WorldWideScience

Sample records for cd-sensitive zn-porphyrin tweezer

  1. Energy transfer within Zn-porphyrin dendrimers: Study of the singlet-singlet annihilation kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Larsen, J.; Brüggemann, B.; Polívka, Tomáš; Sundström, V.; Akesson, E.; Sly, J.; Crossley, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 47 (2005), s. 10654-10662 ISSN 1089-5639 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Energy transfer * Zn-porphyrin Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2005

  2. Synthesis, optical and electrochemical properties of Zn-porphyrin for dye sensitized solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotteswaran, S.; Pandian, M. Senthil; Ramasamy, P., E-mail: ramasamyp@ssn.edu.in [SSN Research Centre, SSN College of Engineering, Chennai-603110, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-05-23

    Zn-Porphyrin dye has been synthesized by the reaction between aldehydes and pyrrole. The dye structure was confirmed by {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR spectrum. The functional group of the dye molecule was confirmed by FTIR spectrum. The UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectrum of Zn-Porphyrin in DMF solution was recorded in spectrophotometer. The UV-Vis NIR spectrum of dye exhibits a strong Soret band and Q-band. Cyclic Voltammograms were obtained with three electrode systems: Pt as counter electrode, saturated calomel used as a reference electrode and glassy carbon as working electrode at a scan rate of 100 mV/s. The curves recorded the oxidation of 0.5 mM compound Zn-Porphyrin in a dichloromethane solution containing 0.1M TBAP as supporting electrolyte, reveal two successive quasi reversible redox couples with the first anodic and cathodic peak potentials of -0.2 V and -1 V. The second anodic and cathodic peak potentials are 0.82 V and 0.01 V respectively.

  3. Optimizing Zn porphyrin-based photosensitizers for efficient antibacterial photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenezi, Khazna; Tovmasyan, Artak; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T

    2017-03-01

    Efficient photodynamic inactivation of microbes requires highly efficient photosensitizers which kill microbial cells, but spare host tissues. One way to achieve such selectivity is to use photosensitizers that are rapidly taken up by microbes and, when applied at low concentrations, efficiently kill them after a short illumination. Design of such photosensitizers requires insight into molecular properties which are critical for antimicrobial photo-efficiency. This study explores the contribution of molecular shape and exposure of charges, to the antimicrobial activity of tetra-cationic Zn porphyrin-based photosensitizers. Two isomers, ortho (2) and meta (3) hexyl and octyl Zn(II) meso-tetrakis(N-alkylpyridinium-2(3)-yl)porphyrins [ZnTnHex-2(3)-PyP and ZnTnOct-2(3)-PyP] were compared for uptake and photo-efficiency against a Gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli. The highest photo-efficiency was displayed by the meta hexyl derivative. At concentration as low as 1.0μM and during only 5min of preincubation with the cells, ZnTnHex-3-PyP decreased viable cell number by about 6log 10 after only 5min of illumination. Since bacterial suspensions were thoroughly washed after preincubation with photosensitizers, this effect can be attributed only to photosensitizer taken up or bound to E. coli. Irrespective of its highest uptake by the cells, the octyl meta isomer, ZnTnOct-3-PyP, did not show higher antibacterial activity than the shorter-chain hexyl derivative, ZnTnHex-3-PyP. Efficiency and eventually selectivity of antimicrobial photosensitizers can be improved by optimizing the shape of the molecule and the position of electric charges. Increasing lipophilicity and cellular uptake per se, does not necessarily materialize in high antimicrobial efficiency of the photosensitizer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Optical tweezers: wideband microrheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, Daryl; Gibson, Graham M; Padgett, Miles J; Warren, Rebecca; Cooper, Jonathan M; Tassieri, Manlio; Evans, R M L

    2011-01-01

    Microrheology is a branch of rheology having the same principles as conventional bulk rheology, but working on micron length scales and microlitre volumes. Optical tweezers have been successfully used with Newtonian fluids for rheological purposes such as determining fluid viscosity. Conversely, when optical tweezers are used to measure the viscoelastic properties of complex fluids the results are either limited to the material's high-frequency response, discarding important information related to the low-frequency behaviour, or they are supplemented by low-frequency measurements performed with different techniques, often without presenting an overlapping region of clear agreement between the sets of results. We present a simple experimental procedure to perform microrheological measurements over the widest frequency range possible with optical tweezers. A generalized Langevin equation is used to relate the frequency-dependent moduli of the complex fluid to the time-dependent trajectory of a probe particle as it flips between two optical traps that alternately switch on and off

  5. Physics of optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Timo A; Knöner, Gregor; Heckenberg, Norman R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2007-01-01

    We outline the basic principles of optical tweezers as well as the fundamental theory underlying optical tweezers. The optical forces responsible for trapping result from the transfer of momentum from the trapping beam to the particle and are explained in terms of the momenta of incoming and reflected or refracted rays. We also consider the angular momentum flux of the beam in order to understand and explain optical torques. In order to provide a qualitative picture of the trapping, we treat the particle as a weak positive lens and the forces on the lens are shown. However, this representation does not provide quantitative results for the force. We, therefore, present results of applying exact electromagnetic theory to optical trapping. First, we consider a tightly focused laser beam. We give results for trapping of spherical particles and examine the limits of trappability in terms of type and size of the particles. We also study the effect of a particle on the beam. This exact solution reproduces the same qualitative effect as when treating the particle as a lens where changes in the convergence or divergence and in the direction of the trapping beam result in restoring forces acting on the particle. Finally, we review the fundamental theory of optical tweezers.

  6. Optical tweezers principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Philip; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Combining state-of-the-art research with a strong pedagogic approach, this text provides a detailed and complete guide to the theory, practice and applications of optical tweezers. In-depth derivation of the theory of optical trapping and numerical modelling of optical forces are supported by a complete step-by-step design and construction guide for building optical tweezers, with detailed tutorials on collecting and analysing data. Also included are comprehensive reviews of optical tweezers research in fields ranging from cell biology to quantum physics. Featuring numerous exercises and problems throughout, this is an ideal self-contained learning package for advanced lecture and laboratory courses, and an invaluable guide to practitioners wanting to enter the field of optical manipulation. The text is supplemented by www.opticaltweezers.org, a forum for discussion and a source of additional material including free-to-download, customisable research-grade software (OTS) for calculation of optical forces, dig...

  7. an optical tweezer based study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shankar Ghosh

    2006-11-12

    Nov 12, 2006 ... Liquid-Solid interface. Liquid-liquid interface. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an .... Bare mass of a colloidal sphere ∼ 10^15Kg. Note : The effective mass scales with viscosity and not with the density. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical tweezer based study ...

  8. Optical tweezers stretching of chromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pope, L.H.; Bennink, Martin L.; Greve, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Recently significant success has emerged from exciting research involving chromatin stretching using optical tweezers. These experiments, in which a single chromatin fibre is attached by one end to a micron-sized bead held in an optical trap and to a solid surface or second bead via the other end,

  9. Optoelectronic tweezers for medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Clemens; Neale, Steven; Menachery, Anoop; Barrett, Mike; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) allows the spatial patterning of electric fields through selected illumination of a photoconductive surface. This enables the manipulation of micro particles and cells by creating non-uniform electrical fields that then produce dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. The DEP responses of cells differ and can produce negative or positive (repelled or attracted to areas of high electric field) forces. Therefore OET can be used to manipulate individual cells and separate different cell types from each other. Thus OET has many applications for medical diagnostics, demonstrated here with work towards diagnosing Human African Trypanosomiasis, also known as sleeping sickness.

  10. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  11. Holographic Raman Tweezers Controlled by Hand Gestures and Voice Commands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Antalík, M.; Kesa, P.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, 2B (2013), s. 331-336 ISSN 2160-8881 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Holographic Optical Tweezers * Raman Tweezers * Natural User Interface * Leap Motion * Gesture Camera Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  12. Biaxial crystal-based optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Maksimyak, Andrew P.; Maksimyak, Peter P.

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an optical tweezer setup based on an optically biaxial crystal. To control movements of opaque particles, we use shifts. The results of experimental studies are reported which are concerned with this laser tweezer setup. We demonstrate a movement of microparticles of toner using a sing...... a singular-optical trap, rotation of particles due to orbital angular momentum of the field, and converging or diverging of two different traps when changing transmission plane of polariser at the input of our polarisation interferometer....

  13. Twisting biological objects by optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormos, P.; Amerongen, van H.; Bottka, S.; Galaja, P.; Garab, G.; Kirei, H.; Oroszi, L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel method by which it is possible to apply and measure torque directly on particles grabbed in optical tweezers. It can be used to orient particles of micron size or even on single molecules, biopolymers by the use of test particles.The procedure is based on the observation that

  14. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  15. Single Chromatin Fibre Assembly Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Pope, L.H.; Leuba, S.H.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Here we observe the formation of a single chromatin fibre using optical tweezers. A single -DNA molecule was suspended between two micron-sized beads, one held by a micropipette and the other in an optical trap. The constrained DNA molecule was incubated with Xenopus laevis egg extract in order to

  16. Independent trapping and manipulation of microparticles using dexterous acoustic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, Charles R. P.; Demore, Christine E. M.; Wu, Hongxiao; Cochran, Sandy; Grinenko, Alon; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    An electronically controlled acoustic tweezer was used to demonstrate two acoustic manipulation phenomena: superposition of Bessel functions to allow independent manipulation of multiple particles and the use of higher-order Bessel functions to trap particles in larger regions than is possible with first-order traps. The acoustic tweezers consist of a circular 64-element ultrasonic array operating at 2.35 MHz which generates ultrasonic pressure fields in a millimeter-scale fluid-filled chamber. The manipulation capabilities were demonstrated experimentally with 45 and 90-μm-diameter polystyrene spheres. These capabilities bring the dexterity of acoustic tweezers substantially closer to that of optical tweezers

  17. 21 CFR 878.5360 - Tweezer-type epilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tweezer-type epilator. 878.5360 Section 878.5360 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED.... (a) Identification. The tweezer-type epilator is an electrical device intended to remove hair. The...

  18. Optical tweezers for the micromanipulation of plant cytoplasm and organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawes, C.; Osterrieder, A.; Sparkes, I.A.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Laser tweezers, often known as optical tweezers or optical traps, permit the capturing and micromanipulation of microscopic particles along X, Y and Z axes using the radiation pressure generated by a focused laser beam, normally in the infrared region of the spectrum. For trapping to be successful,

  19. LMM Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOT) Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to expand the capabilities of the LMM for colloidal and other research by developing a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) module, allowing solid-state...

  20. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Thomaz, A A; Pozzo, L Y; Almeida, D B; Cesar, C L; Fontes, A; Farias, P M A; Stahl, C V; Santos-Mallet, J; Gomes, S A O; Ayres, D C; Giorgio, S; Santos, B S; Feder, D

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients

  1. Power spectrum analysis for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Sørensen, K.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted by an optical trap on a dielectric bead in a fluid is often found by fitting a Lorentzian to the power spectrum of Brownian motion of the bead in the trap. We present explicit functions of the experimental power spectrum that give the values of the parameters fitted, including...... error bars and correlations, for the best such chi(2) fit in a given frequency range. We use these functions to determine the information content of various parts of the power spectrum, and find, at odds with lore, much information at relatively high frequencies. Applying the method to real data, we...... obtain perfect fits and calibrate tweezers with less than 1% error when the trapping force is not too strong. Relatively strong traps have power spectra that cannot be fitted properly with any Lorentzian, we find. This underscores the need for better understanding of the power spectrum than...

  2. Miniaturized Optical Tweezers Through Fiber-End Microfabrication

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2014-07-30

    Optical tweezers represent a powerful tool for a variety of applications both in biology and in physics, and their miniaturization and full integration is of great interest so as to reduce size (towards portable systems), and to minimize the required intervention from the operator. Optical fibers represent a natural solution to achieve this goal, and here we review the realization of single-fiber optical tweezers able to create a purely optical three-dimensional trap. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015.

  3. How safe is gamete micromanipulation by laser tweezers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.

    1998-04-01

    Laser tweezers, used as novel sterile micromanipulation tools of living cells, are employed in laser-assisted in vitro fertilization (IVF). For example, controlled spermatozoa transport with 1064 nm tweezers to human egg cells has been performed in European clinics in cases of male infertility. The interaction of approximately 100 mW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams at MW/cm2 intensity with human gametes results in low mean less than 2 K temperature increases and less than 100 pN trapping forces. Therefore, photothermal or photomechanical induced destructive effects appear unlikely. However, the high photon flux densities may induce simultaneous absorption of two NIR photons resulting in nonlinear interactions. These nonlinear interactions imply non-resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous cellular chromophores. In the case of less than 800 nm tweezers, UV- like damage effects may occur. The destructive effect is amplified when multimode cw lasers are used as tweezer sources due to longitudinal mode-beating effects and partial mode- locking. Spermatozoa damage within seconds using 760 nm traps due to formation of unstable ps pulses in a cw Ti:Sa ring laser is demonstrated. We recommend the use of greater than or equal to 800 nm traps for optical gamete micromanipulation. To our opinion, further basic studies on the influence of nonlinear effects of laser tweezers on human gamete are necessary.

  4. Theory of optical-tweezers forces near a plane interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Neto, P. A. Maia; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Optical-tweezers experiments in molecular and cell biology often take place near the surface of the microscope slide that defines the bottom of the sample chamber. There, as elsewhere, force measurements require forcecalibrated tweezers. In bulk, one can calculate the tweezers force from first...... principles, as recently demonstrated. Near the surface of the microscope slide, this absolute calibration method fails because it does not account for reverberations from the slide of the laser beam scattered by the trapped microsphere. Nor does it account for evanescent waves arising from total internal...... that describes the reverberations, including also evanescent waves. Numerical simulations for typical setup parameters evaluate these effects on the optical force and trap stiffness, with emphasis on axial trapping. Results are in good agreement with available experimental data. Thus, absolute calibration now...

  5. A Plasma Tweezer Concept to De-spin an Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereen, Keon; Datta, Iman; You, Setthivoine

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Tweezer is a new concept for controlled de-spinning and deflection of space bodies without mechanical contact. The method shoots plasma jets or beams at the target from a pair of plasma thrusters located at the end of each lever arm of a ``tweezer'' structure. The main spacecraft body is at the fulcrum point of the tweezer and the target is located between the thrusters. This arrangement cancels out the impulse of two plasma jets on the spacecraft and applies forces on opposite sides of the target. Careful timing and orientation of the jets can then provide the necessary forces to despin and redirect the target. This concept is more efficient than the Ion Beam Shepherd method [C. Bombardelli and J. Pelaez, J. Guid. Control Dyn. (2011)] because it does not require a secondary thruster to cancel momentum and can benefit from angular momentum stored in the spacecraft's initial spin stabilization.

  6. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  7. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  8. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  9. Magneto-optical tweezers built around an inverted microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudet, Cyril; Bednar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    We present a simple experimental setup of magneto-optical tweezers built around an inverted microscope. Two pairs of coils placed around the focal point of the objective generate a planar-rotating magnetic field that is perpendicular to the stretching direction. This configuration allows us to control the rotary movement of a paramagnetic bead trapped in the optical tweezers. The mechanical design is universal and can be simply adapted to any inverted microscope and objective. The mechanical configuration permits the use of a rather large experimental cell and the simple assembly and disassembly of the magnetic attachment

  10. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays. (paper)

  11. Active-passive calibration of optical tweezers in viscoelastic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Mario; Richardson, Andrew C; S Reihani, S Nader

    2010-01-01

    In order to use optical tweezers as a force measuring tool inside a viscoelastic medium such as the cytoplasm of a living cell, it is crucial to perform an exact force calibration within the complex medium. This is a nontrivial task, as many of the physical characteristics of the medium and probe......, e.g., viscosity, elasticity, shape, and density, are often unknown. Here, we suggest how to calibrate single beam optical tweezers in a complex viscoelastic environment. At the same time, we determine viscoelastic characteristics such as friction retardation spectrum and elastic moduli of the medium...

  12. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping...

  13. Construction of an optical tweezer for nanometer scale rheology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The optical tweezer is a versatile set-up that can be employed in a wide variety of studies investigating the microscopic properties of materials. In particular, this set-up has in recent times been gainfully employed in probing rheological properties of materials that exhibit viscoelasticity. These measurements can ...

  14. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbock, L J; Otto, O; Skarstam, D R; Jahn, S; Chimerel, C; Gornall, J L; Keyser, U F, E-mail: ufk20@cam.ac.u [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-17

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of {lambda}-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single {lambda}-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  15. Dynamic array generation and pattern formation for optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, P.C.; Glückstad, J.

    2000-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast approach is used for the generation of optical arrays of arbitrary beam shape, suitable for applications in optical tweezers for the manipulation of biological specimens. This approach offers numerous advantages over current techniques involving the use of computer-......-generated holograms or diffractive optical elements. We demonstrate a low-loss system for generating intensity patterns suitable for the trapping and manipulation of small particles or specimens....

  16. Recent Achievements on Photovoltaic Optoelectronic Tweezers Based on Lithium Niobate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel García-Cabañes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-dated summary of the fundamentals and applications of optoelectronic photovoltaic tweezers for trapping and manipulation of nano-objects on the surface of lithium niobate crystals. It extends the contents of previous reviews to cover new topics and developments which have emerged in recent years and are marking the trends for future research. Regarding the theoretical description of photovoltaic tweezers, detailed simulations of the electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces acting on different crystal configurations are discussed in relation to the structure of the obtained trapping patterns. As for the experimental work, we will pay attention to the manipulation and patterning of micro-and nanoparticles that has experimented an outstanding progress and relevant applications have been reported. An additional focus is now laid on recent work about micro-droplets, which is a central topic in microfluidics and optofluidics. New developments in biology and biomedicine also constitute a relevant part of the review. Finally, some topics partially related with photovoltaic tweezers and a discussion on future prospects and challenges are included.

  17. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    produces less torque under the radiation pressure resulting in slower rotation at the same laser power. Keywords. Rotation of red blood cell; optical tweezers, dual optical trap. PACS Nos 87.80.Cc; 87.83.+a; 87.80.Fe; 89.20.-a. 1. Introduction. The application of optical tweezers in trapping and manipulating single cells [1].

  18. Exact theory of optical tweezers and its application to absolute calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutra, Rafael de Sousa; Viana, Nathan B.; Maia Neto, Paulo A.

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool for basic and applied research in cell biology. Here, we describe an experimentally verified theory for the trapping forces generated by optical tweezers based on first principles that allows absolute calibration. For pedagogical reasons, the steps tha...

  19. Optical Fiber Tweezers Fabricated by Guided Wave Photo-Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita S. Rodrigues Ribeiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the use of guided wave photo-polymerization for the fabrication of novel polymeric micro tips for optical trapping is demonstrated. It is shown that the selective excitation of linear polarized modes, during the fabrication process, has a direct impact on the shape of the resulting micro structures. Tips are fabricated with modes LP02 and LP21 and their shapes and output intensity distribution are compared. The application of the micro structures as optical tweezers is demonstrated with the manipulation of yeast cells.

  20. Probing the mechanical properties, conformational changes, and interactions of nucleic acids with magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Franziska; Ermann, Niklas; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acids are central to the storage and transmission of genetic information. Mechanical properties, along with their sequence, both enable and fundamentally constrain the biological functions of DNA and RNA. For small deformations from the equilibrium conformations, nucleic acids are well described by an isotropic elastic rod model. However, external forces and torsional strains can induce conformational changes, giving rise to a complex force-torque phase diagram. This review focuses on magnetic tweezers as a powerful tool to precisely determine both the elastic parameters and conformational transitions of nucleic acids under external forces and torques at the single-molecule level. We review several variations of magnetic tweezers, in particular conventional magnetic tweezers, freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers, and discuss their characteristic capabilities. We then describe the elastic rod model for DNA and RNA and discuss conformational changes induced by mechanical stress. The focus lies on the responses to torque and twist, which are crucial in the mechanics and interactions of nucleic acids and can directly be measured using magnetic tweezers. We conclude by highlighting several recent studies of nucleic acid-protein and nucleic acid-small-molecule interactions as further applications of magnetic tweezers and give an outlook of some exciting developments to come. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Invited Article: A review of haptic optical tweezers for an interactive microworld exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacoret, Cécile; Régnier, Stéphane

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first review of haptic optical tweezers, a new technique which associates force feedback teleoperation with optical tweezers. This technique allows users to explore the microworld by sensing and exerting picoNewton-scale forces with trapped microspheres. Haptic optical tweezers also allow improved dexterity of micromanipulation and micro-assembly. One of the challenges of this technique is to sense and magnify picoNewton-scale forces by a factor of 1012 to enable human operators to perceive interactions that they have never experienced before, such as adhesion phenomena, extremely low inertia, and high frequency dynamics of extremely small objects. The design of optical tweezers for high quality haptic feedback is challenging, given the requirements for very high sensitivity and dynamic stability. The concept, design process, and specification of optical tweezers reviewed here are focused on those intended for haptic teleoperation. In this paper, two new specific designs as well as the current state-of-the-art are presented. Moreover, the remaining important issues are identified for further developments. The initial results obtained are promising and demonstrate that optical tweezers have a significant potential for haptic exploration of the microworld. Haptic optical tweezers will become an invaluable tool for force feedback micromanipulation of biological samples and nano- and micro-assembly parts.

  2. Inducing trauma into neuroblastoma cells and synthetic neural networks using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Patrick William

    The laser tweezers have become a very useful tool in the fields of physics, chemistry, and biology. My intent is to use the laser tweezers to induce trauma into neuroblastoma cells, cells that resemble neural cells when treated with retinoic acid, to try to surmise what happens when neural cells and networks are disrupted or destroyed. The issues presented will deal with the obtaining, maintenance, and differentiation of the cells, as well as the inner operations of the laser tweezers themselves, and what kind of applications it has been applied to, as well as to my work in this project.

  3. Investigation of shape memory of red blood cells using optical tweezers and quantitative phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2012-03-01

    RBC has been shown to possess shape memory subsequent to shear-induced shape transformation. However, this property of RBC may not be generalized to all kinds of stresses. Here, we report our observation on the action of radiation pressure forces on RBC's shape memory using optical manipulation and quantitative phase microscopy (OMQPM). QPM, based on Mach-Zehnder interferrometry, allowed measurement of dynamic changes of shape of RBC in optical tweezers at different trapping laser powers. In high power near-infrared optical tweezers (>200mW), the RBC was found to deform significantly due to optical forces. Upon removal of the tweezers, hysteresis in recovering its original resting shape was observed. In very high power tweezers or long-term stretching events, shape memory was almost erased. This irreversibility of the deformation may be due to temperature rise or stress-induced phase transformation of lipids in RBC membrane.

  4. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    traditional cell counting methods. Keywords. Antimicrobial activity; optical tweezer; bacterial suspensions; silver nanoparticles. 1. Introduction. The toxicity of silver ions and silver containing compounds on microbes is well known. Nanoparticles of silver are expected to exhibit enhanced antimicrobial properties when.

  5. Flocking multiple microparticles with automatically controlled optical tweezers: solutions and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyao; Wang, Can; Lou, Yunjiang

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to achieve microparticles flocking with robotics and optical tweezers technologies. All particles trapped by optical tweezers can be automatically moved toward a predefined region without collision. The main contribution of this paper lies in the proposal of several solutions to the flocking manipulation of microparticles in microenvironments. First, a simple flocking controller is proposed to generate the desired positions and velocities for particles' movement. Second, a velocity saturation method is implemented to prevent the desired velocities from exceeding a safe limit. Third, a two-layer control architecture is proposed for the motion control of optical tweezers. This architecture can help make many robotic manipulations achievable under microenvironments. The proposed approach with these solutions can be applied to many bioapplications especially in cell engineering and biomedicine. Experiments on yeast cells with a robot-tweezers system are finally performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  6. Laser Tweezer Controlled Solid Immersion Lens for High Resolution Imaging in Microfluidic and Biological Samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birkbeck, Aaron L; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Esener, Sadik C

    2005-01-01

    A novel technique is presented which integrates the capacity of a laser tweezer to optically trap and manipulate objects in three-dimensions with the resolution-enhanced imaging capabilities of a solid immersion lens (SIL...

  7. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45°, smaller angles give a full 2π phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  8. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-01-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2π phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  9. Mechanical properties of a giant liposome studied using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitamichi, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a micrometer-sized giant liposome are studied by deforming it from the inside using dual-beam optical tweezers. As the liposome is extended, its shape changes from a sphere to a lemon shape, and finally, a tubular part is generated. The surface tension σ and the bending rigidity κ of the lipid membrane are obtained from the measured force-extension curve. In a one-phase liposome, it was found that σ increases as the charged component increases but κ remains approximately constant. In a two-phase liposome, the characteristic deformation and the force-extension curve differ from those observed for the one-phase liposome.

  10. Novedosa pinza lumínica New light tweezer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bernstein

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta la primera pinza adaptada a la novedosa tecnología lumínica, mediante diodo ultrabrillante, sin cables ni fibra óptica, a fin de lograr la adecuada iluminación de cavidades oscuras de difícil acceso, y que gracias a su cobertura aislante y su punta libre, permite la cauterización bajo buena iluminación de vasos sangrantes distales, sin lesionar sitios de apoyo accidental de sus ramas.Introducing the first tweezer adjusted to the newest lighting technology though ultra-bright diode, without cables nor optical fiber to obtain the proper illumination of dark and hard acces caves, and thanks to its insulating cover, and its free point allows the cauterization under good illumination of bloody vasels without injurying sites of accidental supports of its branches.

  11. iTweezers: optical micromanipulation controlled by an Apple iPad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, R W; Gibson, G; Padgett, M J; Carberry, D; Picco, L; Miles, M

    2011-01-01

    The 3D interactive manipulation of multiple particles with holographic optical tweezers is often hampered by the control system. We use a multi-touch interface implemented on an Apple iPad to overcome many of the limitations of mouse-based control, and demonstrate an elegant and intuitive interface to multi-particle manipulation. This interface connects to the tweezers system hardware over a wireless network, allowing it to function as a remote monitor and control device. (technical note)

  12. Development and Demonstration of a Multiplexed Magnetic Tweezers Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith Charles

    This dissertation is concerned with the methods and applications of single molecule force spectroscopy. In the introduction, the traditional single molecule force spectroscopy instruments are introduced and the advantages and drawbacks of each are discussed. The first chapter is a review of methods to ensure that biomolecular bond lifetime parameter estimations are not contaminated by multiple bond data. This review culminates in an examination of the literature on the strength of the bond between biotin and streptavidin and finds that by filtering the numerous publications for those that clearly demonstrate specific single bond behavior, there is a consensus of the bond strength and kinetic parameters. The second chapter of the dissertation discusses the capabilities of a magnetic tweezer assay, which combines massive multiplexing, precision bead tracking, and bi-directional force control into a flexible and stabile platform for examining single molecule behavior. Using a novel method for increasing the precision of force estimations on heterogeneous paramagnetic beads, I demonstrate the instrument by examining the force dependence of uncoiling and recoiling velocity of type 1 fimbriae from Eschericia coli (E. coli) bacteria, and see similar results to previous studies. Chapter 3 is a study of the lifetime of the activated FimH-mannose bond under various force conditions using the previously described magnetic tweezer. The bond is found to be extremely long-lived at forces less than 30 pN, with an average lifetime > 1000 times longer than the biotin-streptavidin bond, making it one of the strongest non-covalent interactions known in nature. Furthermore, the average lifetime of the bond is similar between 9 and 30 pN of force, suggesting a force range at which the lifetime is force-independent, demonstrating ideal bond behavior for the first time in a natural system. It is hypothesized that the long lifetime and ideal behavior is due to a gateway that locks mannose

  13. Improved antireflection coated microspheres for biological applications of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Valentina; Sonnberger, Aaron; Abdosamadi, Mohammad K.; McDonald, Craig; Schäffer, Erik; McGloin, David

    2016-09-01

    The success of optical tweezers in cellular biology1 is in part due to the wide range of forces that can be applied, from femto- to hundreds of pico-Newtons; nevertheless extending the range of applicable forces to the nanoNewton regime opens access to a new set of phenomena that currently lie beyond optical manipulation. A successful approach to overcome the conventional limits on trapping forces involves the optimization of the trapped probes. Jannasch et al.2 demonstrated that an anti-reflective shell of nanoporous titanium dioxide (aTiO2, nshell = 1.75) on a core particle made out of titanium dioxide in the anatase phase (cTiO2, ncore = 2.3) results in trappable microspheres capable to reach forces above 1 nN. Here we present how the technique can be further improved by coating the high refractive index microspheres with an additional anti-reflective shell made out of silica (SiO2). This external shell not only improves the trap stability for microspheres of different sizes, but also enables the use of functionalization techniques already established for commercial silica beads in biological experiments. We are also investigating the use of these new microspheres as probes to measure adhesion forces between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in effector T-Cells and will present preliminary results comparing standard and high-index beads.

  14. Toward automated formation of microsphere arrangements using multiplexed optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Keshav; Bollavaram, Manasa; Banerjee, Ashis G.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers offer certain advantages such as multiplexing using a programmable spatial light modulator, flexibility in the choice of the manipulated object and the manipulation medium, precise control, easy object release, and minimal object damage. However, automated manipulation of multiple objects in parallel, which is essential for efficient and reliable formation of micro-scale assembly structures, poses a difficult challenge. There are two primary research issues in addressing this challenge. First, the presence of stochastic Langevin force giving rise to Brownian motion requires motion control for all the manipulated objects at fast rates of several Hz. Second, the object dynamics is non-linear and even difficult to represent analytically due to the interaction of multiple optical traps that are manipulating neighboring objects. As a result, automated controllers have not been realized for tens of objects, particularly with three dimensional motions with guaranteed collision avoidances. In this paper, we model the effect of interacting optical traps on microspheres with significant Brownian motions in stationary fluid media, and develop simplified state-space representations. These representations are used to design a model predictive controller to coordinate the motions of several spheres in real time. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the utility of the controller in automatically forming desired arrangements of varying configurations starting with randomly dispersed microspheres.

  15. Dispersive light-matter interaction in programmable optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Bianca J.; Horvath, Milena S. J.; Deb, Amita B.; Kjørgaard, Niels

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a robust interrogation system using frequency modulation spectroscopy to measure the quantum state-dependent phase shift incurred on an off-resonant optical probe when transmitted by an atomic medium. Recently, our focus has been on extending this technique for the detection of Feshbach resonances in 87Rb atoms. Feshbach resonance is a mechanism which allows the atomic interaction strength to be precisely tuned via an external magnetic field. To access a Feshbach resonance atoms must be independently prepared in certain internal states, during which we utilize programmable optical tweezers to perform precise spatial micro-manipulation of the ensemble in laser "test-tubes." We use our dispersive probing system to identify the resonant magnetic field value in a sample with a dense "ball" geometry. An important design consideration for such a probing scheme is the three-dimensional mode-matching at the interface between light and the atomic sample when coupled by the dispersive interaction. We discuss challenges which dealing with this new geometry compared to the previously used prolate geometry, and consider the possibility of dipole-dipole interactions in our sample leading to cooperative light scattering processes.

  16. Slowing down DNA translocation using magnetic and optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hongbo; Wu, Shanshan; Ryul Park, Sang; Potter, Andrew; Ling, X. S.

    2006-03-01

    Electric-field driven DNA translocation through nanopores can be exploited for DNA sequencing and other applications. However, the DNA translocation under normal patch-clamp-type measurement is too fast to allow detailed measurements of individual or few nucleotides. We propose a concept to slow down the DNA translocation through the nanopore by using magnetic (or optical) tweezers. The 3' end of a single-strand DNA can be attached to a streptavidin-coated magnetic bead through a single biotin molecule. During DNA translocation, the 5' end of DNA will be electrophoretically drawn through the nanopore to the trans side while the 3' end of DNA stays in the cis side with the magnetic bead. A set of permanent magnets or electric coils can be used to generate a magnetic field gradient large enough to pull the bead, hence the DNA out of the nanopore. The net force on the magnetic bead will determine this back-translocation speed. By carefully tuning the magnetic field gradient and the voltage bias on the nanopore, one can make the back-translocation much slower than the conventional forward-translocation in which case the DNA is driven only by the electric force. We will report our experimental design as well as the preliminary results.

  17. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Forbes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping and tweezing systems have found widespread application across diverse fields in science, from applied biology to fundamental physics. In this article we outline the design and construction of an optical trapping and tweezing system, and show how the resulting interaction of the laser light with microscopic particles may be understood in terms of the transfer of linear and angular momentum of light. We demonstrate experimentally the use of our optical tweezing configuration for the measurement of microscopic forces and torques. In particular, we make use of digital holography to create so-called vortex laser beams, capable of transferring orbital angular momentum to particles. The use of such novel laser beams in an optical trapping and tweezing set-up allows for the control of biological species at the single-cell level.

  18. Numerical study of the properties of optical vortex array laser tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun-Fu; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2013-11-04

    Chu et al. constructed a kind of Ince-Gaussian modes (IGM)-based vortex array laser beams consisting of p x p embedded optical vortexes from Ince-Gaussian modes, IG(e)(p,p) modes [Opt. Express 16, 19934 (2008)]. Such an IGM-based vortex array laser beams maintains its vortex array profile during both propagation and focusing, and is applicable to optical tweezers. This study uses the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) method to study the properties of the IGM-based vortex array laser tweezers while it traps dielectric particles. This study calculates the resultant force exerted on the spherical dielectric particles of different sizes situated at the IGM-based vortex array laser beam waist. Numerical results show that the number of trapping spots of a structure light (i.e. IGM-based vortex laser beam), is depended on the relation between the trapped particle size and the structure light beam size. While the trapped particle is small comparing to the beam size of the IGM-based vortex array laser beams, the IGM-based vortex array laser beams tweezers are suitable for multiple traps. Conversely, the tweezers is suitable for single traps. The results of this study is useful to the future development of the vortex array laser tweezers applications.

  19. tweezercalib 2.0: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a vectorized version of the MatLab (MathWorks Inc) package tweezercalib for calibration of optical tweezers with precision. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number...

  20. Fiber based optical tweezers for simultaneous in situ force exertion and measurements in a 3D polyacrylamide gel compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M; Ren, Yundong; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2015-07-01

    Optical tweezers play an important role in biological applications. However, it is difficult for traditional optical tweezers based on objective lenses to work in a three-dimensional (3D) solid far away from the substrate. In this work, we develop a fiber based optical trapping system, namely inclined dual fiber optical tweezers, that can simultaneously apply and measure forces both in water and in a 3D polyacrylamide gel matrix. In addition, we demonstrate in situ, non-invasive characterization of local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide gel by measurements on an embedded bead. The fiber optical tweezers measurements agree well with those of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The inclined dual fiber optical tweezers provide a promising and versatile tool for cell mechanics study in 3D environments.

  1. Manipulation of Nanoparticles Using Dark-Field-Illumination Optical Tweezers with Compensating Spherical Aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Hua, Zhou; Run-Zhe, Tao; Zhi-Bin, Hu; Min-Cheng, Zhong; Zi-Qiang, Wang; Yin-Mei, Li; Jun, Cai

    2009-01-01

    Based on our previous investigation of optical tweezers with dark field illumination [Chin. Phys. Lett. 25(2008)329], nanoparticles at large trap depth are better viewed in wide field and real time for a long time, but with poor forces. Here we present the mismatched tube length to compensate for spherical aberration of an oil-immersion objective in a glass-water interface in an optical tweezers system for manipulating nanoparticles. In this way, the critical power of stable trapping particles is measured at different trap depths. It is found that trap depth is enlarged for trapping nanoparticles and trapping forces are enhanced at large trap depth. According to the measurement, 70-nm particles are manipulated in three dimensions and observed clearly at large appropriate depth. This will expand applications of optical tweezers in a nanometre-scale colloidal system. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  2. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  3. Mechanical and electrical properties of red blood cells using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, A; Castro, M L Barjas; Brandão, M M; Fernandes, H P; Huruta, R R; Costa, F F; Saad, S T O; Thomaz, A A; Pozzo, L Y; Barbosa, L C; Cesar, C L

    2011-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a very sensitive tool, based on photon momentum transfer, for individual, cell by cell, manipulation and measurements, which can be applied to obtain important properties of erythrocytes for clinical and research purposes. Mechanical and electrical properties of erythrocytes are critical parameters for stored cells in transfusion centers, immunohematological tests performed in transfusional routines and in blood diseases. In this work, we showed methods, based on optical tweezers, to study red blood cells and applied them to measure apparent overall elasticity, apparent membrane viscosity, zeta potential, thickness of the double layer of electrical charges and adhesion in red blood cells

  4. Research Advances: Nanoscale Molecular Tweezers; Cinnamon as Pesticide?; Recently Identified Dietary Sources of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2004-12-01

    This Report from Other Journals surveys articles of interest to chemists that have been recently published in other science journals. Topics surveyed include reports that receptors have been designed to act as molecular tweezers; cinnamon has potential in the fight against mosquitoes; and high levels of antioxidants are found in some surprising foods. See Featured Molecules .

  5. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oene, Maarten M; Dickinson, Laura E; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H

    2017-03-07

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor's response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor's performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level.

  6. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oene, M.M.; Dickinson, L.E.; Cross, B.; Pedaci, F.; Lipfert, J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in

  7. Molecular Tweezers for Lysine and Arginine – Powerful Inhibitors of Pathologic Protein Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Molecular tweezers represent the first class of artificial receptor molecules that made the way from a supramolecular host to a drug candidate with promising results in animal tests. Due to their unique structure, only lysine and arginine are well complexed with exquisite selectivity by a threading mechanism, which unites electrostatic, hydrophobic and dispersive attraction. However, tweezer design must avoid self-dimerization, self-inclusion and external guest binding. Moderate affinities of the molecular tweezers towards sterically well accessible basic amino acids with fast on and off rates protect normal proteins from a potential interference with their biological function. However, the early stages of abnormal Aβ, α-synuclein, and TTR assembly are redirected upon tweezer binding towards the generation of amorphous non-toxic material that can be degraded by the intracellular and extracellular clearance mechanisms. Thus, specific host–guest chemistry between aggregation-prone proteins and lysine/arginine binders rescues cell viability and restores animal health in models of AD, PD, and TTR amyloidosis. PMID:27546596

  8. Molecular tweezers for lysine and arginine - powerful inhibitors of pathologic protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit

    2016-10-15

    Molecular tweezers represent the first class of artificial receptor molecules that have made the way from a supramolecular host to a drug candidate with promising results in animal tests. Due to their unique structure, only lysine and arginine are well complexed with exquisite selectivity by a threading mechanism, which unites electrostatic, hydrophobic and dispersive attraction. However, tweezer design must avoid self-dimerization, self-inclusion and external guest binding. Moderate affinities of molecular tweezers towards sterically well accessible basic amino acids with fast on and off rates protect normal proteins from potential interference with their biological function. However, the early stages of abnormal Aβ, α-synuclein, and TTR assembly are redirected upon tweezer binding towards the generation of amorphous non-toxic materials that can be degraded by the intracellular and extracellular clearance mechanisms. Thus, specific host-guest chemistry between aggregation-prone proteins and lysine/arginine binders rescues cell viability and restores animal health in models of AD, PD, and TTR amyloidosis.

  9. Red blood cell micromanipulation with elliptical laser beam profile optical tweezers in different osmolarity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this work optical tweezers with elliptical beam profiles have been developed in order to examine the effect of optical force on fresh red blood cells (RBC) in isotonic, hypertonic and hypotonic buffer solutions. Considering that the optical force depends essentially on the cell surface and the cytoplasmic refractive index, it is obvious that biochemical modifications associated with different states of the cell will influence its behaviour in the optical trap. Line optical tweezers were used to manipulate simultaneously more than one red blood cell. After we have been manipulated a RBC with an elliptical laser beam profile in an isotonic or hypertonic buffer, we noticed that it rotates by itself when gets trapped by optical tweezers and undergoes folding. Further shape deformations can be observed attributed to the competition between alignment and rotational torque which are transferred by laser light to the cell. In hypotonic buffer RBCs become spherical and do not rotate or fold since the resultant force due to rays emerging from diametrically opposite points of the cell leads to zero torque. Manipulation of fresh red blood cells in isotonic solution by line optical tweezers leads to folding and elongation of trapped RBCs. Membrane elasticity properties such as bending modulus can be estimated by measuring RBC's folding time in function with laser power.

  10. Stretching single DNA molecules to demonstrate high-force capabilities of holographic optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farré, Arnau; van der Horst, Astrid; Blab, Gerhard A.; Downing, Benjamin P. B.; Forde, Nancy R.

    2010-01-01

    The well calibrated force-extension behaviour of single double-stranded DNA molecules was used as a standard to investigate the performance of phase-only holographic optical tweezers at high forces. Specifically, the characteristic overstretch transition at 65 pN was found to appear where expected,

  11. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomori, Z.; Keša, P.; Nikorovič, M.; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Valušová, E.; Antalík, M.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2016), 015602:1-9 ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : holographic optical tweezers * Raman microspectroscopy * human-computer interface Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2016

  12. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding and characterizing microbial activity reduction in the presence of antimicrobial agents can help in the design and manufacture of antimicrobial drugs. We demonstrate the use of an optical tweezer setup in recording the changes in bacterial activity with time, induced by the presence of foreign bodies in a ...

  13. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oene, Maarten M.; Dickinson, Laura E.; Cross, Bronwen; Pedaci, Francesco; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magnetic field experienced by a magnetic bead linked to the motor, and we probe the motor’s response. A simple model describes the average motor speed over the entire range of applied fields. We extract the motor torque at stall and find it to be similar to the motor torque at drag-limited speed. In addition, use of the magnetic tweezers allows us to force motor rotation in both forward and backward directions. We monitor the motor’s performance before and after periods of forced rotation and observe no destructive effects on the motor. Our experiments show how magnetic tweezers can provide active and fast control of the external load while also exposing remaining challenges in calibration. Through their non-invasive character and straightforward parallelization, magnetic tweezers provide an attractive platform to study nanoscale rotary motors at the single-motor level. PMID:28266562

  14. Optical tweezers in concentrated colloidal dispersions : Manipulating and imaging individual particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Dirk Leo Joep

    2004-01-01

    Using a laser beam that is focused down to a diffraction-limited spot, particles with a size ranging from several nanometers up to tens of micrometers can be trapped and manipulated. This technique, known as "optical tweezers" or "optical trapping", has been used in a wide variety of

  15. Optical alignment and confinement of an ellipsoidal nanorod in optical tweezers: a theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Zemánek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 7 (2012), s. 1224-1236 ISSN 1084-7529 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ellipsoidal nanorod * optical tweezers * Rayleigh approximation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.665, year: 2012

  16. Custom Made Versatile Device: A Modified Tweezer for Multiple Uses in Clinical Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most commonly it is difficult to overcome some clinical steps during orthodontics treatment, such as placing closed coil spring, engaging NiTi archwire into the bracket slot of severely crowded teeth, to address such messy procedure a new innovative versatile device is designed. This aritcle depicts the fabrication and clinical use of the device-modified tweezer.

  17. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and ...

  18. Characterization of the Stiffness of Multiple Particles Trapped by Dielectrophoretic Tweezers in a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Myeonggu; Choi, Seungyeop; Ko, Kwan Hwi; Kim, Min Hyung; Lee, Sei-Young; Key, Jaehong; Yoon, Young-Ro; Park, In Soo; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-01-26

    Characterization of the stiffness of multiple particles trapped by tweezers-based force spectroscopy is a key step in building simple, high-throughput, and robust systems that can investigate the molecular interactions in a biological process, but the technology to characterize it in a given environment simultaneously is still lacking. We first characterized the stiffness of multiple particles trapped by dielectrophoretic (DEP) tweezers inside a microfluidic device. In this characterization, we developed a method to measure the thermal fluctuations of the trapped multiple particles with DEP tweezers by varying the heights of the particles in the given environment at the same time. Using the data measured in this controlled environment, we extracted the stiffness of the trapped particles and calculated their force. This study not only provides a simple and high-throughput method to measure the trap stiffness of multiple particles inside a microfluidic device using DEP tweezers but also inspires the application of the trapped multiple particles to investigate the dynamics in molecular interactions.

  19. Construction and actuation of a microscopic gear assembly formed using optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of micrometer-sized parts is an important manufacturing process; any development in it could potentially change the current manufacturing practices for micrometer-scale devices. Due to the lack of reliable microassembly techniques, these devices are often manufactured using silicon, which includes etching and depositions with little use of assembly processes. The result is the requirement of specialized manufacturing conditions with hazardous byproducts and limited applications where only simple mechanisms are allowed. Optical tweezers are non-contact type manipulators that are very suitable for assembling microparts and solve one of the most difficult problems for microassembly, which is the sticking of the physical manipulator to the micropart. Although contact type manipulators can be surface modified to be non-sticky, this involves extra preprocessing—optical tweezers do not require such additional efforts. The weakness of using optical tweezers is that the permanent assembly of parts is not possible as only very small forces can be applied. We introduce an advanced microassembly environment with the combined use of optical tweezers and a motorized microtip, where the former is used to position two parts and the latter is used to introduce deformation in the parts so that they form a strongly fitted assembly. (paper)

  20. Accounting for polarization in the calibration of a donut beam axial optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollari, Russell; Milstein, Joshua N

    2018-01-01

    Advances in light shaping techniques are leading to new tools for optical trapping and micromanipulation. For example, optical tweezers made from Laguerre-Gaussian or donut beams display an increased axial trap strength and can impart angular momentum to rotate a specimen. However, the application of donut beam optical tweezers to precision, biophysical measurements remains limited due to a lack of methods for calibrating such devices sufficiently. For instance, one notable complication, not present when trapping with a Gaussian beam, is that the polarization of the trap light can significantly affect the tweezers' strength as well as the location of the trap. In this article, we show how to precisely calibrate the axial trap strength as a function of height above the coverslip surface while accounting for focal shifts in the trap position arising from radiation pressure, mismatches in the index of refraction, and polarization induced intensity variations. This provides a foundation for implementing a donut beam optical tweezers capable of applying precise axial forces.

  1. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in bacterial activity levels as a function of time of contact with the antibacterial agent with greater efficacy than traditional cell counting methods. ... In this work, we demonstrate the use of an optical tweezer in monitoring the effect of .... can be used as an effective tool for characterizing real time changes in bacterial activity ...

