WorldWideScience

Sample records for ccr mag v1

  1. MAG UNCALIBRATED (EDR) DATA E/V/H/SW V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER MAG uncalibrated observations, also known as EDRs. The MAG experiment is a miniature three-axis ring-core...

  2. MAG REDUCED (RDR) DATA E/V/H/SW V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER MAG reduced observations, also known as RDRs. The MAG experiment is a miniature three-axis ring-core...

  3. MAG CALIBRATED (CDR) DATA E/V/H/SW V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER MAG calibrated observations, also known as CDRs. The MAG experiment is a miniature three-axis ring-core...

  4. GALILEO ORBITER AT JUPITER CALIBRATED MAG HIGH RES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains high time resolution magnetic field vectors acquired by the Galileo magnetometer (MAG). It includes both satellite flyby and non-flyby data....

  5. HIV-2 interaction with cell coreceptors: amino acids within the V1/V2 region of viral envelope are determinant for CCR8, CCR5 and CXCR4 usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Costa, Quirina; Lopes, Maria Manuel; Calado, Marta; Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel

    2014-11-25

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) use cellular receptors in distinct ways. Besides a more promiscuous usage of coreceptors by HIV-2 and a more frequent detection of CD4-independent HIV-2 isolates, we have previously identified two HIV-2 isolates (HIV-2MIC97 and HIV-2MJC97) that do not use the two major HIV coreceptors: CCR5 and CXCR4. All these features suggest that in HIV-2 the Env glycoprotein subunits may have a different structural organization enabling distinct - although probably less efficient - interactions with cellular receptors. By infectivity assays using GHOST cell line expressing CD4 and CCR8 and blocking experiments using CCR8-specific ligand, I-309, we show that efficient replication of HIV-2MIC97 and HIV-2MJC97 requires the presence of CCR8 at plasma cell membrane. Additionally, we disclosed the determinants of chemokine receptor usage at the molecular level, and deciphered the amino acids involved in the usage of CCR8 (R8 phenotype) and in the switch from CCR8 to CCR5 or to CCR5/CXCR4 usage (R5 or R5X4 phenotype). The data obtained from site-directed mutagenesis clearly indicates that the main genetic determinants of coreceptor tropism are located within the V1/V2 region of Env surface glycoprotein of these two viruses. We conclude that a viral population able to use CCR8 and unable to infect CCR5 or CXCR4-positive cells, may exist in some HIV-2 infected individuals during an undefined time period, in the course of the asymptomatic stage of infection. This suggests that in vivo alternate molecules might contribute to HIV infection of natural target cells, at least under certain circumstances. Furthermore we provide direct and unequivocal evidence that the usage of CCR8 and the switch from R8 to R5 or R5X4 phenotype is determined by amino acids located in the base and tip of V1 and V2 loops of HIV-2 Env surface glycoprotein.

  6. CCR1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemokine Receptor 1 (CCR1) Derived from Viral ... the potential role and mechanism of peptide C18P derived from viral macrophage inflammatory protein ..... 4. Kauts ML, Pihelgas S, Orro K, Neuman T, Piirsoo A. CCL5/CCR1 axis regulates multipotency of human adipose tissue derived stromal cells. Stem Cell Res. 2013 ...

  7. GO JUPITER MAG MAGNETOSPHERIC SURVEY V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains magnetic field vectors acquired by the Galileo Orbiter magnetometer during the magnetospheric survey portion of the mission. These data were...

  8. CASSINI ORBITER MAG CALIBRATED FULL RES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains calibrated full time resolution Cassini magnetometer data, for the entire Cassini mission. These data are provided in RTN coordinates for...

  9. Demystifying Mag-Lev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Ernest; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presented are classroom activities in which students explore the potential use of magnetic levitation for transportation purposes. The advantages of using a MagLev transportation system instead of conventional trains are discussed. Directions for designing and building a MagLev track and circuit are provided. (KR)

  10. MGS MARS/MOONS MAG/ER MAPPING MAG FULL WORD RESOLUTION V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains vector magnetic field data acquired by the Fluxgate section of the Magnetometer / Electron Reflectometer instrument aboard the Mars Global...

  11. THOR Fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rumi; Eastwood, Jonathan; Magnes, Werner; Carr, Christopher, M.; O'Brien, Helen, L.; Narita, Yasuhito; K, Chen, Christopher H.; Berghofer, Gerhard; Valavanoglou, Aris; Delva, Magda; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Cupido, Emanuele; Soucek, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The fluxgate Magnetometer (MAG) measures the background to low frequency magnetic field. The high sensitivity measurements of MAG enable to characterize the nature of turbulent fluctuations as well as the large-scale context. MAG will provide the reference system for determining anisotropy of field fluctuations, pitch-angle and gyro-phase of particles. The design of the magnetometer consists of two tri-axial sensors and the related magnetometer electronics; the electronics are hosted on printed circuit boards in the common electronics box of the fields and wave processor (FWP). A fully redundant two- sensor system mounted on a common boom and the new miniaturized low noise design based on MMS and Solar Orbiter instruments enable accurate measurement throughout the region of interest for THOR science. The usage of the common electronics hosted by FWP guarantees to fulfill the required timing accuracy with other fields measurements. These improvements are important to obtain precise measurements of magnetic field, which is essential to estimate basic plasma parameters and correctly identify the spatial and temporal scales of the turbulence. Furthermore, THOR MAG provides high quality data with sufficient overlap with the Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) in frequency space to obtain full coverage of the wave forms over all the frequencies necessary to obtain the full solar wind turbulence spectrum from MHD to kinetic range with sufficient accuracy. We discuss the role of MAG in THOR key science questions and present the new developments during Phase A such as the finalised instrument design, MAG relevant requirement, and new calibraion schemes.

  12. I Metadati Amministrativo Gestionali (MAG)

    OpenAIRE

    Magliano, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    ICCU created the MAG scheme for facilitating digital objects' management, and for providing a metadata set for their application to digital projects. The MAG scheme defines the preparation of digital objects, how to file them, their access and conservation.

  13. Clinical Case Registries (CCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Clinical Case Registries (CCR) replaced the former Immunology Case Registry and the Hepatitis C Case Registry with local and national databases. The CCR:HIV and...

  14. Rouw mag er zijn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlieke Moors

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGrieving is allowedGrief is a human experience. Every form of loss shapes you into the human being you are today. Contrary to what earlier, unproven grief models postulate, grief does not have an end point. That is, bereavement does not have to be completely processed, but it should be integrated into someone’s life. The outdated grief models were often interpreted and used in a normative way, which led to a normative standard model. This portraits the belief that every mourner would experience similar symptoms and would go through a fixed pattern of phases. However, the updated vision emphasizes the individual and unique process of coping with loss: norms concerning grief should be banned. By means of literature research, interviews with professionals and personal experiences, it became clear that finding an equilibrium between restoration-orientated and loss-orientated coping styles is most beneficial. An important aspect in finding this balance is meaningfulness. Furthermore, the ability to bear a loss and to adapt accordingly are important components. Lastly, attaching significance to a loss is a constructive way of integrating the loss into one’s life. The death of a loved one should therefore not be forgotten or tucked away. After all, grief is the price we pay for love. SAMENVATTINGRouw mag er zijnRouw is een menselijke ervaring en elk verlies vormt je als mens. Rouw heeft, in tegenstelling tot wat de verouderde, niet bewezen rouwmodellen beweren, geen eindpunt. Verlies hoeft namelijk niet verwerkt te worden, maar moet juist geïntegreerd worden in iemands leven. De verouderde rouwmodellen zijn vaak normatief opgevat en toegepast, waaruit een normatief standaardmodel is ontstaan. Daarbij werd gedacht dat elke rouwende dezelfde symptomen zou vertonen en het rouwproces volgens vaste fasen zou verlopen. Binnen de vernieuwde visie wordt er juist van uitgegaan dat elk individu een unieke manier van reageren op rouw heeft. Er zou

  15. MGS MARS/MOONS MAG/ER PRE-MAP MAG FULL WORD RESOLUTION V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains vector magnetic field data acquired by the Fluxgate section of the Magnetometer / Electron Reflectometer instrument aboard the Mars Global...

  16. BioMagResBank.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulrich, E.L.; Akutsu, H.; Doreleijers, J.; Harano, Y.; Ioannidis, Y.E.; Lin, J.; Livny, M.; Mading, S.; Maziuk, D.; Miller, Z.; Nakatani, E.; Schulte, C.F.; Tolmie, D.E.; Wenger, R.K.; Yao, H.; Markley, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The BioMagResBank (BMRB: www.bmrb.wisc.edu) is a repository for experimental and derived data gathered from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies of biological molecules. BMRB is a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB). The BMRB archive consists of four main data

  17. VG2 NEP MAG RESAMP SUMMARY HELIOGRAPHIC COORDS 48SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes data from the Low Field Magnetometer (LFM) during the inbound Neptune encounter beginning in the solar wind and continuing until the first...

  18. VG2 NEP MAG RESAMP RDR HELIOGRAPHIC COORDINATES 1.92SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes data from the Low Field Magnetometer (LFM) during the inbound Neptune encounter beginning in the solar wind and continuing until the first...

  19. VG2 NEP MAG RESAMP RDR HELIOGRAPHIC COORDINATES 9.6SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes data from the Low Field Magnetometer (LFM) during the inbound Neptune encounter beginning in the solar wind and continuing until the first...

  20. CASSINI ORBITER MAG CALIBRATED SUMMARY 1 MINUTE AVERAGE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains calibrated 1 minute averaged Cassini magnetometer data, for the entire Cassini mission. These data are provided in Kronographic (KRTP, KSO,...

  1. CASSINI ORBITER MAG CALIBRATED SUMMARY 1 SEC AVERAGES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains calibrated 1 second averaged Cassini magnetometer data, for the entire Cassini mission. These data are provided in Kronographic (KRTP, KSO,...

  2. VG1 JUP MAG RESAMPLED HELIOGRAPHIC (RTN) COORDS 48.0SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes data from the Low Field Magnetometer (LFM) during the inbound Jupiter encounter beginning in the solar wind and continuing until at least the...

  3. MGS MARS/MOONS MAG/ER MAPPING ER OMNIDIRECTIONAL FLUX V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Electron Reflectometer Data Record (ERDR) is a time ordered series of electron measurements from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mission. Each record consists of...

  4. MGS MARS/MOONS MAG/ER MAPPING ER ANGULAR FLUX V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of calibrated, time-ordered, angle-resolved electron flux data from the Electron Reflectometer (ER) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor...

  5. CCR1 and CCR5 expressions on peripheral blood mononuclear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated PBMCs from 25 patients with HCC, 10 LC patients and 9 adult healthy controls were stained with monoclonal antibodies against CD4, CD8, CCR1 and CCR5, then detected by using a flow cytometry technique. Patients were diagnosed by abdominal ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) scan findings, ...

  6. SuperMAG: Present and Future Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S. W.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Barnes, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    SuperMAG is a global collaboration that provides ground magnetic field perturbations from a long list of stations in the same coordinate system, identical time resolution and with a common baseline removal approach. This unique high quality dataset provides a continuous and nearly global monitoring of the ground magnetic field perturbation. Currently, only archived data are available on the website and hence it targets basic research without any operational capabilities. The existing SuperMAG software can be easily adapted to ingest real-time or near real-time data and provide a now-casting capability. The SuperDARN program has a long history of providing near real-time maps of the northern hemisphere electrostatic potential and as both SuperMAG and SuperDARN share common software it is relatively easy to adapt these maps for global magnetic perturbations. Magnetometer measurements would be assimilated by the SuperMAG server using a variety of techniques, either by downloading data at regular intervals from remote servers or by real-time streaming connections. The existing SuperMAG analysis software would then process these measurements to provide the final calibrated data set using the SuperMAG coordinate system. The existing plotting software would then be used to produce regularly updated global plots. The talk will focus on current SuperMAG capabilities illustrating the potential for now-casting and eventually forecasting.

  7. Complex formation of technetium with the methyl esters of MAG2 and MAG1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noll, B.; Noll, S.; Grosse, B.; Johannsen, B.; Spies, H.

    1993-01-01

    Mercaptoacetylglycine methyl ester (MAG 2 ester) and mercaptoacetyldiglycine methyl ester (MAG 1 ester) were included to investigate complex formation of SH/amide ligands with technetium. The studies are aimed at finding out how blocking the carboxylic groups influences the complexation reaction, with a view to finding an approach to new lipophilic species. (orig./BBR)

  8. Peripheral Blood CCR4+CCR6+ and CXCR3+CCR6+ CD4+ T Cells Are Highly Permissive to HIV-1 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Gosselin, Annie; Monteiro, Patricia; Chomont, Nicolas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Said, Elias A.; Fonseca, Simone; Wacleche, Vanessa; El-Far, Mohamed; Boulassel, Mohamed-Rachid; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Ancuta, Petronela

    2009-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on the identity of primary CD4+ T cell subsets selectively targeted by HIV-1 in vivo. In this study, we established a link between HIV permissiveness, phenotype/homing potential, and lineage commitment in primary CD4+ T cells. CCR4+CCR6+, CCR4+CCR6−, CXCR3+CCR6+, and CXCR3+CCR6− T cells expressed cytokines and transcription factors specific for Th17, Th2, Th1Th17, and Th1 lineages, respectively. CCR4+CCR6+ and CXCR3+CCR6+ T cells expressed the HIV coreceptors CCR5 a...

