-nitrosylation. We have also recently shown that acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in cells, which can be converted in an oxidative signal through protein cysteine modification, and we are unraveling the molecular mechanisms producing this superoxide burst in mitochondria. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible ...

  11. Dissimilar Crystal Dependence of Vanadium Oxide Cathodes in Organic Carbonate and Safe Ionic Liquid Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaj, Pedro; Amarilla, Jose M; Morales, Enrique; Vazquez-Santos, Maria B

    2016-01-27

    Advances in Li metal anode stabilization, solid-state electrolytes, and capabilities to insert a variety of active ions (Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), and Al(3+)) have renewed the interest in layered vanadium oxides. Here we show that crystal characteristics such as size and crystallinity are fundamental variables that control the dissimilar electrochemical capabilities of 1D vanadium oxides immersed in different electrolytes (organic carbonates and safe electrolytes containing 80% of ionic liquid). We show that this opposite behavior can be understood in terms of a subtle interplay between crystal characteristics (size and crystallinity), electrolyte degradability, and the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte. Thus, through this control we are able to obtain pure 1D vanadium oxides that show reversibility in carbonate electrolytes at a cutoff voltage of 1.5 V (voltage region where insertion of more than two lithium ions is possible). Furthermore, these materials are able to uptake ca. 1.0 mol of Li at a rate of 20C (1C = 295 mAh/g) and retain excellent capabilities (Coulombic efficiency of 98% after 200 cycles at a rate of 5C). Finally, what, to our knowledge, is really remarkable is that this optimization allows building vanadium oxide electrodes with an excellent electrochemical response in a safe electrolyte composition (80% of ionic liquid). Specifically, we reach uptakes also at a cutoff voltage of 1.5 V of ca. 1.0 mol of Li after 200 cycles at 5C (charge/discharge) with Coulombic efficiencies higher than 99.5%.

  12. Dose dependent oxidation kinetics of lipids in fish during irradiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tukenmez, I.; Ersen, M.S.; Bakioglu, A.T. [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, Ankara (Turkey). Lalahan Nuclear Research Inst.; Bicer, A.; Pamuk, V. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-10-01

    Kinetic aspects of the development of lipid oxidation in complex foods as fish in the course of irradiation were analyzed with respect to the associated formation of malonaldehyde (MA) through the reactions modified so as to be consistent with those in complex foods as fish. Air-packed anchovy (Engraulis encrasicholus) samples in polyethylene pouches were irradiated at the doses of 1, 2, 5, 10, 15,20 and 25 kGy at 20{sup o} C in a Cs-137 gamma irradiator of 1.806 kGy/h dose rate. Immediately after each irradiation, MA contents of irradiated and unirradiated samples were determined by thiobarbituric acid test. Based on the MA formation, a kinetic model to simulate the apparent oxidation of lipid in fish as a function of irradiation dose was derived from the rate equations consistent with modified reactions. Kinetic parameters and simulation were related to conditions of lipid oxidation, and associated rancidity state of fish with respect to the doses applied in different irradiation-preservation processes. Numerical values of kinetic parameters based on the MA formation were found as a threshold dose of 0.375 kGy, an apparent yield of 1.871 {mu}mol/kg kGy, and a maximum attainable concentration of 15.853 {mu}mol/kg which may be used for process control and dosimetry. (author).

  13. The Traditional Herbal Medicine, Dangkwisoo-San, Prevents Cerebral Ischemic Injury through Nitric Oxide-Dependent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dangkwisoo-San (DS is an herbal extract that is widely used in traditional Korean medicine to treat traumatic ecchymosis and pain by promoting blood circulation and relieving blood stasis. However, the effect of DS in cerebrovascular disease has not been examined experimentally. The protective effects of DS on focal ischemic brain were investigated in a mouse model. DS stimulated nitric oxide (NO production in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs. DS (10–300 μg/mL produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in mouse aorta, which was significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor L-NAME, suggesting that DS causes vasodilation via a NO-dependent mechanism. DS increased resting cerebral blood flow (CBF, although it caused mild hypotension. To investigate the effect of DS on the acute cerebral injury, C57/BL6J mice received 90 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 22.5 h of reperfusion. DS administered 3 days before arterial occlusion significantly reduced cerebral infarct size by 53.7% compared with vehicle treatment. However, DS did not reduce brain infarction in mice treated with the relatively specific endothelial NOS (eNOS inhibitor, N5-(1-iminoethyl-L-ornithine, suggesting that the neuroprotective effect of DS is primarily endothelium-dependent. This correlated with increased phosphorylation of eNOS in the brains of DS-treated mice. DS acutely improves CBF in eNOS-dependent vasodilation and reduces infarct size in focal cerebral ischemia. These data provide causal evidence that DS is cerebroprotective via the eNOS-dependent production of NO, which ameliorates blood circulation.

  14. Sex- and limb-specific differences in the nitric oxide-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in response to local heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhewicz, Anna E.; Greaney, Jody L.; Larry Kenney, W.

    2014-01-01

    Local heating of the skin is commonly used to assess cutaneous microvasculature function. Controversy exists as to whether there are limb or sex differences in the nitric oxide (NO)-dependent contribution to this vasodilation, as well as the NO synthase (NOS) isoform mediating the responses. We tested the hypotheses that 1) NO-dependent vasodilation would be greater in the calf compared with the forearm; 2) total NO-dependent dilation would not be different between sexes within limb; and 3) women would exhibit greater neuronal NOS (nNOS)-dependent vasodilation in the calf. Two microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of the ventral forearm and the calf of 19 (10 male and 9 female) young (23 ± 1 yr) adults for the local delivery of Ringer solution (control) or 5 mM Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPLA; nNOS inhibition). Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) at each site, after which 20 mM NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) was perfused for within-site assessment of NO-dependent vasodilation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximum (28 mM sodium nitroprusside, 43°C). Total NO-dependent vasodilation in the calf was lower compared with the forearm in both sexes (Ringer: 42 ± 5 vs. 62 ± 4%; P 0.05). These data suggest that the NO-dependent component of local heating-induced cutaneous vasodilation is lower in the calf compared with the forearm. Contrary to our original hypothesis, there was no contribution of nNOS to NO-dependent vasodilation in either limb during local heating. PMID:25100074

  15. Lanthanide-Dependent Regulation of Methanol Oxidation Systems in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and Their Contribution to Methanol Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Huong N; Subuyuj, Gabriel A; Vijayakumar, Srividhya; Good, Nathan M; Martinez-Gomez, N Cecilia; Skovran, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 has two distinct types of methanol dehydrogenase (MeDH) enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. MxaFI-MeDH requires pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) and Ca in its active site, while XoxF-MeDH requires PQQ and lanthanides, such as Ce and La. Using MeDH mutant strains to conduct growth analysis and MeDH activity assays, we demonstrate that M. extorquens AM1 has at least one additional lanthanide-dependent methanol oxidation system contributing to methanol growth. Additionally, the abilities of different lanthanides to support growth were tested and strongly suggest that both XoxF and the unknown methanol oxidation system are able to use La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and, to some extent, Sm. Further, growth analysis using increasing La concentrations showed that maximum growth rate and yield were achieved at and above 1 μM La, while concentrations as low as 2.5 nM allowed growth at a reduced rate. Contrary to published data, we show that addition of exogenous lanthanides results in differential expression from the xox1 and mxa promoters, upregulating genes in the xox1 operon and repressing genes in the mxa operon. Using transcriptional reporter fusions, intermediate expression from both the mxa and xox1 promoters was detected when 50 to 100 nM La was added to the growth medium, suggesting that a condition may exist under which M. extorquens AM1 is able to utilize both enzymes simultaneously. Together, these results suggest that M. extorquens AM1 actively senses and responds to lanthanide availability, preferentially utilizing the lanthanide-dependent MeDHs when possible. The biological role of lanthanides is a nascent field of study with tremendous potential to impact many areas in biology. Our studies demonstrate that there is at least one additional lanthanide-dependent methanol oxidation system, distinct from the MxaFI and XoxF MeDHs, that may aid in classifying additional environmental organisms as methylotrophs. Further

  16. Arginase inhibition reduces interleukin-1β-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by increasing nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeongyeon; Ryoo, Sungwoo, E-mail: ryoosw08@kangwon.ac.kr

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Arginase inhibition suppressed proliferation of IL-1β-stimulated VSMCs in dose-dependent manner. •NO production from IL-1β-induced iNOS expression was augmented by arginase inhibition, reducing VSMC proliferation. •Incubation with cGMP analogues abolished IL-1β-dependent proliferation of VSMCs. -- Abstract: We investigated whether arginase inhibition suppressed interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible mechanisms involved. IL-1β stimulation increased VSMC proliferation, while the arginase inhibitor BEC and transfection of the antisense (AS) oligonucleotide against arginase I decreased VSMC proliferation and was associated with increased protein content of the cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1. IL-1β incubation induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect arginase I and II expression. Consistent with this data, IL-1β stimulation resulted in increase in NO production that was significantly augmented by arginase inhibition. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W abolished IL-1β-mediated NO production and further accentuated IL-1β-stimulated cell proliferation. Incubation with NO donors GSNO and DETA/NO in the presence of IL-1β abolished VSMCs proliferation and increased p21Waf1/Cip1 protein content. Furthermore, incubation with the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP prevented IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation. In conclusion, arginase inhibition augmented iNOS-dependent NO production that resulted in suppression of IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner.

  17. Arginase inhibition reduces interleukin-1β-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by increasing nitric oxide synthase-dependent nitric oxide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jeongyeon; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Arginase inhibition suppressed proliferation of IL-1β-stimulated VSMCs in dose-dependent manner. •NO production from IL-1β-induced iNOS expression was augmented by arginase inhibition, reducing VSMC proliferation. •Incubation with cGMP analogues abolished IL-1β-dependent proliferation of VSMCs. -- Abstract: We investigated whether arginase inhibition suppressed interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the possible mechanisms involved. IL-1β stimulation increased VSMC proliferation, while the arginase inhibitor BEC and transfection of the antisense (AS) oligonucleotide against arginase I decreased VSMC proliferation and was associated with increased protein content of the cell cycle regulator p21Waf1/Cip1. IL-1β incubation induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner, but did not affect arginase I and II expression. Consistent with this data, IL-1β stimulation resulted in increase in NO production that was significantly augmented by arginase inhibition. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W abolished IL-1β-mediated NO production and further accentuated IL-1β-stimulated cell proliferation. Incubation with NO donors GSNO and DETA/NO in the presence of IL-1β abolished VSMCs proliferation and increased p21Waf1/Cip1 protein content. Furthermore, incubation with the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP prevented IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation. In conclusion, arginase inhibition augmented iNOS-dependent NO production that resulted in suppression of IL-1β-induced VSMCs proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner

  18. Charge Distribution Dependent Spectral Analysis of the Oxidized Diferrocenyl-Oligothienylene-Vinylene Molecular Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lixin; Wang, Jing; Ma, Caiqing; Wu, Shiwei; Song, Peng

    2016-10-01

    The vibrational spectra have been investigated for revealing the comprehensive structure of diferrocenyl-oligothienylene-vinylene complex, stimulated by the excellent experimental reports [group of Casado J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 12, 5675]. The IR and Raman spectra were simulated. It is found that the change of charge distribution and bond length are associated with the variation in the frequencies of specific vibration in infrared spectra for the neutral and radical oxidation states. The theoretical simulation of charge difference density indicate that charge transfer mechanism for neutral and dication states are significant different. The results can offer hints for the rational design of novel and interesting oligomer semiconductor.

  19. Structure, temperature and frequency dependent electrical conductivity of oxidized and reduced electrochemically exfoliated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoń, Adrian; Włodarczyk, Patryk; Łukowiec, Dariusz

    2018-05-01

    The article presents the influence of reduction by hydrogen in statu nascendi and modification by hydrogen peroxide on the structure and electrical conductivity of electrochemically exfoliated graphite. It was confirmed that the electrochemical exfoliation can be used to produce oxidized nanographite with an average number of 25 graphene layers. The modified electrochemical exfoliated graphite and reduced electrochemical exfoliated graphite were characterized by high thermal stability, what was associated with removing of labile oxygen-containing groups. The presence of oxygen-containing groups was confirmed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Influence of chemical modification by hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide on the electrical conductivity was determined in wide frequency (0.1 Hz-10 kHz) and temperature range (-50 °C-100 °C). Material modified by hydrogen peroxide (0.29 mS/cm at 0 °C) had the lowest electrical conductivity. This can be associated with oxidation of unstable functional groups and was also confirmed by analysis of Raman spectra. The removal of oxygen-containing functional groups by hydrogen in statu nascendi resulted in a 1000-fold increase in the electrical conductivity compared to the electrochemical exfoliated graphite.

  20. Dose-dependent effects of caffeine in human Sertoli cells metabolism and oxidative profile: relevance for male fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Tânia R; Alves, Marco G; Bernardino, Raquel L; Martins, Ana D; Moreira, Ana C; Silva, Joaquina; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário; Silva, Branca M; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2015-02-03

    Caffeine is a widely consumed substance present in several beverages. There is an increasing consumption of energetic drinks, rich in caffeine, among young individuals in reproductive age. Caffeine has been described as a modulator of cellular metabolism. Hence, we hypothesized that it alters human Sertoli cells (hSCs) metabolism and oxidative profile, which are essential for spermatogenesis. For that purpose, hSCs were cultured with increasing doses of caffeine (5, 50, 500 μM). Caffeine at the lowest concentrations (5 and 50 μM) stimulated lactate production, but only hSCs exposed to 50 μM showed increased expression of glucose transporters (GLUTs). At the highest concentration (500 μM), caffeine stimulated LDH activity to sustain lactate production. Notably, the antioxidant capacity of hSCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner and SCs exposed to 500 μM caffeine presented a pro-oxidant potential, with a concurrent increase of protein oxidative damage. Hence, moderate consumption of caffeine appears to be safe to male reproductive health since it stimulates lactate production by SCs, which can promote germ cells survival. Nevertheless, caution should be taken by heavy consumers of energetic beverages and food supplemented with caffeine to avoid deleterious effects in hSCs functioning and thus, abnormal spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria in two Qinghai-Tibetan saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hongchen; Wu, Geng; Hou, Weiguo; Sun, Yongjuan; Lai, Zhongping; Dong, Hailiang

    2012-12-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing (n-damo) bacteria and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are two groups of microorganisms involved in global carbon and nitrogen cycling. In order to test whether the n-damo and anammox bacteria co-occur in natural saline environments, the DNA and cDNA samples obtained from the surficial sediments of two saline lakes (with salinity of 32 and 84 g/L, respectively) on the Tibetan Plateau were PCR-amplified with the use of anammox- and n-damo-specific primer sets, followed by clone library construction and phylogenetic analysis. DNA and cDNA-based clones affiliated with n-damo and anammox bacteria were successfully retrieved from the two samples, indicating that these two groups of bacteria can co-occur in natural saline environments with salinity as high as 84 g/L. Our finding has great implications for our understanding of the global carbon and nitrogen cycle in nature.

  2. Rat liver microsomal cytochrome P450-dependent oxidation of 3,5-disubstituted analogues of paracetamol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessems, J.G.M.; Koppele, J.M. te; Dijk, P.A. van; Stee, L.L.P. van; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cytochrome P450-dependent binding of paracetamol and a series of 3,5-disubstituted paracetamol analogues (R = -F, -Cl, -Br, -I, -C(H)3, -C2H5, -iC3H7) have been determined with β-naphthoflavone (βNF)-induced rat liver microsomes and produced reverse type I spectral changes. K(s,app) varied

  3. Oxidative burst-dependent NETosis is implicated in the resolution of necrosis-associated sterile inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Helena Biermann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Necrosis is associated with a profound inflammatory response. The regulation of necrosis-associated inflammation, particularly the mechanisms responsible for resolution of inflammation are incompletely characterized. Nanoparticles are known to induce plasma membrane damage and necrosis followed by sterile inflammation. We observed that injection of metabolically inert nanodiamonds resulted in paw edema in WT and Ncf1** mice. However, while inflammation quickly resolved in WT mice, it persisted over several weeks in Ncf1** mice indicating failure of resolution of inflammation. Mechanistically, NOX2-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS production and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs were essential for the resolution of necrosis-induced inflammation: Hence, by evaluating the fate of the particles at the site of inflammation, we observed that Ncf1** mice deficient in NADPH-dependent ROS failed to generate granulation tissue therefore being unable to trap the nanodiamonds. These data suggest that NOX2-dependent NETosis is crucial for preventing the chronification of the inflammatory response to tissue necrosis by forming NETosis-dependent barriers between the necrotic and healthy surrounding tissue.

  4. Size-Dependent Accumulation of PEGylated Silane-Coated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Murine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, T.; Wittenborn, T.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) can be used as contrast-enhancing agents to visualize tumors by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we describe an easy synthesis method of magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and demonstrate size-dependent accumulation in murine tumors fol...

  5. Interfacing BiVO4with Reduced Graphene Oxide for Enhanced Photoactivity: A Tale of Facet Dependence of Electron Shuttling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui Ling; Tahini, Hassan A; Wen, Xiaoming; Wong, Roong Jien; Tan, Xin; Iwase, Akihide; Kudo, Akihiko; Amal, Rose; Smith, Sean C; Ng, Yun Hau

    2016-10-01

    Efficient interfacial charge transfer is essential in graphene-based semiconductors to realize their superior photoactivity. However, little is known about the factors (for example, semiconductor morphology) governing the charge interaction. Here, it is demonstrated that the electron transfer efficacy in reduced graphene oxide-bismuth oxide (RGO/BiVO 4 ) composite is improved as the relative exposure extent of {010}/{110} facets on BiVO 4 increases, indicated by the greater extent of photocurrent enhancement. The dependence of charge transfer ability on the exposure degree of {010} relative to {110} is revealed to arise due to the difference in electronic structures of the graphene/BiVO 4 {010} and graphene/BiVO 4 {110} interfaces, as evidenced by the density functional theory calculations. The former interface is found to be metallic with higher binding energy and smaller Schottky barrier than that of the latter semiconducting interface. The facet-dependent charge interaction elucidated in this study provides new aspect for design of graphene-based semiconductor photocatalyst useful in manifold applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Taurine inhibits 2,5-hexanedione-induced oxidative stress and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuangyue; Guan, Huai; Qian, Zhiqiang; Sun, Yijie; Gao, Chenxue; Li, Guixin; Yang, Yi; Piao, Fengyuan; Hu, Shuhai

    2017-04-07

    2,5-hexanedione (HD) is the ultimate neurotoxic metabolite of hexane, causing the progression of nerve diseases in human. It was reported that HD induced apoptosis and oxidative stress. Taurine has been shown to be a potent antioxidant. In the present study, we investigated the protection of taurine against HD-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells and the underlying mechanism. Our results showed the decreased viability and increased apoptosis in HD-exposed PC12 cells. HD also induced the disturbance of Bax and Bcl-2 expression, the loss of MMP, the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and caspase-3 activation in PC12 cells. Moreover, HD resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and a decline in the activities of superoxidedismutase and catalase in PC12 cells. However, taurine pretreatment ameliorated the increased apoptosis and the alterations in key regulators of mitochondria-dependent pathway in PC12 exposed to HD. The increased ROS level and the decreased activities of the antioxidant enzymes in HD group were attenuated by taurine. These results indicate that pretreatment of taurine may, at least partly, prevent HD-induced apoptosis via inhibiting mitochondria-dependent pathway. It is also suggested that the potential of taurine against HD-induced apoptosis may benefit from its anti-oxidative property.

  7. Redox signaling via oxidative inactivation of PTEN modulates pressure-dependent myogenic tone in rat middle cerebral arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debebe Gebremedhin

    Full Text Available The present study examined the level of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and roles of inactivation of the phosphatase PTEN and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in response to an increase in intramural pressure-induced myogenic cerebral arterial constriction. Step increases in intraluminal pressure of cannulated cerebral arteries induced myogenic constriction and concomitant formation of superoxide (O2 (.- and its dismutation product hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as determined by fluorescent HPLC analysis, microscopic analysis of intensity of dihydroethidium fluorescence and attenuation of pressure-induced myogenic constriction by pretreatment with the ROS scavenger 4,hydroxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine1-oxyl (tempol or Mito-tempol or MitoQ in the presence or absence of PEG-catalase. An increase in intraluminal pressure induced oxidation of PTEN and activation of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous PTEN activity potentiated pressure-dependent myogenic constriction and caused a reduction in NPo of a 238 pS arterial KCa channel current and an increase in [Ca(2+]i level in freshly isolated cerebral arterial muscle cells (CAMCs, responses that were attenuated by Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings demonstrate an increase in intraluminal pressure induced increase in ROS production triggered redox-sensitive signaling mechanism emanating from the cross-talk between oxidative inactivation of PTEN and activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that involves in the regulation of pressure-dependent myogenic cerebral arterial constriction.

  8. Pronounced Size Dependence in Structure and Morphology of Gas-Phase Produced, Partially Oxidized Cobalt Nanoparticles under Catalytic Reaction Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartling, Stephan; Yin, Chunrong; Barke, Ingo; Oldenburg, Kevin; Hartmann, Hannes; von Oeynhausen, Viola; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Houben, Kelly; Tyo, Eric C.; Seifert, Sönke; Lievens, Peter; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Vajda, Stefan

    2015-06-23

    It is generally accepted that optimal particle sizes are key for efficient nanocatalysis. Much less attention is paid to the role of morphology and atomic arrangement during catalytic reactions. Here we unravel the structural, stoichiometric, and morphological evolution of gas-phase produced cobalt nanoparticles in a broad size range. Particles with diameters between 1.4 nm and 22nm generated in cluster sources are size selected and deposited on amorphous alumina (Al2O3) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films. A combination of different techniques is employed to monitor particle properties at the stages of production, exposure to ambient conditions, and catalytic reaction, in this case the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane at elevated temperatures. A pronounced size dependence is found, naturally classifying the particles into three size regimes. While small and intermediate clusters essentially retain their compact morphology, large particles transform into hollow spheres due to the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. Depending on the substrate an isotropic (Al2O3) or anisotropic (UNCD) Kirkendall effect is observed. The latter results in dramatic lateral size changes. Our results shed light on the interplay between chemical reactions and the catalyst's structure and provide an approach to tailor the cobalt oxide phase composition required for specific catalytic schemes.

  9. Curcumin attenuates oxidative stress induced NFκB mediated inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum dependent apoptosis of splenocytes in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Chowdhury, Sayantani; Ghosh, Sumit; Sil, Parames C

    2017-11-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the curative role of curcumin against diabetes induced oxidative stress and its associated splenic complications. Diabetes was induced in the experimental rats via the intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of STZ (65mgkg -1 body weight). Increased blood glucose and intracellular ROS levels along with decreased body weight, the activity of cellular antioxidant enzymes and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in the diabetic animals. Histological assessment showed white pulp depletion and damaged spleen anatomy in these animals. Oral administration of curcumin at a dose of 100mgkg -1 body weight daily for 8weeks, however, restored these alterations. Investigation of the mechanism of hyperglycemia induced oxidative stress mediated inflammation showed upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules and increased translocation of NFκB into the nucleus. Moreover, ER stress dependent cell death showed induction of eIF2α and CHOP mediated signalling pathways as well as increment in the expression of GRP78, Caspase-12, Calpain-1, phospho JNK, phospho p38 and phospho p53 in the diabetic group. Alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio; disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-C from mitochondria and upregulation of caspase 3 along with the formation of characteristic DNA ladder in the diabetic animals suggest the involvement of mitochondria dependent apoptotic pathway in the splenic cells. Treatment with curcumin could, however, protect cells from inflammatory damage and ER as well as mitochondrial apoptotic death by restoring the alterations of these parameters. Our results suggest that curcumin has the potential to act as an anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic therapeutic against diabetes mediated splenic damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystal orientation dependent thermoelectric properties of highly oriented aluminum-doped zinc oxide thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Abutaha, Anas I.

    2013-02-06

    We demonstrate that the thermoelectric properties of highly oriented Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films can be improved by controlling their crystal orientation. The crystal orientation of the AZO films was changed by changing the temperature of the laser deposition process on LaAlO3 (100) substrates. The change in surface termination of the LaAlO3 substrate with temperature induces a change in AZO film orientation. The anisotropic nature of electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the AZO films showed a favored thermoelectric performance in c-axis oriented films. These films gave the highest power factor of 0.26 W m−1 K−1 at 740 K.

  11. Oxidation of intramyocellular lipids is dependent on mitochondrial function and the availability of extracellular fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corpeleijn, Eva; Hessvik, Nina P; Bakke, Siril S

    2010-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are related to both enlarged intramyocellular triacylglycerol stores and accumulation of lipid intermediates. We investigated how lipid overflow can change the oxidation of intramyocellular lipids (ICL(OX)) and intramyocellular lipid storage (ICL). These experiments...... microM) reduced ICL(OX) by 37%. No differences in total lipolysis were observed between low and high OA availability. Uncoupling with FCCP restored ICL(OX) to basal levels during high OA availability. Mitochondrial mass was positively related to ICL(OX), but only in myotubes from lean individuals....... In all, a lower mitochondrial mass and lower ICL(OX) were related to a higher cell-associated OA accumulation. Second, myotubes established from obese T2D individuals showed reduced ICL(OX). ICL(OX) remained lower during uncoupling (P

  12. Free volume dependence on electrical properties of Poly (styrene co-acrylonitrile)/Nickel oxide polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningaraju, S.; Hegde, Vinayakaprasanna N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    Polymer nanocomposites of Poly (styrene co-acrylonitrile)/Nickel Oxide (PSAN/NiO) have been prepared. The increased free volume sizes up to 0.4 wt% of NiO loading indicates overall reduction in packing density of polymer network. The decreased o-Ps lifetime (τ3) at higher concentration of NiO indicates improved interfacial interaction between the surface of NiO nanoparticles and side chain of PSAN polymer matrix. The increased AC/DC conductivity at lower wt% of NiO loading demonstrates increased number of electric charge carriers/mobile ions and their mobility. The increased dielectric constant and dielectric loss up to 0.4 wt% of NiO loading suggests the increased dipoles polarization.

  13. Controlled graphene oxide assembly on silver nanocube monolayers for SERS detection: dependence on nanocube packing procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Banchelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid graphene oxide/silver nanocubes (GO/AgNCs arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS applications were prepared by means of two procedures differing for the method used in the assembly of the silver nanocubes onto the surface: Langmuir–Blodgett (LB transfer and direct sequential physisorption of silver nanocubes (AgNCs. Adsorption of graphene oxide (GO flakes on the AgNC assemblies obtained with both procedures was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM technique as a function of GO bulk concentration. The experiment provided values of the adsorbed GO mass on the AgNC array and the GO saturation limit as well as the thickness and the viscoelastic properties of the GO film. Atomic force microscopy (AFM measurements of the resulting samples revealed that a similar surface coverage was achieved with both procedures but with a different distribution of silver nanoparticles. In the GO covered LB film, the AgNC distribution is characterized by densely packed regions alternating with empty surface areas. On the other hand, AgNCs are more homogeneously dispersed over the entire sensor surface when the nanocubes spontaneously adsorb from solution. In this case, the assembly results in less-packed silver nanostructures with higher inter-cube distance. For the two assembled substrates, AFM of silver nanocubes layers fully covered with GO revealed the presence of a homogeneous, flexible and smooth GO sheet folding over the silver nanocubes and extending onto the bare surface. Preliminary SERS experiments on adenine showed a higher SERS enhancement factor for GO on Langmuir–Blodgett films of AgNCs with respect to bare AgNC systems. Conversely, poor SERS enhancement for adenine resulted for GO-covered AgNCs obtained by spontaneous adsorption. This indicated that the assembly and packing of AgNCs obtained in this way, although more homogeneous over the substrate surface, is not as effective for SERS analysis.

  14. Orthorhombic Ti2O3: A Polymorph-Dependent Narrow-Bandgap Ferromagnetic Oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yangyang

    2017-12-16

    Magnetic semiconductors are highly sought in spintronics, which allow not only the control of charge carriers like in traditional electronics, but also the control of spin states. However, almost all known magnetic semiconductors are featured with bandgaps larger than 1 eV, which limits their applications in long-wavelength regimes. In this work, the discovery of orthorhombic-structured Ti2O3 films is reported as a unique narrow-bandgap (≈0.1 eV) ferromagnetic oxide semiconductor. In contrast, the well-known corundum-structured Ti2O3 polymorph has an antiferromagnetic ground state. This comprehensive study on epitaxial Ti2O3 thin films reveals strong correlations between structure, electrical, and magnetic properties. The new orthorhombic Ti2O3 polymorph is found to be n-type with a very high electron concentration, while the bulk-type trigonal-structured Ti2O3 is p-type. More interestingly, in contrast to the antiferromagnetic ground state of trigonal bulk Ti2O3, unexpected ferromagnetism with a transition temperature well above room temperature is observed in the orthorhombic Ti2O3, which is confirmed by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements. Using first-principles calculations, the ferromagnetism is attributed to a particular type of oxygen vacancies in the orthorhombic Ti2O3. The room-temperature ferromagnetism observed in orthorhombic-structured Ti2O3, demonstrates a new route toward controlling magnetism in epitaxial oxide films through selective stabilization of polymorph phases.

  15. β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors drive COMT-dependent pain by increasing production of nitric oxide and cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    E., Hartung Jane; P., Ciszek, Brittney; G., Nackley, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Decreased activity of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that metabolizes catecholamines, contributes to pain in humans and animals. Previously, we demonstrated that development of COMT-dependent pain is mediated by both β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors (β2-and β3ARs). Here, we investigated molecules downstream of β2-and β3ARs driving pain in animals with decreased COMT activity. Based on evidence linking their role in pain and synthesis downstream of β2- and β3AR stimulation, we hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines drive COMT-dependent pain. To test this, we measured plasma NO derivatives and cytokines in rats receiving the COMT inhibitor OR486 in the presence or absence of the β2AR antagonist ICI118,551 + β3AR antagonist SR59320A. We also assessed if the NO synthase inhibitor L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and cytokine neutralizing antibodies block the development of COMT-dependent pain. Results showed that animals receiving OR486 exhibited higher levels of NO derivatives, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in a β2-and β3AR-dependent manner. Additionally, inhibition of NO synthases and neutralization of the innate immunity cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 blocked the development of COMT-dependent pain. Finally, we found that NO influences TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL2 levels, while TNFα and IL-6 influence NO levels. Altogether, these results demonstrate that β2- and β3ARs contribute to COMT-dependent pain, at least partly, by increasing NO and cytokines. Furthermore, they identify β2- and β3ARs, NO, and pro-inflammatory cytokines as potential therapeutic targets for pain patients with abnormalities in COMT physiology. PMID:24727346

  16. Temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of chemically derived gallium zinc oxide thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Barasheed, Abeer Z.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of sol-gel prepared ZnO and 3% Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) thin films have been explored. The power factor of GZO films, as compared to ZnO, is improved by nearly 17% at high temperature. A stabilization anneal, prior to thermoelectric measurements, in a strongly reducing Ar/H2 (95/5) atmosphere at 500°C was found to effectively stabilize the chemically derived films, practically eliminating hysteresis during thermoelectric measurements. Subtle changes in the thermoelectric properties of stabilized films have been correlated to oxygen vacancies and excitonic levels that are known to exist in ZnO-based thin films. The role of Ga dopants and defects, formed upon annealing, in driving the observed complex temperature dependence of the thermoelectric properties is discussed. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  17. Seasonal cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products, dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols in fine and coarse air particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-08-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse air particulate matter (PM) collected over a period of one year in central Europe (Mainz, Germany) were analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs), including the α- and β-pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA), as well as a variety of dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features in fine, coarse, and total PM (TSP) are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks in comparison to data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid and phthalic acid to azelaic acid indicate that the investigated aerosol samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. A strong Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature (R2 = 0.79, n = 52, Ea = 126 ± 10 kJ mol-1, temperature range 275-300 K). Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence observed for 3-MBTCA can be explained by enhanced photochemical production due to an increase of hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration with increasing temperature, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. The results indicate that the OH-initiated oxidation of pinonic acid is the rate-limiting step in the formation of 3-MBTCA, and that 3-MBTCA may be a suitable tracer for the chemical aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by OH radicals. An Arrhenius-type temperature dependence was also observed for the concentration of pinic acid (R2 = 0.60, n = 56, Ea = 84 ± 9 kJ mol-1); it can be tentatively explained by the temperature dependence of biogenic pinene emission as the rate-limiting step of pinic acid formation.

  18. Sex-Dependent Depression-Like Behavior Induced by Respiratory Administration of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine aluminum oxide, which are abundant in ambient and involved occupational environments, are associated with neurobehavioral alterations. However, few studies have focused on the effect of sex differences following exposure to environmental Al2O3 ultrafine particles. In the present study, male and female mice were exposed to Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs through a respiratory route. Only the female mice showed depression-like behavior. Although no obvious pathological changes were observed in mice brain tissues, the neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion channel related gene expression, as well as the small molecule metabolites in the cerebral cortex, were differentially modulated between male and female mice. Both mental disorder-involved gene expression levels and metabolomics analysis results strongly suggested that glutamate pathways were implicated in sex differentiation induced by Al2O3 NPs. Results demonstrated the potential mechanism of environmental ultrafine particle-induced depression-like behavior and the importance of sex dimorphism in the toxic research of environmental chemicals.

  19. Surface ligand dependent toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles in HepG2 cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartczak, D; Baradez, M-O; Merson, S; Goenaga-Infante, H; Marshall, D

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NP) strongly affect their influence on cell behaviour, but can be significantly distorted by interactions with the proteins present in biological solutions. In this study we show how different surface functionalities of zinc oxide (ZnO) NP lead to changes in the size distribution and dissolution of the NP in serum containing cell culture media and how this impacts on NP toxicity. NPs capped with weakly bound large proteins undergo substantial transformations due to the exchange of the original surface ligands to the components of the cell culture media. Conversely, NP capped with a tight monolayer of small organic molecules or with covalently conjugated proteins show significantly higher stability. These differences in ligand exchange also affect the toxicity of the NP to the HepG2 liver cell model, with the NP capped with small organic molecules being more toxic than those capped with large proteins. This study highlights the importance of characterising NPs in biological media and the effect the media has during in-vitro analysis.

  20. Pressure-Dependent Electronic and Transport Properties of Bulk Platinum Oxide by Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Nekrasov, Kirill A.; Kichigina, Natalia V.

    2018-02-01

    The structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of bulk platinum oxide (PtO) at compressive pressures in the interval from 0 GPa to 35 GPa are investigated using the density functional theory. The calculated electronic band structure of PtO shows poor metallicity at very low density of states on the Fermi level. However, the hybrid pseudopotential calculation yielded 0.78 eV and 1.30 eV direct band and indirect gap, respectively. Importantly, our results predict that PtO has a direct band gap within the framework of HSE06, and it prefers equally zero magnetic order at different pressures. In the Raman spectra, peaks are slightly shifted towards higher frequency with the decrease in pressure. We have also calculated the thermoelectric properties, namely the electronic thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, with respect to temperature and thermodynamic properties such as entropy, specific heat at constant volume, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy with respect to pressure. The result shows that PtO is a promising candidate for use as a catalyst, in sensors, as a photo-cathode in water electrolysis, for thermal decomposition of inorganic salt and fuel cells.

  1. Size and time dependences of the valence states of Sn ions in amphoteric tin oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunekawa, S.; Kang, J.; Asami, K.; Kawazoe, Y.; Kasuya, A.

    2002-01-01

    Sn 3d core-level spectra are measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for nearly monodisperse acidic and alkaline SnO 2-x nanoparticles in the size range 3-4 nm (original) and 1.5-2.5 nm (ultrafiltrated) in diameter. The comparison between the spectra obtained from the acidic and alkaline filtrated samples reveals that the difference is small after a few days but very large after 3 months. The acidic samples show little change in the peak positions and the Sn valence remains around 2.9. The alkaline samples exhibit an increase in the binding energy of more than 0.1 eV and the Sn valence increases up to 3.60 after 3 months. The fact that the lattice strain and the valence change of the Sn ions in the alkaline samples are larger than those in the acidic samples is well explained by surface coating and structure, in which the tin oxalate in the acidic samples is much more stable than the ammonium tin oxide in the alkaline samples

  2. Size and time dependences of the valence states of Sn ions in amphoteric tin oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunekawa, S.; Kang, J.; Asami, K.; Kawazoe, Y.; Kasuya, A.

    2002-11-01

    Sn 3d core-level spectra are measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for nearly monodisperse acidic and alkaline SnO 2- x nanoparticles in the size range 3-4 nm (original) and 1.5-2.5 nm (ultrafiltrated) in diameter. The comparison between the spectra obtained from the acidic and alkaline filtrated samples reveals that the difference is small after a few days but very large after 3 months. The acidic samples show little change in the peak positions and the Sn valence remains around 2.9. The alkaline samples exhibit an increase in the binding energy of more than 0.1 eV and the Sn valence increases up to 3.60 after 3 months. The fact that the lattice strain and the valence change of the Sn ions in the alkaline samples are larger than those in the acidic samples is well explained by surface coating and structure, in which the tin oxalate in the acidic samples is much more stable than the ammonium tin oxide in the alkaline samples.

  3. Surface ligand dependent toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles in HepG2 cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, D.; Baradez, M.-O.; Merson, S.; Goenaga-Infante, H.; Marshall, D.

    2013-04-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NP) strongly affect their influence on cell behaviour, but can be significantly distorted by interactions with the proteins present in biological solutions. In this study we show how different surface functionalities of zinc oxide (ZnO) NP lead to changes in the size distribution and dissolution of the NP in serum containing cell culture media and how this impacts on NP toxicity. NPs capped with weakly bound large proteins undergo substantial transformations due to the exchange of the original surface ligands to the components of the cell culture media. Conversely, NP capped with a tight monolayer of small organic molecules or with covalently conjugated proteins show significantly higher stability. These differences in ligand exchange also affect the toxicity of the NP to the HepG2 liver cell model, with the NP capped with small organic molecules being more toxic than those capped with large proteins. This study highlights the importance of characterising NPs in biological media and the effect the media has during in-vitro analysis.

  4. Lack of K-Dependent Oxidative Stress in Cotton Roots Following Coronatine-Induced ROS Accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Zhang

    Full Text Available Coronatine [COR] is a novel type of plant growth regulator with similarities in structure and property to jasmonate. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between increased root vitality induced by 10 nM COR and reactive oxygen species scavenging under potassium (K-replete (2.5 mM and K-deficient (0.05 mM conditions in hydroponic cultured cotton seedlings. K-replete and K-deficient conditions increased root vitality by 2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively. COR treatment significantly decreased lipid peroxidation in cotton seedlings determined by reduction in MDA levels. These results suggest that COR improves the functioning of both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Under K-replete and K-deficient conditions, COR significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD (only for K-repletion, CAT, GPX, and APX comparing; COR also significantly increased DPPH-radical scavenging activity. However, COR led to 1.6- and 1.7-fold increases in superoxide anion (O2•- concentrations, and 5.7- and 2.1-fold increases in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 levels, respectively. Additionally, COR intensified the DAB staining of H2O2 and the NBT staining of O2•-. Therefore, our results reveal that COR-induced ROS accumulation stimulates the activities of most antioxidant enzymes but does not induce oxidative stress in cotton roots.

  5. Magnetochromic sensing and size-dependent collective excitations in iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Kenneth R.; Patete, Jonathan M.; Chen, Peng; Nanavati, Ruhani; Holinsworth, Brian S.; Smith, Jacqueline M.; Marques, Carlos; Simonson, Jack W.; Aronson, Meigan C.; McGill, Stephen A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Musfeldt, Janice L.

    2017-03-01

    We combine optical and magneto-optical spectroscopies with complementary vibrational and magnetic property measurements to reveal finite length scale effects in nanoscale α -Fe2O3 . Analysis of the d -to-d on-site excitations uncovers enhanced color contrast at particle sizes below approximately 75 nm due to size-induced changes in spin-charge coupling that are suppressed again below the superparamagnetic limit. These findings provide a general strategy for amplifying magnetochromism in α -Fe2O3 and other iron-containing nanomaterials that may be useful for advanced sensing applications. We also unravel the size dependence of collective excitations in this iconic antiferromagnet.

  6. Novel approaches to improving endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated vasodilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Ulf; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Rosalia; Dalsgaard, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    investigated three different approaches, with the aim of correcting endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease. Thus, (1) we evaluated the effect of a cell permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol, on endothelial dysfunction in small arteries exposed to high pressure, (2) investigated...... the endothelial signal transduction pathways involved in vasorelaxation and NO release induced by an olive oil component, oleanolic acid, and (3) investigated the role of calcium-activated K channels in the release of NO induced by receptor activation. Tempol increases endothelium-dependent vasodilatation...

  7. Temperature-dependent bias-stress-induced electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui-Min; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Tang, Lan-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Liao; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The time and temperature dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias stress (PBS) and the following recovery process are investigated in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. It is found that the time dependence of threshold voltage shift can be well described by a stretched exponential equation in which the time constant τ is found to be temperature dependent. Based on Arrhenius plots, an average effective energy barrier Eτstress = 0.72 eV for the PBS process and an average effective energy barrier Eτrecovery = 0.58 eV for the recovery process are extracted respectively. A charge trapping/detrapping model is used to explain the threshold voltage shift in both the PBS and the recovery process. The influence of gate bias stress on transistor performance is one of the most critical issues for practical device development. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China

  8. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis in primary lymphocytes is associated with oxidative stress-dependent activation of caspase-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.-Y.; Chu, R.-M.; Wang, C.-C.; Lee, C.-Y.; Lin, S.-H.; Jan, T.-R.