  2. Molecular tweezers modulate 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, David; Rose, Rolf; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Bartel, Maria; Ramirez-Anguita, Juan Manuel; Dutt, Som; Wilch, Constanze; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Schrader, Thomas; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has recently emerged as a promising way to modulate protein functions, but devising molecules that will interact with a protein in the desired manner is difficult as many competing interactions exist in a biological environment (with solvents, salts or different sites for the target biomolecule). We now show that lysine-specific molecular tweezers bind to a 14-3-3 adapter protein and modulate its interaction with partner proteins. The tweezers inhibit binding between the 14-3-3 protein and two partner proteins—a phosphorylated (C-Raf) protein and an unphosphorylated one (ExoS)—in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein crystallography shows that this effect arises from the binding of the tweezers to a single surface-exposed lysine (Lys214) of the 14-3-3 protein in the proximity of its central channel, which normally binds the partner proteins. A combination of structural analysis and computer simulations provides rules for the tweezers' binding preferences, thus allowing us to predict their influence on this type of protein-protein interactions.

  3. Construction and actuation of a microscopic gear assembly formed using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Dae; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2013-06-01

    The assembly of micrometer-sized parts is an important manufacturing process; any development in it could potentially change the current manufacturing practices for micrometer-scale devices. Due to the lack of reliable microassembly techniques, these devices are often manufactured using silicon, which includes etching and depositions with little use of assembly processes. The result is the requirement of specialized manufacturing conditions with hazardous byproducts and limited applications where only simple mechanisms are allowed. Optical tweezers are non-contact type manipulators that are very suitable for assembling microparts and solve one of the most difficult problems for microassembly, which is the sticking of the physical manipulator to the micropart. Although contact type manipulators can be surface modified to be non-sticky, this involves extra preprocessing—optical tweezers do not require such additional efforts. The weakness of using optical tweezers is that the permanent assembly of parts is not possible as only very small forces can be applied. We introduce an advanced microassembly environment with the combined use of optical tweezers and a motorized microtip, where the former is used to position two parts and the latter is used to introduce deformation in the parts so that they form a strongly fitted assembly.

  4. Dual-trap Raman tweezers for probing dynamics and heterogeneity of interacting microbial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Guiwen; Yao, Hui-Lu; Liu, Junxian; Li, Yong-Qing

    2010-11-01

    We report on development of dual-trap Raman tweezers for monitoring cellular dynamics and heterogeneity of interacting living cells suspended in a liquid medium. Dual-beam optical tweezers were combined with Raman spectroscopy, which allows capturing two cells that are in direct contact or closely separated by a few micrometers and simultaneously acquiring their Raman spectra with an imaging CCD spectrograph. As a demonstration, we recorded time-lapse Raman spectra of budding yeast cells held in dual traps for over 40 min to monitor the dynamic growth in a nutrient medium. We also monitored two germinating Bacillus spores after the initiation with L-alanine and observed their heterogeneity in the release of CaDPA under identical microenvironment.

  5. Low cost optical tweezers systems using double coil driving stepping motor to controlling sample stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laowattanatham, N.; Cheamanunkul, N.; Plaipichit, S.; Buranasiri, P.; Nuansri, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this research, the low cost optical tweezers systems using X-Y stage has been developed by using 5-phase stepping motor. By using sequential double coil driving, we can obtain the driving torque larger than using the single coil driving. The moving scale is fine resolution at 0.2 micrometer. The overall systems based on microcontroller PIC18F458 and joystick controller with LabView® graphical user interface (GUI). The mechanical damping has been included in the system for decreasing the vibrational noise. By using this method, our optical tweezers system is cheaper than the other commercial system that has been used the piezoelectric driving, and still has the same efficiency.

  6. Neural Network for Image-to-Image Control of Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Anderson, Robert C.; Weiland, Kenneth E.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2004-01-01

    A method is discussed for using neural networks to control optical tweezers. Neural-net outputs are combined with scaling and tiling to generate 480 by 480-pixel control patterns for a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM can be combined in various ways with a microscope to create movable tweezers traps with controllable profiles. The neural nets are intended to respond to scattered light from carbon and silicon carbide nanotube sensors. The nanotube sensors are to be held by the traps for manipulation and calibration. Scaling and tiling allow the 100 by 100-pixel maximum resolution of the neural-net software to be applied in stages to exploit the full 480 by 480-pixel resolution of the SLM. One of these stages is intended to create sensitive null detectors for detecting variations in the scattered light from the nanotube sensors.

  7. A feasibility study of in vivo applications of single beam acoustic tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-10-01

    Tools that are capable of manipulating micro-sized objects have been widely used in such fields as physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Several devices, including optical tweezers, atomic force microscope, micro-pipette aspirator, and standing surface wave type acoustic tweezers have been studied to satisfy this need. However, none of them has been demonstrated to be suitable for in vivo and clinical studies. Single beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT) is a technology that uses highly focused acoustic beam to trap particles toward the beam focus. Its feasibility was first theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by Lee and Shung several years ago. Since then, much effort has been devoted to improving this technology. At present, the tool is capable of trapping a microparticle as small as 1 μm, as well as a single red blood cell. Although in comparing to other microparticles manipulating technologies, SBAT has advantages of providing stronger trapping force and deeper penetration depth in tissues, and producing less tissue damage, its potential for in vivo applications has yet been explored. It is worth noting that ultrasound has been used as a diagnostic tool for over 50 years and no known major adverse effects have been observed at the diagnostic energy level. This paper reports the results of an initial attempt to assess the feasibility of single beam acoustic tweezers to trap microparticles in vivo inside of a blood vessel. The acoustic intensity of SBAT under the trapping conditions that were utilized was measured. The mechanical index and thermal index at the focus of acoustic beam were found to be 0.48 and 0.044, respectively, which meet the standard of commercial diagnostic ultrasound system.

  8. Applying torque to the Escherichia coli flagellar motor using magnetic tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    van Oene, M.M.; Dickinson, L.E.; Cross, B.; Pedaci, F.; Lipfert, J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor of Escherichia coli is a nanoscale rotary engine essential for bacterial propulsion. Studies on the power output of single motors rely on the measurement of motor torque and rotation under external load. Here, we investigate the use of magnetic tweezers, which in principle allow the application and active control of a calibrated load torque, to study single flagellar motors in Escherichia coli. We manipulate the external load on the motor by adjusting the magneti...

  9. Identification of individual biofilm-forming bacterial cells using Raman tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Šiler, Martin; Šerý, Mojmír; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Hrubanová, Kamila; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, V.; Růžička, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 5 (2015), 051038:1-6 ISSN 1083-3668 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/1687; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman tweezers * Staphylococcus epidermidis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.556, year: 2015

  10. Optical tweezers and surface plasmon resonance combination system based on the high numerical aperture lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xuchen; Zhang, Bei; Lan, Guoqiang; Wang, Yiqiao; Liu, Shugang

    2015-11-01

    Biology and medicine sample measurement takes an important role in the microscopic optical technology. Optical tweezer has the advantage of accurate capture and non-pollution of the sample. The SPR(surface plasmon resonance) sensor has so many advantages include high sensitivity, fast measurement, less consumption of sample and label-free detection of biological sample that the SPR sensing technique has been used for surface topography, analysis of biochemical and immune, drug screening and environmental monitoring. If they combine, they will play an important role in the biological, chemical and other subjects. The system we propose use the multi-axis cage system, by using the methods of reflection and transmiss ion to improve the space utilization. The SPR system and optical tweezer were builtup and combined in one system. The cage of multi-axis system gives full play to its accuracy, simplicity and flexibility. The size of the system is 20 * 15 * 40 cm3 and thus the sample can be replaced to switch between the optical tweezers system and the SPR system in the small space. It means that we get the refractive index of the sample and control the particle in the same system. In order to control the revolving stage, get the picture and achieve the data stored automatically, we write a LabVIEW procedure. Then according to the data from the back focal plane calculate the refractive index of the sample. By changing the slide we can trap the particle as optical tweezer, which makes us measurement and trap the sample at the same time.

  11. Scanning a DNA molecule for bound proteins using hybrid magnetic and optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn T J van Loenhout

    Full Text Available The functional state of the genome is determined by its interactions with proteins that bind, modify, and move along the DNA. To determine the positions and binding strength of proteins localized on DNA we have developed a combined magnetic and optical tweezers apparatus that allows for both sensitive and label-free detection. A DNA loop, that acts as a scanning probe, is created by looping an optically trapped DNA tether around a DNA molecule that is held with magnetic tweezers. Upon scanning the loop along the λ-DNA molecule, EcoRI proteins were detected with ~17 nm spatial resolution. An offset of 33 ± 5 nm for the detected protein positions was found between back and forwards scans, corresponding to the size of the DNA loop and in agreement with theoretical estimates. At higher applied stretching forces, the scanning loop was able to remove bound proteins from the DNA, showing that the method is in principle also capable of measuring the binding strength of proteins to DNA with a force resolution of 0.1 pN/[Formula: see text]. The use of magnetic tweezers in this assay allows the facile preparation of many single-molecule tethers, which can be scanned one after the other, while it also allows for direct control of the supercoiling state of the DNA molecule, making it uniquely suitable to address the effects of torque on protein-DNA interactions.

  12. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A.; Valentine, Megan T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  13. Design and optimization of arrays of neodymium iron boron-based magnets for magnetic tweezers applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacchia, Nicholas A; Valentine, Megan T

    2015-05-01

    We present the design methodology for arrays of neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnets for use in magnetic tweezers devices. Using finite element analysis (FEA), we optimized the geometry of the NdFeB magnet as well as the geometry of iron yokes designed to focus the magnetic fields toward the sample plane. Together, the magnets and yokes form a magnetic array which is the basis of the magnetic tweezers device. By systematically varying 15 distinct shape parameters, we determined those features that maximize the magnitude of the magnetic field gradient as well as the length scale over which the magnetic force operates. Additionally, we demonstrated that magnetic saturation of the yoke material leads to intrinsic limitations in any geometric design. Using this approach, we generated a compact and light-weight magnetic tweezers device that produces a high field gradient at the image plane in order to apply large forces to magnetic beads. We then fabricated the optimized yoke and validated the FEA by experimentally mapping the magnetic field of the device. The optimization data and iterative FEA approach outlined here will enable the streamlined design and construction of specialized instrumentation for force-sensitive microscopy.

  14. Raman Tweezers as a Diagnostic Tool of Hemoglobin-Related Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Rusciano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the development of a Raman Tweezers system for detecting hemoglobin-related blood disorders at a single cell level. The study demonstrates that the molecular fingerprint insight provided by Raman analysis holds great promise for distinguishing between healthy and diseased cells in the field of biomedicine. Herein a Raman Tweezers system has been applied to investigate the effects of thalassemia, a blood disease quite diffuse in the Mediterranean Sea region. By resonant excitation of hemoglobin Raman bands, we examined the oxygenation capability of normal, alpha- and beta-thalassemic erythrocytes. A reduction of this fundamental red blood cell function, particularly severe for beta-thalassemia, has been found. Raman spectroscopy was also used to draw hemoglobin distribution inside single erythrocytes; the results confirmed the characteristic anomaly (target shape, occurring in thalassemia and some other blood disorders. The success of resonance Raman spectroscopy for thalassemia detection reported in this review provide an interesting starting point to explore the application of a Raman Tweezers system in the analysis of several blood disorders.

  15. Grating-flanked plasmonic coaxial apertures for efficient fiber optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amr A E; Sheikhoelislami, Sassan; Gastelum, Steven; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-09-05

    Subwavelength plasmonic apertures have been foundational for direct optical manipulation of nanoscale specimens including sub-100 nm polymeric beads, metallic nanoparticles and proteins. While most plasmonic traps result in two-dimensional localization, three-dimensional manipulation has been demonstrated by integrating a plasmonic aperture on an optical fiber tip. However, such 3D traps are usually inefficient since the optical mode of the fiber and the subwavelength aperture only weakly couple. In this paper we design more efficient optical-fiber-based plasmonic tweezers combining a coaxial plasmonic aperture with a plasmonic grating coupler at the fiber tip facet. Using full-field finite difference time domain analysis, we optimize the grating design for both gold and silver fiber-based coaxial tweezers such that the optical transmission through the apertures is maximized. With the optimized grating, we show that the maximum transmission efficiency increases from 2.5% to 19.6% and from 1.48% to 16.7% for the gold and silver structures respectively. To evaluate their performance as optical tweezers, we calculate the optical forces and the corresponding trapping potential on dielectric particles interacting with the apertures. We demonstrate that the enahncement in the transmission translates into an equivalent increase in the optical forces. Consequently, the optical power required to achieve stable optical trapping is significantly reduced allowing for efficient localization and 3D manipulation of sub-30 nm dielectric particles.

  16. Holographic optical tweezers combined with a microfluidic device for exposing cells to fast environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Emma; Scrimgeour, Jan; Enger, Jonas; Goksör, Mattias

    2007-05-01

    Optical manipulation techniques have become an important research tool for single cell experiments in microbiology. Using optical tweezers, single cells can be trapped and held during long experiments without risk of cross contamination or compromising viability. However, it is often desirable to not only control the position of a cell, but also to control its environment. We have developed a method that combines optical tweezers with a microfluidic device. The microfluidic system is fabricated by soft lithography in which a constant flow is established by a syringe pump. In the microfluidic system multiple laminar flows of different media are combined into a single channel, where the fluid streams couple viscously. Adjacent media will mix only by diffusion, and consequently two different environments will be separated by a mixing region a few tens of micrometers wide. Thus, by moving optically trapped cells from one medium to another we are able to change the local environment of the cells in a fraction of a second. The time needed to establish a change in environment depends on several factors such as the strength of the optical traps and the steepness of the concentration gradient in the mixing region. By introducing dynamic holographic optical tweezers several cells can be trapped and analyzed simultaneously, thus shortening data acquisition time. The power of this system is demonstrated on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) subjected to osmotic stress, where the volume of the yeast cell and the spatial localization of green fluorescent proteins (GFP) are monitored using fluorescence microscopy.

  17. Dislocation reactions, grain boundaries, and irreversibility in two-dimensional lattices using topological tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, William T M; Hollingsworth, Andrew D; Grier, David G; Chaikin, Paul M

    2013-09-24

    Dislocations, disclinations, and grain boundaries are topological excitations of crystals that play a key role in determining out-of-equilibrium material properties. In this article we study the kinetics, creation, and annihilation processes of these defects in a controllable way by applying "topological tweezers," an array of weak optical tweezers which strain the lattice by weakly pulling on a collection of particles without grabbing them individually. We use topological tweezers to deterministically control individual dislocations and grain boundaries, and reversibly create and destroy dislocation pairs in a 2D crystal of charged colloids. Starting from a perfect lattice, we exert a torque on a finite region and follow the complete step-by-step creation of a disoriented grain, from the creation of dislocation pairs through their reactions to form a grain boundary and their reduction of elastic energy. However, when the grain is rotated back to its original orientation the dislocation reactions do not retrace. Rather, the process is irreversible; the grain boundary expands instead of collapsing.

  18. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  19. Determining the structure-mechanics relationships of dense microtubule networks with confocal microscopy and magnetic tweezers-based microrheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Valentine, Megan T

    2013-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential in maintaining the shape, strength, and organization of cells. Its spatiotemporal organization is fundamental for numerous dynamic biological processes, and mechanical stress within the MT cytoskeleton provides an important signaling mechanism in mitosis and neural development. This raises important questions about the relationships between structure and mechanics in complex MT structures. In vitro, reconstituted cytoskeletal networks provide a minimal model of cell mechanics while also providing a testing ground for the fundamental polymer physics of stiff polymer gels. Here, we describe our development and implementation of a broad tool kit to study structure-mechanics relationships in reconstituted MT networks, including protocols for the assembly of entangled and cross-linked MT networks, fluorescence imaging, microstructure characterization, construction and calibration of magnetic tweezers devices, and mechanical data collection and analysis. In particular, we present the design and assembly of three neodymium iron boron (NdFeB)-based magnetic tweezers devices optimized for use with MT networks: (1) high-force magnetic tweezers devices that enable the application of nano-Newton forces and possible meso- to macroscale materials characterization; (2) ring-shaped NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers devices that enable oscillatory microrheology measurements; and (3) portable magnetic tweezers devices that enable direct visualization of microscale deformation in soft materials under applied force. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel tunable dynamic tweezers using dark-bright soliton collision control in an optical add/drop filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeka, Chat; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Yupapin, Preecha P; Ali, Jalil

    2010-12-01

    We propose a novel system of the dynamic optical tweezers generated by a dark soliton in the fiber optic loop. A dark soliton known as an optical tweezer is amplified and tuned within the microring resonator system. The required tunable tweezers with different widths and powers can be controlled. The analysis of dark-bright soliton conversion using a dark soliton pulse propagating within a microring resonator system is analyzed. The dynamic behaviors of soliton conversion in add/drop filter is also analyzed. The control dark soliton is input into the system via the add port of the add/drop filter. The dynamic behavior of the dark-bright soliton conversion is observed. The required stable signal is obtained via a drop and throughput ports of the add/drop filter with some suitable parameters. In application, the trapped light/atom and transportation can be realized by using the proposed system.

  1. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm(2), a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle's position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  2. Magnetic tweezers with high permeability electromagnets for fast actuation of magnetic beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, La; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Bioelectronics (ICS-8/PGI-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    As a powerful and versatile scientific instrument, magnetic tweezers have been widely used in biophysical research areas, such as mechanical cell properties and single molecule manipulation. If one wants to steer bead position, the nonlinearity of magnetic properties and the strong position dependence of the magnetic field in most magnetic tweezers lead to quite a challenge in their control. In this article, we report multi-pole electromagnetic tweezers with high permeability cores yielding high force output, good maneuverability, and flexible design. For modeling, we adopted a piece-wise linear dependence of magnetization on field to characterize the magnetic beads. We implemented a bi-linear interpolation of magnetic field in the work space, based on a lookup table obtained from finite element simulation. The electronics and software were custom-made to achieve high performance. In addition, the effects of dimension and defect on structure of magnetic tips also were inspected. In a workspace with size of 0.1 × 0.1 mm{sup 2}, a force of up to 400 pN can be applied on a 2.8 μm superparamagnetic bead in any direction within the plane. Because the magnetic particle is always pulled towards a tip, the pulling forces from the pole tips have to be well balanced in order to achieve control of the particle’s position. Active video tracking based feedback control is implemented, which is able to work at a speed of up to 1 kHz, yielding good maneuverability of the magnetic beads.

  3. Optical macro-tweezers: trapping of highly motile micro-organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalhammer, G; Steiger, R; Bernet, S; Ritsch-Marte, M

    2011-01-01

    Optical micromanipulation stands for contact-free handling of microscopic particles by light. Optical forces can manipulate non-absorbing objects in a large range of sizes, e.g., from biological cells down to cold atoms. Recently much progress has been made going from the micro- down to the nanoscale. Less attention has been paid to going the other way, trapping increasingly large particles. Optical tweezers typically employ a single laser beam tightly focused by a microscope objective of high numerical aperture to stably trap a particle in three dimensions (3D). As the particle size increases, stable 3D trapping in a single-beam trap requires scaling up the optical power, which eventually induces adverse biological effects. Moreover, the restricted field of view of standard optical tweezers, dictated by the use of high NA objectives, is particularly unfavorable for catching actively moving specimens. Both problems can be overcome by traps with counter-propagating beams. Our 'macro-tweezers' are especially designed to trap highly motile organisms, as they enable three-dimensional all-optical trapping and guiding in a volume of 2 × 1 × 2 mm 3 . Here we report for the first time the optical trapping of large actively swimming organisms, such as for instance Euglena protists and dinoflagellates of up to 70 µm length. Adverse bio-effects are kept low since trapping occurs outside high intensity regions, e.g., focal spots. We expect our approach to open various possibilities in the contact-free handling of 50–100 µm sized objects that could hitherto not be envisaged, for instance all-optical holding of individual micro-organisms for taxonomic identification, selective collecting or tagging

  4. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuxun; Cheng, Jinping; Kong, Chi-Wing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han Cheng, Shuk; Li, Ronald A.; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  5. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas Instruments Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20,000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25{\\mu}m with laser cooling and 4{\\mu}m without. We discuss the limitations...

  6. The Cryptococcus neoformans capsule: lessons from the use of optical tweezers and other biophysical tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Bruno; Frases, Susana

    2015-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, representing one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients. The main virulence factor of C. neoformans is the polysaccharide capsule; however, many fundamental aspects of capsule structure and function remain poorly understood. Recently, important capsule properties were uncovered using optical tweezers and other biophysical techniques, including dynamic and static light scattering, zeta potential and viscosity analysis. This review provides an overview of the latest findings in this emerging field, explaining the impact of these findings on our understanding of C. neoformans biology and resistance to host immune defenses. PMID:26157436

  7. In vivo vascular flow profiling combined with optical tweezers based blood routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Robert; Sugden, Wade W.; Siekmann, Arndt F.; Denz, Cornelia

    2017-07-01

    In vivo wall shear rate is quantified during zebrafish development using particle image velocimetry for biomedical diagnosis and modeling of artificial vessels. By using brightfield microscopy based high speed video tracking we can resolve single heart-beat cycles of blood flow in both space and time. Maximum blood flow velocities and wall shear rates are presented for zebrafish at two and three days post fertilization. By applying biocompatible optical tweezers as an Optical rail we present rerouting of red blood cells in vivo. With purely light-driven means we are able to compensate the lack of proper red blood cell blood flow in so far unperfused capillaries.

  8. Laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuxun; Wang Xiaolin; Sun Dong [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng Jinping; Han Cheng, Shuk [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kong, Chi-Wing [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Ronald A. [Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Consortium, and Departments of Medicine and Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Center of Cardiovascular Research, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We report a study on the laser-induced fusion of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) at the single-cell level. Cells were manipulated by optical tweezers and fused under irradiation with pulsed UV laser at 355 nm. Successful fusion was indicated by green fluorescence protein transfer. The influence of laser pulse energy on the fusion efficiency was investigated. The fused products were viable as gauged by live cell staining. Successful fusion of hESCs with somatic cells was also demonstrated. The reported fusion outcome may facilitate studies of cell differentiation, maturation, and reprogramming.

  9. Single-atom trapping and transport in DMD-controlled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Dustin; Kuhn, Axel

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and manipulation of single neutral atoms in reconfigurable arrays of optical tweezers. Our approach offers unparalleled speed by using a Texas instruments digital micro-mirror device as a holographic amplitude modulator with a frame rate of 20 000 per second. We show the trapping of static arrays of up to 20 atoms, as well as transport of individually selected atoms over a distance of 25 μm with laser cooling and 4 μm without. We discuss the limitations of the technique and the scope for technical improvements.

  10. Nano-bio-optomechanics: nanoaperture tweezers probe single nanoparticles, proteins, and their interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Reuven

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticles in the single digit nanometer range can be easily isolated and studied with low optical powers using nanoaperture tweezers. We have studied individual proteins and their interactions with small molecules, DNA and antibodies. Recently, using the fluctuations of the trapped object, we have pioneered a new way to "listen" to the vibrations of nanoparticles in the 100 GHz - 1 THz range; the approach is called extraordinary acoustic Raman (EAR). EAR gives unprecedented low frequency spectra of individual proteins in solution, allowing for identification and analysis, as well as probing their role in biological functions. We have also used EAR to study the elastic properties, shape and size of various individual nanoparticles.

  11. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers–current magnetic tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessalova, Valentina [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Perov, Nikolai [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1-2, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Rodionova, Valeria [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Nevskogo 14, 236004 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology ' MISiS' , Leninsky Prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers–Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10{sup −11} A m{sup 2} at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates. - Highlights: • We suggest the idea and the results of the test the prototype based on 3 wire's system that allows manipulation of nanoparticles on XY plane.

  12. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  13. A modular assembling platform for manufacturing of microsystems by optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Sarah Isabelle; Aumann, Andreas; Ghadiri, Reza; Prüfer, Michael; Baer, Sebastian; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Due to the increased complexity in terms of materials and geometries for microsystems new assembling techniques are required. Assembling techniques from the semiconductor industry are often very specific and cannot fulfill all specifications in more complex microsystems. Therefore, holographic optical tweezers are applied to manipulate structures in micrometer range with highest flexibility and precision. As is well known non-spherical assemblies can be trapped and controlled by laser light and assembled with an additional light modulator application, where the incident laser beam is rearranged into flexible light patterns in order to generate multiple spots. The complementary building blocks are generated by a two-photon-polymerization process. The possibilities of manufacturing arbitrary microstructures and the potential of optical tweezers lead to the idea of combining manufacturing techniques with manipulation processes to "microrobotic" processes. This work presents the manipulation of generated complex microstructures with optical tools as well as a storage solution for 2PP assemblies. A sample holder has been developed for the manual feeding of 2PP building blocks. Furthermore, a modular assembling platform has been constructed for an `all-in-one' 2PP manufacturing process as a dedicated storage system. The long-term objective is the automation process of feeding and storage of several different 2PP micro-assemblies to realize an automated assembly process.

  14. Probing mechanical properties of Jurkat cells under the effect of ART using oscillating optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Khakshour

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoid leukemia is a common type of blood cancer and chemotherapy is the initial treatment of choice. Quantifying the effect of a chemotherapeutic drug at the cellular level plays an important role in the process of the treatment. In this study, an oscillating optical tweezer was employed to characterize the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of Jurkat cells exposed to the chemotherapeutic agent, artesunate (ART. A motion equation for a bead bound to a cell was applied to describe the mechanical characteristics of the cell cytoskeleton. By comparing between the modeling results and experimental results from the optical tweezer, the stiffness and viscosity of the Jurkat cells before and after the ART treatment were obtained. The results demonstrate a weak power-law dependency of cell stiffness with frequency. Furthermore, the stiffness and viscosity were increased after the treatment. Therefore, the cytoskeleton cell stiffness as the well as power-law coefficient can provide a useful insight into the chemo-mechanical relationship of drug treated cancer cells and may serve as another tool for evaluating therapeutic performance quantitatively.

  15. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and laser tweezers based experiments to understand dentine-bacteria interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sum Chee; Mohanty, Samarendra; Gupta, P. K.; Kishen, Anil

    2007-02-01

    Failure of endodontic treatment is commonly due to Enterococcal infection. In this study influence of chemical treatments of type-I collagen membrane by chemical agents commonly used in endodontic treatment on Enterococcus faecalis cell adherence was evaluated. In order to determine the change in number of adhering bacteria after chemical treatment, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used. For this, overnight culture of E faecalis in All Culture broth was applied to chemically treated type-I collagen membrane. It was found that Ca(OH) II treated groups had statistically significant (p value=0.05) increase in population of bacteria adherence. The change in adhesion force between bacteria and collagen was determined by using optical tweezers (1064 nm). For this experiment, Type-I collagen membrane was soaked for 5 mins in a media that contained 50% all culture media and 50% saturated Ca(OH) II . The membrane was spread on the coverslip, on which diluted bacterial suspension was added. The force of laser tweezers on the bacteria was estimated at different trap power levels using viscous drag method and trapping stiffness was calculated using Equipartition theorem method. Presence of Ca(OH) II was found to increase the cell-substrate adherence force from 0.38pN to >2.1pN. Together, these experiments show that it was highly probable that the increase in adherence to collagen was due to a stronger adhesion in the presence of Ca (OH) II.

  16. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  17. A novel single fiber optical tweezers based on light-induced thermal effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Liang, Peibo; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    We present and demonstrate a novel single fiber optical tweezers which can trap and launch (clean) a target polystyrene (PS) microsphere (diameter~10μm) with independent control by using two wavelengths beams: 980nm and 1480nm. We employ 980nm laser beam to trap the target PS microsphere by molding the fiber tip into a special tapered-shape; and we employ 1480nm laser beam to launch the trapped PS microsphere with a certain velocity by using the thermophoresis force generated from the thermal effect due to the high absorption of the 1480nm laser beams in water. When the launching force is smaller than the trapping force, the PS microsphere will be trapped near the fiber tip, and the launching force will blow away other PS microspheres in the workspace realizing the cleaning function; When the launching force is larger than the trapping force, the trapped PS microsphere will be launched away from the fiber tip with a certain velocity and towards a certain direction, realizing the launching function. This PS microsphere launching and cleaning functions expanded new features of single fiber optical tweezers, providing for the possibility of more practical applications in the micro manipulation research fields.

  18. New approaches in the design of magnetic tweezers–current magnetic tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessalova, Valentina; Perov, Nikolai; Rodionova, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The main advantages of the magnetic tweezers are the low price and simplicity of use. However the range of their application is reduced due to shortcomings like, for example, the remanent induction of the core and interaction between ferromagnetic cores. We present the new design of magnetic tweezers–Current Magnetic Tweezers (CMT) that allow particle manipulation by means of the magnetic field generated by the electric currents flowing through the non-magnetic wires. Arranging wires in different geometric shapes allows the particle movement either in two or three dimensions. Forces acting on the magnetic particles with the magnetic moment of 2·10 −11 A m 2 at distances up to 1 mm had been experimentally measured. It is established that a current of about 1 A at a 1 mm distance generates force of (approximately) 3 pN which is consistent with theoretical estimates. - Highlights: • We suggest the idea and the results of the test the prototype based on 3 wire's system that allows manipulation of nanoparticles on XY plane.

  19. Binding mechanism of PicoGreen to DNA characterized by magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Schellenberg, Helene; Walhorn, Volker; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescent dyes are broadly used in many biotechnological applications to detect and visualize DNA molecules. However, their binding to DNA alters the structural and nanomechanical properties of DNA and, thus, interferes with associated biological processes. In this work we employed magnetic tweezers and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate the binding of PicoGreen to DNA at room temperature in a concentration-dependent manner. PicoGreen is an ultrasensitive quinolinium nucleic acid stain exhibiting hardly any background signal from unbound dye molecules. By means of stretching and overwinding single, torsionally constrained, nick-free double-stranded DNA molecules, we acquired force-extension and supercoiling curves which allow quantifying DNA contour length, persistence length and other thermodynamical binding parameters, respectively. The results of our magnetic tweezers single-molecule binding study were well supported through analyzing the fluorescent spectra of stained DNA. On the basis of our work, we could identify a concentration-dependent bimodal binding behavior, where, apparently, PicoGreen associates to DNA as an intercalator and minor-groove binder simultaneously.

  20. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  1. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  2. Auto- and cross-power spectral analysis of dual trap optical tweezer experiments using Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hansen, Yann; Mehlich, Alexander; Pelz, Benjamin; Rief, Matthias; Netz, Roland R

    2012-09-01

    The thermal fluctuations of micron-sized beads in dual trap optical tweezer experiments contain complete dynamic information about the viscoelastic properties of the embedding medium and-if present-macromolecular constructs connecting the two beads. To quantitatively interpret the spectral properties of the measured signals, a detailed understanding of the instrumental characteristics is required. To this end, we present a theoretical description of the signal processing in a typical dual trap optical tweezer experiment accounting for polarization crosstalk and instrumental noise and discuss the effect of finite statistics. To infer the unknown parameters from experimental data, a maximum likelihood method based on the statistical properties of the stochastic signals is derived. In a first step, the method can be used for calibration purposes: We propose a scheme involving three consecutive measurements (both traps empty, first one occupied and second empty, and vice versa), by which all instrumental and physical parameters of the setup are determined. We test our approach for a simple model system, namely a pair of unconnected, but hydrodynamically interacting spheres. The comparison to theoretical predictions based on instantaneous as well as retarded hydrodynamics emphasizes the importance of hydrodynamic retardation effects due to vorticity diffusion in the fluid. For more complex experimental scenarios, where macromolecular constructs are tethered between the two beads, the same maximum likelihood method in conjunction with dynamic deconvolution theory will in a second step allow one to determine the viscoelastic properties of the tethered element connecting the two beads.

  3. Kinetics of DNA translocase SpoIIIE studied by dual optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Lin; Qu, E.; Guo, Honglian; Xu, Chunhua; Li, Zhaolin; Huang, Lu; Zhang, Daozhong; Li, Zhiyuan

    2009-11-01

    DNA translocase SpoIIIE protein is a kind of motor proteins, which transports DNA from one side of the membrane to the other side, so it plays an important role in cell division. In experiment, λDNA is labeled on one end with biotin and the other with digoxigenin. In this work we study kinetics of DNA translocase SpoIIIE by means of dual optical tweezers. In our experiment, λDNA is tethered between streptavidin-coated polystyrene bead and antidigoxigenin-coated polystyrene bead held by dual optical tweezers. One trap is immovable, and the other is movable. When SpoIIIE protein transports DNA, the length of DNA changes. The length change can be calculated according to the displacement of the trapped bead, which is detected by quadrant photodiode. When SpoIIIE transports DNA, DNA is shortened by up to about 500nm, then as the translocation stops, the DNA returns to its normal length, and this process repeats time and time again. The most probable speed that SpoIIIE transports DNA is 710nm/s.

  4. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC 6 (3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC 6 (3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC 6 (3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC 6 (3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics

  5. Real-time identification of the singleness of a trapped bead in optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunguang; Su, Chenguang; Yun, Zelin; Wang, Sirong; He, Chengzhi; Gao, Xiaoqing; Li, Shuai; Li, Hongbin; Hu, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaotang

    2018-02-10

    Beads trapped in optical tweezers are aligned along the optical propagation direction, which makes it difficult to determine the number of beads with bright-field microscopy. This problem also dramatically influences the measurement of the optical trapping based single-molecule force spectroscopy. Here, we propose a video processing approach to count the number of trapped micro-objects in real time. The approach uses a normalized cross-correlation algorithm and image enhancement techniques to amplify a slight change of the image induced by the entry of an exotic object. As tested, this method introduces a ∼10% change per bead to the image similarity, and up to four beads, one-by-one falling into the trap, are identified. Moreover, the feasibility of the above analysis in a moving trap is investigated. A movement of the trap leads to a fluctuation of less than 2% for the similarity signal and can be ignored in most cases. The experimental results prove that image similarity measurement is a sensitive way to monitor the interruption, which is very useful, especially during experiments. In addition, the approach is easy to apply to an existing optical tweezers system.

  6. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M.; Ritort, F.

    2013-01-01

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  7. Counter-propagating dual-trap optical tweezers based on linear momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Huguet, J. M. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ritort, F. [Small Biosystems Lab, Dept. de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ciber-BBN de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    We present a dual-trap optical tweezers setup which directly measures forces using linear momentum conservation. The setup uses a counter-propagating geometry, which allows momentum measurement on each beam separately. The experimental advantages of this setup include low drift due to all-optical manipulation, and a robust calibration (independent of the features of the trapped object or buffer medium) due to the force measurement method. Although this design does not attain the high-resolution of some co-propagating setups, we show that it can be used to perform different single molecule measurements: fluctuation-based molecular stiffness characterization at different forces and hopping experiments on molecular hairpins. Remarkably, in our setup it is possible to manipulate very short tethers (such as molecular hairpins with short handles) down to the limit where beads are almost in contact. The setup is used to illustrate a novel method for measuring the stiffness of optical traps and tethers on the basis of equilibrium force fluctuations, i.e., without the need of measuring the force vs molecular extension curve. This method is of general interest for dual trap optical tweezers setups and can be extended to setups which do not directly measure forces.

  8. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  9. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Valentine, Megan T

    2012-05-01

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to ∼4.5 μm paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as ∼1 kPa.

  10. High-force NdFeB-based magnetic tweezers device optimized for microrheology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Jun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Biomolecular Science and Engineering Program, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Valentine, Megan T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present the design, calibration, and testing of a magnetic tweezers device that employs two pairs of permanent neodymium iron boron magnets surrounded by low-carbon steel focusing tips to apply large forces to soft materials for microrheology experiments. Our design enables the application of forces in the range of 1-1800 pN to {approx}4.5 {mu}m paramagnetic beads using magnet-bead separations in the range of 0.3-20 mm. This allows the use of standard coverslips and sample geometries. A high speed camera, custom LED-based illumination scheme, and mechanically stabilized measurement platform are employed to enable the measurement of materials with viscoelastic moduli as high as {approx}1 kPa.

  11. Stretching single DNA molecules to demonstrate high-force capabilities of holographic optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Arnau; van der Horst, Astrid; Blab, Gerhard A; Downing, Benjamin P B; Forde, Nancy R

    2010-04-01

    The well calibrated force-extension behaviour of single double-stranded DNA molecules was used as a standard to investigate the performance of phase-only holographic optical tweezers at high forces. Specifically, the characteristic overstretch transition at 65 pN was found to appear where expected, demonstrating (1) that holographic optical trap calibration using thermal fluctuation methods is valid to high forces; (2) that the holographic optical traps are harmonic out to >250 nm of 2.1 mum particle displacement; and (3) that temporal modulations in traps induced by the spatial light modulator (SLM) do not affect the ability of optical traps to hold and steer particles against high forces. These studies demonstrate a new high-force capability for holographic optical traps achievable by SLM technologies. ((c) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  12. Micro-particle manipulation by single beam acoustic tweezers based on hydrothermal PZT thick film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Benpeng; Xu, Jiong; Yang, Xiaofei; Li, Ying; Lee, Changyang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Tian; Xiong, Ke; Shiiba, Michihisa; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Single-beam acoustic tweezers (SBAT), used in laboratory-on-a-chip (LOC) device has promising implications for an individual micro-particle contactless manipulation. In this study, a freestanding hydrothermal PZT thick film with excellent piezoelectric property (d 33 = 270 pC/N and k t = 0.51) was employed for SBAT applications and a press-focusing technology was introduced. The obtained SBAT, acting at an operational frequency of 50 MHz, a low f-number (∼0.9), demonstrated the capability to trap and manipulate a micro-particle sized 10μm in the distilled water. These results suggest that such a device has great potential as a manipulator for a wide range of biomedical and chemical science applications.

  13. 3D Manipulation of Protein Microcrystals with Optical Tweezers for X-ray Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikima, T; Hashimoto, K; Murakami, H; Ueno, G; Kawano, Y; Hirata, K; Hasegawa, K; Kumasaka, T; Yamamoto, M

    2013-01-01

    In some synchrotron facilities such as SPring-8, X-ray microbeams have been utilized for protein crystallography, allowing users to collect diffraction data from a protein microcrystal. Usually, a protein crystal is picked up manually from a crystallization droplet. However it is very difficult to manipulate the protein microcrystals which are very small and fragile against a shock and changes of temperature and solvent condition. We have been developing an automatic system applying the optical tweezers with two lensed fiber probes to manipulate the fragile protein microcrystal. The system succeeded in trapping a crystal and levitating it onto the cryoloop in the solvent. X-ray diffraction measurement for the manipulated protein microcrystals indicated that laser irradiation and trap with 1064nm wavelength hardly affected the result of X-ray structural analysis.

  14. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; N Milstein, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices. (paper)

  15. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  16. Rapid feedback control and stabilization of an optical tweezers with a budget microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, Daniel; Wang, Haowei; Milstein, Joshua N.

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories ranging the scientific disciplines employ feedback control to regulate variables within their experiments, from the flow of liquids within a microfluidic device to the temperature within a cell incubator. We have built an inexpensive, yet fast and rapidly deployed, feedback control system that is straightforward and flexible to implement from a commercially available Arduino Due microcontroller. This is in comparison with the complex, time-consuming and often expensive electronics that are commonly implemented. As an example of its utility, we apply our feedback controller to the task of stabilizing the main trapping laser of an optical tweezers. The feedback controller, which is inexpensive yet fast and rapidly deployed, was implemented from hacking an open source Arduino Due microcontroller. Our microcontroller based feedback system can stabilize the laser intensity to a few tenths of a per cent at 200 kHz, which is an order of magnitude better than the laser's base specifications, illustrating the utility of these devices.

  17. Real-time observation of ultrafast electron injection at graphene–Zn porphyrin interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Masih, Dilshad

    2015-02-25

    We report on the ultrafast interfacial electron transfer ( ET) between zinc( II) porphyrin ( ZnTMPyP) and negatively charged graphene carboxylate ( GC) using state- of- the- art femtosecond laser spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The steady- state interaction between GC and ZnTMPyP results in a red- shifted absorption spectrum, providing a clear indication for the binding affinity between ZnTMPyP and GC via electrostatic and p- p stacking interactions. Ultrafast transient absorption ( TA) spectra in the absence and presence of three different GC concentrations reveal ( i) the ultrafast formation of singlet excited ZnTMPyP*, which partially relaxes into a long- lived triplet state, and ( ii) ET from the singlet excited ZnTMPyP* to GC, forming ZnTMPyP + and GC , as indicated by a spectral feature at 650- 750 nm, which is attributed to a ZnTMPyP radical cation resulting from the ET process.

  18. Portable magnetic tweezers device enables visualization of the three-dimensional microscale deformation of soft biological materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yali; Lin, Jun; Meschewski, Ryan; Watson, Erin; Valentine, Megan T

    2011-07-01

    We have designed and built a magnetic tweezers device that enables the application of calibrated stresses to soft materials while simultaneously measuring their microscale deformation using confocal microscopy. Unlike previous magnetic tweezers designs, our device is entirely portable, allowing easy use on microscopes in core imaging facilities or in collaborators' laboratories. The imaging capabilities of the microscope are unimpaired, enabling the 3-D structures of fluorescently labeled materials to be precisely determined under applied load. With this device, we can apply a large range of forces (~1-1200 pN) over micron-scale contact areas to beads that are either embedded within 3-D matrices or attached to the surface of thin slab gels. To demonstrate the usefulness of this instrument, we have studied two important and biologically relevant materials: polyacrylamide-based hydrogel films typical of those used in cell traction force microscopy, and reconstituted networks of microtubules, essential cytoskeletal filaments.

  19. Holographic Raman tweezers controlled by multi-modal natural user interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomori, Zoltán; Keša, Peter; Nikorovič, Matej; Valušová, Eva; Antalík, Marián; Kaňka, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Holographic optical tweezers provide a contactless way to trap and manipulate several microobjects independently in space using focused laser beams. Although the methods of fast and efficient generation of optical traps are well developed, their user friendly control still lags behind. Even though several attempts have appeared recently to exploit touch tablets, 2D cameras, or Kinect game consoles, they have not yet reached the level of natural human interface. Here we demonstrate a multi-modal ‘natural user interface’ approach that combines finger and gaze tracking with gesture and speech recognition. This allows us to select objects with an operator’s gaze and voice, to trap the objects and control their positions via tracking of finger movement in space and to run semi-automatic procedures such as acquisition of Raman spectra from preselected objects. This approach takes advantage of the power of human processing of images together with smooth control of human fingertips and downscales these skills to control remotely the motion of microobjects at microscale in a natural way for the human operator. (paper)

  20. Force measuring optical tweezers system for long time measurements of P pili stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Magnus; Fällman, Erik; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Axner, Ove

    2006-02-01

    A force-measuring optical tweezers instrumentation and long time measurements of the elongation and retraction of bacterial fimbriae from Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) under strain are presented. The instrumentation is presented in some detail. Special emphasis is given to measures taken to reduce the influence of noise and drifts in the system and from the surrounding, which makes long term force measurements possible. Individual P pili from UPEC bacteria were used as a biological model system for repetitive unfolding and refolding cycles of bacterial fimbriae under equilibrium conditions. P pili have evolved into a three-dimensional helix-like structure, the PapA rod, that can be successively and significantly elongated and/or unfolded when exposed to external forces. The instrumentation is used for characterization of the force-vs.-elongation response of the PapA rod of individual P pili, with emphasis on the long time stability of the forced unfolding and refolding of the helical structure of the PapA rod. The results show that the PapA rod is capable of withstanding extensive strain, leading to a complete unfolding of the helical structure, repetitive times during the life cycle of a bacterium without any noticeable alteration of the mechanical properties of the P pili. This function is believed to be importance for UPEC bacteria in vivo since it provides a close contact to a host cell (which is an initial step of invasion) despite urine cleaning attempts.

  1. Dynamic translocation of ligand-complexed DNA through solid-state nanopores with optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sischka, Andy; Spiering, Andre; Anselmetti, Dario; Khaksar, Maryam; Laxa, Miriam; Koenig, Janine; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the threading and controlled translocation of individual lambda-DNA (λ-DNA) molecules through solid-state nanopores with piconewton force sensitivity, millisecond time resolution and picoampere ionic current sensitivity with a set-up combining quantitative 3D optical tweezers (OT) with electrophysiology. With our virtually interference-free OT set-up the binding of RecA and single peroxiredoxin protein molecules to λ-DNA was quantitatively investigated during dynamic translocation experiments where effective forces and respective ionic currents of the threaded DNA molecule through the nanopore were measured during inward and outward sliding. Membrane voltage-dependent experiments of reversible single protein/DNA translocation scans yield hysteresis-free, asymmetric single-molecule fingerprints in the measured force and conductance signals that can be attributed to the interplay of optical trap and electrostatic nanopore potentials. These experiments allow an exact localization of the bound protein along the DNA strand and open fascinating applications for label-free detection of DNA-binding ligands, where structural and positional binding phenomena can be investigated at a single-molecule level.

  2. Trapping, manipulation and rapid rotation of NBD-C8 fluorescent single microcrystals in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GALAUP, Jean-Pierre; RODRIGUEZ-OTAZO, Mariela; AUGIER-CALDERIN, Angel; LAMERE; Jean-Francois; FERY-FORGUES, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We have built an optical tweezers experiment based on an inverted microscope to trap and manipulate single crystals of micro or sub-micrometer size made from fluorescent molecules of 4-octylamino-7-nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD-C8). These single crystals have parallelepiped shapes and exhibit birefringence properties evidenced through optical experiments between crossed polarizers in a polarizing microscope. The crystals are uniaxial with their optical axis oriented along their largest dimension. Trapped in the optical trap, the organic micro-crystals are oriented in such a way that their long axis is along the direction of the beam propagation, and their short axis follows the direction of the linear polarization. Therefore, with linearly polarized light, simply rotating the light polarization can orient the crystal. When using circularly or only elliptically polarized light, the crystal can spontaneously rotate and reach rotation speed of several hundreds of turns per second. A surprising result has been observed: when the incident power is growing up, the rotation speed increases to reach a maximum value and then decreases even when the power is still growing up. Moreover, this evolution is irreversible. Different possible explanations can be considered. The development of a 3D control of the crystals by dynamical holography using liquid crystal spatial modulators will be presented and discussed on the basis of the most recent results obtained. (Author)

  3. Determination of femto Newton forces and fluid viscosity using optical tweezers: application to Leishmania amazonensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes B., Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Marques, Gustavo P.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this research is to use the displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) as a force transducer in mechanical measurements in life sciences. To do this we compared the theoretical optical and hydrodynamic models with experimental data under a broad variation of parameters such as fluid viscosity, refractive index, drag velocity and wall proximities. The laser power was measured after the objective with an integration sphere because normal power meters do not provide an accurate measurement for beam with high numerical apertures. With this careful laser power determination the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under very different conditions shows an almost 45 degrees straight line. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces and vice-versa. With this calibration we observed the forces of polystyrene bead attached to the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. The force range is from 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons and these experiments shows that OT can be used for infection mechanism and chemotaxis studies in parasites. The other application was to use the optical force to measure viscosities of few microliters sample. Our result shows 5% accuracy measurements.