  9. Study on the stability of MAG 3

    CERN Document Server

    Aungurarat, A; Thuntawewadthananon, T

    2000-01-01

    Tc 9 sup 9 sup m -MAG 3 ([(N-(N-(N-(mercaptoacetyl) glycyl)glycyl) glycinato (2-) N, N', N sup , S) oxo technetate (2-)]) was prepared for a good renal imaging agent. The two chromatographic methods for analysis of radiochemical purity investigated that the kit could be used with sodium pertechnetate (Technetium-9 sup 9 sup m) up to 25 mCi, volume 2-5 ml and the Tc9 sup 9 sup m -MAG 3 complex reached maximum at 15 mins. The shelf life of the complex and the expiry date of the kit were 4 hrs and 6 months respectivily.

  10. Regulation of CCR7-dependent cell migration through?CCR7 homodimer formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Daichi; Endo, Masataka; Ochi, Hirotaka; Hojo, Hironobu; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Hayasaka, Haruko

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 contributes to various physiological and pathological processes including T cell maturation, T cell migration from the blood into secondary lymphoid tissues, and tumor cell metastasis to lymph nodes. Although a previous study suggested that the efficacy of CCR7 ligand-dependent T cell migration correlates with CCR7 homo- and heterodimer formation, the exact extent of contribution of the CCR7 dimerization remains unclear. Here, by inducing or disrupting CCR7 dimers,...

  11. Implementation of cargo MagLev in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Dean E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leung, Eddie M [MAGTEC ENGINEERING

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have been completed in the United States, but no commercial MagLev systems have been deployed. Outside the U.S., MagLev continues to attract funding for research, development and implementation. A brief review of recent global developments in MagLev technology is given followed by the status of MagLev in the U.S. The paper compares the cost of existing MagLev systems with other modes of transport, notes that the near-term focus of MagLev development in the U.S. should be for cargo, and suggests that future MagLev systems should be for very high speed cargo. The Los Angeles to Port of Los Angeles corridor is suggested as a first site for implementation. The benefits of MagLev are described along with suggestions on how to obtain funding.

  12. CCR1+/CCR5+ mononuclear phagocytes accumulate in the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trebst, C; Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Kivisäkk, P

    2001-01-01

    and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha/CCL3. We analyzed expression of CCR1 and CCR5, the monocyte receptors for these chemokines, on circulating and cerebrospinal fluid CD14+ cells, and in MS brain lesions. Approximately 70% of cerebrospinal fluid monocytes were CCR1+/CCR5+, regardless of the presence...... of CNS pathology, compared to less than 20% of circulating monocytes. In active MS lesions CCR1+/CCR5+ monocytes were found in perivascular cell cuffs and at the demyelinating edges of evolving lesions. Mononuclear phagocytes in early demyelinating stages comprised CCR1+/CCR5+ hematogenous monocytes...... and CCR1-/CCR5- resident microglial cells. In later stages, phagocytic macrophages were uniformly CCR1-/CCR5+. Cultured in vitro, adherent monocytes/macrophages up-regulated CCR5 and down-regulated CCR1 expression, compared to freshly-isolated monocytes. Taken together, these findings suggest...

  13. Molekulare Klonierung, stabile Transfektion und funktionelle Expression der murinen Chemokinrezeptoren Ccr2 und Ccr5

    OpenAIRE

    Simonis, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The two chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 play important roles in the recruitment and activation of monocytes/macrophages and T-lymphocytes at sites of infection and inflammation. To further examine their function, I cloned the two murine chemokine receptors Ccr2 and Ccr5 from genomic mouse DNA by a PCR-based cloning strategy and functionally expressed them in stably transfected CHO-cells. These cells were used to generate the first monoclonal antibodies against Ccr2 and Ccr5.

  14. How MAG4 Improves Space Weather Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David; Khazanov, Igor; Barghouty, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Dangerous space weather is driven by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejection (CMEs). Forecasting flares and CMEs is the first step to forecasting either dangerous space weather or All Clear. MAG4 (Magnetogram Forecast), developed originally for NASA/SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), is an automated program that analyzes magnetograms from the HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) instrument on NASA SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory), and automatically converts the rate (or probability) of major flares (M- and X-class), Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and Solar Energetic Particle Events.

  15. VG1 SAT MAG RESAMPLED KRONOGRAPHIC (L1) COORDS 48.0SEC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes calibrated magnetic field data acquired by the Voyager 1 Low Field Magnetometer (LFM) during the Saturn encounter. Coverage begins in the...

  16. CCR+: Metadata Based Extended Personal Health Record Data Model Interoperable with the ASTM CCR Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Jang, Tae Hun; Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-01-01

    Extension of the standard model while retaining compliance with it is a challenging issue because there is currently no method for semantically or syntactically verifying an extended data model. A metadata-based extended model, named CCR+, was designed and implemented to achieve interoperability between standard and extended models. Furthermore, a multilayered validation method was devised to validate the standard and extended models. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Community Care Record (CCR) standard was selected to evaluate the CCR+ model; two CCR and one CCR+ XML files were evaluated. In total, 188 metadata were extracted from the ASTM CCR standard; these metadata are semantically interconnected and registered in the metadata registry. An extended-data-model-specific validation file was generated from these metadata. This file can be used in a smartphone application (Health Avatar CCR+) as a part of a multilayered validation. The new CCR+ model was successfully evaluated via a patient-centric exchange scenario involving multiple hospitals, with the results supporting both syntactic and semantic interoperability between the standard CCR and extended, CCR+, model. A feasible method for delivering an extended model that complies with the standard model is presented herein. There is a great need to extend static standard models such as the ASTM CCR in various domains: the methods presented here represent an important reference for achieving interoperability between standard and extended models.

  17. The frequency of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 32 mutation in Iranian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zare-Bidaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence showed that chemokines serve as pro-migratory factors for immune cells. CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, as the main CC  chemokines subfamily members, activate immune cells through binding to CC chemokine receptor 5 or CCR5. Macrophages, NK cells and T lymphocytes express CCR5 and thus, affected CCR5 expression or functions could be associated with altered immune responses. Deletion of 32 base pairs (D 32 in the exon 1 of the CCR5 gene, which is known as CCR5 D 32 mutation causes down regulation and malfunction of the molecule. Furthermore, it has been evidenced that three polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 modulate its expression. Altered CCR5 expression in microbial infection and immune related diseases have been reported by several researchers but the role of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation in Iranian patients suffering from these diseases are controversial. Due to the fact that Iranian people have different genetic backgrounds compared to other ethnics, hence, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation association with the diseases may be different in Iranian patients. Therefore, this review addresses the most recent information regarding the prevalence as well as association of the mutation and polymorphisms in Iranian patients with microbial infection and immune related diseases as along with normal population.

  18. CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 variation and HIV/AIDS in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlotra, Rajeev K; Hall, Noemi B; Bruse, Shannon E; John, Bangan; Zikursh, Melinda J Blood; Stein, Catherine M; Siba, Peter M; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors, serving as HIV co-receptors, and their ligands are among the well-known host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to HIV infection and/or disease progression. Papua New Guinea (PNG) has one of the highest adult HIV prevalences in the Asia-Pacific region. However, information regarding the distribution of polymorphisms in chemokine receptor (CCR5, CCR2) and chemokine (CXCL12) genes in PNG is very limited. In this study, we genotyped a total of nine CCR2-CCR5 polymorphisms, including CCR2 190G >A, CCR5 -2459G >A and Δ32, and CXCL12 801G >A in PNG (n=258), North America (n=184), and five countries in West Africa (n=178). Using this data, we determined previously characterized CCR5 haplotypes. In addition, based on the previously reported associations of CCR2 190, CCR5 -2459, CCR5 open reading frame, and CXCL12 801 genotypes with HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, we calculated composite full risk scores, considering both protective as well as susceptibility effects of the CXCL12 801 AA genotype. We observed a very high frequency of the CCR5 -2459A allele (0.98) in the PNG population, which together with the absence of Δ32 resulted in a very high frequency of the HHE haplotype (0.92). These frequencies were significantly higher than in any other population (all P-valuesnew insights regarding CCR5 variation in the PNG population, and suggest that the collective variation in CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 may increase the risk of HIV/AIDS in a large majority of Papua New Guineans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tc-99m MAG3 excretion in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, O.; Marcus, V.; Herbst, S.; De Klerk, F.; Rubow, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The calculation of the urinary excretory index of patients has been an integral part of the diuresis renography done with Tc-99m DTPA (Pentetate) at Tygerberg Hospital. The value of twenty percent was accepted as normal. Since most renograms are now done with Tc-99m MAG3, normal values of urinary excretion of Tc-99m MAG3 should be available, but nothing was found in the literature. Objectives: 1. To determine whether renography reports can be used to predict normal values of MAG3 excretion in urine during diuresis renography 2. To investigate if there is a relationship between the age of the patient and the urinary excretory index 3. To compare excretory index in patients who had both DTPA and MAG3 studies. Methods: Renography reports and excretion values of diuresis renograms performed during a 15-month period were retrospectively reviewed. According to renogram reports, the patients were classified as normal or abnormal. Where possible, plasma creatinine values were obtained for patients In the normal group. MAG3 excretion values were studied in relation to age, creatinine values and DTPA excretion in those patients who had studies with both agents. Average values and ranges were compared for MAG3 excretion of the normal and abnormal groups. Statistical methods included linear regression and student's t test. Results: One hundred patients data were reviewed; age range 3 to 90 years. The MAG3 normal group included 36 patients. Plasma creatinine values were obtained for 14 patients. There was no correlation between MAG3 excretion and age (r=0.1). Average MAG3 excretion for cases reported as normal was 62.6 + 19.6% and for abnormal studies 51.0 + 21.6%. As plasma creatinine increased, MAG3 excretion decreased (correlation coefficient 0.77). Six patients had studies with both DTPA and MAG3. In this limited group, the correlation coefficient between DTPA excretion and MAG3 excretion was 0.67. Conclusion: This retrospective study demonstrates

  20. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  1. La tecnologia MagDrive di Trimble S6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lemmon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Trimble S6 MagDrive Technology Trimble MagDrive Technology is based on an electromagnetic frictionless direct drive concept, similar to those used in the locomotive industry. Applying this solution to entire stations represents a major improvement in the numeric control approach for instruments of this class.

  2. Influence of the CCR2-V64I Polymorphism on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Activity and on Chemokine Receptor Function of CCR2b, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Benhur; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Rana, Shalini; Yi, Yanji; Mellado, Mario; Frade, Jose M. R.; Martinez-A., Carlos; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Dean, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Doms, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are used by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in conjunction with CD4 to infect cells. In addition, some virus strains can use alternative chemokine receptors, including CCR2b and CCR3, for infection. A polymorphism in CCR2 (CCR2-V64I) is associated with a 2- to 4-year delay in the progression to AIDS. To investigate the mechanism of this protective effect, we studied the expression of CCR2b and CCR2b-V64I, their chemokine and HIV-1 coreceptor ...

  3. Constrained use of CCR5 on CD4+ lymphocytes by R5X4 HIV-1: Efficiency of Env-CCR5 interactions and low CCR5 expression determine a range of restricted CCR5-mediated entry

    OpenAIRE

    Loftin, Lamorris M.; Kienzle, Martha F.; Yi, Yanjie; Lee, Benhur; Lee, Fang-Hua; Gray, Lachlan; Gorry, Paul R.; Collman, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    R5X4 HIV-1 have impaired utilization of CCR5 on primary CD4+ lymphocytes but the mechanisms responsible are not well defined. Using a panel of diverse R5X4 Envs we identified a spectrum of CCR5 use on CD4+ lymphocytes. Greater lymphocyte CCR5 use correlated with relative resistance to CCR5 mAbs and small molecule antagonists. Increasing CCR5 expression on lymphocytes increased the proportion of entry mediated by CCR5 for all R5X4 isolates except 89.6. In cell lines with regulated CCR5 express...

  4. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...... analyzed in 109 patients with relapsing-remitting MS treated with IFN-beta who were followed clinically for 1 year. Cellular CCR5 expression was measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Patients with MS had a higher percentage of CCR5-positive monocytes than healthy controls. Increased monocyte expression...... of CCR5 correlated weakly with an increased short-term relapse risk but there was no relationship between CCR5 Delta32 allele and CCR5 promoter polymorphism genotypes and relapse risk. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support a major role of CCR5 in the pathogenesis of relapses in MS patients treated...

  5. Why CCR2 and CCR5 blockade failed and why CCR1 blockade might still be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lebre, M.C.; Vergunst, C.E.; Choi, I.Y.K.; Aarrass, S.; Oliveira, A.S.F.; Wyant, T.; Horuk, R.; Reedquist, K.A.; Tak, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to provide more insight into the question as to why blockade of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 may have failed in clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, using an in vitro monocyte migration system model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monocytes from healthy donors (HD; n = 8) or from RA patients (for CCR2 and CCR5 antibody n = 8; for CCR1 blockade n = 13) were isolated from peripheral blood and pre-incubated with different concentrations of either ...