    2008-01-01

    We recently reported that cannabidiol (CBD) exhibited a generalized suppressive effect on T-cell functional activities in splenocytes directly exposed to CBD in vitro or isolated from CBD-administered mice. To investigate the potential mechanisms of CBD effects on T cells, we characterized the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on primary lymphocytes. The apoptosis of splenocytes was markedly enhanced following CBD exposure in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as evidenced by nuclear hypodiploidity and DNA strand breaks. Exposure of splenocytes to CBD elicited an early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the peak response at 1 h post CBD treatment. In parallel with the ROS production, a gradual diminishment in the cellular glutathione (GSH) content was detected in CBD-treated splenocytes. Both CBD-mediated ROS production and GSH diminishment were remarkably attenuated by the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a thiol antioxidant. In addition, CBD treatment significantly stimulated the activation of caspase-8, which was abrogated in the presence of NAC or GSH. Pretreatment of splenocytes with a cell-permeable inhibitor for caspase-8 significantly attenuated, in a concentration-dependent manner, CBD-mediated apoptosis, but not ROS production. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the apoptotic effect of CBD in primary lymphocytes is closely associated with oxidative stress-dependent activation of caspase-8

  9. Andrographolide induces oxidative stress-dependent cell death in unicellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Dhar, Pranab; Roy, Manab; Barik, Rajib; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-12-01

    African sleeping sickness is a parasitic disease in humans and livestock caused by Trypanosoma brucei throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Absence of appropriate vaccines and prevalence of drug resistance proclaim that a new way of therapeutic interventions is essential against African trypanosomiasis. In the present study, we have looked into the effect of andrographolide (andro), a diterpenoid lactone from Andrographis paiculata on Trypanosoma brucei PRA 380. Although andro has been recognized as a promosing anti-cancer drug, its usefulness against Trypanosoma spp remained unexplored. Andro showed promising anti-trypanosomal activity with an IC 50 value of 8.3μM assessed through SYBR Green cell viability assay and also showed no cytotoxicity towards normal murine macrophages. Cell cycle analysis revealed that andro could induce sub-G 0 /G 1 phase arrest. Flow cytometric analysis also revealed that incubation with andro caused exposure of phosphatidyl serine to the outer leaflet of plasma membrane in T. brucei PCF. This event was preceded by andro-induced depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δym) and elevation of cytosolic calcium. Andro also caused elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as lipid peroxidation level, and depletion in reduced thiol levels. Taken together, these data indicate that andro has promising antitrypanosomal activity mediated by promoting oxidative stress and depolarizing the mitochondrial membrane potential and thereby triggering an apoptosis-like programmed cell death. Therefore, this study merits further investigation to the therapeutic possibility of using andro for the treatment of African trypanosomiasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Oxide Semiconductor and Channel Effect of Thin Film Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    ZTO was prepared on SiOC/ITO glass and the electrical characteristics were analyzed in accordance with the annealing temperature to research the temperature dependence and an amorphous structure. SiOC annealed at 150 °C as a gate insulator became an amorphous structure. The ZTO annealed at 150 °C had the capacitance without any variation. However, the capacitance of ZTO on SiOC annealed at 150 °C was increased due to the reduction of energy loss. ZTO/SiOC transistor was observed the ambipolar transfer characteristics with high stability and mobility in accordance with the decrement of drain voltages as a result of tunneling effect. Therefore it was obtained that the SiOC annealed at 150 °C means the highest Schottky barrier (SB) at the interface of ZTO/SiOC as the optimization parameter.

  11. Oxidative damage following cerebral ischemia depends on reperfusion - a biochemical study in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nita, D A; Nita, V; Spulber, S

    2002-01-01

    The extent of brain injury during reperfusion appears to depend on the experimental pattern of ischemia/reperfusion. The goals of this study were: first, to identify the rate of free radicals generation and the antioxidant activity during ischemia and reperfusion by means of biochemical measurement...... of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and both enzymatic (superoxide dismutase - SOD, catalase - CAT, glutathione peroxidase - GPx) and non-enzymatic antioxidants activity (glutathione - GSH); and second, to try to find out how the pattern of reperfusion may influence the balance between free radical production...... homogenate using spectrophotometrical techniques. All groups subjected to ischemia shown an increase of LPO and a reduction of the activity of enzymatic antioxidative systems (CAT, GPx, SOD) and non-enzymatic systems (GSH). For both groups subjected to ischemia and reperfusion, results shown an important...

  12. Magnetic state dependent transient lateral photovoltaic effect in patterned ferromagnetic metal-oxide-semiconductor films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidoro Martinez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of an external magnetic field on the magnitude and dephasing of the transient lateral photovoltaic effect (T-LPE in lithographically patterned Co lines of widths of a few microns grown over naturally passivated p-type Si(100. The T-LPE peak-to-peak magnitude and dephasing, measured by lock-in or through the characteristic time of laser OFF exponential relaxation, exhibit a notable influence of the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic overlayer. We show experimentally and by numerical simulations that the T-LPE magnitude is determined by the Co anisotropic magnetoresistance. On the other hand, the magnetic field dependence of the dephasing could be described by the influence of the Lorentz force acting perpendiculary to both the Co magnetization and the photocarrier drift directions. Our findings could stimulate the development of fast position sensitive detectors with magnetically tuned magnitude and phase responses.

  13. PGC1α-dependent NAD biosynthesis links oxidative metabolism to renal protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Mei T.; Zsengeller, Zsuzsanna K.; Berg, Anders H.; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Kim, Wondong; Clish, Clary B.; Stillman, Isaac E.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Rhee, Eugene P.; Parikh, Samir M.

    2016-01-01

    The energetic burden of continuously concentrating solutes against gradients along the tubule may render the kidney especially vulnerable to ischemia. Indeed, acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 3% of all hospitalized patients.1,2 Here we show that the mitochondrial biogenesis regulator, PGC1α,3,4 is a pivotal determinant of renal recovery from injury by regulating NAD biosynthesis. Following renal ischemia, PGC1α−/− mice developed local deficiency of the NAD precursor niacinamide (Nam), marked fat accumulation, and failure to re-establish normal function. Remarkably, exogenous Nam improved local NAD levels, fat accumulation, and renal function in post-ischemic PGC1α−/− mice. Inducible tubular transgenic mice (iNephPGC1α) recapitulated the effects of Nam supplementation, including more local NAD and less fat accumulation with better renal function after ischemia. PGC1α coordinately upregulated the enzymes that synthesize NAD de novo from amino acids whereas PGC1α deficiency or AKI attenuated the de novo pathway. Nam enhanced NAD via the enzyme NAMPT and augmented production of the fat breakdown product beta-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), leading to increased prostaglandin PGE2, a secreted autocoid that maintains renal function.5 Nam treatment reversed established ischemic AKI and also prevented AKI in an unrelated toxic model. Inhibition of β-OHB signaling or prostaglandins similarly abolished PGC1α-dependent renoprotection. Given the importance of mitochondrial health in aging and the function of metabolically active organs, the results implicate Nam and NAD as key effectors for achieving PGC1α-dependent stress resistance. PMID:26982719

  14. Fish oil and treadmill exercise have age-dependent effects on episodic memory and oxidative state of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macêdo, Patrícia Fortes Cavalcanti de; de Melo, Janatar Stella Vasconcelos; Costa, Laís Alves Ribeiro; Braz, Glauber Rudá F; de Sousa, Shirley M; Lagranha, Cláudia J; Hornsby, Manuella Batista-de-Oliveira

    2017-05-01

    There is a growing interest to better understand how lifestyle choices can improve memory functions. Treadmill exercise and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids found in fish oil are able to stimulate hippocampal antioxidant defenses and improve memory. The aim was to test whether fish oil and exercise can improve rat's performance on memory tasks and optimize hippocampal antioxidant state in an age-dependent manner. Therefore, young and adult rats were exercised and received fish oil during 4 weeks. The exercise was performed for 30 min/day, with the speed gradually increasing from the first to the last week. Afterwards, episodic memory was measured by the recognition of object identity and spatial location. Hippocampal oxidative state was investigated with the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyls content, antioxidant enzymatic activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT)), and antioxidant nonenzymatic activity (reduced glutathione, sulfhydryl content). The adult rats treated with fish oil and exercise (FO&EX) were able to recognize object's shape and placement; however, FO&EX young rats had impaired spatial recognition (p improved nonenzymatic antioxidant defense (p memory and oxidative state of the hippocampus during either neurodevelopment or adulthood.

  15. Tanshindiol C inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced macrophage foam cell formation via a peroxiredoxin 1 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuyu; Li, Xueyan; Peng, Liying; An, Lin; Sun, Ningyuan; Hu, Xuewen; Zhou, Ping; Xu, Yong; Li, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2018-03-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been shown to be protective in atherosclerosis. The loss of Nrf2 in macrophages enhances foam cell formation and promotes early atherogenesis. Tanshindiol C (Tan C) is isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge., a traditional Chinese medicine that has been used for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases for many years. This study was aimed to test the potential role of Tan C against macrophage foam cell formation and to explore the underlying mechanism. Firstly, we observed that Tan C markedly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced macrophage foam cell formation. Then, we found that Tan C was an activator of both Nrf2 and Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) in macrophages. Nrf2 and Sirt1 synergistically activated the transcription of anti-oxidant peroxiredoxin 1 (Prdx1) after Tan C treatment. More important, we demonstrated that silencing of Prdx1 promoted oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation. Prdx1 upregulated adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and decreased intracellular lipid accumulation. Furthermore, Tan C ameliorated oxLDL induced macrophage foam cell formation in a Prdx1-dependent manner. These observations suggest that Tan C protects macrophages from oxLDL induced foam cell formation via activation of Prdx1/ABCA1 signaling and that Prdx1 may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation induced by extractive solutions and fractions of Maytenus ilicifolia Mart ex Reissek (Celastraceae) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattmann, Yanna D; Cipriani, Thales R; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Iacomini, Marcello; Rieck, Lia; Marques, Maria C A; da Silva-Santos, José E

    2006-04-06

    This study reveals that an ethanolic supernatant obtained from an aqueous extractive solution prepared from residues of methanolic extracts of ground leaves of Maytenus ilicifolia is able to cause a concentration- and endothelium-dependent relaxation in pre-contract rat aorta rings, with EC(50) of 199.7 (190-210) microg/ml. The non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors l-NAME and l-NMMA abolished this effect, while superoxide dismutase and MnTBAP (a non-enzymatic superoxide dismutase mimetic) enhanced it. Further, relaxation induced by this ethanolic supernatant have been strongly inhibited by the guanylate cyclase inhibitors methylene blue and ODQ, as well as by the potassium channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium, but was unchanged by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the membrane receptor antagonists atropine, HOE-140 and pirilamine. Partition of the ethanolic supernatant between H(2)O and EtOAc generated a fraction several times more potent, able to fully relax endothelium-intact aorta rings with an EC(50) of 4.3 (3.9-4.8) microg/ml. (13)C NMR spectrum of this fraction showed signals typical of catechin. This study reveals that the leaves of M. ilicifolia possess one or more potent substances able to relax endothelium-intact rat aorta rings, an event that appears to involve nitric oxide production, guanylate cyclase activation and potassium channel opening.

  17. Melatonin protects against chromium (VI induced hepatic oxidative stress and toxicity: Duration dependent study with realistic dosage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Sudip

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to assess the degree of oxidative stress and toxic effects induced by chromium on hepatic tissue in male Wistar rats exposed to a realistic dosage of Cr(VI (20 mg/kg/b.w./day through drinking water, based on the levels of these metals found in the environment, for a duration of 15, 30 and 60 days. The protective effect of melatonin (10 mg/kg was also studied by simultaneous administration with the metal. Levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants as well as lipid peroxidation were assessed. There was a significant decrease in enzymatic as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants and an increase in the lipid peroxidation level, which were prevented and maintained at near-normal levels by the administration of melatonin in all treatment periods. Metal accumulation was maximal at 15 days, with gradual decreases till 60 days. Histopathological observations also demonstrated the fact that Cr (VI exposure leads to cytological lesions in the hepatic tissue promoting cellular necrotic/apoptotic changes, while melatonin was able to counteract insults induced by Cr (VI at all treatment periods. It also prevented alterations in insulin and glucose levels. Overall, the present study suggests a duration-dependent effect of Cr on hepatic oxidative stress and cytotoxicity and shows the potent activity of melatonin in preventing the negative effects of Cr (VI.

  18. ROS-dependent anticandidal activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles synthesized by using egg albumen as a biotemplate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoeb, M; Singh, Braj R; Khan, Javed A; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H; Singh, Brahma N; Singh, Harikesh B

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have attracted great attention because of their superior optical properties and wide application in biomedical science. However, little is known about the anticandidal activity of ZnO NPs against Candida albicans (C. albicans). This study was designed to develop the green approach to synthesize ZnO NPs using egg white (denoted as EtZnO NPs) and investigated its possible mechanism of antimicrobial activity against C. albicans 077. It was also notable that anticandidal activity of EtZnO NPs is correlated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in a dose dependent manner. Protection of histidine against ROS clearly suggests the implication of ROS in anticandidal activity of EtZnO NPs. This green approach based on egg white-mediated synthesis of ZnO NPs paves the way for developing cost effective, eco-friendly and promising antimicrobial nanomaterial for applications in medicine. (paper)

  19. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity and suppresses nitric oxide signaling in the mouse hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Christal G; Wang, Gang; Park, Laibaik; Anrather, Josef; Delagrammatikas, George J; Chan, June; Zhou, Joan; Iadecola, Costantino; Pickel, Virginia M

    2010-09-08

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a concomitant of sleep apnea that produces a slowly developing chemosensory-dependent blood pressure elevation ascribed in part to NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity and reduced nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the carotid body. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is responsive to hypoxic stress and also contains neurons that express NMDA receptors and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). We tested the hypothesis that extended (35 d) CIH results in a decrease in the surface/synaptic availability of the essential NMDA NR1 subunit in nNOS-containing neurons and NMDA-induced NO production in the PVN of mice. As compared with controls, the 35 d CIH-exposed mice showed a significant increase in blood pressure and an increased density of NR1 immunogold particles located in the cytoplasm of nNOS-containing dendrites. Neither of these between-group differences was seen after 14 d, even though there was already a reduction in the NR1 plasmalemmal density at this time point. Patch-clamp recording of PVN neurons in slices showed a significant reduction in NMDA currents after either 14 or 35 d exposure to CIH compared with sham controls. In contrast, NO production, as measured by the NO-sensitive fluorescent dye 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein, was suppressed only in the 35 d CIH group. We conclude that CIH produces a reduction in the surface/synaptic targeting of NR1 in nNOS neurons and decreases NMDA receptor-mediated currents in the PVN before the emergence of hypertension, the development of which may be enabled by suppression of NO signaling in this brain region.

  20. Arginase Inhibition Restores Peroxynitrite-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction via L-Arginine-Dependent Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Cong; Park, Jong Taek; Jeon, Yeong Gwan; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Hoe, Kwang Lae; Kim, Young Myeong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peroxynitrite plays a critical role in vascular pathophysiology by increasing arginase activity and decreasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate whether arginase inhibition and L-arginine supplement could restore peroxynitrite-induced endothelial dysfunction and determine the involved mechanism. Materials and Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with SIN-1, a peroxynitrite generator, and arginase activity, nitrite/nitrate production, and expression levels of proteins were measured. eNOS activation was evaluated via Western blot and dimer blot analysis. We also tested nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and performed a vascular tension assay. Results SIN-1 treatment increased arginase activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner and reciprocally decreased nitrite/nitrate production that was prevented by peroxynitrite scavenger in HUVECs. Furthermore, SIN-1 induced an increase in the expression level of arginase I and II, though not in eNOS protein. The decreased eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 and the increased at Thr495 by SIN-1 were restored with arginase inhibitor and L-arginine. The changed eNOS phosphorylation was consistent in the stability of eNOS dimers. SIN-1 decreased NO production and increased ROS generation in the aortic endothelium, all of which was reversed by arginase inhibitor or L-arginine. NG-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) prevented SIN-1-induced ROS generation. In the vascular tension assay, SIN-1 enhanced vasoconstrictor responses to U46619 and attenuated vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine that were reversed by arginase inhibition. Conclusion These findings may explain the beneficial effect of arginase inhibition and L-arginine supplement on endothelial dysfunction under redox imbalance-dependent pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27593859

  1. Susceptibility of β1 Na+-K+ pump subunit to glutathionylation and oxidative inhibition depends on conformational state of pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Mahmmoud, Yasser A; Hamilton, Elisha J; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Fry, Natasha A S; Figtree, Gemma A; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2012-04-06

    Glutathionylation of cysteine 46 of the β1 subunit of the Na(+)-K(+) pump causes pump inhibition. However, the crystal structure, known in a state analogous to an E2·2K(+)·P(i) configuration, indicates that the side chain of cysteine 46 is exposed to the lipid bulk phase of the membrane and not expected to be accessible to the cytosolic glutathione. We have examined whether glutathionylation depends on the conformational changes in the Na(+)-K(+) pump cycle as described by the Albers-Post scheme. We measured β1 subunit glutathionylation and function of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in membrane fragments and in ventricular myocytes. Signals for glutathionylation in Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-enriched membrane fragments suspended in solutions that preferentially induce E1ATP and E1Na(3) conformations were much larger than signals in solutions that induce the E2 conformation. Ouabain further reduced glutathionylation in E2 and eliminated an increase seen with exposure to the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Inhibition of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity after exposure to ONOO(-) was greater when the enzyme had been in the E1Na(3) than the E2 conformation. We exposed myocytes to different extracellular K(+) concentrations to vary the membrane potential and hence voltage-dependent conformational poise. K(+) concentrations expected to shift the poise toward E2 species reduced glutathionylation, and ouabain eliminated a ONOO(-)-induced increase. Angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibition was eliminated by conditions expected to shift the poise toward the E2 species. We conclude that susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na(+)-K(+) pump.

  2. Susceptibility of β1 Na+-K+ Pump Subunit to Glutathionylation and Oxidative Inhibition Depends on Conformational State of Pump*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Mahmmoud, Yasser A.; Hamilton, Elisha J.; Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Fry, Natasha A. S.; Figtree, Gemma A.; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J.; Rasmussen, Helge H.

    2012-01-01

    Glutathionylation of cysteine 46 of the β1 subunit of the Na+-K+ pump causes pump inhibition. However, the crystal structure, known in a state analogous to an E2·2K+·Pi configuration, indicates that the side chain of cysteine 46 is exposed to the lipid bulk phase of the membrane and not expected to be accessible to the cytosolic glutathione. We have examined whether glutathionylation depends on the conformational changes in the Na+-K+ pump cycle as described by the Albers-Post scheme. We measured β1 subunit glutathionylation and function of Na+-K+-ATPase in membrane fragments and in ventricular myocytes. Signals for glutathionylation in Na+-K+-ATPase-enriched membrane fragments suspended in solutions that preferentially induce E1ATP and E1Na3 conformations were much larger than signals in solutions that induce the E2 conformation. Ouabain further reduced glutathionylation in E2 and eliminated an increase seen with exposure to the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase activity after exposure to ONOO− was greater when the enzyme had been in the E1Na3 than the E2 conformation. We exposed myocytes to different extracellular K+ concentrations to vary the membrane potential and hence voltage-dependent conformational poise. K+ concentrations expected to shift the poise toward E2 species reduced glutathionylation, and ouabain eliminated a ONOO−-induced increase. Angiotensin II-induced NADPH oxidase-dependent Na+-K+ pump inhibition was eliminated by conditions expected to shift the poise toward the E2 species. We conclude that susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na+-K+ pump. PMID:22354969

  3. Modeling of pulsatile flow-dependent nitric oxide regulation in a realistic microvascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruofan; Pan, Qing; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Li, John K-J; Pries, Axel R; Ning, Gangmin

    2017-09-01

    Hemodynamic pulsatility has been reported to regulate microcirculatory function. To quantitatively assess the impact of flow pulsatility on the microvasculature, a mathematical model was first developed to simulate the regulation of NO production by pulsatile flow in the microcirculation. Shear stress and pressure pulsatility were selected as regulators of endothelial NO production and NO-dependent vessel dilation as feedback to control microvascular hemodynamics. The model was then applied to a real microvascular network of the rat mesentery consisting of 546 microvessels. As compared to steady flow conditions, pulsatile flow increased the average NO concentration in arterioles from 256.8±93.1nM to 274.8±101.1nM (Pflow as compared to steady flow conditions. Network perfusion and flow heterogeneity were improved under pulsatile flow conditions, and vasodilation within the network was more sensitive to heart rate changes than pulse pressure amplitude. The proposed model simulates the role of flow pulsatility in the regulation of a complex microvascular network in terms of NO concentration and hemodynamics under varied physiological conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. LET dependence of the production of oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Atsushi; Furuichi, Wataru; Inoguchi, Hiroki; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Murayama, Chieko; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2006-01-01

    Production of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in human leukemia HL-60 cells was examined upon irradiation with carbon, neon silicon ions. Cell suspension with the concentration of 1 x 10 7 /ml was irradiated tinder air-saturated condition. After irradiation cells were subjected to the DNA extraction using isopropanol, separation of DNA strands by heat treatment, digestion into nucleosides with nuclease P1 and alkaline phosphatase. A single peak of 8-OHdG on a chromatogram was observed using newly installed ECD detector (Coulochem III; ESA, Inc. U.S.A.). Reproducibility was also greatly improved with this detector. 8-OHdG yield was decreased with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) for carbon and silicon beam. These results are in good accordance with those of dG solution which was previously reported by us. Ion species dependence in 8-OHdG yield was not so apparent through the comparison of carbon and neon beam with an LET of 80 keV/μm and neon and silicon beam with an LET of 150 keV/μm. (author)

  5. The hyperaemic response to passive leg movement is dependent on nitric oxide: a new tool to evaluate endothelial nitric oxide function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Askew, Christopher D; Walker, Meegan; Nyberg, Michael; Hellsten, Ylva

    2012-01-01

    Passive leg movement is associated with a ∼3-fold increase in blood flow to the leg but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The objective of the present study was to examine the role of nitric oxide (NO) for the hyperaemia observed during passive leg movement. Leg haemodynamics and metabolites of NO production (nitrite and nitrate; NOx) were measured in plasma and muscle interstitial fluid at rest and during passive leg movement with and without inhibition of NO formation in healthy young males. The hyperaemic response to passive leg movement and to ACh was also assessed in elderly subjects and patients with peripheral artery disease. Passive leg movement (60 r.p.m.) increased leg blood flow from 0.3 ± 0.1 to 0.9 ± 0.1 litre min−1 at 20 s and 0.5 ± 0.1 litre min−1 at 3 min (P movement was performed during inhibition of NO formation (NG-mono-methyl-l-arginine; 29–52 mg min−1), leg blood flow and vascular conductance were increased after 20 s (P movement increased the femoral venous NOx levels from 35 ± 5 at baseline to 62 ± 11 μmol l−1 during passive leg movement (P movement were correlated with the vasodilatation induced by ACh (r2 = 0.704, P movement in individuals with peripheral arterial disease. These results suggest that the hypaeremia induced by passive leg movement is NO dependent and that the source of NO is likely to be the endothelium. Passive leg movement could therefore be used as a non-invasive tool to evaluate NO dependent endothelial function of the lower limb. PMID:22733658

  6. Morphology–dependent electrochemical sensing properties of manganese dioxide–graphene oxide hybrid for guaiacol and vanillin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Tian; Shi, Zhaoxia; Deng, Yaping; Sun, Junyong; Wang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • MnO 2 with different morphologies were prepared via facile methods. • MnO 2 are loaded on GO via simply grinding which have high solubility and stability. • MnO 2 –GO exhibit high electrocatalytic activities depending on their shapes. • MnO 2 –GO is first used to the determination of guaiacol and vanillin simultaneously. - Abstract: Various morphologies of manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) electrocatalysts, including nanoflowers, nanorods, nanotubes, nanoplates, nanowires and microspheres were prepared via facile hydrothermal synthesis and precipitation methods. By simply grinding with graphene oxide (GO), MnO 2 could be readily dissolved in water with high solubility and stability. The structures and electrochemical performances of these as–prepared MnO 2 –GO hybrids were fully characterized by various techniques, and the properties were found to be strongly dependent on morphology. As sensing materials for the simultaneous determination of guaiacol and vanillin for the first time, the nanoflowers–like MnO 2 , coupled with GO, exhibited relatively high sensitivity. The enhanced electrocatalytic activity was ascribed to the high purity, good crystallinity, and unique porous microstructure, which were favorable for transfer of electrons. These results may provide valuable insights for the development of nanostructured modified electrodes for next–generation high–performance electrochemical sensors

  7. Constitutive arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in different organs of pea seedlings during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Carreras, Alfonso; Valderrama, Raquel; Palma, José M; León, Ana M; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A

    2006-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signalling molecule in different animal and plant physiological processes. Little is known about its biological function in plants and on the enzymatic source or site of NO production during plant development. The endogenous NO production from L-arginine (NO synthase activity) was analyzed in leaves, stems and roots during plant development, using pea seedlings as a model. NOS activity was analyzed using a novel chemiluminescence-based assay which is more sensitive and specific than previous methods used in plant tissues. In parallel, NO accumulation was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using as fluorescent probes either DAF-2 DA or DAF-FM DA. A strong increase in NOS activity was detected in stems after 11 days growth, coinciding with the maximum stem elongation. The arginine-dependent NOS activity was constitutive and sensitive to aminoguanidine, a well-known irreversible inhibitor of animal NOS, and this NOS activity was differentially modulated depending on the plant organ and seedling developmental stage. In all tissues studied, NO was localized mainly in the vascular tissue (xylem) and epidermal cells and in root hairs. These loci of NO generation and accumulation suggest novel functions for NO in these cell types.

  8. Contribution of nitric oxide synthase to luminol-dependent chemiluminescence generated by phorbol-ester-activated Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J F; Komarov, P; Sies, H; de Groot, H

    1991-01-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced luminol chemiluminescence in rat Kupffer cells was doubled by the addition of L-arginine and significantly (up to 70%) inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine and NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, competitive inhibitors of L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide (NO) formation. The release of superoxide anion (O2-) by NADPH oxidase was neither affected by L-arginine nor by the inhibitors. Only very slight luminol chemiluminescence was detectable in lipopolysaccharide-pretreated Kupffer cells, a condition in which significant amounts of NO were formed but no O2-. In a cell-free system, significant luminol chemiluminescence only occurred when both authentic NO and the O2-/H2O2- generating system xanthine/xanthine oxidase were present. The results indicate that luminol chemiluminescence in phorbol-ester-activated Kupffer cells largely depends on L-arginine metabolism by NO synthase, requiring the concurrent formation of NO and O2-/H2O2. PMID:1718262

  9. Mechanism for excitation-dependent photoluminescence from graphene quantum dots and other graphene oxide derivates: consensus, debates and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhixing; Xu, Hao; Hao, Yanling

    2016-04-01

    Luminescent nanomaterials, with wide applications in biosensing, bioimaging, illumination and display techniques, have been consistently garnering enormous research attention. In particular, those with wavelength-controllable emissions could be highly beneficial. Carbon nanostructures, including graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and other graphene oxide derivates (GODs), with excitation-dependent photoluminescence (PL), which means their fluorescence color could be tuned simply by changing the excitation wavelength, have attracted lots of interest. However the intrinsic mechanism for the excitation-dependent PL is still obscure and fiercely debated presently. In this review, we attempt to summarize the latest efforts to explore the mechanism, including the quantum confinement effect, surface traps model, giant red-edge effect, edge states model and electronegativity of heteroatom model, as well as the newly developed synergistic model, to seek some clues to unravel the mechanism. Meanwhile the controversial difficulties for each model are further discussed. Besides this, the challenges and potential influences of the synthetic methodology and development of the materials are illustrated extensively to elicit more thought and constructive attempts toward their application.

  10. Kinetic modeling of pH-dependent antimony (V) sorption and transport in iron oxide-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yongbing; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics controlling the retention and transport of antimony (Sb) is prerequisite for evaluating the risk of groundwater contamination by the toxic element. In this study, kinetic batch and saturated miscible displacement experiments were performed to investigate effects of protonation-deprotonation reactions on sorption-desorption and transport of Sb(V) in iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS). Results clearly demonstrated that Sb(V) sorption was highly nonlinear and time dependent, where both sorption capacity and kinetic rates decreased with increasing solution pH. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained at different solution pH exhibited that mobility of Sb(V) were higher under neutral to alkaline condition than under acidic condition. Because of the nonlinear and non-equilibrium nature of Sb(V) retention and transport, multi-reaction models (MRM) with equilibrium and kinetic sorption expressions were utilized successfully to simulate the experiment data. Equilibrium distribution coefficient (Ke) and reversible kinetic retention parameters (k1 and k2) of both kinetic sorption and transport experiment showed marked decrease as pH increased from 4.0 to 7.5. Surface complexation is suggested as the dominant mechanism for the observed pH-dependent phenomena, which need to be incorporated into the kinetic models to accurately simulate the reactive transport of Sb(V) in vadose zone and aquifers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Seasonal cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products, dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols in fine and coarse air particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Filter samples of fine and coarse air particulate matter (PM collected over a period of one year in central Europe (Mainz, Germany were analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs, including the α- and β-pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA, as well as a variety of dicarboxylic acids and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features in fine, coarse, and total PM (TSP are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks in comparison to data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid and phthalic acid to azelaic acid indicate that the investigated aerosol samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. A strong Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature (R2 = 0.79, n = 52, Ea = 126 ± 10 kJ mol−1, temperature range 275–300 K. Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence observed for 3-MBTCA can be explained by enhanced photochemical production due to an increase of hydroxyl radical (OH concentration with increasing temperature, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. The results indicate that the OH-initiated oxidation of pinonic acid is the rate-limiting step in the formation of 3-MBTCA, and that 3-MBTCA may be a suitable tracer for the chemical aging of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA by OH radicals. An Arrhenius-type temperature dependence was also observed for the concentration of pinic acid (R2 = 0.60, n = 56, Ea = 84 ± 9 kJ mol−1; it can be tentatively explained by the temperature dependence of biogenic pinene emission as the rate-limiting step of pinic acid formation.

  12. Trx2p-dependent regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidative stress response by the Skn7p transcription factor under respiring conditions.

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    Rocío Gómez-Pastor

    Full Text Available The whole genome analysis has demonstrated that wine yeasts undergo changes in promoter regions and variations in gene copy number, which make them different to lab strains and help them better adapt to stressful conditions during winemaking, where oxidative stress plays a critical role. Since cytoplasmic thioredoxin II, a small protein with thiol-disulphide oxidoreductase activity, has been seen to perform important functions under biomass propagation conditions of wine yeasts, we studied the involvement of Trx2p in the molecular regulation of the oxidative stress transcriptional response on these strains. In this study, we analyzed the expression levels of several oxidative stress-related genes regulated by either Yap1p or the co-operation between Yap1p and Skn7p. The results revealed a lowered expression for all the tested Skn7p dependent genes in a Trx2p-deficient strain and that Trx2p is essential for the oxidative stress response during respiratory metabolism in wine yeast. Additionally, activity of Yap1p and Skn7p dependent promoters by β-galactosidase assays clearly demonstrated that Skn7p-dependent promoter activation is affected by TRX2 gene deficiency. Finally we showed that deleting the TRX2 gene causes Skn7p hyperphosphorylation under oxidative stress conditions. We propose Trx2p to be a new positive efector in the regulation of the Skn7p transcription factor that controls phosphorylation events and, therefore, modulates the oxidative stress response in yeast.

  13. Oxidant-NO dependent gene regulation in dogs with type I diabetes: impact on cardiac function and metabolism

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    Ojaimi Caroline

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms responsible for the cardiovascular mortality in type I diabetes (DM have not been defined completely. We have shown in conscious dogs with DM that: 1 baseline coronary blood flow (CBF was significantly decreased, 2 endothelium-dependent (ACh coronary vasodilation was impaired, and 3 reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was selectively depressed. The most likely mechanism responsible for the depressed reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was the decreased bioactivity of NO from the vascular endothelium. The goal of this study was to investigate changes in cardiac gene expression in a canine model of alloxan-induced type 1 diabetes. Methods Mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented and the dogs were divided into two groups: one normal and the other diabetic. In the diabetic group, the dogs were injected with alloxan monohydrate (40-60 mg/kg iv over 1 min. The global changes in cardiac gene expression in dogs with alloxan-induced diabetes were studied using Affymetrix Canine Array. Cardiac RNA was extracted from the control and DM (n = 4. Results The array data revealed that 797 genes were differentially expressed (P 2+ cycling genes (ryanodine receptor; SERCA2 Calcium ATPase, structural proteins (actin alpha. Of particular interests are genes involved in glutathione metabolism (glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase, which were markedly down regulated. Conclusion our findings suggest that type I diabetes might have a direct effect on the heart by impairing NO bioavailability through oxidative stress and perhaps lipid peroxidases.

  14. Compositional Dependence of Solubility/Retention of Molybdenum Oxides in Aluminoborosilicate-Based Model Nuclear Waste Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehault, Antoine; Patil, Deepak; Kamat, Hrishikesh; Youngman, Randall E; Thirion, Lynn M; Mauro, John C; Corkhill, Claire L; McCloy, John S; Goel, Ashutosh

    2018-02-08

    Molybdenum oxides are an integral component of the high-level waste streams being generated from the nuclear reactors in several countries. Although borosilicate glass has been chosen as the baseline waste form by most of the countries to immobilize these waste streams, molybdate oxyanions (MoO 4 2- ) exhibit very low solubility (∼1 mol %) in these glass matrices. In the past three to four decades, several studies describing the compositional and structural dependence of molybdate anions in borosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses have been reported in the literature, providing a basis for our understanding of fundamental science that governs the solubility and retention of these species in the nuclear waste glasses. However, there are still several open questions that need to be answered to gain an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that control the solubility and retention of these oxyanions in glassy waste forms. This article is focused on finding answers to two such questions: (1) What are the solubility and retention limits of MoO 3 in aluminoborosilicate glasses as a function of chemical composition? (2) Why is there a considerable increase in the solubility of MoO 3 with incorporation of rare-earth oxides (for example, Nd 2 O 3 ) in aluminoborosilicate glasses? Accordingly, three different series of aluminoborosilicate glasses (compositional complexity being added in a tiered approach) with varying MoO 3 concentrations have been synthesized and characterized for their ability to accommodate molybdate ions in their structure (solubility) and as a glass-ceramic (retention). The contradictory viewpoints (between different research groups) pertaining to the impact of rare-earth cations on the structure of aluminoborosilicate glasses are discussed, and their implications on the solubility of MoO 3 in these glasses are evaluated. A novel hypothesis explaining the mechanism governing the solubility of MoO 3 in rare-earth containing aluminoborosilicate

  15. The Trypanosoma cruzi vitamin C dependent peroxidase confers protection against oxidative stress but is not a determinant of virulence.

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    Martin C Taylor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The neglected parasitic infection Chagas disease is rapidly becoming a globalised public health issue due to migration. There are only two anti-parasitic drugs available to treat this disease, benznidazole and nifurtimox. Thus it is important to identify and validate new drug targets in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent. T. cruzi expresses an ER-localised ascorbate-dependent peroxidase (TcAPx. This parasite-specific enzyme has attracted interest from the perspective of targeted chemotherapy.To assess the importance of TcAPx in protecting T. cruzi from oxidative stress and to determine if it is essential for virulence, we generated null mutants by targeted gene disruption. Loss of activity was associated with increased sensitivity to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, but had no effect on susceptibility to the front-line Chagas disease drug benznidazole. This suggests that increased oxidative stress in the ER does not play a significant role in its mechanism of action. Homozygous knockouts could proceed through the entire life-cycle in vitro, although they exhibited a significant decrease in their ability to infect mammalian cells. To investigate virulence, we exploited a highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging system which allows parasites to be monitored in real-time in the chronic stage of murine infections. This showed that depletion of enzyme activity had no effect on T. cruzi replication, dissemination or tissue tropism in vivo.TcAPx is not essential for parasite viability within the mammalian host, does not have a significant role in establishment or maintenance of chronic infections, and should therefore not be considered a priority for drug design.

  16. The Trypanosoma cruzi vitamin C dependent peroxidase confers protection against oxidative stress but is not a determinant of virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Martin C; Lewis, Michael D; Fortes Francisco, Amanda; Wilkinson, Shane R; Kelly, John M

    2015-04-01

    The neglected parasitic infection Chagas disease is rapidly becoming a globalised public health issue due to migration. There are only two anti-parasitic drugs available to treat this disease, benznidazole and nifurtimox. Thus it is important to identify and validate new drug targets in Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent. T. cruzi expresses an ER-localised ascorbate-dependent peroxidase (TcAPx). This parasite-specific enzyme has attracted interest from the perspective of targeted chemotherapy. To assess the importance of TcAPx in protecting T. cruzi from oxidative stress and to determine if it is essential for virulence, we generated null mutants by targeted gene disruption. Loss of activity was associated with increased sensitivity to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, but had no effect on susceptibility to the front-line Chagas disease drug benznidazole. This suggests that increased oxidative stress in the ER does not play a significant role in its mechanism of action. Homozygous knockouts could proceed through the entire life-cycle in vitro, although they exhibited a significant decrease in their ability to infect mammalian cells. To investigate virulence, we exploited a highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging system which allows parasites to be monitored in real-time in the chronic stage of murine infections. This showed that depletion of enzyme activity had no effect on T. cruzi replication, dissemination or tissue tropism in vivo. TcAPx is not essential for parasite viability within the mammalian host, does not have a significant role in establishment or maintenance of chronic infections, and should therefore not be considered a priority for drug design.

  17. Carbonate effects and pH-dependence of uranium sorption onto bacteriogenic iron oxides: Kinetic and equilibrium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A.

    2007-01-01

    The removal of U(VI) from groundwaters by adsorption onto bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) has been investigated under batch mode. The adsorbent dosage, the uranium concentration, the concentration of carbonate and the use of a real groundwater spiked with uranium comprised the examined parameters. In addition, the effect of pH was examined in two different water matrixes, i.e., in distilled water and in real groundwater. Equilibrium studies were carried out to determine the maximum adsorption capacity of BIOS and the data correlated well with the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The presence of carbonate affected adversely the adsorption of U(VI) onto BIOS. The maximum adsorption capacity of BIOS was 9.25 mg g -1 at 0.1 mM carbonate concentration and decreased to 6.93 mg g -1 at 0.5 mM carbonate concentration, whereas at carbonate concentration of 2 mM practically no adsorption occurred. The data were further analyzed using the pseudo-second order kinetic equation, which fitted best the experimental results. The initial adsorption rate (h) was found to increase with decreasing the concentration of carbonate in all cases. When experiments were accomplished in the absence of carbonate, the pH values did not have an effect on the adsorption of U(VI). However, the extent of U(VI) adsorption was strongly pH-dependent when the experiments were carried out in the real groundwater. The maximum adsorption capacity increased sharply as the pH decreased and optimum removal was obtained in the pH range 3.2-4.0, thus bacteriogenic iron oxides can found application in the removal of U(VI) by adsorption from low pH or low carbonate waters

  18. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II) oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Tsing; Santelli, Cara M; Akob, Denise M; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Nietzsche, Sándor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II) oxidation at pH < 6. The lack of low pH Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II) oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II) at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II) oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II) oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II) oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  19. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsing eBohu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II oxidation at pH < 6. The lack of low pH Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MOB isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase (MCO expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS, particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  20. Impact of intensive insulin treatment on the development and consequences of oxidative stress in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

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    Kocić Radivoj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The aim of this study, which included patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, was to determine the influence of the application of various treatment modalities (intensive or conventional on the total plasma antioxidative capacity and lipid peroxidation intensity expressed as malondialdehyde (MDA level, catalase and xanthine oxidase activity, erythrocyte glutatione reduced concentration (GSH RBC, erythrocyte MDA level (MDA RBC, as well as susceptibility of erythrocyte to H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Methods. This study included 42 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In 24 of the patients intensive insulin treatment was applied using the model of short-acting insulin in each meal and medium- acting insulin before going to bed, while in 18 of the patients conventional insulin treatment was applied in two (morning and evening doses. In the examined patients no presence of diabetes mellitus complications was recorded. The control group included 20 healthy adults out of a blood doner group. The plasma and erythrocytes taken from the blood samples were analyzed immediately. Results. This investigation proved that the application of intensive insulin treatment regime significantly improves total antioxidative plasma capacity as compared to the application of conventional therapy regime. The obtained results showed that the both plasma and lipoproteines apo B MDA increased significantly more in the patients on conventional therapy than in the patients on intensive insulin therapy, most probably due to intensified xanthine oxidase activity. The level of the MDA in fresh erythrocytes did not differ significantly between the groups on intensive and conventional therapy. The level of GSH and catalase activity, however, were significantly reduced in the patients on conventional therapy due to the increased susceptibility to H2O2-induced oxidative stress . Conclusion. The presented study confirmed positive effect of

  1. The ion dependent change in the mechanism of charge storage of chemically preintercalated bilayered vanadium oxide electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clites, Mallory; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina

    2017-08-01

    Chemical pre-intercalation is a soft chemistry synthesis approach that allows for the insertion of inorganic ions into the interlayer space of layered battery electrode materials prior to electrochemical cycling. Previously, we have demonstrated that chemical pre-intercalation of Na+ ions into the structure of bilayered vanadium oxide (δ-V2O5) results in record high initial capacities above 350 mAh g-1 in Na-ion cells. This performance is attributed to the expanded interlayer spacing and predefined diffusion pathways achieved by the insertion of charge-carrying ions. However, the effect of chemical pre-intercalation of δ-V2O5 has not been studied for other ion-based systems beyond sodium. In this work, we report the effect of the chemically preintercalated alkali ion size on the mechanism of charge storage of δ- MxV2O5 (M = Li, Na, K) in Li-ion, Na-ion, and K-ion batteries, respectively. The interlayer spacing of the δ-MxV2O5 varied depending on inserted ion, with 11.1 Å achieved for Li-preintercalated δ-V2O5, 11.4 Å for Na-preintercalated δ- V2O5, and 9.6 Å for K-preintercalated δ-V2O5. Electrochemical performance of each material has been studied in its respective ion-based system (δ-LixV2O5 in Li-ion cells, δ-NaxV2O5 in Na-ion cells, and δ-KxV2O5 in K-ion cells). All materials demonstrated high initial capacities above 200 mAh g-1. However, the mechanism of charge storage differed depending on the charge-carrying ion, with Li-ion cells demonstrating predominantly pseudocapacitive behavior and Naion and K-ion cells demonstrating a significant portion of capacity from diffusion-limited intercalation processes. In this study, the combination of increased ionic radii of the charge-carrying ions and decreased synthesized interlayer spacing of the bilayered vanadium oxide phase correlates to an increase in the portion of capacity attributed diffusion-limited charge-storage processes.