  4. Uncoiling mechanism of Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 pili measured by using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Jung; Chan, Chia-Han; Liu, Kuo-Liang; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You; Yew, Tri-Rung; Hsu, Ken Y.; Hsu, Long

    2007-09-01

    Pili are bacterial appendages that play many important roles in bacterial behaviors, physiology and interaction with hosts. Via pili, bacteria are able to adhere to, migrate onto, and colonize on host cells, mechanically. Different from the most studied type 1 and P type pili, which are rigid and thick with an average of 6~7 nm in diameter, type 3 pili are relatively tiny (3-5 nm in diameter) and flexible, and their biophysical properties remains unclear. By using optical tweezers, we found that the elongation processes of type 3 pili are divided into three phases: (1) elastic elongation, (2) uncoiling elongation, and (3) intrinsic elongation, separately. Besides, the uncoiling force of the recombinant pili displayed on the surface of E. coli [pmrkABCD V1F] is measured 20 pN in average stronger than that of E. coli [pmrkABCD V1]. This suggests that pilin MrkF is involved in determining the mechanical properties of the type 3 pili.

  5. Thermodynamic DNA Looping by a Two-Site Restriction Endonuclease Studied using Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmen, Gregory J.

    2005-03-01

    Many enzyme-DNA interactions involve multimeric protein complexes that bind at two distant sites such that the DNA is looped. An example is the type IIe restriction enzyme Sau3AI, which requires two recognition sites to cleave the DNA. Here we study this process at the single DNA level using force measuring optical tweezers. We characterize cleavage rates of single DNA molecules in the presence of Sau3AI as a function of enzyme concentration, incubation time, and the fractional extension of the DNA molecule. Activity is completely inhibited by tensions of a few picoNewtons. By replacing Mg^2+ with Ca^2+, the Sau3AI dimers form but do not cleave the DNA, thus trapping DNA loops. We are able to pull apart these loops, measuring the force needed and the length of DNA released for each. We also characterize the number and length distributions of these loops as a function of incubation time and DNA fractional extension. The results of these studies are discussed in the context of a Brownian dynamics model of DNA looping.

  6. Massive ordering and alignment of cylindrical micro-objects by photovoltaic optoelectronic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Iris; Muñoz-Martínez, Juan F; Barroso, Álvaro; Denz, Cornelia; Ramiro, José B; García-Cabañes, Angel; Agulló-López, Fernando; Carrascosa, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    Optical tools for manipulation and trapping of micro- and nano-objects are a fundamental issue for many applications in nano- and biotechnology. This work reports on the use of one such method, known as photovoltaic optoelectronics tweezers, to orientate and organize cylindrical microcrystals, specifically elongated zeolite L, on the surface of Fe-doped LiNbO 3 crystal plates. Patterns of aligned zeolites have been achieved through the forces and torques generated by the bulk photovoltaic effect. The alignment patterns with zeolites parallel or perpendicular to the substrate surface are highly dependent on the features of light distribution and crystal configuration. Moreover, dielectrophoretic chains of zeolites with lengths up to 100 μm have often been observed. The experimental results of zeolite trapping and alignment have been discussed and compared together with theoretical simulations of the evanescent photovoltaic electric field and the dielectrophoretic potential. They demonstrate the remarkable capabilities of the optoelectronic photovoltaic method to orientate and pattern anisotropic microcrystals. The combined action of patterning and alignment offers a unique tool to prepare functional nanostructures with potential applications in a variety of fields such as nonlinear optics or plasmonics.

  7. DNA condensation by TmHU studied by optical tweezers, AFM and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Carsten; Brutzer, Hergen; Salomo, Mathias; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Kremer, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    The compaction of DNA by the HU protein from Thermotoga maritima (TmHU) is analysed on a single-molecule level by the usage of an optical tweezers-assisted force clamp. The condensation reaction is investigated at forces between 2 and 40 pN applied to the ends of the DNA as well as in dependence on the TmHU concentration. At 2 and 5 pN, the DNA compaction down to 30% of the initial end-to-end distance takes place in two regimes. Increasing the force changes the progression of the reaction until almost nothing is observed at 40 pN. Based on the results of steered molecular dynamics simulations, the first regime of the length reduction is assigned to a primary level of DNA compaction by TmHU. The second one is supposed to correspond to the formation of higher levels of structural organisation. These findings are supported by results obtained by atomic force microscopy. PMID:22210966

  8. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented. (paper)

  9. Dynamic measurements and simulations of airborne picolitre-droplet coalescence in holographic optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bzdek, Bryan R.; Reid, Jonathan P.; Collard, Liam; Sprittles, James E.; Hudson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    We report studies of the coalescence of pairs of picolitre aerosol droplets manipulated with holographic optical tweezers, probing the shape relaxation dynamics following coalescence by simultaneously monitoring the intensity of elastic backscattered light (EBL) from the trapping laser beam (time resolution on the order of 100 ns) while recording high frame rate camera images (time resolution <10 μs). The goals of this work are to: resolve the dynamics of droplet coalescence in holographic optical traps; assign the origin of key features in the time-dependent EBL intensity; and validate the use of the EBL alone to precisely determine droplet surface tension and viscosity. For low viscosity droplets, two sequential processes are evident: binary coalescence first results from the overlap of the optical traps on the time scale of microseconds followed by the recapture of the composite droplet in an optical trap on the time scale of milliseconds. As droplet viscosity increases, the relaxation in droplet shape eventually occurs on the same time scale as recapture, resulting in a convoluted evolution of the EBL intensity that inhibits quantitative determination of the relaxation time scale. Droplet coalescence was simulated using a computational framework to validate both experimental approaches. The results indicate that time-dependent monitoring of droplet shape from the EBL intensity allows for robust determination of properties such as surface tension and viscosity. Finally, the potential of high frame rate imaging to examine the coalescence of dissimilar viscosity droplets is discussed.

  10. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: Amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørlykke, Simon F.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and + 1/n....... The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio...... of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self...

  11. AFM picking-up manipulation of the metaphase chromosome fragment by using the tweezers-type probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Saito, Masato; Shichiri, Motoharu; Sugiyama, Sigeru; Takamura, Yuzuru; Hashiguchi, Gen; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the development of a new procedure based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the analysis of metaphase chromosome. The aim of this study was to obtain detailed information about the specific locations of genes on the metaphase chromosome. In this research, we performed the manipulation of the metaphase chromosome by using novel AFM probes to obtain chromosome fragments of a smaller size than the ones obtained using the conventional methods, such as glass microneedles. We could pick up the fragment of the metaphase chromosome dissected by the knife-edged probe by using our tweezers-type probe

  12. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  13. Determination of fluid viscosity and femto Newton forces of Leishmania amazonensis using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adriana; Giorgio, Selma; de Castro, Archimedes, Jr.; Neto, Vivaldo M.; de Y. Pozzo, Liliana; de Thomaz, Andre A.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2005-08-01

    The displacements of a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers (OT) can be used as a force transducer for mechanical measurements in life sciences such as the measurement of forces of living microorganisms or the viscosity of local fluids. The technique we used allowed us to measure forces on the 200 femto Newtons to 4 pico Newtons range of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis, responsible for a serious tropical disease. These observations can be used to understand the infection mechanism and chemotaxis of these parasites. The same technique was used to measure viscosities of few microliters sample with agreement with known samples better than 5%. To calibrate the force as a function of the microsphere displacement we first dragged the microsphere in a fluid at known velocity for a broad range of different optical and hydrodynamical parameters. The hydrodynamical model took into account the presence of two walls and the force depends on drag velocity, fluid viscosity and walls proximities, while the optical model in the geometric optics regime depends on the particle and fluid refractive indexes and laser power. To measure the high numerical (NA) aperture laser beam power after the objective we used an integration sphere to avoid the systematic errors of usual power meters for high NA beams. After this careful laser power measurement we obtained an almost 45 degrees straight line for the plot of the optical force (calculated by the particle horizontal displacement) versus hydrodynamic force (calculated by the drag velocity) under variation of all the parameters described below. This means that hydrodynamic models can be used to calibrate optical forces, as we have done for the parasite force measurement, or vice-versa, as we did for the viscosity measurements.

  14. Supramolecular Properties of Triazole-containing Two Armed Peptidomimetics: From Organogelators to Nucleotide-binding Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Tin Ki

    obtain a clearer picture on the mode of association of these two series of branched peptidomimetics, the length of the tripeptidomimetic arms was truncated to a dipeptide, and the amino acid, valine, was used for further studies. Both the two new candidates, 88-K-V2 and 89-B-V2, were shown to dimerize in chloroform as shown from vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) studies. 1H NMR titration experiments indicated a better dimerization strength for the latter candidate due to the intermolecular pi-pi interactions offered by its benzene ring in addition to the intermolecular hydrogen bonding by the amides and triazole units. H/D exchange and 2D NMR experiments, and molecular modeling revealed that 88-K-V2 dimerized through the formation of antiparallel beta-strands whereas formation of parallel beta-strands took place in 89-B-V2. Compound 88-K-V2 was found to form 1:1 complexes with chloride (Ka 640 M-1) and monobasic diethyl phosphate (DEP) ion (Ka 810 M-1) in chloroform. Interestingly, 89-B-V 2 was shown to form the usual 1:1 complex with the former ion (Ka 970 M-1) while forming an unexpected 2:1 complex with the latter with positive cooperativity. It was observed that both the amides and triazole protons were involved in anion-binding. In the 88-K-V2-DEP complex, the host formed a helix-like structure that wrapped around the anion located at the center of the complex as determined by 2D NMR and molecular modeling studies. Finally, further structural modification of 88-K-V2 gave a water-soluble nucleotide-binding tweezer 93-K-R2·4TFA . This tweezer consisted of four arginines (R), two triazole units, two pyrene probes and a small hydrophilic ethanolamine tail. Fluorescence study showed that this tweezer was able to form 1:1 complexes with different nucleotides in water with similar binding strength regardless of the number of phosphate groups present in the nucleotides. Moleular modeling suggested that such a charge-independent binding behavior was due to the similar number

  15. Label-free detection of HIV-1 infected cells via integration of optical tweezers and photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugongolo, Masixole Yvonne; Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin; Noto, Luyanda Lunga; Maaza, Malik; Mthunzi-Kufa, Patience

    2018-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is currently detected using conventional qualitative and quantitative tests to determine the presence or absence of HIV in blood samples. However, the approach of these tests detects the presence of either viral antibodies or viral RNA that require labelling which may be costly, sophisticated and time consuming. A label-free approach of detecting the presence of HIV is therefore desirable. Of note optical tweezers can be coupled with other technologies including spectroscopy, which also investigates light-matter interactions. For example, coupling of optical tweezers with luminescence spectroscopy techniques has emerged as a powerful tool in biology for micro-manipulation, detection and analysis of individual cells. Integration of optical techniques has enabled studying biological particles in a label-free manner, whilst detecting functional groups and other essential molecules within mixed populations of cells. In the current study, an optical trapping system coupled to luminescence spectroscopy was utilised to detect the presence of HIV infection in TZM-bl cells in vitro. This was performed by infecting TZM-bl cells with the ZM53 HIV-1 pseudovirus, and incubating them for 48 hours prior analysis. The differences between infected and uninfected cells were thereafter displayed as shown by the spectrographs obtained. Combination of these two techniques has a potential in the field of infectious disease diagnostics.

  16. Single molecule measurements of DNA helicase activity with magnetic tweezers and t-test based step-finding analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Strub, Marie-Paule; Neuman, Keir C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile and easy to implement single-molecule technique that has become increasingly prevalent in the study of nucleic acid based molecular motors. Here, we provide a description of the magnetic tweezers instrument and guidelines for measuring and analyzing DNA helicase activity. Along with experimental methods, we describe a robust method of single-molecule trajectory analysis based on the Student’s t-test that accommodates continuous transitions in addition to the discrete transitions assumed in most widely employed analysis routines. To illustrate the single-molecule unwinding assay and the analysis routine, we provide DNA unwinding measurements of Escherichia coli RecQ helicase under a variety of conditions (Na+, ATP, temperature, and DNA substrate geometry). These examples reveal that DNA unwinding measurements under various conditions can aid in elucidating the unwinding mechanism of DNA helicase but also emphasize that environmental effects on DNA helicase activity must be considered in relation to in vivo activity and mechanism. PMID:27131595

  17. Single-Molecule Manipulation of Double-Stranded DNA Using Optical Tweezers: Interaction Studies of DNA with RecA and YOYO-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennink, Martin L.; Scharer, Orlando D.; Kanaar, Ronald; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Schins, J.M.; Kanger, Johannes S.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    By using optical tweezers and a specially designed flow cell with an integrated glass micropipette, we constructed a setup similar to that of Smith et al. (Science 271:795-799, 1996) in which an individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule can be captured between two polystyrene beads. The first

  18. Inhibition of Mutant αB Crystallin-Induced Protein Aggregation by a Molecular Tweezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Bitan, Gal; Schrader, Thomas; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Osinska, Hanna; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2017-08-08

    Compromised protein quality control causes the accumulation of misfolded proteins and intracellular aggregates, contributing to cardiac disease and heart failure. The development of therapeutics directed at proteotoxicity-based pathology in heart disease is just beginning. The molecular tweezer CLR01 is a broad-spectrum inhibitor of abnormal self-assembly of amyloidogenic proteins, including amyloid β-protein, tau, and α-synuclein. This small molecule interferes with aggregation by binding selectively to lysine side chains, changing the charge distribution of aggregation-prone proteins and thereby disrupting aggregate formation. However, the effects of CLR01 in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic stress have not been explored. Here we assess whether CLR01 can decrease cardiac protein aggregation catalyzed by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of mutated αB-crystallin (CryAB R 120G ). A proteotoxic model of desmin-related cardiomyopathy caused by cardiomyocyte-specific expression of CryAB R 120G was used to test the efficacy of CLR01 therapy in the heart. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were infected with adenovirus expressing either wild-type CryAB or CryAB R 120G . Subsequently, the cells were treated with different doses of CLR01 or a closely related but inactive derivative, CLR03. CLR01 decreased aggregate accumulation and attenuated cytotoxicity caused by CryAB R 120G expression in a dose-dependent manner, whereas CLR03 had no effect. Ubiquitin-proteasome system function was analyzed using a ubiquitin-proteasome system reporter protein consisting of a short degron, CL1, fused to the COOH-terminus of green fluorescent protein. CLR01 improved proteasomal function in CryAB R 120G cardiomyocytes but did not alter autophagic flux. In vivo, CLR01 administration also resulted in reduced protein aggregates in CryAB R 120G transgenic mice. CLR01 can inhibit CryAB R 120G aggregate formation and decrease cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes undergoing proteotoxic stress

  19. Molecular cleft or tweezer compounds derived from trioxabicyclo[3.3.1]nonadiene diisocyanate and diacid dichloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Kollenz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structures of two derivatives of the bisdioxine diisocyanate 1, the bisurea 4 and the biscarbamate 5, are established by X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations. These compounds possess endo,endo structures, in the case of the bisurea 4 with two nearly parallel pendant chains. The X-ray structures are reproduced very well by DFT calculations. Similar endo,endo conformations are calculated for the bisamide crown ether derivatives 7, where two proximate and nearly parallel crown ether units endow the molecules with a claw-like molecular cleft or tweezer structure as evidenced by an enhanced ability to extract some alkali, alkaline earth and rare earth metal ions.

  20. CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL OBJECTS BY MEANS OF FEMTOSECOND LASER OPTICAL TWEEZERS-SCALPEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Rakityansky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was developing of elements of the precise three-dimensional positioning technology of one or several micron and submicron size biological objects. Thereto a laboratory unit of hardware-software complex of optical femtosecond laser tweezers-scalpel was developed and constructed in the Joint institute for high temperatures RAS using material resources of Russia. Experimental data concerning a maximal manipulation speed of CHO and cells, produced from mammalian spinal ganglia (using protocols for producing pure culture of Schwann cells was received. Besides facts of interaction of laser radiation with intracellular structures that lead to unexpected behavior of cell in the zone of optical trap and change of maximal speed of cell manipulation were determined. 

  1. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods

  2. Using optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a single inflammatory cell--eosinophil stimulated by chemoattractants prepared from Toxocara Canis larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Po-Chen; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Ke-Min; Jen, Lin-Ni; Liu, Cheng-tzu; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Granulocytes are a group of white blood cells belonging to the innate immune system in human and in murine in which eosinophils play an important role in worm infection-induced inflammation. The migration of these cells is well characterized and has been separated into four steps: rolling, adhesion, transendothelial migration, and chemotaxis, however, the physical characteristics of the chemotactic force to eosinophils from worm component remain largely unknown. Note that optical tweezers are featured in the manipulation of a single cell and the measurement of biological forces. Therefore, we propose to use optical tweezers to examine the chemotactic force to a eosinophil from a T. canis lavae preparation in terms of distance during the migration of eosinophil.

  3. Synthesis and photoisomerization study of new aza-crown macrocyclic tweezer tethered through an azobenzene linker: The first report on supramolecular interaction of azobenzene moiety with C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Bahram; Mahdavian, Mahsa; García-Deibe, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    In the present communication, three bimacrocyclic tweezers linked through azobenzene moiety, Ln (n = 1-3) were synthesized in a multistep route and characterized by x-ray crystallography, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy as well as CHN microanalysis. UV-visible spectroscopy established that the irradiation of L1 and L3 with UV light promoted the trans to cis isomerization. Irradiating the reaction mixtures with Hg lamp, significant supramolecular interactions between L1 and L3 with C60 were also found in terms of the association constants calculated by UV-visible spectroscopy, denoting on more pronounced interaction with C60 that in the absence of UV light. The molecular structures of L1-L3 calculated by using DFT method suggested a novel unprecedented interaction between the HOMO's of azobenzene moiety on the tweezer instead of the aromatic groups with C60.

  4. tweezercalib 2.1: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2006-10-01

    New version program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier:ADTV_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV_v2_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 134 188 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 050 368 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MatLab (Mathworks Inc.), standard license Computer:General computer running MatLab (Mathworks Inc.) Operating system:Windows2000, Windows-XP, Linux RAM:Of order four times the size of the data file Classification:3, 4.14, 18, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADTV_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 518 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: yes Nature of problem:Calibrate optical tweezers with precision by fitting theory to experimental power spectrum of position of bead doing Brownian motion in incompressible fluid, possibly near microscope cover slip, while trapped in optical tweezers. Thereby determine spring constant of optical trap and conversion factor for arbitrary-units-to-nanometers for detection system. The theoretical underpinnings of the procedure may be found in Ref. [3]. Solution method:Elimination of cross-talk between quadrant photo-diodes, output channels for positions (optional). Check that distribution of recorded positions agrees with Boltzmann distribution of bead in harmonic trap. Data compression and noise reduction by blocking method applied to power spectrum. Full accounting for hydrodynamic effects; Frequency-dependent drag force and interaction with nearby cover slip (optional). Full accounting for electronic filters (optional), for "virtual filtering" caused by detection system (optional). Full accounting for aliasing caused by finite sampling rate (optional). Standard non-linear least-squares fitting with custom written

  5. Developing a New Biophysical Tool to Combine Magneto-Optical Tweezers with Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokun Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel experimental setup in which magnetic and optical tweezers are combined for torque and force transduction onto single filamentous molecules in a transverse configuration to allow simultaneous mechanical measurement and manipulation. Previously we have developed a super-resolution imaging module which, in conjunction with advanced imaging techniques such as Blinking assisted Localisation Microscopy (BaLM, achieves localisation precision of single fluorescent dye molecules bound to DNA of ~30 nm along the contour of the molecule; our work here describes developments in producing a system which combines tweezing and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The instrument also features an acousto-optic deflector that temporally divides the laser beam to form multiple traps for high throughput statistics collection. Our motivation for developing the new tool is to enable direct observation of detailed molecular topological transformation and protein binding event localisation in a stretching/twisting mechanical assay that previously could hitherto only be deduced indirectly from the end-to-end length variation of DNA. Our approach is simple and robust enough for reproduction in the lab without the requirement of precise hardware engineering, yet is capable of unveiling the elastic and dynamic properties of filamentous molecules that have been hidden using traditional tools.

  6. Interactions between the breast cancer-associated MUC1 mucins and C-type lectin characterized by optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soosan Hadjialirezaei

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-protein interactions govern many crucial processes in biological systems including cell recognition events. We have used the sensitive force probe optical tweezers to quantify the interactions occurring between MGL lectins and MUC1 carrying the cancer-associated glycan antigens mucins Tn and STn. Unbinding forces of 7.6 pN and 7.1 pN were determined for the MUC1(Tn-MGL and MUC1(STn-MGL interactions, at a force loading rate of ~40 pN/s. The interaction strength increased with increasing force loading rate, to 27 and 37 pN at a force loading rate of ~ 310 pN/s. No interactions were detected between MGL and MUC1(ST, a glycoform of MUC1 also expressed by breast carcinoma cells. Interestingly, this glycan (ST can be found on proteins expressed by normal cells, although in this case not on MUC1. Additionally, GalNAc decorated polyethylene glycol displayed similar rupture forces as observed for MUC1(Tn and MUC1(STn when forced to unbind from MGL, indicating that GalNAc is an essential group in these interactions. Since the STn glycan decoration is more frequently found on the surface of carcinomas than the Tn glycan, the binding of MUC1 carrying STn to MGL may be more physiologically relevant and may be in part responsible for some of the characteristics of STn expressing tumours.

  7. Signatures of Nucleotide Analog Incorporation by an RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Revealed Using High-Throughput Magnetic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dulin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses pose a threat to public health that is exacerbated by the dearth of antiviral therapeutics. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp holds promise as a broad-spectrum, therapeutic target because of the conserved nature of the nucleotide-substrate-binding and catalytic sites. Conventional, quantitative, kinetic analysis of antiviral ribonucleotides monitors one or a few incorporation events. Here, we use a high-throughput magnetic tweezers platform to monitor the elongation dynamics of a prototypical RdRp over thousands of nucleotide-addition cycles in the absence and presence of a suite of nucleotide analog inhibitors. We observe multiple RdRp-RNA elongation complexes; only a subset of which are competent for analog utilization. Incorporation of a pyrazine-carboxamide nucleotide analog, T-1106, leads to RdRp backtracking. This analysis reveals a mechanism of action for this antiviral ribonucleotide that is corroborated by cellular studies. We propose that induced backtracking represents a distinct mechanistic class of antiviral ribonucleotides.

  8. Dual-mode optical fiber-based tweezers for robust trapping and manipulation of absorbing particles in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Souvik; Kanti Saha, Tushar; Kumar, Avinash; Bera, Sudipta K.; Banerjee, Ayan

    2017-12-01

    We develop an optical tweezers system using a single dual-mode optical fiber where mesoscopic absorbing particles can be trapped in three dimensions and manipulated employing photophoretic forces. We generate a superposition of fundamental and first order Hermite-Gaussian beam modes by the simple innovation of coupling a laser into a commercial optical fiber designed to be single mode for a wavelength higher than that of the laser. We achieve robust trapping of the absorbing particles for hours using both the pure fundamental and superposition mode beams and attain large manipulation velocities of ˜5 mm s-1 in the axial direction and ˜0.75 mm s-1 in the radial direction. We then demonstrate that the superposition mode is more effective in trapping and manipulation compared to the fundamental mode by around 80%, which may be increased several times by the use of a pure first order Hermite-Gaussian mode. The work has promising implications for trapping and spectroscopy of aerosols in air using simple optical fiber-based traps.

  9. Optical tweezers studies of viral DNA packaging: Motor function and DNA confinement in Bacteriophages phi29, lambda, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas

    2007-03-01

    In the assembly of many viruses a powerful molecular motor translocates the genome into a pre-assembled capsid. We use optical tweezers to directly measure translocation of a single DNA molecule into the viral capsid. Improved techniques allow us to measure initiation and early stages of packaging. With phi29 the DNA terminal protein was found to cause large variations in the starting point of packaging. Removal of this protein results in terminal initiation, permitting more accurate assessment of motor function and DNA confinement forces. We investigated the role of electrostatic repulsion by varying ionic screening of the DNA. The observed trends are in accord with those theoretically expected considering counter-ion competition; however the forces are larger than expected in comparison with recent theories and DNA ejection measurements. We have recently succeeded in extending our methods to study two other phages: lambda and T4. These systems have unique structural and functional features, presenting an opportunity for comparative studies in this family of molecular motors. Initial measurements show that lambda and T4 translocate DNA several times faster than the phi29 motor, but are more sensitive to applied load.

  10. Observing dynamics of chromatin fibers in Xenopus egg extracts by single DNA manipulation using a transverse magnetic tweezer setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie; Skoko, Dunja; Marko, John; Maresca, Tom; Heald, Rebecca

    2005-03-01

    We have studied assembly of chromatin on single DNAs using Xenopus egg extracts and a specially designed magnetic tweezer setup which generates controlled force in the focal plane of the objective, allowing us to visualize and measure DNA extension under a wide range of constant tensions. We found, in the absence of ATP, interphase extracts assembled nucleosomes against DNA tensions of up to 3.5 piconewtons (pN). We observed force-induced disassembly and opening-closing fluctuations indicating our experiments were in mechano-chemical equilibrium. We found that the ATP-depleted reaction can do mechanical work of 27 kcal/mol per nucleosome, providing a measurement of the free energy difference between core histone octamers on and off DNA. Addition of ATP leads to highly dynamic behavior: time courses show processive runs of assembly and disassembly of not observed in the -ATP case, with forces of 2 pN leading to nearly complete fiber disassembly. Our study shows that ATP hydrolysis plays a major role in nucleosome rearrangement and removal, and suggests that chromatin in vivo may be subject to continual assembly and disassembly.

  11. Two-point active microrheology in a viscous medium exploiting a motional resonance excited in dual-trap optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shuvojit; Kumar, Randhir; Banerjee, Ayan

    2018-04-01

    Two-point microrheology measurements from widely separated colloidal particles approach the bulk viscosity of the host medium more reliably than corresponding single-point measurements. In addition, active microrheology offers the advantage of enhanced signal to noise over passive techniques. Recently, we reported the observation of a motional resonance induced in a probe particle in dual-trap optical tweezers when the control particle was driven externally [Paul et al., Phys. Rev. E 96, 050102(R) (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevE.96.050102]. We now demonstrate that the amplitude and phase characteristics of the motional resonance can be used as a sensitive tool for active two-point microrheology to measure the viscosity of a viscous fluid. Thus, we measure the viscosity of viscous liquids from both the amplitude and phase response of the resonance, and demonstrate that the zero crossing of the phase response of the probe particle with respect to the external drive is superior compared to the amplitude response in measuring viscosity at large particle separations. We compare our viscosity measurements with those using a commercial rheometer and obtain an agreement ˜1 % . The method can be extended to viscoelastic material where the frequency dependence of the resonance may provide further accuracy for active microrheological measurements.

  12. A polypeptide-DNA hybrid with selective linking capability applied to single molecule nano-mechanical measurements using optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Moayed

    Full Text Available Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an efficient, rapid and specific manner, based on the recently developed linkage between the protein StrepTactin (STN and the peptide StrepTag II (ST. We introduce a two-step approach, in which we first construct a hybrid between DNA and a tandem of two STs peptides (tST. In a second step, this hybrid is linked to polystyrene bead surfaces and Maltose Binding Protein (MBP using STN. Furthermore, we show the STN-tST linkage is more stable against forces applied by optical tweezers than the commonly used biotin-Streptavidin (STV linkage. It can be used in conjunction with Neutravidin (NTV-biotin linkages to form DNA tethers that can sustain applied forces above 65 pN for tens of minutes in a quarter of the cases. The method is general and can be applied to construct other surface-DNA and protein-DNA hybrids. The reversibility, high mechanical stability and specificity provided by this linking procedure make it highly suitable for single molecule mechanical studies, as well as biosensing and lab on chip applications.

  13. Fast characterisation of cell-derived extracellular vesicles by nanoparticles tracking analysis, cryo-electron microscopy, and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irène Tatischeff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The joint use of 3 complementary techniques, namely, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA, cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy (RTM, is proposed for a rapid characterisation of extracellular vesicles (EVs of various origins. NTA is valuable for studying the size distribution and concentration, Cryo-EM is outstanding for the morphological characterisation, including observation of vesicle heterogeneity, while RTM provides the global chemical composition without using any exogenous label. The capabilities of this approach are evaluated on the example of cell-derived vesicles of Dictyostelium discoideum, a convenient general model for eukaryotic EVs. At least 2 separate species differing in chemical composition (relative amounts of DNA, lipids and proteins, presence of carotenoids were found for each of the 2 physiological states of this non-pathogenic microorganism, that is, cell growth and starvation-induced aggregation. These findings demonstrate the specific potency of RTM. In addition, the first Raman spectra of human urinary exosomes are reported, presumably constituting the primary step towards Raman characterisation of EVs for the purpose of human diseases diagnoses.

  14. Disrupting self-assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic protein oligomers by "molecular tweezers" - from the test tube to animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Aida; Bitan, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, therapy for diseases caused by abnormal protein folding and aggregation (amyloidoses) is limited to treatment of symptoms and provides only temporary and moderate relief to sufferers. The failure in developing successful disease-modifying drugs for amyloidoses stems from the nature of the targets for such drugs - primarily oligomers of amyloidogenic proteins, which are distinct from traditional targets, such as enzymes or receptors. The oligomers are metastable, do not have well-defined structures, and exist in dynamically changing mixtures. Therefore, inhibiting the formation and toxicity of these oligomers likely will require out-of-the-box thinking and novel strategies. We review here the development of a strategy based on targeting the combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are key to the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins using lysine (K)-specific "molecular tweezers" (MTs). Our discussion includes a survey of the literature demonstrating the important role of K residues in the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins and the development of a lead MT derivative called CLR01, from an inhibitor of protein aggregation in vitro to a drug candidate showing effective amelioration of disease symptoms in animal models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  15. Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in standing and quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F.G.

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the exact acoustic scattering from a sphere immersed in an ideal fluid and centered along the propagation axis of a standing or quasi-standing zero-order Bessel beam, explicit partial-wave representations for the radiation force are derived. A standing or a quasi-standing acoustic field is the result of propagating two equal or unequal amplitude zero-order Bessel beams, respectively, along the same axis but in opposite sense. The Bessel beam is characterized by the half-cone angle β of its plane wave components, such that β = 0 represents a plane wave. It is assumed here that the half-cone angle β for each of the counter-propagating acoustic Bessel beams is equal. Fluid, elastic and viscoelastic spheres immersed in water are treated as examples. Results indicate the capability of manipulating spherical targets based on their mechanical and acoustical properties. This condition provides an impetus for further designing acoustic tweezers operating with standing or quasi-standing Bessel acoustic waves. Potential applications include particle manipulation in micro-fluidic lab-on-chips as well as in reduced gravity environments

  16. The study of adhesive forces between the type-3 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae and collagen-coated surfaces by using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chiahan; Fan, Chia-chieh; Huang, Ying-Jung; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Long, Hsu

    2004-10-01

    Adherence to host cells by a bacterial pathogen is a critical step for establishment of infection. It will contribute greatly to the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis by studying the biological force between a single pair of pathogen and host cell. In our experiment, we use a calibrated optical tweezers system to detach a single Klebsiella pneumoniae, the pathogen, from collagen, the host. By gradually increasing the laser power of the optical tweezers until the Klebsiella pneumoniae is detached from the collagen, we obtain the magnitude of the adhesive force between them. This happens when the adhesive force is barely equal to the trapping force provided by the optical tweezers at that specific laser power. This study is important because Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen which causes suppurative lesions, urinary and respiratory tract infections. It has been proved that type 3 fimbrial adhesin (mrkD) is strongly associated with the adherence of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Besides, four polymorphic mrkD alleles: namely, mrkDv1, v2, v3, and v4, are typed by using RFLP. In order to investigate the relationship between the structure and the function for each of these variants, DNA fragments encoding the major fimbrial proteins mrkA, mrkB, mrkC are expressed together with any of the four mrkD adhesins in E. coli JM109. Our study shows that the E. coli strain carrying the mrkDv3 fimbriae has the strongest binding activity. This suggests that mrkDv3 is a key factor that enhances the adherence of Klebsiella Pneumoniae to human body.

  17. Power spectrum analysis with least-squares fitting: amplitude bias and its elimination, with application to optical tweezers and atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørrelykke, Simon F; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-07-01

    Optical tweezers and atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers are often calibrated by fitting their experimental power spectra of Brownian motion. We demonstrate here that if this is done with typical weighted least-squares methods, the result is a bias of relative size between -2/n and +1/n on the value of the fitted diffusion coefficient. Here, n is the number of power spectra averaged over, so typical calibrations contain 10%-20% bias. Both the sign and the size of the bias depend on the weighting scheme applied. Hence, so do length-scale calibrations based on the diffusion coefficient. The fitted value for the characteristic frequency is not affected by this bias. For the AFM then, force measurements are not affected provided an independent length-scale calibration is available. For optical tweezers there is no such luck, since the spring constant is found as the ratio of the characteristic frequency and the diffusion coefficient. We give analytical results for the weight-dependent bias for the wide class of systems whose dynamics is described by a linear (integro)differential equation with additive noise, white or colored. Examples are optical tweezers with hydrodynamic self-interaction and aliasing, calibration of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models in finance, models for cell migration in biology, etc. Because the bias takes the form of a simple multiplicative factor on the fitted amplitude (e.g. the diffusion coefficient), it is straightforward to remove and the user will need minimal modifications to his or her favorite least-squares fitting programs. Results are demonstrated and illustrated using synthetic data, so we can compare fits with known true values. We also fit some commonly occurring power spectra once-and-for-all in the sense that we give their parameter values and associated error bars as explicit functions of experimental power-spectral values.

  18. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Ming [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuarn-Jang [Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Ting [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chien-Ting [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Jing-Shin [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chien-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  19. Leishmania amazonensis chemotaxis under glucose gradient studied by the strength and directionality of forces measured with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Ayres, Diana Copi; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2007-02-01

    Chemotaxis is the mechanism microorganisms use to sense the environment surrounding them and to direct their movement towards attractive, or away from the repellent, chemicals. The biochemical sensing is almost the only way for communication between unicellular organisms. Prokaryote and Eukaryote chemotaxis has been mechanically studied mainly by observing the directionality and timing of the microorganisms movements subjected to a chemical gradient, but not through the directionality and strength of the forces it generates. To observe the vector force of microorganisms under a chemical gradient we developed a system composed of two large chambers connected by a tiny duct capable to keep the chemical gradient constant for more than ten hours. We also used the displacements of a microsphere trapped in an Optical Tweezers as the force transducer to measure the direction and the strength of the propulsion forces of flagellum of the microorganism under several gradient conditions. A 9μm diameter microsphere particle was trapped with a Nd:YAG laser and its movement was measured through the light scattered focused on a quadrant detector. We observed the behavior of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis (eukaryote) under several glucose gradients. This protozoa senses the gradient around it by swimming in circles for three to five times following by tumbling, and not by the typical straight swimming/tumbling of bacteria. Our results also suggest that force direction and strength are also used to control its movement, not only the timing of swimming/tumbling, because we observed a higher force strength clearly directed towards the glucose gradient.

  20. Construction of Discrete Pentanuclear Platinum(II) Stacks with Extended Metal-Metal Interactions by Using Phosphorescent Platinum(II) Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fred Ka-Wai; Chan, Alan Kwun-Wa; Ng, Maggie; Low, Kam-Hung; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2017-11-20

    Discrete pentanuclear Pt II stacks were prepared by the host-guest adduct formation between multinuclear tweezer-type Pt II complexes. The formation of the Pt II stacks in solution was accompanied by color changes and the turning on of near-infrared emission resulting from Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt and π-π interactions. The X-ray crystal structure revealed the formation of a discrete 1:1 adduct, in which a linear stack of five Pt II centers with extended Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt interactions was observed. Additional binding affinity and stability have been achieved through a multinuclear host-guest system. The binding behaviors can be fine-tuned by varying the spacer between the two Pt II moieties in the guests. This work provides important insights for the construction of discrete higher-order supramolecular metal-ligand aggregates using a tweezer-directed approach. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobegalov, Georgii, E-mail: george.pobegalov@nanobio.spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Baitin, Dmitrii [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Khodorkovskii, Mikhail [Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, Saint-Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. - Highlights: • We investigate Deinococcus radiodurans RecA interactions with long double-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. • At physiological pH D. radiodurans RecA forms nucleoprotein filaments significantly faster relative to Escherichia coli RecA. • D. radiodurans RecA-dsDNA nucleoprotein filaments are more flexible and slightly shorter compared to those of E. coli RecA.

  2. Studies of viral DNA packaging motors with optical tweezers: a comparison of motor function in bacteriophages φ29, λ, and T4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas E.; Fuller, Derek N.; Raymer, Dorian M.; Rickgauer, Peter; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Anderson, Dwight L.; Catalano, Carlos E.; Kottadiel, Vishal; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2007-09-01

    A key step in the assembly of many viruses is the packaging of double-stranded DNA into a viral procapsid (an empty protein shell) by the action of an ATP-powered portal motor complex. We have developed methods to measure the packaging of single DNA molecules into single viral proheads in real time using optical tweezers. We can measure DNA binding and initiation of translocation, the DNA translocation dynamics, and the filling of the capsid against resisting forces. In addition to studying bacteriophage φ29, we have recently extended these methods to study the E. coli bacteriophages λ and T4, two important model systems in molecular biology. The three systems have different capsid sizes/shapes, genome lengths, and biochemical and structural differences in their packaging motors. Here, we compare and contrast these three systems. We find that all three motors translocate DNA processively and generate very large forces, each exceeding 50 piconewtons, ~20x higher force than generated by the skeletal muscle myosin 2 motor. This high force generation is required to overcome the forces resisting the confinement of the stiff, highly charged DNA at high density within the viral capsids. However, there are also striking differences between the three motors: they exhibit different DNA translocation rates, degrees of static and dynamic disorder, responses to load, and pausing and slipping dynamics.

  3. Comparison of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation as energy sources for mammalian sperm motility, using the combination of fluorescence imaging, laser tweezers, and real-time automated tracking and trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Shi, Linda Z; Tam, James; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Durrant, Barbara; Botvinick, Elliot L; Berns, Michael W

    2008-12-01

    The combination of laser tweezers, fluorescent imaging, and real-time automated tracking and trapping (RATTS) can measure sperm swimming speed and swimming force simultaneously with mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). This approach is used to study the roles of two sources of ATP in sperm motility: oxidative phosphorylation, which occurs in the mitochondria located in the sperm midpiece and glycolysis, which occurs along the length of the sperm tail (flagellum). The relationships between (a) swimming speed and MMP and (b) swimming force and MMP are studied in dog and human sperm. The effects of glucose, oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors and glycolytic inhibitors on human sperm motility are examined. The results indicate that oxidative phosphorylation does contribute some ATP for human sperm motility, but not enough to sustain high motility. The glycolytic pathway is shown to be a primary source of energy for human sperm motility.

  4. Magnetic tweezers for DNA micromanipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Charbel; Wirtz, Denis

    2000-12-01

    We detail the design of an electromagnetic assembly capable of generating a constant magnetic field superimposed to a large magnetic field gradient (between 40 and 100 T/m), which was uniform over a large gap (between 1.5 and 2 cm). Large gaps allowed the use of wide high numerical-aperture lenses to track microspheres attached to DNA molecules with an inverted light microscope. Given the geometric constraints of the microscope, computer-aided design was used to optimize the magnetic field gradient linearity, homogeneity, and amplitude, as well as the arrangement of the magnetic coils, the currents, and the mechanical stability of the assembly. The assembly was used to apply forces of controlled amplitude, direction, and time dependence on superparamagnetic microspheres by using magnetic coils instead of permanent magnets. A streptavidin-coated microsphere was attached to the 3' end of a λ-phage DNA molecule through a single biotin molecule. The 5' end of the λ-phage DNA molecule was tethered to a glass coverslip by conjugating the DNA's overhang to a complementary 12 base-pair primer, which was itself cross-linked to a heterobifunctional group placed on the glass coverslip. By tracking the centroid of this microsphere, the mechanical response of a single λ-phage DNA molecule was measured as a function of the applied magnetic force. The resulting force-extension curve was fitted with the worm-like-chain model to obtain λ-phage DNA's persistence length and contour length, which were in agreement with previous reports.

  5. Synthesis, structure, and properties of a series of chiral tweezer-diamine complexes consisting of an achiral zinc(II) bisporphyrin host and chiral diamine guest: induction and rationalization of supramolecular chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanfaori; Ikbal, Sk Asif; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2014-01-06

    We report here the synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic properties of a series of supramolecular chiral 1:1 tweezer-diamine complexes consisting of an achiral Zn(II) bisporphyrin (Zn2DPO) host and five different chiral diamine guests, namely, (R)-diaminopropane (DAP), (1S,2S)-diaminocyclohexane (CHDA), (S)-phenylpropane diamine (PPDA), (S)-phenyl ethylenediamine (PEDA), and (1R,2R)-diphenylethylene diamine (DPEA). The solid-state structures are preserved in solution, as reflected in their (1)H NMR spectra, which also revealed the remarkably large upfield shifts of the NH2 guest protons with the order Zn2DPO·DAP > Zn2DPO·CHDA > Zn2DPO·PPDA> Zn2DPO·PEDA ≫ Zn2DPO·DPEA, which happens to be the order of binding constants of the respective diamines with Zn2DPO. As the bulk of the substituent at the chiral center of the guest ligand increases, the Zn-Nax distance of the tweezer-diamine complex also increases, which eventually lowers the binding of the guest ligand toward the host. Also, the angle between the two porphyrin rings gradually increases with increasing bulk of the guest in order to accommodate the guest within the bisporphyrin cavity with minimal steric clash. The notably high amplitude bisignate CD signal response by Zn2DPO·DAP, Zn2DPO·CHDA, and Zn2DPO·PPDA can be ascribed to the complex's high stability and the formation of a unidirectional screw as observed in the X-ray structures of the complexes. A relatively lower value of CD amplitude shown by Zn2DPO·PEDA is due to the lower stability of the complex. The projection of the diamine binding sites of the chiral guest would make the two porphyrin macrocycles oriented in either a clockwise or anticlockwise direction in order to minimize host-guest steric clash. In sharp contrast, Zn2DPO·DPEA shows a very low amplitude bisignate CD signal due to the presence of both left- (dictated by the pre-existing chirality of (1R,2R)-DPEA) and right-handed screws (dictated by the steric differentiation at

  6. 'Lissajous-like' trajectories in optical tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hay, R. F.; Gibson, G. M.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Padgett, M. J.; Phillips, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 25 (2015), s. 31716-31727 ISSN 1094-4087 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : low Reynolds number * particles * force Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2015

  7. Nanohole optical tweezers in heterogeneous mixture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Noa; Ip, Candice J. X.; Laxminarayana, Gurunatha K.; DeWolf, Timothy S.; Gordon, Reuven

    2017-08-01

    Nanohole optical trapping is a tool that has been shown to analyze proteins at the single molecule level using pure samples. The next step is to detect and study single molecules with dirty samples. We demonstrate that using our double nanohole optical tweezing configuration, single particles in an egg white solution can be classified when trapped. Different sized molecules provide different signal variations in their trapped state, allowing the proteins to be statistically characterized. Root mean squared variation and trap stiffness are methods used on trapped signals to distinguish between the different proteins. This method to isolate and determine single molecules in heterogeneous samples provides huge potential to become a reliable tool for use within biomedical and scientific communities.

  8. Microrheology with optical tweezers: data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassieri, Manlio; Warren, Rebecca L; Cooper, Jonathan M; Evans, R M L; Bailey, Nicholas J

    2012-01-01

    We present a data analysis procedure that provides the solution to a long-standing issue in microrheology studies, i.e. the evaluation of the fluids' linear viscoelastic properties from the analysis of a finite set of experimental data, describing (for instance) the time-dependent mean-square displacement of suspended probe particles experiencing Brownian fluctuations. We report, for the first time in the literature, the linear viscoelastic response of an optically trapped bead suspended in a Newtonian fluid, over the entire range of experimentally accessible frequencies. The general validity of the proposed method makes it transferable to the majority of microrheology and rheology techniques. (paper)

  9. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus ... Double-stranded DNA having contour length greater ... Indeed, single-mole- cule studies have shown that low ionic strength increases the persistence length of DNA (Baumann et al 1997). The polymeric and highly ...

  10. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In this work, we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) solutions using passive, laser-scattering based particle-tracking methodology. From power spectral analysis, ...

  12. MAGNETIC TWEEZERS FOR THE STUDY OF DNA TRACKING MOTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosas, Maria; Meglio, Adrien; Spiering, Michelle M.; Ding, Fangyuan; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Barre, François-Xavier; Saleh, Omar A.; Allemand, Jean François; Bensimon, David; Croquette, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation methods have opened a new vista on the study of molecular motors. Here we describe the use of magnetic traps for the investigation of the mechanism of DNA based motors, in particular helicases and translocases. PMID:20627163

  13. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...... as one of the workhorses of biophysical research. There exists a variety of implementations of optical traps, from simple single traps to complex multiple traps with engineered three-dimensional light fields. In comparison to single beam optical traps, multiple beam optical traps offer more freedom...