  6. Increased frequency of CCR4+ and CCR6+ memory T-cells including CCR7+CD45RAmed very early memory cells in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's)

    OpenAIRE

    Fagin, Ursula; Pitann, Silke; Gross, Wolfgang L; Lamprecht, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Chemokine receptors play an important role in mediating the recruitment of T cells to inflammatory sites. Previously, small proportions of circulating Th1-type CCR5+ and Th2-type CCR3+ cells have been shown in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Wondering to what extent CCR4 and CCR6 expression could also be implicated in T cell recruitment to inflamed sites in GPA, we investigated the expression of CCR4 and CCR6 on T cells and its association with T cell diversity and polari...

  7. CCR3, CCR5, CCR8 and CXCR3 expression in memory T helper cells from allergic rhinitis patients, asymptomatically sensitized and healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Mille; Assing, Kristian; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2006-01-01

    Chemokine receptors have been suggested to be preferentially expressed on CD4+ T cells with CCR3 and CCR8 linked to the T helper (Th) 2 subset and CCR5 and CXCR3 to the Th1 subset, however this remains controversial.......Chemokine receptors have been suggested to be preferentially expressed on CD4+ T cells with CCR3 and CCR8 linked to the T helper (Th) 2 subset and CCR5 and CXCR3 to the Th1 subset, however this remains controversial....

  8. Methylmercury degradation by Pseudomonas putida V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Lucélia; Yu, Ri-Qing; Crane, Sharron; Giovanella, Patricia; Barkay, Tamar; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2016-08-01

    Environmental contamination of mercury (Hg) has caused public health concerns with focuses on the neurotoxic substance methylmercury, due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. The goals of the present study were to examine: (i) the transformation of methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercuric acetate and mercuric chloride by cultures of Pseudomonas putida V1, (ii) the presence of the genes merA and merB in P. putida V1, and (iii) the degradation pathways of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Strain V1 cultures readily degraded methylmercury, thimerosal, phenylmercury acetate, and reduced mercuric chloride into gaseous Hg(0). However, the Hg transformation in LB broth by P. putida V1 was influenced by the type of Hg compounds. The merA gene was detected in P. putida V1, on the other hand, the merB gene was not detected. The sequencing of this gene, showed high similarity (100%) to the mercuric reductase gene of other Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, tests using radioactive (14)C-methylmercury indicated an uncommon release of (14)CO2 concomitant with the production of Hg(0). The results of the present work suggest that P. putida V1 has the potential to remove methylmercury from contaminated sites. More studies are warranted to determine the mechanism of removal of methylmercury by P. putida V1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CrowdMag - Crowdsourcing magnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M. C.; Boneh, N.; Chulliat, A.

    2014-12-01

    In the CrowdMag project, we explore whether digital magnetometers built in modern mobile phones can be used as scientific instruments to measure Earth's magnetic field. Most modern mobile phones have digital magnetometers to orient themselves. A phone's magnetometer measures three components of the local magnetic field with a typical sensitivity of about 150 to 600 nanotesla (nT). By combining data from vector magnetometers and accelerometers, phone's orientation is determined. Using phone's Internet connection, magnetic data and location are sent to a central server. At the server, we check quality of the magnetic data from all users and make the data available to the public as aggregate maps. We have two long-term goals. 1) Develop near-real-time models of Earth's time changing magnetic field by reducing man-made noise from crowdsourced data and combining it with geomagnetic data from other sources. 2) Improving accuracy of magnetic navigation by mapping magnetic noise sources (for e.g. power transformer and iron pipes). Key challenges to this endeavor are the low sensitivity of the phone's magnetometer and the noisy environment within and surrounding the phone. URL : http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/geomag/crowdmag.shtml

  10. CCR Interns | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Research Interns (CRI) Summer Program was inaugurated in 2004 to increase the diversity of trainee applicants to the Center for Cancer Research (CCR). We have placed 339 students from 2004 to 2017, in labs and branches across the CCR. The Division provides the training dollars, some Service & Supply funds, and travel support for those students who meet the financial eligibility criteria (View and/or print the 2018 flier).

  11. Stimulation of oral fibroblast chemokine receptors identifies CCR3 and CCR4 as potential wound healing targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskermolen, Jeroen K.; Roffel, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine which chemokine receptors are present on oral fibroblasts and whether these receptors influence proliferation, migration, and/or the release of wound healing mediators. This information may provide insight into the superior wound healing characteristics of the oral mucosa. The gingiva fibroblasts expressed 12 different chemokine receptors (CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, CCR10, CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCR7, CX3CR1, and XCR1), as analyzed by flow cytometry. Fourteen corresponding chemokines (CCL5, CCL15, CCL20, CCL22, CCL25, CCL27, CCL28, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL11, CXCL12, CXCL13, CX3CL1, and XCL1) were used to study the activation of these receptors on gingiva fibroblasts. Twelve of these fourteen chemokines stimulated gingiva fibroblast migration (all except for CXCL8 and CXCL12). Five of the chemokines stimulated proliferation (CCL5/CCR3, CCL15/CCR3, CCL22/CCR4, CCL28/CCR3/CCR10, and XCL1/XCR1). Furthermore, CCL28/CCR3/CCR10 and CCL22/CCR4 stimulation increased IL‐6 secretion and CCL28/CCR3/CCR10 together with CCL27/CCR10 upregulated HGF secretion. Moreover, TIMP‐1 secretion was reduced by CCL15/CCR3. In conclusion, this in‐vitro study identifies chemokine receptor‐ligand pairs which may be used in future targeted wound healing strategies. In particular, we identified the chemokine receptors CCR3 and CCR4, and the mucosa specific chemokine CCL28, as having an predominant role in oral wound healing by increasing human gingiva fibroblast proliferation, migration, and the secretion of IL‐6 and HGF and reducing the secretion of TIMP‐1. PMID:28387445

  12. GRIP HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) V1 dataset contains measurements of brightness temperature taken at 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz, as well as MERRA 2 m wind...

  13. Nuclear power plant V-1, V-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the principal scheme of the Bohunice V-1 and V-2 nuclear power plants is presented. Thermal scheme of WWER 440-type NPP (primary circuit, secondary circuit, and cooling water circuit) is described

  14. USEEIO v1.1 - Matrices

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset provides the basic building blocks for the USEEIO v1.1 model and life cycle results per $1 (2013 USD) demand for all goods and services in the model in...

  15. Extracellular Disulfide Bridges Serve Different Purposes in Two Homologous Chemokine Receptors, CCR1 and CCR5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rummel, Pia Cwarzko; Thiele, Stefanie; Hansen, Laerke Smidt

    2013-01-01

    interact with residues in the main binding crevice, we show that the 7TM-conserved bridge is essential for all types of ligand-mediated activation, whereas the chemokine-conserved bridge is dispensable for small-molecule activation in CCR1. However, in striking contrast to previous studies in other...... chemokine receptors, high affinity CCL3 chemokine binding was maintained in the absence of either bridge. In CCR5, the closest homolog to CCR1, a completely different dependency was observed as neither chemokine activation nor binding was retained in the absence of either bridge. In contrast, both bridges...... where dispensable for small-molecule activation. This indicates that CCR5 activity is independent of extracellular regions, whereas in CCR1, preserved folding of ECL2 is necessary for activation. These results indicate that conserved structural features in a receptor subgroup, does not necessarily...

  16. CCL5, CCR1 and CCR5 in murine glioblastoma: immune cell infiltration and survival rates are not dependent on individual expression of either CCR1 or CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Kien; Luo, Defang; Liu, Che; Harrison, Jeffrey K.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain tumor. Microglia/macrophages are found within human GBM where they likely promote tumor progression. We report that CCL5, CCR1, and CCR5 are expressed in glioblastoma. Individual deletion of CCR1 or CCR5 had little to no effect on survival of tumor bearing mice, or numbers of glioblastoma-infiltrated microglia/macrophages or lymphocytes. CCL5 promoted in vitro migration of wild type, CCR1- or CCR5-deficient microglia/macrophages that w...

  17. Heterogeneity of Polyneuropathy Associated with Anti-MAG Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Magy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG antibodies is an immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathy. The pathophysiology of this condition is likely to involve anti-MAG antibody deposition on myelin sheaths of the peripheral nerves and it is supposed to be distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP, another immune-mediated demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. In this series, we have retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory findings from 60 patients with polyneuropathy, IgM gammopathy, and anti-MAG antibodies. We found that the clinical picture in these patients is highly variable suggesting a direct link between the monoclonal gammopathy and the neuropathy. Conversely, one-third of patients had a CIDP-like phenotype on electrodiagnostic testing and this was correlated with a low titer of anti-MAG antibodies and the absence of widening of myelin lamellae. Our data suggest that polyneuropathy associated with anti-MAG antibodies is less homogeneous than previously said and that the pathophysiology of the condition is likely to be heterogeneous as well with the self-antigen being MAG in most of the patients but possibly being another component of myelin in the others.

  18. CCR5 as a treatment target in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsellem, Valérie; Lipskaia, Larissa; Abid, Shariq; Poupel, Lucie; Houssaini, Amal; Quarck, Rozenn; Marcos, Elisabeth; Mouraret, Nathalie; Parpaleix, Aurélien; Bobe, Régis; Gary-Bobo, Guillaume; Saker, Mirna; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Gladwin, Mark T; Norris, Karen A; Delcroix, Marion; Combadière, Christophe; Adnot, Serge

    2014-09-09

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH), whether idiopathic or related to underlying diseases such as HIV infection, results from complex vessel remodeling involving both pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PA-SMC) proliferation and inflammation. CCR5, a coreceptor for cellular HIV-1 entry expressed on macrophages and vascular cells, may be involved in the pathogenesis of PH. Maraviroc is a new CCR5 antagonist designed to block HIV entry. Marked CCR5 expression was found in lungs from patients with idiopathic PH, in mice with hypoxia-induced PH, and in Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques, in which it was localized chiefly in the PA-SMCs. To assess the role for CCR5 in experimental PH, we used both gene disruption and pharmacological CCR5 inactivation in mice. Because maraviroc does not bind to murine CCR5, we used human-CCR5ki mice for pharmacological and immunohistochemical studies. Compared with wild-type mice, CCR5-/- mice or human-CCR5ki mice treated with maraviroc exhibited decreased PA-SMC proliferation and recruitment of perivascular and alveolar macrophages during hypoxia exposure. CCR5-/- mice reconstituted with wild-type bone marrow cells and wild-type mice reconstituted with CCR5-/- bone marrow cells were protected against PH, suggesting CCR5-mediated effects on PA-SMCs and macrophage involvement. The CCR5 ligands CCL5 and the HIV-1 gp120 protein increased intracellular calcium and induced growth of human and human-CCR5ki mouse PA-SMCs; maraviroc inhibited both effects. Maraviroc also reduced the growth-promoting effects of conditioned media from CCL5-activated macrophages derived from human-CCR5ki mice on PA-SMCs from wild-type mice. The CCL5-CCR5 pathway represents a new therapeutic target in PH associated with HIV or with other conditions. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. CCR Interns | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Research Interns (CRI) Summer Program was inaugurated in 2004 to provide an open door for students looking for an initial training opportunity. The goal is to enhance diversity within the CCR (Center for Cancer Research) training program and we have placed 338 students from 2004 to 2017, in labs and branches across the division.  The CCR and the Center for Cancer Training’s Office of Training and Education provide stipend support, some Service & Supply funds, and travel support for those students who meet the financial eligibility criteria (

  20. 75 FR 76962 - Application To Export Electric Energy; MAG Energy Solutions, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; MAG Energy Solutions, Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of Application. SUMMARY: MAG Energy Solutions, Inc. (MAG E.S... Gauthier, Director, MAG Energy Solutions, Inc., 1010 Sherbrooke Quest, Suite 800, Montreal, Quebec, Canada...

  1. Welding of Low Alloy Steel DIN 15Mo3 by MIG/MAG Spot

    OpenAIRE

    Nabeel K. Abid Al- Sahib

    2006-01-01

    ????? ????? ????? ????? ??????? ?????? ?? ????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ??????? ?????? ?????? (MIG/MAG spot) ???????? ??? ??????? ????? ?? ???? ???????? ????? ??? ???????? ?? ?????? ??????????? ??????? ???????? ????? ???? ??????? ??????? ????? ??? (DIN15Mo3) ?????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ?????? ?? ???? ???? ?????? ???????" ??? ?????? ??? ????. ????? ??????? ??????? ?????? ??? CO2 ????" ?? ??? ??????? ?? ???? ??????? ??????? ????? ?? ?????? ????? ?? ??? ???? ?? ????? (13%) ???? (4mm) ???? (2sec). ?...