  2. Nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase signaling affects CO2-dependent but not pressure-dependent regulation of cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahshan, Shadi; Dayan, Lior; Jacob, Giris

    2017-06-01

    Cerebrovascular CO 2 reactivity is affected by nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that sildenafil selectively potentiates NO-cGMP signaling, which affects CO 2 reactivity. Fourteen healthy males (34 ± 2 yr) were enrolled in the study. Blood pressure (BP), ECG, velocity of cerebral blood flow (CBF; measured by transcranial Doppler), and end-tidal CO 2 (EtCO 2 ) were assessed at baseline (CO 2 ~39 mmHg), during hyperventilation (CO 2 ~24 mmHg), during hypercapnia (CO 2 ~46 mmHg), during boluses of phenylephrine (25-200 µg), and during graded head-up tilting (HUT). Measurements were repeated 1 h after 100 mg sildenafil were taken. Results showed that sildenafil did not affect resting BP, heart rate, CBF peak and mean velocities, estimated regional cerebrovascular resistance (eCVR; mean BP/mean CBF), breath/min, and EtCO 2 : 117 ± 2/67 ± 3 mmHg, 69 ± 3 beats/min, 84 ± 5 and 57 ± 4 cm/s, 1.56 ± 0.1 mmHg·cm -1 ·s -1 , 14 ± 0.5 breaths/min, and 39 ± 0.9 mmHg, respectively. Sildenafil increased and decreased the hypercapnia induced in CBF and eCVR, respectively. Sildenafil also attenuated the decrease in peak velocity of CBF, 25 ± 2 vs. 20 ± 2% ( P < 0.05) and increased the eCVR, 2.5 ± 0.2 vs. 2 ± 0.2% ( P < 0.03) during hyperventilation. Sildenafil did not affect CBF despite significant increases in the eCVRs that were elicited by phenylephrine and HUT. This investigation suggests that sildenafil, which potentiates the NO-cGMP signaling, seems to affect the cerebrovascular CO 2 reactivity without affecting the static and dynamic pressure-dependent mechanisms of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Temperature dependence of electron magnetic resonance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Russek, Stephen E.; Klem, Michael T.; Allen, Mark A.; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Idzerda, Yves U.; Singel, David J.

    2012-10-01

    increase in moment with temperature. The second model predicts low-temperature spectra that differ significantly from the observed spectra. The anisotropy energy density K1, determined by fitting the temperature-dependent linewidths, was ˜50 kJ/m3, which is considerably larger than that of bulk maghemite. The work presented here indicates that the magnetic properties of these size-constrained nanoparticles and more generally metal oxide nanoparticles with diameters d < 5 nm are complex and that currently existing models are not sufficient for determining their magnetic resonance signatures.

  4. Effect of environmental particulates on cultured human and bovine endothelium. Cellular injury via an oxidant-dependent pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.G.; Dodson, R.F.; Callahan, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of respirable environmental fibers on cultures of human umbilical vein and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers were studied. Interaction among endothelial cell monolayers and amosite and chrysotile asbestos, attapulgite, fiberglass, or latex beads resulted in rapid phagocytosis of the particulates. A gradient of time-dependent and concentration-dependent endothelial cell injury (measured by specific 51Cr release) was observed with amosite and attapulgite being markedly toxic. Chrysotile and fiberglass were much less toxic, and latex beads were not significantly injurious at any time or dose examined. Responses of bovine pulmonary artery and human endothelial vein endothelial cells to fiber phagocytosis and fiber-induced injury were similar. In human umbilical cell monolayers, fiber-mediated stimulation of the arachidonate metabolite prostacyclin paralleled endothelial cell injury; i.e. amosite and attapulgite were stimulatory, whereas fiberglass (0-500 micrograms/ml) and latex beads (10(9) beads/ml) did not significantly increase prostacyclin generation. Although chrysotile was only weakly cytotoxic, significant stimulation of prostacyclin was observed at the highest dose tested (500 micrograms/ml). To investigate whether toxic oxygen species may be involved in fiber-induced cytotoxicity, oxidant scavengers or inhibitors were used in injury studies. Both superoxide dismutase (a scavenger of O2-) and catalase (an inhibitor of H2O2) produced significant protection against fiber-mediated endothelial cell injury. In addition, chelation by deferoxamine of elemental Fe present in the fiber preparations was also protective, suggesting Fe, via the modified Haber-Weiss reaction, may promote hydroxyl radical formation and contribute to endothelial cell injury induced by these particulates

  5. Copper oxide content dependence of crystallization behavior, glass forming ability, glass stability and fragility of lithium borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, A.A.; Kashif, I.

    2010-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been employed to investigate the copper oxide content dependence of the glass transition temperatures data, activation energy for the glass transition E t , glass stability GS, fragility index Fi, the glass-forming ability (GFA) and crystallization behavior of {(100-x) mol% Li 2 B 4 O 7 -x mol% CuO} glass samples, where x=0-40 mol% CuO. From the dependence of the glass transition temperature T g on the heating rate β, the fragility, F i , and the activation energy, E t , have been calculated. It is seen that F i and E t are attained their minimum values at 0 x -T g , SCL region and the GS. The GFA has been investigated on the basis of Hruby parameter K H , which is a strong indicator of GFA, and the relaxation time. Results of GFA are in good agreement with the fragility index, F i , calculations indicating that {90Li 2 B 4 O 7 .10CuO} is the best glass former. The stronger glass forming ability has decreasing the fragility index. XRD result indicates that no fully amorphous samples but a mixture of crystalline and amorphous phases are formed in the samples containing x>25 mol% CuO and below it composed of glassy phase. Increasing the CuO content above 25 mol% helps the crystallization process, and thus promotes a distinct SCL region. XRD suggests the presence of micro-crystallites of remaining residual amorphous matrix by increasing the CuO content.

  6. Interleukin-6 and insulin incrase and nitric oxide and adiponectin decrease in blind dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Blatter, M F; del Prado, B; Miceli, D D; Gomez, N; Ivanic, J; Di Tollo, B; Gallelli, M F; Castillo, V A

    2012-12-01

    In this study, two populations of dogs with pituitary dependent hypercortisolism (PDH) were compared over a 2-year period. One group had normal vision (Group A, n=27) and one group was blind (Group B, n=20). Group B was characterised by the rapid appearance of the clinical signs of PDH that precede blindness. We found increases in pre-adrenocorticotropic hormone cortisol (P=0.002), IL-6 (P=0.0001), insulin, and insulin sensitivity (detected with the Homeostatic Model Assessment, P<0.0001) in Group B but not in Group A. The nitric oxide (NO) and the total adiponectin concentrations decreased (P=0.0001 and P=0.02, respectively) in Group B versus Group A. The IL-6 and insulin concentrations and the HOMA-A index were positively correlated with the cortisol concentration and were negatively correlated with the NO concentration. With the exception of adiponectin, the other variables were associated with blindness. We concluded that blindness in PDH is a haemodynamic event associated with metabolic changes, with the increase in the IL-6 concentration and the decrease in the NO concentration affecting the retinal vasculature and producing a high risk of vision loss. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of hydroxycinnamic acid degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum reveals a coenzyme A-dependent, beta-oxidative deacetylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Nesme, Xavier; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-06-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionyl-CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)-CoA β-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent β-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials.

  8. Reduction of greenhouse gases emissions during anoxic wastewater treatment by strengthening nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ru; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Liping; Ru, Dongyun

    2017-07-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a recently discovered process performed by NC10 phylum, which plays an important role in greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction. In this study, co-existence of n-damo bacteria and methanogens was successfully achieved by using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Reactor with inorganic carbon source (CO 2 /H 2 ) showed the highest abundance of n-damo bacteria and the highest n-damo potential activity, resulted in its highest nitrogen removal rate. Significant reduction in GHG was obtained after introduction of n-damo process, especially for N 2 O. Furthermore, GHG emissions decreased with the increase of n-damo bacteria abundance. Community structure analysis found carbon source could influence the diversity of n-damo bacteria indirectly. And phylogenetic analysis showed that all the obtained sequences were assigned to group B, mainly due to in situ production and consumption of CH 4 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of redox homeostasis contributes to NPR1-dependent plant innate immunity triggered by lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Aizhen; Nie, Shengjun; Xing, Da

    2012-10-01

    The perception of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by plant cells can lead to nitric oxide (NO) production and defense gene induction. However, the signaling cascades underlying these cellular responses have not yet been resolved. This work investigated the biosynthetic origin of NO and the role of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (NPR1) to gain insight into the mechanism involved in LPS-induced resistance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Analysis of inhibitors and mutants showed that LPS-induced NO synthesis was mainly mediated by an arginine-utilizing source of NO generation. Furthermore, LPS-induced NO caused transcript accumulation of alternative oxidase genes and increased antioxidant enzyme activity, which enhanced antioxidant capacity and modulated redox state. We also analyzed the subcellular localization of NPR1 to identify the mechanism for protein-modulated plant innate immunity triggered by LPS. LPS-activated defense responses, including callose deposition and defense-related gene expression, were found to be regulated through an NPR1-dependent pathway. In summary, a significant NO synthesis induced by LPS contributes to the LPS-induced defense responses by up-regulation of defense genes and modulation of cellular redox state. Moreover, NPR1 plays an important role in LPS-triggered plant innate immunity.

  10. Evidence of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation within an Area Impacted by Coalbed Methane-Related Gas Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A. L.; Wikin, R. T.

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated water quality characteristics in the northern Raton Basin of Colorado and documented the response of the Poison Canyon aquifer system several years after upward migration of methane gas occurred from the deeper Vermejo Formation coalbed production zone. Over a 17-month study period, water samples were obtained from domestic water wells and monitoring wells located within the impacted area, and analyzed for 245 constituents, including organic compounds, nutrients, major and trace elements, dissolved gases, and isotopic tracers for carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and hydrogen. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that sulfate-dependent methane biodegradation, which involves the oxidation of methane (CH4) to carbon dioxide (CO2) using sulfate (SO42-) as the terminal electron acceptor, is occurring: (i) consumption of methane and sulfate and production of sulfide and bicarbonate, (ii) methane loss coupled to production of higher molecular weight (C2+) gaseous hydrocarbons, (iii) patterns of 13C enrichment and depletion in methane and dissolved inorganic carbon, and (iv) a systematic shift in sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate, indicative of microbial sulfate reduction. Groundwater-methane attenuation is linked to the production of dissolved sulfide, and elevated dissolved sulfide concentrations represent an undesirable secondary water quality impact. The biogeochemical response of the aquifer system has not mobilized naturally occurring trace metals, including arsenic, chromium, cobalt, nickel, and lead, likely due to the microbial production of hydrogen sulfide, which favors stabilization of metals in aquifer solids.

  11. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 107 gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m−2 per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution. PMID:24616523

  12. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II) oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Tsing; Santelli, Cara M; Akob, Denise M.; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Nietzsche, Sándor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II) oxidation at pH MOB) isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II) oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II) at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II) oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II) oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II) oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  13. DNA-length-dependent quenching of fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles with gold, graphene oxide and MoS2 nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Mustafa; Rana, Muhit; Robertson, Neil; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2014-08-13

    We controlled the fluorescence emission of a fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle using three different nanomaterials with ultraefficient quenching capabilities. The control over the fluorescence emission was investigated via spacing introduced by the surface-functionalized single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA molecules were conjugated on different templates, either on the surface of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles or gold and nanographene oxide. The efficiency of the quenching was determined and compared with various fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticle and nanoquencher combinations using DNA molecules with three different lengths. We have found that the template for DNA conjugation plays significant role on quenching the fluorescence emission of the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles. We have observed that the size of the DNA controls the quenching efficiency when conjugated only on the fluorescently labeled iron oxide nanoparticles by setting a spacer between the surfaces and resulting change in the hydrodynamic size. The quenching efficiency with 12mer, 23mer and 36mer oligonucleotides decreased to 56%, 54% and 53% with gold nanoparticles, 58%, 38% and 32% with nanographene oxide, 46%, 38% and 35% with MoS2, respectively. On the other hand, the presence, not the size, of the DNA molecules on the other surfaces quenched the fluorescence significantly with different degrees. To understand the effect of the mobility of the DNA molecules on the nanoparticle surface, DNA molecules were attached to the surface with two different approaches. Covalently immobilized oligonucleotides decreased the quenching efficiency of nanographene oxide and gold nanoparticles to ∼22% and ∼21%, respectively, whereas noncovalently adsorbed oligonucleotides decreased it to ∼25% and ∼55%, respectively. As a result, we have found that each nanoquencher has a powerful quenching capability against a fluorescent nanoparticle, which can be

  14. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher, E-mail: yllars@hotmail.com [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Andrea [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, María Jesús [Dept. of Biochemistry, Physiology and Molecular Genetics, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Alcorcón (Spain); Vassallo, Dalton Valentim [Dept. of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of Espirito Santo, Vitória, ES CEP 29040-091 (Brazil); Health Science Center of Vitória-EMESCAM, Vitória, ES CEP 29045-402 (Brazil); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  15. Cardiac hyporesponsiveness in severe sepsis is associated with nitric oxide-dependent activation of G protein receptor kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; DalBó, Silvia; Lautherbach, Natalia E S; Gava, Fábio N; Celes, Mara R N; Benedet, Patricia O; Souza, Adriana H; Akinaga, Juliana; Lima, Vanessa; Silva, Katiussia P; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo A; Rossi, Marcos A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Pupo, André S; Cunha, Fernando Q; Assreuy, Jamil

    2017-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2 (GRK2) has a critical role in physiological and pharmacological responses to endogenous and exogenous substances. Sepsis causes an important cardiovascular dysfunction in which nitric oxide (NO) has a relevant role. The present study aimed to assess the putative effect of inducible NO synthase (NOS2)-derived NO on the activity of GRK2 in the context of septic cardiac dysfunction. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to severe septic injury by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Heart function was assessed by isolated and perfused heart, echocardiography, and β-adrenergic receptor binding. GRK2 was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis in the heart and isolated cardiac myocytes. Sepsis increased NOS2 expression in the heart, increased plasma nitrite + nitrate levels, and reduced isoproterenol-induced isolated ventricle contraction, whole heart tension development, and β-adrenergic receptor density. Treatment with 1400W or with GRK2 inhibitor prevented CLP-induced cardiac hyporesponsiveness 12 and 24 h after CLP. Increased labeling of total and phosphorylated GRK2 was detected in hearts after CLP. With treatment of 1400W or in hearts taken from septic NOS2 knockout mice, the activation of GRK2 was reduced. 1400W or GRK2 inhibitor reduced mortality, improved echocardiographic cardiac parameters, and prevented organ damage. Therefore, during sepsis, NOS2-derived NO increases GRK2, which leads to a reduction in β-adrenergic receptor density, contributing to the heart dysfunction. Isolated cardiac myocyte data indicate that NO acts through the soluble guanylyl cyclase/cGMP/PKG pathway. GRK2 inhibition may be a potential therapeutic target in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The main novelty presented here is to show that septic shock induces cardiac hyporesponsiveness to isoproterenol by a mechanism dependent on nitric oxide and mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2. Therefore

  16. Anaerobic nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria - novel participants in methane cycling of drained peatlands ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Menko, Ekaterina; Sirin, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the key sources of atmospheric methane. Process-based studies of methane dynamic are based on the hypothesis of the balance between microbial methane production and oxidation, but this doesn't explain all variations in and constraints on peatland CH4 emissions. One of the reasons for this discrepancy could be anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) - the process which is still poorly studied and remained controversial. Very little is known about AOM in peatlands, where it could work as an important 'internal' sink for CH4. This lack of knowledge primarily originated from researchers who generally consider AOM quantitatively insignificant or even non-existent in northern peatland ecosystems. But not far ago, Smemo and Yavitt (2007) presented evidence for AOM in freshwater peatlands used indirect techniques including isotope dilution assays and selective methanogenic inhibitors. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation NC10 group bacteria (n-damo) were detected in a minerotrophic peatland in the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water (Zhu et al., 2012). Present study represents the first, to our knowledge, characterization of AOM in human disturbed peatlands, including hydrological elements of artificial drainage network. The experiments were conducted with samples of peat from drained peatlands, as well as of water and bottom sediments of ditches from drained Dubnensky mire massif, Moscow region (Chistotin et al., 2006; Sirin et al., 2012). This is the key testing area of our research group in European part of Russia for the long-term greenhouse gases fluxes measurements supported by testing physicochemical parameters, intensity and genomic diversity of CH4-cycling microbial communities. Only in sediments of drainage ditches the transition anaerobic zone was found, where methane and nitrate occurred, suggested the possible ecological niche for n-damo bacteria. The NC10 group methanotrophs were analyzed by PCR

  17. Concentration-dependent behaviors of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and infectious bacteria toward magnesium oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetteland, Cheyann Lee; Nguyen, Nhu-Y Thi; Liu, Huinan

    2016-04-15

    This article reports the quantitative relationship between the concentration of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles and its distinct biological activities towards mammalian cells and infectious bacteria for the first time. The effects of MgO nanoparticles on the viability of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and infectious bacteria (both gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis) showed a concentration-dependent behavior in vitro. The critical concentrations of MgO nanoparticles identified in this study provided valuable guidelines for biomaterial design toward potential clinical translation. BMSCs density increased significantly when cultured in 200μg/mL of MgO in comparison to the Cells Only control without MgO. The density of BMSCs decreased significantly after culture in the media with 500μg/mL or more of MgO. Concentrations at or above 1000μg/mL of MgO resulted in complete BMSCs death. Quantification of colony forming units (CFU) revealed that the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of MgO for E. coli and S. epidermidis was 1200μg/mL. The addition of MgO nanoparticles into the cultures increased the pH and Mg(2+) ion concentration in the respective culture media, which might have played a role in the observed cell responses but not the main factors. E. coli and S. epidermidis still proliferated significantly at alkaline pH up to 10 or with supplemental Mg(2+) dosages up to 50mM, indicating bactericidal properties of MgO are beyond the effects of increased media pH and Mg(2+) ion concentrations. MgO nanoparticles at a concentration of 200μg/mL provided dual benefits of promoting BMSC proliferation while reducing bacterial adhesion, which should be further studied for potential medical implant applications. The use of free MgO nanoparticles yielded detrimental effects to BMSCs in concentrations above 300μg/mL. We recommend further study into MgO nanoparticle as a coating material or as a part of a

  18. l-Citrulline dilates rat retinal arterioles via nitric oxide- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asami Mori

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available l-Citrulline is an effective precursor of l-arginine produced by the l-citrulline/l-arginine cycle, and it exerts beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system by supporting enhanced nitric oxide (NO production. NO dilates retinal blood vessels via the cyclooxygenase-mediated pathway. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of l-citrulline on retinal circulation and to investigate the potential involvement of NO and prostaglandins in l-citrulline-induced responses in rats. l-Citrulline (10–300 μg kg−1 min−1, i.v. increased the diameter of retinal arterioles without significantly changing mean blood pressure, heart rate, and fundus blood flow. The vasodilator response of retinal arterioles to l-citrulline was significantly diminished following treatment with NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (30 mg/kg, i.v., an NO synthase inhibitor, or indomethacin (5 mg/kg, i.v., a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. In addition, α-methyl-dl-aspartic acid (147 mg/kg, i.v., an inhibitor of argininosuccinate synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme for the recycling of l-citrulline to l-arginine, diminished the l-citrulline-induced retinal vasodilation. These results suggest that both NO- and prostaglandin-dependent pathways contribute to the l-citrulline-induced vasodilation of rat retinal arterioles. The l-citrulline/l-arginine recycling pathway may have more importance in regulating vascular tone in retinal blood vessels than in peripheral resistance vessels.

  19. A full-dimensional multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree study on the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of formaldehyde oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method in conjunction with the multistate multimode vibronic coupling Hamiltonian (MMVCH) model, we perform a full dimensional (9D) quantum dynamical study on the simplest Criegee intermediate, formaldehyde oxide, in five lower-lying singlet electronic states. The ultraviolet (UV) spectrum is then simulated by a Fourier transform of the auto-correlation function. The MMVCH model is built based on extensive MRCI(8e,8o)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations. To ensure a fast convergence of the final calculations, a large number of ML-MCTDH test calculations is performed to find an appropriate multilayer separations (ML-trees) of the ML-MCTDH nuclear wave functions, and the dynamical calculations are carefully checked to ensure that the calculations are well converged. To compare the computational efficiency, standard MCTDH simulations using the same Hamiltonian are also performed. A comparison of the MCTDH and ML-MCTDH calculations shows that even for the present not-too-large system (9D here) the ML-MCTDH calculations can save a considerable amount of computational resources while producing identical spectra as the MCTDH calculations. Furthermore, the present theoretical B ~ 1 A ′ ←X ~ 1 A ′ UV spectral band and the corresponding experimental measurements [J. M. Beames, F. Liu, L. Lu, and M. I. Lester, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 20045–20048 (2012); L. Sheps, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4201–4205 (2013); W.-L. Ting, Y.-H. Chen, W. Chao, M. C. Smith, and J. J.-M. Lin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 10438–10443 (2014)] are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first theoretical UV spectrum simulated for this molecule including nuclear motion beyond an adiabatic harmonic approximation

  20. Concentration-dependent systemic response after inhalation of nano-sized zinc oxide particles in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsé, Christian; Hagemeyer, Olaf; Raulf, Monika; Jettkant, Birger; van Kampen, Vera; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gering, Vitali; Kappert, Günther; Weiss, Tobias; Ulrich, Nadin; Marek, Eike-Maximilian; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas; Merget, Rolf

    2018-02-12

    Inhalation of high concentrations of zinc oxide particles (ZnO) may cause metal fume fever. In an earlier human inhalation study, no effects were observed after exposure to ZnO concentrations of 0.5 mg/m 3 . Further data from experimental studies with pure ZnO in the concentration range between 0.5 and 2.5 mg/m 3 are not available. It was the aim of this experimental study to establish the concentration-response relationship of pure nano-sized ZnO particles. Sixteen healthy subjects were exposed to filtered air and ZnO particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/m 3 ) for 4 h on 4 different days, including 2 h of cycling with a low workload. The effects were assessed before, immediately after, and about 24 h after each exposure. Effect parameters were symptoms, body temperature, inflammatory markers and clotting factors in blood, and lung function. Concentration-dependent increases in symptoms, body temperature, acute phase proteins and neutrophils in blood were detected after ZnO inhalation. Significant effects were detected with ZnO concentrations of 1.0 mg/m 3 or higher, with the most sensitive parameters being inflammatory markers in blood. A concentration-response relationship with nano-sized ZnO particles in a low concentration range was demonstrated. Systemic inflammatory effects of inhaled nano-sized ZnO particles were observed at concentrations well below the occpational exposure limit for ZnO in many countries. It is recommended to reassess the exposure limit for ZnO at workplaces.

  1. Permanganate oxidation of diclofenac: The pH-dependent reaction kinetics and a ring-opening mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hanyang; Song, Dean; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the fate of diclofenac (DCF) during permanganate (Mn(VII)) oxidation was investigated at environmentally relevant pH conditions (from 5 to 9). The batch experiments showed that the kinetics of the Mn(VII)/DCF reaction follows a second-order rate law with an apparent rate constant of 1.57±0.02 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7 and 20 °C. The half-value of DCF was calculated to be 37.5 min, when the concentration of Mn(VII) (0.4 mM) was 20-fold excess of DCF. The pH-dependence of the reaction kinetics was investigated, and the DCF reactivity with Mn(VII) was found to decrease with increasing pH. The second-order rate constants were then quantitatively described by incorporating the species distribution of DCF. A lower reactivity of the anionic DCF (DCF(-)) in comparison with its neutral counterpart (DCF(0)) was most likely attributable to the interaction between the ionized carboxylate group and amine nitrogen position, which can reduce the nucleophilicity of amine nitrogen by inductive and resonance effects. Moreover, a range of degradation products and the corresponding structures were proposed on the basis of the LC-Q-TOF-MS analysis. A detailed ring-opening reaction mechanism was proposed as follows: Mn(VII) acts as an electrophile to attack the amine moiety, leading to the formation of the primary intermediate products 2,6-dichloroaniline and 5-hydroxy-diclofenac, which can be further transformed. The further degradation proceeded through a multistep process including ring-opening, decarboxylation, hydroxylation, and cyclation reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A full-dimensional multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree study on the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of formaldehyde oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-09-01

    Employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method in conjunction with the multistate multimode vibronic coupling Hamiltonian (MMVCH) model, we perform a full dimensional (9D) quantum dynamical study on the simplest Criegee intermediate, formaldehyde oxide, in five lower-lying singlet electronic states. The ultraviolet (UV) spectrum is then simulated by a Fourier transform of the auto-correlation function. The MMVCH model is built based on extensive MRCI(8e,8o)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations. To ensure a fast convergence of the final calculations, a large number of ML-MCTDH test calculations is performed to find an appropriate multilayer separations (ML-trees) of the ML-MCTDH nuclear wave functions, and the dynamical calculations are carefully checked to ensure that the calculations are well converged. To compare the computational efficiency, standard MCTDH simulations using the same Hamiltonian are also performed. A comparison of the MCTDH and ML-MCTDH calculations shows that even for the present not-too-large system (9D here) the ML-MCTDH calculations can save a considerable amount of computational resources while producing identical spectra as the MCTDH calculations. Furthermore, the present theoretical tilde{B}{}^1A^' }leftarrow tilde{X}{}^1A^' } UV spectral band and the corresponding experimental measurements [J. M. Beames, F. Liu, L. Lu, and M. I. Lester, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 20045-20048 (2012); L. Sheps, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4201-4205 (2013); W.-L. Ting, Y.-H. Chen, W. Chao, M. C. Smith, and J. J.-M. Lin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 10438-10443 (2014)] are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first theoretical UV spectrum simulated for this molecule including nuclear motion beyond an adiabatic harmonic approximation.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Is Dependent on Oxidative Stress and Reflects Treatment Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neesha Rockwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is implicated in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis (TB and has been proposed as a biomarker of active disease. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb induces HO-1 as well as how its expression is affected by HIV-1 coinfection and successful antitubercular therapy (ATT are poorly understood. We found that HO-1 expression is markedly increased in rabbits, mice, and non-human primates during experimental Mtb infection and gradually decreased during ATT. In addition, we examined circulating concentrations of HO-1 in a cohort of 130 HIV-1 coinfected and uninfected pulmonary TB patients undergoing ATT to investigate changes in expression of this biomarker in relation to HIV-1 status, radiological disease severity, and treatment outcome. We found that plasma levels of HO-1 were elevated in untreated HIV-1 coinfected TB patients and correlated positively with HIV-1 viral load and negatively with CD4+ T cell count. In both HIV-1 coinfected and Mtb monoinfected patients, HO-1 levels were substantially reduced during successful TB treatment but not in those who experienced treatment failure or subsequently relapsed. To further delineate the molecular mechanisms involved in induction of HO-1 by Mtb, we performed a series of in vitro experiments using mouse and human macrophages. We found that Mtb-induced HO-1 expression requires NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species production induced by the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6, which in turn triggers nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NRF-2. These observations provide further insight into the utility of HO-1 as a biomarker of both disease and successful therapy in TB monoinfected and HIV-TB coinfected patients and reveal a previously undocumented pathway linking expression of the enzyme with oxidative stress.

  4. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Bratt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia.

  5. Nitric Oxide Synthase Enzymes in the Airways of Mice Exposed to Ovalbumin: NOS2 Expression Is NOS3 Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha; Rabowsky, Michelle F.; Last, Michael S.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Last, Jerold A.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives and Design. The function of the airway nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms and the lung cell types responsible for its production are not fully understood. We hypothesized that NO homeostasis in the airway is important to control inflammation, which requires upregulation, of NOS2 protein expression by an NOS3-dependent mechanism. Materials or Subjects. Mice from a C57BL/6 wild-type, NOS1−/−, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− genotypes were used. All mice strains were systemically sensitized and exposed to filtered air or ovalbumin (OVA) aerosol for two weeks to create a subchronic model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. Methods. We measured lung function, lung lavage inflammatory and airway epithelial goblet cell count, exhaled NO, nitrate and nitrite concentration, and airway NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 protein content. Results. Deletion of NOS1 or NOS3 increases NOS2 protein present in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of air-exposed animals. Exposure to allergen significantly reduced the expression of NOS2 protein in the airway epithelium and smooth muscle of the NOS3−/− strain only. This reduction in NOS2 expression was not due to the replacement of epithelial cells with goblet cells as remaining epithelial cells did not express NOS2. NOS1−/− animals had significantly reduced goblet cell metaplasia compared to C57Bl/6 wt, NOS2−/−, and NOS3−/− allergen-exposed mice. Conclusion. The airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells maintain a stable airway NO concentration under noninflammatory conditions. This “homeostatic” mechanism is unable to distinguish between NOS derived from the different constitutive NOS isoforms. NOS3 is essential for the expression of NOS2 under inflammatory conditions, while NOS1 expression contributes to allergen-induced goblet cell metaplasia. PMID:20953358

  6. Reduction of health care-associated infection indicators by copper oxide-impregnated textiles: Crossover, double-blind controlled study in chronic ventilator-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Esther-Lee; Yosef, Hana; Borkow, Gadi; Caine, Yehezkel; Sasson, Ady; Moses, Allon E

    2017-04-01

    Copper oxide has potent wide-spectrum biocidal properties. The purpose of this study is to determine if replacing hospital textiles with copper oxide-impregnated textiles reduces the following health care-associated infection (HAI) indicators: antibiotic treatment initiation events (ATIEs), fever days, and antibiotic usage in hospitalized chronic ventilator-dependent patients. A 7-month, crossover, double-blind controlled trial including all patients in 2 ventilator-dependent wards in a long-term care hospital. For 3 months (period 1), one ward received copper oxide-impregnated textiles and the other received untreated textiles. After a 1-month washout period of using regular textiles, for 3 months (period 2) the ward that received the treated textiles received the control textiles and vice versa. The personnel were blinded to which were treated or control textiles. There were no differences in infection control measures during the study. There were reductions of 29.3% (P = .002), 55.5% (P 37.6°C), days of antibiotic treatment, and antibiotic defined daily dose per 1,000 hospitalization days, respectively, when using the copper oxide-impregnated textiles. Use of copper oxide-impregnated biocidal textiles in a long-term care ward of ventilator-dependent patients was associated with a significant reduction of HAI indicators and antibiotic utilization. Using copper oxide-impregnated biocidal textiles may be an important measure aimed at reducing HAIs in long-term care medical settings. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Angiopoietin-like 4 mediates PPAR delta effect on lipoprotein lipase-dependent fatty acid uptake but not on beta-oxidation in myotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius R Robciuc

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR delta is an important regulator of fatty acid (FA metabolism. Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4, a multifunctional protein, is one of the major targets of PPAR delta in skeletal muscle cells. Here we investigated the regulation of Angptl4 and its role in mediating PPAR delta functions using human, rat and mouse myotubes. Expression of Angptl4 was upregulated during myotubes differentiation and by oleic acid, insulin and PPAR delta agonist GW501516. Treatment with GW501516 or Angptl4 overexpression inhibited both lipoprotein lipase (LPL activity and LPL-dependent uptake of FAs whereas uptake of BSA-bound FAs was not affected by either treatment. Activation of retinoic X receptor (RXR, PPAR delta functional partner, using bexarotene upregulated Angptl4 expression and inhibited LPL activity in a PPAR delta dependent fashion. Silencing of Angptl4 blocked the effect of GW501516 and bexarotene on LPL activity. Treatment with GW501516 but not Angptl4 overexpression significantly increased palmitate oxidation. Furthermore, Angptl4 overexpression did not affect the capacity of GW501516 to increase palmitate oxidation. Basal and insulin stimulated glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis and glucose oxidation were not significantly modulated by Angptl4 overexpression. Our findings suggest that FAs-PPARdelta/RXR-Angptl4 axis controls the LPL-dependent uptake of FAs in myotubes, whereas the effect of PPAR delta activation on beta-oxidation is independent of Angptl4.

  8. Accuracy of dielectric-dependent hybrid functionals in the prediction of optoelectronic properties of metal oxide semiconductors: a comprehensive comparison with many-body GW and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerosa, M.; E Bottani, C.; Di Valentin, C.; Onida, G.; Pacchioni, G.

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of metal oxide semiconductors is crucial to their numerous technological applications, such as photoelectrochemical water splitting and solar cells. The needed experimental and theoretical knowledge goes beyond that of pristine bulk crystals, and must include the effects of surfaces and interfaces, as well as those due to the presence of intrinsic defects (e.g. oxygen vacancies), or dopants for band engineering. In this review, we present an account of the recent efforts in predicting and understanding the optoelectronic properties of oxides using ab initio theoretical methods. In particular, we discuss the performance of recently developed dielectric-dependent hybrid functionals, providing a comparison against the results of many-body GW calculations, including G 0 W 0 as well as more refined approaches, such as quasiparticle self-consistent GW. We summarize results in the recent literature for the band gap, the band level alignment at surfaces, and optical transition energies in defective oxides, including wide gap oxide semiconductors and transition metal oxides. Correlated transition metal oxides are also discussed. For each method, we describe successes and drawbacks, emphasizing the challenges faced by the development of improved theoretical approaches. The theoretical section is preceded by a critical overview of the main experimental techniques needed to characterize the optoelectronic properties of semiconductors, including absorption and reflection spectroscopy, photoemission, and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS).

  9. Characteristic of the Oxidative Stress in Blood of Patients in Dependence of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov-Luchankiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Lee, Valentina

    2016-03-15

    At the present time the alternation of the oxidative metabolism is considered as one of the leading pathogenic mechanisms in the development and progression of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However the nature and direction of the oxidative protein changes in CAP patient's blood had been almost unexplored. To define oxidative and modified proteins in erythrocytes and blood plasma of CAP patients. Blood plasma and erythrocytes obtained from: 42 patients with moderate severity pneumonia, 12 patients with grave severity pneumonia and 32 healthy volunteers. Content of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and reactive carbonyl derivatives were estimated as indicators of the oxidative stress and oxidative damage of proteins. In patients with grave severity the level of oxidative proteins and MDA in erythrocytes exceeded both: control values and similar meanings in CAP patients with moderate severity. The further growth of MDA in this group patients' blood plasma was observed, but the level of oxidative proteins decreased in comparison with those in CAP patients with moderate severity. To sum up, our derived data show, that injury of erythrocytes' redox-status and blood plasma components plays an essential role in development and progression CAP.

  10. Characteristic of the Oxidative Stress in Blood of Patients in Dependence of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Muravlyova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At the present time the alternation of the oxidative metabolism is considered as one of the leading pathogenic mechanisms in the development and progression of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. However the nature and direction of the oxidative protein changes in CAP patient’s blood had been almost unexplored. AIM: To define oxidative and modified proteins in erythrocytes and blood plasma of CAP patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Blood plasma and erythrocytes obtained from: 42 patients with moderate severity pneumonia, 12 patients with grave severity pneumonia and 32 healthy volunteers. Content of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and reactive carbonyl derivatives were estimated as indicators of the oxidative stress and oxidative damage of proteins. RESULTS: In patients with grave severity the level of oxidative proteins and MDA in erythrocytes exceeded both: control values and similar meanings in CAP patients with moderate severity. The further growth of MDA in this group patients’ blood plasma was observed, but the level of oxidative proteins decreased in comparison with those in CAP patients with moderate severity. CONCLUSION: To sum up, our derived data show, that injury of erythrocytes’ redox-status and blood plasma components plays an essential role in development and progression CAP.

  11. Crystallographic studies with xenon and nitrous oxide provide evidence for protein-dependent processes in the mechanisms of general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraini, Jacques H; Marassio, Guillaume; David, Helene N; Vallone, Beatrice; Prangé, Thierry; Colloc'h, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms by which general anesthetics, including xenon and nitrous oxide, act are only beginning to be discovered. However, structural approaches revealed weak but specific protein-gas interactions. To improve knowledge, we performed x-ray crystallography studies under xenon and nitrous oxide pressure in a series of 10 binding sites within four proteins. Whatever the pressure, we show (1) hydrophobicity of the gas binding sites has a screening effect on xenon and nitrous oxide binding, with a threshold value of 83% beyond which and below which xenon and nitrous oxide, respectively, binds to their sites preferentially compared to each other; (2) xenon and nitrous oxide occupancies are significantly correlated respectively to the product and the ratio of hydrophobicity by volume, indicating that hydrophobicity and volume are binding parameters that complement and oppose each other's effects; and (3) the ratio of occupancy of xenon to nitrous oxide is significantly correlated to hydrophobicity of their binding sites. These data demonstrate that xenon and nitrous oxide obey different binding mechanisms, a finding that argues against all unitary hypotheses of narcosis and anesthesia, and indicate that the Meyer-Overton rule of a high correlation between anesthetic potency and solubility in lipids of general anesthetics is often overinterpreted. This study provides evidence that the mechanisms of gas binding to proteins and therefore of general anesthesia should be considered as the result of a fully reversible interaction between a drug ligand and a receptor as this occurs in classical pharmacology.

  12. Propofol Protects Against H2O2-Induced Oxidative Injury in Differentiated PC12 Cells via Inhibition of Ca(2+)-Dependent NADPH Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Lu, Di-Han; Tang, Ying; Ling, Ze-Min; Zhou, Li-Hua; Feng, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a widely used general anesthetic with anti-oxidant activities. This study aims to investigate protective capacity of propofol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative injury in neural cells and whether the anti-oxidative effects of propofol occur through a mechanism involving the modulation of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in a manner of calcium-dependent. The rat differentiated PC12 cell was subjected to H2O2 exposure for 24 h to mimic a neuronal in vitro model of oxidative injury. Our data demonstrated that pretreatment of PC12 cells with propofol significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease in cell viability, prevented H2O2-induced morphological changes, and reduced the ratio of apoptotic cells. We further found that propofol attenuated the accumulation of malondialdehyde (biomarker of oxidative stress), counteracted the overexpression of NOX core subunit gp91(phox) (NOX2) as well as the NOX activity following H2O2 exposure in PC12 cells. In addition, blocking of L-type Ca(2+) channels with nimodipine reduced H2O2-induced overexpression of NOX2 and caspase-3 activation in PC12 cells. Moreover, NOX inhibitor apocynin alone or plus propofol neither induces a significant downregulation of NOX activity nor increases cell viability compared with propofol alone in the PC12 cells exposed to H2O2. These results demonstrate that the protective effects of propofol against oxidative injury in PC12 cells are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent NADPH oxidase.

  13. Temperature and frequency dependence of transport phenomena in co-doped rare earth oxides nanoparticles for ITSOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, A. [Applied Thermal Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); School of Science and Technology, University of Management and Technology, Sialkot Campus, Shahabpura Road, Sialkot 51310 (Pakistan); Saleemi, A.S. [Applied Thermal Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Anis-ur-Rehman, M., E-mail: marehman@comsats.edu.pk [Applied Thermal Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • Phase pure ceria (Gd–La and Gd–Nd co-doped) as electrolytes for fuel cells. • Facile synthesis is done with composite mediated hydrothermal method. • Significant variation in transport properties with doping concentration is observed. • The Raman spectra confirmed the targeted doping and increase of vacancy sites. • Maximum conductivity achieved was 1.78 S cm{sup −1} for Ce{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.25}Nd{sub 0.25}O{sub δ} at 600 °C. - Abstract: The present study is focused on the conductivity enhancement of the doped ceria. Composite mediated hydrothermal method (CMHM) was employed to produce the material. X-ray diffraction was used to determine phase of nanocrystalline Ce{sub 1−2x}Gd{sub x}La{sub x}O{sub δ} and Ce{sub 1−2x}Gd{sub x}Nd{sub x}O{sub δ} (x = 0.1, 0.25). Conduction mechanism (dc conductivity and ac conductivity) in prepared samples was observed as a function of temperature and frequency. DC conductivity was measured in temperature range 300–700 °C. AC conductivity was measured in frequency range 1 kHz to 3 MHz at temperatures 300, 400, 500, 600, and 700 °C. The enhancement in conductivity was observed due to availability of oxygen vacancy sites which was dependent on composition. The Raman measurements supported the electrical conductivity results and more vacancy sites were observed in Raman spectrum in samples which showed maximum conductivities. The maximum conductivity achieved was 1.78 S cm{sup −1} (at 600 °C) for Ce{sub 0.5}Gd{sub 0.25}Nd{sub 0.25}O{sub δ}, which is quite a higher value in these compounds. This made this material a potential candidate for its use as an electrolyte material for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (ITSOFCs)

  14. Oxidative stress induced by palytoxin in human keratinocytes is mediated by a H{sup +}-dependent mitochondrial pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelin, Marco, E-mail: marco.pelin@phd.units.it [Department of Life Science, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 7/9, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Ponti, Cristina, E-mail: cponti@units.it [Department of Life Science, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 7/9, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Sosa, Silvio, E-mail: silvio.sosa@econ.units.it [Department of Life Science, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 7/9, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Gibellini, Davide, E-mail: davide.gibellini@unibo.it [Department of Haematology and Oncological Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Florio, Chiara, E-mail: florioc@units.it [Department of Life Science, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 7/9, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Tubaro, Aurelia, E-mail: tubaro@units.it [Department of Life Science, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 7/9, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades, massive blooms of palytoxin (PLTX)-producing Ostreopsis cf. ovata have been observed along Mediterranean coasts, usually associated to human respiratory and cutaneous problems. At the molecular level, PLTX induces a massive intracellular Na{sup +} influx due to the transformation of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase in a cationic channel. Recently, we have demonstrated that Na{sup +} overload is the crucial step in mediating overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in human HaCaT keratinocytes, tentatively explaining PLTX-induced skin irritant effects. In the present study the molecular mechanisms of ROS production induced by PLTX-mediated Na{sup +} intracellular overload have been investigated. In HaCaT cells, PLTX exposure caused accumulation of superoxide anion, but not of nitric oxide or peroxynitrite/hydroxyl radicals. Even if RT-PCR and western blot analysis revealed an early NOX-2 and iNOS gene and protein over-expressions, their active involvement seemed to be only partial since selective inhibitors did not completely reduce O{sub 2}{sup −} production. A significant role of other enzymes (COX-1, COX-2, XO) was not evidenced. Nigericin, that counteracts Na{sup +}-mediated H{sup +}-imbalance, dissipating ΔpH across mitochondrial inner membrane, and the uncouplers DNP significantly reduced O{sub 2}{sup −} production. These inhibitions were synergistic when co-exposed with complex-I inhibitor rotenone. These results suggest a novel mechanism of O{sub 2}{sup −} production induced by PLTX-mediated ionic imbalance. Indeed, the H{sup +} intracellular overload that follows PLTX-induced intracellular Na{sup +} accumulation, could enhance ΔpH across mitochondrial inner membrane, that seems to be the driving force for O{sub 2}{sup −} production by reversing mitochondrial electron transport. Highlights: ► PLTX induces superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup −}) production by reversing mitochondrial transport chain. ► The mechanism of

  15. Uptake of label-free graphene oxide by Caco-2 cells is dependent on the cell differentiation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucki, Melanie; Diener, Liliane; Bohmer, Nils; Hirsch, Cordula; Krug, Harald F; Palermo, Vincenzo; Wick, Peter

    2017-06-21

    Understanding the interaction of graphene-related materials (GRM) with human cells is a key to the assessment of their potential risks for human health. There is a knowledge gap regarding the potential uptake of GRM by human intestinal cells after unintended ingestion. Therefore the aim of our study was to investigate the interaction of label-free graphene oxide (GO) with the intestinal cell line Caco-2 in vitro and to shed light on the influence of the cell phenotype given by the differentiation status on cellular uptake behaviour. Internalisation of two label-free GOs with different lateral size and thickness by undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells was analysed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Semi-quantification of cells associated with GRM was performed by flow cytometry. Undifferentiated Caco-2 cells showed significant amounts of cell-associated GRM, whereas differentiated Caco-2 cells exhibited low adhesion of GO sheets. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed internalisation of both applied GO (small and large) by undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Even large GO sheets with lateral dimensions up to 10 µm, were found internalised by undifferentiated cells, presumably by macropinocytosis. In contrast, no GO uptake could be found for differentiated Caco-2 cells exhibiting an enterocyte-like morphology with apical brush border. Our results show that the internalisation of GO is highly dependent on the cell differentiation status of human intestinal cells. During differentiation Caco-2 cells undergo intense phenotypic changes which lead to a dramatic decrease in GRM internalisation. The results support the hypothesis that the cell surface topography of differentiated Caco-2 cells given by the brush border leads to low adhesion of GO sheets and sterical hindrance for material uptake. In addition, the mechanical properties of GRM, especially flexibility of the sheets, seem to be an important factor for

  16. Vasodilator efficiency of endogenous prostanoids, Ca2+-activated K+ channels and nitric oxide in rats with spontaneous, salt-dependent or NO-deficient hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Behuliak, Michal; Pintérová, Mária; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 8 (2011), s. 968-975 ISSN 0916-9636 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0336; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110902; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Ca2+-activated K+ channels * nitric oxide-dependent vasodilatation * prostacyclin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.576, year: 2011

  17. Modeling on oxide dependent 2DEG sheet charge density and threshold voltage in AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Jena, K.; Swain, R.; Lenka, T. R.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a physics based analytical model for the calculation of threshold voltage, two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density and surface potential for AlGaN/GaN metal oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMT). The developed model includes important parameters like polarization charge density at oxide/AlGaN and AlGaN/GaN interfaces, interfacial defect oxide charges and donor charges at the surface of the AlGaN barrier. The effects of two different gate oxides (Al2O3 and HfO2) are compared for the performance evaluation of the proposed MOSHEMT. The MOSHEMTs with Al2O3 dielectric have an advantage of significant increase in 2DEG up to 1.2 × 1013 cm-2 with an increase in oxide thickness up to 10 nm as compared to HfO2 dielectric MOSHEMT. The surface potential for HfO2 based device decreases from 2 to -1.6 eV within 10 nm of oxide thickness whereas for the Al2O3 based device a sharp transition of surface potential occurs from 2.8 to -8.3 eV. The variation in oxide thickness and gate metal work function of the proposed MOSHEMT shifts the threshold voltage from negative to positive realizing the enhanced mode operation. Further to validate the model, the device is simulated in Silvaco Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) showing good agreement with the proposed model results. The accuracy of the developed calculations of the proposed model can be used to develop a complete physics based 2DEG sheet charge density and threshold voltage model for GaN MOSHEMT devices for performance analysis.