  14. Calixarene-based metalloporphyrins: molecular tweezers for complexation of DABCO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dudič, M.; Lhoták, P.; Petříčková, H.; Stibor, I.; Lang, Kamil; Sýkora, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 14 (2003), s. 2409-2415 ISSN 0040-4020 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0926; GA ČR GA203/01/0634 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921; CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : porphyrins * calixarenes * DABCO Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.641, year: 2003

  15. Measuring microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    McLaren, MG

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available in the laboratory Rotation of birefringent calcite particles by the transfer of spin angular momentum rad/s 0.0957.1 ±=ω Nm104.0 105.7 2121 −− ×±×=τ Transfer of orbital angular momentum with a vortex beam of order ℓ = 1 Nm100.2102.1 2020 −− ×±×=τ rad/s 09...

  16. Virtual Environment for Manipulating Microscopic Particles With Optical Tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Gu; Lyons, Kevin W.; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, virtual reality techniques are used to define an intuitive interface to a nanoscale manipulation device. This device utilizes optical methods to focus laser light to trap and reposition nano-to-microscopic particles. The underlying physics are simulated by the use of Lagrange mechanics. A unique control method for the manipulation of the particles is also provided. The user can naturally grab and steer the particles. Behind the scene, a complex computation is performed to find ...

  17. Microrheology of concentrated DNA solutions using optical tweezers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Semiflexible biopolymers play a vital role in shaping cellular structure and rigidity. In this work, we report the determination of microrheological properties of concentrated, double-stranded calf thymus. DNA (CT-DNA) solutions using passive, laser-scattering based particle-tracking methodology. From power.

  18. Scanning Probe Optical Tweezers: a new tool to study DNA-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisstede, J.H.G.

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the work described in this thesis is to construct a microscope in which OT and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are combined, to be able to localize proteins while simultaneously controlling the tension within the DNA molecule. This apparatus enables the study of the effect of

  19. Controlling acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic heptagonal tweezers with application to cell manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernassau, A L; Glynne-Jones, P; Gesellchen, F; Riehle, M; Hill, M; Cumming, D R S

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force has been demonstrated as a method for manipulating micron-scale particles, but is frequently affected by unwanted streaming. In this paper the streaming in a multi-transducer quasi-standing wave acoustic particle manipulation device is assessed, and found to be dominated by a form of Eckart streaming. The experimentally observed streaming takes the form of two main vortices that have their highest velocity in the region where the standing wave is established. A finite element model is developed that agrees well with experimental results, and shows that the Reynolds stresses that give rise to the fluid motion are strongest in the high velocity region. A technical solution to reduce the streaming is explored that entails the introduction of a biocompatible agar gel layer at the bottom of the chamber so as to reduce the fluid depth and volume. By this means, we reduce the region of fluid that experiences the Reynolds stresses; the viscous drag per unit volume of fluid is also increased. Particle Image Velocimetry data is used to observe the streaming as a function of agar-modified cavity depth. It was found that, in an optimised structure, Eckart streaming could be reduced to negligible levels so that we could make a sonotweezers device with a large working area of up to 13 mm × 13 mm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [6]Helicene as a novel molecular tweezer for the univalent silver cation: Experimental and theoretical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klepetářová, B.; Makrlík, E.; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Böhm, S.; Vaňura, P.; Storch, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1097, Oct 5 (2015), s. 124-128 ISSN 0022-2860 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-21409P; GA ČR GAP207/10/1124; GA TA ČR TA01010646; GA MPO FR-TI3/628 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : univalent silver cation * [6]helicene * cation-pi interaction * structures Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.780, year: 2015

  1. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we report on the effect of addition of silver nanoparticles on bacterial cultures of Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We observe a decrease in the bacterial activity with time for the investigated bacterial samples. This method in our opinion, enables one to track changes in bacterial activity ...

  2. Non-spherical gold nanoparticles trapped in optical tweezers: Shape matters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2015), s. 8179-8189 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16195S; GA TA ČR TE01020233; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : discrete-dipole approximation * anisotropic particles * plasmon-resonance * gaussian beams * microparticles * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2015

  3. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping of a Plasmonic Nanoparticle using Low Numerical Aperture Optical Tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Chvátal, Lukáš; Karásek, Vítězslav; Paták, Aleš; Pokorná, Zuzana; Mika, Filip; Zemánek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, JAN 29 (2015), 08106:1-9 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : discrete-dipole approximation * gold nanoparticles * radiation forces * spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  4. Raman tweezers in microfluidic systems for analysis and sorting of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilát, Zdenëk; Ježek, Jan; Kaňka, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    We have devised an analytical and sorting system combining optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy in microfluidic environment in order to identify and sort biological objects, such as living cells of various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Our main objective was to create a robust and universal platform for non-contact sorting of microobjects based on their Raman spectral properties. This approach allowed us to collect information about the chemical composition of the objects, such as the presence and composition of lipids, proteins, or nucleic acids without using artificial chemical probes such as fluorescent markers. The non-destructive and non-contact nature of this optical analysis and manipulation allowed us to separate individual living cells of our interest in a sterile environment and provided the possibility to cultivate the selected cells for further experiments. We used differently treated cells of algae to test and demonstrate the function of our analytical and sorting system. The devised system could find its use in many medical, biotechnological, and biological applications.

  5. Force generation in dividing E. coli cells : A handles-on approach using optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Gertjan Sebastiaan

    2008-01-01

    In bacteria, what ‘drives’ the process of cell division is unknown. Possibly, forces generated by an internal protein ring (termed ‘the Z-ring’) are responsible for the division process, but direct evidence is lacking. Here we describe the development of a method to measure forces in a single

  6. Marangoni effect visualized in two-dimensions Optical tweezers for gas bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniewicz, A.; Bartkiewicz, S.; Orlikowska, H.; Dradrach, K.

    2016-10-01

    In the report we demonstrate how, using laser light, effectively trap gas bubbles and transport them through a liquid phase to a desired destination by shifting the laser beam position. The physics underlying the effect is complex but quite general as it comes from the limited to two-dimension, well-known, Marangoni effect. The experimental microscope-based system consists of a thin layer of liquid placed between two glass plates containing a dye dissolved in a solvent and a laser light beam that is strongly absorbed by the dye. This point-like heat source locally changes surface tension of nearby liquid-air interface. Because of temperature gradients a photo-triggered Marangoni flows are induced leading to self-amplification of the effect and formation of large-scale whirls. The interface is bending toward beam position allowing formation of a gas bubble upon suitable beam steering. Using various techniques (employing luminescent particles or liquid crystals), we visualize liquid flows propelled by the tangential to interface forces. This helped us to understand the physics of the phenomenon and analyze accompanying effects leading to gas bubble trapping. The manipulation of sessile droplets moving on the glass surface induced via controlled with laser light interface bending (i.e. “droplet catapult”) is demonstrated as well.

  7. Nanostructure-enhanced laser tweezers for efficient trapping and alignment of particles

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Benjamin K.; Mentele, Tim; Bachar, Stephanie; Knouf, Emily; Bendoraite, Ausra; Tewari, Muneesh; Pun, Suzie H.; Lin, Lih Y.

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a purely optical approach to trap and align particles using the interaction of polarized light with periodic nanostructures to generate enhanced trapping force. With a weakly focused laser beam, we observed efficient trapping and transportation of polystyrene beads with sizes ranging from 10 μm down to 190 nm as well as cancer cell nuclei. In addition, alignment of non-spherical dielectric particles to a 1-D periodic nanostructure was achieved with low laser intensi...

  8. Direct measurement of the nonconservative force field generated by optical tweezers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wu, P.; Huang, R.; Tischer, Ch.; Jonáš, Alexandr; Florin, E. L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 10 (2009), 108101:1-4 ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : manipulation * molecules * particles * equality * trap Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 7.328, year: 2009

  9. In situ single-atom array synthesis using dynamic holographic optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Lee, Woojun; Lee, Han-gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Song, Yunheung; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a reliable method to form scalable neutral-atom platforms is an essential cornerstone for quantum computation, quantum simulation and quantum many-body physics. Here we demonstrate a real-time transport of single atoms using holographic microtraps controlled by a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. For this, an analytical design approach to flicker-free microtrap movement is devised and cold rubidium atoms are simultaneously rearranged with 2N motional degrees of freedom, representing unprecedented space controllability. We also accomplish an in situ feedback control for single-atom rearrangements with the high success rate of 99% for up to 10 μm translation. We hope this proof-of-principle demonstration of high-fidelity atom-array preparations will be useful for deterministic loading of N single atoms, especially on arbitrary lattice locations, and also for real-time qubit shuttling in high-dimensional quantum computing architectures. PMID:27796372

  10. Raman tweezers spectroscopy of live, single red and white blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseefhali Bankapur

    Full Text Available An optical trap has been combined with a Raman spectrometer to make high-resolution measurements of Raman spectra of optically-immobilized, single, live red (RBC and white blood cells (WBC under physiological conditions. Tightly-focused, near infrared wavelength light (1064 nm is utilized for trapping of single cells and 785 nm light is used for Raman excitation at low levels of incident power (few mW. Raman spectra of RBC recorded using this high-sensitivity, dual-wavelength apparatus has enabled identification of several additional lines; the hitherto-unreported lines originate purely from hemoglobin molecules. Raman spectra of single granulocytes and lymphocytes are interpreted on the basis of standard protein and nucleic acid vibrational spectroscopy data. The richness of the measured spectrum illustrates that Raman studies of live cells in suspension are more informative than conventional micro-Raman studies where the cells are chemically bound to a glass cover slip.

  11. Measurement of the atom number distribution in an optical tweezer using single-photon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrmanek, A.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Grangier, P.; Browaeys, A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate in this paper a method to reconstruct the atom number distribution of a cloud containing a few tens of cold atoms. The atoms are first loaded from a magneto-optical trap into a microscopic optical dipole trap and then released in a resonant light probe where they undergo a Brownian motion and scatter photons. We count the number of photon events detected on an image intensifier. Using the response of our detection system to a single atom as a calibration, we extract the atom number distribution when the trap is loaded with more than one atom. The atom number distribution is found to be compatible with a Poisson distribution.

  12. Studying effect of carrier fluid viscosity in magnetite based ferrofluids using optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitha, S.; Iyengar, Shruthi S.; Ananthamurthy, Sharath; Bhattacharya, Sarbari

    2018-02-01

    Ferrofluids with varying viscosities of carrier fluids have been prepared with magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation and characterized using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). They were found to be nearly spherical in shape with an almost uniform size of 13nm. The superparamagnetic nature of the water based ferrofluids at room temperature was established by SQUID magnetometry. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out to establish the size of the nanoparticle clusters in the ferrofluids synthesized. The results indicate an increase in cluster size with increase in carrier fluid viscosity. This is supported by results from Raman Spectroscopy. A further attempt to characterise these ferrofluids was made by studying the behaviour of well characterised non-magnetic micron sized probes that are optically trapped while suspended in the ferrofluid. An increase in carrier fluid viscosity results in a decrease in corner frequency when only the carrier fluid is used as the suspending medium. When the magnetic component is also present the corner frequency is higher than with just the carrier fluid. This relative increase happens at all laser powers at the trapping plane. This trend is also found to be independent of the size and material of the probe particle. Comparisons of various parameters that influence optical trapping lead us to believe that the enhancement could be due to a directed motion of the magnetic clusters in the presence of an optical trap.

  13. Characterization of hydrogel microstructure using laser tweezers particle tracking and confocal reflection imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlarchyk, M. A.; Botvinick, E. L.; Putnam, A. J.

    2010-05-01

    Hydrogels are commonly used as extracellular matrix mimetics for applications in tissue engineering and increasingly as cell culture platforms with which to study the influence of biophysical and biochemical cues on cell function in 3D. In recent years, a significant number of studies have focused on linking substrate mechanical properties to cell function using standard methodologies to characterize the bulk mechanical properties of the hydrogel substrates. However, current understanding of the correlations between the microstructural mechanical properties of hydrogels and cell function in 3D is poor, in part because of a lack of appropriate techniques. Here we have utilized a laser tracking system, based on passive optical microrheology instrumentation, to characterize the microstructure of viscoelastic fibrin clots. Trajectories and mean square displacements were observed as bioinert PEGylated (PEG: polyethylene glycol) microspheres (1, 2 or 4.7 µm in diameter) diffused within confined pores created by the protein phase of fibrin hydrogels. Complementary confocal reflection imaging revealed microstructures comprised of a highly heterogeneous fibrin network with a wide range of pore sizes. As the protein concentration of fibrin gels was increased, our quantitative laser tracking measurements showed a corresponding decrease in particle mean square displacements with greater resolution and sensitivity than conventional imaging techniques. This platform-independent method will enable a more complete understanding of how changes in substrate mechanical properties simultaneously influence other microenvironmental parameters in 3D cultures.

  14. Laser Tweezer Controlled Solid Immersion Lens for High Resolution Imaging in Microfluidic and Biological Samples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Birkbeck, Aaron L; Zlatanovic, Sanja; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Esener, Sadik C

    2005-01-01

    ...). Up to now, solid immersion lens imaging systems have relied upon cantilever-mounted SILs that are difficult to integrate into microfluidic systems and require an extra alignment step with external optics...

  15. Raman spectroscopy of single nanoparticles in a double-nanohole optical tweezer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Steven; Al Balushi, Ahmed A; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal was observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparticle isolation and manipulation with unique identification. (fast track communication)

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Single Nanoparticles in a Double-Nanohole Optical Tweezer System

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Steven; Balushi, Ahmed A. Al; Gordon, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    A double nanohole in a metal film was used to trap nanoparticles (20 nm diameter) and simultaneously record their Raman spectrum using the trapping laser as the excitation source. This allowed for the identification of characteristic Stokes lines for titania and polystyrene nanoparticles, showing the capability for material identification of nanoparticles once trapped. Increased Raman signal is observed for the trapping of multiple nanoparticles. This system combines the benefits of nanoparti...

  17. Metal-Cation Recognition in Water by a Tetrapyrazinoporphyrazine-Based Tweezer Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lochman, L.; Švec, J.; Roh, J.; Kirakci, Kaplan; Lang, Kamil; Zimčík, P.; Nováková, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 7 (2016), s. 2417-2426 ISSN 0947-6539 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : cations * crown compounds * fluorescent probes * phthalocyanines * sensors Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  18. Probing cytoplasmic organization and the actin cytoskeleton of plant cells with optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, T.; Honing, van der H.S.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    In interphase plant cells, the actin cytoskeleton is essential for intracellular transport and organization. To fully understand how the actin cytoskeleton functions as the structural basis for cytoplasmic organization, both molecular and physical aspects of the actin organization have to be

  19. Fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of motile sperm cells and CHO cells in an optical trap (laser tweezers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Karsten; Liu, Yagang; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Patrizio, Pasquale; Tadir, Yona; Sonek, Gregory J.; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-05-01

    We describe fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging studies of optically trapped single Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and motile human sperm cells. The NIR trapping beam was provided by a tunable, multimode continuous wave Ti:Sapphire laser. The beam was introduced into an inverted confocal laser scanning microscope. Fluorescence of cells in the single- beam gradient force optical trap was excited with a 488 nm microbeam (laser scanning microscopy) or with 365 nm radiation from a high- pressure mercury lamp. Modifications to NADH-attributed autofluorescence and Rhodamine- and Propidium Iodide-attributed xenofluorescence indicate a significant cell-damaging effect of 760 nm trapping beams. 760 nm effects produce a biological response comparable to UVA-induced oxidative stress and appear to be a consequence to two-photon absorption.

  20. Laser microtreatment for genetic manipulations and DNA diagnostics by a combination of microbeam and photonic tweezers (laser microbeam trap)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, Karl-Otto; Monajembashi, Shamci; Celeda, D.; Endlich, N.; Eickhoff, Holger; Hoyer, Carsten; Leitz, G.; Weber, Gerd; Scheef, J.; Rueterjans, H.

    1994-12-01

    Genomes of higher organisms are larger than one typically expects. For example, the DNA of a single human cell is almost two meters long, the DNA in the human body covers the distance Earth-Sun approximately 140 times. This is often not considered in typical molecular biological approaches for DNA diagnostics, where usually only DNA of the length of a gene is investigated. Also, one basic aspect of sequencing the human genome is not really solved: the problem how to prepare the huge amounts of DNA required. Approaches from biomedical optics combined with new developments in single molecule biotechnology may at least contribute some parts of the puzzle. A large genome can be partitioned into portions comprising approximately 1% of the whole DNA using a laser microbeam. The single DNA fragment can be amplified by the polymerase chain reaction in order to obtain a sufficient amount of molecules for conventional DNA diagnostics or for analysis by octanucleotide hybridization. When not amplified by biotechnological processes, the individual DNA molecule can be visualized in the light microscope and can be manipulated and dissected with the laser microbeam trap. The DNA probes obtained by single molecule biotechnology can be employed for fluorescence in situ introduced into plant cells and subcellular structures even when other techniques fail. Since the laser microbeam trap allows to work in the interior of a cell without opening it, subcellular structures can be manipulated. For example, in algae, such structures can be moved out of their original position and used to study intracellular viscosities.

  1. Inactivation of Spores of Bacillus Species by Wet Heat: Studies on Single Spores Using Laser Tweezers Taman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    13/2011 22.00 Keren K. Griffiths, Jingqiao Zhang, Ann E. Cowan, Ji Yu, Peter Setlow. Germination proteins in the inner membrane of dormant Bacillus...that this technique can be used to rapidly identify single airborne particles or bacteria collected on a slide and to monitor germination dynamics of...the environment of dipicolinic acid in the core of superdormant spores is different from that in dormant spores [J. Bacteriol., 191, 5584 (2009

  2. A Polypeptide-DNA Hybrid with Selective Linking Capability Applied to Single Molecule Nano-Mechanical Measurements Using Optical Tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moayed, F.; Mashaghi, A.; Tans, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Many applications in biosensing, biomaterial engineering and single molecule biophysics require multiple non-covalent linkages between DNA, protein molecules, and surfaces that are specific yet strong. Here, we present a novel method to join proteins and dsDNA molecule at their ends, in an

  3. Induction and Rationalization of Supramolecular Chirality in the Tweezer-Diamine Complexes: Insights from Experimental and DFT Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamija, Avinash; Ikbal, Sk Asif; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2016-12-19

    A series of supramolecular chiral 1:1 sandwich complexes (1 M ·L and 2 M ·L) consisting of diphenylether/ethane bridged metallobisporphyrin host (1 M and 2 M ; M: Zn/Mg) and chiral diamine guest (L) have been presented. The host-guest complexes are compared just upon changing the metal ion (Mg vs Zn) or the bridge (highly flexible ethane vs rigid diphenylether) keeping other factors similar. The factors that would influence the chirality induction process along with their contributions toward the sign and intensity of the CD couplet of the overall complex have been analyzed. Larger CD amplitude was observed in the host-guest complex with the more flexible ethane bridge as compared to the rigid diphenylether bridged one, irrespective of the metal ion used. Also, Zn complexes have displayed larger CD amplitude because of their stronger binding with the chiral diamines. A fairly linear dependence between the binding constant (K) and CD amplitude has been observed. Moreover, the amplitude of the CD couplet has been correlated with the relative steric bulk of the substituent at the stereogenic center: with increasing the bulk, CD intensity gradually increases. However, large increase of steric hindrance, after a threshold value, has diminished the intensity. The observation of a weak positive CD couplet between (1R,2R)-DPEA guest and Zn-bisporphyrin hosts indicates that the clockwise-twisted (steric-controlled) conformer is more populated as compared to the anticlockwise (chirality-controlled) one. In contrast, amplitude of the positive CD couplets is larger with Mg-bisporphyrin hosts, suggesting almost exclusive contribution of the clockwise-twisted conformer guided solely by sterics. DFT calculations support the experimental observations and have displayed the possible interconversion between clockwise and anticlockwise twisted conformers just upon changing the bulk of the substituent irrespective of the nature of chirality at the stereogenic center.

  4. Long-distance photoinitiated electron transfer through polyene molecular wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G.; Svec, W.A.; Kersey, K.M.; Cragg, D.E.; Minsek, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Long-chain polyenes can be used as molecular wires to facilitate electron transfer between a photo-excited donor and an acceptor in an artificial photosynthetic system. The authors present data here on two Zn-porphyrin-polyene-anthraquinone molecules possessing either 5 or 9 all trans double bonds between the donor and acceptor, 1 and 2. The center-to-center distances between the porphyrin and the quinone in these relatively rigid molecules are 25 angstrom for 1 and 35 angstrom for 2. Selective picosecond laser excitation of the Zn-porphyrin and 1 and 2 results in the very rapid transfer of an electron to the anthraquinone in <2 ps and 10 ps, respectively. The resultant radical ion pairs recombine with τ = 10 ps for 1 and τ = 25 ps for 2. The electron transfer rates remain remarkably rapid over these long distances. The involvement of polyene radical cations in the mechanism of the radical ion pair recombination reaction is clear from the transient absorption spectra of 1 and 2, which show strong absorbances in the near-infrared. The strong electronic coupling between the Zn-porphyrin n the anthraquinone provided by low-lying states of the polyene make it possible to transfer an electron rapidly over very long distances

  5. SU-G-TeP3-07: On the Development of Mechano-Biological Assessment of Leukemia Cells Using Optical Tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brost, E; Brooks, J; Piepenburg, J; Watanabe, Y; Hui, S [Therapeutic Radiology and Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Chakraborty, S; Das, T [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems Department of New Materials and Biosystems Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Green, A [Department of Physics, University of Saint Thomas, Saint Paul, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patients with BCR-ABL (Ph +ve) acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at very high risk of relapse and mortality. In line with the NIH mission to understand the physical and biological processes, we seek to report mechano-biological method to assessment and distinguish treated/untreated leukemia cells. Methods: BCR-ABL leukemia cell populations and silica microspheres were trapped in a 100x magnification optical trapping system (λ=660 nm, 70 mW). Light refracted through the trapped sample was collected in the back focal plane by a quadrant detector to measure the positions of individual cells. The sample was driven at a known frequency and amplitude with a flexure translation stage, and the target’s response was recorded. The measured response was calibrated using the known driving parameters, and information about cell movements due to mechano-biological effects was extracted. Two leukemia cell populations were tested: a control group and a group treated with 2 Gy. Results: The mechano-biological movements of 10 microspheres, control cells, and treated cells were tracked over a ∼30 minute window at 1 minute intervals. The microsphere population did not see significant change in mechano-biological movements over the testing interval and remained constant. The control cell population saw a two-fold rise in activity that peaked around 1200 seconds, then dropped off sharply. The treated cell population saw a two-fold rise in activity that peaked at 400 seconds, and dropped off slowly. Conclusion: The investigated technique allows for direct measurement the movements of a trapped object due to mechano-biological effects such as thermal and extracellular motion. When testing microspheres, the mechano-biological activity remained constant over time due to the lack of biological factors. In both the control and treated cell populations, the mechano-biological activity was increased, possibly due to mitochondrial activation. This extra activity decreased over time, possibly due to cellular damage from trapping radiation.

  6. Determination of the refractive index of insoluble organic extracts from atmospheric aerosol over the visible wavelength range using optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Shepherd

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical trapping combined with Mie spectroscopy is a new technique used to record the refractive index of insoluble organic material extracted from atmospheric aerosol samples over a wide wavelength range. The refractive index of the insoluble organic extracts was shown to follow a Cauchy equation between 460 and 700 nm for organic aerosol extracts collected from urban (London and remote (Antarctica locations. Cauchy coefficients for the remote sample were for the Austral summer and gave the Cauchy coefficients of A  =  1.467 and B  =  1000 nm2 with a real refractive index of 1.489 at a wavelength of 589 nm. Cauchy coefficients for the urban samples varied with season, with extracts collected during summer having Cauchy coefficients of A  =  1.465  ±  0.005 and B  =  4625  ±  1200 nm2 with a representative real refractive index of 1.478 at a wavelength of 589 nm, whilst samples extracted during autumn had larger Cauchy coefficients of A  =  1.505 and B  =  600 nm2 with a representative real refractive index of 1.522 at a wavelength of 589 nm. The refractive index of absorbing aerosol was also recorded. The absorption Ångström exponent was determined for woodsmoke and humic acid aerosol extract. Typical values of the Cauchy coefficient for the woodsmoke aerosol extract were A  =  1.541  ±  0.03 and B  =  14 800  ±  2900 nm2, resulting in a real refractive index of 1.584  ±  0.007 at a wavelength of 589 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent of 8.0. The measured values of refractive index compare well with previous monochromatic or very small wavelength range measurements of refractive index. In general, the real component of the refractive index increases from remote to urban to woodsmoke. A one-dimensional radiative-transfer calculation of the top-of-the-atmosphere albedo was applied to model an atmosphere containing a 3 km thick layer of aerosol comprising pure water, pure insoluble organic aerosol, or an aerosol consisting of an aqueous core with an insoluble organic shell. The calculation demonstrated that the top-of-the-atmosphere albedo increases by 0.01 to 0.04 for pure organic particles relative to water particles of the same size and that the top-of-the-atmosphere albedo increases by 0.03 for aqueous core-shell particles as volume fraction of the shell material increases to 25 %.

  7. A hybrid total internal reflection fluorescence and optical tweezers microscope to study cell adhesion and membrane protein dynamics of single living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder-van As, M.I.; Rieger, B.; Joosten, B.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Figdor, Carl; Kanger, Johannes S.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins plays an important role in cell–cell interactions. The onset of the interaction is typically not precisely controlled by current techniques, making especially difficult the visualization of early-stage dynamics. We have developed a novel method where

  8. Manipulation and Motion of Organelles and Single Molecules in Living Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Metzler, Ralf; Ritter, Christine M.

    2017-01-01

    used force spectroscopy techniques, namely optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy, are described in detail, and their strength and limitations related to in vivo experiments are discussed. Finally, recent exciting discoveries within the field of in vivo manipulation...

  9. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-13

    Feb 13, 2014 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 82; Issue 2. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using optoelectronic tweezers ... We report the development of an optoelectronic tweezers set-up which works by lightinduced dielectrophoresis mechanism to manipulate microparticles.

  10. Mindre inventar og personlige ejendele

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Hans Jørgen; Pedersen, Unn; Roesdahl, Else

    2014-01-01

    Groups of finds from Aggersborg: keys and locks, casket-hasps, ornamental mount and nail, combs, tweezers, bone pins and bodkins, gamin-pieces, pierced metatarsus, small axe-head, weight......Groups of finds from Aggersborg: keys and locks, casket-hasps, ornamental mount and nail, combs, tweezers, bone pins and bodkins, gamin-pieces, pierced metatarsus, small axe-head, weight...

  11. Direct observation of nanomechanical properties of chromatin in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Anthony H B; Krenn, Bea E; van Driel, Roel; Subramaniam, Vinod; Kanger, Johannes S

    Precise manipulation of nanometer-sized magnetic particles using magnetic tweezers has yielded insights into the rheology of the cell cytoplasm. We present first results using this approach to study the nanomechanics of the cell nucleus. Using a custom-designed micro-magnetic-tweezers instrument, we

  12. Entanglement of two ground state neutral atoms using Rydberg blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Browaeys, Antoine; Evellin, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report on our recent progress in trapping and manipulation of internal states of single neutral rubidium atoms in optical tweezers. We demonstrate the creation of an entangled state between two ground state atoms trapped in separate tweezers using the effect of Rydberg blockade. The quality...... of the entanglement is measured using global rotations of the internal states of both atoms....

  13. Intracellular manipulation of chromatin using magnetic nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanger, Johannes S; Subramaniam, Vinod; van Driel, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic tweezers are widely used for manipulating small magnetic beads inside the cell cytoplasm in order to gain insight into the structural and mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton. Here we discuss the use of magnetic tweezers for the study of nuclear architecture and the mechanical

  14. Light energy collection in a porphyrin-imide-corrole ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuciu, Adina I; Flamigni, Lucia; Voloshchuk, Roman; Gryko, Daniel T

    2013-05-01

    An assembly consisting of three units, that is, a meso-substituted corrole (C3), 1,8 naphthaleneimide (NIE), and a Zn porphyrin (ZnP), has been synthesized. NIE is connected to C3 through a 1,3-phenylene bridge and to the ZnP unit through a direct C-C bond. The convergent synthetic strategy includes the preparation of a trans-A2B-corrole possessing the imide unit, followed by Sonogashira coupling with a meso-substituted A3B-porphyrin. The photophysical processes in the resulting triad ZnP-NIE-C3 are examined and compared with those of the corresponding C3-NIE dyad and the constituent reference models C3, NIE, and ZnP. Excitation of the NIE unit in C3-NIE leads to a fast energy transfer of 98 % efficiency to C3 with a rate k(en) =7.5×10(10) s(-1), whereas excitation of the corrole unit leads to a reactivity of the excited state identical to that of the model C3, with a deactivation rate to the ground state k=2.5×10(8) s(-1). Energy transfer to C3 and to ZnP moieties follows excitation of NIE in the triad ZnP-NIE-C3. The rates are k(en) =7.5×10(10) s(-1) and k(en) =2.5×10(10) s(-1) for the sensitization of the C3 and ZnP unit, respectively. The light energy transferred from NIE to Zn porphyrin unit is ultimately funneled to the corrole component, which is the final recipient of the excitation energy absorbed by the different components of the array. The latter process occurs with a rate k(en) =3.4×10(9) s(-1) and 89 % efficiency. Energy transfer processes take place in all cases by a Förster (dipole-dipole) mechanism. The theory predicts quite satisfactorily the rate for the ZnP/C3 couple, where components are separated by about 23 Å, but results in calculated rates that are one to two orders of magnitude higher for the couples NIE/ZnP (D/A) and NIE/C3, which are separated by distances of about 14 and 10 Å, respectively. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Tick Talk: Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of tick-borne diseases. Use fine-tipped tweezers. Grab the tick close to the skin and gently ... D. Illustrator: Alan Defibaugh Attention Editors: Reprint our articles and illustrations in your own publication. Our material ...

  16. Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... remove an attached tick, use fine tweezers to grab the tick firmly by the head (or as ... 15, 2005) Last Updated: May 1, 2014 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: ...

  17. Nucleosome Assembly Dynamics Involve Spontaneous Fluctuations in the Handedness of Tetrasomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Lee, M.; Lipfert, J.; Lusser, A.; Dekker, C.; Dekker, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA wrapping around histone octamers generates nucleosomes, the basic compaction unit of eukaryotic chromatin. Nucleosome stability is carefully tuned to maintain DNA accessibility in transcription, replication, and repair. Using freely orbiting magnetic tweezers, which measure the twist and length

  18. Optimizing Light-Matter Interaction on the BioPhotonics Workstation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Tauro, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    The use of light for controlling objects led to the development of optical tweezers. Now, the applications have expanded into the creation of three-dimensional structures and the control of surface structures....

  19. Vector assembly of colloids on monolayer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yang, Shenyu; Tsang, Boyce; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve

    2017-06-01

    The key to spontaneous and directed assembly is to encode the desired assembly information to building blocks in a programmable and efficient way. In computer graphics, raster graphics encodes images on a single-pixel level, conferring fine details at the expense of large file sizes, whereas vector graphics encrypts shape information into vectors that allow small file sizes and operational transformations. Here, we adapt this raster/vector concept to a 2D colloidal system and realize `vector assembly' by manipulating particles on a colloidal monolayer substrate with optical tweezers. In contrast to raster assembly that assigns optical tweezers to each particle, vector assembly requires a minimal number of optical tweezers that allow operations like chain elongation and shortening. This vector approach enables simple uniform particles to form a vast collection of colloidal arenes and colloidenes, the spontaneous dissociation of which is achieved with precision and stage-by-stage complexity by simply removing the optical tweezers.

  20. Functionalisation of the hinge region in receptor molecules for explosive detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C

    2003-01-01

    The functionalisation of the hinge region in a molecular tweezer molecule showing a strong binding to explosives is presented. Two versatile functional groups are introduced, a carboxylic acid and a bromine atom. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......The functionalisation of the hinge region in a molecular tweezer molecule showing a strong binding to explosives is presented. Two versatile functional groups are introduced, a carboxylic acid and a bromine atom. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Using DNA looping to measure sequence dependent DNA elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandinov, Alan; Raghunathan, Krishnan; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2012-10-01

    We are using tethered particle motion (TPM) microscopy to observe protein-mediated DNA looping in the lactose repressor system in DNA constructs with varying AT / CG content. We use these data to determine the persistence length of the DNA as a function of its sequence content and compare the data to direct micromechanical measurements with constant-force axial optical tweezers. The data from the TPM experiments show a much smaller sequence effect on the persistence length than the optical tweezers experiments.

  2. Interaction of ZnII porphyrin with TiO2 nanoparticles: from mechanism to synthesis of hybrid nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Méthivier, Christophe; Landoulsi, Jessem; Pradier, Claire-Marie

    2013-08-05

    The mechanism of interaction of Zn porphyrin (ZnPP) with TiO2 surfaces is investigated with a view to optimizing the synthesis of hybrid nanomaterials. The strategy consists of studying the adsorption of ZnPP on TiO2 flat surfaces by taking advantage of complementary surface characterization techniques. Combining a detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis with AFM imaging allows ZnPP-surface and ZnPP intermolecular interactions to be discriminated. Probing the adsorption of ZnPP on TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) reveals the dominant role of ZnPP-mediated interactions, which are associated with the formation of ZnPP multilayers and/or with the state of aggregation of NPs. These preliminary investigations provide a guideline to synthesizing a novel ZnPP-TiO2 hybrid nanomaterial in a one-step protocol. In this material, ZnPP molecules are presumably involved in the TiO2 lattice rather than on the NP surface. Furthermore, ZnPP molecules preserve their electronic properties within the TiO2 NPs, and this makes the ZnPP-TiO2 hybrid nanomaterial an excellent candidate for nanomedicine and related applications, such as localization of nanoparticles in cells and tissues or in photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The influence of the addition of dye surface modifier on the performance of transparent dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Erlyta Septa; Shobih, Retnaningsih, Lilis; Muliani, Lia; Hidayat, Jojo

    2017-11-01

    The light-harvesting properties and charge injection kinetics of dye molecules play a significant role to improve the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). Dyes based on metal complexes with ruthenium complexes also a variety of metal-organic dyes such as Zn-porphyrin derivatives have been used. The requirements for dye to function as a photosensitizer in DSSC are the absorption in the visible or near-infrared regions of the solar spectrum and the binding to the semiconductor TiO2. In order to interact with the TiO2 surface it is preferable that the dye has a functional group as anchoring group such as carboxylic or other peripheral acidic. The carboxylic group is the most frequently used anchoring group, as in ruthenium-complex based dyes. However, carboxylic acid as an anchoring group is still not enough for conducting in electron injection to TiO2. In this research, 0.87 mg phosphonic acid is added to N719 and Z907 ruthenium-complex based dyes, rspectively, as a surface modifier to strengthen the anchoring group. The addition of dyes surface modifier on the transparent DSSC device performance is investigated. Under illumination of 500 Wm-2, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSC using N719 ruthenium increases from 2.09 % to 3.22 % by the addition of surface modifier. However, different results are obtained on Z907 dye, where efficiency decreases from 2.02 % to 1.58 %.

  4. Piezoelectricity of chiral polymeric fiber and its application in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajitsu, Y

    2008-05-01

    Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), which is a type of chiral polymer, exhibits a high shear piezoelectric constant. To realize a higher shear piezoelectric constant, we spun PLLA resin into fibers. We succeeded in controlling the piezoelectric motion of a PLLA fiber by applying a dc voltage and ac voltage, similar to the control of a piezoelectric actuator. On the basis of this experimental result, we designed a catheter using a PLLA fiber (PLLA fiber catheter) and tweezers using a pair of PLLA fibers (PLLA fiber tweezers), controlled by adjusting the applied voltage. Then, using the PLLA fiber tweezers or catheter, we successfully picked up and removed small samples, such as a thrombosis in a blood vessel.

  5. Micro-grippers for assembly of LIGA parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.; Polosky, M.; Christenson, T.; Spletzer, B.; Simon, R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes ongoing testing of two microgrippers for assembly of LIGA (Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung) parts. The goal is to place 100 micron outside diameter (OD) LIGA gears with a 50 micron inner diameter hole onto pins ranging from 35 to 49 microns. The first micro gripper is a vacuum gripper made of a 100 micron OD stainless steel tube. The second micro gripper is a set of tweezers fabricated using the LIGA process. Nickel, Permalloy, and copper materials are tested. The tweezers are actuated by a collet mechanism which is closed by a DC linear motor.

  6. Acoustic patterning for 3D embedded electrically conductive wire in stereolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, Doruk Erdem; Sohrabi, Salman; He, Ran; Liu, Yaling; Shi, Wentao

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we reported a new approach for particle assembly with acoustic tweezers during three-dimensional (3D) printing, for the fabrication of embedded conductive wires with 3D structures. A hexagon shaped acoustic tweezer was incorporated with a digital light processing based stereolithography printer to pattern conductive lines via aligning and condensing conductive nanoparticles. The effect of filler content on electrical resistivity and pattern thickness were studied for copper, magnetite nanoparticles, and carbon nanofiber reinforced nanocomposite samples. The obtained data was later used to produce examples of conductive 3D microstructures and embedded electronic components by using the suggested method. (paper)

  7. Acoustic patterning for 3D embedded electrically conductive wire in stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem Yunus, Doruk; Sohrabi, Salman; He, Ran; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we reported a new approach for particle assembly with acoustic tweezers during three-dimensional (3D) printing, for the fabrication of embedded conductive wires with 3D structures. A hexagon shaped acoustic tweezer was incorporated with a digital light processing based stereolithography printer to pattern conductive lines via aligning and condensing conductive nanoparticles. The effect of filler content on electrical resistivity and pattern thickness were studied for copper, magnetite nanoparticles, and carbon nanofiber reinforced nanocomposite samples. The obtained data was later used to produce examples of conductive 3D microstructures and embedded electronic components by using the suggested method.

  8. N -annulated perylene as an efficient electron donor for porphyrin-based dyes: Enhanced light-harvesting ability and high-efficiency Co(II/III)-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Jie

    2014-01-08

    Porphyrin-based dyes recently have become good candidates for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). However, the bottleneck is how to further improve their light-harvesting ability. In this work, N-annulated perylene (NP) was used to functionalize the Zn-porphyrin, and four "push-pull"-type NP-substituted and fused porphyrin dyes with intense absorption in the visible and even in the near-infrared (NIR) region were synthesized. Co(II/III)-based DSC device characterizations revealed that dyes WW-5 and WW-6, in which an ethynylene spacer is incorporated between the NP and porphyrin core, showed pantochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency action spectra in the visible and NIR region, with a further red-shift of about 90 and 60 nm, respectively, compared to the benchmark molecule YD2-o-C8. As a result, the short-circuit current density was largely increased, and the devices displayed power conversion efficiencies as high as 10.3% and 10.5%, respectively, which is comparable to that of the YD2-o-C8 cell (η = 10.5%) under the same conditions. On the other hand, the dye WW-3 in which the NP unit is directly attached to the porphyrin core showed a moderate power conversion efficiency (η = 5.6%) due to the inefficient π-conjugation, and the NP-fused dye WW-4 exhibited even poorer performance due to its low-lying LUMO energy level and nondisjointed HOMO/LUMO profile. Our detailed physical measurements (optical and electrochemical), density functional theory calculations, and photovoltaic characterizations disclosed that the energy level alignment, the molecular orbital profile, and dye aggregation all played very important roles on the interface electron transfer and charge recombination kinetics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  9. Dualism of Sensitivity and Selectivity of Porphyrin Dimers in Electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisak, Grzegorz; Tamaki, Takashi; Ogawa, Takuji

    2017-04-04

    This work uncovers the application of porphyrin dimers for the use in electroanalysis, such as potentiometric determination of ions. It also puts in question a current perception of an occurrence of the super-Nernstian response, as a result of the possible dimerization of single porphyrins within an ion-selective membrane. To study that, four various porphyrin dimers were used as ionophores, namely, freebase-freebase, Zn-Zn, Zn-freebase, and freebase-Zn. Since the Zn-freebase and freebase-Zn porphyrin dimers carried both anion- and cation-sensitive porphyrin units, their application in ISEs was utilized in both anion- and cation-sensitive sensors. With respect to the lipophilic salt added, both porphyrins dimers were found anion- and cation-sensitive. This allowed using a single molecule as novel type of versatile ionophore (anion- and cation-selective), simply by varying the membrane composition. All anion-sensitive sensors were perchlorate-sensitive, while the cation-selective sensors were silver-sensitive. The selectivity of the sensors depended primarily on the porphyrin dimers in the ion-selective membrane. Furthermore, the selectivity of cation-sensitive dimer based sensors was found significantly superior to the ones measured for the single porphyrin unit based sensors (precursors of the porphyrin dimers). Thus, the dimerization of single porphyrins may actually be a factor to increase or modulate porphyrin selectivity. Moreover, in the case of cation-sensitive sensors, the selectivity vastly depended on the order of porphyrin units in the dimer. This opens a new approach of regulating and adjusting sensitivity and selectivity of the sensor through the application of complex porphyrin systems with more than one porphyrin units with mix sensitive porphyrins.

  10. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shankar Ghosh

    2006-11-12

    Nov 12, 2006 ... Introduction. WATER. Strong distortion of motion of the sphere at high frequencies. GLYCEROL. Motion of the sphere is sinusoidal and monochromatic. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical tweezer based study ...

  11. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. M K Rabinal. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 35 Issue 4 August 2012 pp 529-532. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles · Yogesha Sarbari Bhattacharya M K Rabinal Sharath Ananthamurthy · More Details Abstract ...

  12. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 34 Issue 7 December 2011 pp 1699-1706. Corrosion resistant Zn–Co alloy coatings deposited using saw-tooth current pulse · S Yogesha A Chitharanjan Hegde ... An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles · Yogesha Sarbari Bhattacharya M K Rabinal Sharath Ananthamurthy.

  13. Golgi apparatus: finally mechanics comes to play in the secretory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Gustavo; Serra-Peinado, Carla

    2014-08-18

    New findings report a mechanical role for actin in Golgi organization and vesicular trafficking. An elegant study uses optical tweezers and live-cell imaging to demonstrate the effects of a mechanical constraint on the dynamics of secretory membrane trafficking, combining physical experimental approaches with in cellulo studies of endomembranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. PRF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    271 from centrifuge tube with tweezer and placed on a sterile gauze piece. Figure 2: (a) Blood drawn into the tube without anticoagulant, (b) Blood centrifuged for 15 min at. 3000rpm, (c) Pliers inserted into the tube to gently grab the fibrin clot with attached. RBC's, (d) platelet rich fibrin. Figure 3: Different layer in centrifuged ...

  15. Rotation, oscillation and hydrodynamic synchronization of optically trapped oblate spheroidal microparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arzola, Alejandro V.; Jákl, Petr; Chvátal, Lukáš; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 13 (2014), s. 16207-1621 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12018 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : orbital angular-momentum * lineary polarized-light * ellipsoidal molecules * microscopic particles * Gaussian beams * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  16. Calibration of the optical torque wrench

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaci, F.; Huang, Z.; Van Oene, M.; Dekker, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    The optical torque wrench is a laser trapping technique that expands the capability of standard optical tweezers to torque manipulation and measurement, using the laser linear polarization to orient tailored microscopic birefringent particles. The ability to measure torque of the order of kBT (?4 pN

  17. Fabrication of a cantilever-based microfluidic flow meter with nL min(-1) resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2011-01-01

    ). With this etch the cantilever structures are under-etched before they are released by tweezers and the release yield is enhanced from 41.5% to 84.0%. In a continuous flow mode, the deflection of the cantilevers is directly proportional to the flow rate. By tuning the design of the integrated grid (hole size...

  18. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2013-02-13

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  19. Sharath Ananthamurthy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 35 Issue 4 August 2012 pp 529-532. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles · Yogesha Sarbari Bhattacharya M K Rabinal Sharath Ananthamurthy · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Understanding and characterizing microbial activity reduction in the presence of antimicrobial ...

  20. Yogesha

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 35 Issue 4 August 2012 pp 529-532. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles · Yogesha Sarbari Bhattacharya M K Rabinal Sharath Ananthamurthy · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Understanding and characterizing microbial activity reduction in the presence of antimicrobial ...

  1. Photonic Torque Microscopy of the Nonconservative Force Field for Optically Trapped Silicon Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Irrera, A.; Maggazu, A.; Artoni, P.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Hanna, S.; Jones, P.H.; Priolo, F.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Marago, O.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 7 (2016), s. 4181-4188 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * silicon nanowires * nonequilibrium dynamics * Brownian motion Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  2. The supercoiling state of DNA determines the handedness of both H3 and CENP-A nucleosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijm, R.; Kim, S.H.; De Zwart, P. L.; Dalal, Y.; Dekker, C.

    2017-01-01

    Nucleosomes form the unit structure of the genome in eukaryotes, thereby constituting a fundamental tenet of chromatin biology. In canonical nucleosomes, DNA wraps around the histone octamer in a left-handed toroidal ramp. Here, in single-molecule magnetic tweezers studies of chaperone-assisted

  3. Modelling the spatial shape of nondiffracting beams: Experimental generation of Frozen Waves via computer generated holograms

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Tárcio A.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Gesualdi, Marcos R. R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we implement experimentally the spatial shape modelling of nondiffracting optical beams via computer generated holograms. The results reported here are the experimental confirmation of the so called Frozen Wave method, developed few years ago. Optical beams of this type can possess potential applications in optical tweezers, medicine, atom guiding, remote sensing, etc..

  4. Orthogonal trapping and sensing with long working distance optics [invited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    immersion objectives required in conventional optical tweezers. This generates a large field of view and leaves vital space for integrating other enabling tools for probing the trapped particles, such as linear and nonlinear microscopy or micro-spectroscopy. Together with chcmists at another Danish...

  5. Journal of Chemical Sciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modular design of a molecular tweezer is presented that integrates a multipolar D--A [D: Donor, A: Acceptor] scaffold, 1-aminopyrene-based fluorophore units and L-alanine-based linkers. The synthesis of the molecule is based on two-fold aromatic nucleophilic reactions (ArSN) and coupling reactions of the acid and ...

  6. Automation of microfactories: towards using small industrial robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Mazzola, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    with tweezers under a microscope. This is tedious work for the operators and it is very hard to keep an even quality. This process would be excellent to automate, for example by using small industrial robots. There are mainly two properties that are significant for selecting a robot for micro...

  7. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-13

    Feb 13, 2014 ... Abstract. We report the development of an optoelectronic tweezers set-up which works by light- induced dielectrophoresis mechanism to manipulate microparticles. We used thermal evaporation technique for coating the organic polymer, titanium oxide phthalocyanine (TiOPc), as a photo- conductive layer ...