  2. A Simulink simulation framework of a MagLev model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudall, H.; Williams, R.D.; Giras, T.C. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville (United States). School of Enegineering and Applied Science

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a three-degree-of-freedom model of a section of the magnetically levitated train Maglev. The Maglev system dealt with in this article utilizes electromagnetic levitation. Each MagLev vehicle section is viewed as two separate parts, namely a body and a chassis, coupled by a set of springs and dampers. The MagLev model includes the propulsion, the guidance and the levitation systems. The equations of motion are developed. A Simulink simulation framework is implemented in order to study the interaction between the different systems and the dynamics of a MagLev vehicle. The simulation framework will eventually serve as a tool to assist the design and development of the Maglev system in the United States of America. (author)

  3. METEOR v1.0 - User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-01-01

    This script is a User's Guide for the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  4. Naturally Occurring Deletional Mutation in the C-Terminal Cytoplasmic Tail of CCR5 Affects Surface Trafficking of CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    Shioda, Tatsuo; Nakayama, Emi E.; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Xin, Xiaomi; Liu, Huanliang; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Kato, Atsushi; Sakai, Yuko; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2001-01-01

    CCR5 is an essential coreceptor for the cellular entry of R5 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CCR5-893(−) is a single-nucleotide deletion mutation which is observed exclusively in Asians (M. A. Ansari-Lari, et al., Nat. Genet. 16:221–222, 1997). This mutant gene produces a CCR5 which lacks the entire C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. To assess the effect of CCR5-893(−) on HIV-1 infection, we generated a recombinant Sendai virus expressing the mutant CCR5 and compared its HIV...

  5. The Abrogation of Phosphorylation Plays a Relevant Role in the CCR5 Signalosome Formation with Natural Antibodies to CCR5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assunta Venuti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The exposure to CCR5 (CC chemokine receptor 5 specific natural antibodies in vitro produces a Class B β-arrestin2-dependent CCR5 retention with the aid of ERK1, due to the formation of a CCR5 signalosome, which remains stable for at least 48 h. Considering that β-arrestins and MAPKs are receptive to environmental signals, their signal complexes could be one of the key junction for GPCRs internalization related signal transduction. Here, we demonstrate that, in T cells, the phosphorylation status of either CCR5 receptor or ERK1 protein is necessary to drive the internalized receptor into the early endosomes, forming the CCR5 signalosome. In particular, our data show that β-arrestin2/ERK1 complex is a relevant transducer in the CCR5 signaling pathway. Understanding the mechanism of CCR5 regulation is essential for many inflammatory disorders, tumorigenesis and viral infection such as HIV.

  6. MagLIF scaling on Z and future machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Stephen; Stygar, William; Gomez, Matthew; Campbell, Edward; Peterson, Kyle; Sefkow, Adam; Sinars, Daniel; Vesey, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept [S.A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303, 2010] has demonstrated [M.R. Gomez et al., PRL 113, 155003, 2014] fusion-relevant plasma conditions on the Z machine. We present 2D numerical simulations of the scaling of MagLIF on Z indicating that deuterium/tritium (DT) fusion yields greater than 100 kJ could be possible on Z when operated at a peak current of 25 MA. Much higher yields are predicted for MagLIF driven with larger peak currents. Two high performance pulsed-power machines (Z300 and Z800) have been designed based on Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. The Z300 design would provide approximately 48 MA to a MagLIF load, while Z800 would provide about 66 MA. We used a parameterized Thevenin equivalent circuit to drive a series of 1D and 2D numerical simulations with currents between and beyond these two designs. Our simulations indicate that 5-10 MJ yields may be possible with Z300, while yields of about 1 GJ may be possible with Z800. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Changes in the V3 Region of gp120 Contribute to Unusually Broad Coreceptor Usage of an HIV-1 Isolate from a CCR5 Δ32 Heterozygote

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorry, Paul R.; Dunfee, Rebecca L.; Mefford, Megan E.; Kunstman, Kevin; Morgan, Tom; Moore, John P.; Mascola, John R.; Agopian, Kristin; Holm, Geoffrey H.; Mehle, Andrew; Taylor, Joann; Farzan, Michael; Wang, Hui; Ellery, Philip; Willey, Samantha J.; Clapham, Paul R.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2007-01-01

    Heterozygosity for the CCR5 Δ32 allele is associated with delayed progression to AIDS in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here we describe an unusual HIV-1 isolate from blood of an asymptomatic individual who was heterozygous for the CCR5 Δ32 allele and had reduced levels of CCR5 expression. The primary virus used CCR5, CXCR4, and an unusually broad range of alternative coreceptors to enter transfected cells. However, only CXCR4 and CCR5 were used to enter primary T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages, respectively. Full-length Env clones had an unusually long V1/V2 region and rare amino acid variants in the V3 and C4 regions. Mutagenesis studies and structural models suggested Y308, D321, and to a lesser extent K442 and E444, contribute to the broad coreceptor usage of these Envs, whereas I317 is likely to be a compensatory change. Furthermore, database analysis suggests covariation can occur at positions 308/317 and 308/321 in vivo. Y308 and D321 reduced dependence on the extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) region of CCR5, while these residues along with Y330, K442, and E444 enhanced dependence on the CCR5 N-terminus compared to clade B consensus residues at these positions. These results suggest that expanded coreceptor usage of HIV-1 can occur in some individuals without rapid progression to AIDS as a consequence of changes in the V3 region that reduce dependence on the ECL2 region of CCR5 by enhancing interactions with conserved structural elements in G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:17239419

  8. Global and local magnetic mapping using CrowdMag data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltus, R.; Nair, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), in partnership with the University of Colorado's CIRES develop magnetic field models to aid navigation, resource exploration and scientific research. We use observatories, satellites and ship/airborne surveys to map and model the Earth's magnetic field. However, the available measurements leave gaps in coverage, particularly for short-wavelength anomalies associated with man-made infrastructure ("urban noise"). In 2014, we started a project to address these gaps through the collection of vector magnetic data from digital magnetometers in smartphones. In October 2014, we released the "CrowdMag" Android and iOS apps for harvesting data from phones. Currently, the CrowdMag project has more than 10,000 enthusiastic users contributing more than 12 million magnetic data measurements from around the world. We present the first analysis results from the crowdsourced magnetic data. A global magnetic model derived solely from CrowdMag data is consistent to degree and order 4 with satellite-derived models such as World Magnetic Model. A unique contribution of CrowdMag project is the collection of ground level magnetic data in densely populated regions with an unprecedented spatial resolution. To demonstrate, we generated a magnetic map (by binning the data collected in 200x200m cells) of central Boulder, Colorado using 170,000 data points collected by about 60 devices over the duration October 2014- January 2016. The median value is consistent with the expected magnitude of the Earth's background magnetic field. The standard deviation of the CrowdMag total field (F) values is much higher than the expected natural (i.e., diurnal and geologic) magnetic field variation. However, the phone's magnetometer is sensitive enough to capture the larger magnitude magnetic signature from the urban magnetic sources. We discuss the potential reliability of crowdsourced magnetic maps and their applications to navigation and other

  9. Owl monkey CCR5 reveals synergism between CD4 and CCR5 in HIV-1 entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahabedian, John; Sharma, Amit; Kaczmarek, Maryska E; Wilkerson, Greg K; Sawyer, Sara L; Overbaugh, Julie

    2017-12-01

    Studying HIV-1 replication in the presence of functionally related proteins from different species has helped define host determinants of HIV-1 infection. Humans and owl monkeys, but not macaques, encode a CD4 receptor that permits entry of transmissible HIV-1 variants due to a single residue difference. However, little is known about whether divergent CCR5 receptor proteins act as determinants of host-range. Here we show that both owl monkey (Aotus vociferans) CD4 and CCR5 receptors are functional for the entry of transmitted HIV-1 when paired with human versions of the other receptor. By contrast, the owl monkey CD4/CCR5 pair is generally a suboptimal receptor combination, although there is virus-specific variation in infection with owl monkey receptors. Introduction of the human residues 15Y and 16T within a sulfation motif into owl monkey CCR5 resulted in a gain of function. These findings suggest there is cross-talk between CD4 and CCR5 involving the sulfation motif. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CCR5 inhibitors in HIV-1 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Patrick; Perros, Manos

    2008-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is the causative pathogen of AIDS, the world's biggest infectious disease killer. About 33 million people are infected worldwide, with 2.1 million deaths a year as a direct consequence. The devastating nature of AIDS has prompted widespread research, which has led to an extensive array of therapies to suppress viral replication and enable recovery of the immune system to prolong and improve patient life substantially. However, the genetic plasticity and replication rate of HIV-1 are considerable, which has lead to rapid drug resistance. This, together with the need for reducing drug side effects and increasing regimen compliance, has led researchers to identify antiretroviral drugs with new modes of action. This review describes the discovery and clinical development of CCR5 antagonists and the recent approval of maraviroc as a breakthrough in anti-HIV-1 therapy. CCR5 inhibitors target a human cofactor to disable HIV-1 entry into the cells, and thereby provide a new hurdle for the virus to overcome. The status and expert opinion of CCR5 antagonists for the treatment of HIV-1 infection are detailed.

  11. Gradual reconstruction of the V-1 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefunko, D.; Kerak, J.; Repka, M.; Libosvar, K.; Augustin, V.; Lebruska, J.; Fagula, L.

    1998-01-01

    The background and objectives of the gradual reconstruction of the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant are described in detail, including the pre-design and design preparation activities, tender procedures, aims, safety analyses, and technological coverage of the project. The following systems are included in the reconstruction project: (1) safety valves and pressurizer relief line system; (2) steam generator super emergency feedwater system; (3) system of steam dump valves to the atmosphere; (4) external power supply system for plant home consumption; (5) emergency core cooling system and spray system; (6) fire prevention systems; (7) electrical systems; (8) instrumentation and control systems; (9) system of accident location in the hermetic zone; (10) hermetic zone leaktightness and integrity, filtered venting system; (11) hermetic zone strength; (12) vital technological water system; (13) ventilation and air conditioning systems; and (14) seismic strengthening of the facilities. Each of the items is described in detail. (P.A.)

  12. Analysis of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus sciuri: identification of a novel ccr gene complex with a newly identified ccrA allotype (ccrA7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushibara, Noriko; Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2011-06-01

    Methicillin resistance in staphylococci is conferred by the acquisition in its chromosome of the mecA gene, which is located on a mobile genetic element called staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Genetic type of SCCmec is defined by combination of mec gene complex class and cassette chromosome recombinase gene (ccr) allotype. In this study, we analyzed genetic diversity of the SCCmec in 11 Staphylococcus haemolyticus strains and a Staphylococcus sciuri strain, which were recently isolated from clinical specimens in Bangladesh. Among these strains, only two S. haemolyticus strains were proved to have the known types of SCCmec, that is, SCCmec V (class C2 mec-ccrC) and VII (class C1 mec-ccrC). Five S. haemolyticus strains were assigned two unique mec-ccr gene complexes combination; that is, class C1 mec-ccrA4B4 (four isolates) and class A mec-ccrC (one isolate). In the remaining four S. haemolyticus strains with class C1 mec, no known ccr allotypes could be detected. A single S. sciuri strain with class A mec complex carried a ccrA gene belonging to a novel allotype designated ccrA7, together with ccrB3. The ccrA7 gene in the S. sciuri strain showed 61.7%-82.7% sequence identity to the ccrA gene sequences published so far, and 75.3% identity to ccrA3, which is a component of the type 3 ccr complex (ccrA3-ccrB3) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The results of the present study indicated that mec gene complex and ccr genes in coagulase-negative staphylococci are highly divergent, and distinct from those of common methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Identification of the novel ccrA7 allotype combined with ccrB3 suggested an occurrence of recombination between different ccr complexes in nature.

  13. Temporal expression and cellular origin of CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 in the central nervous system: insight into mechanisms of MOG-induced EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericsson-Dahlstrand Anders

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 are critical for the recruitment of mononuclear phagocytes to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. Mononuclear phagocytes are effector cells capable of phagocytosing myelin and damaging axons. In this study, we characterize the regional, temporal and cellular expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA in the spinal cord of rats with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (MOG-EAE. While resembling human MS, this animal model allows unique access to CNS-tissue from various time-points of relapsing neuroinflammation and from various lesional stages: early active, late active, and inactive completely demyelinated lesions. Methods The expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA was studied with in situ hybridization using radio labelled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining for phenotypic cell markers. Spinal cord sections from healthy rats and rats with MOG-EAE (acute phase, remission phase, relapse phase were analysed. In defined lesion stages, the number of cells expressing CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA was determined. Data were statistically analysed by the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test. Results In MOG-EAE rats, extensive up-regulation of CCR1 and CCR5 mRNA, and moderate up-regulation of CCR2 mRNA, was found in the spinal cord during episodes of active inflammation and demyelination. Double staining with phenotypic cell markers identified the chemokine receptor mRNA-expressing cells as macrophages/microglia. Expression of all three receptors was substantially reduced during clinical remission, coinciding with diminished inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord. Healthy control rats did not show any detectable expression of CCR1, CCR2 or CCR5 mRNA in the spinal cord. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the acute and chronic-relapsing phases of MOG

  14. Next Generation HeliMag UXO Mapping Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    as a 160-acre quarter-section containing a circular night bombing target including power plant , underground cables, floodlights, and target circle...appropriate, requests for re-flights passed to the acquisition team. Figure 3. Overview of survey data collected. The areas with opaque palettes ...were collected with the 13 sensor HeliMag configuration. The large semi-opaque palette is the AMTADS 2005 data set, and the boxes outlined in red