  18. Oxidative stress-dependent changes in immune responses and cell death in the substantia nigra after ozone exposure in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Arancibia, Selva; Zimbrón, Luis Fernando Hernández; Rodríguez-Martínez, Erika; Maldonado, Perla D.; Borgonio Pérez, Gabino; Sepúlveda-Parada, María

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has been associated with the selective loss of neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a major role. The resulting increase in reactive oxygen species triggers a sequence of events that leads to cell damage, activation of microglia cells and neuroinflammatory responses. Our objective was to study whether chronic exposure to low doses of ozone, which produces oxidative stress itself, induces progressive cell death in conjunction with glial alterations in the substantia nigra. Animals were exposed to an ozone-free air stream (control) or to low doses of ozone for 7, 15, 30, 60, or 90 days. Each group underwent (1) spectrophotometric analysis for protein oxidation; (2) western blot testing for microglia reactivity and nuclear factor kappa B expression levels; and (3) immunohistochemistry for cytochrome c, GFAP, Iba-1, NFkB, and COX-2. Our results indicate that ozone induces an increase in protein oxidation levels, changes in activated astrocytes and microglia, and cell death. NFkB and cytochrome c showed an increase until 30 days of exposure, while cyclooxygenase 2 in the substantia nigra increased from 7 days up to 90 days of repetitive ozone exposure. These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by ozone exposure induces changes in inflammatory responses and progressive cell death in the substantia nigra in rats, which could also be occurring in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25999851

  19. Chlorpromazine and carnitine-dependency of rat liver peroxisomal beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Vamecq, J

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme targets for chlorpromazine inhibition of rat liver peroxisomal and mitochondrial oxidations of fatty acids were studied. Effects of chlorpromazine on total fatty acyl-CoA synthetase activity, on both the first and the third steps of peroxisomal beta-oxidation, on the entry of fatty acyl-CoA esters into the peroxisome and on catalase activity, which allows breakdown of the H2O2 generated during the acyl-CoA oxidase step, were analysed. On all these metabolic processes, chlorpromazin...

  20. Zanthoxylum heitzii Modulates Ferric Nitrilotriacetate-Dependent Oxidative Alterations in Four Vital Organs: An In Vitro Organoprotective Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joël Essogo, Jacques; Tankeu, Francine Nzufo; Nanfack, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a highly reactive compound used to induce degenerative disorders through oxidative stress (OS). Zanthoxylum heitzii (Z. heitzii) is a spice used as a medicinal plant to treat a variety of illnesses. This study investigated the ability of extracts from the leaves, fruits, roots, and barks of Z. Heitzii to inhibit Fe-NTA mediated oxidative damage in rats. The supernatant of rat liver homogenates was pretreated with the extracts for one hour before the induction of oxidative damage using a solution of Fe-NTA (400 mM). The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and peroxidases were measured together with the marker of lipid peroxidation and the level of glutathione. The pretreated groups showed a significant increase in the activity of SOD, catalase, and peroxidases. The methanolic extract from the leaves of Z. heitzii (36.78 ± 3.30) and aqueous extract from the fruits (37.01 ± 2.52) showed the highest activities of SOD in the liver. The lowest concentration of MDA was found in the liver, and the glutathione was greater in the brain. Conclusively, these results suggest that Z. heitzii might be a chemoprotector which may be used in for prevention of distinct types of diseases induced by oxidative stress. PMID:28852413

  1. Zanthoxylum heitzii Modulates Ferric Nitrilotriacetate-Dependent Oxidative Alterations in Four Vital Organs: An In Vitro Organoprotective Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Joël Essogo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA is a highly reactive compound used to induce degenerative disorders through oxidative stress (OS. Zanthoxylum heitzii (Z. heitzii is a spice used as a medicinal plant to treat a variety of illnesses. This study investigated the ability of extracts from the leaves, fruits, roots, and barks of Z. Heitzii to inhibit Fe-NTA mediated oxidative damage in rats. The supernatant of rat liver homogenates was pretreated with the extracts for one hour before the induction of oxidative damage using a solution of Fe-NTA (400 mM. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase, and peroxidases were measured together with the marker of lipid peroxidation and the level of glutathione. The pretreated groups showed a significant increase in the activity of SOD, catalase, and peroxidases. The methanolic extract from the leaves of Z. heitzii (36.78 ± 3.30 and aqueous extract from the fruits (37.01 ± 2.52 showed the highest activities of SOD in the liver. The lowest concentration of MDA was found in the liver, and the glutathione was greater in the brain. Conclusively, these results suggest that Z. heitzii might be a chemoprotector which may be used in for prevention of distinct types of diseases induced by oxidative stress.

  2. Dependence Properties of Sol-Gel Derived CuO@SiO2 Nanostructure to Diverse Concentrations of Copper Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Homaunmir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Various concentrations of copper oxide were embedded into silica matrix of xerogel forms using copper source Cu(NO32·3H2O. The xerogel samples were prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS with determination of new molar ratios of the components by the sol-gel method. In this paper, three samples of copper oxide were doped into silica matrices using different concentrations. We obtained 10, 20, and 30 wt.% of copper oxide in silica matrices labeled as A, B, and C, respectively. The absorption and transmittance spectra of the gel matrices were treated at different concentrations by Uv-vis spectrophotometer. Quantities of water and transparency in the silica network change the spectral characteristics of Cu2+ ions in the host silica. Absorption spectra of the samples heated to higher concentration complete the conversion of Cu2+ ions to Cu+ ions. The effects of concentration of copper oxide were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM micrographs. Also, textural properties of samples were studied by surface area analysis (BET method at different concentrations.

  3. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in endotoxemic rat hepatocytes is dependent on the cellular glutathione status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, TA; van Goor, H; Tuyt, L; de Jager-Krikken, A; Leuvenink, R; Kuipers, F; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    The inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promoter contains nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) binding sites. NF-kappa B activation is determined, in part, by the intracellular redox status, The aim of this study was to determine the importance of the cellular glutathione status in relation to

  4. Probing the structural dependency of photoinduced properties of colloidal quantum dots using metal-oxide photo-active substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patty, Kira; Campbell, Quinn; Hamilton, Nathan; West, Robert G. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Sadeghi, Seyed M., E-mail: seyed.sadeghi@uah.edu [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Nano and Micro Device Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Mao, Chuanbin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    We used photoactive substrates consisting of about 1 nm coating of a metal oxide on glass substrates to investigate the impact of the structures of colloidal quantum dots on their photophysical and photochemical properties. We showed during irradiation these substrates can interact uniquely with such quantum dots, inducing distinct forms of photo-induced processes when they have different cores, shells, or ligands. In particular, our results showed that for certain types of core-shell quantum dot structures an ultrathin layer of a metal oxide can reduce suppression of quantum efficiency of the quantum dots happening when they undergo extensive photo-oxidation. This suggests the possibility of shrinking the sizes of quantum dots without significant enhancement of their non-radiative decay rates. We show that such quantum dots are not influenced significantly by Coulomb blockade or photoionization, while those without a shell can undergo a large amount of photo-induced fluorescence enhancement via such blockade when they are in touch with the metal oxide.

  5. Establishing the potential dependent equilibrium oxide coverage on platinum in alkaline solution and its influence on the oxygen reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Gustav; Arenz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Publication year: 2012 Source:Journal of Power Sources, Volume 217 Gustav K.H. Wiberg, Matthias Arenz The oxidation process of polycrystalline platinum subjected to alkaline solution is re-examined using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and potential hold techniques in Ar, H2 and O2 purged 0.1...

  6. Mechanistic analysis of temperature-dependent current conduction through thin tunnel oxide in n+-polySi/SiO2/n+-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Piyas

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed investigation on temperature-dependent current conduction through thin tunnel oxides grown on degenerately doped n-type silicon (n+-Si) under positive bias ( VG ) on heavily doped n-type polycrystalline silicon (n+-polySi) gate in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. The leakage current measured between 298 and 573 K and at oxide fields ranging from 6 to 10 MV/cm is primarily attributed to Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission of trapped electrons from the neutral electron traps located in the silicon dioxide (SiO2) band gap in addition to Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling of electrons from n+-Si acting as the drain node in FLOating gate Tunnel OXide Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory devices. Process-induced neutral electron traps are located at 0.18 eV and 0.9 eV below the SiO2 conduction band. Throughout the temperature range studied here, PF emission current IPF dominates FN electron tunneling current IFN at oxide electric fields Eox between 6 and 10 MV/cm. A physics based new analytical formula has been developed for FN tunneling of electrons from the accumulation layer of degenerate semiconductors at a wide range of temperatures incorporating the image force barrier rounding effect. FN tunneling has been formulated in the framework of Wentzel-Kramers-Brilloiun taking into account the correction factor due to abrupt variation of the energy barrier at the cathode/oxide interface. The effect of interfacial and near-interfacial trapped-oxide charges on FN tunneling has also been investigated in detail at positive VG . The mechanism of leakage current conduction through SiO2 films plays a crucial role in simulation of time-dependent dielectric breakdown of the memory devices and to precisely predict the normal operating field or applied floating gate (FG) voltage for lifetime projection of the devices. In addition, we present theoretical results showing the effect of drain doping concentration on the FG leakage current.

  7. Single crystal structures and theoretical calculations of uranium endohedral metallofullerenes (U@C2n , 2n = 74, 82) show cage isomer dependent oxidation states for U.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenting; Morales-Martínez, Roser; Zhang, Xingxing; Najera, Daniel; Romero, Elkin L; Metta-Magaña, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Fortea, Antonio; Fortier, Skye; Chen, Ning; Poblet, Josep M; Echegoyen, Luis

    2017-08-01

    Charge transfer is a general phenomenon observed for all endohedral mono-metallofullerenes. Since the detection of the first endohedral metallofullerene (EMF), La@C 82 , in 1991, it has always been observed that the oxidation state of a given encapsulated metal is always the same, regardless of the cage size. No crystallographic data exist for any early actinide endohedrals and little is known about the oxidation states for the few compounds that have been reported. Here we report the X-ray structures of three uranium metallofullerenes, U@ D 3h -C 74 , U@ C 2 (5)-C 82 and U@ C 2v (9)-C 82 , and provide theoretical evidence for cage isomer dependent charge transfer states for U. Results from DFT calculations show that U@ D 3h -C 74 and U@ C 2 (5)-C 82 have tetravalent electronic configurations corresponding to U 4+ @ D 3h -C 74 4- and U 4+ @ C 2 (5)-C 82 4- . Surprisingly, the isomeric U@ C 2v (9)-C 82 has a trivalent electronic configuration corresponding to U 3+ @ C 2v (9)-C 82 3- . These are the first X-ray crystallographic structures of uranium EMFs and this is first observation of metal oxidation state dependence on carbon cage isomerism for mono-EMFs.

  8. In vitro dose and duration dependent approaches for the assessment of ameliorative effects of nanoconjugated vancomycin against Staphylococcus aureus infection induced oxidative stress in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2016-02-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the in vitro ameliorative effect of nanoconjugated vancomycin (NV) against vancomycin sensitive and resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus infection-induced oxidative stress in murine peritoneal macrophage. Peritoneal macrophages from mice were treated with VSSA and VRSA (5 × 10(6) CFU/mL), VSSA + NV (5-250 μg/ml) and VRSA + NV (5-250 μg/ml) for 18 h, having 3 h interval in culture media; and the superoxide anion generation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, antioxidant enzymes status and glutathione enzymes activity were monitored. The significantly increased free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls and oxidized glutathione levels were observed in VSSA and VRSA treated group as compared to control group; where as reduced glutathione level, antioxidant enzymes status and glutathione dependent enzymes were decreased significantly. All these changes come near to control in NV treated group in a dose and duration dependent fashion. Among the different doses and duration intervals of NV, maximum ameliorative effect was observed by 100 μg/ml for 12 h treatment which does not produce any damage to the cell. These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role of nanoconjugated vancomycin as a modulator of S. aureus infection-induced cellular damage in murine peritoneal macrophage. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Mechanistic characterization of aerobic alcohol oxidation catalyzed by Pd(OAc)(2)/pyridine including identification of the catalyst resting state and the origin of nonlinear [catalyst] dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Bradley A; Guzei, Ilia A; Stahl, Shannon S

    2004-09-15

    The Pd(OAc)(2)/pyridine catalyst system is one of the most convenient and versatile catalyst systems for selective aerobic oxidation of organic substrates. This report describes the catalytic mechanism of Pd(OAc)(2)/pyridine-mediated oxidation of benzyl alcohol, which has been studied by gas-uptake kinetic methods and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The data reveal that turnover-limiting substrate oxidation by palladium(II) proceeds by a four-step pathway involving (1) formation of an adduct between the alcohol substrate and the square-planar palladium(II) complex, (2) proton-coupled ligand substitution to generate a palladium-alkoxide species, (3) reversible dissociation of pyridine from palladium(II) to create a three-coordinate intermediate, and (4) irreversible beta-hydride elimination to produce benzaldehyde. The catalyst resting state, characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, consists of an equilibrium mixture of (py)(2)Pd(OAc)(2), 1, and the alcohol adduct of this complex, 1xRCH(2)OH. These in situ spectroscopic data provide direct support for the mechanism proposed from kinetic studies. The catalyst displays higher turnover frequency at lower catalyst loading, as revealed by a nonlinear dependence of the rate on [catalyst]. This phenomenon arises from a competition between forward and reverse reaction steps that exhibit unimolecular and bimolecular dependences on [catalyst]. Finally, overoxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzoic acid, even at low levels, contributes to catalyst deactivation by formation of a less active palladium benzoate complex.

  10. Mechanism of oxide thickness and temperature dependent current conduction in n+-polySi/SiO2/p-Si structures — a new analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Piyas

    2017-10-01

    The conduction mechanism of gate leakage current through thermally grown silicon dioxide (SiO2) films on (100) p-type silicon has been investigated in detail under negative bias on the degenerately doped n-type polysilicon (n+-polySi) gate. The analysis utilizes the measured gate current density J G at high oxide fields E ox in 5.4 to 12 nm thick SiO2 films between 25 and 300 °C. The leakage current measured up to 300 °C was due to Fowler–Nordheim (FN) tunneling of electrons from the accumulated n +-polySi gate in conjunction with Poole Frenkel (PF) emission of trapped-electrons from the electron traps located at energy levels ranging from 0.6 to 1.12 eV (depending on the oxide thickness) below the SiO2 conduction band (CB). It was observed that PF emission current I PF dominates FN electron tunneling current I FN at oxide electric fields E ox between 6 and 10 MV/cm and throughout the temperature range studied here. Understanding of the mechanism of leakage current conduction through SiO2 films plays a crucial role in simulation of time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) of metaloxide–semiconductor (MOS) devices and to precisely predict the normal operating field or applied gate voltage for lifetime projection of the MOS integrated circuits.

  11. Macrophage activation by a vanadyl-aspirin complex is dependent on L-type calcium channel and the generation of nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinuevo, Maria Silvina; Etcheverry, Susana Beatriz; Cortizo, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is the result of a tight balance between bone resorption and bone formation where macrophage activation is believed to contribute to bone resorption. We have previously shown that a vanadyl(IV)-aspirin complex (VOAspi) regulates cell proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts in culture. In this study, we assessed VOAspi and VO effects and their possible mechanism of action on a mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Both vanadium compounds inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Nifedipine completely reversed the VOAspi-induced macrophage cytotoxicity, while it could not block the effect of VO. VOAspi also stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production, the oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR-123) and enhanced the expression of both constitutive and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide syntases (NOS). All these effects were abolished by nifedipine. Althogether our finding give evidence that VOAspi-induced macrophage cytotoxicity is dependent on L-type calcium channel and the generation of NO though the induction of eNOS and iNOS. Contrary, the parent compound VO exerted a cytotoxic effect by mechanisms independent of a calcium entry and the NO/NOS activation

  12. Correlation of nucleotides and carbohydrates metabolism with pro-oxidant and antioxidant systems of erythrocytes depending on age in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuikov, S A; Borzenko, B G; Shatova, O P; Bakurova, E M; Polunin, G E

    2014-06-01

    To examine the relationship between metabolic features of purine nucleotides and antioxidant system depending on the age of patients with colorectal cancer. The activity of adenosine deaminase, xanthine oxidase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the NOx concentration and the oxidative modification of proteins were determined spectrophotometricaly in 50 apparently healthy people and 26 patients with colorectal cancer stage -III---IV, aged 40 to 79 years. Increase of pro-oxidant system of erythrocytes with the age against decrease in level of antioxidant protection in both healthy individuals and colorectal cancer patients was determined. A significant increase of pro-ducts of oxidative proteins modification in erythrocytes with ageing was shown. Statistically significant correlation between enzymatic and non enzymatic markers pro-oxidant system and the activity of antioxidant defense enzymes in erythrocytes of patient with colorectal cancer was determined. Obtained results have demonstrated the imbalance in the antioxidant system of erythrocytes in colorectal cancer patients that improve the survival of cancer cells that is more distinctly manifested in ageing.

  13. Surface Chemistry Dependence of Mechanochemical Reaction of Adsorbed Molecules-An Experimental Study on Tribopolymerization of α-Pinene on Metal, Metal Oxide, and Carbon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Kim, Seong H

    2018-02-20

    Mechanochemical reactions between adsorbate molecules sheared at tribological interfaces can induce association of adsorbed molecules, forming oligomeric and polymeric products often called tribopolymers). This study revealed the role or effect of surface chemistry of the solid substrate in mechanochemical polymerization reactions. As a model reactant, α-pinene was chosen because it was known to readily form tribopolymers at the sliding interface of stainless steel under vapor-phase lubrication conditions. Eight different substrate materials were tested-palladium, nickel, copper, stainless steel, gold, silicon oxide, aluminum oxide, and diamond-like carbon (DLC). All metal substrates and DLC were initially covered with surface oxide species formed naturally in air or during the oxidative sample cleaning. It was found that the tribopolymerization yield of α-pinene is much higher on the substrates that can chemisorb α-pinene, compared to the ones on which only physisorption occurs. From the load dependence of the tribopolymerization yield, it was found that the surfaces capable of chemisorption give a smaller critical activation volume for the mechanochemical reaction, compared to the ones capable of physisorption only. On the basis of these observations and infrared spectroscopy analyses of the adsorbed molecules and the produced polymers, it was concluded that the mechanochemical reaction mechanisms might be different between chemically reactive and inert surfaces and that the chemical reactivity of the substrate surface greatly influences the tribochemical polymerization reactions of adsorbed molecules.

  14. Maternal smoking and impaired endothelium-dependent nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of uterine small arteries in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene R; Uldbjerg, Niels; Stender, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy.......This study aimed to investigate the endothelium-dependent relaxation of uterine small arteries from pregnant nonsmokers, smokers, and ex-smokers who stopped smoking early in pregnancy....

  15. Polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers as templates for stacked, spherical large-mesopore silica coatings: dependence of silica pore size on the PS/PEO ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisticò, Roberto; Magnacca, Giuliana; Jadhav, Sushilkumar A; Scalarone, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Large-mesopore silica films with a narrow pore size distribution and high porosity have been obtained by a sol-gel reaction of a silicon oxide precursor (TEOS) and using polystyrene- block -poly(ethylene oxide) (PS- b -PEO) copolymers as templates in an acidic environment. PS- b -PEO copolymers with different molecular weight and composition have been studied in order to assess the effects of the block length on the pore size of the templated silica films. The changes in the morphology of the porous systems have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and a systematic analysis has been carried out, evidencing the dependence between the hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio of the two polymer blocks and the size of the final silica pores. The obtained results prove that by tuning the PS/PEO ratio, the pore size of the templated silica films can be easily and finely predicted.

  16. Polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide copolymers as templates for stacked, spherical large-mesopore silica coatings: dependence of silica pore size on the PS/PEO ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Nisticò

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-mesopore silica films with a narrow pore size distribution and high porosity have been obtained by a sol–gel reaction of a silicon oxide precursor (TEOS and using polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide (PS-b-PEO copolymers as templates in an acidic environment. PS-b-PEO copolymers with different molecular weight and composition have been studied in order to assess the effects of the block length on the pore size of the templated silica films. The changes in the morphology of the porous systems have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and a systematic analysis has been carried out, evidencing the dependence between the hydrophilic/hydrophobic ratio of the two polymer blocks and the size of the final silica pores. The obtained results prove that by tuning the PS/PEO ratio, the pore size of the templated silica films can be easily and finely predicted.

  17. Reaction-induced cluster ripening and initial size-dependent reaction rates for CO oxidation on Pt(n)/TiO2(110)-(1×1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Simon; Aït-Mansour, Kamel; Harbich, Wolfgang; Brune, Harald

    2014-06-18

    We determined the CO oxidation rates for size-selected Ptn (n ∈ {3,7,10}) clusters deposited onto TiO2(110). In addition, we investigated the cluster morphologies and their mean sizes before and after the reaction. While the clusters are fairly stable upon annealing in ultrahigh vacuum up to 600 K, increasing the temperature while adsorbing either one of the two reactants leads to ripening already from 430 K on. This coarsening is even more pronounced when both reactants are dosed simultaneously, i.e., running the CO oxidation reaction. Since the ripening depends on the size initially deposited, there is nevertheless a size effect; the catalytic activity decreases monotonically with increasing initial cluster size.

  18. Alloantigen-induced, T-cell-dependent production of nitic oxide by macrophagesinfiltrating skin allografts in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krulová, Magdalena; Zajícová, Alena; Frič, Jan; Holáň, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, 2-3 (2002), s. 108-116 ISSN 0934-0874 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/D044; GA ČR GA310/99/0360; GA MZd NI6659; GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : allograft rejection * macrophages * nitric oxide Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.520, year: 2002

  19. Alloantigen-induced, T-cell dependent production of nitric oxide by macrophages infiltrating skin allografts in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krulová, Magdalena; Zajícová, Alena; Frič, Jan; Holáň, Vladimír

    15, 2002, 2-3 (2002), s. 108-116 ISSN 0934-0874 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/D044; GA ČR GA310/99/0360; GA MZd NI6659; GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : mouse * allograft rejection * nitric oxide Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.520, year: 2002

  20. Ropivacaine-Induced Contraction Is Attenuated by Both Endothelial Nitric Oxide and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channels in Isolated Rat Aortae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Ho Ok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated endothelium-derived vasodilators and potassium channels involved in the modulation of ropivacaine-induced contraction. In endothelium-intact rat aortae, ropivacaine concentration-response curves were generated in the presence or absence of the following inhibitors: the nonspecific nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, the neuronal NOS inhibitor Nω-propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride, the inducible NOS inhibitor 1400W dihydrochloride, the nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (GC inhibitor ODQ, the NOS and GC inhibitor methylene blue, the phosphoinositide-3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin, the cytochrome p450 epoxygenase inhibitor fluconazole, the voltage-dependent potassium channel inhibitor 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium (TEA, the inward-rectifying potassium channel inhibitor barium chloride, and the ATP-sensitive potassium channel inhibitor glibenclamide. The effect of ropivacaine on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells was examined by western blotting. Ropivacaine-induced contraction was weaker in endothelium-intact aortae than in endothelium-denuded aortae. L-NAME, ODQ, and methylene blue enhanced ropivacaine-induced contraction, whereas wortmannin, Nω-propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride, 1400W dihydrochloride, and fluconazole had no effect. 4-AP and TEA enhanced ropivacaine-induced contraction; however, barium chloride and glibenclamide had no effect. eNOS phosphorylation was induced by ropivacaine. These results suggest that ropivacaine-induced contraction is attenuated primarily by both endothelial nitric oxide and voltage-dependent potassium channels.

  1. Inhibition of IFN-γ-Induced Nitric Oxide Dependent Antimycobacterial Activity by miR-155 and C/EBPβ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Qin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available miR-155 (microRNA-155 is an important non-coding RNA in regulating host crucial biological regulators. However, its regulatory function in mycobacterium infection remains unclear. Our study demonstrates that miR-155 expression is significantly increased in macrophages after Mycobacterium marinum (M.m infection. Transfection with anti-miR-155 enhances nitric oxide (NO synthesis and decreases the mycobacterium burden, and vice versa, in interferon γ (IFN-γ activated macrophages. More importantly, miR-155 can directly bind to the 3′UTR of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ, a positive transcriptional regulator of nitric oxide synthase (NOS2, and regulate C/EBPβ expression negatively. Knockdown of C/EBPβ inhibit the production of nitric oxide synthase and promoted mycobacterium survival. Collectively, these data suggest that M.m-induced upregulation of miR-155 downregulated the expression of C/EBPβ, thus decreasing the production of NO and promoting mycobacterium survival, which may provide an insight into the function of miRNA in subverting the host innate immune response by using mycobacterium for its own profit. Understanding how miRNAs partly regulate microbicidal mechanisms may represent an attractive way to control tuberculosis infectious.

  2. Time and Dose-Dependent Effects of Labisia pumila on Bone Oxidative Status of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Mohd Effendy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal osteoporosis can be associated with oxidative stress and deterioration of antioxidant enzymes. It is mainly treated with estrogen replacement therapy (ERT. Although effective, ERT may cause adverse effects such as breast cancer and pulmonary embolism. Labisia pumila var. alata (LP, a herb used traditionally for women’s health was found to protect against estrogen-deficient osteoporosis. An extensive study was conducted in a postmenopausal osteoporosis rat model using several LP doses and duration of treatments to determine if anti-oxidative mechanisms were involved in its bone protective effects. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups; baseline group (BL, sham-operated (Sham, ovariectomised control (OVXC, ovariectomised (OVX and given 64.5 μg/kg of Premarin (ERT, ovariectomised and given 20 mg/kg of LP (LP20 and ovariectomised and given 100 mg/kg of LP (LP100. The groups were further subdivided to receive their respective treatments via daily oral gavages for three, six or nine weeks of treatment periods. Following euthanization, the femora were dissected out for bone oxidative measurements which include superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and malondialdehyde (MDA levels. Results: The SOD levels of the sham-operated and all the treatment groups were significantly higher than the OVX groups at all treatment periods. The GPx level of ERT and LP100 groups at the 9th week of treatment were significantly higher than the baseline and OVX groups. MDA level of the OVX group was significantly higher than all the other groups at weeks 6 and 9. The LP20 and LP100 groups at the 9th week of treatment had significantly lower MDA levels than the ERT group. There were no significant differences between LP20 and LP100 for all parameters. Thus, LP supplementations at both doses, which showed the best results at 9 weeks, may reduce oxidative stress which in turn may prevent bone loss via its

  3. Mechanism of oxalate ion adsorption on chromium oxide-hydroxide from pH dependence and time evolution of ATR-IR spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Jens; McQuillan, A. James

    1999-09-01

    A chromium (III) oxide-hydroxide colloid film has been used to model the passive surface of stainless steel in in situ ATR-IR studies of oxalate ion adsorption from aqueous oxalate solutions over a wide pH range. Studies of time and pH dependence of adsorption have been used to reveal a mechanism of adsorption proceeding through ionic, hydrogen bonded and coordinated oxalate species. A Langmuir adsorption constant of 4.5×10 4 M -1 was determined for the surface coordinated oxalate from an adsorption isotherm at pH=3.

  4. Differentiation of cGMP-dependent and -independent nitric oxide effects on platelet apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production using platelets lacking soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukoyatkina, N; Walter, U; Friebe, A; Gambaryan, S

    2011-11-01

    Platelet activation is an irreversible process resulting in platelet apoptosis and necrosis, and circulating platelets contain many components of the apoptotic machinery. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) generated by nitric oxide (NO) activated soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) plays a crucial role in preventing platelet activation. However, in addition to activation of sGC, cGMP-independent NO effects in platelets have been described. To differentiate between cGMP-dependent and -independent NO effects on platelet apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, we generated platelet-specific sGC-deficient mice (PS-GCKO). Platelet apoptosis was induced by a combination of thrombin/convulxin (Thr/Cvx) and assessed by phosphatidylserine (PS) surface exposure, and loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. NO-induced inhibition of PS externalisation was mediated only by cGMP-dependent mechanisms. Inhibition of the mitochondrial membrane potential decrease at low NO concentration was also cGMP-dependent but became cGMP-independent at high NO concentrations. In contrast, inhibition of ROS formation at any NO concentration was mediated by cGMP-independent mechanisms, very likely due to direct radical scavenging. NO inhibits platelet apoptosis by cGMP-dependent mechanisms and ROS production by cGMP-independent mechanisms. The PS-GCKO mouse model is an important tool for the differentiation of cGMP-dependent and -independent NO effects on platelets.

  5. ROLE OF NRF2 IN THE OXIDATIVE STRESS-DEPENDENT HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEPLETION OF DJ-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Santiago; Yang, Yu; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Asico, Laureano; Feranil, Jun; Jones, John; Villar, Van Anthony; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Renal dopamine 2 receptor dysfunction is associated with oxidative stress and high blood pressure. We have reported that DJ-1, an oxidative stress response protein, is positively regulated by dopamine 2 receptor in the kidney. The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the expression of several antioxidant genes. We tested the hypothesis that Nrf2 is involved in the renal DJ-1-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species production. We have reported that silencing dopamine 2 receptor in mouse renal proximal tubule cells decreases the expression of DJ-1. We now report that silencing DJ-1 or dopamine 2 receptor in mouse proximal tubule cells and mouse kidneys, decreases Nrf2 expression and activity and increases reactive oxygen species production; blood pressure is also increased in mice in which renal DJ-1 or dopamine 2 receptor is silenced. DJ-1−/− mice have decreased renal Nrf2 expression and activity, and increased nitro-tyrosine levels an dopamine 2 receptor d blood pressure. Silencing Nrf2 in mouse proximal tubule cells does not alter the expression of DJ-1 or dopamine 2 receptor, indicating that Nrf2 is downstream of dopamine 2 receptor and DJ-1. A Nrf2 inducer, bardoxolone, normalizes the systolic blood pressure and renal malondialdehyde levels in DJ-1−/− mice without affecting them in their wild-type littermates. Because Nrf2 ubiquitination is increased in DJ-1−/− mice, we conclude that the protective effect of DJ-1 on renal oxidative stress is mediated, in part, by preventing Nrf2 degradation. Moreover, renal dopamine 2 receptor and DJ-1 are necessary for normal Nrf2 activity to keep a normal redox balance and blood pressure. PMID:25895590

  6. Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

    CERN Document Server

    Foulon, V; Croes, K; Waelkens, E

    1999-01-01

    Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

  7. Telmisartan increases fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-[gamma] dependent pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sugimoto, K.; Kazdová, L.; Qi, N.R.; Hyakukoku, M.; Křen, Vladimír; Šimáková, Miroslava; Zídek, Václav; Kurtz, T. W.; Pravenec, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2008), s. 1209-1215 ISSN 0263-6352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA MZd(CZ) NR8495; GA MZd NR9359; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/06/0028 Grant - others:-(XE) LSHG-CT-2005-019015; HHMI(US) 55005624; -(US) HL56028; -(US) HL63709 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK ; N - neverejné zdroje Keywords : telmisartan * fatty acid oxidation * PPARgamma Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 5.132, year: 2008

  8. Enhanced strain-dependent electrical resistance of polyurethane composites with embedded oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benlikaya, R.; Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, Fall (2013) ISSN 1687-4110 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111; GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0104; TBU Zlin(CZ) IGA/FT/2013/018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : carbon nanotube s * oxidation * strain sensor * gauge factor * polyurethane Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.611, year: 2013 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2013/327597/

  9. Stress depended changes in activityof gp red blood cells receptors and its correction by therahertz waves at nitric oxide frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichuk V.F.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range frequencies of molecular spectrum of emission and absorption of nitric oxide 150.176–150.664 GHz for the restoration of the impaired carbohydrate component and functional activity glikoproteid receptors of erythrocytes of white rats in a state of acute imm obilization stress. Shown that exposure to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies is the normalization of the increased content of b-D-galactose in the carbohydrate component and the restoration of the impaired activity of the receptors glikoproteid erythrocytes

  10. Enhanced strain-dependent electrical resistance of polyurethane composites with embedded oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benlikaya, R.; Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, Fall (2013) ISSN 1687-4110 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111; GA MŠk(CZ) EE.2.3.20.0104; TBU Zlin(CZ) IGA/FT/2013/018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * oxidation * strain sensor * gauge factor * polyurethane Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.611, year: 2013 http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2013/327597/

  11. Frequency-dependent electrophysiological remodeling of the AV node by hydroalcohol extract of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) during experimental atrial fibrillation: the role of endogenous nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khori, Vahid; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Rakhshan, Elnaz; Mirabbasi, Abbas; Changizi, Shima; Mazandarani, Masumeh; Nayebpour, Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    The study assessed the hydroalcohol extract effects of Crocus sativus L. (saffron) on (i) the basic and rate-dependent electrophysiological properties of the AV node, (ii) remodeling of the AV node during experimental atrial fibrillation (AF) and (iii) the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effects of saffron on the AV node. Stimulation protocols in isolated AV node were used to quantify AV nodal recovery, facilitation and fatigue in four groups of rabbits (n = 8-16 per group). In addition, the nodal response to AF was evaluated at multiple cycle lengths and during AF. Saffron had a depressant effect on AV nodal rate-dependent properties; further, it increased Wenckebach block cycle length, functional refractory period, facilitation and fatigue (p AV node (p AV node during AF by saffron. Saffron increased the AV nodal refractoriness and zone of concealment. These depressant effects of saffron were mediated by endogenous NO. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-derived peptide (NAP) ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Narendra K; Sethy, Niroj K; Meena, Ram Niwas; Ilavazhagan, Govindsamy; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2011-06-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia is a socio-economic problem affecting cognitive, memory and behavior functions. Severe oxidative stress caused by hypobaric hypoxia adversely affects brain areas like cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. In the present study, we have investigated the antioxidant and memory protection efficacy of the synthetic NAP peptide (NAPVSIPQ) during long-term chronic hypobaric hypoxia (7, 14, 21 and 28 days, 25,000ft) in rats. Intranasal supplementation of NAP peptide (2μg/Kg body weight) improved antioxidant status of brain evaluated by biochemical assays for free radical estimation, lipid peroxidation, GSH and GSSG level. Analysis of expression levels of SOD revealed that NAP significantly activated antioxidant genes as compared to hypoxia exposed rats. We have also observed a significant increased expression of Nrf2, the master regulator of antioxidant defense system and its downstream targets such as HO-1, GST and SOD1 by NAP supplementation, suggesting activation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense response. In corroboration, our results also demonstrate that NAP supplementation improved the memory function assessed with radial arm maze. These cumulative results suggest the therapeutic potential of NAP peptide for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A phosphate-dependent shift in redox state of cerium oxide nanoparticles and its effects on catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sanjay; Dosani, Talib; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Kumar, Amit; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William

    2011-10-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in cell culture and animal models as both superoxide dismutase and catalase mimetics. The reactivity of the cerium (Ce) atoms at the surface of its oxide particle is critical to such therapeutic properties, yet little is known about the potential for a protein or small molecule corona to form on these materials in vivo. Moreover Ce atoms in these active sites have the potential to interact with small molecule anions, peptides, or sugars when administered in culture or animal models. Several nanomaterials have been shown to alter or aggregate under these conditions, rendering them less useful for biomedical applications. In this work we have studied the change in catalytic properties of CeNPs when exposed to various biologically relevant conditions in vitro. We have found that CeNPs are resistant to broad changes in pH and also not altered by incubation in cell culture medium. However to our surprise phosphate anions significantly altered the characteristics of these nanomaterials and shifted the catalytic behavior due to the binding of phosphate anions to cerium. Given the abundance of phosphate in biological systems in an inorganic form, it is likely that the action of CeNPs as a catalyst may be strongly influenced by the local concentration of phosphate in the cells and/or tissues in which it has been introduced.

  14. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Regulation of CXCR4-Mediated Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells is Dependent on Cellular Oxidative State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Young

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: CXCL12, acting via one of its G protein-coupled receptors, CXCR4, is a chemoattractant for a broad range of cell types, including several types of cancer cells. Elevated expression of CXCR4, and its ligand CXCL12, play important roles in promoting cancer metastasis. Cancer cells have the potential for rapid and unlimited growth in an area that may have restricted blood supply, as oxidative stress is a common feature of solid tumors. Recent studies have reported that enhanced expression of cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD1, a critical enzyme responsible for regulation of superoxide radicals, may increase the aggressive and invasive potential of malignant cells in some cancers. Methods: We used a variety of biochemical approaches and a prostate cancer cell line to study the effects of SOD1 on CXCR4 signaling. Results: Here, we report a direct interaction between SOD1 and CXCR4. We showed that SOD1 interacts directly with the first intracellular loop (ICL1 of CXCR4 and that the CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated regulation of AKT activation, apoptosis and cell migration in prostate cancer (PCa cells is differentially modulated under normal versus hypoxic conditions when SOD1 is present. Conclusions: This study highlights a potential new regulatory mechanism by which a sensor of the oxidative environment could directly regulate signal transduction of a receptor involved in cancer cell survival and migration.

  15. Versatile Redox Chemistry Complicates Antioxidant Capacity Assessment: Flavonoids as Milieu-Dependent Anti- and Pro-Oxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Bachmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Some antioxidants have been shown to possess additional pro-oxidant effects. Diverse methodologies exist for studying redox properties of synthetic and natural chemicals. The latter are substantial components of our diet. Exploration of their contribution to life-extending or -compromising effects is mandatory. Among reactive oxygen species (ROS, hydroxyl radical (•OH is the most damaging species. Due to its short half-life, the assay has to contain a specific generation system. Plants synthesize flavonoids, phenolic compounds recognized as counter-agents to coronary heart disease. Their antioxidant activities are affected by their hydroxylation patterns. Moreover, in the plant, they mainly occur as glycosides. We chose three derivatives, quercetin, luteolin, and rutin, in attempts to explore their redox chemistry in contrasting hydrogen peroxide environments. Initial addition of hydrogen peroxide in high concentration or gradual development constituted a main factor affecting their redox chemical properties, especially in case of quercetin. Our study exemplifies that a combination of a chemical assay (deoxyribose degradation with an electrochemical method (square-wave voltammetry provides insightful data. The ambiguity of the tested flavonoids to act either as anti- or pro-oxidant may complicate categorization, but probably contributed to their evolution as components of a successful metabolic system that benefits both producer and consumer.