  8. Mechanosensitive channels and bacterial cell wall integrity: Does life end with a bang or a whimper?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Reuter (Marcel); N.J. Hayward (Nicholas); S.S. Black (Susan); S. Miller (Samantha); D.T.F. Dryden (David); I.R. Booth (Ian)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMechanogated channels are fundamental components of bacterial cells that enable retention of physical integrity during extreme increases in cell turgor. Optical tweezers combined with microfluidics have been used to study the fate of individual Escherichia coli cells lacking such

  9. Theoretical comparison of optical traps created by standing wave and single beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemánek, Pavel; Jonáš, Alexandr; Jákl, Petr; Ježek, Jan; Šerý, Mojmír; Liška, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 220, 4-6 (2003), s. 401 - 412 ISSN 0030-4018 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/00/0974 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : single beam trap * optical trapping * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.482, year: 2003

  10. The Role of Molecular Motors in the Mechanics of Active Gels and the Effects of Inertia, Hydrodynamic Interaction and Compressibility in Passive Microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    interaction, compressibility and non- conservative forces in passive microrheology. A type of biological material that has proven specially chal- lenging...ELIMINATIONOF INERTIA FROMAGENERALIZED LANGE- VIN EQUATION: APPLICATIONS TO MICROBEAD RHEOL- OGY MODELING AND DATA ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.1...46 2.12 Accumulated circulation for a bead trapped in an optical tweezer with non- conservative forces along the optical axis. For the

  11. Microfluidic devices for analysis and active optical sorting of individual cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; Pilát, Zdeněk; Šerý, Mojmír; Kaňka, Jan; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2013), s. 55-59 ISSN 0447-6441 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/433; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : microfluidic * cell sorting * optical tweezers * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  12. Beware of Bug Bites and Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repellent. What's the best way to remove a bee stinger? It's best to scrape a stinger away in a side-to-side motion with a straight-edged object like a credit card. Don't use tweezers because it may push more venom into the skin. After removing a stinger, wash ...

  13. Detecting sequential bond formation using three-dimensional thermal fluctuation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartsch, T.; Fisinger, S.; Kochanczyk, M.D.; Huang, R.; Jonáš, Alexandr; Florin, E. L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 10, 9-10 (2009), s. 1541-1547 ISSN 1439-4235 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : biophysics * mechanical properties * optical tweezers * single-molecule studies * thermal fluctuations Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.453, year: 2009

  14. The Motion of a Single Molecule, the Lambda-Receptor, in the Bacterial Outer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Dreyer, Jakob Kisbye; Grego, Sonia

    2002-01-01

    Using optical tweezers and single particle tracking, we have revealed the motion of a single protein, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli bacteria. We genetically modified the lambda-receptor placing a biotin on an extracellular site of the receptor in vivo...

  15. Manipulation of microparticles and red blood cells using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-13

    Feb 13, 2014 ... We report the development of an optoelectronic tweezers set-up which works by lightinduced dielectrophoresis mechanism to manipulate microparticles. We used thermal evaporation technique for coating the organic polymer, titanium oxide phthalocyanine (TiOPc), as a photoconductive layer on ...

  16. Accuracy and Mechanistic Details of Optical Printing of Single Au and Ag Nanoparticles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gargiulo, J.; Violi, I.L.; Cerrota, S.; Chvátal, Lukáš; Cortés, E.; Perassi, E.M.; Diaz, F.; Zemánek, Pavel; Stefani, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 10 (2017), s. 9678-9688 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : colloidal patterning * nanofabrication * optical forces * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  17. C60Recognition from Extended Tetrathiafulvalene Bis-acetylide Platinum(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Guillaume; Dron, Paul I; Vincent, Manon; Canevet, David; Allain, Magali; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2016-11-18

    The favorable spatial organization imposed by the square planar 4,4'-di(tert-butyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (dbbpy) platinum(II) complex associated with the electronic and shape complementarity of π-extended tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (exTTF) toward fullerenes is usefully exploited to construct molecular tweezers, which display good affinities for C 60 .

  18. 49 CFR 239.101 - Emergency preparedness plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... training at least once every two calendar years thereafter, on appropriate courses of action for each... gauge roller bandage that is at least two inches wide; (F) Wound cleaning agent, such as sealed moistened towelettes; (G) One pair of scissors; (H) One set of tweezers; (I) One roll of adhesive tape; (J...

  19. Thermally induced passage and current of particles in a highly unstable optical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ryabov, A.; Zemánek, Pavel; Filip, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 4 (2016), 042108:1-9 ISSN 2470-0045 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brownian movement * Electron transitions * Optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.366, year: 2016

  20. Filopodial retraction force is generated by cortical actin dynamics and controlled by reversible tethering at the tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Romero, Stéphane; Vestergaard, Christian L.

    2013-01-01

    at the tip and the retrograde flow at the base of the filopodium. Adhesion of a bead to the filopodial tip locally reduces actin polymerization and leads to retraction via retrograde flow, reminiscent of a process used by pathogens to invade cells. Using optical tweezers, we show that filopodial retraction...

  1. HYGIENIC PROCEDURES IN SIX REGIONAL DENTAL CLI~JICS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Table 2 Sterilization or at least heat disinfection of different instruments between patients. Number of clinics. Instruments. At least. Not heat Instruments heat disinf. disinfected not used. Mouth mirror. 3. 3. 0. Dental probe. 4. 2. 0. Tweezers. 4. 2. 0. Scaler and curette. 4. 2. 0. Forcep. 6. 0. 0. Elevator. 5. 1. 0. Handpiece. 1. 4. 1.

  2. Long-Range One-Dimensional Longitudinal Optical Binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Vítězslav; Čižmár, Tomáš; Brzobohatý, Oto; Zemánek, Pavel; Garcés-Chávez, V.; Dholakia, K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 14 (2008), 143601: 1-4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optical binding * optical tweezers * optical self-arrangement * coupled dipole method * optical forces Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 7.180, year: 2008

  3. Propagadon of slow electromagnedc disturbances in plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IPR

    Combinadon of axial and density gradient related drift makes following applicadons possible: • Energy deposidon and headng at localized desired locadon. • Trapping of current pulse in high density plasma – basis for plasma tweezer. • Other effects: collimadon – guiding – bifurcadon of electron current pulses – basis for ...

  4. Customizable nanotweezers for manipulation of free-standing nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Mølhave, Kristian

    2001-01-01

    We present a novel nanotweezer device for manipulation and measurement of free-standing nanostructures, where the shape of the tweezer tips can be customized for the application. Electrostatic actuators with submicron interelectrode spacings are fabricated on a batch level using silicon microfabr...

  5. Four-dimensional optical manipulation of colloidal particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Daria, Vincent Ricardo Mancao; Glückstad, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The technical development of optical tweezers, along with their application in the biological and physical sciences, has progressed significantly since the demonstration of an optical trap for micron-sized particles based on a single, tightly focused laser beam was first reported more than twenty...

  6. Direct measurement of the temperature profile close to an optically trapped absorbing particle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 5 (2016), s. 870-873 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/12/P868 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : gold nanoparticles * fluorescence * spectroscopy * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2016

  7. Self-Assembly Characteristics of a Multipolar Donor-Acceptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PC

    Integrated Molecular Tweezer. Deepak Asthana, Geeta Hundal and Pritam Mukhopadhyay*. Supramolecular & Material Chemistry Lab, School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. 110067, India. e-mail: m_pritam@ jnu.ac.in. Contents. S. No. Topic. Page No. 1. Synthesis and characterization of 1.

  8. Nonspherical oscilllations of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dollet, B.; van der Meer, S.M.; Garbin, V.; Garbin, Valeria; de Jong, N.; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of nonspherical oscillations (or surface modes) of coated microbubbles, used as ultrasound contrast agents in medical imaging, is investigated using ultra–high-speed optical imaging. Optical tweezers designed to micromanipulate single bubbles in 3-D are used to trap the bubbles far

  9. Mechanochemical properties of individual human telomeric RNA (TERRA) G-quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangyuoru, Philip M; Zhang, Amy Y Q; Shi, Zhe; Koirala, Deepak; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Mao, Hanbin

    2013-10-11

    Potential functions: By following the unfolding and refolding of individual human RNA telomeric (TERRA) G-quadruplexes (GQs) in laser tweezers, the mechanical stability and transition kinetics of RNA GQs are obtained. Comparison between TERRA and DNA GQs suggests their different regulatory capacities for processes associated with human telomeres. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Využití více opticky zachycených sond pro měření profilů nepřístupných průhledných povrchů

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerý, Mojmír; Jákl, Petr; Ježek, Jan; Liška, M.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2003), s. 170 - 173 ISSN 0447-6441 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/00/0974; GA AV ČR IAA1065203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : optical tweezers * microparticles * nanoparticles Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  11. White light wavefront control with a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spangenberg, D-M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available vortices; (090.1995) Digital holography; (320.5540) Pulse shaping. References and links 1. M. Padgett and R. Bowman, “Tweezers with a twist,” Nat. Photon. 5, 343–348 (2011). 2. K. Dholakia and T. Cizmar, “Shaping the future of manipulation,” Nat. Photon. 5...

  12. Genotype-Dependent Effect of Exogenous Nitric Oxide on Cd-induced Changes in Antioxidative Metabolism, Ultrastructure, and Photosynthetic Performance in Barley Seedlings (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fei; Wang, Fang; Sun, Hongyan

    2010-01-01

    A greenhouse hydroponic experiment was performed using Cd-sensitive (cv. Dong 17) and Cd-tolerant (Weisuobuzhi) barley seedlings to evaluate how different genotypes responded to cadmium (Cd) toxicity in the presence of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Results showed that 5 μ...

  13. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  14. Hybrid magnet devices for molecule manipulation and small scale high gradient-field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E [El Cerrito, CA; Hong, Seok-Cheol [Seoul, KR; Cozzarelli, legal representative, Linda A.; Pollard, Martin J [El Cerrito, CA; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R [Berkeley, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are hybrid magnetic tweezers able to exert approximately 1 nN of force to 4.5 .mu.m magnetic bead. The maximum force was experimentally measured to be .about.900 pN which is in good agreement with theoretical estimations and other measurements. In addition, a new analysis scheme that permits fast real-time position measurement in typical geometry of magnetic tweezers has been developed and described in detail.

  15. Objective-lens-free Fiber-based Position Detection with Nanometer Resolution in a Fiber Optical Trapping System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Ho-Thanh, Minh-Tri; Wen, Qi; Liu, Yuxiang

    2017-10-13

    Position detection with high accuracy is crucial for force calibration of optical trapping systems. Most existing position detection methods require high-numerical-aperture objective lenses, which are bulky, expensive, and difficult to miniaturize. Here, we report an affordable objective-lens-free, fiber-based position detection scheme with 2 nm spatial resolution and 150 MHz bandwidth. This fiber based detection mechanism enables simultaneous trapping and force measurements in a compact fiber optical tweezers system. In addition, we achieved more reliable signal acquisition with less distortion compared with objective based position detection methods, thanks to the light guiding in optical fibers and small distance between the fiber tips and trapped particle. As a demonstration of the fiber based detection, we used the fiber optical tweezers to apply a force on a cell membrane and simultaneously measure the cellular response.

  16. Fabrication and actuation of customized nanotweezers with a 25 nm gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Tanasa, C.

    2001-01-01

    By combining conventional silicon microfabrication and direct three-dimensional growth using electron-beam induced carbon contamination, we have developed a scheme for fabricating nanotweezers with a gap of 25 nm. Four silicon oxide cantilevers with a spacing of 1.5 mum extending over an edge...... of a silicon support chip, were covered with a thin layer of metal. By focusing an electron beam at the ends of the cantilevers, narrow supertips grew from the substrate. Careful alignment of the substrate made the supertips converge to form a nanoscale gap. We demonstrate customization of the shape and size...... of the tweezer arms, using a simple scheme that allows conveniently fine-tuning of the tip features and the gap to within 5 nm. The supertips can be metallized subsequently, to be made conducting, without significantly affecting the shape of the tweezers. By applying a voltage on the outer electrodes...

  17. Transformation and patterning of supermicelles using dynamic holographic assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Oliver E C; Qiu, Huibin; Lunn, David J; Rowden, John; Harniman, Robert L; Hudson, Zachary M; Winnik, Mitchell A; Miles, Mervyn J; Manners, Ian

    2015-12-02

    Although the solution self-assembly of block copolymers has enabled the fabrication of a broad range of complex, functional nanostructures, their precise manipulation and patterning remain a key challenge. Here we demonstrate that spherical and linear supermicelles, supramolecular structures held together by non-covalent solvophobic and coordination interactions and formed by the hierarchical self-assembly of block copolymer micelle and block comicelle precursors, can be manipulated, transformed and patterned with mediation by dynamic holographic assembly (optical tweezers). This allows the creation of new and stable soft-matter superstructures far from equilibrium. For example, individual spherical supermicelles can be optically held in close proximity and photocrosslinked through controlled coronal chemistry to generate linear oligomeric arrays. The use of optical tweezers also enables the directed deposition and immobilization of supermicelles on surfaces, allowing the precise creation of arrays of soft-matter nano-objects with potentially diverse functionality and a range of applications.

  18. Analysis of single-cell differences by use of an on-chip microculture system and optical trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamoto, Y; Inoue, I; Moriguchi, H; Yasuda, K

    2001-09-01

    A method is described for continuous observation of isolated single cells that enables genetically identical cells to be compared; it uses an on-chip microculture system and optical tweezers. Photolithography is used to construct microchambers with 5-microm-high walls made of thick photoresist (SU-8) on the surface of a glass slide. These microchambers are connected by a channel through which cells are transported, by means of optical tweezers, from a cultivation microchamber to an analysis microchamber, or from the analysis microchamber to a waste microchamber. The microchambers are covered with a semi-permeable membrane to separate them from nutrient medium circulating through a "cover chamber" above. Differential analysis of isolated direct descendants of single cells showed that this system could be used to compare genetically identical cells under contamination-free conditions. It should thus help in the clarification of heterogeneous phenomena, for example unequal cell division and cell differentiation.

  19. Optimized systems for energy efficient optical tweezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, R.; Kleindienst, R.; Grewe, A.; Bürger, Elisabeth; Oeder, A.; Sinzinger, S.

    2013-03-01

    Compared to conventional optics like singlet lenses or even microscope objectives advanced optical designs help to develop properties specifically useful for efficient optical tweezers. We present an optical setup providing a customized intensity distribution optimized with respect to large trapping forces. The optical design concept combines a refractive double axicon with a reflective parabolic focusing mirror. The axicon arrangement creates an annular field distribution and thus clears space for additional integrated observation optics in the center of the system. Finally the beam is focused to the desired intensity distribution by a parabolic ring mirror. The compact realization of the system potentially opens new fields of applications for optical tweezers such as in production industries and micro-nano assembly.

  20. The manipulation of micron-sized metal particles by pulse laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jimin; Shun, Daqing; Zhong, Xiajun

    2006-08-01

    In Selective Laser Micro Sintering the powder particles should be assembled or arranged and sintered together. Optical tweezers make used of optical refractive force to manipulate micro objects. Currently the manipulated objects are limited to nano or several micro meters scale. In this paper we develop a novel optical tweezers which employs pulse laser force to drive bigger particles and assemble them. This pulse laser is controlled to form spiral trap which can grasp big particles. In our experiment the 50μm- 100μm-diameter metal particles were moved on a solid surfaces in a process we call 'laser spiral driving force'. Nearly any shape particle, including sphere and non-regular shape, can be moved on the surfaces.

  1. A switchable positive and negative air pressure device for efficient and gentle handling of nanofiber scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotaling, Nathan A.; Khristov, Vladimir; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Bharti, Kapil; Simon, Carl G.

    2017-10-01

    A scaffold handling device (SHD) has been designed that can switch from gentle suction to positive pressure to lift and place nanofiber scaffolds. In tissue engineering laboratories, delicate fibrous scaffolds, such as electrospun nanofiber scaffolds, are often used as substrates for cell culture. Typical scaffold handling procedures include lifting the scaffolds, moving them from one container to another, sterilization, and loading scaffolds into cell culture plates. Using tweezers to handle the scaffolds can be slow, can damage the scaffolds, and can cause them to wrinkle or fold. Scaffolds may also acquire a static charge which makes them difficult to put down as they cling to tweezers. An SHD has been designed that enables more efficient, gentle lifting, and placement of delicate scaffolds. Most of the parts to make the SHD can be purchased, except for the tip which can be 3D-printed. The SHD enables more reliable handling of nanofiber scaffolds that may improve the consistency of biomanufacturing processes.

  2. Evidence of chemotaxis by quantitative measurement of the force vectors of Trypanossoma cruzi in the vicinity of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut wall cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-08-01

    In this work we used a methodology to study chemotaxis of Trypanossoma cruzi (T. Cruzi) in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Trapped beads were used as a force transducer for measuring forces of the same order of magnitude as typical forces induced by flagellar motion. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. We applied this methodology to investigate the T. cruzi under distinct situations: the parasite alone and in the presence of its insect-vector Rhodnius prolixus (R. prolixus).

  3. Solid microparticles in nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muševič, Igor

    A brief historic overview of colloidal experiments in the 1990's is given in the introduction. These experiments have later inspired research on nematic colloids, after the technique of laser tweezers manipulation of particles was introduced to this field. Basic topological properties of colloidal inclusions in the nematic liquid crystals are discussed and the nematic-mediated forces between dipolar and quadrupolar colloidal particles in bulk nematic are explained. Structural and topological properties of 2D and 3D colloidal crystals and superstructures made of colloidal particles of different size and symmetry in bulk nematic liquid crystal are described. Laser-tweezer manipulation and rewiring of topological defect loops around colloidal particles is introduced. This results in the colloidal entanglement, as well as knotting and linking of defect loops of the order parameter field. Shape and size-dependent colloidal interactions in the nematic liquid crystals are reviewed. The chapter concludes with the discussion of bulk chiral nematic and blue phase colloids.

  4. Optical particle trapping and dynamic manipulation using spatial light modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge

    This thesis deals with the spatial phase-control of light and its application for optical trapping and manipulation of micron-scale objects. Utilizing the radiation pressure, light exerts on dielectric micron-scale particles, functionality of optical tweezers can be obtained. Multiple intensity...... spots acting as tweezers beams are generated using phase-only spatial light modulation of an incident laser beam together with a generalized phase contrast (GPC) filter. The GPC method acts as a common-path interferometer, which converts encoded phase information into an appropriate intensity pattern...... suitable for optical trapping. A phaseonly spatial light modulator (SLM) is used for the phase encoding of the laser beam. The SLM is controlled directly from a standard computer where phase information is represented as gray-scale image information. Experimentally, both linear and angular movements...

  5. Twist-Bend Coupling and the Torsional Response of Double-Stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomidis, Stefanos K.; Kriegel, Franziska; Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Carlon, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    Recent magnetic tweezers experiments have reported systematic deviations of the twist response of double-stranded DNA from the predictions of the twistable wormlike chain model. Here we show, by means of analytical results and computer simulations, that these discrepancies can be resolved if a coupling between twist and bend is introduced. We obtain an estimate of 40 ±10 nm for the twist-bend coupling constant. Our simulations are in good agreement with high-resolution, magnetic-tweezers torque data. Although the existence of twist-bend coupling was predicted long ago [J. Marko and E. Siggia, Macromolecules 27, 981 (1994), 10.1021/ma00082a015], its effects on the mechanical properties of DNA have been so far largely unexplored. We expect that this coupling plays an important role in several aspects of DNA statics and dynamics.

  6. Optical trapping of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vasi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We study optical trapping of nanotubes and graphene. We extract the distribution of both centre-of-mass and angular fluctuations from three-dimensional tracking of these optically trapped carbon nanostructures. The optical force and torque constants are measured from auto and cross-correlation of the tracking signals. We demonstrate that nanotubes enable nanometer spatial, and femto-Newton force resolution in photonic force microscopy by accurately measuring the radiation pressure in a double frequency optical tweezers. Finally, we integrate optical trapping with Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrating the use of a Raman and photoluminescence tweezers by investigating the spectroscopy of nanotubes and graphene flakes in solution. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on electromagnetic scattering theory.

  7. The use of supramolecular chemistry in dye delivery systems

    CERN Document Server

    Merckel, D A S

    2002-01-01

    This thesis reports an investigation into supramolecular recognition of the sulfate/ sulfonate oxoanionic group, a moiety present in the majority of reactive dyes. In the first section the problems associated with the use of reactive dyes in dyeing cotton fabrics together with a literature review of supramolecular approaches to anion recognition are discussed. Drawing on the current literature concerning anion recognition (in particular the recognition of phosphates), the main body of the thesis concerns the design and synthesis of several series ofC-shaped (tweezer) and tripodal potential sulfate/ sulfonate receptors. These receptors incorporate the H-bond donor groups guanidine and thiourea and to a lesser extent urea and amide functionalities. In addition the behaviour of potential tweezer-like receptor molecules based on s-triazine (derived from cyanuric chloride) has also been investigated. The sulfate/ sulfonate and related phosphonate association properties of these potential receptors have been studie...

  8. Optical manipulation of aerosol droplets using a holographic dual and single beam trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 22 (2013), s. 4601-4604 ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA ČR GPP205/12/P868; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * optical manipulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2013

  9. Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site. This report contains remedial verification of the soil sample analytical results for the following: Area 11 Tweezer facility; Area 12 boiler house; Area 12 service station; Area 23 bypass yard; Area 23 service station; Area 25 power house; Area 25 tech. services building; Area 25 tech. operations building; Area 26 power house; and Area 27 boiler house.

  10. Better Ceramics Through Chemistry IV. Materials Research Society Sumposium Proceedings. Volume 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-31

    information on the average structure of complex colloid/polymer networks in the region of 10-500A (generally NMR- invisible ); and light scattering is an...could shatter the silica aerogel and it was invisible in liquid nitrogen, the nitrogen bath was avoided and the silica aerogel was fractured with tweezers... orthodontic treatment which allow teeth to be moved in situations where no suitable anchor teeth are available [23]. Bioactive materials as powders have proven

  11. Better Ceramics Through Chemistry 4. Symposium Held in San Francisco, California on April 16 - 20, 1990. Volume 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-20

    SANS can provide informatign on the average structure of complex colloid4polymer networks in the region of 10-500A (generally NMR- invisible ); and...and it was invisible in liquid nitrogen, the nitrogen bath was avoided and the silica aerogel was fractured with tweezers at rom temperture. Aerogel...used to make anchors for orthodontic treatment which allow teeth to be moved in situations where no suitable anchor teeth are available (23]. Iioactive

  12. Non-conservative optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2017-11-01

    Undoubtedly, laser tweezers are the most recognized application of optically induced mechanical action. Their operation is usually described in terms of conservative forces originating from intensity gradients. However, the fundamental optical action on matter is non-conservative. We will review different manifestations of non-conservative optical forces (NCF) and discuss their dependence on the specific spatial properties of optical fields that generate them. New developments relevant to the NCF such as tractor beams and transversal forces are also discussed.

  13. Axial optical trap stiffness influenced by retro-reflected beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jákl, Petr; Šerý, Mojmír; Ježek, Jan; Liška, M.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 8 (2007), S251-S255 ISSN 1464-4258 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 508952 - ATOM3D Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optical tweezers * optical force * colloidal particle * optical trap * standing wave * stiffness measurement * light scattering * refractive index Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.752, year: 2007

  14. The Light Microscopy Module: An On-Orbit Multi-User Microscope Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.

    2002-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is planned as a remotely controllable on-orbit microscope subrack facility, allowing flexible scheduling and operation of fluids and biology experiments within the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) on the International Space Station (ISS). The LMM will be the first integrated payload with the FIR to conduct four fluid physics experiments. A description of the LMM diagnostic capabilities, including video microscopy, interferometry, laser tweezers, confocal, and spectrophotometry, will be provided.

  15. Optical sorting of nonspherical and living microobjects in moving interference structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jákl, Petr; Arzola, A. V.; Šiler, Martin; Chvátal, Lukáš; Volke-Sepulveda, K.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 24 (2014), s. 29746-29760 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : standing-wave * forces * microparticles * tweezers * chromatography Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  16. Particle jumps between optical traps in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, Aug 2 (2010), 083001:1-20 ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk OC08034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : stochastic resonance * brownian-motion * tweezers * forces * manipulation * calibration * separation * interface * diffusion * tracking Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.849, year: 2010

  17. Chiral particles in the dual-beam optical trap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Hernández, R.J.; Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Mazzulla, A.; Cipparrone, G.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 23 (2016), 26382:1-10 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-16195S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical tweezers * optical manipulation * liquid crystals * chiral media Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  18. Nanoelectromechanical systems face the future

    OpenAIRE

    Roukes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    In the late 1950s visionary physicist Richard Feynman issued a public challenge by offering $1000 to the first person to create an electrical motor "smaller than 1/64th of an inch". Much to Feynman's consternation the young man who met this challenge, William McLellan, did so by investing many tedious and painstaking hours building the device by hand using tweezers and a microscope.

  19. Optical trapping of colloidal particles and measurement of the defect line tension and colloidal forces in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smalyukh, I.I.; Kuzmin, A.N.; Kachynski, A.V.; Prasad, P.N.; Lavrentovich, O.D.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate optical trapping and manipulation of transparent microparticles suspended in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal with low birefringence. We employ the particle manipulation to measure line tension of a topologically stable disclination line and to determine colloidal interaction of particles with perpendicular surface anchoring of the director. The three-dimensional director fields and positions of the particles manipulated by laser tweezers are visualized by fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

  20. Relaxation dynamics of a single DNA molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshen, E.; Zhao, W. Z.; Carmon, G.; Rosen, S.; Granek, R.; Feingold, M.

    2005-06-01

    The relaxation of a single DNA molecule is studied. The experimental system consists of optical tweezers and a micron-sized bead that is tethered to the bottom of the sample by a single double-stranded DNA molecule. The bead slows down the DNA relaxation from a strongly stretched configuration such that it is passing through stretched equilibrium states. This allows for a theoretical description of the relaxation trajectory, which is in good agreement with experiment.

  1. Thermal tuning of spectral emission from optically trapped liquid-crystal droplet resonators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáš, A.; Pilát, Zdeněk; Ježek, Jan; Bernatová, Silvie; Fořt, Tomáš; Zemánek, Pavel; Aas, M.; Kiraz, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 9 (2017), s. 1855-1864 ISSN 0740-3224 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14069; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : emission spectroscopy * drops * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.843, year: 2016

  2. High-throughput sorting and analysis of human sperm with a ring-shaped laser trap

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, B; Shi, LZ; Nascimento, JM; Botvinick, EL; Ozkan, M; Berns, MW; Esener, SC

    2007-01-01

    Sperm motility is an important concept in fertility research. To this end, single spot laser tweezers have been used to quantitatively analyze the motility of individual sperm. However, this method is limited with throughput (single sperm per spot), lacks the ability of in-situ sorting based on motility and chemotaxis, requires high laser power (hundreds of milliWatts) and can not be used to dynamically monitor changes in sperm swimming behavior under the influence of a laser beam. Here, we r...

  3. Development of A Microhand using Direct Laser Writing for IndirectOptical Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    purposes, Ytterbium fibre laser (YLM-10-LP- SC), which emits 1070 nm wavelength light with a power of up to 10.6 watts (this is the optical output, the...Development of A Microhand using Direct Laser Writing for Indirect Optical Manipulation Ebubekir Avci1 and Guang-Zhong Yang2 Abstract— In this paper...we propose manipulation ability extension of the optical tweezers by developing microhands, which are to use as end-effectors of the laser beam

  4. Exploring the Interaction of Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes with DNA Using Single-Molecule Techniques†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Vladescu, Ioana; McCauley, Micah; Ly, Elaine; Williams, Mark C.; Spain, Eileen M.; Nuñez, Megan E.

    2008-01-01

    Here we explore DNA binding by a family of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical tweezers. We demonstrate using AFM that Ru(bpy)2dppz2+ intercalates into DNA (Kb= 1.5 × 105 M−1), as does its close relative Ru(bpy)2dppx2+ (Kb= 1.5 × 105 M−1). However, intercalation by Ru(phen)32+ and other Ru(II) complexes with Kb's lower than Ru(bpy)2dppz2+ are difficult to determine using AFM because of competing aggregation and surface-binding phenomena. At the high Ru(II) concentrations required to evaluate intercalation, most of the DNA strands acquire a twisted, curled conformation that is impossible to measure accurately. The condensation of DNA on mica in the presence of polycations is well known, but it clearly precludes the accurate assessment by AFM of DNA intercalation by most Ru(II) complexes, though not by ethidium bromide and other monovalent intercalators. When stretching individual DNA molecules using optical tweezers the same limitation on high metal concentration does not exist. Using optical tweezers we show that Ru(phen)2dppz2+ intercalates avidly (Kb = 3.2 × 106 M−1) while Ru(bpy)32+ does not intercalate, even at micromolar ruthenium concentrations. Ru(phen)32+ is shown to intercalate weakly, i.e. at micromolar concentrations (Kb= 8.8 × 103 M−1). The distinct differences in DNA stretching behavior between Ru(phen)32+ and Ru(bpy)32+ clearly illustrate that intercalation can be distinguished from groove binding by pulling the DNA with optical tweezers. Our results demonstrate both the benefits and challenges of two single-molecule methods in exploring DNA binding, and help to elucidate the mode of binding of Ru(phen)32+. PMID:16649785

  5. Parametric study of optical forces acting upon nanoparticles in a single, or a standing, evanescent wave

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2011), 044016:1-9 ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk OC08034; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optical tweezers * optical lattice * optical force * evanescent wave Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.573, year: 2011

  6. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Klebsiella pneumoniae Type 3 Fimbriae▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Feng-Jung; Chan, Chia-Han; Huang, Ying-Jung; Liu, Kuo-Liang; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You; Liou, Gunn-Guang; Yew, Tri-Rung; Liu, Cheng-Hsien; Hsu, Ken Y.; Hsu, Long

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the structural and mechanical properties of Klebsiella pneumoniae type 3 fimbriae, which constitute a known virulence factor for the bacterium. Transmission electron microscopy and optical tweezers were used to understand the ability of the bacterium to survive flushes. An individual K. pneumoniae type 3 fimbria exhibited a helix-like structure with a pitch of 4.1 nm and a three-phase force-extension curve. The fimbria was first nonlinearly stretched with increasing fo...

  7. Transverse particle dynamics in a Bessel beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milne, G.; Dholakia, K.; McGloin, D.; Volke-Sepulveda, K.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 21 (2007), s. 13972-13987 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MPO(CZ) FT-TA2/059 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 508952 - ATOM3D Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optical tweezers or optical manipulation * laser trapping * laser beam shaping Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.709, year: 2007

  8. Assessment of the Tensile Properties for Single Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    the live load-displacement curve in the Psylotech software. Starting with the ...Fiber sample installed in the Psylotech nTS prior to the frame being cut Just prior to testing, the edges of the cardstock frame are cut. It is important ...is important to ensure that the fiber remains attached to the cardboard mount. If a pair of tweezers is used to lightly hold the ends of the

  9. Transcrição cooperativa de genes ribossomais em Escherichia coli usando um modelo estocástico e dependente de sequência

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Rafael Takahiro [UNESP

    2015-01-01

    The process that produces messenger RNAs from DNA sequences is called transcription, and these reactions are catalyzed by the RNA polimerase enzyme. Many different experimental techniques have been applied to investigate this process including biochemical techniques, optical and magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy and single molecule florescence. These biochemical process studies showed that many RNAP molecules operate simultaneously on a single DNA strand. The number of different mole...

  10. Colloids dragged through a polymer solution: experiment, theory and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gutsche, Christof; Kremer, Friedrich; Krüger, Matthias; Rauscher, Markus; Weeber, Rudolf; Harting, Jens

    2007-01-01

    We present micro-rheological measurments of the drag force on colloids pulled through a solution of lambda-DNA (used here as a monodisperse model polymer) with an optical tweezer. The experiments show a violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation based on the independently measured viscosity of the DNA solution: the drag force is larger than expected. We attribute this to the accumulation of DNA infront of the colloid and the reduced DNA density behind the colloid. This hypothesis is corroborat...

  11. Experimental demonstration of optical transport, sorting and self-arrangement using a “tractor beam"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Chvátal, Lukáš; Čižmár, T.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2013), s. 123-127 ISSN 1749-4885 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : theoretical determination * radiation force * tweezers * binding Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 29.958, year: 2013

  12. Spectral tuning of lasing emission from optofluidic droplet microlasers using optical stretching

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aas, M.; Jonáš, A.; Kiraz, A.; Ježek, Jan; Brzobohatý, Oto; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 18 (2013), s. 21380-21394 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA TA ČR TA03010642 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Microcavities * Dye lasers * Optical tweezers * Optical manipulation * Fluorescence, laser-induced Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.525, year: 2013

  13. Quantifying Force and Viscoelasticity Inside Living Cells Using an Active–Passive Calibrated Optical Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Christine M.; Maes, Josep; Oddershede, Lene

    2017-01-01

    As described in the previous chapters, optical tweezers have become a tool of precision for in vitro single-molecule investigations, where the single molecule of interest most often is studied in purified form in an experimental assay with a well-controlled fluidic environment. A well-controlled ...... is that the size and refractive properties of the trapped object and the viscoelastic properties of its environment need not be known. We explain the protocol and demonstrate its use with experiments of trapped granules inside live S.pombe cells.......As described in the previous chapters, optical tweezers have become a tool of precision for in vitro single-molecule investigations, where the single molecule of interest most often is studied in purified form in an experimental assay with a well-controlled fluidic environment. A well......-controlled fluidic environment implies that the physical properties of the liquid, most notably the viscosity, are known and the fluidic environment can, for calibrational purposes, be treated as a simple liquid. In vivo, however, optical tweezers have primarily been used as a tool of manipulation and not so often...

  14. Mothers and not genes determine inherited differences in cadmium sensitivities within unexposed populations of the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Amandine; Geffard, Olivier; Quéau, Hervé; Chaumot, Arnaud

    2016-02-01

    Deciphering evolutionary processes occurring within contaminated populations is important for the ecological risk assessment of toxic chemicals. Whereas increased tolerance to contaminants is well documented in aquatic animal populations, whether such phenotypic changes occur through genetic adaptation is still debated. In that sense, several studies with the freshwater crustacean Gammarus concluded in a weak potential for genetic adaptation to cadmium (Cd), while others reported inheritable increased tolerance in Cd-contaminated populations. Using quantitative genetics and selection experiments, this study sought to further assess the potential of Gammarus populations to genetically adapt to Cd. By combining the control of the reproductive cycle of this species in the laboratory and protocols of individual Cd exposure, we conducted half-sib analyses to establish the genetic and environmental sources of variance in Cd sensitivity of neonates. Prior to experiments, computations allowed optimizing the experimental design in order to increase the power to detect additive genetic variance. The main findings are the existence of strong between-brood variability along with weak heritability of Cd sensitivity within Gammarus populations. This study also revealed a significant maternal effect on individual Cd sensitivity. This sheds new light on the importance of maternal influence in microevolutionary processes occurring in contaminated environments.

  15. Photonic Interrogation and Control of Nano Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassemnejad, Baha

    2003-01-01

    My research activities for the summer of 2003 consisted of two projects: One project was concerned with determining a method for predicting the static and dynamic assembly properties of nano-structures using laser tweezers. The other project was to investigate the generation of Laguerre-Gaussian modes using a spatial light modulator incorporated into an optical tweezers system. Concerning the first project, I initially pursued the approach suggested by my NASA colleague Dr. Art Decker. This approach involved mimicking the model of the structure of atomic nucleus for the assembly of 1 to 100 atoms using allowed quadruple transitions induced by orbital angular momentums of a Laguerre- Gaussian (Doughnut) laser mode. After realizing the inaptness of the nuclear model with the nanostructure model as far as the binding forces and transitions were concerned, I focused on using quantum dot modei. This model was not attuned also for the host lattice influences the electronic structure of the quantum dot. Thus one other option that I decided to pursue was the approach of molecular quantum mechanics. In this approach the nanostructure is treated as a large (10-100 nm) molecule constructed from single element or multi-elements. Subsequent to consultation with Dr. Fred Morales, a chemical engineer at NASA GRC, and Dr. David Ball, a computational chemist at Cleveland State University, I acquired a molecular-quantum computation software, Hyperchem 7.0. This software allows simulation of different molecular structures as far as their static and dynamic behaviors are concerned. The time that I spent on this project was about eight weeks. Once this suitable approach was identified, I realized the need to collaborate with a computational quantum chemist to pursue searching for stable nanostructures in the range of 10-100 nm that we can be assembled using laser tweezers. The second project was about generating laser tweezers that possess orbital angular momentum. As shown, we were

  16. Static and dynamic behavior of two optically bound microparticles in a standing wave

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Trojek, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 20 (2011), s. 19613-19626 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : single-beam * binding * particles * nanoparticles * tweezers * matter * forces * light * micromanipulation * manipulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.587, year: 2011

  17. Magnetic wires in MEMS and bio-medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbic, Mladen

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic wires of appropriate design have special features making them useful to micro-electromechanical systems and bio-medical applications. Several applications that exploit the properties of magnetic wires are reviewed including: (a) a magnetic micro-manipulation technique that utilizes integrated micro-coils and magnetic micro-wires for localized positioning of micron-sized magnetic objects, (b) integrated micro-coil/micro-wire system operating as a micro-fluidic micro-motor, (c) mechanical tweezers using magneto-static interaction between two magnetic micro-wires, and (d) ultra-high gradient magnetic separation system based on porous membranes partially filled with magnetic wires

  18. Device for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device is disclosed for removing foreign objects from anatomic organs such as the ear canal or throat. It has a housing shaped like a flashlight, an electrical power source such as a battery or AC power from a wall socket, and a tip extending from the housing. The tip has at least one wire loop made from a shape-memory-effect alloy, such as Nitinol, switchably connected to the electrical power source such that when electric current flows through the wire loop the wire loop heats up and returns to a previously programmed shape such as a curet or tweezers so as to facilitate removal of the foreign object.

  19. Nonequilibrium Energetics of Single Molecule Motor, Kinesin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Takayuki; Tomishige, Michio; Mizuno, Daisuke

    2018-02-01

    Molecular motors are nonequilibrium open systems that convert chemical energy to mechanical work. Here we investigate the nonequilibrium energetics of a single molecule kinesin by measuring the motion of an attached probe particle and its response to external forces with optical tweezers. The sum of the heat dissipation estimated from the violation of the fluctuation-response relation and the output power was inconsistent with the input free energy rate, implying that internal dissipation is dominant. By using a two-state Markov model, we discuss the energy flow of the kinesin motor.

  20. Brownian motion after Einstein and Smoluchowski: Some new applications and new experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dávid, Selmeczi; Tolic-Nørrelykke, S.F.; Schäffer, E.

    2007-01-01

    that it requires an understanding of Brownian motion beyond Einstein's and Smoluchowski's for its calibration, and can measure effects not present in their theories. This is illustrated with some applications, current and potential. It is also shown how addition of a controlled forced motion on the nano......The first half of this review describes the development in mathematical models of Brownian motion after Einstein's and Smoluchowski's seminal papers and current applications to optical tweezers. This instrument of choice among single-molecule biophysicists is also an instrument of such precision...

  1. Effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA hairpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Zhai, Weili; Gong, Hongling; Liu, Yanhui; Chen, Hu

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride prevents tooth decay as an additive in oral hygiene products, while high dose intake of fluoride from contaminated drinking water leads to fluorosis. Here we studied the effect of fluoride ion on the stability of DNA double helix using magnetic tweezers. The equilibrium critical force decreases with increasing concentration of fluoride in the range from 1 mM to 100 mM. Our results give the first quantitative measurement of DNA stability in the presence of fluoride ion, which might disturb DNA-related biological processes to cause fluorosis.

  2. Theory of nonlinear acoustic forces acting on fluids and particles in microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Jonas Tobias

    as well as experiments with aqueous solutions in an acoustofluidic glass-silicon microchip. The ability of the acoustic force density to stabilize fluid inhomogeneities makes possible the development of a microfluidic analog to density-gradient centrifugation, called iso-acoustic focusing, which...... is demonstrated for acousto-mechanical phenotyping of single white blood cells and cancer cells in continuous flow. The theory of the acoustic force density furthermore leads to the prediction of the possibility of using acoustic tweezers to actively manipulate miscible-fluid interfaces and concentration fields...

  3. CAD-driven microassembly and visual servoing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.T.; Simon, R.W.

    1998-03-10

    This paper describes current research and development on a robotic visual servoing system for assembly of LIGA (Lithography Galvonoforming Abforming) parts. The workcell consists of an AMTI robot, precision stage, long working distance microscope, and LIGA fabricated tweezers for picking up the parts. Fourier optics methods are used to generate synthetic microscope images from CAD drawings. These synthetic images are used off-line to test image processing routines under varying magnifications and depths of field, They also provide reference image features which are used to visually servo the part to the desired position.

  4. Surface optical vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Babiker, M.; Andrews, D. L.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how the total internal reflection of orbital-angular-momentum-endowed light can lead to the generation of evanescent light possessing rotational properties in which the intensity distribution is firmly localized in the vicinity of the surface. The characteristics of these surface optical vortices depend on the form of the incident light and on the dielectric mismatch of the two media. The interference of surface optical vortices is shown to give rise to interesting phenomena, including pattern rotation akin to a surface optical Ferris wheel. Applications are envisaged to be in atom lithography, optical surface tweezers, and spanners.

  5. Buckling of Actin-Coated Membranes under Application of a Local Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, E.; Harlepp, S.; Bourdieu, L.; Robert, J.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Chatenay, D.

    2001-08-20

    The mechanical properties of composite membranes obtained by self-assembly of actin filaments with giant fluid vesicles are studied by micromanipulation with optical tweezers. These complexes exhibit typical mechanical features of a solid shell, including a finite in-plane shear elastic modulus ({approx}10{sup -6} N /m). A buckling instability is observed when a localized force of the order of 0.5pN is applied perpendicular to the membrane plane. Although predicted for polymerized vesicles, this is the first evidence of such an instability.

  6. Buckling of Actin-Coated Membranes under Application of a Local Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfer, E.; Harlepp, S.; Bourdieu, L.; Robert, J.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Chatenay, D.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanical properties of composite membranes obtained by self-assembly of actin filaments with giant fluid vesicles are studied by micromanipulation with optical tweezers. These complexes exhibit typical mechanical features of a solid shell, including a finite in-plane shear elastic modulus (∼10 -6 N /m). A buckling instability is observed when a localized force of the order of 0.5pN is applied perpendicular to the membrane plane. Although predicted for polymerized vesicles, this is the first evidence of such an instability

  7. Simulation of optical soliton control in micro- and nanoring resonator systems

    CERN Document Server

    Daud, Suzairi; Ali, Jalil

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces optical soliton control in micro- and nanoring resonator systems. It describes how the ring resonator systems can be optimized as optical tweezers for photodetection by controlling the input power, ring radii and coupling coefficients of the systems. Numerous arrangements and configurations of micro and nanoring resonator systems are explained. The analytical formulation and optical transfer function for each model and the interaction of the optical signals in the systems are discussed. This book shows that the models designed are able to control the dynamical behaviour of generated signals.

  8. Optical two-beam trap in a polymer microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Catak, Darmin; Marie, Rodolphe

    2016-01-01

    , single beam optical traps, aka optical tweezers, by far outnumber the existing optical stretchers in research labs throughout the world. The ability to easily construct an optical stretcher setup in a low-cost material would possibly imply more frequent use of the optical stretching technique. Here, we...... will outline the design, the production procedures, and results obtained in a fiber-based experimental setup built within an injection molded microfluidic polymer chip. The microfluidic chip is constructed with a three layer technology in which we ensure both horizontal and vertical focusing of the cells we...

  9. Crystal structure of racemic cis-2-amino-1,2-diphenylethanol (ADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Fujii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title racemic compound, C14H15NO, the hydroxy and amino groups form a bent tweezer-like motif towards the phenyl groups. In the crystal, enantiomers aggregate with each other and are linked by O—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming chiral 21-helical columnar structures from C(5 chains along the b-axis direction. Left- and right-handed 21 helices are formed from (1S,2R-2-amino-1,2-diphenylethanol and (1R,2S-2-amino-1,2-diphenylethanol, respectively.

  10. Mechanical unfolding of proteins: reduction to a single-reaction coordinate unfolding potential, and an application of the Jarzynski Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Peter; West, Daniel; Paci, Emanuele

    2007-03-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM, optical tweezers, etc) has revolutionized the study of many biopolymers, including DNA, RNA, and proteins. In this talk I will discuss recent work on modelling of mechanical unfolding of proteins, as often probed by AFM. I will address two issues in obtaining a coarse-grained description of protein unfolding: how to project the entire energy landscape onto an effective one dimensional unfolding potential, and how to apply the Jarzynski Relation to extract equilibrium free energies from nonequilibrium unfolding experiments.

  11. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed...

  12. Optically controlled grippers for manipulating micron-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Graham; Barron, Louise; Beck, Fiona; Whyte, Graeme; Padgett, Miles

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a joystick controlled gripper for the real-time manipulation of micron-sized objects, driven using holographic optical tweezers (HOTs). The gripper consists of an arrangement of four silica beads, located in optical traps, which can be positioned and scaled in order to trap an object indirectly. The joystick can be used to grasp, move (lateral or axial), and change the orientation of the target object. The ability to trap objects indirectly allows us to demonstrate the manipulation of a strongly scattering micron-sized metallic particle.

  13. Experimental and theoretical determination of optical binding forces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Čižmár, T.; Karásek, Vítězslav; Šiler, Martin; Dholakia, K.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 24 (2010), s. 25389-25402 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0348; GA MŠk OC08034; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06007; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : optical binding forces * micro-particles * inter-particle effects * optical manipulation * optical tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.749, year: 2010

  14. Single-molecule folding mechanism of an EF-hand neuronal calcium sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Otazo, Mariela R.; Bellucci, Luca

    2013-01-01

    EF-hand calcium sensors respond structurally to changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, triggering diverse cellular responses and resulting in broad interactomes. Despite impressive advances in decoding their structure-function relationships, the folding mechanism of neuronal calcium sensors...... is still elusive. We used single-molecule optical tweezers to study the folding mechanism of the human neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS1). Two intermediate structures induced by Ca2+ binding to the EF-hands were observed during refolding. The complete folding of the C domain is obligatory for the folding...