  15. MAG3 in a renal transplant with complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rynderman, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 42 year-old female presenting with glomerulonephritis induced end stage renal failure was found suitable for a renal transplant (Tx). A cadaveric renal Tx was performed after a prolonged cold ischaemic time of 12 hours (optimal<4 hours). The surgery was uncomplicated and doppler ultrasound (u/s) post surgery demonstrated good perfusion to the transplant. Sequential MAG3 renal scanning, at days 1, 3 and 5 post transplant demonstrated reduced but clearly identifiable perfusion and an accumulation renogram ('hot kidney') consistent with acute tubular necrosis (ATN). These results lead to a biopsy being performed at day 5. The biopsy demonstrated rejection and tubular dilatation m keeping with ATN Intense anti-rejection therapy commenced. The day 7, MAG3 study demonstrated some improvement in perfusion, uptake, and clearance, however, overall function remained impaired Dialysis was resumed. At day 10, the patient developed pain with a distended, firm, and tender abdomen. An urgent MAG3 study demonstrated acute vascular insult with near complete absence of perfusion or function ('cold kidney') and the decrease on accumulation renogram. Renal u/s demonstrated a peri-nephric haematoma and markedly abnormal intra-renal blood flow in keeping with acute rejection. This lead to an emergency renal Tx nephrectomy Macroscopically, the kidney was swollen with extensive necrosis and surrounded by fresh blood, with microscopy showing extensive rejection and venous thrombosis. Post nephrectomy the patient returned to haemodialysis While limited by ATN in the early post Tx period, MAG3 imaging provided timely, accurate and non invasive diagnostic information as to the viability of the renal Tx and to the ultimate decision to remove the kidney. This case also demonstrates the importance of frequent serial scanning in early post Tx monitoring. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  16. Design of MagLIF experiments using the Z facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefkow, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept has been presented as a path toward obtaining substantial fusion yields using the Z facility, and related experiments have begun in earnest at Sandia National Laboratories. We present fully integrated numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the MagLIF concept, which include laser preheating of the fuel, the presence of electrodes, and end loss effects. These simulations have been used to design neutron-producing integrated MagLIF experiments on the Z facility for the capabilities that presently exist, namely, D2 fuel, peak currents of Imax 15-18 MA, pre-seeded axial magnetic fields of Bz0 = 7-10 T, and laser preheat energies of Elaser = 2-3 kJ delivered in 2 ns. The first fully integrated experiments, based on these simulations, are planned to occur in 2013. Neutron yields in excess of 1011 are predicted with the available laser preheat energy and accelerator drive energy. In several years, we plan to upgrade the laser to increase Elaser = by several more kJ, provide Bz0 up to 30 T, deliver Imax 22 MA or more to the load, and develop the capability to use DT fuel. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Fuel magnetization without external field coils (AutoMag)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Stephen; Jennings, Christopher; Awe, Thomas; Shipley, Gabe; Lamppa, Derek; McBride, Ryan

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) has produced fusion-relevant plasma conditions on the Z accelerator where the fuel was magnetized using external field coils. We present a novel concept that does not need external field coils. This concept (AutoMag) magnetizes the fuel during the early part of the drive current by using a composite liner with helical conduction paths separated by insulating material. The drive is designed so the current rises slowly enough to avoid electrical breakdown of the insulators until a sufficiently strong magnetic field is established. Then the current rises more quickly, which causes the insulators to break down allowing the drive current to follow an axial path and implode the liner. Low inductance magnetically insulated power feeds can be used with AutoMag to increase the drive current without interfering with diagnostic access. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Grape seed extract proanthocyanidins downregulate HIV- 1 entry coreceptors, CCR2b, CCR3 and CCR5 gene expression by normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADHAVAN P NAIR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids and related polyphenols, in addition to their cardioprotective, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and anti-allergic activities, also possess promising anti-HIV effects. Recent studies documented that the ß-chemokine receptors, CCR2b, CCR3 and CCR5, and the alpha-chemokine receptors, CXCR1, CXCR2 and CXCR4 serve as entry coreceptors for HIV-1. Although flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds elicit anti-HIV effects such as inhibition of HIV-1 expression and virus replication, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects remain to be clearly elucidated. We hypothesize that flavonoids exert their anti-HIV effects, possibly by interfering at the HIV co-receptor level. We investigated the effect of flavonoid constituents of a proprietary grape seed extract (GSE on the expression of HIV-1 coentry receptors by immunocompetent mononuclear leukocytes. Our results showed that GSE significantly downregulated the expression of the HIV-1 entry co-receptors, CCR2b , CCR3 and CCR5 in normal PBMC in a dose dependent manner. Further , GSE treated cultures showed significantly lower number of CCR3 positive cells as quantitated by flow cytometry analysis which supports RT-PCR gene expression data.Investigations of the mechanisms underlying the anti-HIV-1 effects of grape seed extracts may help to identify promising natural products useful in the prevention and /or amelioration of HIV-1 infection

  19. Compact containment boiling water reactor (CCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The compact containment boiling water reactor (CCR) is a modular boiling water reactor (BWR) designed by the Toshiba Corporation with the support of the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC). The current CCR design falls into the category of innovative small and medium size reactors, featuring 300MW electrical output per module. In Japan, increases in nuclear plant unit capacity have been promoted to take advantage of the economies of scale while further enhancing safety and reliability. As a result, more than 50 nuclear units are playing an important role in the domestic electric power generation. The next generation reactor with a 1700 MW(e) capacity is currently under development [IX-1, IX-2]. However, the future of nuclear power generation looks uncertain because of increasing competition with other power sources [IX-3] in the deregulated market, in spite of the general recognition that nuclear power is attractive from the viewpoint of energy security and environmental protection. Furthermore, factors such as stagnant growth in recent electricity demand, limitations in grid capacity and limited initial investment to avoid risk, will not favour large plant outputs. Nuclear plants are required that can easily be adopted in any country to globalize nuclear power generation for the mitigation of greenhouse effects. In the 1980s, the Toshiba Corporation has carried out R and D for BWRs with natural circulation and passive safety features. These R and D included tests and analysis of passive containment cooling systems (PCCS), isolation condensers (IC) and gravity driven cooling systems (GDCS). The results obtained through these tests have been used in the design of a simplified boiling water reactor (SBWR). Based on these activities, the design of a simplified BWR with a long operating cycle (LSBWR) design has been under development since the mid 1990s. The concept of the LSBWR is to provide flexibility to meet site conditions and electricity demands, to mitigate

  20. On relativistic irreducible quantum fields fulfilling CCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, K.

    1987-01-01

    Let phi be a relativistic scalar field fulfilling canonical commutation relations (CCR). Furthermore it is assumed that the time zero fields and momenta form an irreducible set. Based on estimates given by Herbst [I. W. Herbst, J. Math. Phys. 17, 1210 (1976)], and by methods developed by Powers [R. T. Powers, Commun. Math. Phys. 4, 145 (1967)], it is shown that phi has to be a free field in n>3 space dimensions. For n = 3 (resp. n = 2) restrictions that look similar to the restriction in a formal :phi 4 : 3 /sub +/ 1 (resp. :phi 6 : 2 /sub +/ 1 ) theory are obtained

  1. CCR presentations at AACR - 2018 | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR presentations at AACR Several CCR scientists will present their research at the AACR Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL, between April 14-18, 2018. Selected oral presentations are listed below. A full list of abstracts can be found on the AACR website.

  2. CCR presentations at AACR | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CCR presentations at AACR Several CCR scientists will present their research at the AACR Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., between April 1-5, 2017. Selected oral presentations are listed below. A full list of abstracts can be found on the AACR website.

  3. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in inflammatory…

  4. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  5. Phenotypic expressions of CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygosity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, GT; Carrington, M; Beeler, JA; Dean, M; Aledort, LM; Blatt, PM; Cohen, AR; DiMichele, D; Eyster, ME; Kessler, CM; Konkle, B; Leissinger, C; Luban, N; O'Brien, SJ; Goedert, JJ; O'Brien, TR

    1999-01-01

    Objective: As blockade of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has been proposed as therapy for HIV-1, we examined whether the CCR5-Delta 32/Delta 32 homozygous genotype has phenotypic expressions other than those related to HIV-1. Design: Study subjects were white homosexual men or men with hemophilia

  6. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment

  7. The ins and outs of ligand binding to CCR2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweemer, Annelien Jacomina Maria

    2014-01-01

    This thesis provides novel insights in the molecular mechanism of action of antagonists for the chemokine receptor CCR2. CCR2 belongs to the protein family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is involved in several inflammatory diseases and therefore many small molecule antagonists targeting

  8. Metal dusting in CCR platforming unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dampc, J. [Lotos Group SA, Gdansk (Poland); Grzesik, Z. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Hucinska, J. [Gdansk University of Technology, Gdansk (Poland)

    2009-03-15

    The mechanism of metal dusting of 9Cr-1Mo steel in CCR platforming unit, based on examinations of a charge heater tube, is presented. The tube operated for 10 years, and the metal skin temperature was about 600 C. The feed was composed of hydrotreated naphtha and hydrogen gas. The mechanism of the corrosion was elucidated using scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction technique. It has been found that the carbon deposition on the steel surface and its inward diffusion into the steel is accompanied by the outward diffusion of carbide forming elements, i.e. chromium and molybdenum. At an advanced stage of the metal dusting process a thin layer of fine chromium-rich carbides beneath the steel surface exists. The layer is followed by a porous zone composed of big degraded primary carbides and fine carbides instead of alloy ferrite, with chromium and molybdenum content higher than the ferrite inside the tube wall. On the steel surface, a layer of coke composed of graphite, iron and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides is formed and the uniform wastage of the steel takes place. Possible influence of some sulphur additions to the CCR platformer feed during the future service on degradation of the subsurface material has been considered. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Allosteric and orthosteric sites in CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), a chimeric receptor approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Steen, Anne; Jensen, Pia C

    2011-01-01

    molecules often act more deeply in an allosteric mode. However, opposed to the well described molecular interaction of allosteric modulators in class C 7-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors, the interaction in class A, to which the chemokine receptors belong, is more sparsely described. Using the CCR5...... chemokine receptor as a model system, we studied the molecular interaction and conformational interchange required for proper action of various orthosteric chemokines and allosteric small molecules, including the well known CCR5 antagonists TAK-779, SCH-C, and aplaviroc, and four novel CCR5 ago......-allosteric molecules. A chimera was successfully constructed between CCR5 and the closely related CCR2 by transferring all extracellular regions of CCR2 to CCR5, i.e. a Trojan horse that resembles CCR2 extracellularly but signals through a CCR5 transmembrane unit. The chimera bound CCR2 (CCL2 and CCL7), but not CCR5...

  10. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  11. CCR2+ and CCR5+ CD8+ T cells increase during viral infection and migrate to sites of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, A; Marker, O; Bartholdy, C

    2000-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in the selective recruitment of various leukocyte subsets. In this study, we correlated the expression of multiple chemokine and CC chemokine receptor (CCR) genes during the course of intracerebral (i.c.) infection with lymphocytic choriomeningi......Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in the selective recruitment of various leukocyte subsets. In this study, we correlated the expression of multiple chemokine and CC chemokine receptor (CCR) genes during the course of intracerebral (i.c.) infection with lymphocytic...... a rapidly lethal, T cell-independent encephalitis, and infection resulted in a dramatic early up-regulation of chemokine gene expression. Similar marked up-regulation of chemokine expression was not seen until late after LCMV infection and required the presence of activated T cells. Cerebral CCR gene...... expression was dominated by CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5. However, despite a stronger initial chemokine signal in VSV-infected mice, only LCMV-induced T cell-dependent inflammation was found to be associated with substantially increased expression of CCR genes. Virus-activated CD8+ T cells were found to express CCR2...

  12. Systemic MCP1/CCR2 blockade and leukocyte specific MCP1/CCR2 inhibition affect aortic aneurysm formation differently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waard, Vivian; Bot, Ilze; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Talib, Sara; Egashira, Kensuke; de Vries, Margreet R.; Quax, Paul H. A.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; van Berkel, Theo J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), is involved in atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Here, we explored the potential beneficial blockade of the MCP1/CCR2 pathway. Methods: We applied an AAA model in aging apolipoprotein E deficient mice

  13. Role of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR4 in the pathogenesis of experimental dengue infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Guabiraba

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a public health problem in many tropical countries. Recent clinical data have shown an association between levels of different chemokines in plasma and severity of dengue. We evaluated the role of CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR4 in an experimental model of DENV-2 infection in mice. Infection of mice induced evident clinical disease and tissue damage, including thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, lymphopenia, increased levels of transaminases and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lethality in WT mice. Importantly, infected WT mice presented increased levels of chemokines CCL2/JE, CCL3/MIP-1α and CCL5/RANTES in spleen and liver. CCR1⁻/⁻ mice had a mild phenotype with disease presentation and lethality similar to those of WT mice. In CCR2⁻/⁻ mice, lethality, liver damage, levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and leukocyte activation were attenuated. However, thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration and systemic TNF-α levels were similar to infected WT mice. Infection enhanced levels of CCL17/TARC, a CCR4 ligand. In CCR4⁻/⁻ mice, lethality, tissue injury and systemic inflammation were markedly decreased. Despite differences in disease presentation in CCR-deficient mice, there was no significant difference in viral load. In conclusion, activation of chemokine receptors has discrete roles in the pathogenesis of dengue infection. These studies suggest that the chemokine storm that follows severe primary dengue infection associates mostly to development of disease rather than protection.