  16. Extracellular dopamine potentiates mn-induced oxidative stress, lifespan reduction, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a BLI-3-dependent manner in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Benedetto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD-mimicking drugs and pesticides, and more recently PD-associated gene mutations, have been studied in cell cultures and mammalian models to decipher the molecular basis of PD. Thus far, a dozen of genes have been identified that are responsible for inherited PD. However they only account for about 8% of PD cases, most of the cases likely involving environmental contributions. Environmental manganese (Mn exposure represents an established risk factor for PD occurrence, and both PD and Mn-intoxicated patients display a characteristic extrapyramidal syndrome primarily involving dopaminergic (DAergic neurodegeneration with shared common molecular mechanisms. To better understand the specificity of DAergic neurodegeneration, we studied Mn toxicity in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. Combining genetics and biochemical assays, we established that extracellular, and not intracellular, dopamine (DA is responsible for Mn-induced DAergic neurodegeneration and that this process (1 requires functional DA-reuptake transporter (DAT-1 and (2 is associated with oxidative stress and lifespan reduction. Overexpression of the anti-oxidant transcription factor, SKN-1, affords protection against Mn toxicity, while the DA-dependency of Mn toxicity requires the NADPH dual-oxidase BLI-3. These results suggest that in vivo BLI-3 activity promotes the conversion of extracellular DA into toxic reactive species, which, in turn, can be taken up by DAT-1 in DAergic neurons, thus leading to oxidative stress and cell degeneration.

  17. PRMT1 and PRMT4 Regulate Oxidative Stress-Induced Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Damage in SIRT1-Dependent and SIRT1-Independent Manners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Il Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell damage is involved in the progression of diabetic retinopathy. Arginine methylation catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs has emerged as an important histone modification involved in diverse diseases. Sirtuin (SIRT1 is a protein deacetylase implicated in the onset of metabolic diseases. Therefore, we examined the roles of type I PRMTs and their relationship with SIRT1 in human RPE cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress. H2O2 treatment increased PRMT1 and PRMT4 expression but decreased SIRT1 expression. Similar to H2O2 treatment, PRMT1 or PRMT4 overexpression increased RPE cell damage. Moreover, the H2O2-induced RPE cell damage was attenuated by PRMT1 or PRMT4 knockdown and SIRT1 overexpression. In this study, we revealed that SIRT1 expression was regulated by PRMT1 but not by PRMT4. Finally, we found that PRMT1 and PRMT4 expression is increased in the RPE layer of streptozotocin-treated rats. Taken together, we demonstrated that oxidative stress induces apoptosis both via PRMT1 in a SIRT1-dependent manner and via PRMT4 in a SIRT1-independent manner. The inhibition of the expression of type I PRMTs, especially PRMT1 and PRMT4, and increased SIRT1 could be therapeutic approaches for diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Tiliacora triandra, an Anti-Intoxication Plant, Improves Memory Impairment, Neurodegeneration, Cholinergic Function, and Oxidative Stress in Hippocampus of Ethanol Dependence Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattaporn Phunchago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in brain dysfunctions induced by alcohol. Since less therapeutic agent against cognitive deficit and brain damage induced by chronic alcohol consumption is less available, we aimed to assess the effect of Tiliacora triandra extract, a plant possessing antioxidant activity, on memory impairment, neuron density, cholinergic function, and oxidative stress in hippocampus of alcoholic rats. Male Wistar rats were induced ethanol dependence condition by semivoluntary intake of alcohol for 15 weeks. Alcoholic rats were orally given T. triandra at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg·kg−1BW for 14 days. Memory assessment was performed every 7 days while neuron density, activities of AChE, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px and, MDA level in hippocampus were assessed at the end of study. Interestingly, the extract mitigated the increased escape latency, AChE and MDA level. The extract also mitigated the decreased retention time, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities, and neurons density in hippocampus induced by alcohol. These data suggested that the extract improved memory deficit in alcoholic rats partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AChE. Therefore, T. triandra is the potential reagent for treating brain dysfunction induced by alcohol. However, further researches are necessary to understand the detail mechanism and possible active ingredient.

  19. Activation of cAMP-dependent signaling induces oxidative modification of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump and inhibits its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Caroline N; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Hamilton, Elisha J; Chia, Karin K M; Figtree, Gemma A; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2010-04-30

    Cellular signaling can inhibit the membrane Na(+)-K(+) pump via protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase and a downstream oxidative modification, glutathionylation, of the beta(1) subunit of the pump alpha/beta heterodimer. It is firmly established that cAMP-dependent signaling also regulates the pump, and we have now examined the hypothesis that such regulation can be mediated by glutathionylation. Exposure of rabbit cardiac myocytes to the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin increased the co-immunoprecipitation of NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and p22(phox), required for its activation, and increased superoxide-sensitive fluorescence. Forskolin also increased glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump beta(1) subunit and decreased its co-immunoprecipitation with the alpha(1) subunit, findings similar to those already established for PKC-dependent signaling. The decrease in co-immunoprecipitation indicates a decrease in the alpha(1)/beta(1) subunit interaction known to be critical for pump function. In agreement with this, forskolin decreased ouabain-sensitive electrogenic Na(+)-K(+) pump current (arising from the 3:2 Na(+):K(+) exchange ratio) of voltage-clamped, internally perfused myocytes. The decrease was abolished by the inclusion of superoxide dismutase, the inhibitory peptide for the epsilon-isoform of PKC or inhibitory peptide for NADPH oxidase in patch pipette solutions that perfuse the intracellular compartment. Pump inhibition was also abolished by inhibitors of protein kinase A and phospholipase C. We conclude that cAMP- and PKC-dependent inhibition of the cardiac Na(+)-K(+) pump occurs via a shared downstream oxidative signaling pathway involving NADPH oxidase activation and glutathionylation of the pump beta(1) subunit.

  20. Oxidation of the tryptophan 32 residue of human superoxide dismutase 1 caused by its bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity triggers the non-amyloid aggregation of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Fernando R; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F; Lima, Filipe S; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-10-31

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1(WT) and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp(32) residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp(32) residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1(WT) and hSOD1(G93A) mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp(32) residue in the process. The results showed that Trp(32) residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp(32) residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1(W32F) mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp(32) residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Magnetic field and temperature dependent measurements of hall coefficient in thermal evaporated Tin-Doped Cadmium Oxide Thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamadi, O.; Shakir, N.; Mohammed, F.

    2010-01-01

    CdO:Sn thin films are deposited onto glass substrates by thermal evaporation under vacuum. The studied films are polycrystalline and have an NaCl structure. The Hall effect is studied for films with different thickness as substrates are maintained at different temperatures. The temperature dependence of the Hall mobility is also investigated. (authors)

  2. Induction of time-dependent oxidative stress and related transcriptional effects of perfluorododecanoic acid in zebrafish liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yang [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wang Jianshe; Wei Yanhong; Zhang Hongxia; Xu Muqi [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai Jiayin [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China)], E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn

    2008-09-29

    The effects of acute perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) exposure on the induction of oxidative stress and alteration of mitochondrial gene expression were studied in the livers of female zebrafish (Danio rerio). Female zebrafish were exposed to PFDoA via a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g PFDoA/g body weight) and were then sacrificed 48 h, 96 h, or seven days post-PFDoA administration. PFDoA-treated fish exhibited histopathological liver damage, including swollen hepatocytes, vacuolar degeneration, and nuclei pycnosis. Glutathione (GSH) content and catalase (CAT) activity decreased significantly at 48 h post-injection while superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was initially decreased at 48 h post-injection but was then elevated by seven days post-injection. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) increased at 48 h and seven days compared to control fish, although the increased level at seven days post-injection was decreased compared to the level at 48 h post-injection. Lipid peroxidation levels were increased at seven days post-injection, while no apparent induction was observed at 48 h or 96 h post-injection. The mRNA expression of medium-chain fatty acid dehydrogenase (MCAD) was induced, while the transcriptional expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), peroxisome proliferating activating receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), carnitine palmitoyl-transferase I (CPT-I), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2), and Bcl-2 were significantly inhibited. Furthermore, the transcriptional expression of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX), very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) did not exhibit significant changes following PFDoA treatment. No significant changes were noted in the transcriptional expression of genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chain and ATP synthesis, including cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COXI), NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (NDI), and ATP synthase F0 subunit 6

  3. Grape seed and skin extract mitigates heart and liver oxidative damage induced by a high-fat diet in the rat: gender dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charradi, Kamel; Mahmoudi, Mohamed; Elkahoui, Salem; Limam, Ferid; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2013-12-01

    Obesity is a public health problem contributing to morbidity and mortality from metabolic syndrome. It has long been recognized that there is a gender dependency in several obesity-related health risks. Using a high fat diet (HFD) to induce obesity in Wistar rats, we studied the gender dependency of fat-induced oxidative stress in the heart and liver, with a special emphasis on the distribution of transition metals, as well as the protective effects of grape seed and skin extract (GSSE). HFD induced obesity in both male and female rats, characterized by increased body weight as well as relative liver mass in both genders, and increased relative heart mass in the males only. HFD also provoked the accumulation of triglycerides and total cholesterol into the male hearts, and into the livers of both genders. HFD induced oxidative stress in the male hearts and also in the livers of both genders. Furthermore, HFD affected cardiac levels of copper in the males, and hepatic levels of copper and zinc in both genders, whereas HFD affected free iron in the male hearts and female livers, specifically. In conclusion, HFD treatment altered transition metal homeostasis more drastically in the male heart than in the female liver, and GSSE efficiently protected these organs against fat-induced disturbances, regardless of gender.

  4. Improvement of biological nitrogen removal with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation bacterium Aquabacterium parvum B6 in an up-flow bioreactor for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Li, Ang; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Ma, Fang

    2016-11-01

    Aquabacterium parvum strain B6 exhibited efficient nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation ability using nitrate as an electron acceptor. A continuous up-flow bioreactor that included an aerobic and an anoxic section was constructed, and strain B6 was added to the bioreactor as inocula to explore the application of microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing (NDFO) efficiency in wastewater treatment. The maximum NRE (anoxic section) and TNRE of 46.9% and 79.7%, respectively, could be obtained at a C/N ratio of 5.3:1 in the influent with HRT of 17. Meanwhile, the taxonomy composition of the reactor was assessed, as well. The NDFO metabolism of strain B6 could be expected because of its relatively dominant position in the anoxic section, whereas potential heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification developed into the prevailing status in the aerobic section after 50days of continuous operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tetrahydrobiopterin Has a Glucose-Lowering Effect by Suppressing Hepatic Gluconeogenesis in an Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase–Dependent Manner in Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fujita, Yoshihito; Obara, Akio; Ohashi, Akiko; Fukushima, Toru; Sato, Yuichi; Ogura, Masahito; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Hosokawa, Masaya; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction induces insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor of eNOS that regulates eNOS activity. In the diabetic state, BH4 is oxidized to 7,8-dihydrobiopterin, which leads to eNOS dysfunction owing to eNOS uncoupling. The current study investigates the effects of BH4 on glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in diabetic mice. Single administration of BH4 lowered fasting blood glucose levels in wild-type mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and alleviated eNOS dysfunction by increasing eNOS dimerization in the liver of these mice. Liver has a critical role in glucose-lowering effects of BH4 through suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. BH4 activated AMP kinase (AMPK), and the suppressing effect of BH4 on gluconeogenesis was AMPK-dependent. In addition, the glucose-lowering effect and activation of AMPK by BH4 did not appear in mice with STZ-induced diabetes lacking eNOS. Consecutive administration of BH4 in ob/ob mice ameliorated glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Taken together, BH4 suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis in an eNOS-dependent manner, and BH4 has a glucose-lowering effect as well as an insulin-sensitizing effect in diabetic mice. BH4 has potential in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23649519

  6. Heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport show dependence of cadmium pollution history in the liver of female zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qing-Ling; Guo, Sai-Nan; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Lv, Zhen-Ming; Zheng, Jia-Lang; Xia, Hu

    2017-10-01

    Environmental stressors such as high temperature and metal exposure may occur sequentially, simultaneously, previously in aquatic ecosystems. However, information about whether responses to high temperature depend on Cd exposure history is still unknown in fish. Zebrafish were exposed to 0 (group 1), 2.5 (group 2) and 5μg/L (group 3) cadmium (Cd) for 10 weeks, and then each group was subjected to Cd-free water maintained at 26°C and 32°C for 7days respectively. 26 indicators were used to compare differences between 26°C and 32°C in the liver of female zebrafish, including 5 biochemical indicators (activity of Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and iNOS; LPO; MT protein), 8 molecular indicators of oxidative stress (mRNA levels of Nrf2, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT, HSF1, HSF2, HSP70, MTF-1 and MT), 5 molecular indicators of inflammation (mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS and NF-κB), 8 molecular indicators of metal transport (mRNA levels of, ZnT1, ZnT5, ZIP8, ZIP10, ATP7A, ATP7B and CTR1). All biochemical indicators were unchanged in group 1 and changed in group 2 and 3. Contrarily, differences were observed in almost all of molecular indicators of inflammation and metal transport in group 1, about half in group 2, and few in group 3. We also found that all molecular indicators of oxidative stress in group 2 and fewer in group 1 and 3 were significantly affected by heat. Our data indicated that heat indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation and metal transport showed dependence of previous cadmium exposure in the liver of zebrafish, emphasizing metal pollution history should be carefully considered when evaluating heat stress in fish. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Does Swimming at a Moderate Altitude Favor a Lower Oxidative Stress in an Intensity-Dependent Manner? Role of Nonenzymatic Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casuso, Rafael A; Aragón-Vela, Jerónimo; López-Contreras, Gracia; Gomes, Silvana N; Casals, Cristina; Barranco-Ruiz, Yaira; Mercadé, Jordi J; Huertas, Jesus R

    2017-03-01

    Casuso, Rafael A., Jerónimo Aragón-Vela, Gracia López-Contreras, Silvana N. Gomes, Cristina Casals, Yaira Barranco-Ruiz, Jordi J. Mercadé, and Jesus R. Huertas. Does swimming at a moderate altitude favor a lower oxidative stress in an intensity-dependent manner? Role of nonenzymatic antioxidants. High-Alt Med Biol. 18:46-55, 2017.-we aimed to describe oxidative damage and enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant responses to swimming at different intensities in hypoxia. We recruited 12 highly experienced swimmers who have been involved in competitive swimming for at least 9 years. They performed a total of six swimming sessions carried out at low (LOW), moderate (MOD), or high (HIGH) intensity at low altitude (630 m) and at 2320 m above sea level. Blood samples were collected before the session (Pre), after the cool down (Post), and after 15 minutes of recovery (Rec). Blood lactate (BL) and heart rate were recorded throughout the main part of the session. Average velocities did not change between hypoxia and normoxia. We found a higher BL in response to MOD intensity in hypoxia. Plasmatic hydroperoxide level decreased at all intensities when swimming in hypoxia. This effect coincided with a lower glutation peroxidase activity and a marked mobilization of the circulating levels of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q10 in an intensity-dependent manner. Our results suggest that, regardless of the intensity, no oxidative damage is found in response to hypoxic swimming in well-trained swimmers. Indeed, swimmers show a highly efficient antioxidant system by stimulating the mobilization of nonenzymatic antioxidants.

  8. Chronic treatment with taurine ameliorates diabetes-induced dysfunction of nitric oxide-mediated neurogenic and endothelium-dependent corpus cavernosum relaxation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalaklioglu, Selvinaz; Kuscu, Nilay; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Bayram, Zeliha; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Ozdem, Sadi Satilmis

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to examine the effect of chronic taurine treatment on corpus cavernosum dysfunction in diabetic rats and to investigate possible underlying mechanisms. Thirty male rats were randomized to three groups of 10 each, including control, diabetic, and taurine-treated diabetic. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ, single intraperitoneal dose of 50 mg/kg body weight). Taurine was administered orally for 12 weeks (1% w/v in drinking water) from the day on which STZ was injected. At the end of the 12th week, strips of corpus cavernosum were suspended in an organ bath system for functional studies. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation were evaluated by acetylcholine (ACh, 0.1-100 μm) and electrical field stimulation (EFS, 30 V, 5 ms, 2-32 Hz), respectively. The expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) (Ser-1177), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), NADPH oxidase subunit gp91(phox) , Rho A, and Rho kinase in corpus cavernosum were semi-quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemistry. Induction of diabetes resulted in significant inhibition of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation. Furthermore, eNOS, p-eNOS, and nNOS expressions decreased significantly in diabetic rats compared to controls, while gp91(phox) , RhoA and Rho kinase expressions increased significantly. The diminished relaxation response to ACh and EFS as well as diabetes-related changes in expressions of these proteins in corpus cavernosum of diabetic rats was significantly improved by taurine. Taurine treatment improves NO-mediated relaxations of corpus cavernosum in diabetic rats probably by inhibiting NADPH oxidase/Rho kinase pathways. © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Semen leukocytes and oxidative-dependent DNA damage of spermatozoa in male partners of subfertile couples with no symptoms of genital tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micillo, A; Vassallo, M R C; Cordeschi, G; D'Andrea, S; Necozione, S; Francavilla, F; Francavilla, S; Barbonetti, A

    2016-09-01

    The influence of seminal leukocytes on generation of oxidative damage to sperm DNA was here investigated on male partners of subfertile couples asymptomatic for a genital tract infection. The study included 111 ejaculates from men attending the Andrology Centre at University of L'Aquila. Semen leukocytes subset included round cells expressing pan-leukocyte CD45 antigen, monocyte/macrophage lineage antigen CD14, and activated macrophages HLA-DR antigen. The 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) expression identified spermatozoa with DNA oxidative adducts while terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated fluorescein-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay detected spermatozoa with DNA fragmentation. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry was used for determinations. Main outcome measure was the association of semen leukocyte subpopulations with spermatozoa showing oxidative-related DNA damage and with routine semen parameters. Leukocyte subpopulations were strictly correlated (p spermatozoa. The percentage of 8-OHdG-positive spermatozoa was positively correlated with the percentage of TUNEL-positive spermatozoa (r = 0.48; p spermatozoa independently contributed (β = -0.25, p = 0.008; β = 0.23, p = 0.05, respectively) to the variation in percentage of 8-OHdG-positive spermatozoa after adjusting for age, abstinence time, and smoking. In conclusion, oxidative-dependent DNA damage in spermatozoa was associated to poor semen quality but not to different leukocyte subpopulations in ejaculates of men asymptomatic for a genital tract infection. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  10. Structural instability and Cu-dependent pro-oxidant activity acquired by the apo form of mutant SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Furi; Fujimaki, Nobuhiro; Okita, Wakana; Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu; Takeuchi, Hideo

    2011-05-24

    Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a cytosolic antioxidant enzyme, and its mutation has been implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease causing a progressive loss of motor neurons. Although the pathogenic mechanism of ALS remains unclear, it is hypothesized that some toxic properties acquired by mutant SOD1 play a role in the development of ALS. We have examined the structural and catalytic properties of an ALS-linked mutant of human SOD1, His43Arg (H43R), which is characterized by rapid disease progression. As revealed by circular dichroism spectroscopy, H43R assumes a stable β-barrel structure in the Cu(2+),Zn(2+)-bound holo form, but its metal-depleted apo form is highly unstable and readily unfolds or misfolds into an irregular structure at physiological temperature. The conformational change occurs as a two-state transition from a nativelike apo form to a denatured apo form with a half-life of ∼0.5 h. At the same time as the denaturation, the apo form of H43R acquires pro-oxidant potential, which is fully expressed in the presence of Cu(2+) and H(2)O(2), as monitored with a fluorogenic probe for detecting pro-oxidant activity. Comparison of d-d absorption bands suggests that the Cu(2+) binding mode of the denatured apo form is different from that of the native holo form. The denatured apo form of H43R is likely to provide non-native Cu(2+) binding sites where the Cu(2+) ion is activated to catalyze harmful oxidation reactions. This study raises the possibility that the structural instability and the resultant Cu-dependent pro-oxidant activity of the apo form of mutant SOD1 may be one of the pathogenic mechanisms of ALS.

  11. ERβ-dependent neuroglobin up-regulation impairs 17β-estradiol-induced apoptosis in DLD-1 colon cancer cells upon oxidative stress injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocchetti, Marco; Camilli, Giulia; Acconcia, Filippo; Leone, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Besides other mechanism(s) 17β-estradiol (E2) facilitates neuronal survival by increasing, via estrogen receptor β (ERβ), the levels of neuroglobin (NGB) an anti-apoptotic protein. In contrast, E2 could exert protective effects in cancer cells by activating apoptosis when the ERβ level prevails on that of ERα as in colon cancer cell lines. These apparently contrasting results raise the possibility that E2-induced NGB up-regulation could regulate the ERβ activities shunning this receptor subtype to trigger an apoptotic cascade in neurons but not in non-neuronal cells. Here, human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (DLD-1) that only expresses ERβ and HeLa cells transiently transfected with ERβ encoding vector has been used to verify this hypothesis. In addition, neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells were used as positive control. Surprisingly, E2 also induced NGB up-regulation, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in DLD-1 cells. The ERβ-mediated activation of p38/MAPK was necessary for this E2 effect. E2 induced NGB re-allocation in mitochondria where, subsequently to an oxidative stress injury (i.e., 100μM H2O2), NGB interacted with cytochrome c preventing its release into the cytosol and the activation of an apoptotic cascade. As a whole, these results demonstrate that E2-induced NGB up-regulation could act as an oxidative stress sensor, which does not oppose to the pro-apoptotic E2 effect in ERβ-containing colon cancer cells unless a rise of oxidative stress occurs. These results support the concept that oxidative stress plays a critical role in E2-induced carcinogenesis and further open an important scenario to develop novel therapeutic strategies that target NGB against E2-related cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Infrared spectroscopic studies on the cluster size dependence of charge carrier structure in nitrous oxide cluster anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-01-01

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of nitrous oxide cluster anions of the form (N 2 O) n O − (n = 1–12) and (N 2 O) n − (n = 7–15) in the region 800–1600 cm −1 . The charge carriers in these ions are NNO 2 − and O − for (N 2 O) n O − clusters with a solvation induced core ion switch, and N 2 O − for (N 2 O) n − clusters. The N–N and N–O stretching vibrations of N 2 O − (solvated by N 2 O) are reported for the first time, and they are found at (1595 ± 3) cm −1 and (894 ± 5) cm −1 , respectively. We interpret our infrared spectra by comparison with the existing photoelectron spectroscopy data and with computational data in the framework of density functional theory.

  13. Species-Dependent Effects of the Urban Environment on Fatty Acid Composition and Oxidative Stress in Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Isaksson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ecological impacts of urbanization include the loss of biodiversity and changes in species composition and population densities. However, how the urban environment affects fundamental physiological parameters is largely unknown. Here, we investigated physiological components related to health and nutrition, namely, plasma fatty acids (FA and lipid peroxidation at inter-habitat and interspecific levels. Specifically, we compared four passerine bird species—the great tit (Parus major, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus, the house sparrow (Passer domesticus, and the tree sparrow (P. montanus—from urban and rural environments. Significant interactions between species and habitat were revealed for the majority of the FAs. Interestingly, the observed inter-habitat variation in FAs was frequently in opposite directions when comparing species from the two families (tits, Paridae; sparrows, Passeridae. These patterns suggest that sparrows and tits feed on different food sources, or modulate their FA metabolism differently, across the urban-rural gradient. By using canonical discriminant analyses (CDA, we further demonstrated species-specific signals in FA composition, with misclassification of species being <1% within habitats and <7% between habitats. Finally, the urban-rural FA differences between species and families were manifested in two indices of health. Firstly, urban blue tits had a higher total ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated FA ratio than rural conspecifics, which is believed to increase inflammatory responses. Secondly, urban sparrows of both species showed higher lipid peroxidation indices (indicating a higher susceptibility to lipid peroxidation if exposed to pro-oxidants, and consequently, a higher level of lipid peroxidation compared to their rural conspecifics. Collectively, the species- and habitat-specific differences in plasma FA composition, which are linked to nutrition and metabolism, suggest that the urban environment affect tits and

  14. Wild soybean roots depend on specific transcription factors and oxidation reduction related genesin response to alkaline stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuanMu, Huizi; Wang, Yang; Bai, Xi; Cheng, Shufei; Deyholos, Michael K; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Li, Dan; Zhu, Dan; Li, Ran; Yu, Yang; Cao, Lei; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Yanming

    2015-11-01

    Soil alkalinity is an important environmental problem limiting agricultural productivity. Wild soybean (Glycine soja) shows strong alkaline stress tolerance, so it is an ideal plant candidate for studying the molecular mechanisms of alkaline tolerance and identifying alkaline stress-responsive genes. However, limited information is available about G. soja responses to alkaline stress on a genomic scale. Therefore, in the present study, we used RNA sequencing to compare transcript profiles of G. soja root responses to sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) at six time points, and a total of 68,138,478 pairs of clean reads were obtained using the Illumina GAIIX. Expression patterns of 46,404 G. soja genes were profiled in all six samples based on RNA-seq data using Cufflinks software. Then, t12 transcription factors from MYB, WRKY, NAC, bZIP, C2H2, HB, and TIFY families and 12 oxidation reduction related genes were chosen and verified to be induced in response to alkaline stress by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The GO functional annotation analysis showed that besides "transcriptional regulation" and "oxidation reduction," these genes were involved in a variety of processes, such as "binding" and "response to stress." This is the first comprehensive transcriptome profiling analysis of wild soybean root under alkaline stress by RNA sequencing. Our results highlight changes in the gene expression patterns and identify a set of genes induced by NaHCO3 stress. These findings provide a base for the global analyses of G. soja alkaline stress tolerance mechanisms.

  15. Accumulation of Fe oxyhydroxides in the Peruvian oxygen deficient zone implies non-oxygen dependent Fe oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Maija I.; Lam, Phoebe J.; Moffett, James W.; Till, Claire P.; Lee, Jong-Mi; Toner, Brandy M.; Marcus, Matthew A.

    2017-08-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have been proposed to be an important source of dissolved iron (Fe) into the interior ocean. However, previous studies in OMZs have shown a sharp decrease in total dissolved Fe (dFe) and/or dissolved Fe(II) (dFe(II)) concentrations at the shelf-break, despite constant temperature, salinity and continued lack of oxygen across the shelf-break. The loss of both total dFe and dFe(II) suggests a conversion of the dFe to particulate form, but studies that have coupled the reduction-oxidation (redox) speciation of both dissolved and particulate phases have not previously been done. Here we have measured the redox speciation and concentrations of both dissolved and particulate forms of Fe in samples collected during the U.S. GEOTRACES Eastern tropical Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) cruise in 2013 (GP16). This complete data set allows us to assess possible mechanisms for loss of dFe. We observed an offshore loss of dFe(II) within the oxygen deficient zone (ODZ), where dissolved oxygen is undetectable, accompanied by an increase in total particulate Fe (pFe). Total pFe concentrations were highest in the upper ODZ. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the pFe maximum was primarily in the Fe(III) form as Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. The remarkable similarity in the distributions of total particulate iron and nitrite suggests a role for nitrite in the oxidation of dFe(II) to pFe(III). We present a conceptual model for the rapid redox cycling of Fe that occurs in ODZs, despite the absence of oxygen.

  16. A diet rich in olive oil phenolics reduces oxidative stress in the heart of SAMP8 mice by induction of Nrf2-dependent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Banu; Ozcelik, Beraat; Grimm, Stefanie; Roeder, Thomas; Schrader, Charlotte; Ernst, Insa M A; Wagner, Anika E; Grune, Tilman; Frank, Jan; Rimbach, Gerald

    2012-02-01

    A Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil has been associated with health benefits in humans. It is unclear if and to what extent olive oil phenolics may mediate these health benefits. In this study, we fed senescence-accelerated mouse-prone 8 (SAMP8, n=11 per group) semisynthetic diets with 10% olive oil containing either high (HP) or low amounts of olive oil phenolics (LP) for 4.5 months. Mice consuming the HP diet had significantly lower concentrations of the oxidative damage markers thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and protein carbonyls in the heart, whereas proteasomal activity was similar in both groups. Nrf2-dependent gene expression may be impaired during the aging process. Therefore, we measured Nrf2 and its target genes glutathione-S-transferase (GST), γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H]:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), and paraoxonase-2 (PON2) in the hearts of these mice. Nrf2 as well as GST, γ-GCS, NQO1, and PON2 mRNA levels were significantly higher in heart tissue of the HP as compared to the LP group. The HP-fed mice had significantly higher PON1 activity in serum compared to those receiving the LP diet. Furthermore, HP feeding increased relative SIRT1 mRNA levels. Additional mechanistic cell culture experiments were performed, and they suggest that the olive oil phenolic hydroxytyrosol present in the HP oil may be responsible for the induction of Nrf2-dependent gene expression and the increase in PON activity. In conclusion, a diet rich in olive oil phenolics may prevent oxidative stress in the heart of SAMP8 mice by modulating Nrf2-dependent gene expression.

  17. The temperature dependence on the electrical properties of dysprosium oxide deposited on n-porous GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saghrouni, H., E-mail: hayet_sagrouni@yahoo.fr [Université de Sousse, LabEM-LR11ES34 Energie-Matériaux, Ecole Supérieure des Sciences et de la Technologie, Rue Lamine Abessi 4011, Hammam Sousse (Tunisia); Université de Sousse, Equipe de recherche caractérisations optoélectronique et spectroscopique des matériaux et nanomatériaux pour les télécommunications et capteurs, ISITCOM 4011, Hammam Sousse (Tunisia); Jomni, S. [Université de Tunis El Manar, LR: LAB MA03 Matériaux, Organisation et Propriétés, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 (Tunisia); Cherif, A. [Université de Sousse, LabEM-LR11ES34 Energie-Matériaux, Ecole Supérieure des Sciences et de la Technologie, Rue Lamine Abessi 4011, Hammam Sousse (Tunisia); Université de Sousse, Equipe de recherche caractérisations optoélectronique et spectroscopique des matériaux et nanomatériaux pour les télécommunications et capteurs, ISITCOM 4011, Hammam Sousse (Tunisia); Belgacem, W. [Université de Tunis El Manar, LR: LAB MA03 Matériaux, Organisation et Propriétés, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 (Tunisia); and others

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes the electrical and dielectric characteristics for the first time of the high-k Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide film deposited on the porous GaAs substrate by electron beam deposition under ultra vacuum. Morphological characterization is investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical and dielectric properties of Co/Au/Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}/n-porous GaAs structure were studied in the temperature range of 80–500 K. The conductance and capacitance measurements were performed as a function of bias voltage and frequency. The dielectric constant (ε′), dielectric loss (ε″) and dielectric loss tangent (tanδ) of the structure are obtained from capacitance–voltage (C–V) and conductance–voltage (G/ω–V) measurements. These parameters are found to be strong functions of temperature and bias voltage. In the forward bias region, C–V plots show a negative capacitance (NC) behavior, ε′–V plots for each temperature value take negative values as well. Such negative values of C correspond to the maximum of the conductance (G/ω). The negative capacitance values appear abnormal when compared to the conventional behavior of ideal Schottky barrier diode (SBD) and metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) structures. The following behavior of the C and ε′ in the forward bias region has been explained with the minority-carrier injection and relaxation theory. From DC conductance study, electronic conduction is found to be dominated by thermally activated hopping at high temperature. Activation energy is deduced from the variation of conductance with temperature. The Nyquist plots exhibited single semi-circular arcs which were well fitted to an equivalent circuit. - Highlights: • The high-k Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide film is deposited on n-porous GaAs by means of electron beam deposition. • The electrical and dielectric properties of MOS structure were studied. • A strong negative capacitance (NC) phenomenon has been observed in the C-V and C

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell (CD34+) uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide is enhanced by but not dependent on a transfection agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Timothy J; Bath, Philip M W; Abaei, Maryam; Auer, Dorothee; Jones, D Rhodri E

    2013-03-01

    Tracking the fate of cells after infusion would be a valuable asset for many stem cell therapies, but very few (cell) labels are approved for human therapeutic use. Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) can be internalized into stem cells in vitro to allow real-time tracking with gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging, but SPIO are approved for (diagnostic) imaging and not for (therapeutic) cell labeling in vivo. In this study, we investigated the possibility of labeling stem cells with an SPIO approved for patient use, albeit in a novel manner by enhancing uptake with the use of a transfection agent, also approved for patient use. Although there are many reports of hematopoietic stem cells being labeled with SPIO, there is some controversy regarding the efficiency of this and whether undifferentiated CD34+ progenitor (stem) cells are able to take up iron in the absence of a transfection agent to enhance the process. Human CD34+ cells were treated in vitro as follows: incubation with (i) medium only (control), (ii) ferumoxide (Endorem) and (iii) ferumoxide (Endorem) plus exposure to a transfection agent (protamine sulfate). Cells were incubated for 2, 4 and 24 hours and assessed for viability, differentiation capacity and visualized in vitro with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging. The cells were also analyzed by means of flow cytometry and morphology examined by electron microscopy. CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells can internalize ferumoxide (Endorem) independently of a transfection agent. However, uptake of ferumoxide is enhanced after exposure to protamine sulfate. Iron labeling of CD34+ cells in this manner does not affect cell viability and does not appear to affect the potential of the cells to grow in culture. Iron-labeled CD34+ cells can be visualized in vitro on 3-T magnetic resonance image scanning. Endorem and protamine sulfate can be combined to promote iron oxide nanoparticle uptake by CD34+ cells, and this methodology can potentially be used

  19. NO accumulation alleviates H2 O2 -dependent oxidative damage induced by Ca(NO3 )2 stress in the leaves of pumpkin-grafted cucumber seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Shu, Sheng; Xu, Qing; An, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jin; Guo, Shi-Rong

    2017-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), two important signaling molecules, are stimulated in plants by abiotic stresses. In this study, we investigated the role of NO and its interplay with H 2 O 2 in the response of self-grafted (S-G) and salt-tolerant pumpkin-grafted (Cucurbita maxima × C. moschata) cucumber seedlings to 80 mM Ca(NO 3 ) 2 stress. Endogenous NO and H 2 O 2 production in S-G seedlings increased in a time-dependent manner, reaching maximum levels after 24 h of Ca(NO 3 ) 2 stress. In contrast, a transient increase in NO production, accompanied by H 2 O 2 accumulation, was observed at 2 h in rootstock-grafted plants. N w -Nitro-l-Arg methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), tungstate, an inhibitor of nitrate reductase (NR), and 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethy-limidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), a scavenger of NO, were found to significantly inhibit NO accumulation induced by salt stress in rootstock-grafted seedlings. H 2 O 2 production was unaffected by these stress conditions. Ca(NO 3 ) 2 stress-induced NO accumulation was blocked by pretreatment with an H 2 O 2 scavenger (dimethylthiourea, DMTU) and an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium, DPI). In addition, maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm), as well as the activities and transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes, were significantly decreased by salt stress in rootstock grafted seedlings after pretreatment with these above inhibitors; antioxidant enzyme transcript levels and activities were higher in rootstock-grafted seedlings compared with S-G seedlings. These results suggest that rootstock grafting could alleviate the oxidative damage induced by Ca(NO 3 ) 2 stress in cucumber seedlings, an effect that may be attributable to the involvement of NO in H 2 O 2 -dependent antioxidative metabolism. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Oxidative inhibition of the vascular Na+-K+ pump via NADPH oxidase-dependent β1-subunit glutathionylation: implications for angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Weisbrod, Robert M; Hansen, Thomas; Ravaie, Ramtin; Nunez, Andrea; Liu, Yi B; Fry, Natasha; Garcia, Alvaro; Hamilton, Elisha J; Sweadner, Kathleen J; Cohen, Richard A; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-12-01

    Glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump's β1-subunit is a key molecular mechanism of physiological and pathophysiological pump inhibition in cardiac myocytes. Its contribution to Na(+)-K(+) pump regulation in other tissues is unknown, and cannot be assumed given the dependence on specific β-subunit isoform expression and receptor-coupled pathways. As Na(+)-K(+) pump activity is an important determinant of vascular tone through effects on [Ca(2+)]i, we have examined the role of oxidative regulation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump in mediating angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in vascular reactivity. β1-subunit glutathione adducts were present at baseline and increased by exposure to Ang II in rabbit aortic rings, primary rabbit aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and human arterial segments. In VSMCs, Ang II-induced glutathionylation was associated with marked reduction in Na(+)-K(+)ATPase activity, an effect that was abolished by the NADPH oxidase inhibitory peptide, tat-gp91ds. In aortic segments, Ang II-induced glutathionylation was associated with decreased K(+)-induced vasorelaxation, a validated index of pump activity. Ang II-induced oxidative inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and decrease in K(+)-induced relaxation were reversed by preincubation of VSMCs and rings with recombinant FXYD3 protein that is known to facilitate deglutathionylation of β1-subunit. Knock-out of FXYD1 dramatically decreased K(+)-induced relaxation in a mouse model. Attenuation of Ang II signaling in vivo by captopril (8 mg/kg/day for 7 days) decreased superoxide-sensitive DHE levels in the media of rabbit aorta, decreased β1-subunit glutathionylation, and enhanced K(+)-induced vasorelaxation. Ang II inhibits the Na(+)-K(+) pump in VSMCs via NADPH oxidase-dependent glutathionylation of the pump's β1-subunit, and this newly identified signaling pathway may contribute to altered vascular tone. FXYD proteins reduce oxidative inhibition of the Na(+)-K(+) pump and may have an

  1. Thickness-Dependent Bioelectrochemical and Energy Applications of Thickness-Controlled Meso-Macroporous Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mieritz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Coatings of hierarchically meso-macroporous antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO enable interfacing adsorbed species, such as biomacromolecules, with an electronic circuit. The coating thickness is a limiting factor for the surface coverage of adsorbates, that are electrochemically addressable. To overcome this challenge, a carbon black-based templating method was developed by studying the composition of the template system, and finding the right conditions for self-standing templates, preventing the reaction mixture from flowing out of the mask. The thicknesses of as-fabricated coatings were measured using stylus profilometry to establish a relationship between the mask thickness and the coating thickness. Cyclic voltammetry was performed on coatings with adsorbed cytochrome c to check whether the entire coating thickness was electrochemically addressable. Further, bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers were incorporated into the coatings, and photocurrent with respect to coating thickness was studied. The template mixture required enough of both carbon black and polymer, roughly 7% carbon black and 6% poly(ethylene glycol. Coatings were fabricated with thicknesses approaching 30 µm, and thickness was shown to be controllable up to at least 15 µm. Under the experimental conditions, photocurrent was found to increase linearly with the coating thickness, up to around 12 µm, above which were diminished gains.

  2. Compositional dependence of optical and electrical properties of indium doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintle, Lawrence K.; Luhanga, Pearson V. C.; Moditswe, Charles; Muiva, Cosmas M.

    2018-05-01

    The structural and optoelectronic properties of undoped and indium doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films grown on glass substrates through a simple reproducible custom-made pneumatic chemical spray pyrolysis technique are presented. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed a polycrystalline structure of hexagonal wurtzite phase growing preferentially along the (002) plane for the undoped sample. Increase in dopant content modified the orientation leading to more pronounced (100) and (101) reflections. Optical transmission spectra showed high transmittance of 80-90% in the visible range for all thin films. The optical band gap energy (Eg) was evaluated on the basis of the derivative of transmittance (dT/dλ) versus wavelength (λ) model and Tauc's extrapolation method in the region where the absorption coefficient, α ≥ 104 cm-1. The observed values of Eg were found to decrease generally with increasing In dopant concentration. From the figure of merit calculations a sample with 4 at.% In dopant concentration showed better optoelectronic properties.

  3. Protein adsorption on well-characterized polyethylene oxide brushes on gold: dependence on molecular weight and grafting density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Warren; Jones, Richard A L

    2013-05-21

    The adsorption of lysozyme protein was measured ex situ on well-characterized gold surfaces coated by end-tethered polyethylene oxide brushes of various molecular weights and controlled grafting densities. The adsorbed amount of protein for different molecular weight brushes was found to collapse onto one master curve when plotted against brush coverage. We interpret this relationship in terms of a model involving site-blocking of the adsorption of proteins at the substrate and discuss the role of the physical attraction of PEO segments to gold. We account for our observation of a simple exponential relationship between protein adsorption and normalized brush coverage with a simple protein adsorption model. In contrast to other studies in similar systems, we do not observe protein adsorption on brushes at high grafting density, and we suggest that this discrepancy may be due to the solubility effects of salt upon the brushes, influencing their protein binding affinity, in the limit of high grafting density and high brush volume fraction.