  15. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon

    2015-01-01

    distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Ramanbased cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/ or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating...... peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscaleresolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from...

  16. Bio-optofluidics and biophotonics at the cellular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Tauro, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    tweezers, the BioPhotonics workstation is e.g. capable of long range 3D manipulation. This enables a variety of biological studies such as manipulation of intricate microfabricated assemblies or for automated and parallel optofluidic cell sorting. To further reduce its overhead, we propose ways of making...... the BioPhotonics Workstation platform more photon efficient by studying the 3D distribution of the counter propagating beams and utilizing the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method for illuminating the applied spatial light modulators. Moving ahead, we envision optimal designs for the manipulated...

  17. DNA-cisplatin binding mechanism peculiarities studied with single molecule stretching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafuli, F. A. P.; Cesconetto, E. C.; Ramos, E. B.; Rocha, M. S.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the DNA-cisplatin binding mechanism peculiarities by monitoring the mechanical properties of these complexes. To accomplish this task, we have performed single molecule stretching experiments by using optical tweezers, from which the persistence and contour lengths of the complexes can be promptly measured. The persistence length of the complexes as a function of the drug total concentration in the sample was used to deduce the binding data, from which we show that cisplatin binds cooperatively to the DNA molecule, a point which so far has not been stressed in binding equilibrium studies of this ligand.

  18. A rate-jump method for characterization of soft tissues using nanoindentation techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Bin

    2012-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of soft tissues play an important role in their normal physiological and physical function, and may possibly relate to certain diseases. The advent of nanomechanical testing techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), nano-indentation and optical tweezers, enables the nano/micro-mechanical properties of soft tissues to be investigated, but in spite of the fact that biological tissues are highly viscoelastic, traditional elastic contact theory has been routinely used to analyze experimental data. In this article, a novel rate-jump protocol for treating viscoelasticity in nanomechanical data analysis is described. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. A method to estimate the elastic energy stored in braided DNA molecules using hydrodynamic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sierra, Mónica; Delgado-Martí, Violeta; Colón-García, Jorge E.; Quiñones, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    We present a single-molecule method for measuring the torque exerted by braided DNA molecules undergoing spontaneous unbraiding while attached to a paramagnetic dumbbell in the absence of external manipulation. A magnetic tweezers setup is employed to braid pairs of lambda DNA molecules covalently bound to a surface. Upon removing the magnetic field, the braided DNA molecules undergo spontaneous unbraiding, efficiently transforming the stored elastic energy into enough mechanical energy to rotate the tethered dumbbells for periods as long as 30 minutes. Using hydrodynamic equations we estimate the torque exerted on the dumbbells by the DNA braids, yielding values ranging from 47 to 166 pN nm. PMID:21765578

  20. Brownian motion after Einstein and Smoluchowski: Some new applications and new experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dávid, Selmeczi; Tolic-Nørrelykke, S.F.; Schäffer, E.

    2007-01-01

    The first half of this review describes the development in mathematical models of Brownian motion after Einstein's and Smoluchowski's seminal papers and current applications to optical tweezers. This instrument of choice among single-molecule biophysicists is also an instrument of such precision...... that it requires an understanding of Brownian motion beyond Einstein's and Smoluchowski's for its calibration, and can measure effects not present in their theories. This is illustrated with some applications, current and potential. It is also shown how addition of a controlled forced motion on the nano...

  1. Application of reverse engineering in the medical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleev, A. A.; Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop on the basis of existing analogs new design of ophthalmologic microsurgical tweezers by using reverse engineering techniques. Virtual model was obtained by using a three-dimensional scanning system Solutionix Rexcan 450 MP. Geomagic Studio program was used to remove defects and inaccuracies of the obtained parametric model. A prototype of the finished model was made on the installation of laser stereolithography Projet 6000. Total time of the creation was 16 hours from the reverse engineering procedure to 3D-printing of the prototype.

  2. Thermally induced micro-motion by inflection in optical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ryabov, A.; Filip, R.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAY (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 1697. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : molecular motors * brownian-motion * manipulation * efficiency * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  3. Controlling Active Liquid Crystal Droplets with Temperature and Surfactant Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Jake; Milas, Peker; Ross, Jennifer

    Active matter is the study of driven many-body systems that span length scales from flocking birds to molecular motors. A previously described self-propelled particle system was made from liquid crystal (LC) droplets in water with high surfactant concentration to move particles via asymmetric surface instabilities. Using a similar system, we investigate the driving activity as a function of SDS surfactant concentration and temperature. We then use an optical tweezer to trap and locally heat the droplets to cause hydrodynamic flow and coupling between multiple droplets. This system will be the basis for a triggerable assembly system to build and couple LC droplets. DOD AROMURI 67455-CH-MUR.

  4. Hairpins under tension: RNA versus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercy, Mathilde; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2015-11-16

    We use optical tweezers to control the folding and unfolding of individual DNA and RNA hairpins by force. Four hairpin molecules are studied in comparison: two DNA and two RNA ones. We observe that the conformational dynamics is slower for the RNA hairpins than for their DNA counterparts. Our results indicate that structures made of RNA are dynamically more stable. This difference might contribute to the fact that DNA and RNA play fundamentally different biological roles in spite of chemical similarity. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Adaptive optics in microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Martin J

    2007-12-15

    The imaging properties of optical microscopes are often compromised by aberrations that reduce image resolution and contrast. Adaptive optics technology has been employed in various systems to correct these aberrations and restore performance. This has required various departures from the traditional adaptive optics schemes that are used in astronomy. This review discusses the sources of aberrations, their effects and their correction with adaptive optics, particularly in confocal and two-photon microscopes. Different methods of wavefront sensing, indirect aberration measurement and aberration correction devices are discussed. Applications of adaptive optics in the related areas of optical data storage, optical tweezers and micro/nanofabrication are also reviewed.

  6. Graphene hydrogels with embedded metal nanoparticles as efficient catalysts in 4-nitrophenol reduction and methylene blue decolorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żelechowska Kamila

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis and characterization of the graphene hydrogels with three different metallic nanoparticles, that is Au, Ag and Cu, respectively is presented. Synthesized in a one-pot approach graphene hydrogels with embedded metallic nanoparticles were tested as heterogeneous catalysts in a model reaction of 4-nitrophenol reduction. The highest activity was obtained for graphene hydrogel with Cu nanoparticles and additional reaction of methylene blued degradation was evaluated using this system. The obtained outstanding catalytic activity arises from the synergistic effect of graphene and metallic nanoparticles. The hydrogel form of the catalyst benefits in the easiness in separation from the reaction mixture (for example using tweezers and reusability.

  7. Colloids dragged through a polymer solution: Experiment, theory, and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Christof; Kremer, Friedrich; Krüger, Matthias; Rauscher, Markus; Weeber, Rudolf; Harting, Jens

    2008-08-28

    We present microrheological measurements of the drag force on colloids pulled through a solution of lambda-DNA (used here as a monodisperse model polymer) with an optical tweezer. The experiments show a drag force that is larger than expected from the Stokes formula and the independently measured viscosity of the DNA solution. We attribute this to the accumulation of DNA in front of the colloid and the reduced DNA density behind the colloid. This hypothesis is corroborated by a simple drift-diffusion model for the DNA molecules, which reproduces the experimental data surprisingly well, as well as by corresponding Brownian dynamics simulations.

  8. Real-time interactive 3D manipulation of particles viewed in two orthogonal observation planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch-Nielsen, I.; Rodrigo, P.J.; Glückstad, J.

    2005-01-01

    The generalized phase contrast (GPC) method has been applied to transform a single TEM00 beam into a manifold of counterpropagating-beam traps capable of real-time interactive manipulation of multiple microparticles in three dimensions (3D). This paper reports on the use of low numerical aperture...... (NA), non-immersion, objective lenses in an implementation of the GPC-based 3D trapping system. Contrary to high-NA based optical tweezers, the GPC trapping system demonstrated here operates with long working distance (>10 mm), and offers a wider manipulation region and a larger field of view...

  9. Three-dimensional mapping of fluorescent nanoparticles using incoherent digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Takumi; Abe, Ryosuke; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2015-07-15

    Three-dimensional mapping of fluorescent nanoparticles was performed by using incoherent digital holography. The positions of the nanoparticles were quantitatively determined by using Gaussian fitting of the axial- and lateral-diffraction distributions through position calibration from the observation space to the sample space. It was found that the axial magnification was constant whereas the lateral magnification linearly depended on the axial position of the fluorescent nanoparticles. The mapping of multiple fluorescent nanoparticles fixed in gelatin and a single fluorescent nanoparticle manipulated with optical tweezers in water were demonstrated.

  10. Silicon-enhanced resistance to cadmium toxicity in Brassica chinensis L. is attributed to Si-suppressed cadmium uptake and transport and Si-enhanced antioxidant defense capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Alin [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Li Zhaojun [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Crop Nutrition and Fertilization, Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang Jie [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Xue Gaofeng; Fan Fenliang [Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Crop Nutrition and Fertilization, Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081 (China); Liang Yongchao, E-mail: ycliang@caas.ac.cn [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Crop Nutrition and Fertilization, Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081 (China); Key Laboratory of Oasis Eco-Agriculture, College of Agriculture, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China)

    2009-12-15

    A series of hydroponics experiments were performed to investigate roles of silicon (Si) in enhancing cadmium (Cd) tolerance in two pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.) cultivars: i.e. cv. Shanghaiqing, a Cd-sensitive cultivar, and cv. Hangyoudong, a Cd-tolerant cultivar. Plants were grown under 0.5 and 5 mg Cd L{sup -1} Cd stress without or with 1.5 mM Si. Plant growth of the Cd-tolerant cultivar was stimulated at the lower Cd level, but was decreased at the higher Cd level when plants were treated with Cd for one week. However, Plant growth was severely inhibited at both Cd levels as stress duration lasted for up to three weeks. Plant growth of the Cd-sensitive cultivar was severely inhibited at both Cd levels irrespective of Cd stress duration. Addition of Si increased shoot and root biomass of both cultivars at both Cd levels and decreased Cd uptake and root-to-shoot transport. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities decreased, but malondialdehyde and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations increased at the higher Cd level, which were counteracted by Si added. Ascorbic acid, glutathione and non-protein thiols concentrations increased at the higher Cd level, which were further intensified by addition of Si. The effects of Si and Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activity were further verified by isoenzyme analysis. Silicon was more effective in enhancing Cd tolerance in the Cd-tolerant cultivar than in the Cd-sensitive cultivar. It can be concluded that Si-enhanced Cd tolerance in B. chinensis is attributed mainly to Si-suppressed Cd uptake and root-to-shoot Cd transport and Si-enhanced antioxidant defense activity.

  11. Barley metallothioneins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Schiller, Michaela; Kichey, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    and cadmium (Cd) in MT4, which was not the case for MT3. When complementary DNAs from barley MTs were expressed in Cu- or Cd-sensitive yeast mutants, MT3 provided a much stronger complementation than did MT4. We conclude that MT3 may play a housekeeping role in metal homeostasis, while MT4 may function in Zn...... storage in developing and mature grains. The localization of MT4 and its discrimination against Cd make it an ideal candidate for future biofortification strategies directed toward increasing food and feed Zn concentrations....

  12. Optically Driven Mobile Integrated Micro-Tools for a Lab-on-a-Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jui Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an optically driven complex micromachine with an Archimedes microscrew as the mechanical power, a sphere as a coupler, and three knives as the mechanical tools. The micromachine is fabricated by two-photon polymerization and is portably driven by optical tweezers. Because the microscrew can be optically trapped and rotates spontaneously, it provides driving power for the complex micro-tools. In other words, when a laser beam focuses on the micromachine, the microscrew is trapped toward the focus point and simultaneously rotates. A demonstration showed that the integrated micromachines are grasped by the optical tweezers and rotated by the Archimedes screw. The rotation efficiencies of the microrotors with and without knives are 1.9 rpm/mW and 13.5 rpm/mW, respectively. The micromachine can also be portably dragged along planed routes. Such Archimedes screw-based optically driven complex mechanical micro-tools enable rotation similar to moving machines or mixers, which could contribute to applications for a biological microfluidic chip or a lab-on-a-chip.

  13. Measurement of the mechanical properties of single Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 cells in different osmotic concentrations using a robot-integrated microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Di; Sakuma, Shinya; Kera, Kota; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Arai, Fumihito

    2018-03-23

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 (Synechocystis) is a model microorganism and its mechanosensitive (MS) channels play important roles in its osmoadaptation mechanism. When the osmotic concentration of the culture environment changes, the inner pressure of the cell also changes due to the transportation of water through ion channels. Because the tension in the cell membrane relates to the inner pressure, we expect that the response of the MS channels to an osmotic concentration change could be evaluated by measuring their mechanical properties. Here, we propose a system for the measurement of the mechanical properties of a single Synechocystis cell. We developed a robot-integrated microfluidic chip combined with optical tweezers. The chip has an external actuated pushing probe and a force sensor probe. A single cell was located between the tip of both probes using the optical tweezers and was then deformed using the probes. As a result, we could measure the force and deformation and compare the Young's moduli of two groups: a group of wild type cells and a group of mutant (genetically modified) cells with a defect in the MS channels, at three different osmotic concentrations. The results showed that the Young's modulus of each group changed according to the osmotic concentration, while changes in cell size were too small to be detected. These results confirmed that the proposed evaluation method provides an understanding of the physiological function of MS channels for keeping the cell integrity of microorganisms when the cells are exposed to different external osmotic changes.

  14. Exploring how infrared radiation enhances the attractive interaction between a cell pair by its electromagnetic nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Yeh, Chu; Lin, Po-Cheng; Chao, Chi-Tse

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic radiation can be categorized into ionizing and non-ionizing varieties. To determine the mechanism how non-ionizing radiation affects biological cells, we analyzed the difference between its thermal and electromagnetic effects. Two-beam optical tweezers were designed to demonstrate that infrared radiation could enhance the cellular interaction between red blood cells by its electromagnetic nature. An IR spot in the optical tweezers was irradiated on two RBCs to polarize them and induce electromagnetic attraction, while the other focused visible spot was used to quantify the intensity of the intercellular interaction. It was found that 0.1 mW/μm2 infrared radiation was adequate to cause pN-scale interaction between a cell pair, which was only 1/1000 of the power density used in a CD-R drive. We then set up a model to describe how non-ionizing radiation affected a cell assembly by deriving electromagnetic micro-stress transverse to its propagation axis.

  15. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell-protein or cell-cell contact was also demonstrated.

  16. A novel two-layer, coupled finite element approach for modeling the nonlinear elastic and viscoelastic behavior of human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöppel, Thomas; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2011-07-01

    A novel finite element approach is presented to simulate the mechanical behavior of human red blood cells (RBC, erythrocytes). As the RBC membrane comprises a phospholipid bilayer with an intervening protein network, we propose to model the membrane with two distinct layers. The fairly complex characteristics of the very thin lipid bilayer are represented by special incompressible solid shell elements and an anisotropic viscoelastic constitutive model. Properties of the protein network are modeled with an isotropic hyperelastic third-order material. The elastic behavior of the model is validated with existing optical tweezers studies with quasi-static deformations. Employing material parameters consistent with literature, simulation results are in excellent agreement with experimental data. Available models in literature neglect either the surface area conservation of the RBC membrane or realistic loading conditions of the optical tweezers experiments. The importance of these modeling assumptions, that are both included in this study, are discussed and their influence quantified. For the simulation of the dynamic motion of RBC, the model is extended to incorporate the cytoplasm. This is realized with a monolithic fully coupled fluid-structure interaction simulation, where the fluid is described by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian framework. It is shown that both membrane viscosity and cytoplasm viscosity have significant influence on simulation results. Characteristic recovery times and energy dissipation for varying strain rates in dynamic laser trap experiments are calculated for the first time and are found to be comparable with experimental data.

  17. Effects of glovebox gloves on grip and key pinch strength and contact forces for simulated manual operations with three commonly used hand tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Peng-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of glovebox gloves for 11 females on maximum grip and key pinch strength and on contact forces generated from simulated tasks of a roller, a pair of tweezers and a crescent wrench. The independent variables were gloves fabricated of butyl, CSM/hypalon and neoprene materials; two glove thicknesses; and layers of gloves worn including single, double and triple gloving. CSM/hypalon and butyl gloves produced greater grip strength than the neoprene gloves. CSM/hypalon gloves also lowered contact forces for roller and wrench tasks. Single gloving and thin gloves improved hand strength performances. However, triple layers lowered contact forces for all tasks. Based on the evaluating results, selection and design recommendations of gloves for three hand tools were provided to minimise the effects on hand strength and optimise protection of the palmar hand in glovebox environments. To improve safety and health in the glovebox environments where gloves usage is a necessity, this study provides recommendations for selection and design of glovebox gloves for three hand tools including a roller, a pair of tweezers and a crescent wrench based on the results discovered in the experiments.

  18. Nanoscopic control and quantification of enantioselective optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Saleh, Amr A. E.; van de Haar, Marie Anne; Baum, Brian; Briggs, Justin A.; Lay, Alice; Reyes-Becerra, Olivia A.; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2017-11-01

    Circularly polarized light (CPL) exerts a force of different magnitude on left- and right-handed enantiomers, an effect that could be exploited for chiral resolution of chemical compounds as well as controlled assembly of chiral nanostructures. However, enantioselective optical forces are challenging to control and quantify because their magnitude is extremely small (sub-piconewton) and varies in space with sub-micrometre resolution. Here, we report a technique to both strengthen and visualize these forces, using a chiral atomic force microscope probe coupled to a plasmonic optical tweezer. Illumination of the plasmonic tweezer with CPL exerts a force on the microscope tip that depends on the handedness of the light and the tip. In particular, for a left-handed chiral tip, transverse forces are attractive with left-CPL and repulsive with right-CPL. Additionally, total force differences between opposite-handed specimens exceed 10 pN. The microscope tip can map chiral forces with 2 nm lateral resolution, revealing a distinct spatial distribution of forces for each handedness.

  19. A Quick-responsive DNA Nanotechnology Device for Bio-molecular Homeostasis Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Wang, Pei; Xiao, Chen; Li, Zheng; Yang, Bing; Fu, Jieyang; Chen, Jing; Wan, Neng; Ma, Cong; Li, Maoteng; Yang, Xiangliang; Zhan, Yi

    2016-08-10

    Physiological processes such as metabolism, cell apoptosis and immune responses, must be strictly regulated to maintain their homeostasis and achieve their normal physiological functions. The speed with which bio-molecular homeostatic regulation occurs directly determines the ability of an organism to adapt to conditional changes. To produce a quick-responsive regulatory system that can be easily utilized for various types of homeostasis, a device called nano-fingers that facilitates the regulation of physiological processes was constructed using DNA origami nanotechnology. This nano-fingers device functioned in linked open and closed phases using two types of DNA tweezers, which were covalently coupled with aptamers that captured specific molecules when the tweezer arms were sufficiently close. Via this specific interaction mechanism, certain physiological processes could be simultaneously regulated from two directions by capturing one biofactor and releasing the other to enhance the regulatory capacity of the device. To validate the universal application of this device, regulation of the homeostasis of the blood coagulant thrombin was attempted using the nano-fingers device. It was successfully demonstrated that this nano-fingers device achieved coagulation buffering upon the input of fuel DNA. This nano-device could also be utilized to regulate the homeostasis of other types of bio-molecules.

  20. Appraisal of psychomotor skills of dental students at University Complutense of Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Alfonso García; Sánchez, Esperanza; Hidalgo, Juan J; Díaz, María J

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychomotor skills of the dental students at University Complutense of Madrid (UCM), using a battery of psychometric tests. The sample comprised 306 students of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years of Odontology, who, during the last month of the academic term, took the test on rotation of solid shapes, the Embedded Figures test in its group form (GEFT), the O'Connor Tweezer test, the MacQuarrie test for mechanical ability and the indirect vision test. Before these tests began, some personal data of all students were collected. The results showed some statistically significant correlation between several personal variables (sex, manual dominance and previous skills) and performance in the psychometric tests, although no significant relation was found between these variables and the students' academic qualifications. When comparisons were made between the psychomotor tests and the academic results of the students, significant differences appeared in the tracing and dotting subtests of the MacQuarrie test, whereby those students with higher practical qualifications reached the best punctuation. In the O'Connor Tweezer test, the students who obtained the worst results were those with lower qualifications. These data could serve to detect at an early stage those students who need greater educational support. No relation was found between the GEFT and the indirect vision test.

  1. Tuning and Switching a Plasmonic Quantum Dot “Sandwich” in a Nematic Line Defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundoor, Haridas [University of Colorado; Sheetah, Ghadah H. [University of Colorado; Park, Sungoh [University of Colorado; Ackerman, Paul J. [University of Colorado; Smalyukh, Ivan I. [Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, United States; van de Lagemaat, Jao [Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, United States; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States

    2018-03-05

    We study the quantum-mechanical effects arising in a single semiconductor core/shell quantum dot (QD) controllably sandwiched between two plasmonic nanorods. Control over the position and the 'sandwich' confinement structure is achieved by the use of a linear-trap liquid crystal (LC) line defect and laser tweezers that 'push' the sandwich together. This arrangement allows for the study of exciton-plasmon interactions in a single structure, unaltered by ensemble effects or the complexity of dielectric interfaces. We demonstrate the effect of plasmonic confinement on the photon antibunching behavior of the QD and its luminescence lifetime. The QD behaves as a single emitter when nanorods are far away from the QD but shows possible multiexciton emission and a significantly decreased lifetime when tightly confined in a plasmonic 'sandwich'. These findings demonstrate that LC defects, combined with laser tweezers, enable a versatile platform to study plasmonic coupling phenomena in a nanoscale laboratory, where all elements can be arranged almost at will.

  2. Viscoelastic Properties of Levan-DNA Mixtures Important in Microbial Biofilm Formation as Determined by Micro- and Macrorheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Biljana; Sretenovic, Simon; Dogsa, Iztok; Poberaj, Igor; Stopar, David

    2015-01-01

    We studied the viscoelastic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous levan-DNA mixtures using optical tweezers and a rotational rheometer. Levan and DNA are important components of the extracellular matrix of bacterial biofilms. Their viscoelastic properties influence the mechanical as well as molecular-transport properties of biofilm. Both macro- and microrheology measurements in homogeneous levan-DNA mixtures revealed pseudoplastic behavior. When the concentration of DNA reached a critical value, levan started to aggregate, forming clusters of a few microns in size. Microrheology using optical tweezers enabled us to measure local viscoelastic properties within the clusters as well as in the DNA phase surrounding the levan aggregates. In phase-separated levan-DNA mixtures, the results of macro- and microrheology differed significantly. The local viscosity and elasticity of levan increased, whereas the local viscosity of DNA decreased. On the other hand, the results of bulk viscosity measurements suggest that levan clusters do not interact strongly with DNA. Upon treatment with DNase, levan aggregates dispersed. These results demonstrate the advantages of microrheological measurements compared to bulk viscoelastic measurements when the materials under investigation are complex and inhomogeneous, as is often the case in biological samples. PMID:25650942

  3. Rational design of a cytotoxic dinuclear Cu2 complex that binds by molecular recognition at two neighboring phosphates of the DNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jany, Thomas; Moreth, Alexander; Gruschka, Claudia; Sischka, Andy; Spiering, Andre; Dieding, Mareike; Wang, Ying; Samo, Susan Haji; Stammler, Anja; Bögge, Hartmut; Fischer von Mollard, Gabriele; Anselmetti, Dario; Glaser, Thorsten

    2015-03-16

    The mechanism of the cytotoxic function of cisplatin and related anticancer drugs is based on their binding to the nucleobases of DNA. The development of new classes of anticancer drugs requires establishing other binding modes. Therefore, we performed a rational design for complexes that target two neighboring phosphates of the DNA backbone by molecular recognition resulting in a family of dinuclear complexes based on 2,7-disubstituted 1,8-naphthalenediol. This rigid backbone preorganizes the two metal ions for molecular recognition at the distance of two neighboring phosphates in DNA of 6-7 Å. Additionally, bulky chelating pendant arms in the 2,7-position impede nucleobase complexation by steric hindrance. We successfully synthesized the Cu(II)2 complex of the designed family of dinuclear complexes and studied its binding to dsDNA by independent ensemble and single-molecule methods like gel electrophoresis, precipitation, and titration experiments followed by UV-vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), as well as optical tweezers (OT) and magnetic tweezers (MT) DNA stretching. The observed irreversible binding of our dinuclear Cu(II)2 complex to dsDNA leads to a blocking of DNA synthesis as studied by polymerase chain reactions and cytotoxicity for human cancer cells.

  4. Geometrically unrestricted, topologically constrained control of liquid crystal defects using simultaneous holonomic magnetic and holographic optical manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Michael C. M.; Jenness, Nathan J.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.

    2014-02-01

    Despite the recent progress in physical control and manipulation of various condensed matter, atomic, and particle systems, including individual atoms and photons, our ability to control topological defects remains limited. Recently, controlled generation, spatial translation, and stretching of topological point and line defects have been achieved using laser tweezers and liquid crystals as model defect-hosting systems. However, many modes of manipulation remain hindered by limitations inherent to optical trapping. To overcome some of these limitations, we integrate holographic optical tweezers with a magnetic manipulation system, which enables fully holonomic manipulation of defects by means of optically and magnetically controllable colloids used as "handles" to transfer forces and torques to various liquid crystal defects. These colloidal handles are magnetically rotated around determined axes and are optically translated along three-dimensional pathways while mechanically attached to defects, which, combined with inducing spatially localized nematic-isotropic phase transitions, allow for geometrically unrestricted control of defects, including previously unrealized modes of noncontact manipulation, such as the twisting of disclination clusters. These manipulation capabilities may allow for probing topological constraints and the nature of defects in unprecedented ways, providing the foundation for a tabletop laboratory to expand our understanding of the role defects play in fields ranging from subatomic particle physics to early-universe cosmology.

  5. Single-molecule manipulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyu; Liu, Siyun; Gao, Ying

    2018-01-25

    Compared to conventional ensemble methods, studying macromolecules at single-molecule level can reveal extraordinary clear and even surprising views for a biological reaction. In the past 20 years, single-molecule techniques have been undergoing a very rapid development, and these cutting edge technologies have revolutionized the biological research by facilitating single-molecule manipulation and detection. Here we give a brief review about these advanced techniques, including optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, atomic force microscopy (AFM), hydrodynamic flow-stretching assay, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET). We are trying to describe their basic principles and provide a few examples of applications for each technique. This review aims to give a rather introductory survey of single-molecule techniques for audiences with biological or biophysical background. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Bespoke optical springs and passive force clamps from shaped dielectric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, S.H.; Phillips, D.B.; Carberry, D.M.; Hanna, S.

    2013-01-01

    By moulding optical fields, holographic optical tweezers are able to generate structured force fields with magnitudes and length scales of great utility for experiments in soft matter and biological physics. It has recently been noted that optically induced force fields are determined not only by the incident optical field, but by the shape and composition of the particles involved [Gluckstad J. Optical manipulation: sculpting the object. Nat Photonics 2011;5:7–8]. Indeed, there are desirable but simple attributes of a force field, such as orientational control, that cannot be introduced by sculpting optical fields alone. With this insight in mind, we show, theoretically, how relationships between force and displacement can be controlled by optimizing particle shapes. We exhibit a constant force optical spring, made from a tapered microrod and discuss methods by which it could be fabricated. In addition, we investigate the optical analogue of streamlining, and show how objects can be shaped so as to reduce the effects of radiation pressure, and hence switch from non-trapping to trapping regimes. -- Highlights: ► Forces in optical tweezers are controlled in theory by optimizing particle shapes. ► Optical force clamping is suggested, using a tapered microrod. ► Optical streamlining is demonstrated using computer simulations. ► Via streamlining it is possible to switch from non-trapping to trapping regimes

  7. Direct measurements of the frequency-dependent dielectrophoresis force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming-Tzo; Junio, Joseph; Ou-Yang, H Daniel

    2009-01-02

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the phenomenon of directed motion of electrically polarizable particles in a nonuniform electric field, is promising for applications in biochemical separation and filtration. For colloidal particles in suspension, the relaxation of the ionic species in the shear layer gives rise to a frequency-dependent, bidirectional DEP force in the radio frequency range. However, quantification methods of the DEP force on individual particles with the pico-Newton resolution required for the development of theories and design of device applications are lacking. We report the use of optical tweezers as a force sensor and a lock-in phase-sensitive technique for analysis of the particle motion in an amplitude modulated DEP force. The coherent detection and sensing scheme yielded not only unprecedented sensitivity for DEP force measurements, but also provided a selectivity that clearly distinguishes the pure DEP force from all the other forces in the system, including electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, heat-induced convection, and Brownian forces, all of which can hamper accurate measurements through other existing methods. Using optical tweezers-based force transducers already developed in our laboratory, we have results that quantify the frequency-dependent DEP force and the crossover frequency of individual particles with this new experimental method.

  8. Study of optically trapped living Trypanosoma cruzi/Trypanosoma rangeli - Rhodnius prolixus interactions by real time confocal images using CdSe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Faustino, W. M.; Jacob, G. J.; Fontes, A.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2008-08-01

    One of the fundamental goals in biology is to understand the interplay between biomolecules of different cells. This happen, for example, in the first moments of the infection of a vector by a parasite that results in the adherence to the cell walls. To observe this kind of event we used an integrated Optical Tweezers and Confocal Microscopy tool. This tool allow us to use the Optical Tweezers to trigger the adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli parasite to the intestine wall cells and salivary gland of the Rhodnius prolixus vector and to, subsequently observe the sequence of events by confocal fluorescence microscopy under optical forces stresses. We kept the microorganism and vector cells alive using CdSe quantum dot staining. Besides the fact that Quantum Dots are bright vital fluorescent markers, the absence of photobleaching allow us to follow the events in time for an extended period. By zooming to the region of interested we have been able to acquire confocal images at the 2 to 3 frames per second rate.

  9. Propagation-invariant vectorial Bessel beams by use of sub wavelength quantized Pancharatnam-Berry phase optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niv, A.; Biener, G.; Kleiner, V.; Hasman, E.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text:Propagation-invariant scalar fields have been extensively studied both theoretically and experimentally, since they were proposed by Durnin et al. These fields were employed in applications such as optical tweezers and for transport and guiding of microspheres. Although there has recently been considerable theoretical interest in propagation-invariant vectorial beams, experimental studies of such beams have remained somewhat limited. One of the most interesting types of propagation-invariant vectorial beam is the linearly polarized axially symmetric beam (LPASB) [l]. Recently, we introduced and experimentally demonstrated propagation-invariant vectorial Bessel beams with linearly polarized axial symmetry based on quantized Pancharatnam-Berry phase optical elements (QPBOEs) [21 and an axicon. QP-BOEs utilize the geometric phase that accompanies space-variant polarization manipulations to achieve a desired phase modification [31. To test our approach we formed QPBOEs with different polarization orders as computer-generated space-variant sub wavelength gratings upon GaAs wafers for use with 10.6 micron laser radiation. The resultant beams were also transmitted through a polarizer that produced a unique propagation-invariant scalar beam. This beam has a propeller-shaped intensity pattern that can be rotated by simple rotation of the polarizer. We therefore have demonstrated the formation of a vectorial Bessel beam by using simple, lightweight thin elements and exploited that beam to perform a controlled rotation of a propeller-shaped intensity pattern that can be suitable for optical tweezers

  10. Improved Laser Manipulation for On-chip Fabricated Microstructures Based on Solution Replacement and Its Application in Single Cell Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the fabrication and assembly of microstructures inside a microfluidic device based on a photocrosslinkable resin and optical tweezers. We also report a method of solution replacement inside the microfluidic channel in order to improve the manipulation performance and apply the assembled microstructures for single cell cultivation. By the illumination of patterned ultraviolet (UV through a microscope, microstructures of arbitrary shape were fabricated by the photocrosslinkable resin inside a microfluidic channel. Based on the microfluidic channel with both glass and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS surfaces, immovable and movable microstructures were fabricated and manipulated. The microstructures were fabricated at the desired places and manipulated by the optical tweezers. A rotational microstructure including a microgear and a rotation axis was assembled and rotated in demonstrating this technique. The improved laser manipulation of microstructures was achieved based on the on-chip solution replacement method. The manipulation speed of the microstructures increased when the viscosity of the solvent decreased. The movement efficiency of the fabricated microstructures inside the lower viscosity solvent was evaluated and compared with those microstructures inside the former high viscosity solvent. A novel cell cage was fabricated and the cultivation of a single yeast cell (w303 was demonstrated in the cell cage, inside the microfluidic device.

  11. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  12. Investigation on cytoskeleton dynamics for no-adherent cells subjected to point-like stimuli by digital holographic microscopy and holographic optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Memmolo, Pasquale; Mugnano, Martina; Fusco, Sabato; Netti, Paolo A.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-05-01

    Guiding, controlling and studying cellular functions are challenging themes in the biomedical field, as they are fundamental prerequisites for new therapeutic strategies from tissue regeneration to controlled drug delivery. In recent years, multidisciplinary studies in nanotechnology offer new tools to investigate important biophysical phenomena in response to the local physical characteristics of the extracellular environment, some examples are the mechanisms of cell adhesion, migration, communication and differentiation. Indeed for reproducing the features of the extracellular matrix in vitro, it is essential to develop active devices that evoke as much as possible the natural cellular environment. Our investigation is in the framework of studying and clarifying the biophysical mechanisms of the interaction between cells and the microenvironment in which they exist. We implement an optical tweezers setup to investigate cell material interaction and we use Digital Holography as non-invasive imaging technique in microscopy. We exploit Holographic Optical Tweezers arrangement in order to trap and manage functionalized micrometric latex beads to induce mechanical deformation in suspended cells. A lot of papers in literature examine the dynamics of the cytoskeleton when cells adhere on substrates and nowadays well established cell models are based on such research activities. Actually, the natural cell environment is made of a complex extracellular matrix and the single cell behavior is due to intricate interactions with the environment and are strongly correlated to the cell-cell interactions. Our investigation is devoted to understand the inner cell mechanism when it is mechanically stressed by point-like stimulus without the substrate influence.

  13. HoloTrap: Interactive hologram design for multiple dynamic optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleguezuelos, E.; Carnicer, A.; Andilla, J.; Martín-Badosa, E.; Montes-Usategui, M.

    2007-06-01

    This work presents an application that generates real-time holograms to be displayed on a holographic optical tweezers setup; a technique that allows the manipulation of particles in the range from micrometres to nanometres. The software is written in Java, and uses random binary masks to generate the holograms. It allows customization of several parameters that are dependent on the experimental setup, such as the specific characteristics of the device displaying the hologram, or the presence of aberrations. We evaluate the software's performance and conclude that real-time interaction is achieved. We give our experimental results from manipulating 5 μm microspheres using the program. Program summaryTitle of program: HoloTrap Catalogue identifier:ADZB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZB_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: General computer Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Windows, Linux Programming language used: Java Memory required to execute with typical data: up to 34 MB including the Java Virtual Machine No. of bits in a word: 8 bits No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 471 145 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 141 457 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: To calculate and display holograms for generating multiple and dynamic optical tweezers to be reconfigured interactively. Method of solution: Fast random binary mask for the simultaneous codification of multiple phase functions into a phase modulation device. Typical running time: Up to 10 frames per second Unusual features of the program: None References: The method for calculating holograms can be found in [M. Montes-Usategui, E. Pleguezuelos, J. Andilla

  14. Use of an optical trap for study of host-pathogen interactions for dynamic live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Jenny M; Castro, Carlos E; Heath, Robert J W; Mansour, Michael K; Cardenas, Michael L; Xavier, Ramnik J; Lang, Matthew J; Vyas, Jatin M

    2011-07-28

    Dynamic live cell imaging allows direct visualization of real-time interactions between cells of the immune system(1, 2); however, the lack of spatial and temporal control between the phagocytic cell and microbe has rendered focused observations into the initial interactions of host response to pathogens difficult. Historically, intercellular contact events such as phagocytosis(3) have been imaged by mixing two cell types, and then continuously scanning the field-of-view to find serendipitous intercellular contacts at the appropriate stage of interaction. The stochastic nature of these events renders this process tedious, and it is difficult to observe early or fleeting events in cell-cell contact by this approach. This method requires finding cell pairs that are on the verge of contact, and observing them until they consummate their contact, or do not. To address these limitations, we use optical trapping as a non-invasive, non-destructive, but fast and effective method to position cells in culture. Optical traps, or optical tweezers, are increasingly utilized in biological research to capture and physically manipulate cells and other micron-sized particles in three dimensions(4). Radiation pressure was first observed and applied to optical tweezer systems in 1970(5, 6), and was first used to control biological specimens in 1987(7). Since then, optical tweezers have matured into a technology to probe a variety of biological phenomena(8-13). We describe a method(14) that advances live cell imaging by integrating an optical trap with spinning disk confocal microscopy with temperature and humidity control to provide exquisite spatial and temporal control of pathogenic organisms in a physiological environment to facilitate interactions with host cells, as determined by the operator. Live, pathogenic organisms like Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus, which can cause potentially lethal, invasive infections in immunocompromised individuals(15, 16) (e.g. AIDS

  15. New records of three hippoboscid species on newly captured birds from nature in Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Fontanelli Vaz

    Full Text Available Abstract The aims of this study was to provide new records of hippoboscid flies collected over an one-year period on newly captured birds from nature in the state of Paraná, Brazil. The birds were received by a wildlife center in Tijucas do Sul and the hippoboscid flies were collect by hand or by tweezers, generating a prevalence of 0.7% (16/2232 of parasitized birds. New information about distribution of hippoboscid flies on Asio clamator, Rupornis magnirostris and Athene cunicularia was reported in the state of Paraná. The Caracara plancus, Falco peregrinus and Penelope obscura are new host species for Ornithoctona erythrocephala in the state of Paraná, and the Asio stygius for Icosta rufiventris and Ornithoica vicina in Brazil. This study provided new information about hosts and distribution of hippoboscid flies in Brazilian birds.

  16. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed......Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...

  17. Mechanisms of Cellular Proteostasis: Insights from Single-Molecule Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Carlos J.; Kaiser, Christian M.; Maillard, Rodrigo A.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Wilson, Christian A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells employ a variety of strategies to maintain proteome homeostasis. Beginning during protein biogenesis, the translation machinery and a number of molecular chaperones promote correct de novo folding of nascent proteins even before synthesis is complete. Another set of molecular chaperones helps to maintain proteins in their functional, native state. Polypeptides that are no longer needed or pose a threat to the cell, such as misfolded proteins and aggregates, are removed in an efficient and timely fashion by ATP-dependent proteases. In this review, we describe how applications of single-molecule manipulation methods, in particular optical tweezers, are shedding new light on the molecular mechanisms of quality control during the life cycles of proteins. PMID:24895851

  18. Blood cleaner on-chip design for artificial human kidney manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanpayak, N; Jalil, MA; Aziz, MS; Ismail, FD; Ali, J; Yupapin, PP

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of a blood cleaner on-chip using an optical waveguide known as a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. By controlling some suitable parameters, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated and used to form the trapping tools in the same way as optical tweezers. In operation, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons by using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator. This can be used for blood waste trapping and moves dynamically within the blood cleaner on-chip system (artificial kidney), and is performed within the wavelength routers. Finally, the blood quality test is exploited by the external probe before sending to the destination. The advantage of the proposed kidney on-chip system is that the unwanted substances can be trapped and filtered from the artificial kidney, which can be available for blood cleaning applications. PMID:21720507

  19. Proposal for Alzheimer’s diagnosis using molecular buffer and bus network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitatha, S; Moongfangklang, N; Jalil, MA; Suwanpayak, N; Saktioto, T; Ali, J; Yupapin, PP

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of an optical trapping tool for tangle protein (tau tangles, β-amyloid plaques) and molecular motor storage and delivery using a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. The optical vortices can be generated and controlled to form the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers. In theory, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons, and is reviewed. By using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator, the required molecular volumes can be trapped and moved dynamically within the molecular buffer and bus network. The tangle protein and molecular motor can transport and connect to the required destinations, enabling availability for Alzheimer’s diagnosis. PMID:21822383

  20. Molecular buffer using a PANDA ring resonator for drug delivery use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanpayak, N; Jalil, MA; Aziz, MS; Ali, J; Yupapin, PP

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of molecular buffer for molecule storage and delivery using a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. The optical vortices can be generated and controlled to form the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers. In theory, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons, which is reviewed. By using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator, the required molecules can be trapped and moved (transported) dynamically within the wavelength router or network, ie, a molecular buffer. This can be performed within the wavelength router before reaching the required destination. The advantage of the proposed system is that a transmitter and receiver can be formed within the same system, which is available for molecule storage and transportation. PMID:21674014

  1. Blood cleaner on-chip design for artificial human kidney manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanpayak, N; Jalil, M A; Aziz, M S; Ismail, F D; Ali, J; Yupapin, P P

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of a blood cleaner on-chip using an optical waveguide known as a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. By controlling some suitable parameters, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated and used to form the trapping tools in the same way as optical tweezers. In operation, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons by using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator. This can be used for blood waste trapping and moves dynamically within the blood cleaner on-chip system (artificial kidney), and is performed within the wavelength routers. Finally, the blood quality test is exploited by the external probe before sending to the destination. The advantage of the proposed kidney on-chip system is that the unwanted substances can be trapped and filtered from the artificial kidney, which can be available for blood cleaning applications.

  2. The role of thermal motion in free-space light-atom interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yue Sum; Steiner, Matthias; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The prospects of distributed quantum networks have triggered much interest in developing light-matter interfaces. While this is usually realized by optical resonators, tightly focused free-space interfaces offer a complementary alternative. Our version of free-space light-matter interface is formed by a pair of high numerical aperture (NA=0.75) lenses and a single atom held in an optical tweezer. Operating near the diffraction limit, we demonstrate 17.7% extinction of a weak coherent field by a single atom. The thermal motion of the atom is commonly suspected to be one of the limiting factors of the interaction. Here we verify quantitatively this effect by measuring in-situ the interaction strength as the atom heats up. Ministry of Education in Singapore; National Research Foundation.

  3. Change in spectrum of Brownian fluctuations of optically trapped red blood cells due to malarial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraogi, Vishal; Padmapriya, P.; Paul, Apurba; Tatu, Utpal S.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-05-01

    We study the properties of single red blood cells (RBCs) held in an optical-tweezers trap. We observe a change in the spectrum of Brownian fluctuations between RBCs from normal and malaria-infected samples. The change, caused by infection-induced structural changes in the cell, appears as a statistical increase in the mean (by 25%) and standard deviation (by 200%) of the corner frequency measured over ~100 cells. The increase is observed even though the ensemble of cells being measured consists mostly of cells that do not actually host the parasite, but are from an infected pool. This bystander effect appears to vindicate other observations that infected cells can affect the biomechanical properties of uninfected cells. The change is also observed to be independent of the stage of infection and its duration, highlighting its potential for disease detection.

  4. Optical Trapping of Beads and Jurkat Cells Using Micromachined Fresnel Zone Plate Integrated with Microfluidic Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ju-Nan; Hu, Han-Zhong

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a method for trapping beads and cells using a single-beam optical tweezer and a Fresnel zone plate integrated with a microfluidic chip. The experimental results show that a laser power of 2.4 mW is sufficient to trap 3-µm-diameter polystyrene beads, while a laser power of 1.5 mW is sufficient to trap individual Jurkat cells. The Fresnel zone plate developed in this study has many advantages, including a small size, a straightforward fabrication process, and a simple integration with microfluidic chips. Consequently, it provides an ideal solution for the trapping of a wide range of biological cells for analysis purposes.

  5. Tuning the structural and optical properties of gold/silver nanoalloys prepared by laser ablation in liquids for ultra-sensitive spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Neri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasmon resonance of metallic Au/Ag alloys in the colloidal state was tuned from 400 nm to 500 nm using a laser irradiated technique, performed directly in the liquid state. Interesting optical nonlinearities, trapping effects and spectroscopic enhancements were detected as function of gold concentration in the nanoalloys. In particular a reduction of the limiting threshold was observed by increasing the gold amount. The SERS activity of the Au/Ag alloys was tested in liquid and in solid state in presence of linear carbon chains as probe molecules. The dependence of the increased Raman signals on the nanoparticle Au/Ag atomic ratio is presented and discussed. Finally preliminary studies and prospects for optical and Raman tweezers experiments are discussed.

  6. Quantitative approach to small-scale nonequilibrium systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Jakob K; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B

    2006-01-01

    In a nano-scale system out of thermodynamic equilibrium, it is important to account for thermal fluctuations. Typically, the thermal noise contributes fluctuations, e.g., of distances that are substantial in comparison to the size of the system and typical distances measured. If the thermal...... propose an approximate but quantitative way of dealing with such an out-of-equilibrium system. The limits of this approximate description of the escape process are determined through optical tweezers experiments and comparison to simulations. Also, this serves as a recipe for how to use the proposed...... method to obtain knowledge about the underlying energy landscape from a set of experimental measurements. Finally, we perform estimates of the error made if thermal fluctuations are ignored....

  7. Tissue culture system using a PANDA ring resonator and wavelength router for hydroponic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoldilok, Surachart; Suwanpayak, Nathaporn; Suttirak, Saisudawan; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2012-06-01

    A novel system of nanofluidics trapping and delivery, which is known as a tissue culture system is proposed. By using the intense optical pulse(i.e., a soliton pulse) and a system constructed by a liquid core waveguide, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells) can be generated, where the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers in the PANDA ring resonator can be formed. By controlling the suitable parameters, the intense optical vortices can be generated within the PANDA ring resonator, in which the nanofluidics can be trapped and moved (transported) dynamically within the Tissue culture system(a wavelength router), which can be used for tissue culture and delivery in the hydroponic plant system.

  8. Helical wavefront and beam shape modulated by advanced liquid crystal q-plate fabricated via photoalignment and analyzed by Michelson's interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Han; Li, Ming-Shian; Ko, Shih-Wei; Fuh, Andy Y-G

    2013-09-10

    In this study, electrically tunable advanced liquid crystal q-plates (ALCQPs) that combine two q values in one device to generate optical vortex beams were fabricated using a photoalignment method that involves the use of azo dye, a surfactant alignment material. The electrically tunable ALCQP device could be modulated to control the shape and polarization of a circularly polarized Gaussian laser beam that propagated through the device. A Gaussian beam modulated by an ALCQP under suitable applied voltage showed a variation beam shape with helical wavefront, as demonstrated by Michelson's interference. This helical wavefront beam carries an orbital angular momentum and can be used in an optical tweezers system to trap, move, and rotate particles simultaneously.