  14. Chemokine CCL28 induces apoptosis of decidual stromal cells via binding CCR3/CCR10 in human spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chan; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Tang, Chuan-Ling; Wang, Song-Cun; Piao, Hai-Lan; Tao, Yu; Zhu, Rui; Du, Mei-Rong; Li, Da-Jin

    2013-10-01

    Spontaneous abortion is the most common complication of pregnancy. Immune activation and the subsequent inflammation-induced tissue injury are often observed at the maternal-fetal interface as the final pathological assault in recurrent spontaneous abortion. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for spontaneous abortion involving inflammation are not fully understood. Chemokine CCL28 and its receptors CCR3 and CCR10 are important regulators in inflammatory process. Here, we examined the expression of CCL28 and its receptors in decidual stromal cells (DSCs) by immunochemistry and flow cytometry (FCM), and compared their expression level in DSCs from normal pregnancy versus spontaneous abortion, and their relationship to inflammatory cytokines production by DSCs. We further analyzed regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines on CCL28 expression in DSCs by real-time polymerase chain reaction, In-cell Western and FCM. The effects of CCL28-CCR3/CCR10 interaction on DSC apoptosis was investigated by Annexin V staining and FCM analysis or DAPI staining and nuclear morphology. Higher levels of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-17A and tumor necrosis factor-α, and increased CCR3/CCR10 expression were observed in DSCs from spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy. Treatment with inflammatory cytokines differently affected CCL28 and CCR3/CCR10 expression in DSCs. Human recombinant CCL28 promoted DSC apoptosis, which was eliminated by pretreatment with neutralizing antibodies against CCR3/CCR10 and CCL28. However, CCL28 did not affect DSC growth. These results suggest that the inflammation-promoted up-regulation of CCL28 and its receptors interaction in DSCs is involved in human spontaneous abortion via inducing DSC apoptosis.

  15. GoldMag nanoparticles with core/shell structure: characterization and application in MR molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Song; Zou Liguang, E-mail: kxyjzy@yahoo.cn; Zhang Dong; Pang Xin; Yang Hua [Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology (China); Xu Ying [Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Base for Drug Clinical Trial (China)

    2011-09-15

    GoldMag is a kind of bi-functional nanoparticle, composed of a gold nanoshell and an iron oxide core. GoldMag combines the antibody immobilization property of gold nanoshell with the superparamagnetic feature of the iron oxide core. Rabbit anti-mouse IgG was immobilized on the surface of GoldMag to synthesize GoldMag-IgG in a single-step process. Transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis spectrophotometry, zeta potential analysis, dynamic light scattering, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were employed to characterize the nanostructures and the spectroscopic and magnetic properties of GoldMag and GoldMag-IgG. The antibody encapsulation efficiency of GoldMag was measured as 58.7%, and the antibody loading capacity was 88 {mu}g IgG per milligram of GoldMag. The immunoactivity of GoldMag-IgG was estimated to be 43.3% of that of the original IgG. The cytotoxicity of GoldMag was assessed by MTT assay, which showed that it has only little influence on human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells. MR imaging of different concentrations of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, GoldMag, and GoldMag-IgG showed that 3 {mu}g/mL of nanoparticles could significantly affect the MRI signal intensity of GRE T2*WI. The results demonstrate that GoldMag nanoparticles can be effectively conjugated with biomacromolecules and possess great potential for MR molecular imaging.

  16. An extended CCR5 ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayev, Meital; Moseri, Adi; Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as a co-receptor for HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing extracellular loops 1 and 3 (ECL1 and ECL3) were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study, we found that, in aqueous buffer, the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168-K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two-dimensional saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule, and therefore could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions that are not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides, as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. The structures and NMR data of ECL2S (Q186-T195) were deposited under Protein Data Bank ID 2mzx and BioMagResBank ID 25505. © 2015 FEBS.

  17. Editing CCR5: a novel approach to HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu, Tatjana I; Mussolino, Claudio; Bloom, Kristie; Cathomen, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a life-threatening disorder caused by infection of individuals with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Entry of HIV-1 into target cells depends on the presence of two surface proteins on the cell membrane: CD4, which serves as the main receptor, and either CCR5 or CXCR4 as a co-receptor. A limited number of people harbor a genomic 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32), leading to expression of a truncated gene product that provides resistance to HIV-1 infection in individuals homozygous for this mutation. Moreover, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation with CCR5∆32 donor cells seems to confer HIV-1 resistance to the recipient as well. However, since Δ32 donors are scarce and allogeneic HSC transplantation is not exempt from risks, the development of gene editing tools to knockout CCR5 in the genome of autologous cells is highly warranted. Targeted gene editing can be accomplished with designer nucleases, which essentially are engineered restriction enzymes that can be designed to cleave DNA at specific sites. During repair of these breaks, the cellular repair pathway often introduces small mutations at the break site, which makes it possible to disrupt the ability of the targeted locus to express a functional protein, in this case CCR5. Here, we review the current promise and limitations of CCR5 gene editing with engineered nucleases, including factors affecting the efficiency of gene disruption and potential off-target effects.

  18. Laser heating challenges of high yield MagLIF targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutz, Stephen; Sefkow, Adam; Vesey, Roger

    2014-10-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept is predicted by numerical simulation to produce fusion yields of about 100 kJ, when driven by 25 MA from the existing Z accelerator [S. A. Slutz et al. Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] and much higher yields with future accelerators delivering higher currents [Slutz and Vesey PRL 108, 025003 (2012)]. The fuel must be heated before compression to obtain significant fusion yields due to the relatively slow implosion velocities (~ 100 km/s) of magnetically driven liners. Lasers provide a convenient means to accomplish this pre-compressional heating of the fusion fuel, but there are challenges. The laser must penetrate a foil covering the laser entrance hole and deposit 20-30 kJ within the ~1 cm length of the liner in fuel at 6-12 mg/cc. Such high densities could result in beam scattering due to refraction and laser plasma interactions. Numerical simulations of the laser heating process are presented, which indicate that energies as high as 30 kJ could be deposited in the fuel by using two laser pulses of different wavelengths. Simulations of this process will be presented as well of results for a MagLIF design for a potential new machine delivering 50 MA of current. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Roles of CcrA and CcrB in Excision and Integration of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec, a Staphylococcus aureus Genomic Island▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Archer, Gordon L.

    2010-01-01

    The gene encoding resistance to methicillin and other β-lactam antibiotics in staphylococci, mecA, is carried on a genomic island, SCCmec (for staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec). The chromosomal excision and integration of types I to IV SCCmec are catalyzed by the site-specific recombinases CcrA and CcrB, the genes for which are encoded on each element. We sought to identify the relative contributions of CcrA and CcrB in the excision and integration of SCCmec. Purified CcrB but not CcrA ...

  20. Inefficient entry of vicriviroc-resistant HIV-1 via the inhibitor-CCR5 complex at low cell surface CCR5 densities

    OpenAIRE

    Pugach, Pavel; Ray, Neelanjana; Klasse, Per Johan; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Doms, Robert W.; Lee, Benhur; Moore, John P.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 variants resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as vicriviroc (VVC) have modified Env complexes that can use both the inhibitor-bound and -free forms of the CCR5 co-receptor to enter target cells. However, entry via the inhibitor-CCR5 complex is inefficient in some, but not all, cell types, particularly cell lines engineered to express CCR5. We investigated the effect of increasing CCR5 expression, and hence the density of the inhibitor-CCR5 complex when a saturating inhibitor...

  1. The CCR5 receptor acts as an alloantigen in CCR5Δ32 homozygous individuals: Identification of chemokineand HIV-1-blocking human antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Ditzel, Henrik J.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Garred, Peter; Wang, Meng; Koefoed, Klaus; Pedersen, Court; Burton, Dennis R.; Schwartz, Thue W.

    1998-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor for infection by macrophage-tropic R5 HIV-1. A 32-bp deletion in the gene coding for CCR5 (CCR5Δ32) occurs with a frequency of 10% in the Caucasian population and results in a receptor protein that is truncated and not expressed at the cell surface. CCR5Δ32 homozygous individuals are apparently normal but resistant to infection with R5 HIV-1. In two individuals homozygous for CCR5Δ32, who had been repeatedly exposed to CCR5-expressing blood ...

  2. CCR5 delta32, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and disease activity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Madsen, Hans O; Jensen, Claus V

    2000-01-01

    Chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) appear to be crucial in leukocyte recruitment to the central nervous system in multiple sclerosis (MS). CCR5 delta32, a truncated allele of the CC chemokine receptor CCR5 gene encoding a non-functional receptor, did not confer protection from MS. CCR5...... targeting CCR5 or treatment with MMP inhibitors may attenuate disease activity in MS...

  3. Clinical use of CCR5 inhibitors in HIV and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilliam Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the discovery of CCR5 as a coreceptor for HIV entry, there has been interest in blockade of the receptor for treatment and prevention of HIV infection. Although several CCR5 antagonists have been evaluated in clinical trials, only maraviroc has been approved for clinical use in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. The efficacy, safety and resistance profile of CCR5 antagonists with a focus on maraviroc are reviewed here along with their usage in special and emerging clinical situations. Despite being approved for use since 2007, the optimal use of maraviroc has yet to be well-defined in HIV and potentially in other diseases. Maraviroc and other CCR5 antagonists have the potential for use in a variety of other clinical situations such as the prevention of HIV transmission, intensification of HIV treatment and prevention of rejection in organ transplantation. The use of CCR5 antagonists may be potentiated by other agents such as rapamycin which downregulate CCR5 receptors thus decreasing CCR5 density. There may even be a role for their use in combination with other entry inhibitors. However, clinical use of CCR5 antagonists may have negative consequences in diseases such as West Nile and Tick-borne encephalitis virus infections. In summary, CCR5 antagonists have great therapeutic potential in the treatment and prevention of HIV as well as future use in novel situations such as organ transplantation. Their optimal use either alone or in combination with other agents will be defined by further investigation.

  4. Metilação e CCR

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Mónica Sofia Barroso

    2016-01-01

    Dissertação para obtenção do grau de Mestre no Instituto Superior de Ciências da Saúde Egas Moniz O Cancro Cólon Retal (CCR) é um dos cancros mais comuns no mundo, sendo o terceiro mais frequente e mortal a nível mundial, com uma incidência de cerca de 9% e provocando a morte de aproximadamente 394000 pessoas/ano. O desenvolvimento desta neoplasia surge maioritariamente associado a uma sequência e acumulação de mutações genéticas, designada sequência adenoma-carcinoma. Esta doença pode tam...

  5. Conformational Flexibility Differentiates Naturally Occurring Bet v 1 Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarina Grutsch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The protein Bet v 1 represents the main cause for allergic reactions to birch pollen in Europe and North America. Structurally homologous isoforms of Bet v 1 can have different properties regarding allergic sensitization and Th2 polarization, most likely due to differential susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. Using NMR relaxation experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that the initial proteolytic cleavage sites in two naturally occurring Bet v 1 isoforms, Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a and Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d, are conformationally flexible. Inaccessible cleavage sites in helices and strands are highly flexible on the microsecond-millisecond time scale, whereas those located in loops display faster nanosecond-microsecond flexibility. The data consistently show that Bet v 1.0102 is more flexible and conformationally heterogeneous than Bet v 1.0101. Moreover, NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements reveal that the backbone amides in Bet v 1.0102 are significantly more solvent exposed, in agreement with this isoform’s higher susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. The differential conformational flexibility of Bet v 1 isoforms, along with the transient exposure of inaccessible sites to the protein surface, may be linked to proteolytic susceptibility, representing a potential structure-based rationale for the observed differences in Th2 polarization and allergic sensitization.

  6. Adverse effect of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T B; Kristiansen, T B; Katzenstein, T L

    2001-01-01

    HIV positive individuals heterozygous for a 32 basepair deletion in the CCR5 encoding gene (CCR5 Delta32) have a reduced number of CCR5 receptors on the cell surface and a slower progression towards AIDS and death. Other human polymorphisms, such as the CCR2 64I and the CCR5 promoter -2459 A....... Genotypes were determined in 119 individuals enrolled in the Copenhagen AIDS Cohort. When including the concurrent effects of the CCR5 Delta32 and CCR2 64I mutations, homozygous carriers of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele had a significantly faster progression towards death than heterozygous A/G individuals...... (P = 0.03), whereas this adverse effect was not significant when comparing A/A and G/G individuals. However, independent analysis revealed a significant adverse effect of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele. Homozygous carriers of the -2459A allele that lack the protective effects of the CCR5 Delta32...