  4. Side Chain-oxidized Oxysterols Regulate the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System through a Liver X Receptor-dependent Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Laura; Ismail, Muhammad-Al-Mustafa; Gil-Bea, Francisco-Javier; Schüle, Rebecca; Schöls, Ludger; Heverin, Maura; Folkesson, Ronnie; Björkhem, Ingemar; Cedazo-Mínguez, Angel

    2011-01-01

    Disturbances in cholesterol metabolism have been associated with hypertension and neurodegenerative disorders. Because cholesterol metabolism in the brain is efficiently separated from plasma cholesterol by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), it is an unsolved paradox how high blood cholesterol can cause an effect in the brain. Here, we discuss the possibility that cholesterol metabolites permeable to the BBB might account for these effects. We show that 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OH) and 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) up-regulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the brain. Brains of mice on a cholesterol-enriched diet showed up-regulated angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensinogen (AGT), and increased JAK/STAT activity. These effects were confirmed in in vitro studies with primary neurons and astrocytes exposed to 27-OH or 24S-OH, and were partially mediated by liver X receptors. In contrast, brain RAS activity was decreased in Cyp27a1-deficient mice, a model exhibiting reduced 27-OH production from cholesterol. Moreover, in humans, normocholesterolemic patients with elevated 27-OH levels, due to a CYP7B1 mutation, had markers of activated RAS in their cerebrospinal fluid. Our results demonstrate that side chain-oxidized oxysterols are modulators of brain RAS. Considering that levels of cholesterol and 27-OH correlate in the circulation and 27-OH can pass the BBB into the brain, we suggest that this cholesterol metabolite could be a link between high plasma cholesterol levels, hypertension, and neurodegeneration. PMID:21628469

  5. Acetaminophen and NAPQI are toxic to auditory cells via oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinec, Gilda M; Thein, Pru; Parsa, Arya; Yorgason, Joshua; Luxford, William; Urrutia, Raul; Kalinec, Federico

    2014-07-01

    Pain relievers containing N-acetyl-para-aminophenol, also called APAP, acetaminophen or paracetamol, in combination with opioid narcotics are top-selling pharmaceuticals in the U.S. Individuals who abuse these drugs for as little as sixty days can develop tinnitus and progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Recently published studies indicate that APAP and its metabolic product N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine (NAPQI) are the primary ototoxic agents in this type of pain relievers. However, the mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of these drugs on auditory cells remain to be fully characterized. In this study, we report cellular, genomic, and proteomic experiments revealing that cytotoxicity by APAP and NAPQI involves two different pathways in Immortomouse-derived HEI-OC1 cells, implicating ROS overproduction, alterations in ER morphology, redistribution of intra-cisternal chaperones, activation of the eIF2α-CHOP pathway, as well as changes in ER stress and protein folding response markers. Thus, both oxidative and ER stress are part of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the cytotoxic effects of APAP and NAPQI in these cells. We suggest that these in vitro findings should be taken into consideration when designing pharmacological strategies aimed at preventing the toxic effects of these drugs on the auditory system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural properties of WO{sub 3} dependent of the annealing temperature deposited by hot-filament metal oxide deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores M, J. E. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias de la Electronica, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, Col. Jardines de San Manuel, 72570 Puebla (Mexico); Diaz R, J. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Biotecnologia Aplicada, Ex-Hacienda de San Molino Km 1.5 Tepetitla, 90700 Tlaxcala (Mexico); Balderas L, J. A., E-mail: eflores@ece.buap.mx [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Biotecnologia, Av. Acueducto s/n, Col. Barrio la Laguna, 07340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    In this work presents a study of the effect of the annealing temperature on structural and optical properties of WO{sub 3} that has been grown by hot-filament metal oxide deposition. The chemical stoichiometry was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By X-ray diffraction obtained that the as-deposited WO{sub 3} films present mainly monoclinic crystalline phase. WO{sub 3} optical band gap energy can be varied from 2.92 to 3.15 eV obtained by transmittance measurements by annealing WO{sub 3} from 100 to 500 C. The Raman spectrum of the as-deposited WO{sub 3} film shows four intense peaks that are typical Raman peaks of crystalline WO{sub 3} (m-phase) that corresponds to the stretching vibrations of the bridging oxygen that are assigned to W-O stretching ({upsilon}) and W-O bending ({delta}) modes, respectively, which enhanced and increased their intensity with the annealing temperature. (Author)

  7. Leaf Age-Dependent Photoprotective and Antioxidative Response Mechanisms to Paraquat-Induced Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julietta Moustaka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana young and mature leaves to the herbicide paraquat (Pq resulted in a localized increase of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in the leaf veins and the neighboring mesophyll cells, but this increase was not similar in the two leaf types. Increased H2O2 production was concomitant with closed reaction centers (qP. Thirty min after Pq exposure despite the induction of the photoprotective mechanism of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ in mature leaves, H2O2 production was lower in young leaves mainly due to the higher increase activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX. Later, 60 min after Pq exposure, the total antioxidant capacity of young leaves was not sufficient to scavenge the excess reactive oxygen species (ROS that were formed, and thus, a higher H2O2 accumulation in young leaves occurred. The energy allocation of absorbed light in photosystem II (PSII suggests the existence of a differential photoprotective regulatory mechanism in the two leaf types to the time-course Pq exposure accompanied by differential antioxidant protection mechanisms. It is concluded that tolerance to Pq-induced oxidative stress is related to the redox state of quinone A (QA.

  8. Nitric oxide-induced eosinophil apoptosis is dependent on mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT, JNK and oxidative stress: apoptosis is preceded but not mediated by early mPT-dependent JNK activation

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    Ilmarinen-Salo Pinja

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eosinophils are critically involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. Nitric oxide (NO is produced in high amounts in asthmatic lungs and has an important role as a regulator of lung inflammation. NO was previously shown to induce eosinophil apoptosis mediated via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and caspases. Our aim was to clarify the cascade of events leading to NO-induced apoptosis in granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF-treated human eosinophils concentrating on the role of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species (ROS and JNK. Methods Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometric analysis of relative DNA content, by Annexin-V labelling and/or morphological analysis. Immunoblotting was used to study phospho-JNK (pJNK expression. Mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed by JC-1-staining and mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT by loading cells with calcein acetoxymethyl ester (AM and CoCl2 after which flow cytometric analysis was conducted. Statistical significance was calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA or paired t-test. Results NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP induced late apoptosis in GM-CSF-treated eosinophils. SNAP-induced apoptosis was suppressed by inhibitor of mPT bongkrekic acid (BA, inhibitor of JNK SP600125 and superoxide dismutase-mimetic AEOL 10150. Treatment with SNAP led to late loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Additionally, we found that SNAP induces early partial mPT (1 h that was followed by a strong increase in pJNK levels (2 h. Both events were prevented by BA. However, these events were not related to apoptosis because SNAP-induced apoptosis was prevented as efficiently when BA was added 16 h after SNAP. In addition to the early and strong rise, pJNK levels were less prominently increased at 20–30 h. Conclusions Here we demonstrated that NO-induced eosinophil apoptosis is mediated via ROS, JNK and late mPT. Additionally

  9. Estradiol coupling to human monocyte nitric oxide release is dependent on intracellular calcium transients: evidence for an estrogen surface receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, G B; Prevot, V; Beauvillain, J C; Fimiani, C; Welters, I; Cadet, P; Breton, C; Pestel, J; Salzet, M; Bilfinger, T V

    1999-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that estrogen acutely stimulates constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) activity in human peripheral monocytes by acting on an estrogen surface receptor. NO release was measured in real time with an amperometric probe. 17beta-estradiol exposure to monocytes stimulated NO release within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas 17alpha-estradiol had no effect. 17beta-estradiol conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) also stimulated NO release, suggesting mediation by a membrane surface receptor. Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor, antagonized the action of both 17beta-estradiol and E2-BSA, whereas ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the nuclear estrogen receptor, had no effect. We further showed, using a dual emission microfluorometry in a calcium-free medium, that the 17beta-estradiol-stimulated release of monocyte NO was dependent on the initial stimulation of intracellular calcium transients in a tamoxifen-sensitive process. Leeching out the intracellular calcium stores abolished the effect of 17beta-estradiol on NO release. RT-PCR analysis of RNA obtained from the cells revealed a strong estrogen receptor-alpha amplification signal and a weak beta signal. Taken together, a physiological dose of estrogen acutely stimulates NO release from human monocytes via the activation of an estrogen surface receptor that is coupled to increases in intracellular calcium.

  10. Distinct Mechanism of Cysteine Oxidation-Dependent Activation and Cold Sensitization of Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 Channel by High and Low Oxaliplatin

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    Takahito Miyake

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin, a third-generation platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, displays unique acute peripheral neuropathy triggered or enhanced by cold, and accumulating evidence suggests that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 is responsible. TRPA1 is activated by oxaliplatin via a glutathione-sensitive mechanism. However, oxaliplatin interrupts hydroxylation of a proline residue located in the N-terminal region of TRPA1 via inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase (PHD, which causes sensitization of TRPA1 to reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, PHD inhibition endows cold-insensitive human TRPA1 (hTRPA1 with ROS-dependent cold sensitivity. Since cysteine oxidation and proline hydroxylation regulate its activity, their association with oxaliplatin-induced TRPA1 activation and acquirement of cold sensitivity were investigated in the present study. A high concentration of oxaliplatin (1 mM induced outward-rectifier whole-cell currents and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in hTRPA1-expressing HEK293 cells, but did not increase the probability of hTRPA1 channel opening in the inside-out configuration. Oxaliplatin also induced the rapid generation of hydrogen peroxide, and the resultant Ca2+ influx was prevented in the presence of glutathione and in cysteine-mutated hTRPA1 (Cys641Ser-expressing cells, whereas proline-mutated hTRPA1 (Pro394Ala-expressing cells showed similar whole-cell currents and Ca2+ influx. By contrast, a lower concentration of oxaliplatin (100 μM did not increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration but did confer cold sensitivity on hTRPA1-expressing cells, and this was inhibited by PHD2 co-overexpression. Cold sensitivity was abolished by the mitochondria-targeting ROS scavenger mitoTEMPO and was minimal in cysteine-mutated hTRPA1 (Cys641Ser or Cys665Ser-expressing cells. Thus, high oxaliplatin evokes ROS-mediated cysteine oxidation-dependent hTRPA1 activation independent of PHD activity, while a lower

  11. Hypertonic saline increases lung epithelial lining fluid glutathione and thiocyanate: two protective CFTR-dependent thiols against oxidative injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gould Neal S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis is a debilitating lung disease due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR and is associated with chronic infections resulting in elevated myeloperoxidase activity and generation of hypochlorous acid (HOCl. CFTR mutations lead to decreased levels of glutathione (GSH and thiocyanate (SCN in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF. Hypertonic saline is used to improve lung function however the mechanism is uncertain. Methods In the present study, the effect of GSH and SCN on HOCl-mediated cell injury and their changes in the ELF after hypertonic saline nebulization in wild type (WT and CFTR KO mice was examined. CFTR sufficient and deficient lung cells were assessed for GSH, SCN and corresponding sensitivity towards HOCl-mediated injury, in vitro. Results CFTR (- cells had lower extracellular levels of both GSH and SCN and were more sensitive to HOCl-mediated injury. In vivo, hypertonic saline increased ELF GSH in the WT and to a lesser extent in the CFTR KO mice but only SCN in the WT ELF. Finally, potential protective effects of GSH and SCN at concentrations found in the ELF against HOCl toxicity were examined in vitro. Conclusions While the concentrations of GSH and SCN associated with the WT ELF protect against HOCl toxicity, those found in the CFTR KO mice were less sufficient to inhibit cell injury. These data suggests that CFTR has important roles in exporting GSH and SCN which are protective against oxidants and that hypertonic saline treatment may have beneficial effects by increasing their levels in the lung.

  12. Effect of lithium on endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum: role of nitric oxide pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Ebrahimi, Farzad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2007-02-01

    Some studies have reported erectile dysfunction in patients receiving lithium through a mechanism that has not yet been defined. The aim of the present study was to verify the effect of acute lithium administration on the nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC)- and endothelium-mediated relaxation of rat isolated corpus cavernosum. The isolated rat corporeal strips were precontracted with phenylephrine hydrochloride (7.5 microM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) was applied at different frequencies (2, 5, 10, and 15 Hz) to obtain NANC-mediated relaxation or relaxed by adding cumulative doses of acetylcholine (10nM-1mM) to obtain endothelium-dependent relaxation in the presence or absence of lithium (0.3, 0.5, 1, and 5mM). Also, effects of combining lithium (0.3mM) with 30 nM and 0.1 nM L-NAME (an NO synthase inhibitor) on NANC- and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was investigated, respectively. Moreover, effects of combining lithium (1mM) with 0.1mM and 10 microM L-arginine (a precursor of NO) on NANC- and endothelium-mediated relaxation was assessed, respectively. Also, the effect of lithium (1mM) on relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1nM-1mM), an NO donor, was investigated. The NANC-mediated relaxation was significantly (Pacetylcholine in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination of lithium (0.3mM) with 30 and 0.1 nM L-NAME, which separately had a minimum effect on NANC- and endothelium-mediated relaxation, significantly (Pacetylcholine and EFS, it improved the inhibition by lithium (1mM) of relaxant responses to acetylcholine and EFS, respectively. Also, SNP produced similar concentration-dependent relaxations from both groups. Our experiments indicated that lithium likely by interfering with NO pathway in both endothelium and nitrergic nerve can result in impairment of both the endothelium- and NANC-mediated relaxation of rat corpus cavernosum.

  13. Reaction Kinetics with Hydrogen and Temperature Dependence of the Hydriding Rate for a Magnesium-Based Nickel Iron Oxide Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Myoung Youp; Baek, Sung Hwan; Park, Hye Ryoung

    2012-01-01

    A 71.5 wt%Mg-23.5 wt%Ni-5 wt%Fe 2 O 3 (Mg-23.5Ni-5Fe 2 O 3 ) sample was prepared by a quite simple process, reactive mechanical grinding, and its hydriding and dehydriding properties were then investigated. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni and Fe 2 O 3 is considered to facilitate nucleation and shorten the diffusion distances of the hydrogen atoms. After the hydriding-dehydriding cycling, the Mg-23.5Ni-5Fe 2 O 3 sample contained Mg 2 Ni phase. Expansion and contraction of the hydride-forming materials (Mg and Mg 2 Ni) with the hydriding and dehydriding reactions are also considered to increase the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the mixture by forming defects and cracks leading to the fragmentation of the particles. The temperature dependence of the hydriding rate of the sample is discussed.

  14. Increase in Red Blood Cell-Nitric Oxide Synthase Dependent Nitric Oxide Production during Red Blood Cell Aging in Health and Disease: A Study on Age Dependent Changes of Rheologic and Enzymatic Properties in Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizjak, Daniel Alexander; Brinkmann, Christian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Grau, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate RBC-NOS dependent NO signaling during in vivo RBC aging in health and disease. Method RBC from fifteen healthy volunteers (HC) and four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) were separated in seven subpopulations by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Results The proportion of old RBC was significantly higher in DM compared to HC. In both groups, in vivo aging was marked by changes in RBC shape and decreased cell volume. RBC nitrite, as marker for NO, was higher in DM and increased in both HC and DM during aging. RBC deformability was lower in DM and significantly decreased in old compared to young RBC in both HC and DM. RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation, indicating enzyme activation, increased during aging in both HC and DM. Arginase I activity remained unchanged during aging in HC. In DM, arginase I activity was significantly higher in young RBC compared to HC but decreased during aging. In HC, concentration of L-arginine, the substrate of RBC-NOS and arginase I, significantly dropped from young to old RBC. In DM, L-arginine concentration was significantly higher in young RBC compared to HC and significantly decreased during aging. In blood from healthy subjects, RBC-NOS activation was additionally inhibited by N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-Ornithine dihydrochloride which decreased RBC nitrite, and impaired RBC deformability of all but the oldest RBC subpopulation. Conclusion This study first-time showed highest RBC-NOS activation and NO production in old RBC, possibly to counteract the negative impact of cell shrinkage on RBC deformability. This was even more pronounced in DM. It is further suggested that highly produced NO only insufficiently affects cell function of old RBC maybe because of isolated RBC-NOS in old RBC thus decreasing NO bioavailability. Thus, increasing NO availability may improve RBC function and may extend cell life span in old RBC. PMID:25902315

  15. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some people use it as ... one to four times daily depending on which brand is used and what condition you have. Follow ...

  16. High-level expression of heme-dependent catalase gene katA from Lactobacillus Sakei protects Lactobacillus rhamnosus from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Haoran; Zhou, Hui; Huang, Ying; Wang, Guohong; Luan, Chunguang; Mou, Jing; Luo, Yunbo; Hao, Yanling

    2010-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), Lactobacillus sakei YSI8 is one of the very few LAB strains able to degrade H(2)O(2) through the action of a heme-dependent catalase. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are very important probiotic starter cultures in meat product fermentation, but they are deficient in catalase. In this study, the effect of heterologous expression of L. sakei catalase gene katA in L. rhamnosus on its oxidative stress resistance was tested. The recombinant L. rhamnosus AS 1.2466 was able to decompose H(2)O(2) and the catalase activity reached 2.85 mumol H(2)O(2)/min/10(8) c.f.u. Furthermore, the expression of the katA gene in L. rhamnosus conferred enhanced oxidative resistance on the host. The survival ratios after short-term H(2)O(2) challenge were increased 600 and 10(4)-fold at exponential and stationary phase, respectively. Further, viable cells were 100-fold higher in long-term aerated cultures. Simulation experiment demonstrated that both growth and catalase activity of recombinant L. rhamnosus displayed high stability under environmental conditions similar to those encountered during sausage fermentation.

  17. The putative endoglucanase PcGH61D from Phanerochaete chrysosporium is a metal-dependent oxidative enzyme that cleaves cellulose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørge Westereng

    Full Text Available Many fungi growing on plant biomass produce proteins currently classified as glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61, some of which are known to act synergistically with cellulases. In this study we show that PcGH61D, the gene product of an open reading frame in the genome of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, is an enzyme that cleaves cellulose using a metal-dependent oxidative mechanism that leads to generation of aldonic acids. The activity of this enzyme and its beneficial effect on the efficiency of classical cellulases are stimulated by the presence of electron donors. Experiments with reduced cellulose confirmed the oxidative nature of the reaction catalyzed by PcGH61D and indicated that the enzyme may be capable of penetrating into the substrate. Considering the abundance of GH61-encoding genes in fungi and genes encoding their functional bacterial homologues currently classified as carbohydrate binding modules family 33 (CBM33, this enzyme activity is likely to turn out as a major determinant of microbial biomass-degrading efficiency.

  18. Depletion of the Third Complement Component Ameliorates Age-Dependent Oxidative Stress and Positively Modulates Autophagic Activity in Aged Retinas in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogińska, Dorota; Kawa, Miłosz P; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Lejkowska, Renata; Łuczkowska, Karolina; Wiszniewska, Barbara; Kaarniranta, Kai; Paterno, Jussi J; Schmidt, Christian A; Machaliński, Bogusław; Machalińska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of complement component C3 global depletion on the biological structure and function of the aged retina. In vivo morphology (OCT), electrophysiological function (ERG), and the expression of selected oxidative stress-, apoptosis-, and autophagy-related proteins were assessed in retinas of 12-month-old C3-deficient and WT mice. Moreover, global gene expression in retinas was analyzed by RNA arrays. We found that the absence of active C3 was associated with (1) alleviation of the age-dependent decrease in retinal thickness and gradual deterioration of retinal bioelectrical function, (2) significantly higher levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and glutathione reductase) and the antiapoptotic survivin and Mcl-1/Bak dimer, (3) lower expression of the cellular oxidative stress marker-4HNE-and decreased activity of proapoptotic caspase-3, (4) ameliorated retinal autophagic activity with localization of ubiquitinated protein conjugates commonly along the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer, and (5) significantly increased expression of several gene sets associated with maintenance of the physiological functions of the neural retina. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of age-related retinal alterations by identifying C3 as a potential therapeutic target for retinal aging.

  19. Depletion of the Third Complement Component Ameliorates Age-Dependent Oxidative Stress and Positively Modulates Autophagic Activity in Aged Retinas in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rogińska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of complement component C3 global depletion on the biological structure and function of the aged retina. In vivo morphology (OCT, electrophysiological function (ERG, and the expression of selected oxidative stress-, apoptosis-, and autophagy-related proteins were assessed in retinas of 12-month-old C3-deficient and WT mice. Moreover, global gene expression in retinas was analyzed by RNA arrays. We found that the absence of active C3 was associated with (1 alleviation of the age-dependent decrease in retinal thickness and gradual deterioration of retinal bioelectrical function, (2 significantly higher levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and glutathione reductase and the antiapoptotic survivin and Mcl-1/Bak dimer, (3 lower expression of the cellular oxidative stress marker—4HNE—and decreased activity of proapoptotic caspase-3, (4 ameliorated retinal autophagic activity with localization of ubiquitinated protein conjugates commonly along the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer, and (5 significantly increased expression of several gene sets associated with maintenance of the physiological functions of the neural retina. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of age-related retinal alterations by identifying C3 as a potential therapeutic target for retinal aging.

  20. Dietary supplementation of grape seed and skin flour mitigates brain oxidative damage induced by a high-fat diet in rat: Gender dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charradi, Kamel; Mahmoudi, Mohamed; Bedhiafi, Takwa; Kadri, Safwen; Elkahoui, Salem; Limam, Ferid; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2017-03-01

    It is unknown whether gender has an impact on brain injury in obesity, and, if so, whether treatment with grape seed and skin flour could exert a protective effect. Both male and female rats were fed a standard diet (SD) or a high fat diet (HFD) during eight weeks and treated with high dosage grape seed and skin flour (GSSF). Fat-induced oxidative stress was evaluated into the brain with a special emphasis on transition metals determination. HFD induced male-cholesterol overload (+78.12%) and an oxidative stress status characterized by increased lipoperoxidation (+68.97%), carbonylation (+40.28%), decreased antioxidant enzyme activities as glutathione peroxidase (-61.07%) and manganese-superoxide dismutase (-35.47%) but not catalase. Additionally HFD depleted the brain from manganese (-71.31%) and dropped glutamine synthetase activity (-36.16%), without affecting copper nor iron nor their associated enzymes. HFD also altered intracellular mediators as superoxide anion (+36.12%), calcium (+44.41%) and also calpain (+76.54%) a calcium dependent protease. Importantly all these alterations were detected exclusively in male brain and were efficiently corrected upon GSSF treatment. In conclusion, GSSF has the potential to alleviate the deleterious lipotoxic effect of HFD treatment that occurred in male brain and perhaps in post-menauposal female brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of temperature dependent threshold voltage variation of Gd2O3/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure

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    Atanu Das

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature dependent threshold voltage (Vth variation of GaN/AlGaN/Gd2O3/Ni-Au structure is investigated by capacitance-voltage measurement with temperature varying from 25°C to 150°C. The Vth of the Schottky device without oxide layer is slightly changed with respect to temperature. However, variation of Vth is observed for both as-deposited and annealed device owing to electron capture by the interface traps or bulk traps. The Vth shifts of 0.4V and 3.2V are obtained for as-deposited and annealed device respectively. For annealed device, electron capture process is not only restricted in the interface region but also extended into the crystalline Gd2O3 layer through Frenkel-Poole emission and hooping conduction, resulting in a larger Vth shift. The calculated trap density for as-deposited and annealed device is 3.28×1011∼1.12×1011 eV−1cm−2 and 1.74×1012∼7.33×1011 eV−1cm−2 respectively in measured temperature range. These results indicate that elevated temperature measurement is necessary to characterize GaN/AlGaN heterostructure based devices with oxide as gate dielectric.

  2. KDM4A Coactivates E2F1 to Regulate the PDK-Dependent Metabolic Switch between Mitochondrial Oxidation and Glycolysis

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    Ling-Yu Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The histone lysine demethylase KDM4A/JMJD2A has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis through its role in transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe KDM4A as a E2F1 coactivator and demonstrate a functional role for the E2F1-KDM4A complex in the control of tumor metabolism. KDM4A associates with E2F1 on target gene promoters and enhances E2F1 chromatin binding and transcriptional activity, thereby modulating the transcriptional profile essential for cancer cell proliferation and survival. The pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs PDK1 and PDK3 are direct targets of KDM4A and E2F1 and modulate the switch between glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidation. Downregulation of KDM4A leads to elevated activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase and mitochondrial oxidation, resulting in excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species. The altered metabolic phenotypes can be partially rescued by ectopic expression of PDK1 and PDK3, indicating a KDM4A-dependent tumor metabolic regulation via PDK. Our results suggest that KDM4A is a key regulator of tumor metabolism and a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer.

  3. Evaluation of passive oxide layer formation-biocompatibility relationship in NiTi shape memory alloys: geometry and body location dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, S M; Canadinc, D; Maier, H J; Birer, O

    2014-03-01

    A systematic set of ex-situ experiments were carried out on Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy (SMA) in order to identify the dependence of its biocompatibility on sample geometry and body location. NiTi samples with three different geometries were immersed into three different fluids simulating different body parts. The changes observed in alloy surface and chemical content of fluids upon immersion experiments designed for four different time periods were analyzed in terms of ion release, oxide layer formation, and chemical composition of the surface layer. The results indicate that both sample geometry and immersion fluid significantly affect the alloy biocompatibility, as evidenced by the passive oxide layer formation on the alloy surface and ion release from the samples. Upon a 30 day immersion period, all three types of NiTi samples exhibited lower ion release than the critical value for clinic applications. However; a significant amount of ion release was detected in the case of gastric fluid, warranting a thorough investigation prior to utility of NiTi in gastrointestinal treatments involving long-time contact with tissue. Furthermore, certain geometries appear to be safer than the others for each fluid, providing a new set of guidelines to follow while designing implants making use of NiTi SMAs to be employed in treatments targeting specific body parts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidation of purine nucleotides by Triplet 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid in aqueous solution: pH-dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprygina, Natalya N; Morozova, Olga B; Abramova, Tatyana V; Grampp, Günter; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V

    2014-07-10

    The photo-oxidation of purine nucleotides adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) and guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) by 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid (TCBP) has been investigated in aqueous solutions using nanosecond laser flash photolysis (LFP) and time-resolved chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP). The pH dependences of quenching rate constants and of geminate polarization are measured within a wide range of pH values. As a result, the chemical reactivity of reacting species in different protonation states is determined. In acidic solution (pH basic solutions it is significantly lower: kq = 2.6 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) (GMP, 4.9 9.4), kq = 1.0 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) (AMP, pH > 6.5). Surprisingly, the strong influence of the protonation state of the phosphoric group on the oxidation of adenosine-5'-monophosphate is revealed: the deprotonation of the AMP phosphoric group (6.5) decreases the quenching rate constant from 5.0 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) (4.9 6.5).

  5. Ursolic acid increases energy expenditure through enhancing free fatty acid uptake and β-oxidation via an UCP3/AMPK-dependent pathway in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xia; He, Xuan; Shi, Zhiping; Li, Chunjuan; Guo, Fuchuan; Li, Songtao; Li, Ying; Na, Lixin; Sun, Changhao

    2015-08-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a triterpenoid compound with multifold biological functions. Our previous studies have reported that UA protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity and improves insulin resistance (IR). However, the potential mechanisms are still undefined. Free fatty acid (FFA) metabolism in skeletal muscle plays a central role in obesity and IR. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect and the potential mechanisms of UA on skeletal muscle FFA metabolism. In diet-induced obese rats, 0.5% UA supplementation for 6 weeks markedly reduced body weight, increased energy expenditure, decreased FFA level in serum and skeletal muscle and triglyceride content in skeletal muscle. In vitro, the data provided directly evidence that UA significantly increased fluorescently labeled FFA uptake and (3) H-labeled palmitic acid β-oxidation. UA-activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and downstream targets were involved in the increase of FFA catabolism. Moreover, upregulated uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) by UA contributed to AMPK activation via elevating adenosine monophosphate/adenosine triphosphate ratio. UA increases FFA burning through enhancing skeletal muscle FFA uptake and β-oxidation via an UCP3/AMPK-dependent pathway, which provides a novel perspective on the biological function of UA against obesity and IR. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Temperature Dependent Electrical Transport in Al/Poly(4-vinyl phenol/p-GaAs Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor by Sol-Gel Spin Coating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şadan Özden

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of poly(4-vinyl phenol insulator layer is carried out by applying the spin coating technique onto p-type GaAs substrate so as to create Al/poly(4-vinyl phenol/p-GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS structure. Temperature was set to 80–320 K while the current-voltage (I-V characteristics of the structure were examined in the study. Ideality factor (n and barrier height (ϕb values found in the experiment ranged from 3.13 and 0.616 eV (320 K to 11.56 and 0.147 eV (80 K. Comparing the thermionic field emission theory and thermionic emission theory, the temperature dependent ideality factor behavior displayed that thermionic field emission theory is more valid than the latter. The calculated tunneling energy was 96 meV.

  7. Strongly Nonlinear Dependence of Energy Transfer Rate on sp(2) Carbon Content in Reduced Graphene Oxide-Quantum Dot Hybrid Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yitong; Son, Dong Hee

    2015-01-02

    The dependence of the energy transfer rate on the content of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms in the hybrid structures of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and Mn-doped quantum dot (QD(Mn)) was investigated. Taking advantage of the sensitivity of QD(Mn)'s dopant luminescence lifetime only to the energy transfer process without interference from the charge transfer process, the correlation between the sp(2) carbon content in RGO and the rate of energy transfer from QD(Mn) to RGO was obtained. The rate of energy transfer showed a strongly superlinear increase with increasing sp(2) carbon content in RGO, suggesting the possible cooperative behavior of sp(2) carbon domains in the energy transfer process as the sp(2) carbon content increases.

  8. Spin-dependent transport properties of a GaMnAs-based vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaki, Toshiki; Asahara, Hirokatsu; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    We fabricate a vertical spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (spin-MOSFET) structure, which is composed of an epitaxial single-crystal heterostructure with a ferromagnetic-semiconductor GaMnAs source/drain, and investigate its spin-dependent transport properties. We modulate the drain-source current I DS by ∼±0.5% with a gate-source voltage of ±10.8 V and also modulate I DS by up to 60% with changing the magnetization configuration of the GaMnAs source/drain at 3.5 K. The magnetoresistance ratio is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that obtained in the previous studies on spin MOSFETs. Our result shows that a vertical structure is one of the hopeful candidates for spin MOSFET when the device size is reduced to a sub-micron or nanometer scale

  9. Microbiota-dependent metabolite and cardiovascular disease marker trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is associated with monocyte activation but not platelet function in untreated HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haissman, Judith M; Haugaard, Anna K; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2017-01-01

    trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) predicts myocardial infarction (MI) in the general population and has recently been shown to induce platelet hyperreactivity. In the present study, we investigated if TMAO was associated with platelet function, microbial translocation, and immune activation in both untreated......-blood impedance aggregometry, C-reactive protein, sCD14, and lipopolysaccharide were assessed as measures of platelet function, inflammation, monocyte activation, and microbial translocation, respectively. RESULTS: TMAO was not associated with platelet aggregation response after stimulation with four different......BACKGROUND: HIV infection is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease beyond that explained by traditional risk factors. Altered gut microbiota, microbial translocation, and immune activation have been proposed as potential triggers. The microbiota-dependent metabolite...

  10. Oxidative stress by monosodium urate crystals promotes renal cell apoptosis through mitochondrial caspase-dependent pathway in human embryonic kidney 293 cells: mechanism for urate-induced nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jung-Yoon; Park, Ki-Yeun; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of oxidative stress on monosodium urate (MSU)-mediated apoptosis of renal cells. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting for Bcl-2, caspase-9, caspase-3, iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-18, TNF receptor-associated factor-6 (TRAF-6), and mitogen-activated protein kinases were performed on human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which were stimulated by MSU crystals. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was performed using annexin V for assessment of apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured. IL-1β siRNA was used for blocking IL-1β expression. MSU crystals promoted ROS, iNOS, and COX-2 expression and also increased TRAF-6 and IL-1β expression in HEK293 cells, which was inhibited by an antioxidant ascorbic acid. Caspase-dependent renal cell apoptosis was induced through attenuation of Bcl-2 and enhanced caspase-3 and caspase-9 expression by MSU crystals, which was significantly reversed by ascorbic acid and transfection of IL-1β siRNA to HEK293 cells. Ascorbic acid inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Jun N-terminal protein kinase stimulated by MSU crystals. ROS accumulation and iNOS and COX-2 mRNA expression by MSU crystals was also suppressed by transfection with IL-1β siRNA. Oxidative stress generated by MSU crystals promotes renal apoptosis through the mitochondrial caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  11. Protective Effects of Maillard Reaction Products of Whey Protein Concentrate against Oxidative Stress through an Nrf2-Dependent Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Min Cheol; Yang, Sung-Yong; Chun, Su-Hyun; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC), which contains α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, is utilized widely in the food industry. The Maillard reaction is a complex reaction that produces Maillard reaction products (MRPs), which are associated with the formation of antioxidant compounds. In this study, the hepatoprotection activity of MRPs of WPC against oxidative stress through the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant pathway in HepG2 cells was examined. Glucose-whey protein concentrate conjugate (Glc-WPC) was obtained from Maillard reaction between WPC and glucose. The fluorescence intensity of Glc-WPC increased after 7 d compared to native WPC, and resulted in loss of 48% of the free amino groups of WPC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns of Glc-WPC showed the presence of a high-molecular-weight portion. Treatment of HepG2 cells with Glc-WPC increased cell viability in the presence of oxidative stress, inhibited the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), and increased the glutathione level. Nrf2 translocation and Nrf2, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NOQ1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutamate-L-cysteine ligase (GCL)M and GCLC mRNA levels were increased by Glc-WPC. Also, Glc-WPC increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The results of this study demonstrate that Glc-WPC activates the Nrf2-dependent pathway through the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in HepG2 cells, and induces production of antioxidant enzymes and phase II enzymes.

  12. Uptake of L-cystine via an ABC transporter contributes defense of oxidative stress in the L-cystine export-dependent manner in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Ohtsu

    Full Text Available Intracellular thiols like L-cystine and L-cystine play a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes. Here we show that Escherichia coli has two L-cystine transporters, the symporter YdjN and the ATP-binding cassette importer FliY-YecSC. These proteins import L-cystine, an oxidized product of L-cystine from the periplasm to the cytoplasm. The symporter YdjN, which is expected to be a new member of the L-cystine regulon, is a low affinity L-cystine transporter (Km = 1.1 μM that is mainly involved in L-cystine uptake from outside as a nutrient. E. coli has only two L-cystine importers because ΔydjNΔyecS mutant cells are not capable of growing in the minimal medium containing L-cystine as a sole sulfur source. Another protein YecSC is the FliY-dependent L-cystine transporter that functions cooperatively with the L-cystine transporter YdeD, which exports L-cystine as reducing equivalents from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, to prevent E. coli cells from oxidative stress. The exported L-cystine can reduce the periplasmic hydrogen peroxide to water, and then generated L-cystine is imported back into the cytoplasm via the ATP-binding cassette transporter YecSC with a high affinity to L-cystine (Km = 110 nM in a manner dependent on FliY, the periplasmic L-cystine-binding protein. The double disruption of ydeD and fliY increased cellular levels of lipid peroxides. From these findings, we propose that the hydrogen peroxide-inducible L-cystine/L-cystine shuttle system plays a role of detoxification of hydrogen peroxide before lipid peroxidation occurs, and then might specific prevent damage to membrane lipids.

  13. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of rat aorta to a histamine H3 agonist is reduced by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and Na+,K+-ATPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Djuric

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The possible involvement of different effector systems (nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase, β-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, and Na+,K+-ATPase was evaluated in a histamine H3 receptor agonist-induced ((Rα-methylhistamine, (Rα-MeHA endothelium-dependent rat aorta relaxation assay. (Rα-MeHA (0.1 nM – 0.01 mM relaxed endothelium-dependent rat aorta, with a pD2 value of 8.22 ± 0.06, compared with a pD2 value of 7.98 ± 0.02 caused by histamine (50% and 70% relaxation, respectively. The effect of (Rα-MeHA (0.1 nM – 0.01 mM was competitively antagonized by thioperamide (1, 10 and 30 nM (pA2 = 9.21 ± 0.40; slope = 1.03 ± 0.35 but it was unaffected by pyrilamine (100 nM, cimetidine (1 μM, atropine (10 μM, propranolol (1 μM, indomethacin (10 μM or nordthydroguaiaretic acid (0.1 mM. Inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, L-NG-monomethylarginine (L-NMMA, 10 μM and NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NOARG, 10 μM inhibited the relaxation effect of (Rα-MeHA, by approximately 52% and 70%, respectively. This inhibitory effect of L-NMMA was partially reversed by L-arginine (10 μM. Methylene blue (10 μM and ouabain (10 μM inhibited relaxation (Rα-MeHA-induced by approximately 50% and 90%, respectively. The products of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase are not involved in (Rα-MeHA-induced endothelium-dependent rat aorta relaxation nor are the muscarinic cholinergic and β-adrenergic receptors. The results also suggest the involvement of NO synthase, guanylate cyclase and Na+,K+-ATPase in (Rα-MeHA-induced endothelium-dependent rat aorta relaxation.

  14. Methylene blue improves mitochondrial respiration and decreases oxidative stress in a substrate-dependent manner in diabetic rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duicu, Oana M; Privistirescu, Andreea; Wolf, Adrian; Petruş, Alexandra; Dănilă, Maria D; Raţiu, Corina D; Muntean, Danina M; Sturza, Adrian

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been systematically associated with compromised mitochondrial energetics and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that underlie its progression to heart failure. Methylene blue is a redox drug with reported protective effects mainly on brain mitochondria. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute administration of methylene blue on mitochondrial respiration, H 2 O 2 production, and calcium sensitivity in rat heart mitochondria isolated from healthy and 2 months (streptozotocin-induced) diabetic rats. Mitochondrial respiratory function was assessed by high-resolution respirometry. H 2 O 2 production and calcium retention capacity were measured spectrofluorimetrically. The addition of methylene blue (0.1 μmol·L -1 ) elicited an increase in oxygen consumption of mitochondria energized with complex I and II substrates in both normal and diseased mitochondria. Interestingly, methylene blue elicited a significant increase in H 2 O 2 release in the presence of complex I substrates (glutamate and malate), but had an opposite effect in mitochondria energized with complex II substrate (succinate). No changes in the calcium retention capacity of healthy or diabetic mitochondria were found in the presence of methylene blue. In conclusion, in cardiac mitochondria isolated from diabetic and nondiabetic rat hearts, methylene blue improved respiratory function and elicited a dichotomic, substrate-dependent effect on ROS production.

  15. Diffusion-driven and size-dependent phase changes of gallium oxide nanocrystals in a glassy host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, N V; Ignat'eva, E S; Sigaev, V N; Lauria, A; De Trizio, L; Azarbod, A; Paleari, A; Lorenzi, R

    2015-02-21

    Phase transformations at the nanoscale represent a challenging field of research, mainly in the case of nanocrystals (NCs) in a solid host, with size-effects and interactions with the matrix. Here we report the study of the structural evolution of γ-Ga2O3 NCs in alkali-germanosilicate glass - a technologically relevant system for its light emission and UV-to-visible conversion - showing an evolution drastically different from the expected transformation of γ-Ga2O3 into β-Ga2O3. Differential scanning calorimetry registers an irreversible endothermic process at ∼1300 K, well above the exothermic peak of γ-Ga2O3 nano-crystallization (∼960 K) and below the melting temperature (∼1620 K). Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction data clarify that glass-embedded γ-Ga2O3 NCs transform into LiGa5O8via diffusion-driven kinetics of Li incorporation into NCs. At the endothermic peak, β-Ga2O3 forms from LiGa5O8 dissociation, following a nucleation-limited kinetics promoted by size-dependent order-disorder change between LiGa5O8 polymorphs. As a result of the changes, modifications of UV-excited NC light emission are registered, with potential interest for applications.

  16. Calcium- and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Nuclear Accumulation of Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Response to Long Chain Bases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testard, Ambroise; Da Silva, Daniel; Ormancey, Mélanie; Pichereaux, Carole; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Grat, Sabine; Robe, Eugénie; Brière, Christian; Cotelle, Valérie; Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0, DHS), one of the most abundant free sphingoid long chain bases (LCBs) in plants, is known to induce a calcium-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. In addition, in tobacco BY-2 cells, it has been shown that DHS triggers a rapid production of H 2 O 2 and nitric oxide (NO). Recently, in analogy to what is known in the animal field, plant cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC), a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis, has been suggested to fulfill other functions associated with its oxidative post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation on cysteine residues. In particular, in mammals, stress signals inducing NO production promote S-nitrosylation of GAPC and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus where the protein participates in the establishment of apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the behavior of GAPC in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with DHS. We found that upon DHS treatment, an S-nitrosylated form of GAPC accumulated in the nucleus. This accumulation was dependent on NO production. Two genes encoding GAPCs, namely Nt(BY-2)GAPC1 and Nt(BY-2)GAPC2, were cloned. Transient overexpression of Nt(BY-2)GAPC-green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric constructs indicated that both proteins localized in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Mutating into serine the two cysteine residues thought to be S-nitrosylated in response to DHS did not modify the localization of the proteins, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of GAPCs was probably not necessary for their nuclear relocalization. Interestingly, using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we showed that Nt(BY-2)GAPCs interact with nucleic acids in the nucleus. When GAPCs were mutated on their cysteine residues, their interaction with nucleic acids was abolished, suggesting a role for GAPCs in the protection of nucleic acids against oxidative stress. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  17. Giant Cellular Vacuoles Induced by Rare Earth Oxide Nanoparticles are Abnormally Enlarged Endo/Lysosomes and Promote mTOR-Dependent TFEB Nucleus Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Shi, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Ji-Qian; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yun; Jin, Pei-Pei; Wei, Peng-Fei; Shi, Rong-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Wen, Long-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Many nanomaterials are reported to disrupt lysosomal function and homeostasis, but how cells sense and then respond to nanomaterial-elicited lysosome stress is poorly understood. Nucleus translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) plays critical roles in lysosome biogenesis following lysosome stress induced by starvation. The authors previously reported massive cellular vacuolization, along with autophagy induction, in cells treated with rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Here, the authors identify these giant cellular vacuoles as abnormally enlarged and alkalinized endo/lysosomes whose formation is dependent on macropinocytosis. This vacuolization causes deactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a TFEB-interacting kinase that resides on the lysosome membrane. Subsequently, TFEB is dephosphorylated at serine 142 and translocated into cell nucleus. This nucleus translocation of TFEB is observed only in vacuolated cells and it is critical for maintaining lysosome homeostasis after REO nanoparticle treatment, as knock-down of TFEB gene significantly compromises lysosome function and enhances cell death in nanoparticle-treated cells. Our results reveal that cellular vacuolization, which is commonly observed in cells treated with REOs and other nanomaterials, represents a condition of profound lysosome stress, and cells sense and respond to this stress by facilitating mTOR-dependent TFEB nucleus translocation in an effort to restore lysosome homeostasis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and glutathione depletion after accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by oligodendroglial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C.; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are currently used for various neurobiological applications. To investigate the consequences of a treatment of brain cells with such particles, we have applied dimercaptosuccinate (DMSA)-coated IONP that had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 60 nm to oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells. After exposure to 4 mM iron applied as DMSA–IONP, these cells increased their total specific iron content within 8 h 600-fold from 7 to 4,200 nmol/mg cellular protein. The strong iron accumulation was accompanied by a change in cell morphology, although the cell viability was not compromized. DMSA–IONP treatment caused a concentration-dependent increase in the iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in the specific content of the cellular antioxidative tripeptide glutathione. During a 16 h recovery phase in IONP-free culture medium following exposure to DMSA–IONP, OLN-93 cells maintained their high iron content and replenished their cellular glutathione content. These data demonstrate that viable OLN-93 cells have a remarkable potential to deal successfully with the consequences of an accumulation of large amounts of iron after exposure to DMSA–IONP.

  19. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics of Au/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes and the effect of transition metal oxides as an interface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Somnath; Puigdollers, Joaquim

    2018-02-01

    Temperature dependent current-voltage (I‒V) characteristics of Au/n-type silicon (n-Si) Schottky barrier diodes have been investigated. Three transition metal oxides (TMO) are used as an interface layer between gold and silicon. The basic Schottky diode parameters such as ideality factor (n), barrier height (ϕb 0) and series resistance (Rs) are calculated and successfully explained by the thermionic emission (TE) theory. It has been found that ideality factor decreased and barrier height increased with increased of temperature. The conventional Richardson plot of ln(I0/T2) vs. 1000/T is determined the activation energy (Ea) and Richardson constant (A*). Whereas value of 'A*' is much smaller than the known theoretical value of n-type Si. The temperature dependent I-V characteristics obtained the mean value of barrier height (ϕb 0 bar) and standard deviation (σs) from the linear plot of ϕap vs. 1000/T. From the modified Richardson plot of ln(I0/T2) ˗ (qσ)2/2(kT)2 vs. 1000/T gives Richardson constant and homogeneous barrier height of Schottky diodes. Main observation in this present work is the barrier height and ideality factor shows a considerable change but the series resistance value exhibits negligible change due to TMO as an interface layer.