  9. Optical Trapping Techniques Applied to the Study of Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morss, Andrew J.

    Optical tweezers allow for manipulating micron-sized objects using pN level optical forces. In this work, we use an optical trapping setup to aid in three separate experiments, all related to the physics of the cellular membrane. In the first experiment, in conjunction with Brian Henslee, we use optical tweezers to allow for precise positioning and control of cells in suspension to evaluate the cell size dependence of electroporation. Theory predicts that all cells porate at a transmembrane potential VTMof roughly 1 V. The Schwann equation predicts that the transmembrane potential depends linearly on the cell radius r, thus predicting that cells should porate at threshold electric fields that go as 1/r. The threshold field required to induce poration is determined by applying a low voltage pulse to the cell and then applying additional pulses of greater and greater magnitude, checking for poration at each step using propidium iodide dye. We find that, contrary to expectations, cells do not porate at a constant value of the transmembrane potential but at a constant value of the electric field which we find to be 692 V/cm for K562 cells. Delivering precise dosages of nanoparticles into cells is of importance for assessing toxicity of nanoparticles or for genetic research. In the second experiment, we conduct nano-electroporation—a novel method of applying precise doses of transfection agents to cells—by using optical tweezers in conjunction with a confocal microscope to manipulate cells into contact with 100 nm wide nanochannels. This work was done in collaboration with Pouyan Boukany of Dr. Lee's group. The small cross sectional area of these nano channels means that the electric field within them is extremely large, 60 MV/m, which allows them to electrophoretically drive transfection agents into the cell. We find that nano electroporation results in excellent dose control (to within 10% in our experiments) compared to bulk electroporation. We also find that

  10. Variety in intracellular diffusion during the cell cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selhuber-Unkel, C.; Yde, P.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2009-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces Pombe using optical tweezers. The cell cycle was divided into interphase and mitotic cell division, and the mitotic cell division was further subdivided in its stages. During all stages of the cell cycle, the granules predominantly underwent subdiffusive motion, characterized by an exponent......During the cell cycle, the organization of the cytoskeletal network undergoes dramatic changes. In order to reveal possible changes of the viscoelastic properties in the intracellular space during the cell cycle we investigated the diffusion of endogenous lipid granules within the fission yeast...... a that is also linked to the viscoelastic moduli of the cytoplasm. The exponent a was significantly smaller during interphase than during any stage of the mitotic cell division, signifying that the cytoplasm was more elastic during interphase than during division. We found no significant differences...

  11. Versatile microsphere attachment of GFP-labeled motors and other tagged proteins with preserved functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bugiel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Microspheres are often used as handles for protein purification or force spectroscopy. For example, optical tweezers apply forces on trapped particles to which motor proteins are attached. However, even though many attachment strategies exist, procedures are often limited to a particular biomolecule and prone to non-specific protein or surface attachment. Such interactions may lead to loss of protein functionality or microsphere clustering. Here, we describe a versatile coupling procedure for GFP-tagged proteins via a polyethylene glycol linker preserving the functionality of the coupled proteins. The procedure combines well-established protocols, is highly reproducible, reliable, and can be used for a large variety of proteins. The coupling is efficient and can be tuned to the desired microsphere-to-protein ratio. Moreover, microspheres hardly cluster or adhere to surfaces. Furthermore, the procedure can be adapted to different tags providing flexibility and a promising attachment strategy for any tagged protein.

  12. Engineering optical gradient force from coupled surface plasmon polariton modes in nanoscale plasmonic waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Guanghui

    2016-11-01

    We explore the dispersion properties and optical gradient forces from mutual coupling of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at two interfaces of nanoscale plasmonic waveguides with hyperbolic metamaterial cladding. With Maxwell’s equations and Maxwell stress tensor, we calculate and compare the dispersion relation and optical gradient force for symmetric and antisymmetric SPP modes in two kinds of nanoscale plasmonic waveguides. The numerical results show that the optical gradient force between two coupled hyperbolic metamaterial waveguides can be engineered flexibly by adjusting the waveguide structure parameters. Importantly, an alternative way to boost the optical gradient force is provided through engineering the hyperbolic metamaterial cladding of suitable orientation. These special optical properties will open the door for potential optomechanical applications, such as optical tweezers and actuators. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474106) and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2016A030313439).

  13. Real time characterization of hydrodynamics in optically trapped networks of micro-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Arran; Yao, Alison M; Gibson, Graham M; Bowman, Richard; Cooper, Jon M; Padgett, Miles L

    2010-04-01

    The hydrodynamic interactions of micro-silica spheres trapped in a variety of networks using holographic optical tweezers are measured and characterized in terms of their predicted eigenmodes. The characteristic eigenmodes of the networks are distinguishable within 20-40 seconds of acquisition time. Three different multi-particle networks are considered; an eight-particle linear chain, a nine-particle square grid and, finally, an eight-particle ring. The eigenmodes and their decay rates are shown to behave as predicted by the Oseen tensor and the Langevin equation, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the potential of using our micro-ring as a non-invasive sensor to the local environmental viscosity, by showing the distortion of the eigenmode spectrum due to the proximity of a planar boundary. ((c) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  14. Theoretical analysis of optical conveyor belt with plasmonic nanodisk array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhun; Kim, Donghyun

    2017-07-01

    Plasmonic optical trapping allows trapping and manipulation of micro- and even nanometer-sized particles using localized and enhanced electric fields by plasmon resonance in metallic nanostructure. We consider an optical conveyor belt consisting of an array of nanodisks acting as optical tweezers with different sizes to implement a system to trap and manipulate particles through a laser-induced gradient force. An electric field induced and localized at each optical resonator is sensitive to the wavelength and polarization. The maximum electric field is enhanced at resonant wavelength depending on the shape and size of the plasmonic nanostructure used for light localization. By changing the light wavelength and polarization, the position of localized light induced in the disk can be determined and nanoparticles can be moved to a desired location through the variation of resonance conditions without any mechanical forces.

  15. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamic, M.L.; Lister, T.E.; Dufek, E.J.; Jenson, D.D.; Olson, J.E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129 I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  16. Solitary waves of surface plasmon polariton via phase shifts under Doppler broadening and Kerr nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Ahmad, A.; Bacha, B. A.; Khan, A. A.; Abdul Jabar, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) are theoretically investigated at the interface of a dielectric metal and gold. The output pulse from the dielectric is used as the input pulse for the generation of SPPs. The SPPs show soliton-like behavior at the interface. The solitary form of a SPP is maintained under the effects of Kerr nonlinearity, Doppler broadening and Fresnel dragging whereas its phase shift is significantly modified. A 0.3radian phase shift is calculated in the presence of both Kerr nonlinearity and Fresnel dragging in the absence of plasma motion. The phase shift is enhanced to 60radian due to the combined effect of Doppler broadening, Kerr nonlinearity and Fresnel dragging. The results may have significant applications in nano-photonics, optical tweezers, photovoltaic devices, plasmonster and sensing technology.

  17. Observation of Brownian motion in liquids at short times: instantaneous velocity and memory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheifets, Simon; Simha, Akarsh; Melin, Kevin; Li, Tongcang; Raizen, Mark G

    2014-03-28

    Measurement of the instantaneous velocity of Brownian motion of suspended particles in liquid probes the microscopic foundations of statistical mechanics in soft condensed matter. However, instantaneous velocity has eluded experimental observation for more than a century since Einstein's prediction of the small length and time scales involved. We report shot-noise-limited, high-bandwidth measurements of Brownian motion of micrometer-sized beads suspended in water and acetone by an optical tweezer. We observe the hydrodynamic instantaneous velocity of Brownian motion in a liquid, which follows a modified energy equipartition theorem that accounts for the kinetic energy of the fluid displaced by the moving bead. We also observe an anticorrelated thermal force, which is conventionally assumed to be uncorrelated.

  18. Protein friction limits diffusive and directed movements of kinesin motors on microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Varga, Vladimir; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2009-08-14

    Friction limits the operation of macroscopic engines and is critical to the performance of micromechanical devices. We report measurements of friction in a biological nanomachine. Using optical tweezers, we characterized the frictional drag force of individual kinesin-8 motor proteins interacting with their microtubule tracks. At low speeds and with no energy source, the frictional drag was related to the diffusion coefficient by the Einstein relation. At higher speeds, the frictional drag force increased nonlinearly, consistent with the motor jumping 8 nanometers between adjacent tubulin dimers along the microtubule, and was asymmetric, reflecting the structural polarity of the microtubule. We argue that these frictional forces arise from breaking bonds between the motor domains and the microtubule, and they limit the speed and efficiency of kinesin.

  19. A dark hollow beam from a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei-Yan, Zhang; Shu-Guang, Li; Yan-Yan, Yao; Bo, Fu; Lei, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that, based on the electromagnetic scattering theory of the multipole method, a high-quality hollow beam is produced through a selectively liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre. Instead of a doughnut shape, a typical hollow beam is produced by other methods; the mode-field images of the hollow-beam photonic crystal fibre satisfy sixth-order rotation symmetry, according to the symmetry of the photonic crystal fibre (PCF) structure. A dark spot size of the liquid-filled photonic crystal fibre-generated hollow beam can be tuned by inserting liquid into the cladding region and varying the photonic crystal fibre structure parameters. The liquid-filled PCF makes a convenient and flexible tool for the guiding and trapping of atoms and the creation of all-fibre optical tweezers. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  20. Bio-optofluidics and Bio-photonics: Programmable Phase Optics activities at DTU Fotonik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Pedersen, Finn

    We present ongoing research and development activities for constructing a compact next generation BioPhotonics Workstation and a Bio-optofluidic Cell Sorter (cell-BOCS) for all-optical micromanipulation platforms utilizing low numerical aperture beam geometries. Unlike conventional high NA optical...... tweezers, the BioPhotonics workstation is e.g. capable of long range 3D manipulation. This enables a variety of biological studies such as manipulation of intricate microfabricated assemblies or for automated and parallel optofluidic cell sorting. To further reduce its overhead, we propose ways of making...... the BioPhotonics Workstation platform more photon efficient by studying the 3D distribution of the counter propagating beams and utilizing the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method for illuminating the applied spatial light modulators....

  1. Generalized Lorenz-Mie theories

    CERN Document Server

    Gouesbet, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    This book explores generalized Lorenz–Mie theories when the illuminating beam is an electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beam relying on the method of separation of variables. The new edition includes an additional chapter covering the latest advances in both research and applications, which are highly relevant for readers. Although it particularly focuses on the homogeneous sphere, the book also considers other regular particles. It discusses in detail the methods available for evaluating beam shape coefficients describing the illuminating beam. In addition it features applications used in many fields such as optical particle sizing and, more generally, optical particle characterization, morphology-dependent resonances and the mechanical effects of light for optical trapping, optical tweezers and optical stretchers. Furthermore, it provides various computer programs relevant to the content.

  2. A Penning trap for advanced studies with particles in extreme laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, M.; Quint, W.; Paulus, G. G.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2012-08-01

    We present a Penning trap as a tool for advanced studies of particles in extreme laser fields. Particularly, trap-specific manipulation techniques allow control over the confined particles' localization and spatial density by use of trap electrodes as 'electrostatic tweezers' and by application of a 'rotating wall', respectively. It is thereby possible to select and prepare well-defined ion ensembles and to optimize the laser-particle interaction. Non-destructive detection of reaction educts and products with up to single-ion sensitivity supports advanced studies by maintaining the products for further studies at extended confinement times of minutes and above. The trap features endcaps with conical openings for applications with strongly focused lasers. We show that such a modification of a cylindrical trap is possible while harmonicity and tunability are maintained.

  3. Optical investigation of intra- and extra-cellular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leijnse, Natascha

    In this thesis we investigated intra- and extra-cellular dynamics with the help of optical tweezers and confocal imaging. Firstly, we measured in vivo diffusion inside endothelial cells by tracking lipid granules and compared the results to in vitro diffusion of polystyrene beads in wormlike......, investigations of force generation by living cells embedded in 3D matrices, conducted in Alexander Dunn's lab at Stanford University, are described in the last chapter....... micelles. Furthermore, we studied F-actin dynamics in, and curvature sensing of, a receptor and its ligand on artificially pulled membrane tethers. Force measurements between a cell and an approaching optically trapped bead were conducted in order to probe the endothelial cell's glycocalyx. Finally...

  4. Determination of pitch rotation in a spherical birefringent microparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Basudev; Ramaiya, Avin; Schäffer, Erik

    2018-03-01

    Rotational motion of a three dimensional spherical microscopic object can happen either in pitch, yaw or roll fashion. Among these, the yaw motion has been conventionally studied using the intensity of scattered light from birefringent microspheres through crossed polarizers. Up until now, however, there is no way to study the pitch motion in spherical microspheres. Here, we suggest a new method to study the pitch motion of birefringent microspheres under crossed polarizers by measuring the 2-fold asymmetry in the scattered signal either using video microscopy or with optical tweezers. We show a couple of simple examples of pitch rotation determination using video microscopy for a microsphere attached with a kinesin molecule while moving along a microtubule and of a particle diffusing freely in water.

  5. Force-detected nanoscale absorption spectroscopy in water at room temperature using an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parobek, Alexander; Black, Jacob W.; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2018-04-01

    Measuring absorption spectra of single molecules presents a fundamental challenge for standard transmission-based instruments because of the inherently low signal relative to the large background of the excitation source. Here we demonstrate a new approach for performing absorption spectroscopy in solution using a force measurement to read out optical excitation at the nanoscale. The photoinduced force between model chromophores and an optically trapped gold nanoshell has been measured in water at room temperature. This photoinduced force is characterized as a function of wavelength to yield the force spectrum, which is shown to be correlated to the absorption spectrum for four model systems. The instrument constructed for these measurements combines an optical tweezer with frequency domain absorption spectroscopy over the 400-800 nm range. These measurements provide proof-of-principle experiments for force-detected nanoscale spectroscopies that operate under ambient chemical conditions.

  6. Lectures on light nonlinear and quantum optics using the density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    This book bridges the gap between introductory quantum mechanics and the research front of modern optics and scientific fields that make use of light. While suitable as a reference for the specialist in quantum optics, it also targets non-specialists from other disciplines who need to understand light and its uses in research. It introduces a single analytic tool, the density matrix, to analyze complex optical phenomena encountered in traditional as well as cross-disciplinary research. It moves swiftly in a tight sequence from elementary to sophisticated topics in quantum optics, including optical tweezers, laser cooling, coherent population transfer, optical magnetism, electromagnetically induced transparency, squeezed light, and cavity quantum electrodynamics. A systematic approach starts with the simplest systems—stationary two-level atoms—then introduces atomic motion, adds more energy levels, and moves on to discuss first-, second-, and third-order coherence effects that are the basis for analyzing n...

  7. Efficiency of Dinucleosides as the Backbone to Pre-Organize Multi-Porphyrins and Enhance Their Stability as Sandwich Type Complexes with DABCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Merkaš

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible linkers such as uridine or 2′-deoxyuridine pre-organize bis-porphyrins in a face-to-face conformation, thus forming stable sandwich complexes with a bidentate base such as 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO. Increased stability can be even greater when a dinucleotide linker is used. Such pre-organization increases the association constant by one to two orders of magnitude when compared to the association constant of DABCO with a reference porphyrin. Comparison with rigid tweezers shows a better efficiency of nucleosidic dimers. Thus, the choice of rigid spacers is not the only way to pre-organize bis-porphyrins, and well-chosen nucleosidic linkers offer an interesting option for the synthesis of such devices.

  8. Essentials of single-cell analysis concepts, applications and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of single-cell isolation, separation, injection, lysis and dynamics analysis as well as a study of their heterogeneity using different miniaturized devices. As an important part of single-cell analysis, different techniques including electroporation, microinjection, optical trapping, optoporation, rapid electrokinetic patterning and optoelectronic tweezers are described in detail. It presents different fluidic systems (e.g. continuous micro/nano-fluidic devices, microfluidic cytometry) and their integration with sensor technology, optical and hydrodynamic stretchers etc., and demonstrates the applications of single-cell analysis in systems biology, proteomics, genomics, epigenomics, cancer transcriptomics, metabolomics, biomedicine and drug delivery systems. It also discusses the future challenges for single-cell analysis, including the advantages and limitations. This book is enjoyable reading material while at the same time providing essential information to scientists in acad...

  9. Biophysics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Cotteril, Rodney

    2002-01-01

    Biophysics: An Introduction, is a concise balanced introduction to this subject. Written in an accessible and readable style, the book takes a fresh, modern approach with the author successfully combining key concepts and theory with relevant applications and examples drawn from the field as a whole. Beginning with a brief introduction to the origins of biophysics, the book takes the reader through successive levels of complexity, from atoms to molecules, structures, systems and ultimately to the behaviour of organisms. The book also includes extensive coverage of biopolymers, biomembranes, biological energy, and nervous systems. The text not only explores basic ideas, but also discusses recent developments, such as protein folding, DNA/RNA conformations, molecular motors, optical tweezers and the biological origins of consciousness and intelligence.

  10. The Effect of a Helix-Coil Transition on the Extension Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhot, Arnaud; Halperin, Avi

    2000-03-01

    The secondary structure of a polymer affects its deformation behavior in accordance with the Le Chatelier principle. An important example of such secondary structure is the alpha helix encountered in polypeptides. Similar structure was recently proposed for PEO in aqueous media. Our discussion concerns the coupling of the cooperative helix-coil transition and the extension elasticity. In particular, we analyze the extension of a long single chain by use of optical tweezers or AFM. We consider chains that exist in the coil-state when unperturbed. The transition nevertheless occurs because the extension favors the low entropy helical state. As a result, the corresponding force law exhibits a plateau. The analysis of this situation involves two ingredients: (I) the stretching free energy penalty for a rod-coil mutiblock copolymer (II) the entropy associated with the possible placements of the rod and coil blocks.

  11. Force probing of individual molecules inside the living cell is now a reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddershede, Lene B

    2012-11-01

    Biological systems can be quantitatively explored using single-molecule manipulation techniques such as optical or magnetic tweezers or atomic force microscopy. Though a plethora of discoveries have been accomplished using single-molecule manipulation techniques in vitro, such investigations constantly face the criticism that conditions are too far from being physiologically relevant. Technical achievements now allow scientists to take the next step: to use single-molecule manipulation techniques quantitatively in vivo. Considerable progress has been accomplished in this realm; for example, the interaction between a protein and the membrane of a living cell has been probed, the mechanical properties of individual proteins central for cellular adhesion have been measured and even the action of molecular motors in living cells has been quantified. Here, we review the progress of in vivo single-molecule manipulation with a focus on the special challenges posed by in vivo conditions and how these can be overcome.

  12. Colloidal attraction induced by a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leonardo, R; Ianni, F; Ruocco, G

    2009-04-21

    Colloidal crystals are of extreme importance for applied research and for fundamental studies in statistical mechanics. Long-range attractive interactions, such as capillary forces, can drive the spontaneous assembly of such mesoscopic ordered structures. However, long-range attractive forces are very rare in the colloidal realm. Here we report a novel strong, long-ranged attraction induced by a thermal gradient in the presence of a wall. By switching the thermal gradient on and off, we can rapidly and reversibly form stable hexagonal 2D crystals. We show that the observed attraction is hydrodynamic in nature and arises from thermally induced slip flow on particle surfaces. We used optical tweezers to measure the force law directly and compare it to an analytical prediction based on Stokes flow driven by Marangoni-like forces.

  13. Quantitative determination of optical trapping strength and viscoelastic moduli inside living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mas, Josep; Richardson, Andrew Callum; Reihani, S. Nader S.

    2013-01-01

    is viscoelastic, it would be incorrect to use a calibration procedure relying on a viscous environment. Here we demonstrate a method to perform a correct force calibration inside a living cell. This method (theoretically proposed in Fischer and Berg-Sørensen (2007 J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 9 S239)) takes......With the success of in vitro single-molecule force measurements obtained in recent years, the next step is to perform quantitative force measurements inside a living cell. Optical traps have proven excellent tools for manipulation, also in vivo, where they can be essentially non-invasive under...... correct wavelength and exposure conditions. It is a pre-requisite for in vivo quantitative force measurements that a precise and reliable force calibration of the tweezers is performed. There are well-established calibration protocols in purely viscous environments; however, as the cellular cytoplasm...

  14. Initiation factor 2, tRNA, and 50S subunits cooperatively stabilize mRNAs on the ribosome during initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tomoaki; Petrov, Alexey N.; Iizuka, Ryo; Funatsu, Takashi; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Uemura, Sotaro

    2012-01-01

    Initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a key factor in initiation of bacterial protein synthesis. It recruits initiator tRNA to the small ribosomal subunit and facilitates joining of the large ribosomal subunit. Using reconstituted translation system of Escherichia coli and optical tweezers, we directly measure the rupture force between single ribosomal complexes and mRNAs for initiation complexes in the presence and the absence of IF2. We demonstrate that IF2 together with codon recognition by initiator tRNA increases the force required to dislocate mRNA from the ribosome complexes; mRNA stabilization by IF2 required the presence of a joined 50S subunit, and was independent of bound guanine nucleotide. IF2 thus helps lock the 70S ribosome over the start codon during initiation, thus maintaining reading frame. Our results show how mRNA is progressively stabilized on the ribosome through distinct steps of initiation. PMID:22411833

  15. Optofluidic taming of a colloidal dimer with a silicon nanocavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pin, C.; Renaut, C. [Groupe d' Optique de Champ Proche - LRC CEA n°DSM-08-36, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS n°6303- Université de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); University Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M-SINAPS, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, INAC-SP2M-SINAPS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); University Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA-Leti Minatec, LTM, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Cluzel, B., E-mail: benoit.cluzel@u-bourgogne.fr; Fornel, F. de [Groupe d' Optique de Champ Proche - LRC CEA n°DSM-08-36, Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS n°6303- Université de Bourgogne, Dijon (France); Peyrade, D. [University Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, CEA-Leti Minatec, LTM, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Picard, E.; Hadji, E. [University Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M-SINAPS, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, INAC-SP2M-SINAPS, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-27

    We report here the optical trapping of a heterogeneous colloidal dimer above a photonic crystal nanocavity used as an on-chip optical tweezer. The trapped dimer consists of a cluster of two dielectric microbeads of different sizes linked by van der Waals forces. The smallest bead, 1 μm in diameter, is observed to be preferentially trapped by the nanotweezer, leaving the second bead untrapped. The rotational nature of the trapped dimer Brownian motion is first evidenced. Then, in the presence of a fluid flow, control of its orientation and rotation is achieved. The whole system is found to show high rotational degrees of freedom, thereby acting as an effective flow-sensitive microscopic optical ball joint.

  16. Mechanical strength of sarcomere structures of skeletal myofibrils studied by submicromanipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayamori, Taisuke; Miyake, Norihito; Akiyama, Nao; Aimi, Momoko; Wakayama, Jun'ichi; Kunioka, Yuki; Yamada, Takenori

    2006-01-01

    The mechanical strength of sarcomere structures of skeletal muscle was studied by rupturing single myofibrils of rabbit psoas muscle by submicromanipulation techniques. Microbeads coated with alpha-actinin were attached to the surface of myofibrils immobilized to coverslip. By use of either optical tweezers or atomic force microscope, the attached beads were captured and detached from the myofibrils. During the detachment of the beads, the actin filaments bound specifically to the beads were peeled off from the bulk structures of myofibrils, thus rupturing the peripheral components of the myofibrils bound to the actin filaments. By analyzing the ruptures thus produced in various myofibril preparations, it was found that the sarcomere structure of myofibrils is maintained by numerous molecular components having the mechanical strength sufficient to sustain the contractile force produced by the actomyosin system. The present techniques could be applied to study the mechanical strength of cellular organelles containing actin filaments as their component.

  17. Dynamic force spectroscopy of DNA hairpins: I. Force kinetics and free energy landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mossa, A; Manosas, M; Forns, N; Huguet, J M; Ritort, F

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA hairpins that fold/unfold under the action of applied mechanical force. We introduce the concept of the molecular free energy landscape and derive simplified expressions for the force dependent Kramers–Bell rates. To test the theory we have designed a specific DNA hairpin sequence that shows two-state cooperative folding under mechanical tension and carried out pulling experiments using optical tweezers. We show how we can determine the parameters that characterize the molecular free energy landscape of such sequences from rupture force kinetic studies. Finally we combine such kinetic studies with experimental investigations of the Crooks fluctuation relation to derive the free energy of formation of the hairpin at zero force

  18. Mechanistic basis of otolith formation during teleost inner ear development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, David; Freund, Jonathan B; Fraser, Scott E; Vermot, Julien

    2011-02-15

    Otoliths, which are connected to stereociliary bundles in the inner ear, serve as inertial sensors for balance. In teleostei, otolith development is critically dependent on flow forces generated by beating cilia; however, the mechanism by which flow controls otolith formation remains unclear. Here, we have developed a noninvasive flow probe using optical tweezers and a viscous flow model in order to demonstrate how the observed hydrodynamics influence otolith assembly. We show that rotational flow stirs and suppresses precursor agglomeration in the core of the cilia-driven vortex. The velocity field correlates with the shape of the otolith and we provide evidence that hydrodynamics is actively involved in controlling otolith morphogenesis. An implication of this hydrodynamic effect is that otolith self-assembly is mediated by the balance between Brownian motion and cilia-driven flow. More generally, this flow feature highlights an alternative biological strategy for controlling particle localization in solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracavity optical trapping with Ytterbium doped fiber ring laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Rania; Kalantarifard, Fatemeh; Elahi, Parviz; Ilday, F. Omer; Volpe, Giovanni; Maragò, Onofrio M.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a novel approach for trapping micron-sized particles and living cells based on optical feedback. This approach can be implemented at low numerical aperture (NA=0.5, 20X) and long working distance. In this configuration, an optical tweezers is constructed inside a ring cavity fiber laser and the optical feedback in the ring cavity is controlled by the light scattered from a trapped particle. In particular, once the particle is trapped, the laser operation, optical feedback and intracavity power are affected by the particle motion. We demonstrate that using this configuration is possible to stably hold micron-sized particles and single living cells in the focal spot of the laser beam. The calibration of the optical forces is achieved by tracking the Brownian motion of a trapped particle or cell and analysing its position distribution.

  20. Cell contraction induces long-ranged stress stiffening in the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu Long; Ronceray, Pierre; Xu, Guoqiang; Malandrino, Andrea; Kamm, Roger D; Lenz, Martin; Broedersz, Chase P; Guo, Ming

    2018-04-04

    Animal cells in tissues are supported by biopolymer matrices, which typically exhibit highly nonlinear mechanical properties. While the linear elasticity of the matrix can significantly impact cell mechanics and functionality, it remains largely unknown how cells, in turn, affect the nonlinear mechanics of their surrounding matrix. Here, we show that living contractile cells are able to generate a massive stiffness gradient in three distinct 3D extracellular matrix model systems: collagen, fibrin, and Matrigel. We decipher this remarkable behavior by introducing nonlinear stress inference microscopy (NSIM), a technique to infer stress fields in a 3D matrix from nonlinear microrheology measurements with optical tweezers. Using NSIM and simulations, we reveal large long-ranged cell-generated stresses capable of buckling filaments in the matrix. These stresses give rise to the large spatial extent of the observed cell-induced matrix stiffness gradient, which can provide a mechanism for mechanical communication between cells.

  1. Optical combing to align photoreceptors in detached retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shizhuo; Gardner, Thomas W.; Wu, Fei; Cholker, Milind S.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel micro-manipulating method, called 'optical combing', that could improve the retina reattachment surgery results. Optical combing adopts the working principle of optical tweezers (i.e., focused Gaussian beam produces a trapping force when it incidents onto a micro-object. The trapping force can pull the micro-object to the central point of focused laser beam. Optical combing is implemented by scanning a focused laser beam on the misaligned micro objects (such as misaligned photoreceptors). In our preliminary experiment, a set of misaligned micro glass rods was re-aligned by applying this optical combing technology, which verified our theory. In the future, this technique will be used to re-align misaligned photoreceptors in real retina.

  2. Molecules cooled below the Doppler limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, S.; Williams, H. J.; Hambach, M.; Caldwell, L.; Fitch, N. J.; Hinds, E. A.; Sauer, B. E.; Tarbutt, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Magneto-optical trapping and sub-Doppler cooling have been essential to most experiments with quantum degenerate gases, optical lattices, atomic fountains and many other applications. A broad set of new applications await ultracold molecules, and the extension of laser cooling to molecules has begun. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been demonstrated for a single molecular species, SrF, but the sub-Doppler temperatures required for many applications have not yet been reached. Here we demonstrate a MOT of a second species, CaF, and we show how to cool these molecules to 50 μK, well below the Doppler limit, using a three-dimensional optical molasses. These ultracold molecules could be loaded into optical tweezers to trap arbitrary arrays for quantum simulation, launched into a molecular fountain for testing fundamental physics, and used to study collisions and chemistry between atoms and molecules at ultracold temperatures.

  3. Electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Viva R.; Alemán, Benjamín J.; Christle, David J.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Using an optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous readout of ground-state electron-spin resonance (ESR) transitions in an ensemble of diamond nitrogen-vacancy color centers. Despite the motion and random orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the measured ESR spectra qualitatively similar to the same measurement in bulk. Accounting for the random dynamics, we model the ESR spectra observed in an externally applied magnetic field to enable dc magnetometry in solution. We estimate the dc magnetic field sensitivity based on variations in ESR line shapes to be approximately . This technique may provide a pathway for spin-based magnetic, electric, and thermal sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques. PMID:22869706

  4. Single-Molecule Studies of Hyaluronic Acid Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes-Gold, Sarah; Berezney, John; Saleh, Omar

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a charged linear polysaccharide abundant in extracellular spaces. Its solution conformation and mechanical properties help define the environment outside of cells, play key roles in cell motility and adhesion processes, and are of interest for the development of HA biomaterials. Intra-chain hydrogen bonds and electrostatic repulsion contribute to HAs physical structure, but the nature of this structure, as well as its dependence on solution electrostatics, are not well-understood. To address this problem, we have investigated HA conformation and mechanical properties under a range of solution conditions systematically designed to affect charge screening or hydrogen bonding. We used magnetic tweezers to apply biological-scale stretching forces to individual HA chains under varying solution conditions.

  5. Nematic Liquid-Crystal Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muševič, Igor

    2017-12-25

    This article provides a concise review of a new state of colloidal matter called nematic liquid-crystal colloids. These colloids are obtained by dispersing microparticles of different shapes in a nematic liquid crystal that acts as a solvent for the dispersed particles. The microparticles induce a local deformation of the liquid crystal, which then generates topological defects and long-range forces between the neighboring particles. The colloidal forces in nematic colloids are much stronger than the forces in ordinary colloids in isotropic solvents, exceeding thousands of k B T per micrometer-sized particle. Of special interest are the topological defects in nematic colloids, which appear in many fascinating forms, such as singular points, closed loops, multitudes of interlinked and knotted loops or soliton-like structures. The richness of the topological phenomena and the possibility to design and control topological defects with laser tweezers make colloids in nematic liquid crystals an excellent playground for testing the basic theorems of topology.

  6. The role of coupling on the statistical properties of the energy fluxes between stochastic systems at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérut, A.; Imparato, A.; Petrosyan, A.; Ciliberto, S.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally study the statistical properties of the energy fluxes in two systems whose components are kept at different temperatures. The first system under consideration is an electric circuit which is composed by two resistances, kept at different temperatures and connected by a capacitance (conservative coupling) which couples the thermal noise of the two resistances. The other system is composed by two Brownian particles, trapped with optical tweezers, interacting through a dissipative hydrodynamic coupling. The particles are subjected to an effective temperature difference obtained by random forcing the position of one trap. In these two systems we measure the properties of the energy flowing between the two reservoirs. The role on these properties of the coupling and of the method used to produce the highest temperature is analyzed.

  7. Gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, MS; Suwanpayak, Nathaporn; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Jomtarak, R; Saktioto, T; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, PP

    2012-01-01

    A new optical trapping design to transport gold nanoparticles using a PANDA ring resonator system is proposed. Intense optical fields in the form of dark solitons controlled by Gaussian pulses are used to trap and transport nanoscopic volumes of matter to the desired destination via an optical waveguide. Theoretically, the gradient and scattering forces are responsible for this trapping phenomenon, where in practice such systems can be fabricated and a thin-film device formed on the specific artificial medical materials, for instance, an artificial bone. The dynamic behavior of the tweezers can be tuned by controlling the optical pulse input power and parameters of the ring resonator system. Different trap sizes can be generated to trap different gold nanoparticles sizes, which is useful for gold nanoparticle therapy. In this paper, we have shown the utility of gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapy, which may be useful for cosmetic therapy and related applications. PMID:22275818

  8. Nonparaxial Bessel and Bessel-Gauss pincers light-sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2017-01-01

    Nonparaxial optical Bessel and Bessel-Gauss pincers optical-sheets are introduced based upon the angular spectrum decomposition in plane waves. The angular spectrum function and the beam-shape coefficients are expressed by means of improper integrals computed numerically. The radiated component of the electric field is also evaluated, displaying unique features of the nonparaxial Bessel pincers light-sheets. This new type of auto-focusing light-sheets finds potential applications in the development of novel methods in optical light-sheet tweezers for particle manipulation in opto-fluidics, particle sizing and imaging. Numerical predictions for the scattering, radiation force and torque, and particle dynamics also benefit from the developed beam solution.

  9. Energy flow characteristics of vector X-Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Salem, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The vector form of X-Waves is obtained as a superposition of transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized field components. It is shown that the signs of all components of the Poynting vector can be locally changed using carefully chosen complex amplitudes of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarization components. Negative energy flux density in the longitudinal direction can be observed in a bounded region around the centroid; in this region the local behavior of the wave field is similar to that of wave field with negative energy flow. This peculiar energy flux phenomenon is of essential importance for electromagnetic and optical traps and tweezers, where the location and momenta of microand nanoparticles are manipulated by changing the Poynting vector, and in detection of invisibility cloaks. © 2011 Optical Society of America.

  10. Vectorial optical fields fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Polarization is a vector nature of light that plays an important role in optical science and engineering. While existing textbook treatments of light assume beams with spatially homogeneous polarization, there is an increasing interest in vectorial optical fields with spatially engineered states of polarization. New effects and phenomena have been predicted and observed for light beams with these unconventional polarization states. This edited review volume aims to provide a comprehensive overview and summarize the latest developments in this important emerging field of optics. This book will cover the fundamentals including mathematical and physical descriptions, experimental generation, manipulation, focusing, propagation, and the applications of the engineered vectorial optical fields in focal field engineering, plasmonic focusing and optical antenna, single molecular imaging, optical tweezers/trapping, as well as optical measurements and instrumentations. Readership: Students, professionals, post-graduat...

  11. Theoretical study of moving magnetic beads on an inclined plane and its application in the ratchet separation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, M. M.; Johnson, S.; Yang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    For first time, motion of a magnetic bead ascending an inclined surface is investigated. The translational and rotational velocities of magnetic beads traveling on an inclined plane in the creeping flow regime are studied. The governing equations considering lift force and magnetic torque are obtained. Rolling and slipping cases are studied in detail. It is shown that the lift force effect is critical for large values of sedimentation Reynolds number (Res) and negligible for small values of Res. This method is applicable for neutrally buoyant and heavy magnetic bead motion. Practical application of this study is implemented in the ratchet configuration for separation of magnetic beads with different sizes. This is applicable for novel applications such as drug delivery, magnetic tweezers, and magnetic actuated stiffness testing systems which require accurate magnetic bead sizes for accurate function.

  12. Control of colloids with gravity, temperature gradients, and electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Harrison, C; Austin, R H; Megens, M; Hollingsworth, A; Russel, W B; Cheng Zhen; Mason, T; Chaikin, P M

    2003-01-01

    We have used a variety of different applied fields to control the density, growth, and structure of colloidal crystals. Gravity exerts a body force proportional to the buoyant mass and in equilibrium produces a height-dependent concentration profile. A similar body force can be obtained with electric fields on charged particles (electrophoresis), a temperature gradient on all particles, or an electric field gradient on uncharged particles (dielectrophoresis). The last is particularly interesting since its magnitude and sign can be changed by tuning the applied frequency. We study these effects in bulk (making 'dielectrophoretic bottles' or traps), to control concentration profiles during nucleation and growth and near surfaces. We also study control of non-spherical and optically anisotropic particles with the light field from laser tweezers.

  13. Polymer translocation under a pulling force: Scaling arguments and threshold forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menais, Timothée

    2018-02-01

    DNA translocation through nanopores is one of the most promising strategies for next-generation sequencing technologies. Most experimental and numerical works have focused on polymer translocation biased by electrophoresis, where a pulling force acts on the polymer within the nanopore. An alternative strategy, however, is emerging, which uses optical or magnetic tweezers. In this case, the pulling force is exerted directly at one end of the polymer, which strongly modifies the translocation process. In this paper, we report numerical simulations of both linear and structured (mimicking DNA) polymer models, simple enough to allow for a statistical treatment of the pore structure effects on the translocation time probability distributions. Based on extremely extended computer simulation data, we (i) propose scaling arguments for an extension of the predicted translocation times τ ˜N2F-1 over the moderate forces range and (ii) analyze the effect of pore size and polymer structuration on translocation times τ .

  14. An Accurate Perception Method for Low Contrast Bright Field Microscopy in Heterogeneous Microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Rajasekaran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Automated optical tweezers-based robotic manipulation of microscale objects requires real-time visual perception for estimating the states, i.e., positions and orientations, of the objects. Such visual perception is particularly challenging in heterogeneous environments comprising mixtures of biological and colloidal objects, such as cells and microspheres, when the popular imaging modality of low contrast bright field microscopy is used. In this paper, we present an accurate method to address this challenge. Our method combines many well-established image processing techniques such as blob detection, histogram equalization, erosion, and dilation with a convolutional neural network in a novel manner. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our processing pipeline in perceiving objects of both regular and irregular shapes in heterogeneous microenvironments of varying compositions. The neural network, in particular, helps in distinguishing the individual microspheres present in dense clusters.

  15. Spatial Manipulation and Assembly of Nanoparticles by Atomic Force Microscopy Tip-Induced Dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peilin; Yu, Haibo; Yang, Wenguang; Wen, Yangdong; Wang, Zhidong; Li, Wen Jung; Liu, Lianqing

    2017-05-17

    In this article, we present a novel method of spatial manipulation and assembly of nanoparticles via atomic force microscopy tip-induced dielectrophoresis (AFM-DEP). This method combines the high-accuracy positioning of AFM with the parallel manipulation of DEP. A spatially nonuniform electric field is induced by applying an alternating current (AC) voltage between the conductive AFM probe and an indium tin oxide glass substrate. The AFM probe acted as a movable DEP tweezer for nanomanipulation and assembly of nanoparticles. The mechanism of AFM-DEP was analyzed by numerical simulation. The effects of solution depth, gap distance, AC voltage, solution concentration, and duration time were experimentally studied and optimized. Arrays of 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles were assembled into various nanostructures, including lines, ellipsoids, and arrays of dots. The sizes and shapes of the assembled structures were controllable. It was thus demonstrated that AFM-DEP is a flexible and powerful tool for nanomanipulation.

  16. Non-Protein Coding RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Nils G; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    This book assembles chapters from experts in the Biophysics of RNA to provide a broadly accessible snapshot of the current status of this rapidly expanding field. The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the discoverers of RNA interference, highlighting just one example of a large number of non-protein coding RNAs. Because non-protein coding RNAs outnumber protein coding genes in mammals and other higher eukaryotes, it is now thought that the complexity of organisms is correlated with the fraction of their genome that encodes non-protein coding RNAs. Essential biological processes as diverse as cell differentiation, suppression of infecting viruses and parasitic transposons, higher-level organization of eukaryotic chromosomes, and gene expression itself are found to largely be directed by non-protein coding RNAs. The biophysical study of these RNAs employs X-ray crystallography, NMR, ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, optical tweezers, cryo-electron microscopy, and ot...

  17. A Test–Retest Reliability Study of Human Experimental Models of Histaminergic and Non-histaminergic Itch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hjalte H.; Sørensen, Anne Kathrine R.; Nielsen, Gebbie A.R.

    2017-01-01

    Numerous exploratory, proof-of-concept and interventional studies have used histaminergic and non-histaminergic human models of itch. However, no reliability studies for such surrogate models have been conducted. This study investigated the test–retest reliability for the response to histamine.......57– 0.77, CVbetween =97%, CVwithin =41%) and histamine: (ICC=0.83–0.93, CVbetween =97%, CVwithin =20%) exhibited moderate-to-excellent intra-individual reliability and moderate inter-individual reliability for the itch intensity. For a test–retest observation period of one week, SPT-delivered histamine......- and cowhage- (5, 15, 25 spiculae) induced itch in healthy volunteers. Cowhage spiculae were individually applied with tweezers and 1% histamine was applied with a skin prick test (SPT) lancet, both on the volar forearm. The intensity of itch was recorded on a visual analogue scale and self-reported area...

  18. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamic, M.L., E-mail: Mary.Adamic@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Lister, T.E.; Dufek, E.J.; Jenson, D.D.; Olson, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Vockenhuber, C. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Watrous, M.G. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for {sup 129}I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  19. Selected Topics in MicroNano-robotics for Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Selected Topics in Micro/Nano-robotics for Biomedical Applications features a system approach and incorporates modern methodologies in autonomous mobile robots for programmable and controllable micro/nano-robots aiming at biomedical applications. The book provides chapters of instructional materials and cutting-edge research results in micro/nanorobotics for biomedical applications. The book presents new sensing technology on nanofibers, new power supply techniques including miniature fuel cells and energy harvesting devices, and manipulation techniques including AFM-based nano-robotic manipulation, robot-aided optical tweezers, and robot-assisted catheter surgery systems. It also contains case studies on using micro/nano-robots in biomedical environments and in biomedicine, as well as a design example to conceptually develop a Vitamin-pill sized robot to enter human’s gastrointestinal tract. Each chapter covers a different topic of the highly interdisciplinary area. Bring together the selected topics into ...

  20. Single-molecule observation of helix staggering, sliding, and coiled coil misfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhiqun; Gao, Ying; Sirinakis, George; Guo, Honglian; Zhang, Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The biological functions of coiled coils generally depend on efficient folding and perfect pairing of their α-helices. Dynamic changes in the helical registry that lead to staggered helices have only been proposed for a few special systems and not found in generic coiled coils. Here, we report our observations of multiple staggered helical structures of two canonical coiled coils. The partially folded structures are formed predominantly by coiled coil misfolding and occasionally by helix sliding. Using high-resolution optical tweezers, we characterized their energies and transition kinetics at a single-molecule level. The staggered states occur less than 2% of the time and about 0.1% of the time at zero force. We conclude that dynamic changes in helical registry may be a general property of coiled coils. Our findings should have broad and unique implications in functions and dysfunctions of proteins containing coiled coils. PMID:22451899

  1. Accurate computational design of multipass transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peilong; Min, Duyoung; DiMaio, Frank; Wei, Kathy Y; Vahey, Michael D; Boyken, Scott E; Chen, Zibo; Fallas, Jorge A; Ueda, George; Sheffler, William; Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Xu, Wenqing; Bowie, James U; Baker, David

    2018-03-02

    The computational design of transmembrane proteins with more than one membrane-spanning region remains a major challenge. We report the design of transmembrane monomers, homodimers, trimers, and tetramers with 76 to 215 residue subunits containing two to four membrane-spanning regions and up to 860 total residues that adopt the target oligomerization state in detergent solution. The designed proteins localize to the plasma membrane in bacteria and in mammalian cells, and magnetic tweezer unfolding experiments in the membrane indicate that they are very stable. Crystal structures of the designed dimer and tetramer-a rocket-shaped structure with a wide cytoplasmic base that funnels into eight transmembrane helices-are very close to the design models. Our results pave the way for the design of multispan membrane proteins with new functions. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  2. Building one molecule from a reservoir of two atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L R; Hood, J D; Yu, Y; Zhang, J T; Hutzler, N R; Rosenband, T; Ni, K-K

    2018-04-12

    Chemical reactions typically proceed via stochastic encounters between reactants. Going beyond this paradigm, we combine exactly two atoms into a single, controlled reaction. The experimental apparatus traps two individual laser-cooled atoms (one sodium and one cesium) in separate optical tweezers and then merges them into one optical dipole trap. Subsequently, photo-association forms an excited-state NaCs molecule. The discovery of previously unseen resonances near the molecular dissociation threshold and measurement of collision rates are enabled by the tightly trapped ultracold sample of atoms. As laser-cooling and trapping capabilities are extended to more elements, the technique will enable the study of more diverse, and eventually more complex, molecules in an isolated environment, as well as synthesis of designer molecules for qubits. Copyright © 2018, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Parallel optical sorting of biological cells using the generalized phase contrast method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars; Bu, Minqiang; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Optical forces are used to fixate biological cells with optical tweezers where numerous biological parameters and phenomena can be studied. Optical beams carry a small momentum which generates a weak optical force, but on a cellular level this force is strong enough to allow for manipulation...... of biological cells in microfluidic systems exclusively using light. We demonstrate an optical cell sorter that uses simultaneous manipulation by multiple laser beams using the Generalized Phase Contrast method (GPC). The basic principle in an optical sorter is that the radiation force of the optical beam can...... push the biological cell from one microfluidic sheath flow to another. By incorporating a spatial light modulator the manipulation can be made parallel with multiple laser beams. We claim advantages over the serial optical sorters with only a single laser beam that has been demonstrated by others....

  4. Transfer and scattering of wave packets by a nonlinear trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Kevrekidis, P G; Malomed, Boris A; Frantzeskakis, D J

    2011-11-01

    In the framework of a one-dimensional model with a tightly localized self-attractive nonlinearity, we study the formation and transfer (dragging) of a trapped mode by "nonlinear tweezers," as well as the scattering of coherent linear wave packets on the stationary localized nonlinearity. The use of a nonlinear trap for dragging allows one to pick up and transfer the relevant structures without grabbing surrounding "radiation." A stability border for the dragged modes is identified by means of analytical estimates and systematic simulations. In the framework of the scattering problem, the shares of trapped, reflected, and transmitted wave fields are found. Quasi-Airy stationary modes with a divergent norm, which may be dragged by a nonlinear trap moving at a constant acceleration, are briefly considered too.