  7. Genotyping of CCR5 gene, CCR2b and SDF1 variants related to HIV-1 infection in Gabonese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombo, Landry Erik; Bisseye, Cyrille; Mickala, Patrick; Ossari, Simon; Makuwa, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Given the magnitude of the HIV epidemic infection, many viral and human factors were analyzed, and the most decisive was the variant CCR5-Δ32. The presence of a low HIV prevalence (1.8%) in Gabon in the 1990s, compared to neighboring countries, represents a paradox that led us to search for viral and human genetic variants in this country. In this study, only variants of coreceptors and chemokines were investigated. Variants of the coding region of the CCR5 gene were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and then variants of SDF1 and CCR2b were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Four rare variants of the CCR5 coreceptor were found, while CCR5-Δ32 and CCR5m303 variants were not found. No association with CCR2b-V64I (17%) and SDF1-3'A (2%) variants was determined in relation to HIV-1 infection in Gabonese patients. The paradox of HIV seroprevalence in Gabon, which ended in the 2000s, was not caused by human genetic variants but rather by environmental factors. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. "Lights on at the end of the party": are lads' mags mainstreaming dangerous sexism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Miranda A H; Hegarty, Peter; Tyler, Suzannah; Mansfield, Sophie

    2012-11-01

    Research has suggested that some magazines targeted at young men - lads' mags - are normalizing extreme sexist views by presenting those views in a mainstream context. Consistent with this view, young men in Study 1 (n = 90) identified more with derogatory quotes about women drawn from recent lads' mags, and from interviews with convicted rapists, when those quotes were attributed to lads' mags, than when they were attributed to convicted rapists. In Study 2, 40 young women and men could not reliably judge the source of those same quotes. While these participants sometimes voiced the belief that the content of lads' mags was 'normal' while rapists' talk was 'extreme', they categorized quotes from both sources as derogatory with equal frequency. Jointly, the two studies show an overlap in the content of convicted rapists' talk and the contents of contemporary lads' mags, and suggest that the framing of such content within lads' mags may normalize it for young men. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Cloning and expression analysis of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) genes in sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieqin; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Lihua; Zhan, Qiuwen; Wu, Peijin; Du, Junli; Yang, Xiaocui; Liu, Yanlong

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is the first enzyme in the monolignol-specific branch of the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this research, three sorghum CCR genes including SbCCR1, SbCCR2-1 and SbCCR2-2 were cloned and characterized. Analyses of the structure and phylogeny of the three CCR genes showed evolutionary conservation of the functional domains and divergence of function. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves demonstrated that the three CCR proteins were localized in the cytoplasm. The expression analysis showed that the three CCR genes were induced by drought. But in 48 h, the expression levels of SbCCR1 and SbCCR2-2 did not differ between CK and the drought treatment; while the expression level of SbCCR2-1 in the drought treatment was higher than in CK. The expression of the SbCCR1 and SbCCR2-1 genes was not induced by sorghum aphid [Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner)] attack, but SbCCR2-2 was significantly induced by sorghum aphid attack. It is suggested that SbCCR2-2 is involved in the process of pest defense. Absolute quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the three CCR genes were mainly expressed in lignin deposition organs. The gene copy number of SbCCR1 was significantly higher than those of SbCCR2-1 and SbCCR2-2 in the tested tissues, especially in stem. The results provide new insight into the functions of the three CCR genes in sorghum.

  10. The chemokine receptor CCR5 in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Silvia; Myburgh, Renier; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2011-02-01

    The expression and the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 have been mainly studied in the context of HIV infection. However, this protein is also expressed in the brain, where it can be crucial in determining the outcome in response to different insults. CCR5 expression can be deleterious or protective in controlling the progression of certain infections in the CNS, but it is also emerging that it could play a role in non-infectious diseases. In particular, it appears that, in addition to modulating immune responses, CCR5 can influence neuronal survival. Here, we summarize the present knowledge about the expression of CCR5 in the brain and highlight recent findings suggesting its possible involvement in neuroprotective mechanisms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Temporal relationship between V1V2 variation, macrophage replication, and coreceptor adaptation during HIV-1 disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciotra, Silvina; Owen, Sherry M; Rudolph, Donna; Yang, Chunfu; Wang, Bin; Saksena, Nitin; Spira, Thomas; Dhawan, Subhash; Lal, Renu B

    2002-09-27

    Specific mutations in VPR and V2 potentially restrict HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Such restriction could potentially limit HIV replication in long-term non-progressors (LTNP), thus accounting for low viral load and delayed progression to AIDS. To examine whether a specific VPR phenotype (truncated versus non-truncated) correlates with disease progression and whether elongated V2 restricts viral replication in macrophages or alters viral tropism. Sequence analysis was carried for VPR and V1-V3 env from four rapid progressors (RPs), six late progressors (LPs), and three LTNPs in cohort of HIV-1-infected homosexual men. The replication kinetics of sequential isolates was examined in primary CD4 cells and macrophages and coreceptor usage was determined by GHOST infection assays. No differences were found in the VPR protein from RP and LTNP isolates. Analysis of the V2 region revealed that all RPs maintained similar V2 lengths (40 aa), whereas LPs and LTNPs acquired additional amino acids (2-13 aa) in the V2 region. Coreceptor specificity revealed that RP switch from CCR5 to multiple coreceptor usage, whereas LTNPs maintained R5 viruses. Sequential isolates from each group revealed comparable replication efficiencies in both T-cells and macrophages, regardless of the V2 length or coreceptor utilization. In addition, cross-section analysis of six LTNPs from Australia revealed extended V2 with consistent usage of CCR5 coreceptor. The present results suggest that acquisition of a V2 extension over time in HIV-1-infected LPs/LTNPs appears to correlate with maintenance of CCR5 usage among LTNPs. These findings may be important for a better understanding of the host interactions and disease progression.

  12. Aplicabilidad del monitoreo de emisiones del arco eléctrico para el control de calidad en el proceso MAG-S Applicability of monitoring of electric arc emissions for quality control in MAG-S process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eber Huanca Cayo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Garantizar la calidad en soldadura no es una tarea trivial. Para ello diversas inspecciones de control de calidad son realizadas, en detrimento, los costos y tiempos de producción se elevan. Existen diversos sistemas automatizados de soldadura, éstos son auxiliados por sistemas de control basados en el monitoreo de parámetros de soldadura. Sin embargo son reducidos los sistemas automatizados de monitoreo de calidad que en su mayoría son diseñados para el proceso TIG. Durante la soldadura, el arco eléctrico produce emisiones acústicas y electromagnéticas que se manifiestan como sonido y luminosidad. El objetivo del presente trabajo es mostrar que estas emisiones del arco pueden ser utilizados para el monitoreo de la calidad de la soldadura para el proceso MAG-S. Se realizaron múltiples experimentos de soldadura en posición plana donde se indujeron perturbaciones consistentes presencia de grasa y ausencia de gas de protección. En cada experimento se adquirió simultáneamente señales de tensión y corriente así como señales de emisiones del arco eléctrico. A partir de las emisiones acústicas y electromagnéticas en la banda de ultravioleta, se midió la frecuencia de cortocircuitos. A partir de la emisión electromagnética en la banda infrarroja se midió la estabilidad del proceso de soldadura. Los resultados muestran que las emisiones del arco pueden ser utilizadas para el monitoreo y detección de perturbaciones en soldadura y con el entendimiento de las variaciones de cada emisión podría identificarse determinados tipos de perturbaciones.Ensuring quality in welding is not a trivial task. For this purpose several quality control checks are performed, at the expense, costs and production times are increased. There are several automated welding systems and they are assisted by control systems based on monitoring of welding parameters. However, automated quality monitoring systems are limited and they are mostly designed for the

  13. Relevance of CCL3/CCR5 axis in oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Moreira Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna; Sobral, Lays Martin; Queiroz-Junior, Celso Martins; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Leopoldino, Andréia Machado; Russo, Remo Castro; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2017-08-01

    The chemokine CCL3 is a chemotactic cytokine crucial for inflammatory cell recruitment in homeostatic and pathological conditions. CCL3 might stimulate cancer progression by promoting leukocyte accumulation, angiogenesis and tumour growth. The expression of CCL3 and its receptors CCR1 and CCR5 was demonstrated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but their role was not defined. Here, the functions of CCL3 were assessed using a model of chemically induced tongue carcinogenesis with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Lineages of OSCC were used to analyse the effects of CCL3 in vitro . The 4NQO-induced lesions exhibited increased expression of CCL3, CCR1 and CCR5. CCL3 -/- and CCR5 -/- mice presented reduced incidence of tongue tumours compared to wild-type (WT) and CCR1 -/- mice. Consistently, attenuated cytomorphological atypia and reduced cell proliferation were observed in lesions of CCL3 -/- and CCR5 -/- mice. OSCC from CCL3 -/- mice exhibited lower infiltration of eosinophils and reduced expression of Egf, Fgf1, Tgf-β1, Vegfa, Vegfb, Itga-4, Vtn, Mmp-1a, Mmp-2 and Mmp-9 than WT mice. In vitro , CCL3 induced invasion and production of CCL5, IL-6, MMP -2, -8, -9. Blockage of CCL3 in vitro using α-CCL3 or Evasin-1 (a CCL3-binding protein) impaired tumour cell invasion. In conclusion, CCL3/CCR5 axis has pro-tumourigenic effects in oral carcinogenesis. The induction of inflammatory and angiogenic pathways and eosinophils recruitment appear to be the underlying mechanism explaining these effects. These data reveal potential protective effects of CCL3 blockade in oral cancer.

  14. The case for selection at CCR5-Delta32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Delta32 allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Delta32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%-14% in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic plague or smallpox during the Middle Ages. This hypothesis was based on several lines of evidence, including the absence of the allele outside of Europe and long-range linkage disequilibrium at the locus. We reevaluated this evidence with the benefit of much denser genetic maps and extensive control data. We find that the pattern of genetic variation at CCR5-Delta32 does not stand out as exceptional relative to other loci across the genome. Moreover using newer genetic maps, we estimated that the CCR5-Delta32 allele is likely to have arisen more than 5,000 y ago. While such results can not rule out the possibility that some selection may have occurred at C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, they imply that the pattern of genetic variation seen atCCR5-Delta32 is consistent with neutral evolution. More broadly, the results have general implications for the design of future studies to detect the signs of positive selection in the human genome.

  15. The case for selection at CCR5-Delta32.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardis C Sabeti

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Delta32 allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Delta32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%-14% in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic plague or smallpox during the Middle Ages. This hypothesis was based on several lines of evidence, including the absence of the allele outside of Europe and long-range linkage disequilibrium at the locus. We reevaluated this evidence with the benefit of much denser genetic maps and extensive control data. We find that the pattern of genetic variation at CCR5-Delta32 does not stand out as exceptional relative to other loci across the genome. Moreover using newer genetic maps, we estimated that the CCR5-Delta32 allele is likely to have arisen more than 5,000 y ago. While such results can not rule out the possibility that some selection may have occurred at C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, they imply that the pattern of genetic variation seen at CCR5-Delta32 is consistent with neutral evolution. More broadly, the results have general implications for the design of future studies to detect the signs of positive selection in the human genome.

  16. Short Communication: HIV-1 Variants That Use Mouse CCR5 Reveal Critical Interactions of gp120's V3 Crown with CCR5 Extracellular Loop 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Durnin, James P; Kabat, David

    2015-10-01

    The CCR5 coreceptor amino terminus and extracellular (ECL) loops 1 and 2 have been implicated in HIV-1 infections, with species differences in these regions inhibiting zoonoses. Interactions of gp120 with CD4 and CCR5 reduce constraints on metastable envelope subunit gp41, enabling gp41 conformational changes needed for infection. We previously selected HIV-1JRCSF variants that efficiently use CCR5(Δ18) with a deleted amino terminus or CCR5(HHMH) with ECL2 from an NIH/Swiss mouse. Unexpectedly, the adaptive gp120 mutations were nearly identical, suggesting that they function by weakening gp120's grip on gp41 and/or by increasing interactions with ECL1. To analyze this and further wean HIV-1 from human CCR5, we selected variants using CCR5(HMMH) with murine ECL1 and 2 sequences. HIV-1JRCSF mutations adaptive for CCR5(Δ18) and CCR5(HHMH) were generally maladaptive for CCR5(HMMH), whereas the converse was true for CCR5(HMMH) adaptations. The HIV-1JRCSF variant adapted to CCR5(HMMH) also weakly used intact NIH/Swiss mouse CCR5. Our results strongly suggest that HIV-1JRCSF makes functionally critical contacts with human ECL1 and that adaptation to murine ECL1 requires multiple mutations in the crown of gp120's V3 loop.

  17. Neurophysiological and clinical responses to rituximab in patients with anti-MAG polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Gabriella; Zambello, Renato; Ermani, M

    2011-12-01

    Rituximab treatment has shown clinical improvement in anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) polyneuropathy. We analyzed scores of clinical scales and the most sensitive electrophysiological parameters before and after immunomodulating treatment with rituximab in a group of patients affected by anti-MAG demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical scores, the percentage of CD20 B-lymphocytes, anti-MAG antibody titers and electrophysiological data in 7 patients with anti-MAG polyneuropathy were analyzed. The patients were examined before a cycle with rituximab, 6, 12 and 24 months after the end of the treatment. Two patients were treated with rituximab additional cycles and re-evaluated 48 months after the first treatment. There were no evident correlation between anti-MAG serum antibody titers or clinical scales and electrodiagnostic data. Significant decrease in the proportion of CD20 B-lymphocytes was observed. Significant anti-MAG antibodies titers reduction was detected after re-treatment. At follow-up, pinprik sensation and two point discrimination presented a significant improvement compared with the score before treatment. In our patients, rituximab did not improve any electrophysiological data. No correlation with anti-MAG serum antibodies course was found. With rituximab only pin sensibility improved. Rituximab re-treatment significantly reduces anti-MAG serum antibodies titers but improves only small fibers sensibility. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of substrate specificity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 alkylpurine DNA glycosylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, Suraj; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    DNA glycosylases specialized for the repair of alkylation damage must identify, with fine specificity, a diverse array of subtle modifications within DNA. The current mechanism involves damage sensing through interrogation of the DNA duplex, followed by more specific recognition of the target base inside the active site pocket. To better understand the physical basis for alkylpurine detection, we determined the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 (spMag1) in complex with DNA and performed a mutational analysis of spMag1 and the close homologue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (scMag). Despite strong homology, spMag1 and scMag differ in substrate specificity and cellular alkylation sensitivity, although the enzymological basis for their functional differences is unknown. We show that Mag preference for 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A) is influenced by a minor groove-interrogating residue more than the composition of the nucleobase-binding pocket. Exchanging this residue between Mag proteins swapped their {var_epsilon}A activities, providing evidence that residues outside the extrahelical base-binding pocket have a role in identification of a particular modification in addition to sensing damage.