  20. The Nitric Oxide Donor SNAP-Induced Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Release in Cortical Neurons. Effects of Blockers of Voltage-Dependent Sodium and Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José Joaquín; Arce, Carmen; Naddaf, Ahmad; Bellver-Landete, Victor; Oset-Gasque, Maria Jesús; González, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Background The discovery that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signalling molecule in the nervous system has radically changed the concept of neuronal communication. NO induces the release of amino acid neurotransmitters but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Findings The aim of this work was to study the effect of NO on amino acid neurotransmitter release (Asp, Glu, Gly and GABA) in cortical neurons as well as the mechanism underlying the release of these neurotransmitters. Cortical neurons were stimulated with SNAP, a NO donor, and the release of different amino acid neurotransmitters was measured by HPLC. The involvement of voltage dependent Na+ and Ca2+ channels as well as cGMP in its mechanism of action was evaluated. Conclusions Our results indicate that NO induces release of aspartate, glutamate, glycine and GABA in cortical neurons and that this release is inhibited by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Thus, the NO effect on amino acid neurotransmission could be mediated by cGMP formation in cortical neurons. Our data also demonstrate that the Na+ and Ca2+ voltage- dependent calcium channels are involved in the NO effects on cortical neurons. PMID:24598811

  1. Advanced oxidation protein products induce chondrocyte apoptosis via receptor for advanced glycation end products-mediated, redox-dependent intrinsic apoptosis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Zhu, Si-Yuan; Liao, Cong-Rui; Pan, Ying; Zeng, Ji-Huan; Zheng, Shuai; Ding, Ruo-Ting; Lin, Qing-Song; Ye, Qing; Ye, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Chen, Jian-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced chondrocyte apoptosis is a primary cause of cartilage destruction in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), a novel pro-inflammatory mediator, have been confirmed to accumulate in patients with RA. However, the effect of AOPPs accumulation on chondrocyte apoptosis and the associated cellular mechanisms remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the plasma formation of AOPPs was enhanced in RA rats compared with normal. Then, chondrocyte were treated with AOPPs-modified rat serum albumin (AOPPs-RSA) in vitro. Exposure of chondrocyte to AOPPs activated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, which was mediated by receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not scavenger receptor CD36. Moreover, AOPPs challenge triggered NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation which induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress resulted in activation of caspase family that eventually lead to apoptosis. Lastly, blockade of RAGE, instead of CD36, largely attenuated these signals. Our study demonstrated first time that AOPPs induce chondrocyte apoptosis via RAGE-mediated and redox-dependent intrinsic apoptosis pathway in vitro. These data implicates that AOPPs may represent a novel pathogenic factor that contributes to RA progression. Targeting AOPPs-triggered cellular mechanisms might emerge as a promising therapeutic option for patients with RA.

  2. Temperature-dependence of hydrogen oxidation reaction rates and CO-tolerance at carbon-supported Pt, Pt-Co, and Pt-Ru catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Kenji; Aoki, Koichi; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2009-03-21

    The temperature-dependence of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) rate was examined at commercial Pt, Pt3Co, PtRu, and PtRu(1.5) nano-sized catalysts (diameter, d = ca. 3 nm) supported on carbon black in 0.1 M HClO4 solution in the presence and absence of carbon monoxide by use of a channel flow electrode at temperatures from 30 to 90 degrees C. It was found that the values of the apparent rate constant k(app) (per real Pt active surface area) for the HOR at these supported catalysts agreed beautifully with those of the corresponding bulk electrodes in the whole temperature range. The dependence of the kinetically controlled current density (jk) on CO coverage at each supported catalyst was also identical to that of the bulk. Hence, no particle size effect was observed on the HOR activity and the CO tolerance, at least, was brought down to d = 3 nm.

  3. Time-Dependent and Organ-Specific Changes in Mitochondrial Function, Mitochondrial DNA Integrity, Oxidative Stress and Mononuclear Cell Infiltration in a Mouse Model of Burn Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Szczesny

    Full Text Available Severe thermal injury induces a pathophysiological response that affects most of the organs within the body; liver, heart, lung, skeletal muscle among others, with inflammation and hyper-metabolism as a hallmark of the post-burn damage. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a key component in development of inflammatory and metabolic responses induced by burn. The goal of the current study was to evaluate several critical mitochondrial functions in a mouse model of severe burn injury. Mitochondrial bioenergetics, measured by Extracellular Flux Analyzer, showed a time dependent, post-burn decrease in basal respiration and ATP-turnover but enhanced maximal respiratory capacity in mitochondria isolated from the liver and lung of animals subjected to burn injury. Moreover, we detected a tissue-specific degree of DNA damage, particularly of the mitochondrial DNA, with the most profound effect detected in lungs and hearts of mice subjected to burn injury. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis in lung tissue in response to burn injury was also observed. Burn injury also induced time dependent increases in oxidative stress (measured by amount of malondialdehyde and neutrophil infiltration (measured by myeloperoxidase activity, particularly in lung and heart. Tissue mononuclear cell infiltration was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The amount of poly(ADP-ribose polymers decreased in the liver, but increased in the heart in later time points after burn. All of these biochemical changes were also associated with histological alterations in all three organs studied. Finally, we detected a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA fragments circulating in the blood immediately post-burn. There was no evidence of systemic bacteremia, or the presence of bacterial DNA fragments at any time after burn injury. The majority of the measured parameters demonstrated a sustained elevation even at 20-40 days post injury suggesting a long-lasting effect of thermal

  4. Peculiarities of oxidative modification of proteins indices in blood plasma of the female rats’ offspring with experimental gestational diabetes depending on sex, age and basal glycemia level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gancheva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of products of oxidative modification of proteins (OMP in correlation with plasma catalase activity will help us to define the state of oxidative stress parameters in the normal animals and in the female rats’ offspring with experimental gestational diabetes (EGD. Itwilldefine their role in organism’s reorganization aimed to activation of compensatory and defensive mechanisms both at the cellular level and at the level of homeostasis. We’ll also define its alteration in animals with the prenatal negative influence of chronic hyperglycemia. The aim of research wasto study peculiarities of OMP parameters and plasma catalase activity of the female rats’offspring with EGD in dependence on sex, age and basal glycemia level. Materials and methods.The research was carried out on 80 rats (males and females offspring of the female rats with normal pregnancy and 80 offspring (males and females of the female rats with EGD. The animals were grouped by the age 2, 4, 6 and 18 months; 20 animals in each group. Animals were freely allowed to standard food and water. When animals reached appropriate age they were decapitated under thiopental anesthesia (40 mg/kg. Glucose was measured by glucose oxidative method in all groups of animals. In order to define the intensity of oxidative reactions in blood plasma of laboratory animals the degree of OMP by Halliwell method was done. Wemeasuredlevelofaldehydephenylhydrazone (APH which is thought to be as early mark of proteins oxidation, and ketonephenylhydrazone (KPH which is referred to late mark of protein destruction. The state of antioxidative system was evaluated by plasma catalase activity with the help of spectrophotometric method. The obtained data was processed by statistic programs VIDAS-2.5 (Kontron Elektronik, Германия, EXCEL MS Office 2007 (Microsoft Corp., США, STATISTICA 6.0 (Stat-Soft, 2001. Results and discussion. In the present research, we have observed the decrease of

  5. Off-target function of the Sonic hedgehog inhibitor cyclopamine in mediating apoptosis via nitric oxide-dependent neutral sphingomyelinase 2/ceramide induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers-Needham, Marisa; Lewis, Jocelyn A; Gencer, Salih; Sentelle, R David; Saddoughi, Sahar A; Clarke, Christopher J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Norell, Haakan; da Palma, Telma Martins; Nishimura, Michael; Kraveka, Jacqueline M; Khavandgar, Zohreh; Murshed, Monzur; Cevik, M Ozgur; Ogretmen, Besim

    2012-05-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHh) signaling is important in the pathogenesis of various human cancers, such as medulloblastomas, and it has been identified as a valid target for anticancer therapeutics. The SHh inhibitor cyclopamine induces apoptosis. The bioactive sphingolipid ceramide mediates cell death in response to various chemotherapeutic agents; however, ceramide's roles/mechanisms in cyclopamine-induced apoptosis are unknown. Here, we report that cyclopamine mediates ceramide generation selectively via induction of neutral sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3, SMPD3 (nSMase2) in Daoy human medulloblastoma cells. Importantly, short interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of nSMase2 prevented cyclopamine-induced ceramide generation and protected Daoy cells from drug-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, ectopic wild-type N-SMase2 caused cell death, compared with controls, which express the catalytically inactive N-SMase2 mutant. Interestingly, knockdown of smoothened (Smo), a target protein for cyclopamine, or Gli1, a downstream signaling transcription factor of Smo, did not affect nSMase2. Mechanistically, our data showed that cyclopamine induced nSMase2 and cell death selectively via increased nitric oxide (NO) generation by neuronal-nitric oxide synthase (n-NOS) induction, in Daoy medulloblastoma, and multiple other human cancer cell lines. Knockdown of n-NOS prevented nSMase2 induction and cell death in response to cyclopamine. Accordingly, N-SMase2 activity-deficient skin fibroblasts isolated from homozygous fro/fro (fragilitas ossium) mice exhibited resistance to NO-induced cell death. Thus, our data suggest a novel off-target function of cyclopamine in inducing apoptosis, at least in part, by n-NOS/NO-dependent induction of N-SMase2/ceramide axis, independent of Smo/Gli inhibition. ©2012 AACR

  6. Nitric Oxide Regulates Skeletal Muscle Fatigue, Fiber Type, Microtubule Organization, and Mitochondrial ATP Synthesis Efficiency Through cGMP-Dependent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Younghye; Balke, Jordan E; Madorma, Derik; Siegel, Michael P; Knowels, Gary; Brouckaert, Peter; Buys, Emmanuel S; Marcinek, David J; Percival, Justin M

    2017-06-10

    Skeletal muscle nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathways are impaired in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy partly because of reduced nNOSμ and soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) activity. However, GC function and the consequences of reduced GC activity in skeletal muscle are unknown. In this study, we explore the functions of GC and NO-cGMP signaling in skeletal muscle. GC1, but not GC2, expression was higher in oxidative than glycolytic muscles. GC1 was found in a complex with nNOSμ and targeted to nNOS compartments at the Golgi complex and neuromuscular junction. Baseline GC activity and GC agonist responsiveness was reduced in the absence of nNOS. Structural analyses revealed aberrant microtubule directionality in GC1 -/- muscle. Functional analyses of GC1 -/- muscles revealed reduced fatigue resistance and postexercise force recovery that were not due to shifts in type IIA-IIX fiber balance. Force deficits in GC1 -/- muscles were also not driven by defects in resting mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. However, increasing muscle cGMP with sildenafil decreased ATP synthesis efficiency and capacity, without impacting mitochondrial content or ultrastructure. GC may represent a new target for alleviating muscle fatigue and that NO-cGMP signaling may play important roles in muscle structure, contractility, and bioenergetics. These findings suggest that GC activity is nNOS dependent and that muscle-specific control of GC expression and differential GC targeting may facilitate NO-cGMP signaling diversity. They suggest that nNOS regulates muscle fiber type, microtubule organization, fatigability, and postexercise force recovery partly through GC1 and suggest that NO-cGMP pathways may modulate mitochondrial ATP synthesis efficiency. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 966-985.

  7. Absence of RIP140 reveals a pathway regulating glut4-dependent glucose uptake in oxidative skeletal muscle through UCP1-mediated activation of AMPK.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaà Fritah

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle constitutes the major site of glucose uptake leading to increased removal of glucose from the circulation in response to insulin. Type 2 diabetes and obesity are often associated with insulin resistance that can be counteracted by exercise or the use of drugs increasing the relative proportion of oxidative fibers. RIP140 is a transcriptional coregulator with a central role in metabolic tissues and we tested the effect of modulating its level of expression on muscle glucose and lipid metabolism in two mice models. Here, we show that although RIP140 protein is expressed at the same level in both oxidative and glycolytic muscles, it inhibits both fatty acid and glucose utilization in a fiber-type dependent manner. In RIP140-null mice, fatty acid utilization increases in the extensor digitorum longus and this is associated with elevated expression of genes implicated in fatty acid binding and transport. In the RIP140-null soleus, depletion of RIP140 leads to increased GLUT4 trafficking and glucose uptake with no change in Akt activity. AMPK phosphorylation/activity is inhibited in the soleus of RIP140 transgenic mice and increased in RIP140-null soleus. This is associated with increased UCP1 expression and mitochondrial uncoupling revealing the existence of a signaling pathway controlling insulin-independent glucose uptake in the soleus of RIP140-null mice. In conclusion, our findings reinforce the participation of RIP140 in the maintenance of energy homeostasis by acting as an inhibitor of energy production and particularly point to RIP140 as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  8. Calcium-dependent nitric oxide production is involved in the cytoprotective properties of n-acetylcysteine in glycochenodeoxycholic acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Rubio, Sandra; Linares, Clara I.; Bello, Rosario I.; Gonzalez, Raul; Ferrin, Gustavo; Hidalgo, Ana B.; Munoz-Gomariz, Elisa; Rodriguez, Blanca A.; Barrera, Pilar; Ranchal, Isidora; Duran-Prado, Mario; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; De la Mata, Manuel; Muntane, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    The intracellular oxidative stress has been involved in bile acid-induced cell death in hepatocytes. Nitric oxide (NO) exerts cytoprotective properties in glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)-treated hepatocytes. The study evaluated the involvement of Ca 2+ on the regulation of NO synthase (NOS)-3 expression during N-acetylcysteine (NAC) cytoprotection against GCDCA-induced cell death in hepatocytes. The regulation of Ca 2+ pools (EGTA or BAPTA-AM) and NO (L-NAME or NO donor) production was assessed during NAC cytoprotection in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The stimulation of Ca 2+ entrance was induced by A23187 in HepG2. Cell death, Ca 2+ mobilization, NOS-1, -2 and -3 expression, AP-1 activation, and NO production were evaluated. GCDCA reduced intracellular Ca 2+ concentration and NOS-3 expression, and enhanced cell death in HepG2. NO donor prevented, and L-NAME enhanced, GCDCA-induced cell death. The reduction of Ca 2+ entry by EGTA, but not its release from intracellular stores by BAPTA-AM, enhanced cell death in GCDCA-treated cells. The stimulation of Ca 2+ entrance by A23187 reduced cell death and enhanced NOS-3 expression in GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The cytoprotective properties of NAC were related to the recovery of intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, NOS-3 expression and NO production induced by GCDCA-treated HepG2 cells. The increase of NO production by Ca 2+ -dependent NOS-3 expression during NAC administration reduces cell death in GCDCA-treated hepatocytes.

  9. Cobalt chloride decreases fibroblast growth factor-21 expression dependent on oxidative stress but not hypoxia-inducible factor in Caco-2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanlong [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Wang, Chunhong [Second Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Wang, Yuhua [College of Food Science and Engineering, Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Ma, Zhenhua [First Hospital, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Xiao, Jian [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Robley Rex Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Louisville, KY (United States); Li, Xiaokun [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Feng, Wenke, E-mail: wenke.feng@louisville.edu [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is a potential metabolic regulator with multiple beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. FGF21 is mainly expressed in the liver, but is also found in other tissues including the intestine, which expresses β-klotho abundantly. The intestine is a unique organ that operates in a physiologically hypoxic environment, and is responsible for the fat absorption processes including triglyceride breakdown, re-synthesis and absorption into the portal circulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and the chemical hypoxia inducer, cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), on FGF21 expression in Caco-2 cells and the consequence of fat accumulation. Physical hypoxia (1% oxygen) and CoCl{sub 2} treatment decreased both FGF21 mRNA and secreted protein levels. Gene silence and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIFα) did not affect the reduction of FGF21 mRNA and protein levels by hypoxia. However, CoCl{sub 2} administration caused a significant increase in oxidative stress. The addition of n-acetylcysteine (NAC) suppressed CoCl{sub 2}-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and completely negated CoCl{sub 2}-induced FGF21 loss. mRNA stability analysis demonstrated that the CoCl{sub 2} administration caused a remarkable reduction in FGF21 mRNA stability. Furthermore, CoCl{sub 2} increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation, along with a reduction in mRNA levels of lipid lipase, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and an increase of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and stearoyl-coenzyme A (SCD1). Addition of both NAC and recombinant FGF21 significantly attenuated the CoCl{sub 2}-induced TG accumulation. In conclusion, the decrease of FGF21 in Caco-2 cells by chemical hypoxia is independent of HIFα, but dependent on an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism. The regulation of FGF21 by hypoxia may contribute to intestinal lipid metabolism and

  10. Cobalt chloride decreases fibroblast growth factor-21 expression dependent on oxidative stress but not hypoxia-inducible factor in Caco-2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanlong; Wang, Chunhong; Wang, Yuhua; Ma, Zhenhua; Xiao, Jian; McClain, Craig; Li, Xiaokun; Feng, Wenke

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) is a potential metabolic regulator with multiple beneficial effects on metabolic diseases. FGF21 is mainly expressed in the liver, but is also found in other tissues including the intestine, which expresses β-klotho abundantly. The intestine is a unique organ that operates in a physiologically hypoxic environment, and is responsible for the fat absorption processes including triglyceride breakdown, re-synthesis and absorption into the portal circulation. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia and the chemical hypoxia inducer, cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ), on FGF21 expression in Caco-2 cells and the consequence of fat accumulation. Physical hypoxia (1% oxygen) and CoCl 2 treatment decreased both FGF21 mRNA and secreted protein levels. Gene silence and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIFα) did not affect the reduction of FGF21 mRNA and protein levels by hypoxia. However, CoCl 2 administration caused a significant increase in oxidative stress. The addition of n-acetylcysteine (NAC) suppressed CoCl 2 -induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and completely negated CoCl 2 -induced FGF21 loss. mRNA stability analysis demonstrated that the CoCl 2 administration caused a remarkable reduction in FGF21 mRNA stability. Furthermore, CoCl 2 increased intracellular triglyceride (TG) accumulation, along with a reduction in mRNA levels of lipid lipase, hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and an increase of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) and stearoyl-coenzyme A (SCD1). Addition of both NAC and recombinant FGF21 significantly attenuated the CoCl 2 -induced TG accumulation. In conclusion, the decrease of FGF21 in Caco-2 cells by chemical hypoxia is independent of HIFα, but dependent on an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism. The regulation of FGF21 by hypoxia may contribute to intestinal lipid metabolism and absorption. -- Graphical abstract: Physical

  11. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles combined with actein suppress non-small-cell lung cancer growth in a p53-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang MS

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ming-Shan Wang,1 Liang Chen,2 Ya-Qiong Xiong,2 Jing Xu,2 Ji-Peng Wang,2 Zi-Li Meng2 1Department of Oncology, Huaiyin Hospital of Huai’an City, Huai’an, China; 2Department of Respiration, Huai’an First People’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Huai’an, China Abstract: Actein (AT is a triterpene glycoside isolated from the rhizomes of Cimicifuga foetida that has been investigated for its antitumor effects. AT treatment leads to apoptosis in various cell types, including breast cancer cells, by regulating different signaling pathways. Iron oxide (Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs are nanomaterials with biocompatible activity and low toxicity. In the present study, the possible benefits of AT in combination with MNPs on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC were explored in in vitro and in vivo studies. AT-MNP treatment contributed to apoptosis in NSCLC cells, as evidenced by activation of the caspase 3-signaling pathway, which was accompanied by downregulation of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl2 and BclXL, and upregulation of the proapoptotic signals Bax and Bad. The death receptors of TRAIL were also elevated following AT-MNP treatment in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, a mouse xenograft model in vivo revealed that AT-MNP treatment exhibited no toxicity and suppressed NSCLC growth compared to either AT or MNP monotherapies. In conclusion, this study suggests a novel therapy to induce apoptosis in suppressing NSCLC growth in a p53-dependent manner by combining AT with Fe3O4 MNPs. Keywords: actein, Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles, NSCLC, apoptosis, p53

  12. Magnetic super-hydrophilic carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide composite as nanocarriers of mesenchymal stem cells: Insights into the time and dose dependences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Alessandro E C; Rodrigues, Bruno V M; Rodrigues-Junior, Dorival M; Marciano, Fernanda R; Lobo, Anderson O; Porcionatto, Marimelia A

    2016-10-01

    Among nanostructured materials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have demonstrated great potential for biomedical applications in recent years. After oxygen plasma etching, we can obtain super-hydrophilic MWCNT that contain graphene oxide (GO) at their tips. This material exhibits good dispersion in biological systems due to the presence of polar groups and its excellent magnetic properties due to metal particle residues from the catalyst that often remain trapped in its walls and tips. Here, we show for the first time a careful biological investigation using magnetic superhydrophilic MWCNT/GO (GCN composites). The objective of this study was to investigate the application of GCN for the in vitro immobilization of mesenchymal stem cells. Our ultimate goal was to develop a system to deliver mesenchymal stem cells to different tissues and organs. We show here that mesenchymal stem cells were able to internalize GCN with a consequent migration when subjected to a magnetic field. The cytotoxicity of GCN was time- and dose-dependent. We also observed that GCN internalization caused changes in the gene expression of the proteins involved in cell adhesion and migration, such as integrins, laminins, and the chemokine CXCL12, as well as its receptor CXCR4. These results suggest that GCN represents a potential new platform for mesenchymal stem cell immobilization at injury sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Distribution and characteristic of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria by comparative analysis of wastewater treatment plants and agriculture fields in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo is a recently discovered biological process which has been arousing global attention because of its potential in minimizing greenhouse gases emissions. In this study, molecular biological techniques and potential n-damo activity batch experiments were conducted to investigate the presence and diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria in paddy field, corn field, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP sites in northern China, as well as lab-scale n-damo enrichment culture. N-damo enrichment culture showed the highest abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria, and positive correlation was observed between potential n-damo rate and abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria. Both paddy field and corn field sites were believed to be better inoculum than WWTP for the enrichment of M. oxyfera bacteria due to their higher abundance and the diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria. Comparative analysis revealed that long biomass retention time, low NH ${}_{4}^{+}$ 4 + and high NO ${}_{2}^{-}$ 2 − content were suitable for the growth of M. oxyfera bacteria.

  14. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  15. Annual cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products and other water-soluble organic compounds in coarse and fine aerosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-05-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse particulate matter were collected over a period of one year and analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds, including the pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid, 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) and a variety of dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks and data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid (C6) and phthalic acid (Ph) to azelaic acid (C9) indicate that the investigated aerosols samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. An Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature. Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence is largely due to enhanced emissions and OH radical concentrations at elevated temperatures, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. Enhanced ratios of pinic acid to 3-MBTCA indicate strong chemical aging of the investigated aerosols in summer and spring. Acknowledgment: The authors would like to thank M. Claeys for providing synthetic 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid standards for LC-MS analysis and J. Fröhlich for providing filter samples and related information.

  16. Melatonin protects against maternal obesity-associated oxidative stress and meiotic defects in oocytes via the SIRT3-SOD2-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Longsen; Wang, Haichao; Li, Ling; Li, Xiaoyan; Ge, Juan; Reiter, Russel J; Wang, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Maternal obesity in humans is associated with poor outcomes across the reproductive spectrum. Emerging evidence indicates that these defects are likely attributed to factors within the oocyte. Although various molecules and pathways may contribute to impaired oocyte quality, prevention of fertility issues associated with maternal obesity is a challenge. Using mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) as an obesity model, we document spindle disorganization, chromosome misalignment, and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in oocytes from obese mice. Oral administration of melatonin to HFD mice not only reduces ROS generation, but also prevents spindle/chromosome anomalies in oocytes, consequently promoting the developmental potential of early embryos. Consistent with this finding, we find that melatonin supplement during in vitro maturation also markedly attenuates oxidative stress and meiotic defects in HFD oocytes. Finally, by performing morpholino knockdown and acetylation-mimetic mutant overexpression assays, we reveal that melatonin ameliorates maternal obesity-induced defective phenotypes in oocytes through the SIRT3-SOD2-dependent mechanism. In sum, our data uncover the marked beneficial effects of melatonin on oocyte quality from obese females; this opens a new area for optimizing culture system as well as fertility management. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The dependence of the discharge of nitrous oxide by ordinary chernozem steppe of the Central-Chernozem Region of Russia from the content of humus, nitrogen and enzymatic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avksentev, Alexey; Negrobova, Elena; Kramareva, Tatiana; Moiseeva, Evgenya

    2016-04-01

    The dependence of the discharge of nitrous oxide by ordinary chernozem steppe of the Central-Chernozem Region of Russia from the content of humus, nitrogen and enzymatic activity Alexey Avksentev, Elena Negrobova, Tatiana Kramareva, Evgenya Moiseeva 394000 Voronezh, Universitetskaya square, 1 Voronezh State University Nitrous oxide is emitted by soil as a result of microbiological processes, ranks third in the list of aggressive greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide and methane. Nitrous oxide is formed during nitrification and denitrification of ammonia that enters the soil during microbial decomposition of complex organic compounds. Denitrification can be direct and indirect. In the microbiological process of recovery of nitrates involved of the organic substance. In aerobic conditions microorganisms denitrificator behave like normal saprotrophs and oxidize organic matter in the act of breathing oxygen. Thus, they operate at different times two enzyme systems: the electron transport chain with an oxygen acceptor in aerobic and restoration of nitrates under anaerobic conditions. Investigation of the emission of nitrous oxide by ordinary Chernozem steppe of the Central-Chernozem Region showed that it depends on the type of cenosis and the content of available forms of nitrogen. Natural ecosystems emit nitrous oxide more than the soil of arable land. The dependence of the emission of nitrous oxide from the humus content shows positive trend, but the aggregation of data, significant differences are not detected. Research shows that nitrous oxide emissions are seasonal. So the autumn season is characterized by nitrous oxide emissions than spring. Enzymatic processes are an important link in the biological cycle of elements and, consequently, participate in the process of decomposition of organic matter, nitrification and other processes. Analysis of the data on enzyme activity of ordinary Chernozem and the intensity of emission of N20 shows a clear relationship between

  18. Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Modulates Basal and β-Adrenergic-Stimulated Contractility by Rapid and Reversible Redox-Dependent S-Nitrosylation of the Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Z Vielma

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation of several Ca2+ regulating proteins in response to β-adrenergic stimulation was recently described in the heart; however the specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS isoform and signaling pathways responsible for this modification have not been elucidated. NOS-1 activity increases inotropism, therefore, we tested whether β-adrenergic stimulation induces NOS-1-dependent S-nitrosylation of total proteins, the ryanodine receptor (RyR2, SERCA2 and the L-Type Ca2+ channel (LTCC. In the isolated rat heart, isoproterenol (10 nM, 3-min increased S-nitrosylation of total cardiac proteins (+46±14% and RyR2 (+146±77%, without affecting S-nitrosylation of SERCA2 and LTCC. Selective NOS-1 blockade with S-methyl-L-thiocitrulline (SMTC and Nω-propyl-l-arginine decreased basal contractility and relaxation (-25-30% and basal S-nitrosylation of total proteins (-25-60%, RyR2, SERCA2 and LTCC (-60-75%. NOS-1 inhibition reduced (-25-40% the inotropic response and protein S-nitrosylation induced by isoproterenol, particularly that of RyR2 (-85±7%. Tempol, a superoxide scavenger, mimicked the effects of NOS-1 inhibition on inotropism and protein S-nitrosylation; whereas selective NOS-3 inhibitor L-N5-(1-Iminoethylornithine had no effect. Inhibition of NOS-1 did not affect phospholamban phosphorylation, but reduced its oligomerization. Attenuation of contractility was abolished by PKA blockade and unaffected by guanylate cyclase inhibition. Additionally, in isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, NOS-1 inhibition or removal reduced the Ca2+-transient amplitude and sarcomere shortening induced by isoproterenol or by direct PKA activation. We conclude that 1 normal cardiac performance requires basal NOS-1 activity and S-nitrosylation of the calcium-cycling machinery; 2 β-adrenergic stimulation induces rapid and reversible NOS-1 dependent, PKA and ROS-dependent, S-nitrosylation of RyR2 and other proteins, accounting for about one third of its inotropic effect.

  19. Nitric oxide augments single Ca(2+) channel currents via cGMP-dependent protein kinase in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosakai, Kumiko; Tsujiuchi, Yuuki; Yoshino, Masami

    2015-07-01

    Behavioral and pharmacological studies in insects have suggested that the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic GMP (cGMP) signaling pathway is involved in the formation of long-term memory (LTM) associated with olfactory learning. However, the target molecules of NO and the downstream signaling pathway are still not known. In this study, we investigated the action of NO on single voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in the intrinsic neurons known as Kenyon cells within the mushroom body of the cricket brain, using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Application of the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) increased the open probability (NPO) of single Ca(2+) channel currents. This GSNO-induced increase was blocked by ODQ, a soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, suggesting that the NO generated by GSNO acts via sGC to raise cGMP levels. The membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-Bro-cGMP also increased the NPO of single Ca(2+) channel currents. Pretreatment of cells with KT5823, a protein kinase G blocker, abolished the excitatory effect of GSNO. These results suggest that NO augments the activity of single Ca(2+) channels via the cGMP/PKG signaling pathway. To gain insight into the physiological role of NO, we examined the effect of GSNO on action potentials of Kenyon cells under current-clamp conditions. Application of GSNO increased the frequency of action potentials elicited by depolarizing current injections, indicating that NO acts as a modulator resulting in a stimulatory signal in Kenyon cells. We discuss the increased Ca(2+) influx through these Ca(2+) channels via the NO/cGMP signaling cascade in relation to the formation of olfactory LTM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular and stable isotopic evidence for the occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria in the mangrove sediment of Zhangjiang Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manping; Luo, Yi; Lin, Li'an; Lin, Xiaolan; Hetharua, Buce; Zhao, Weijun; Zhou, Mengkai; Zhan, Qing; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling; Tian, Yun

    2018-03-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which is mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like" bacteria, is unique in linking the carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, the niche and activity of n-damo bacteria in the mangrove ecosystem have not been confirmed. Here, we report the occurrence of the n-damo process in the mangrove wetland of the Zhangjiang Estuary, China. The widespread occurrence of n-damo bacteria in mangrove wetland was confirmed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay, which showed that the abundance of Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacterial 16S rRNA and pmoA genes ranged from 2.43 × 10 6 to 2.09 × 10 7 and 2.07 × 10 6 to 3.38 × 10 7 copies per gram of dry soil in the examined sediment cores. The highest amount of targeting genes was all detected in the upper layer (0-20 cm). Phylogenetic analyses of n-damo bacterial 16S rRNA and pmoA genes illustrated the depth-specific distribution and high diversity of n-damo bacteria in the mangrove wetland. Stable isotope experiments further confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined mangrove sediments, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 25.93 to 704.08 nmol CO 2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of the sediment cores, with the n-damo being more active in the upper layer of the mangrove sediments. These results illustrate the existence of active M. oxyfera-like bacteria and indicate that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in the mangrove wetlands.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus sigma B-dependent emergence of small-colony variants and biofilm production following exposure to Pseudomonas aeruginosa 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-N-oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaud Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are often found together in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients. It was previously shown that the P. aeruginosa exoproduct 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO suppresses the growth of S. aureus and provokes the emergence of small-colony variants (SCVs. The presence of S. aureus SCVs as well as biofilms have both been associated with chronic infections in CF. Results We demonstrated that HQNO stimulates S. aureus to form a biofilm in association with the formation of SCVs. The emergence of SCVs and biofilm production under HQNO exposure was shown to be dependent on the activity of the stress- and colonization-related alternative sigma factor B (SigB. Analysis of gene expression revealed that exposure of a prototypical S. aureus strain to HQNO activates SigB, which was leading to an increase in the expression of the fibronectin-binding protein A and the biofilm-associated sarA genes. Conversely, the quorum sensing accessory gene regulator (agr system and the α-hemolysin gene were repressed by HQNO. Experiments using culture supernatants from P. aeruginosa PAO1 and a double chamber co-culture model confirmed that P. aeruginosa stimulates biofilm formation and activates SigB in a S. aureus strain isolated from a CF patient. Furthermore, the supernatant from P. aeruginosa mutants unable to produce HQNO induced the production of biofilms by S. aureus to a lesser extent than the wild-type strain only in a S. aureus SigB-functional background. Conclusions These results suggest that S. aureus responds to HQNO from P. aeruginosa by forming SCVs and biofilms through SigB activation, a phenomenon that may contribute to the establishment of chronic infections in CF patients.

  2. CysB-dependent upregulation of the Salmonella Typhimurium cysJIH operon in response to antimicrobial compounds that induce oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Ricardo; Neumann, German; Frávega, Jorge; Díaz, Fernando; Tejías, Cristóbal; Collao, Bernardo; Fuentes, Juan A; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Calderón, Iván L; Gil, Fernando

    2015-02-27

    It has been proposed that some antibiotics exert additional damage through reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Since H₂S protects neurons and cardiac muscle from oxidative stress, it has been hypothesized that bacterial H₂S might, similarly, be a cellular protector against antibiotics. In Enterobacteriaceae, H₂S can be produced by the cysJIH pathway, which uses sulfate as the sulfur source. CysB, in turn, is a positive regulator of cysJIH. At present, the role of S. Typhimurium cysJIH operon in the protection to reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by antimicrobial compounds remains to be elucidated. In this work, we evaluated the role of cysJIH and cysB in ROS accumulation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, reduced thiol accumulation, and H₂S accumulation in S. Typhimurium, cultured in either sulfate or cysteine as the sole sulfur source. Furthermore, we assessed the effects of the addition of ceftriaxone (CEF) and menadione (MEN) in these same parameters. In sulfate as the sole sulfur source, we found that the cysJIH operon and the cysB gene were required to full growth in minimal media, independently on the addition of CEF or MEN. Most importantly, both cysJIH and cysB contributed to diminish ROS levels, increase the SOD activity, increase the reduced thiols, and increase the H₂S levels in presence of CEF or MEN. Moreover, the cysJIH operon exhibited a CysB-dependent upregulation in presence of these two antimicrobials compounds. On the other hand, when cysteine was used as the sole sulfur source, we found that cysJIH operon was completely negligible, were only cysB exhibited similar phenotypes than the described for sulfate as sulfur source. Unexpectedly, CysB downregulated cysJIH operon when cysteine was used instead of sulfate, suggesting a complex regulation of this system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidized CaMKII (Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II) Is Essential for Ventricular Arrhythmia in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongling; Quick, Ann P; Cao, Shuyi; Reynolds, Julia; Chiang, David Y; Beavers, David; Li, Na; Wang, Guoliang; Rodney, George G; Anderson, Mark E; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2018-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients are prone to ventricular arrhythmias, which may be caused by abnormal calcium (Ca 2+ ) homeostasis and elevated reactive oxygen species. CaMKII (Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) is vital for normal Ca 2+ homeostasis, but excessive CaMKII activity contributes to abnormal Ca 2+ homeostasis and arrhythmias in cardiomyocytes. Reactive oxygen species induce CaMKII to become autonomously active. We hypothesized that genetic inhibition of CaMKII oxidation (ox-CaMKII) in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy can alleviate abnormal Ca 2+ homeostasis, thus, preventing ventricular arrhythmia. The objective of this study was to test if selective loss of ox-CaMKII affects ventricular arrhythmias in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 5-(6)-Chloromethyl-2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate staining revealed increased reactive oxygen species production in ventricular myocytes isolated from mdx mice, which coincides with elevated ventricular ox-CaMKII demonstrated by Western blotting. Genetic inhibition of ox-CaMKII by knockin replacement of the regulatory domain methionines with valines (MM-VV [CaMKII M281/282V]) prevented ventricular tachycardia in mdx mice. Confocal calcium imaging of ventricular myocytes isolated from mdx :MM-VV mice revealed normalization of intracellular Ca 2+ release events compared with cardiomyocytes from mdx mice. Abnormal action potentials assessed by optical mapping in mdx mice were also alleviated by genetic inhibition of ox-CaMKII. Knockout of the NADPH oxidase regulatory subunit p47 phox normalized elevated ox-CaMKII, repaired intracellular Ca 2+ homeostasis, and rescued inducible ventricular arrhythmias in mdx mice. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species or ox-CaMKII protects against proarrhythmic intracellular Ca 2+ handling and prevents ventricular arrhythmia in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Protein kinase-dependent oxidative regulation of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump: evidence from in vivo and in vitro modulation of cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A S; Hamilton, Elisha J; Rasmussen, Helge H; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-06-15

    The widely reported stimulation of the cardiac Na(+)-K(+) pump by protein kinase A (PKA) should oppose other effects of PKA to increase contractility of the normal heart. It should also reduce harmful raised myocyte Na(+) levels in heart failure, yet blockade of the β1 adrenergic receptor (AR), coupled to PKA signalling, is beneficial. We treated rabbits with the β1 AR antagonist metoprolol to modulate PKA activity and studied cardiac myocytes ex vivo. Metoprolol increased electrogenic pump current (Ip) in voltage clamped myocytes and reduced glutathionylation of the β1 pump subunit, an oxidative modification causally related to pump inhibition. Activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin to enhance cAMP synthesis or inclusion of the catalytic subunit of PKA in patch pipette solutions abolished the increase in Ip in voltage clamped myocytes induced by treatment with metoprolol, supporting cAMP/PKA-mediated pump inhibition. Metoprolol reduced myocardial PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, reduced coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47(phox) and membranous p22(phox) NADPH oxidase subunits and reduced myocardial O2(•-)-sensitive dihydroethidium fluorescence. Treatment also enhanced coimmunoprecipitation of the β1 pump subunit with glutaredoxin 1 that catalyses de-glutathionylation. Since angiotensin II induces PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase, we examined the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with captopril. This treatment had no effect on PKA activity but reduced the activity of PKC, reduced β1 subunit glutathionylation and increased Ip. The PKA-induced Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibition we report should act with other mechanisms that enhance contractility of the normal heart but accentuate the harmful effects of raised cytosolic Na(+) in the failing heart. This scheme is consistent with the efficacy of β1 AR blockade in the treatment of heart failure.