  5. Dynamics of Traction Force Reinforcement in Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chia; Kramer, Corinne; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Mechanical forces influence cell function in various ways. For instance, the force-induced contraction or relaxation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is critical to regulating the properties of blood vessels. Here, we study the dynamics of cellular traction forces in SMCs using micro-scale magnetic nanowires together with flexible PDMS micropost arrays. We use dual magnetic tweezers to apply a sinusoidal magnetic torque on nickel nanowires which are internalized by the SMCs. The spatial and temporal responses of the SMCs cultured on the tips of the microposts are recorded by the deflected posts. We observe a global reinforcement of the cells' traction forces upon applying a localized torque via the nanowires. Interestingly, we also find that the contractile response depends on the frequency of the applied stimulation, with a greater percentage of the SMCs showing enhanced reinforcement at lower frequencies.

  6. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for single-molecule studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Chen, Danqi; Yue, Hongjun; French, Jarrod B; Rufo, Joseph; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-06-21

    Recent developments on various lab-on-a-chip techniques allow miniaturized and integrated devices to perform on-chip single-molecule studies. Fluidic-based platforms that utilize unique microscale fluidic behavior are capable of conducting single-molecule experiments with high sensitivities and throughputs, while biomolecular systems can be studied on-chip using techniques such as DNA curtains, magnetic tweezers, and solid-state nanopores. The advances of these on-chip single-molecule techniques lead to next-generation lab-on-a-chip devices, such as DNA transistors, and single-molecule real-time (SMRT) technology for rapid and low-cost whole genome DNA sequencing. In this Focus article, we will discuss some recent successes in the development of lab-on-a-chip techniques for single-molecule studies and expound our thoughts on the near future of on-chip single-molecule studies.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Study of Optoelectronic Trapping on Iron-Doped Lithium Niobate Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Gazzetto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OET are a promising technique for the realization of reconfigurable systems suitable to trap and manipulate microparticles. In particular, dielectrophoretic (DEP forces produced by OET represent a valid alternative to micro-fabricated metal electrodes, as strong and spatially reconfigurable electrical fields can be induced in a photoconductive layer by means of light-driven phenomena. In this paper we report, and compare with the experimental data, the results obtained by analyzing the spatial configurations of the DEP-forces produced by a 532 nm laser beam, with Gaussian intensity distribution, impinging on a Fe-doped Lithium Niobate substrate. Furthermore, we also present a promising preliminary result for water-droplets trapping, which could open the way to the application of this technique to biological samples manipulation.

  8. Spherical microparticles with Saturn ring defects and their self-assembly across the nematic to smectic-A phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhail, K P; Čopar, S; Muševič, I; Dhara, Surajit

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental studies on the Saturn ring defect associated with a spherical microparticle across the nematic (N) to smectic-A (SmA) phase transition. We observe that the director distortion around the microparticle changes rapidly with temperature. The equilibrium interparticle separation and the angle between two quadrupolar particles in the N phase are larger than those of the SmA phase. They are almost independent of the temperature in both phases, except for a discontinuous jump at the transition. We assembled a few particles using a laser tweezer to form a two-dimensional colloidal crystal in the N phase. The lattice structure of the crystal dissolves irreversibly across the N-SmA phase transition. The results on the pretransitional behavior of the defect are supported by the Landau-de Gennes Q-tensor modeling.

  9. Advantages and Challenges of Relaxor-PbTiO3 Ferroelectric Crystals for Electroacoustic Transducers- A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Jinwook; Luo, Jun; Geng, Xuecang

    2014-01-01

    Relaxor-PbTiO3 (PT) based ferroelectric crystals with the perovskite structure have been investigated over the last few decades due to their ultrahigh piezoelectric coefficients (d33 > 1500 pC/N) and electromechanical coupling factors (k33 > 90%), far outperforming state-of-the-art ferroelectric polycrystalline Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramics, and are at the forefront of advanced electroacoustic applications. In this review, the performance merits of relaxor-PT crystals in various electroacoustic devices are presented from a piezoelectric material viewpoint. Opportunities come from not only the ultrahigh properties, specifically coupling and piezoelectric coefficients, but through novel vibration modes and crystallographic/domain engineering. Figure of merits (FOMs) of crystals with various compositions and phases were established for various applications, including medical ultrasonic transducers, underwater transducers, acoustic sensors and tweezers. For each device application, recent developments in relaxor-PT ferroelectric crystals were surveyed and compared with state-of-the-art polycrystalline piezoelectrics, with an emphasis on their strong anisotropic features and crystallographic uniqueness, including engineered domain - property relationships. This review starts with an introduction on electroacoustic transducers and the history of piezoelectric materials. The development of the high performance relaxor-PT single crystals, with a focus on their uniqueness in transducer applications, is then discussed. In the third part, various FOMs of piezoelectric materials for a wide range of ultrasound applications, including diagnostic ultrasound, therapeutic ultrasound, underwater acoustic and passive sensors, tactile sensors and acoustic tweezers, are evaluated to provide a thorough understanding of the materials’ behavior under operational conditions. Structure-property-performance relationships are then established. Finally, the impacts and challenges of relaxor

  10. Thrombin and fibrinogen γ' impact clot structure by marked effects on intrafibrillar structure and protofibril packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Marco M; Macrae, Fraser L; Duval, Cédric; McPherson, Helen R; Bridge, Katherine I; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Ridger, Victoria C; Connell, Simon D; Philippou, Helen; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-01-28

    Previous studies have shown effects of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' on clot structure. However, structural information was obtained using electron microscopy, which requires sample dehydration. Our aim was to investigate the role of thrombin and fibrinogen γ' in modulating fibrin structure under fully hydrated conditions. Fibrin fibers were studied using turbidimetry, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and magnetic tweezers in purified and plasma solutions. Increased thrombin induced a pronounced decrease in average protofibril content per fiber, with a relatively minor decrease in fiber size, leading to the formation of less compact fiber structures. Atomic force microscopy under fully hydrated conditions confirmed that fiber diameter was only marginally decreased. Decreased protofibril content of the fibers produced by high thrombin resulted in weakened clot architecture as analyzed by magnetic tweezers in purified systems and by thromboelastometry in plasma and whole blood. Fibers produced with fibrinogen γ' showed reduced protofibril packing over a range of thrombin concentrations. High-magnification electron microscopy demonstrated reduced protofibril packing in γ' fibers and unraveling of fibers into separate protofibrils. Decreased protofibril packing was confirmed in plasma for high thrombin concentrations and fibrinogen-deficient plasma reconstituted with γ' fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate that, in fully hydrated conditions, thrombin and fibrinogen γ' have dramatic effects on protofibril content and that protein density within fibers correlates with strength of the fibrin network. We conclude that regulation of protofibril content of fibers is an important mechanism by which thrombin and fibrinogen γ' modulate fibrin clot structure and strength. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. A thin permeable-membrane device for single-molecule manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Young; Jacobson, David R; Nguyen, Dan T; Willardson, Sam; Saleh, Omar A

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation instruments have unparalleled abilities to interrogate the structure and elasticity of single biomolecules. Key insights are derived by measuring the system response in varying solution conditions; yet, typical solution control strategies require imposing a direct fluid flow on the measured biomolecule that perturbs the high-sensitivity measurement and/or removes interacting molecules by advection. An alternate approach is to fabricate devices that permit solution changes by diffusion of the introduced species through permeable membranes, rather than by direct solution flow through the sensing region. Prior implementations of permeable-membrane devices are relatively thick, disallowing their use in apparatus that require the simultaneous close approach of external instrumentation from two sides, as occurs in single-molecule manipulation devices like the magnetic tweezer. Here, we describe the construction and use of a thin microfluidic device appropriate for single-molecule studies. We create a flow cell of only ∼500 μm total thickness by sandwiching glass coverslips around a thin plastic gasket and then create permeable walls between laterally separated channels in situ through photo-induced cross-linking of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate hydrogels. We show that these membranes permit passage of ions and small molecules (thus permitting solution equilibration in the absence of direct flow), but the membranes block the passage of larger biomolecules (thus retaining precious samples). Finally, we demonstrate the suitability of the device for high-resolution magnetic-tweezer experiments by measuring the salt-dependent folding of a single RNA hairpin under force.

  12. Development of an Educational Game to Set Up Surgical Instruments on the Mayo Stand or Back Table: Applied Research in Production Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paim, Crislaine Pires Padilha; Goldmeier, Silvia

    2017-01-10

    Existing research suggests that digital games can be used effectively for educational purposes at any level of training. Perioperative nursing educators can use games to complement curricula, in guidance and staff development programs, to foster team collaboration, and to give support to critical thinking in nursing practice because it is a complex environment. To describe the process of developing an educational game to set up surgical instruments on the Mayo stand or back table as a resource to assist the instructor in surgical instrumentation training for students and nursing health professionals in continued education. The study was characterized by applied research in production technology. It included the phases of analysis and design, development, and evaluation. The objectives of the educational game were developed through Bloom's taxonomy. Parallel to the physical development of the educational game, a proposed model for the use of digital elements in educational game activities was applied to develop the game content. The development of the game called "Playing with Tweezers" was carried out in 3 phases and was evaluated by 15 participants, comprising students and professional experts in various areas of knowledge such as nursing, information technology, and education. An environment was created with an initial screen, menu buttons containing the rules of the game, and virtual tour modes for learning and assessment. The "digital" nursing student needs engagement, stimulation, reality, and entertainment, not just readings. "Playing with Tweezers" is an example of educational gaming as an innovative teaching strategy in nursing that encourages the strategy of involving the use of educational games to support theoretical or practical classroom teaching. Thus, the teacher does not work with only 1 type of teaching methodology, but with a combination of different methodologies. In addition, we cannot forget that skill training in an educational game does not

  13. Mechanical stress analysis of microfluidic environments designed for isolated biological cell investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohles, Sean S; Nève, Nathalie; Zimmerman, Jeremiah D; Tretheway, Derek C

    2009-12-01

    Advancements in technologies for assessing biomechanics at the cellular level have led to discoveries in mechanotransduction and the investigation of cell mechanics as a biomarker for disease. With the recent development of an integrated optical tweezer with micron resolution particle image velocimetry, the opportunity to apply controlled multiaxial stresses to suspended single cells is available (Neve, N., Lingwood, J. K., Zimmerman, J., Kohles, S. S., and Tretheway, D. C., 2008, "The muPIVOT: An Integrated Particle Image Velocimetry and Optical Tweezers Instrument for Microenvironment Investigations," Meas. Sci. Technol., 19(9), pp. 095403). A stress analysis was applied to experimental and theoretical flow velocity gradients of suspended cell-sized polystyrene microspheres demonstrating the relevant geometry of nonadhered spherical cells, as observed for osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and fibroblasts. Three flow conditions were assessed: a uniform flow field generated by moving the fluid sample with an automated translation stage, a gravity driven flow through a straight microchannel, and a gravity driven flow through a microchannel cross junction. The analysis showed that fluid-induced stresses on suspended cells (hydrodynamic shear, normal, and principal stresses in the range of 0.02-0.04 Pa) are generally at least an order of magnitude lower than adhered single cell studies for uniform and straight microchannel flows (0.5-1.0 Pa). In addition, hydrostatic pressures dominate (1-100 Pa) over hydrodynamic stresses. However, in a cross junction configuration, orders of magnitude larger hydrodynamic stresses are possible without the influence of physical contact and with minimal laser trapping power.

  14. Laser microbeam manipulation of cell morphogenesis growing in fungal hyphae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracker, Charles E.; Murphy, Douglas J.; Lopez-Franco, Rosamaria

    1997-05-01

    Laser microbeam irradiation at 820 nm predictably and reproducibly altered morphogenetic patterns in fungal cells. Optical tweezers were highly effective as localized, noninvasive, and largely nondestructive probes under precise spatial and temporal control. In growing hyphae, the position of the Spitzenkorper (a multicomponent complex containing mainly secretory vesicles in the hyphal apex), is correlated with the site of maximum cell expansion during tip growth. The Spitzenkorper was not trapped by the laser, but moved away from the trap, and could be `chased' around the cell by the laser beam. Consequently, the direction of cell elongation was readily changed by moving the Spitzenkorper. When the laser was held steady at the cytoplasmic surface immediately beside the Spitzenkorper, an adventitious branch hypha was initiated on the same side of the hypha, suggesting that unilateral disturbance of vesicle traffic initiated a new lateral Spitzenkorper and hyphal branch near the original hyphal apex. If moving vesicles were trapped by the laser beam and transported to a different area of the cytoplasm near the cell surface, the cell profile bulged where the vesicles were newly concentrated. Variations in the mode of vesicle transfer caused: (1) single and multiple bulges, (2) adventitious branch hyphae, (3) increased cell diameter, and (4) changing directions of hyphal elongation. Thus, laser tweezers emerge as a powerful tool for controlling patterns of cell morphogenesis. The findings strongly support the hypothesis that sites of vesicle concentration and release to the cell surface are important determinants of cell morphogenesis in fungi. This conclusion lends support to the basic premises of a modern mathematical model of hyphal tip growth (the hyphoid/VSC model) but does not in itself provide the information needed for a comprehensive and integrated explanation of the mechanism of cell growth in fungi.

  15. Mechanotransmission and Mechanosensing of Human alpha-Actinin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimin Le

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: α-Actinins, a family of critical cytoskeletal actin-binding proteins that usually exist as anti-parallel dimers, play crucial roles in organizing the framework of the cytoskeleton through crosslinking the actin filaments, as well as in focal adhesion maturation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its functions are unclear. Here, by mechanical manipulation of single human α-actinin 1 using magnetic tweezers, we determined the mechanical stability and kinetics of the functional domains in α-actinin 1. Moreover, we identified the force-dependence of vinculin binding to α-actinin 1, with the demonstration that force is required to expose the high-affinity binding site for vinculin binding. Further, a role of the α-actinin 1 as molecular shock absorber for the cytoskeleton network is revealed. Our results provide a comprehensive analysis of the force-dependent stability and interactions of α-actinin 1, which sheds important light on the molecular mechanisms underlying its mechanotransmission and mechanosensing functions. : α-Actinins are critical actin crosslinking proteins that organize actin cytoskeletal networks. Le et al. determine the mechanical stability and dynamics of human α-actinin 1 and the force-dependence of vinculin binding to α-actinin 1, which sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of mechanotransmission and mechanosensing. Keywords: α-actinin 1, cytoskeleton, mechanosensing, mechanostransmission, vinculin binding, magnetic tweezers, single molecule manipulation, molecular shock absorber

  16. A thin permeable-membrane device for single-molecule manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Young; Jacobson, David R.; Nguyen, Dan T.; Willardson, Sam; Saleh, Omar A.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule manipulation instruments have unparalleled abilities to interrogate the structure and elasticity of single biomolecules. Key insights are derived by measuring the system response in varying solution conditions; yet, typical solution control strategies require imposing a direct fluid flow on the measured biomolecule that perturbs the high-sensitivity measurement and/or removes interacting molecules by advection. An alternate approach is to fabricate devices that permit solution changes by diffusion of the introduced species through permeable membranes, rather than by direct solution flow through the sensing region. Prior implementations of permeable-membrane devices are relatively thick, disallowing their use in apparatus that require the simultaneous close approach of external instrumentation from two sides, as occurs in single-molecule manipulation devices like the magnetic tweezer. Here, we describe the construction and use of a thin microfluidic device appropriate for single-molecule studies. We create a flow cell of only ˜500 μm total thickness by sandwiching glass coverslips around a thin plastic gasket and then create permeable walls between laterally separated channels in situ through photo-induced cross-linking of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate hydrogels. We show that these membranes permit passage of ions and small molecules (thus permitting solution equilibration in the absence of direct flow), but the membranes block the passage of larger biomolecules (thus retaining precious samples). Finally, we demonstrate the suitability of the device for high-resolution magnetic-tweezer experiments by measuring the salt-dependent folding of a single RNA hairpin under force.

  17. Ultra-Precise Assembly of Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.T.; Simon, R.; Polosky, M.; Christenson, T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes a three year effort to develop an automated microassembly workcell for the assembly of LIGA (Lithography Galvonoforming Abforming) parts. Over the last several years, Sandia has developed processes for producing surface machined silicon and LIGA parts for use in weapons surety devices. Some of these parts have outside dimensions as small as 100 micron, and most all have submicron tolerances. Parts this small and precise are extremely difficult to assembly by hand. Therefore, in this project, we investigated the technologies required to develop a robotic workcell to assembly these parts. In particular, we concentrated on micro-grippers, visual servoing, micro-assembly planning, and parallel assembly. Three different micro-grippers were tested: a pneumatic probe, a thermally actuated polysilicon tweezer, and a LIGA fabricated tweezer. Visual servoing was used to accuracy position two parts relative to one another. Fourier optics methods were used to generate synthetic microscope images from CAD drawings. These synthetic images are used off-line to test image processing routines under varying magnifications and depths of field. They also provide reference image features which are used to visually servo the part to the desired position. We also investigated a new aspect of fine motion planning for the micro-domain. As parts approach 1-10 {micro}m or less in outside dimensions, interactive forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces become major factors which greatly change the assembly sequence and path plans. We developed the mathematics required to determine the goal regions for pick up, holding, and release of a micro-sphere being handled by a rectangular tool. Finally, we implemented and tested the ability to assemble an array of LIGA parts attached to two 3 inch diameter wafers. In this way, hundreds of parts can be assembled in parallel rather than assembling each part individually.

  18. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Advantages and Challenges of Relaxor-PbTiO3 Ferroelectric Crystals for Electroacoustic Transducers- A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Jiang, Xiaoning; Kim, Jinwook; Luo, Jun; Geng, Xuecang

    2015-03-01

    Relaxor-PbTiO 3 (PT) based ferroelectric crystals with the perovskite structure have been investigated over the last few decades due to their ultrahigh piezoelectric coefficients ( d 33 > 1500 pC/N) and electromechanical coupling factors ( k 33 > 90%), far outperforming state-of-the-art ferroelectric polycrystalline Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 ceramics, and are at the forefront of advanced electroacoustic applications. In this review, the performance merits of relaxor-PT crystals in various electroacoustic devices are presented from a piezoelectric material viewpoint. Opportunities come from not only the ultrahigh properties, specifically coupling and piezoelectric coefficients, but through novel vibration modes and crystallographic/domain engineering. Figure of merits (FOMs) of crystals with various compositions and phases were established for various applications, including medical ultrasonic transducers, underwater transducers, acoustic sensors and tweezers. For each device application, recent developments in relaxor-PT ferroelectric crystals were surveyed and compared with state-of-the-art polycrystalline piezoelectrics, with an emphasis on their strong anisotropic features and crystallographic uniqueness, including engineered domain - property relationships. This review starts with an introduction on electroacoustic transducers and the history of piezoelectric materials. The development of the high performance relaxor-PT single crystals, with a focus on their uniqueness in transducer applications, is then discussed. In the third part, various FOMs of piezoelectric materials for a wide range of ultrasound applications, including diagnostic ultrasound, therapeutic ultrasound, underwater acoustic and passive sensors, tactile sensors and acoustic tweezers, are evaluated to provide a thorough understanding of the materials' behavior under operational conditions. Structure-property-performance relationships are then established. Finally, the impacts and challenges of relaxor

  20. Genetic Variance in Cadmium Tolerance and Accumulation in Wheat Materials Differing in Ploidy and Genome at Seedling Stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ci, D; Jiang, D; Wollenweber, B

    2010-01-01

    and cluster analysis, Triticum boeoticum Boiss was found to be the most Cd-tolerant variety exhibiting low Cd translocation rates, whereas T. aestivum cv. Huixianhong and Jinghui 1 were identified as the most Cd-sensitive varieties showing also higher Cd translocation rates.......Cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation in wheat varieties differing in ploidy and genome were investigated at seedling stage under controlled environmental conditions. The wheat varieties included six diploid, eight tetraploid, seven hexaploid and three octoploid species together with wheat...... translocation (ratio of SCA to total Cd accumulation in plants) of the wheat varieties differing in ploidies generally decreased from octoploid to diploid, except for material containing the CCUU genome. It was found that Cd tolerance of these 24 wheat varieties varied with different ploidy and genomes...

  1. Evolutionary concepts in ecotoxicology: tracing the genetic background of differential cadmium sensitivities in invertebrate lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Reinhard; Höckner, Martina

    2013-07-01

    In many toxicological and ecotoxicological studies and experimental setups, the investigator is mainly interested in traditional parameters such as toxicity data and effects of toxicants on molecular, cellular or physiological functions of individuals, species or statistical populations. It is clear, however, that such approaches focus on the phenotype level of animal species, whilst the genetic and evolutionary background of reactions to environmental toxicants may remain untold. In ecotoxicological risk assessment, moreover, species sensitivities towards pollutants are often regarded as random variables in a statistical approach. Beyond statistics, however, toxicant sensitivity of every species assumes a biological significance, especially if we consider that sensitivity traits have developed in lineages of species with common evolutionary roots. In this article, the genetic and evolutionary background of differential Cd sensitivities among invertebrate populations and species and their potential of adaptation to environmental Cd exposure will be highlighted. Important evolutionary and population genetic concepts such as genome structure and their importance for evolutionary adaptation, population structure of affected individuals, as well as micro and macroevolutionary mechanisms of Cd resistance in invertebrate lineages will be stressed by discussing examples of work from our own laboratory along with a review of relevant literature data and a brief discussion of open questions along with some perspectives for further research. Both, differences and similarities in Cd sensitivity traits of related invertebrate species can only be understood if we consider the underlying evolutionary processes and genetic (or epigenetic) mechanisms. Keeping in mind this perception can help us to better understand and interpret more precisely why the sensitivity of some species or species groups towards a certain toxicant (or metal) may be ranked in the lower or higher range of

  2. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: Recovery from cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Mengjiao [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Section of Marine Ecology and Biotechnology, Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-01-25

    Studies in the recovery from metal stress and the tolerance development to metal exposure of aquatic organisms are important for the understanding of epidemic pollution. In this study, the responses of a marine diatom, Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii, following recovery from environmental cadmium (Cd) stress were investigated. The diatoms were exposed to different concentrations of Cd for 7 days, and were then allowed different periods of time to recover. The Cd sensitivity increased after recovery from Cd stress, followed by a gradual restoration. The extent of restoration depended on both the recovery time and the environmental Cd stress during the exposure period. A complete restoration of Cd tolerance proved to be impossible for cells pre-exposed to High-Cd. The Cd cellular burden and subcellular Cd concentration decreased to the control level within the first day of recovery, indicating that the elevated sensitivity may have been due to the accumulation of functional damage caused by Cd exposure instead of a result of physical Cd accumulation. The rapid change in phytochelatins (PC) to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress made it a good quantitative bioindicator of environmental Cd contamination. However, the relationships between Cd distribution in the metal sensitive fraction (MSF-Cd) or intracellular Cd to thiol ratio (intra-Cd/PC-SH) and the relative change in the median inhibition [Cd{sup 2+}] ([Cd{sup 2+}]-based-IC{sub 50}, i.e., Cd sensitivity) differed for the various exposure and recovery periods tested. Our study suggests that more attention should be given to the recovery of aquatic organisms from episodic metal exposure.

  3. Preliminary evidence of differences in cadmium tolerance in metal-free stocks of the standard earthworm test species Eisenia andrei (Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otomo, Patricks Voua; Otomo, Laetitia Voua; Bezuidenhout, Carlos C; Maboeta, Mark S

    2016-08-01

    To test whether metal-tolerant and metal-sensitive earthworm specimens could be an inherent part of metal-free earthworm populations, (i) we used DNA barcoding to identify and categorize earthworms from 8 populations of the standard test species Eisenia andrei, and (ii) the earthworms carrying three of the identified COI haplotypes (named Hap1, hap3 and Hap3) were paired up and exposed to Cd in order to assess the difference in Cd sensitivity between the breeding pairs. A total of six breeding pairs were exposed to 0, 25, 50 and 100 mg Cd/kg for 4 weeks at 20 °C. The survival of the breeding pairs, their change in biomass and cocoon production were assessed. For all of the endpoints assessed, the results indicated that couple 6 (Hap3 × Hap3) was the most sensitive breeding pair whereas couple 4 (Hap1 × Hap3) was the least sensitive one. The analysis of Cd tissue contents revealed that with increasing Cd concentration, Cp6 (Hap3 × Hap3) could accumulate significantly more Cd than any other breeding pair (p ≤ 0.01). Our findings indicate that E. andrei may harbour intrinsically Cd-tolerant and Cd-sensitive individuals and that this may be due to individual differences in Cd accumulation kinetics. In the context of ecotoxicological testing, our results underline the importance of using genetically diverse populations in laboratory testing to prevent generating flawed data from genetically homogeneous laboratory stocks. Although we do not regard the present mitochondrial haplotypes as proxy for possibly nuclear encoded traits, we discuss the necessity of a standardised earthworm barcoding protocol that could help not only to confirm the taxonomy of laboratory earthworm stocks but also to select genetically diverse stocks suitable for laboratory testing.

  4. Evidence for two populations of hair bundles in the sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Shelcie S; Watson, Glen M

    2017-06-01

    Cytochalasin D (CD) was employed to disrupt F-actin within stereocilia of anemone hair bundles. CD treatment decreases the abundance of hair bundles (by 85%) while significantly impairing predation. The remaining hair bundles are 'CD-resistant.' Surprisingly, the morphology and F-actin content of resistant hair bundles are comparable to those of untreated controls. However, the resistant hair bundles fail to respond normally to the N-acetylated sugar, NANA, by elongating. Instead, they remain at resting length. Immediately after CD treatment, when only CD-resistant hair bundles are present, nematocyst discharge is normal into targets touched to tentacles in the absence of vibrations (i.e., baseline) but fails to increase normally in the presence of nearby vibrations at 56Hz, a key frequency. After CD treatment, the abundance of hair bundles recovers to control levels within three hours. At 2h after CD treatment, when CD-resistant and CD-sensitive hair bundles are both present, but a full-recovery is not yet complete, somewhat enhanced discharge of nematocysts occurs into targets touched to tentacles in the presence of nearby vibrations at 56Hz (at least as compared to the response of CD-treated animals to contact with test probes in the absence of vibrations). Additionally, at 2h after CD-treatment, prey capture recovers to normal. Thus, two populations of hair bundles may be present on tentacles of sea anemones: those that are CD-resistant and those that are CD-sensitive. The functions of these hair bundles may be distinct. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. New tools to study biophysical properties of single molecules and single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio S. Rocha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a review on two new tools to study biophysical properties of single molecules and single cells. A laser incident through a high numerical aperture microscope objective can trap small dielectric particles near the focus. This arrangement is named optical tweezers. This technique has the advantage to permit manipulation of a single individual object. We use optical tweezers to measure the entropic elasticity of a single DNA molecule and its interaction with the drug Psoralen. Optical tweezers are also used to hold a kidney cell MDCK away from the substrate to allow precise volume measurements of this single cell during an osmotic shock. This procedure allows us to obtain information about membrane water permeability and regulatory volume increase. Defocusing microscopy is a recent technique invented in our laboratory, which allows the observation of transparent objects, by simply defocusing the microscope in a controlled way. Our physical model of a defocused microscope shows that the image contrast observed in this case is proportional to the defocus distance and to the curvature of the transparent object. Defocusing microscopy is very useful to study motility and mechanical properties of cells. We show here the application of defocusing microscopy to measurements of macrophage surface fluctuations and their influence on phagocytosis.Apresentamos uma revisão de duas novas técnicas para estudar propriedades biofísicas de moléculas únicas e células únicas. Um laser incidindo em uma objetiva de microscópio de grande abertura numérica é capaz de aprisionar pequenas partículas dielétricas na região próxima ao foco. Este aparato é chamado de pinça óptica. Esta técnica tem a grande vantagem de permitir a manipulação de um objeto individual. Usamos a pinça óptica para medir a elasticidade entrópica de uma molécula única de DNA em sua interação com o fármaco Psoralen. A pinça óptica também é usada para segurar

  6. On the shape memory of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) undergo remarkably large deformations when subjected to external forces but return to their biconcave discoid resting shape as the forces are withdrawn. In many experiments, such as when RBCs are subjected to a shear flow and undergo the tank-treading motion, the membrane elements are also displaced from their original (resting) locations along the cell surface with respect to the cell axis, in addition to the cell being deformed. A shape memory is said to exist if after the flow is stopped the RBC regains its biconcave shape and the membrane elements also return to their original locations. The shape memory of RBCs was demonstrated by Fischer ["Shape memory of human red blood cells," Biophys. J. 86, 3304-3313 (2004)] using shear flow go-and-stop experiments. Optical tweezer and micropipette based stretch-relaxation experiments do not reveal the complete shape memory because while the RBC may be deformed, the membrane elements are not significantly displaced from their original locations with respect to the cell axis. Here we present the first three-dimensional computational study predicting the complete shape memory of RBCs using shear flow go-and-stop simulations. The influence of different parameters, namely, membrane shear elasticity and bending rigidity, membrane viscosity, cytoplasmic and suspending fluid viscosity, as well as different stress-free states of the RBC is studied. For all cases, the RBCs always exhibit shape memory. The complete recovery of the RBC in shear flow go-and-stop simulations occurs over a time that is orders of magnitude longer than that for optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. The response is also observed to be more complex and composed of widely disparate time scales as opposed to only one time scale that characterizes the optical tweezer and micropipette based relaxations. We observe that the recovery occurs in three phases: a rapid compression of the RBC immediately after the flow is stopped

  7. Viral DNA Packaging: One Step at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Carlos; Moffitt, Jeffrey R.

    During its life-cycle the bacteriophage φ29 actively packages its dsDNA genome into a proteinacious capsid, compressing its genome to near crystalline densities against large electrostatic, elastic, and entropic forces. This remarkable process is accomplished by a nano-scale, molecular DNA pump - a complex assembly of three protein and nucleic acid rings which utilizes the free energy released in ATP hydrolysis to perform the mechanical work necessary to overcome these large energetic barriers. We have developed a single molecule optical tweezers assay which has allowed us to probe the detailed mechanism of this packaging motor. By following the rate of packaging of a single bacteriophage as the capsid is filled with genome and as a function of optically applied load, we find that the compression of the genome results in the build-up of an internal force, on the order of ˜ 55 pN, due to the compressed genome. The ability to work against such large forces makes the packaging motor one of the strongest known molecular motors. By titrating the concentration of ATP, ADP, and inorganic phosphate at different opposing load, we are able to determine features of the mechanochemistry of this motor - the coupling between the mechanical and chemical cycles. We find that force is generated not upon binding of ATP, but rather upon release of hydrolysis products. Finally, by improving the resolution of the optical tweezers assay, we are able to observe the discrete increments of DNA encapsidated each cycle of the packaging motor. We find that DNA is packaged in 10-bp increments preceded by the binding of multiple ATPs. The application of large external forces slows the packaging rate of the motor, revealing that the 10-bp steps are actually composed of four 2.5-bp steps which occur in rapid succession. These data show that the individual subunits of the pentameric ring-ATPase at the core of the packaging motor are highly coordinated, with the binding of ATP and the

  8. Single molecule studies of DNA packaging by bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Derek Nathan

    The DNA packaging dynamics of bacteriophages φ29, gamma, and T4 were studied at the single molecule level using a dual trap optical tweezers. Also, a method for producing long DNA molecules by PCR for optical tweezers studies of protein DNA interactions is presented and thoroughly characterized. This DNA preparation technique provided DNA samples for the φ29 and T4 studies. In the studies of φ29, the role of charge was investigated by varying the ionic conditions of the packaging buffer. Ionic conditions in which the DNA charge was highly screened due to divalent and trivalent cations showed the lowest resistance to packaging of the DNA to high density. This confirmed the importance of counterions in shielding the DNA interstrand repulsion when packaged to high density. While the ionic nature of the packaging buffer had a strong effect on packaging velocities, there was no clear trend between the counterion-screened charge of the DNA and the maximum packaging velocity. The packaging studies of lambda and T4 served as systems for comparative studies with φ29. Each system showed similarities to the φ29 system and unique differences. Both the lambda and T4 packaging motors were capable of generating forces in excess of 50 pN and showed remarkably high processivity, similar to φ29. However, dynamic structural transitions were observed with lambda that are not observed with φ29. The packaging of the lambda genome showed capsid expansion at approximately 30 percent of the genome packaged and capsid rupture at 90 percent of the genome packaged in the absence of capsid stabilizing protein gpD. Unique to the T4 packaging motor, packaging dynamics showed a remarkable amount of variability in velocities. This variability was seen both within individual packaging phages and from one phage to the next. This is possibly due to different conformational states of the packaging machinery. Additionally, lambda and T4 had average packaging velocities under minimal load of 600

  9. Generation of arbitrary complex quasi-non-diffracting optical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ambriz, Antonio; Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Vysloukh, Victor A; Petrov, Dmitri; Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C; Torner, Lluis

    2013-09-23

    Due to their unique ability to maintain an intensity distribution upon propagation, non-diffracting light fields are used extensively in various areas of science, including optical tweezers, nonlinear optics and quantum optics, in applications where complex transverse field distributions are required. However, the number and type of rigorously non-diffracting beams is severely limited because their symmetry is dictated by one of the coordinate system where the Helmholtz equation governing beam propagation is separable. Here, we demonstrate a powerful technique that allows the generation of a rich variety of quasi-non-diffracting optical beams featuring nearly arbitrary intensity distributions in the transverse plane. These can be readily engineered via modifications of the angular spectrum of the beam in order to meet the requirements of particular applications. Such beams are not rigorously non-diffracting but they maintain their shape over large distances, which may be tuned by varying the width of the angular spectrum. We report the generation of unique spiral patterns and patterns involving arbitrary combinations of truncated harmonic, Bessel, Mathieu, or parabolic beams occupying different spatial domains. Optical trapping experiments illustrate the opto-mechanical properties of such beams.

  10. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  11. DNA as a Model for Probing Polymer Entanglements: Circular Polymers and Non-Classical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Regan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Double-stranded DNA offers a robust platform for investigating fundamental questions regarding the dynamics of entangled polymer solutions. The exceptional monodispersity and multiple naturally occurring topologies of DNA, as well as a wide range of tunable lengths and concentrations that encompass the entanglement regime, enable direct testing of molecular-level entanglement theories and corresponding scaling laws. DNA is also amenable to a wide range of techniques from passive to nonlinear measurements and from single-molecule to bulk macroscopic experiments. Over the past two decades, researchers have developed methods to directly visualize and manipulate single entangled DNA molecules in steady-state and stressed conditions using fluorescence microscopy, particle tracking and optical tweezers. Developments in microfluidics, microrheology and bulk rheology have also enabled characterization of the viscoelastic response of entangled DNA from molecular levels to macroscopic scales and over timescales that span from linear to nonlinear regimes. Experiments using DNA have uniquely elucidated the debated entanglement properties of circular polymers and blends of linear and circular polymers. Experiments have also revealed important lengthscale and timescale dependent entanglement dynamics not predicted by classical tube models, both validating and refuting new proposed extensions and alternatives to tube theory and motivating further theoretical work to describe the rich dynamics exhibited in entangled polymer systems.

  12. Dynamical hologram generation for high speed optical trapping of smart droplet microtools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, P M P; Munro, I; Grace, E J; Casey, D R; Phillips, J; Klug, D R; Ces, O; Neil, M A A

    2012-07-01

    This paper demonstrates spatially selective sampling of the plasma membrane by the implementation of time-multiplexed holographic optical tweezers for Smart Droplet Microtools (SDMs). High speed (>1000fps) dynamical hologram generation was computed on the graphics processing unit of a standard display card and controlled by a user friendly LabView interface. Time multiplexed binary holograms were displayed in real time and mirrored to a ferroelectric Spatial Light Modulator. SDMs were manufactured with both liquid cores (as previously described) and solid cores, which confer significant advantages in terms of stability, polydispersity and ease of use. These were coated with a number of detergents, the most successful based upon lipids doped with transfection reagents. In order to validate these, trapped SDMs were maneuvered up to the plasma membrane of giant vesicles containing Nile Red and human biliary epithelial (BE) colon cancer cells with green fluorescent labeled protein (GFP)-labeled CAAX (a motif belonging to the Ras protein). Bright field and fluorescence images showed that successful trapping and manipulation of multiple SDMs in x, y, z was achieved with success rates of 30-50% and that subsequent membrane-SDM interactions led to the uptake of Nile Red or GFP-CAAX into the SDM.

  13. Use of adrenalin with lidocaine in hand surgery ,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Antonio de Freitas Novais Junior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Because of the received wisdom within our setting that claims that local anesthesia should not be used with adrenalin in hand surgery; we conducted a study using lidocaine with adrenalin, to demonstrate its safety, utility and efficacy.Methods:We conducted a prospective study in which, in wrist, hand and finger surgery performed from July 2012 onwards, we used local anesthesia comprising a 1% lidocaine solution with adrenalin at 1:100,000. We evaluated the quantity of bleeding, systemic alterations, signs of arterial deficit and complications, among other parameters. We described the infiltration techniques for specific procedures individually.Results:We operated on 41 patients and chose to describe separately the raising of a lateral microsurgical flap on the arm, which was done without excessive bleeding and within the usual length of time. In only three cases was there excessive bleeding or use of bipolar tweezers. No systemic alterations were observed by the anesthesiologists or any complications relating to ischemia and necrosis in the wounds or in the fingers, and use of tourniquets was not necessary in any case.Conclusions:Use of lidocaine with adrenalin in hand surgery was shown to be a safe local anesthetic technique, without complications relating to necrosis. It provided efficient exsanguination of the surgical field and made it possible to perform the surgical procedures without using a pneumatic tourniquet, thereby avoiding its risks and benefiting the patient through lower sedation.

  14. Laser-refrigeration of rare-earth-doped nanocrystals in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Paden B.; Smith, Bennett; Zhou, Xuezhe; Crane, Matthew J.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Single-beam laser-tweezers have been demonstrated over the past several decades to confine nanometer-scale particles in three dimensions with sufficient sensitivity to measure the spring constants of individual biological macromolecules including DNA. Large laser-irradiance values (on the order of MW/cm2) commonly are used to generate laser traps which can lead to significant laser-heating within the 3D optical potential well. To date, laser-refrigeration of particles within an aqueous medium has not been reported stemming primarily from the large near-infrared (NIR) optical absorption coefficient of liquid water (0.2 cm-1 at lambda = 1020nm). In this paper we will detail the methods on how single-beam laser-traps can be used to induce and quantify the refrigeration of optically trapped nanocrystals in an aqueous medium. Analysis of the Brownian dynamics of individual nanocrystals via forward light scattering provides a way to determine both a relative and absolute measurement of particle's temperature. Signal analysis considerations to interpreting Brownian motion data of trapped particles in nonisothermal aqueous environments, or so-called hot Brownian motion, are detailed. Applications of these methods to determining local laser-refrigeration of laser trapped nanoparticles in water show promise at realizing the first observation of particles undergoing cold Brownian motion.

  15. Fingerprint detection and using intercalated CdSe nanoparticles on non-porous surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algarra, Manuel, E-mail: malgarra67@gmail.com [Centro de Geología da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Geociências, Ambiente e Ordenamemto do Territorio do Porto, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Radotić, Ksenija; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Mutavdžić, Dragosav; Savić, Aleksandar [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Višeslava 1, 11000 Beograd (Serbia); Jiménez-Jiménez, José; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Teatinos s/n, 29071Málaga (Spain); Silva, Joaquim C.G. Esteves da [Centro de Investigação em Química (CIQ-UP). Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Guerrero-González, Juan José [Policía Científica, Cuerpo Nacional de Policía, Málaga (Spain)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Fluorescent nanocomposite based on the inclusion of CdSe quantum dots in porous phosphate heterostructures. •Characterized by FTIR, XRD and fluorescence spectroscopies. •Deconvolution of the emission spectra was confirmed by using multivariate curve resolution (MCR) method. •Application for fingerprint detection and analysis on different non-porous surfaces. -- Abstract: A fluorescent nanocomposite based on the inclusion of CdSe quantum dots in porous phosphate heterostructures, functionalized with amino groups (PPH-NH{sub 2}@CdSe), was synthesized, characterized and used for fingerprint detection. The main scopes of this work were first to develop a friendly chemical powder for detecting latent fingerprints, especially in non-porous surfaces; their further intercalation in PPH structure enables not to spread the fluorescent nanoparticles, for that reason very good fluorescent images can be obtained. The fingerprints, obtained on different non-porous surfaces such as iron tweezers, mobile telephone screen and magnetic band of a credit card, treated with this powder emit a pale orange luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. A further image processing consists of contrast enhancement that allows obtaining positive matches according to the information supplied from a police database, and showed to be more effective than that obtained with the non-processed images. Experimental results illustrate the effectiveness of proposed methods.

  16. Blood cleaner on-chip design for artificial human kidney manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwanpayak N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available N Suwanpayak1, MA Jalil2, MS Aziz3, FD Ismail3, J Ali3, PP Yupapin11Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance (N'SERA, Advanced Research Center for Photonics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology, Ladkrabang, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Ibnu Sina Institute of Fundamental Science Studies (IIS, 3Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, Nanotechnology Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, MalaysiaAbstract: A novel design of a blood cleaner on-chip using an optical waveguide known as a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. By controlling some suitable parameters, the optical vortices (gradient optical fields/wells can be generated and used to form the trapping tools in the same way as optical tweezers. In operation, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons by using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator. This can be used for blood waste trapping and moves dynamically within the blood cleaner on-chip system (artificial kidney, and is performed within the wavelength routers. Finally, the blood quality test is exploited by the external probe before sending to the destination. The advantage of the proposed kidney on-chip system is that the unwanted substances can be trapped and filtered from the artificial kidney, which can be available for blood cleaning applications.Keywords: optical trapping, blood dialysis, blood cleaner, human kidney manipulation

  17. Multi-access drug delivery network and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitatha, S; Moongfangklang, N; Jalil, MA; Suwanpayak, N; Ali, J; Yupapin, PP

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of a multi-drug delivery network and diagnosis using a molecular network is proposed. By using a pair of tweezers to generate the intense optical vortices within the PANDA ring resonator, the required molecules (drug volumes) can be trapped and moved dynamically within the molecular bus networks, in which the required drug delivery targets can be achieved within the network. The advantage of the proposed system is that the diagnostic method can be used within a tiny system (thin film device or circuit), which is available as an embedded device for diagnostic use in patients. In practice, the large molecular networks such as ring, star, and bus networks can be integrated to form a large drug delivery system. The channel spacing of the trapped volumes (molecules) within the bus molecular networks can be provided by using the appropriate free spectrum range, which is analyzed and discussed in the terms of crosstalk effects. In this work, crosstalk effects of about 0.1% are noted, which can be neglected and does not affect the network stability. PMID:21980238

  18. Methods of tick removal: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Nikki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background An increase in tick borne diseases in Australia has seen an interest in appropriate removal of ticks (order Ixodida in order to prevent anaphylaxis, allergy and transmission of tick borne diseases. Aims A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature to determine what method of tick removal should be promoted in terms of preventing future health complications. Methods Thematic synthesis was used in two stages: – tick removal studies conducted on animals and humans were examined and the conclusions from all of these studies were compared, in order to ascertain the best tick removal method in relation to prevention of future medical problems (including tick bite allergy and transmission of infection. Conclusion This systematic review documents the best method of tick removal based on scientific and medical studies between 1985 and 2016. It concludes that the best method is to remove the tick as soon as possible after it is detected, using either fine-tipped tweezers or a reputable commercially produced tick removal tool to pull the tick away from the site of attachment. Some methods of removal, such as applying chemicals like petroleum jelly, alcohol, or nail polish to the tick, have been discredited. Other methods of removal, such as freezing, while promising, have not yet been scientifically validated

  19. Kinesin and Dynein Mechanics: Measurement Methods and Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Zachary; Hawley, Emma; Hayosh, Daniel; Webster-Wood, Victoria A; Akkus, Ozan

    2018-02-01

    Motor proteins play critical roles in the normal function of cells and proper development of organisms. Among motor proteins, failings in the normal function of two types of proteins, kinesin and dynein, have been shown to lead many pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. As such, it is critical to researchers to understand the underlying mechanics and behaviors of these proteins, not only to shed light on how failures may lead to disease, but also to guide research toward novel treatment and nano-engineering solutions. To this end, many experimental techniques have been developed to measure the force and motility capabilities of these proteins. This review will (a) discuss such techniques, specifically microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical trapping, and magnetic tweezers, and (b) the resulting nanomechanical properties of motor protein functions such as stalling force, velocity, and dependence on adenosine triphosophate (ATP) concentrations will be comparatively discussed. Additionally, this review will highlight the clinical importance of these proteins. Furthermore, as the understanding of the structure and function of motor proteins improves, novel applications are emerging in the field. Specifically, researchers have begun to modify the structure of existing proteins, thereby engineering novel elements to alter and improve native motor protein function, or even allow the motor proteins to perform entirely new tasks as parts of nanomachines. Kinesin and dynein are vital elements for the proper function of cells. While many exciting experiments have shed light on their function, mechanics, and applications, additional research is needed to completely understand their behavior.

  20. On-chip Magnetic Separation and Cell Encapsulation in Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A.; Byvank, T.; Bharde, A.; Miller, B. L.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.; Chang, W.-J.; Bashir, R.

    2012-02-01

    The demand for high-throughput single cell assays is gaining importance because of the heterogeneity of many cell suspensions, even after significant initial sorting. These suspensions may display cell-to-cell variability at the gene expression level that could impact single cell functional genomics, cancer, stem-cell research and drug screening. The on-chip monitoring of individual cells in an isolated environment could prevent cross-contamination, provide high recovery yield and ability to study biological traits at a single cell level These advantages of on-chip biological experiments contrast to conventional methods, which require bulk samples that provide only averaged information on cell metabolism. We report on a device that integrates microfluidic technology with a magnetic tweezers array to combine the functionality of separation and encapsulation of objects such as immunomagnetically labeled cells or magnetic beads into pico-liter droplets on the same chip. The ability to control the separation throughput that is independent of the hydrodynamic droplet generation rate allows the encapsulation efficiency to be optimized. The device can potentially be integrated with on-chip labeling and/or bio-detection to become a powerful single-cell analysis device.