  5. Protein kinase-dependent oxidative regulation of the cardiac Na+–K+ pump: evidence from in vivo and in vitro modulation of cell signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A S; Hamilton, Elisha J; Rasmussen, Helge H; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-01-01

    The widely reported stimulation of the cardiac Na+–K+ pump by protein kinase A (PKA) should oppose other effects of PKA to increase contractility of the normal heart. It should also reduce harmful raised myocyte Na+ levels in heart failure, yet blockade of the β1 adrenergic receptor (AR), coupled to PKA signalling, is beneficial. We treated rabbits with the β1 AR antagonist metoprolol to modulate PKA activity and studied cardiac myocytes ex vivo. Metoprolol increased electrogenic pump current (Ip) in voltage clamped myocytes and reduced glutathionylation of the β1 pump subunit, an oxidative modification causally related to pump inhibition. Activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin to enhance cAMP synthesis or inclusion of the catalytic subunit of PKA in patch pipette solutions abolished the increase in Ip in voltage clamped myocytes induced by treatment with metoprolol, supporting cAMP/PKA-mediated pump inhibition. Metoprolol reduced myocardial PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, reduced coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47phox and membranous p22phox NADPH oxidase subunits and reduced myocardial O2•−-sensitive dihydroethidium fluorescence. Treatment also enhanced coimmunoprecipitation of the β1 pump subunit with glutaredoxin 1 that catalyses de-glutathionylation. Since angiotensin II induces PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase, we examined the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with captopril. This treatment had no effect on PKA activity but reduced the activity of PKC, reduced β1 subunit glutathionylation and increased Ip. The PKA-induced Na+–K+ pump inhibition we report should act with other mechanisms that enhance contractility of the normal heart but accentuate the harmful effects of raised cytosolic Na+ in the failing heart. This scheme is consistent with the efficacy of β1 AR blockade in the treatment of heart failure. PMID:23587884

  6. Suppression of intestinal microbiota-dependent production of pro-atherogenic trimethylamine N-oxide by shifting L-carnitine microbial degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuka, Janis; Liepinsh, Edgars; Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Liepins, Janis; Cirule, Helena; Gustina, Daina; Loza, Einars; Zharkova-Malkova, Olga; Grinberga, Solveiga; Pugovics, Osvalds; Dambrova, Maija

    2014-11-11

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is produced in host liver from trimethylamine (TMA). TMAO and TMA share common dietary quaternary amine precursors, carnitine and choline, which are metabolized by the intestinal microbiota. TMAO recently has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and severity of cardiovascular diseases. We examined the effects of anti-atherosclerotic compound meldonium, an aza-analogue of carnitine bioprecursor gamma-butyrobetaine (GBB), on the availability of TMA and TMAO. Wistar rats received L-carnitine, GBB or choline alone or in combination with meldonium. Plasma, urine and rat small intestine perfusate samples were assayed for L-carnitine, GBB, choline and TMAO using UPLC-MS/MS. Meldonium effects on TMA production by intestinal bacteria from L-carnitine and choline were tested. Treatment with meldonium significantly decreased intestinal microbiota-dependent production of TMA/TMAO from L-carnitine, but not from choline. 24hours after the administration of meldonium, the urinary excretion of TMAO was 3.6 times lower in the combination group than in the L-carnitine-alone group. In addition, the administration of meldonium together with L-carnitine significantly increased GBB concentration in blood plasma and in isolated rat small intestine perfusate. Meldonium did not influence bacterial growth and bacterial uptake of L-carnitine, but TMA production by the intestinal microbiota bacteria K. pneumoniae was significantly decreased. We have shown for the first time that TMA/TMAO production from quaternary amines could be decreased by targeting bacterial TMA-production. In addition, the production of pro-atherogenic TMAO can be suppressed by shifting the microbial degradation pattern of supplemental/dietary quaternary amines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein kinase A-dependent Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediates the Enhancement of Baroreflex Response by Adrenomedullin in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho I-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenomedullin (ADM exerts its biological functions through the receptor-mediated enzymatic mechanisms that involve protein kinase A (PKA, or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. We previously demonstrated that the receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA pathway involves in ADM-enhanced baroreceptor reflex (BRR response. It remains unclear whether ADM may enhance BRR response via activation of nNOS-dependent mechanism in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS. Methods Intravenous injection of phenylephrine was administered to evoke the BRR before and at 10, 30, and 60 min after microinjection of the test agents into NTS of Sprague-Dawley rats. Western blotting analysis was used to measure the level and phosphorylation of proteins that involved in BRR-enhancing effects of ADM (0.2 pmol in NTS. The colocalization of PKA and nNOS was examined by immunohistochemical staining and observed with a laser confocal microscope. Results We found that ADM-induced enhancement of BRR response was blunted by microinjection of NPLA or Rp-8-Br-cGMP, a selective inhibitor of nNOS or protein kinase G (PKG respectively, into NTS. Western blot analysis further revealed that ADM induced an increase in the protein level of PKG-I which could be attenuated by co-microinjection with the ADM receptor antagonist ADM22-52 or NPLA. Moreover, we observed an increase in phosphorylation at Ser1416 of nNOS at 10, 30, and 60 min after intra-NTS administration of ADM. As such, nNOS/PKG signaling may also account for the enhancing effect of ADM on BRR response. Interestingly, biochemical evidence further showed that ADM-induced increase of nNOS phosphorylation was prevented by co-microinjection with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor. The possibility of PKA-dependent nNOS activation was substantiated by immunohistochemical demonstration of co-localization of PKA and nNOS in putative NTS neurons. Conclusions The novel finding of this study is that the signal transduction cascade that

  8. Identification of Novel Signal Transduction, Immune Function, and Oxidative Stress Genes and Pathways by Topiramate for Treatment of Methamphetamine Dependence Based on Secondary Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Niu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTopiramate (TPM is suggested to be a promising medication for treatment of methamphetamine (METH dependence, but the molecular basis remains to be elucidated.MethodsAmong 140 METH-dependent participants randomly assigned to receive either TPM (N = 69 or placebo (N = 71 in a previously conducted randomized controlled trial, 50 TPM- and 49 placebo-treated participants had a total 212 RNA samples available at baseline, week 8, and week 12 time points. Following our primary analysis of gene expression data, we reanalyzed the microarray expression data based on a latent class analysis of binary secondary outcomes during weeks 1–12 that provided a classification of 21 responders and 31 non-responders with consistent responses at both time points.ResultsBased on secondary outcomes, 1,381, 576, 905, and 711 differentially expressed genes at nominal P values < 0.05 were identified in responders versus non-responders for week 8 TPM, week 8 placebo, week 12 TPM, and week 12 placebo groups, respectively. Among 1,381 genes identified in week 8 TPM responders, 359 genes were identified in both week 8 and week 12 TPM groups, of which 300 genes were exclusively detected in TPM responders. Of them, 32 genes had nominal P values < 5 × 10−3 at either week 8 or week 12 and false discovery rates < 0.15 at both time points with consistent directions of gene expression changes, which include GABARAPL1, GPR155, and IL15RA in GABA receptor signaling that represent direct targets for TPM. Analyses of these 300 genes revealed 7 enriched pathways belonging to neuronal function/synaptic plasticity, signal transduction, inflammation/immune function, and oxidative stress response categories. No pathways were enriched for 72 genes exclusively detected in both week 8 and week 12 placebo groups.ConclusionThis secondary analysis study of gene expression data from a TPM clinical trial not only yielded consistent results with those of primary

  9. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Du-Hyong [Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk-Hee [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Inho, E-mail: inhojo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  10. Role of Protein Phosphatase 1 and Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase-1 in Nitric Oxide-Dependent Inhibition of the DNA Damage Response in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Bryndon J; Naatz, Aaron; Proudfoot, Sarah C; Yeo, Chay Teng; Corbett, John A

    2018-02-14

    Nitric oxide is produced at micromolar levels by pancreatic β-cells during exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. While classically viewed as damaging, nitric oxide also activates pathways that promote β-cell survival. We have shown that nitric oxide, in a cell type selective manner, inhibits the DNA damage response (DDR) and, in doing so, protects β-cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. This study explores potential mechanisms by which nitric oxide inhibits DDR signaling. We show that inhibition of DDR signaling (measured by γH2AX formation and the phosphorylation of KAP1) is selective for nitric oxide, as other forms of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species do not impair DDR signaling. The kinetics and broad range of DDR substrates that are inhibited suggest that protein phosphatase activation may be one mechanism by which nitric oxide attenuates DDR signaling in β-cells. While protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a primary regulator of DDR signaling and an inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (IPP-1) is selectively expressed only in β-cells, disruption of either IPP-1 or PP1 does not modify the inhibitory actions of nitric oxide on DDR signaling in β-cells. These findings support a PP1-independent mechanism by which nitric oxide selectively impairs DDR signaling and protects β-cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Dependence of DNA-protein cross-linking via guanine oxidation upon local DNA sequence as studied by restriction endonuclease inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Amanda L; Perez, Zitadel A; To, Phuong; Maisonet, Tiffany; Rios, Eunice V; Trejo, Yuri; Ochoa-Paniagua, Carmen; Reno, Anita; Stemp, Eric D A

    2012-01-10

    Oxidative damage plays a causative role in many diseases, and DNA-protein cross-linking is one important consequence of such damage. It is known that GG and GGG sites are particularly prone to one-electron oxidation, and here we examined how the local DNA sequence influences the formation of DNA-protein cross-links induced by guanine oxidation. Oxidative DNA-protein cross-linking was induced between DNA and histone protein via the flash quench technique, a photochemical method that selectively oxidizes the guanine base in double-stranded DNA. An assay based on restriction enzyme cleavage was developed to detect the cross-linking in plasmid DNA. Following oxidation of pBR322 DNA by flash quench, several restriction enzymes (PpuMI, BamHI, EcoRI) were then used to probe the plasmid surface for the expected damage at guanine sites. These three endonucleases were strongly inhibited by DNA-protein cross-linking, whereas the AT-recognizing enzyme AseI was unaffected in its cleavage. These experiments also reveal the susceptibility of different guanine sites toward oxidative cross-linking. The percent inhibition observed for the endonucleases, and their pBR322 cleavage sites, decreased in the order: PpuMI (5'-GGGTCCT-3' and 5'-AGGACCC-3') > BamHI (5'-GGATCC-3') > EcoRI (5'-GAATTC-3'), a trend consistent with the observed and predicted tendencies for guanine to undergo one-electron oxidation: 5'-GGG-3' > 5'-GG-3' > 5'-GA-3'. Thus, it appears that in mixed DNA sequences the guanine sites most vulnerable to oxidative cross-linking are those that are easiest to oxidize. These results further indicate that equilibration of the electron hole in the plasmid DNA occurs on a time scale faster than that of cross-linking.

  12. OH radical-initiated oxidation of (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimene in the presence of NOx: the role of light-dependent monoterpenes in organic nitrate and secondary organic aerosol formation in the above-canopy forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, J. H., Jr.; Jayarathne, T.; Morales, A. C.; Shepson, P. B.

    2017-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) oxidation represents a significant pathway in the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). BVOC oxidation products, including organic nitrates (ON), impact both the SOA burden and the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere by sequestering NOx. A recent field study in the mixed deciduous/coniferous forest of northern Michigan showed that concentrations of multifunctional monoterpene-derived hydroxy nitrates (MTN) and SOA can be greater in the above-canopy environment during daytime, but the source of MTN is unclear as model simulations cannot replicate the higher concentrations above canopy. Light-dependent monoterpenes, including the polyolefinic species, trans-ocimene, may be one such contributor to the higher measured ON and SOA above canopy as this compound has been predicted to be an important source of monoterpene-derived ON during daytime in this environment. However, there are currently no measurements of the ON (and SOA yields) from trans-ocimene oxidation by OH in the presence of NOx, the dominant pathway for daytime ON production. Here we conduct photochemical reaction chamber studies of the OH radical-initiated oxidation of authentic (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimene isomers in the presence of NOx to examine the total (gas and particle) ON, hydroxy nitrate, and SOA yields. The effects of variable chamber relative humidity and seed particle acidity on the ON and SOA yields are examined to better understand the role of hydrolysis on SOA formation and the lifetime of ocimene-derived ON in the particles. This work underscores the importance of light-dependent monoterpenes on mediating the oxidative capacity of the near canopy forest environment and has important implications for understanding NOx cycling and the formation of SOA in forests, which are not currently included in atmospheric models.

  13. Voltage and oxide thickness dependent tunneling current density and tunnel resistivity model: Application to high-k material HfO2 based MOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, N. P.; Maity, Reshmi; Baishya, Srimanta

    2017-11-01

    In this paper presents a straightforward efficient investigation of tunneling current density for ultra thin oxide layer based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices to realization the gate current as a function of applied potential and oxide thickness. Solutions to the Schrödinger's wave equation are evolved for the different potential energy regions of the MOS device considering appropriate effective mass for each region. For finding approximate mathematical solutions to linear differential equations using spatially changeable coefficients the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation technique is considered. A p-substrate based n-channel MOS device has been analyzed consisting of SiO2 material as the oxide dielectric along with high-k material HfO2. The tunnel resistivity is correspondingly assessed employing this tunneling current density model. Synopsys Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) tool results are employed to validate the analytical model. Tremendous agreements among the results are observed.

  14. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles induced by biphasic regulation of oxidative stress in different human hepatoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuexia Xie,1,2,* Dejun Liu,3,* Chenlei Cai,1,* Xiaojing Chen,1 Yan Zhou,1 Liangliang Wu,1 Yongwei Sun,3 Huili Dai,1,2 Xianming Kong,1,2 Peifeng Liu1,2 1Central Laboratory, 2State Key Laboratory of Oncogenes and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, 3Department of Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The application of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs has made great progress in the diagnosis of disease and in the drug delivery system for cancer therapy, but the relative mecha­nisms of potential toxicity induced by Fe3O4 have not kept pace with its development in the application, which has hampered its further clinical application. In this article, we used two kinds of human hepatoma cell lines, SK-Hep-1 and Hep3B, to investigate the cytotoxic effects and the involved mechanisms of small Fe3O4 NPs with different diameters (6 nm, 9 nm, and 14 nm. Results showed that the size of NPs effectively influences the cytotoxicity of hepatoma cells: 6 nm Fe3O4 NPs exhibited negligible cytotoxicity and 9 nm Fe3O4 NPs affected cytotoxicity via cellular mitochondrial dysfunction and by inducing necrosis mediated through the mitochondria-dependent intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. Meanwhile, 14 nm Fe3O4 NPs induced cytotoxicity by impairing the integrity of plasma membrane and promoting massive lactate dehydrogenase leakage. These results explain the detailed mechanism of different diameters of small Fe3O4 NPs-induced cytotoxicity. We anticipate that this study will provide different insights into the cytotoxicity mechanism of Fe3O4 NPs, so as to make them safer to use in clinical application. Keywords: hepatoma cells, nanoparticles, cytotoxicity, mechanism, oxidative stress

  15. Relative humidity-dependent viscosity of secondary organic material from toluene photo-oxidation and possible implications for organic particulate matter over megacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Mijung; Liu, Pengfei F.; Hanna, Sarah J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Potter, Katie; You, Yuan; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-01-01

    To improve predictions of air quality, visibility, and climate change, knowledge of the viscosities and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter consisting of secondary organic material (SOM) is required. Most qualitative and quantitative measurements of viscosity and diffusion rates within organic particulate matter have focused on SOM particles generated from biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as α-pinene and isoprene. In this study, we quantify the relative humidity (RH)-dependent viscosities at 295±1K of SOM produced by photo-oxidation of toluene, an anthropogenic VOC. The viscosities of toluene-derived SOM were 2 × 10₋1 to ~6 ×106Pa s from 30 to 90%RH, and greater than ~2 × 108 Pa s (similar to or greater than the viscosity of tar pitch) for RH ≤ 17%. These viscosities correspond to Stokes–Einstein-equivalent diffusion coefficients for large organic molecules of ~2 ×10₋15cm2s₋1 for 30 % RH, and lower than ~3 × 10₋17cm2s₋1 for RH ≤ 17 %. Based on these estimated diffusion coefficients, the mixing time of large organic molecules within 200 nm toluene-derived SOM particles is 0.1–5 h for 30% RH, and higher than ~100 h for RH ≤ 17%. As a starting point for understanding the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter over cities, we applied the mixing times determined for toluene-derived SOM particles to the world's top 15 most populous megacities. If the organic particulate matter in these megacities is similar to the toluene-derived SOM in this study, in Istanbul, Tokyo, Shanghai, and São Paulo, mixing times in organic particulate matter during certain periods of the year may be very short, and the particles may be well-mixed. On the other hand, the mixing times of large organic molecules in organic particulate matter in Beijing, Mexico City, Cairo, and Karachi may be long

  16. Time-Dependent Effects of Training on Cardiovascular Control in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Role for Brain Oxidative Stress and Inflammation and Baroreflex Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Masson, Gustavo S.; Costa, Tassia S. R.; Yshii, Lidia; Fernandes, Denise C.; Soares, Pedro Paulo Silva; Laurindo, Francisco R.; Scavone, Cristoforo; Michelini, Lisete C.

    2014-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in traine...

  17. Counteraction of Oxidative Stress by Vitamin E Affects Epigenetic Regulation by Increasing Global Methylation and Gene Expression of MLH1 and DNMT1 Dose Dependently in Caco-2 Cells

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    Katja Zappe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity- or diabetes-induced oxidative stress is discussed as a major risk factor for DNA damage. Vitamin E and many polyphenols exhibit antioxidative activities with consequences on epigenetic regulation of inflammation and DNA repair. The present study investigated the counteraction of oxidative stress by vitamin E in the colorectal cancer cell line Caco-2 under normal (1 g/l and high (4.5 g/l glucose cell culture condition. Malondialdehyde (MDA as a surrogate marker of lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS was analyzed. Gene expression and promoter methylation of the DNA repair gene MutL homolog 1 (MLH1 and the DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 as well as global methylation by LINE-1 were investigated. Results revealed a dose-dependent counteracting effect of vitamin E on H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Thereby, 10 μM vitamin E proved to be more efficient than did 50 μM in reducing MDA. Further, an induction of MLH1 and DNMT1 gene expression was noticed, accompanied by an increase in global methylation. Whether LINE-1 hypomethylation is a cause or effect of oxidative stress is still unclear. In conclusion, supplementation of exogenous antioxidants like vitamin E in vitro exhibits beneficial effects concerning oxidative stress as well as epigenetic regulation involved in DNA repair.

  18. pH dependence of proton translocation in the oxidative and reductive phases of the catalytic cycle of cytochrome c oxidase. The role of H2O produced at the oxygen-reduction site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Capitanio, Nazzareno; De Nitto, Emanuele; Papa, Sergio

    2006-02-14

    A study is presented on the pH dependence of proton translocation in the oxidative and reductive phases of the catalytic cycle of purified cytochrome c oxidase (COX) from beef heart reconstituted in phospholipid vesicles (COV). Protons were shown to be released from COV both in the oxidative and reductive phases. In the oxidation by O2 of the fully reduced oxidase, the H+/COX ratio for proton release from COV (R --> O transition) decreased from approximately 2.4 at pH 6.5 to approximately 1.8 at pH 8.5. In the direct reduction of the fully oxidized enzyme (O --> R transition), the H+/COX ratio for proton release from COV increased from approximately 0.3 at pH 6.5 to approximately 1.6 at pH 8.5. Anaerobic oxidation by ferricyanide of the fully reduced oxidase, reconstituted in COV or in the soluble case, resulted in H+ release which exhibited, in both cases, an H+/COX ratio of 1.7-1.9 in the pH range 6.5-8.5. This H+ release associated with ferricyanide oxidation of the oxidase, in the absence of oxygen, originates evidently from deprotonation of acidic groups in the enzyme cooperatively linked to the redox state of the metal centers (redox Bohr protons). The additional H+ release (O2 versus ferricyanide oxidation) approaching 1 H+/COX at pH pH > or = 8.5, this additional proton release takes place in the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle of the oxidase. The H+/COX ratio for proton release from COV in the overall catalytic cycle, oxidation by O2 of the fully reduced oxidase directly followed by re-reduction (R --> O --> R transition), exhibited a bell-shaped pH dependence approaching 4 at pH 7.2. A mechanism for the involvement in the proton pump of the oxidase of H+/e- cooperative coupling at the metal centers (redox Bohr effects) and protonmotive steps of reduction of O2 to H2O is presented.

  19. Reproduction is associated with a tissue-dependent reduction of oxidative stress in eusocial female Damaraland mole-rats (Fukomys damarensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Schmidt

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated as both a physiological cost of reproduction and a driving force on an animal's lifespan. Since increased reproductive effort is generally linked with a reduction in survival, it has been proposed that oxidative stress may influence this relationship. Support for this hypothesis is inconsistent, but this may, in part, be due to the type of tissues that have been analyzed. In Damaraland mole-rats the sole reproducing female in the colony is also the longest lived. Therefore, if oxidative stress does impact the trade-off between reproduction and survival in general, this species may possess some form of enhanced defense. We assessed this relationship by comparing markers of oxidative damage (malondialdehyde, MDA; protein carbonyls, PC and antioxidants (total antioxidant capacity, TAC; superoxide dismutase, SOD in various tissues including plasma, erythrocytes, heart, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle between wild-caught reproductive and non-reproductive female Damaraland mole-rats. Reproductive females exhibited significantly lower levels of PC across all tissues, and lower levels of MDA in heart, kidney and liver relative to non-reproductive females. Levels of TAC and SOD did not differ significantly according to reproductive state. The reduction in oxidative damage in breeding females may be attributable to the unusual social structure of this species, as similar relationships have been observed between reproductive and non-reproductive eusocial insects.

  20. Wiring of Glucose Oxidizing Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Enzymes by Methylene Blue-Modified Third Generation Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers Attached to Spectroscopic Graphite Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaing, Victor; Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Ferapontova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    , characterized by the heterogeneous ET rate constant of 7.1 0.1 s1; they can be used for electronic wiring of glucose-oxidizing FAD-containing enzymes, such as hexose oxidase (HOX), and further bioelectrocatalysis of glucose oxidation, starting, at pH 7, from -100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Thus, dendrimer......-templated electronic wires, comprising MB molecules conjugated to the periphery of the PAMAM and anchored to the surface of cost-effective Gr electrodes represent an efficient and robust tool for protein wiring to electrodes for their perspective bioelectronic applications in biosensors and biofuel cells....

  1. Iron Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Amonette, James E.

    2016-09-19

    Abstract: Fe oxides are common clay-sized oxide, oxyhydroxide and hydroxide soil minerals. They are compounds of Fe, O, and H that have structures based on close-packed arrays of O. The octahedral and tetrahedral cavities within these arrays are filled with either Fe3+ or Fe2+ to form Fe(O/OH)6, FeO6, or FeO4 structural units. All of the naturally occurring Fe oxide minerals usually undergo some degree of isomorphous substitution of other metal ions for Fe in their structures. Relatively simple techniques may be used to identify Fe oxides in the field based on their typical colors and magnetic properties. In the laboratory, a variety of instrumental techniques can be used to confirm phase identity and to quantify amount. Of these, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy are the most commonly used techniques. As oxides, the functional groups on their surfaces may have positive, negative, or no charge depending on pH and on the concentration and nature of other ions in the contact solution. A net positive surface charge usually is observed in soils because Fe oxides have a point-of-zero-charge in the neutral or slightly basic pHs. The functional groups on the surface form complexes with cations and anions from the aqueous phase. Their sorption and electron-buffering properties significantly affect the geochemical cycles of almost all elements having agronomic or environmental significance.

  2. The effect of oxide shell thickness on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of Si-SiO2 core-shell nano-crystals: A (time dependent)density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazemi, Sanaz; Soleimani, Ebrahim Asl; Pourfath, Mahdi; Kosina, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Due to their tunable properties, silicon nano-crystals (NC) are currently being investigated. Quantum confinement can generally be employed for size-dependent band-gap tuning at dimensions smaller than the Bohr radius (∼5 nm for silicon). At the nano-meter scale, however, increased surface-to-volume ratio makes the surface effects dominant. Specifically, in Si-SiO 2 core-shell semiconductor NCs the interfacial transition layer causes peculiar electronic and optical properties, because of the co-existence of intermediate oxidation states of silicon (Si n+ , n = 0–4). Due to the presence of the many factors involved, a comprehensive understanding of the optical properties of these NCs has not yet been achieved. In this work, Si-SiO 2 NCs with a diameter of 1.1 nm and covered by amorphous oxide shells with thicknesses between 2.5 and 4.75 Å are comprehensively studied, employing density functional theory calculations. It is shown that with increased oxide shell thickness, the low-energy part of the optical transition spectrum of the NC is red shifted and attenuated. Moreover, the absorption coefficient is increased in the high-energy part of the spectrum which corresponds to SiO 2 transitions. Structural examinations indicate a larger compressive stress on the central silicon cluster with a thicker oxide shell. Examination of the local density of states reveals the migration of frontier molecular orbitals from the oxide shell into the silicon core with the increase of silica shell thickness. The optical and electrical properties are explained through the analysis of the density of states and the spatial distribution of silicon sub-oxide species.

  3. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Glutamate- and Arginine-dependent Acid Resistance Systems Protect Against Oxidative Stress During Extreme Acid Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the protection that several known Escherichia coli O157:H7 acid resistance systems provide against oxidative stress, the addition of diamide or hydrogen peroxide were used concomitant with acid challenge at pH 2.5 to determine bacterial survival. Diamide and hydrogen peroxide both de...

  4. Nitric oxide production from rat adipocytes is modulated beta3-adrenergic receptor agonists and is involved in a vycliv AMP-dependent lipolysis in adipocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutinová-Canová, N.; Lincová, D.; Kmoníčková, Eva; Kameníková, L.; Farghali, H.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2006), s. 200-211 ISSN 1089-8603 R&D Projects: GA MZd NL7418; GA ČR GA305/05/2425 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Lipolysis * Nitric oxide * Rat adipocytes Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 2.509, year: 2006

  5. NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation capacity in unfixed tissue sections: characterization of the pro-oxidizing conditions and optimization of the histochemical detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, M.; Frederiks, W. M.; van Noorden, C. J.; Bosch, K. S.; Pompella, A.

    1994-01-01

    Factors which influence the iron-stimulated lipid peroxidation in rat liver have been studied by incubating unfixed cryostat sections with a pro-oxidant system and using an optimized histochemical detection method for lipid peroxidation products with 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid hydrazide and Fast

  6. The combined effects of developmental lead and ethanol exposure on hippocampus dependent spatial learning and memory in rats: Role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Elham; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2016-10-01

    Either developmental lead or ethanol exposure can impair learning and memory via induction of oxidative stress, which results in neuronal damage. we examined the effect of combined exposure with lead and ethanol on spatial learning and memory in offspring and oxidative stress in hippocampus. Rats were exposed to lead (0.2% in drinking water) or ethanol (4 g/kg) either individually or in combination in 5th day gestation through weaning. On postnatal days (PD) 30, rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 37, a probe test was done. Also, oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were also evaluated. Results demonstrated that lead + ethanol co-exposed rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency and average proximity in probe trial test. There was significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in hippocampus of animals co-exposed to lead and ethanol compared with their individual exposures. We suggest that maternal consumption of ethanol during lead exposure has pronounced detrimental effects on memory, which may be mediated by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Influence of calcium-dependent potassium channel blockade and nitric oxide inhibition on norepinephrine-induced contractions in two forms of genetic hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Líšková, Silvia; Petrová, M.; Karen, Petr; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2010), s. 128-134 ISSN 1933-1711 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : potassium channels * nitric oxide * norepinephrine Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.931, year: 2010

  8. Polyol pathway-dependent osmotic and oxidative stresses in aldose reductase-mediated apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells: role of AOP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, E; Urakami, T; Fatma, N; Akagi, Y; Singh, Dhirendra P

    2004-02-20

    Aldose reductase (AR) has been implicated as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of diabetic cataracts. AR activation generates osmotic and oxidative stresses via the polyol pathway and induces cell death signals. Antioxidant protein 2 (AOP2) protects cells from oxidative stress. We investigated the effect of AR overexpression on polyol accumulation and on hyperglycemic oxidative stress and osmotic stress, as well as the effects of these stresses on human lens epithelial cell (hLEC) survival. hLECs overexpressing the AR became apoptotic during hyperglycemia and showed elevated levels of intracellular polyols. Glutathione and AOP2 levels were significantly decreased in these cells. Interestingly, supply of AOP2 and/or the AR inhibitor fidarestat protected the cells against hyperglycemia-induced death. Overexpression of AR increased osmotic and oxidative stresses, resulting in increased apoptosis in hLECs. Because AOP2 protects hyperglycemia-induced hLEC apoptosis, this molecule may have the potential to prevent hyperglycemia-mediated complications in diabetes.

  9. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gβ1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gβ1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  10. Analysis and Optimization of Oxidized Heterolayers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Eicke

    1998-01-01

    .... A systematic study of the fundamental properties of the wet thermal oxides is being performed, including the dependence on oxide processing parameters, hydrogen and other dopant concentrations...

  11. Metal-Catalyzed Oxidation of Protein Methionine Residues in Human Parathyroid Hormone (1-34): Formation of Homocysteine and a Novel Methionine-Dependent Hydrolysis Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Ji, Junyan A.; Wang, Y. John; Schöneich, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of PTH(1-34) catalyzed by ferrous ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is site-specific. The oxidation of PTH(1-34) is localized primarily to the residues Met[8] and His[9]. Beyond the transformation of Met[8] and His[9] into methionine sulfoxide and 2-oxo-histidine, respectively, we observed a hydrolytic cleavage between Met[8] and His[9]. This hydrolysis requires the presence of FeII and oxygen and can be prevented by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and phosphate buffer. Conditions leading to this site-specific hydrolysis also promote the transformation of Met[8] into homocysteine, indicating that the hydrolysis and transformation of homocysteine may proceed through a common intermediate. PMID:23289936

  12. Inhibition of NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Oxidative Stress in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla Mediates the Antihypertensive Effects of Acupuncture in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Rui; Yang, Jing-Wen; Ji, Cai-Shuo; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Shi, Guang-Xia; Fisher, Marc; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2018-02-01

    Oxidative stress in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), where the sympathetic nervous control center is located, contributes to neural mechanisms of hypertension. Acupuncture was previously reported to favorably affect high blood pressure. However, little is known about the effect of acupuncture on oxidative stress-modulated mechanisms in hypertension. This study was designed to evaluate the hypothesis that acupuncture exerts an antihypertensive effect via ameliorating oxidative stress and the redox-sensitive pathway in the RVLM of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Two weeks of acupuncture reduced blood pressure and sympathetic nervous system activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Oxidative stress in the RVLM was alleviated by acupuncture, accompanied by a decrease in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity and expression of its subunits. Acupuncture significantly altered the mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathway as assessed by pathway enrichment analysis in a gene chip assay. The phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2, but not Jun N-terminal kinase, was downregulated by acupuncture. Microinjection bilaterally of the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor apocynin, or diphenyleneiodonium chloride into the RVLM mimicked the antihypertensive effect of acupuncture. In contrast, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase agonist tetrabromocinnamic acid abolished the beneficial effects of acupuncture. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin or surgical sectioning of the sciatic nerve abolished the antihypertensive effect of acupuncture. We conclude that acupuncture decreases high blood pressure and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in the RVLM of spontaneously hypertensive rats. The mitogen-activated protein kinases and the sciatic nerve are involved in the mechanism

  13. Eriodictyol Protects Endothelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death through Modulating ERK/Nrf2/ARE-Dependent Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Hana; Son, Gun Woo; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho; Park, Yong Seek

    2015-06-26

    The pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases is complex and may involve oxidative stress-related pathways. Eriodictyol is a flavonoid present in citrus fruits that demonstrates anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, neurotrophic, and antioxidant effects in a range of pathophysiological conditions including vascular diseases. Because oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the present study was designed to verify whether eriodictyol has therapeutic potential. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a phase II detoxifying enzyme, in endothelial cells is considered to be helpful in cardiovascular disease. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with eriodictyol showed the upregulation of HO-1 through extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathways. Further, eriodictyol treatment provided protection against hydrogen peroxide-provoked cell death. This protective effect was eliminated by treatment with a specific inhibitor of HO-1 and RNA interference-mediated knockdown of HO-1 expression. These data demonstrate that eriodictyol induces ERK/Nrf2/ARE-mediated HO-1 upregulation in human endothelial cells, which is directly associated with its vascular protection against oxidative stress-related endothelial injury, and propose that targeting the upregulation of HO-1 is a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in cardiovascular disease.

  14. Cisplatin combined with zidovudine enhances cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human head and neck cancer cells via a thiol-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, David M; Ahmad, Iman M; Dayal, Disha; Parsons, Arlene D; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Li, Ling; Orcutt, Kevin P; Spitz, Douglas R; Dornfeld, Kenneth J; Simons, Andrean L

    2009-01-15

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells represent features that may be exploited therapeutically. We determined whether agents that induce mitochondrial dysfunction, such as zidovudine (AZT) and cisplatin (CIS), could enhance killing of human head and neck cancer cells via oxidative stress. AZT- and/or CIS-induced cytotoxicity was determined using clonogenic survival, mitochondrial membrane potential was analyzed to investigate mitochondrial function, and glutathione was measured to determine thiol metabolism perturbations. AZT+CIS significantly increased toxicity and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in FaDu, Cal-27, and SQ20B head and neck cancer cells while increasing the percentage of glutathione disulfide (%GSSG). Treatment with the thiol antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) reversed the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and the increase in %GSSG and partially protected FaDu and Cal-27 cells from AZT+CIS. Finally, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, l-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine, sensitized the cells to AZT+CIS-induced cytotoxicity, which was partially reversed by NAC. These results suggest that exposure of cancer cells to agents that induce mitochondrial dysfunction, such as AZT, causes significant sensitization to CIS-induced toxicity via disruptions in thiol metabolism and oxidative stress. These findings provide a biochemical rationale for evaluating agents that induce mitochondrial dysfunction in combination with chemotherapy and inhibitors of glutathione metabolism in head and neck cancer.

  15. Age-dependent changes in essential elements and oxidative stress biomarkers in blood of red deer and vulnerability to nutritional deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Carrera, Jennifer; Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Martinez-Haro, Mónica; Ortiz, José A; Mateo, Rafael

    2018-01-16

    Changes in the concentration of circulating essential elements in animals over life may be indicative of periods of vulnerability to deficiencies and associated diseases. Here we studied age-related variations in essential elements (Se, Cu, Zn and Mn) and some selected oxidative stress biomarkers (GPx, SOD, vitamin A and vitamin E) in blood of an Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) population living in semicaptive conditions. Animals during their first year of life showed to be especially vulnerable to suffer Se- and Cu-related diseases and disorders. Older female deer had lower blood levels of Zn and Mn, which was accompanied by a lower blood SOD activity. On the contrary, GPx blood activity was elevated in older deer, which may help to compensate the reduction of other antioxidants with during aging. Age-related changes in GPx and SOD and their positive relationships with the essential elements suggest that the observed nutritional deficiencies at certain age stages may have a detrimental effect on the antioxidant system, increasing the risk of oxidative stress. Thus, the biomarkers used in the present study may be important tools for the subclinical diagnosis of nutritional disorders and diseases related to the generation of oxidative stress in both domestic and wild ungulates. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 in the oxidative stress-dependent hypertension associated with the depletion of DJ-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Santiago; Yang, Yu; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Asico, Laureano D; Feranil, Jun; Jones, John; Villar, Van Anthony; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A

    2015-06-01

    Renal dopamine 2 receptor dysfunction is associated with oxidative stress and high blood pressure (BP). We have reported that DJ-1, an oxidative stress response protein, is positively regulated by dopamine 2 receptor in the kidney. The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the expression of several antioxidant genes. We tested the hypothesis that Nrf2 is involved in the renal DJ-1-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species production. We have reported that silencing dopamine 2 receptor in mouse renal proximal tubule cells decreases the expression of DJ-1. We now report that silencing DJ-1 or dopamine 2 receptor in mouse proximal tubule cells and mouse kidneys decreases Nrf2 expression and activity and increases reactive oxygen species production; BP is also increased in mice in which renal DJ-1 or dopamine 2 receptor is silenced. DJ-1(-/-) mice have decreased renal Nrf2 expression and activity and increased nitro-tyrosine levels and BP. Silencing Nrf2 in mouse proximal tubule cells does not alter the expression of DJ-1 or dopamine 2 receptor, indicating that Nrf2 is downstream of dopamine 2 receptor and DJ-1. An Nrf2 inducer, bardoxolone, normalizes the systolic BP and renal malondialdehyde levels in DJ-1(-/-) mice without affecting them in their wild-type littermates. Because Nrf2 ubiquitination is increased in DJ-1(-/-) mice, we conclude that the protective effect of DJ-1 on renal oxidative stress is mediated, in part, by preventing Nrf2 degradation. Moreover, renal dopamine 2 receptor and DJ-1 are necessary for normal Nrf2 activity to keep a normal redox balance and BP. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP-1)-dependent Glutathione Disulfide (GSSG) Efflux as a Critical Survival Factor for Oxidant-enriched Tumorigenic Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Gayle M; Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Spieldenner, James M; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K

    2016-05-06

    Endothelial cell tumors are the most common soft tissue tumors in infants. Tumor-forming endothelial (EOMA) cells are able to escape cell death fate despite excessive nuclear oxidant burden. Our previous work recognized perinuclear Nox-4 as a key contributor to EOMA growth. The objective of this work was to characterize the mechanisms by which EOMA cells evade oxidant toxicity and thrive. In EOMA cells, compared with in the cytosol, the nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio was 5-fold higher. Compared to the ratio observed in healthy murine aortic endothelial (MAE) cells, GSSG/GSH was over twice as high in EOMA cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), an active GSSG efflux mechanism, showed 2-fold increased activity in EOMA compared with MAE cells. Hyperactive YB-1 and Ape/Ref-1 were responsible for high MRP-1 expression in EOMA. Proximity ligand assay demonstrated MRP-1 and YB-1 binding. Such binding enabled the nuclear targeting of MRP-1 in EOMA in a leptomycin-B-sensitive manner. MRP-1 inhibition as well as knockdown trapped nuclear GSSG, causing cell death of EOMA. Disulfide loading of cells by inhibition of GSSG reductase (bischoloronitrosourea) or thioredoxin reductase (auranofin) was effective in causing EOMA death as well. In sum, EOMA cells survive a heavy oxidant burden by rapid efflux of GSSG, which is lethal if trapped within the cell. A hyperactive MRP-1 system for GSSG efflux acts as a critical survival factor for these cells, making it a potential target for EOMA therapeutics. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein-1 (MRP-1)-dependent Glutathione Disulfide (GSSG) Efflux as a Critical Survival Factor for Oxidant-enriched Tumorigenic Endothelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Gayle M.; Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Spieldenner, James M.; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell tumors are the most common soft tissue tumors in infants. Tumor-forming endothelial (EOMA) cells are able to escape cell death fate despite excessive nuclear oxidant burden. Our previous work recognized perinuclear Nox-4 as a key contributor to EOMA growth. The objective of this work was to characterize the mechanisms by which EOMA cells evade oxidant toxicity and thrive. In EOMA cells, compared with in the cytosol, the nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio was 5-fold higher. Compared to the ratio observed in healthy murine aortic endothelial (MAE) cells, GSSG/GSH was over twice as high in EOMA cells. Multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP-1), an active GSSG efflux mechanism, showed 2-fold increased activity in EOMA compared with MAE cells. Hyperactive YB-1 and Ape/Ref-1 were responsible for high MRP-1 expression in EOMA. Proximity ligand assay demonstrated MRP-1 and YB-1 binding. Such binding enabled the nuclear targeting of MRP-1 in EOMA in a leptomycin-B-sensitive manner. MRP-1 inhibition as well as knockdown trapped nuclear GSSG, causing cell death of EOMA. Disulfide loading of cells by inhibition of GSSG reductase (bischoloronitrosourea) or thioredoxin reductase (auranofin) was effective in causing EOMA death as well. In sum, EOMA cells survive a heavy oxidant burden by rapid efflux of GSSG, which is lethal if trapped within the cell. A hyperactive MRP-1 system for GSSG efflux acts as a critical survival factor for these cells, making it a potential target for EOMA therapeutics. PMID:26961872

  19. Atmosphere- and Voltage-Dependent Electronic Conductivity of Oxide-Ion-Conducting Zr1-xYxO2-x/2Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovaní, Marc; Beltrán-Mir, Héctor; Cordoncillo, Eloisa; West, Anthony R

    2017-06-19

    Cubic, fluorite-structured solid solutions Zr 1-x Y x O 2-x/2 (YSZ; x = 0.4-0.7) were prepared by sol-gel synthesis. Impedance measurements on pellets of 85% approximate density sintered at 1300 °C for 24 h showed strong evidence of oxide ion conduction with an inclined Warburg spike at low frequencies and capacitance values of ∼10 -6 F cm -1 at 40 Hz. Arrhenius plots of total pellet conductivities were linear with activation energies of 1.4-1.56 eV. The conductivity decreased with x and was 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than that with optimized YSZ, x = 0.08. When the atmosphere was changed from N 2 to O 2 during impedance measurements, two reversible effects were seen: the Warburg spike contracted greatly, and the sample resistance decreased. These effects were more noticeable at higher x and are attributed to the introduction of p-type electronic conduction, in parallel with the preexisting oxide ion conduction. A similar reversible result was observed upon application of a direct-current (dc) bias during impedance measurements. When either pO 2 is increased or a dc bias is applied, hole creation is believed to arise by the ionization of underbonded oxide ions situated near the Y 3+ dopant ions. The ionized electrons are trapped at surface oxygen species, and the holes that are left on oxygen are responsible for p-type conduction. The electrolytic domain of x = 0.4-0.7 extends up to approximately 10 -2 atm of O 2 before p-type conduction is observed. The upper pO 2 limit of the electrolytic domain of x = 0.08 is not known but is likely to be close to or slightly above 1 atm of O 2 .

  20. Temperature dependence of long-term cadmium toxicity in the zebrafish is not explained by liver oxidative stress: Evidence from transcript expression to physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergauwen, Lucia, E-mail: lucia.vergauwen@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Hagenaars, An, E-mail: an.hagenaars@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Blust, Ronny, E-mail: ronny.blust@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Knapen, Dries, E-mail: dries.knapen@ua.ac.be [Systemic Physiological and Ecotoxicological Research (SPHERE), Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Gamete Research Center (GRC), Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Standard ecotoxicity tests are performed at species' specific standard temperatures, but temperature is known to affect chemical toxicity. A temperature increase has been shown to increase cadmium toxicity in several aquatic species but information in fish is scarce. Based on literature we hypothesize that with increasing temperature, cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress increase, resulting in increased toxicity. In this study zebrafish acclimated to 12, 18, 26 (standard temperature) or 34 Degree-Sign C for one month, were exposed to 5 {mu}M cadmium for 4 or 28 days at the respective acclimation temperature. Cadmium toxicity (mortality) increased with increasing temperature. PCA showed that the high mortality at 34 Degree-Sign C was closely correlated to an increasing tissue cadmium accumulation with increasing temperature, but not to liver oxidative damage under the form of protein carbonyl content or lipid peroxidation (measured as malondialdehyde levels) or liver antioxidative potential. Instead, acclimation to 12 Degree-Sign C induced the highest oxidative damage to liver proteins and lipids, and transcript levels of glucose-6P-dehydrogenase, 6P-gluconate-dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase were particularly good markers of cold-induced oxidative stress. At this low temperature there was no interaction with cadmium exposure and there was no sign of cadmium sensitivity. Contrastingly, the combined effect of high temperature and cadmium exposure on mortality proved synergistic. Therefore we conclude that interactions between temperature and cadmium toxicity increased with increasing temperature and that this probably played part in increasing cadmium sensitivity. Increased cadmium compartmentalization and protein carbonyl content in liver of zebrafish acclimated to the standard temperature of 26 Degree-Sign C probably played part in increased sensitivity towards the same cadmium body burden compared to lower temperatures. On the one hand we

  1. Time-dependent effects of training on cardiovascular control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: role for brain oxidative stress and inflammation and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Masson

    Full Text Available Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in trained (T, low-intensity treadmill training and sedentary (S SHR at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Paraventricular nucleus was used to determine reactive oxygen species (dihydroethidium oxidation products, HPLC, NADPH oxidase subunits and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (Real time PCR, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 expression (Western blotting, NF-κB content (electrophoretic mobility shift assay and cytokines immunofluorescence. SHR-S vs. WKY-S (Wistar Kyoto rats as time control showed increased mean arterial pressure (172±3 mmHg, pressure variability and heart rate (358±7 b/min, decreased baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability, increased p47phox and reactive oxygen species production, elevated NF-κB activity and increased TNF-α and IL-6 expression within the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus. Two weeks of training reversed all hypothalamic changes, reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and normalized baroreflex sensitivity (4.04±0.31 vs. 2.31±0.19 b/min/mmHg in SHR-S. These responses were followed by increased vagal component of heart rate variability (1.9-fold and resting bradycardia (-13% at the 4th week, and, by reduced vasomotor component of pressure variability (-28% and decreased mean arterial pressure (-7% only at the 8th week of training. Our findings indicate that independent of the high pressure levels in SHR, training promptly restores baroreflex function by disrupting the positive feedback between high oxidative stress and increased pro

  2. Reaction-Induced Cluster Ripening and Initial Size-Dependent Reaction Rates for CO Oxidation on Pt-n/TiO2(110)-(1x1)

    OpenAIRE

    Bonanni Simon; Ait-Mansour Kamel; Harbich Wolfgang; Brune Harald

    2014-01-01

    We determined the CO oxidation rates for size-selected Pt-n (n is an element of {3,7,10}) clusters deposited onto TiO2(110). In addition, we investigated the cluster morphologies and their mean sizes before and after the reaction. While the clusters are fairly stable upon annealing in ultrahigh vacuum up to 600 K, increasing the temperature while adsorbing either one of the two reactants leads to ripening already from 430 K on. This coarsening is even more pronounced when both reactants are d...

  3. Time-dependent effects of training on cardiovascular control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: role for brain oxidative stress and inflammation and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Gustavo S; Costa, Tassia S R; Yshii, Lidia; Fernandes, Denise C; Soares, Pedro Paulo Silva; Laurindo, Francisco R; Scavone, Cristoforo; Michelini, Lisete C

    2014-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in trained (T, low-intensity treadmill training) and sedentary (S) SHR at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Paraventricular nucleus was used to determine reactive oxygen species (dihydroethidium oxidation products, HPLC), NADPH oxi