  19. Structural basis for capping protein sequestration by myotrophin (V-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Adam; Fujiwara, Ikuko; Hammer, John A; Tjandra, Nico

    2010-08-13

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric 62-kDa protein that binds the barbed end of the actin filament with high affinity to block further filament elongation. Myotrophin (V-1) is a 13-kDa ankyrin repeat-containing protein that binds CP tightly, sequestering it in a totally inactive complex in vitro. Here, we elucidate the molecular interaction between CP and V-1 by NMR. Specifically, chemical shift mapping and intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments reveal that the ankyrin loops of V-1, which are essential for V-1/CP interaction, bind the basic patch near the joint of the alpha tentacle of CP shown previously to drive most of the association of CP with and affinity for the barbed end. Consistently, site-directed mutagenesis of CP shows that V-1 and the strong electrostatic binding site for CP on the barbed end compete for this basic patch on CP. These results can explain how V-1 inactivates barbed end capping by CP and why V-1 is incapable of uncapping CP-capped actin filaments, the two signature biochemical activities of V-1.

  20. ULYSSES DUST DETECTOR SYSTEM V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Version 1.1 =========== This data set, ULY-D-UDDS-5-DUST-V1.1, differs slightly from the data set UL-D-UDDS-5-DUST-V1.0 created and reviewed at the PDS/Small Bodies...

  1. Solar Probe Plus MAG Sensor Thermal Design for Low Heater Power and Extreme Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The heater power available for the Solar Probe Plus FIELDS MAG sensor is less than half of the heritage value for other missions. Nominally the MAG sensors are in the spacecraft's umbra. In the worst hot case, approximately 200 spacecraft communication downlinks, up to 10 hours each, are required at 0.7 AU. These downlinks require the spacecraft to slew 45 deg. about the Y-axis, exposing the MAG sensors and boom to sunlight. This paper presents the thermal design to meet the MAG sensor thermal requirements in the extreme thermal environment and with low heater power. A thermal balance test on the MAG sensor engineering model has verified the thermal design and correlated the thermal model for flight temperature predictions.

  2. Nonlinear Propagation of Mag Waves Through the Transition Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Mahajan, S.; Tajima, T.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Una onda de gravitaci5n magneto acustica (GMA), se inicia en el regimen de alta beta cerca de la basa de fot5sfera solar y es segui- da, usando simulaciones numericas, mientras viaja radialmente a traves de la cromosfera, la regi5n de transici6n y dentro de la corona. Se ha' seleccionado parametros iniciales de manera que la beta resulte menor que uno cerca de la parte alta de la regi6n de transici6n. Nuestro interes maximo se concentra en la cantidad y forma del flujo de energia que puede ser llevada por la onda hasta la corona dados una atm6sfera inicial y amplitud de onda especificas. Segun los estudios a la fecha, el flujo de energ1a termico domina, aumentando linealmente con la ampli tud deonda y resulta de aproximadamente i05 ergs/cm2-s en una amplitud de 0.5. El flujo de energia cinetica siempre permanece despreciable, mientras que el flujo de energia magnetica depende de la orientaci5n inicial del campo. Un modo GMA rapido y casi paralelo, el cual es esen- cialmente un modo MHD en la corona se convierte a un modo rapido modificado y a uno lento, cuando la beta atmosferica disminuye a uno. ABSTRACT: A magneto-acoustic-gravity (MAG) wave is initiated in the high-beta regime near the base of the solar photosphere and followed, using numerical siriiulations, as it travels radially through the chromosphere, the transition region, and into the corona. Initial parameters are selected such that beta becomes less than one near the top of the transition region. Our primary interest is in the amount and form of energy flux that can be carried by the wave train into the corona for a specified initial atmosphere and wave amplitude. For the studies conducted to date, the thermal energy flux dominates, it about linearly with wave amplitude and becomes approximately 10 ergs/cm2-s at an amplitude of 0.5. The kinetic energy flux always remains negligible, while the magnetic energy flux depends on the inLtial field orientation. A nearly parallel fast MAG mode, which

  3. Epitope Switching as a Novel Escape Mechanism of HIV to CCR5 Monoclonal Antibodies▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jekle, Andreas; Chhabra, Milloni; Lochner, Adriane; Meier, Sonja; Chow, Eugene; Brandt, Michael; Sankuratri, Surya; Cammack, Nick; Heilek, Gabrielle

    2009-01-01

    In passaging experiments, we isolated HIV strains resistant to MAb3952, a chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) monoclonal antibody (MAb) that binds to the second extracellular domain (extracellular loop 2 [ECL-2]) of CCR5. MAb3952-resistant viruses remain CCR5-tropic and are cross-resistant to a second ECL-2-specific antibody. Surprisingly, MAb3952-resistant viruses were more susceptible to RoAb13, a CCR5 antibody binding to the N terminus of CCR5. Using CCR5 receptor mutants, we show that...

  4. Glomerular filtration and tubular secretion of MAG-3 in the rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Suur, R.M.; Mueller-Suur, C.

    1989-01-01

    Technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG-3) has recently been introduced as a new radiopharmaceutical for dynamic renal scintigraphy. To elucidate the mechanism of renal excretion, micropuncture experiments were performed in rat kidneys for direct measurements of glomerular filtration and tubular secretory capacity. Fluid of Bowman space was collected from superficial glomeruli and analyzed for its contents of [99mTc]MAG-3, [125I]hippurate and [3H]inulin during constant infusion of these compounds. The ratio of activity of ultrafiltrate to that of arterial plasma was 0.23 for MAG-3, 0.68 for hippurate and 1.04 for inulin which demonstrates that the filtrated amount of MAG-3 is only 23% of that of inulin, presumably because of higher plasma protein binding which was also measured in vitro and found to be 80 +/- 1.5% for MAG-3 and 32 +/- 2% for [125I]hippurate. Proximal and distal tubules were also micropunctured and their tubular fluid as well as the final urine analyzed for the activity of hippurate and MAG-3. The tubular fluid to plasma ratio values along the nephron and in the final urine were all lower for MAG-3 than for hippurate, indicating a lower secretory capacity. From measurements of whole renal clearance, GFR and plasma protein binding the filtered amount of MAG-3 was 0.26 and of hippurate 0.87 ml/min.g kidney weight (p less than 0.001) and the secreted amount 2.01 and 2.38 ml/min.g kidney weight (p less than 0.05), respectively. We conclude that MAG-3 is predominantly excreted by tubular secretion and that the lower renal clearance of MAG-3 as compared with that of hippurate is a result both of a substantially decreased glomerular filtration and of a lower tubular secretion

  5. Window decompression in laser-heated MagLIF targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Daniel; Peterson, Kyle; Sefkow, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept requires pre-magnetized fuel to be pre-heated with a laser before undergoing compression by a thick solid liner. Recent experiments and simulations suggest that yield has been limited to date by poor laser preheat and laser-induced mix in the fuel region. In order to assess laser energy transmission through the pressure-holding window, as well as resultant mix, we modeled window disassembly under different conditions using 1D and 2D simulations in both Helios and HYDRA. We present results tracking energy absorption, time needed for decompression, risk of laser-plasma interaction (LPI) that may scatter laser light, and potential for mix from various window thicknesses, laser spot sizes and gas fill densities. These results indicate that using thinner windows (0.5-1 μm windows) and relatively large laser spot radii (600 μm and above) can avoid deleterious effects and improve coupling with the fuel. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  6. MagIC: Geomagnetic Applications from Earth History to Archeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A.; Minnett, R.; Jarboe, N.

    2016-12-01

    Major scientific challenges increasingly require an interdisciplinary approach, and highlight the need for open archives, incorporating visualization and analysis tools that are flexible enough to address novel research problems. Increasingly modern standards for publication are (or should be) demanding direct links to data, data citations, and adequate documentation that allow other researchers direct access to the fundamental measurements and analyses producing the results. Carefully documented metadata are essential and data models may need considerable complexity to accommodate re-use of observations originally collected with a different purpose in mind. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) provides an online home for all kinds of paleo-, archeo-magnetic, rock, and environmental magnetic data, from documentation of fieldwork, through lab protocols, to interpretations in terms of geomagnetic history. Examples of their application to understanding geomagnetic field behavior, archeological dating, and voyages of exploration to discover America will be used to highlight best practices and illustrate unexpected benefits of data archived using best practices with the goal of maintaining high standards for reproducibility.

  7. MAG4 versus alternative techniques for forecasting active region flare productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David A; Moore, Ronald L; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 is a technique of forecasting an active region's rate of production of major flares in the coming few days from a free magnetic energy proxy. We present a statistical method of measuring the difference in performance between MAG4 and comparable alternative techniques that forecast an active region's major-flare productivity from alternative observed aspects of the active region. We demonstrate the method by measuring the difference in performance between the “Present MAG4” technique and each of three alternative techniques, called “McIntosh Active-Region Class,” “Total Magnetic Flux,” and “Next MAG4.” We do this by using (1) the MAG4 database of magnetograms and major flare histories of sunspot active regions, (2) the NOAA table of the major-flare productivity of each of 60 McIntosh active-region classes of sunspot active regions, and (3) five technique performance metrics (Heidke Skill Score, True Skill Score, Percent Correct, Probability of Detection, and False Alarm Rate) evaluated from 2000 random two-by-two contingency tables obtained from the databases. We find that (1) Present MAG4 far outperforms both McIntosh Active-Region Class and Total Magnetic Flux, (2) Next MAG4 significantly outperforms Present MAG4, (3) the performance of Next MAG4 is insensitive to the forward and backward temporal windows used, in the range of one to a few days, and (4) forecasting from the free-energy proxy in combination with either any broad category of McIntosh active-region classes or any Mount Wilson active-region class gives no significant performance improvement over forecasting from the free-energy proxy alone (Present MAG4). Key Points Quantitative comparison of performance of pairs of forecasting techniques Next MAG4 forecasts major flares more accurately than Present MAG4 Present MAG4 forecast outperforms McIntosh AR Class and total magnetic flux PMID:26213517

  8. Renal scintigraphy in the 21st Century 99m Tc-MAG3 with zero time injection of furosemide (MAG3-F0): a fast and easy protocol, one for all indications. Part 3. Clinical experience. Congenital disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfakianakis, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    In this work the Protocol for MAG 3 -F 0 is presented. Patient preparation, easy (only restriction, oral hydration, no bladder cathartic). Dynamic study (iv 1-10 mCi MAG 3 + 40-80 mg LASIX), simultaneous injection of furosemide: MAG 3 -F 0 , duration of the study: 25 minutes. Tomography-SPECT (20 mCi MAG 3 ). No diuretic needed, duration of the study: 4 minutes. (Author)

  9. Depletion of Gut-Resident CCR5+Cells for HIV Cure Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, David; Chen, Connie; Méndez-Lagares, Gema; Rogers, Kenneth A; Michaels, Anthony J; Yan, Jiangli; Casaz, Paul; Reimann, Keith A; Villinger, François; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J

    2017-11-01

    The HIV reservoir forming at the earliest stages of infection is likely composed of CCR5 + cells, because these cells are the targets of transmissible virus. Restriction of the CCR5 + reservoir, particularly in the gut, may be needed for subsequent cure attempts. Strategies for killing or depleting CCR5 + cells have been described, but none have been tested in vivo in nonhuman primates, and the extent of achievable depletion from tissues is not known. In this study we investigate the efficacy of two novel cytotoxic treatments for targeting and eliminating CCR5 + cells in young rhesus macaques. The first, an immunotoxin consisting of the endogenous CCR5 ligand RANTES fused with Pseudomonas exotoxin (RANTES-PE38), killed CCR5 + lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) ex vivo, but had no detectable effect on CCR5 + LPLs in vivo. The second, a primatized bispecific antibody for CCR5 and CD3, depleted all CCR5 + cells from blood and the vast majority of such cells from the colonic mucosa (up to 96% of CD4 + CCR5 + ). Absence of CCR5-expressing cells from blood endured for at least 1 week, while CCR5 + cells in colon were substantially replenished over the same time span. These data open an avenue to investigation of combined early ART treatment and CCR5 + reservoir depletion for cure of HIV-infected infants.

  10. Uma metodologia para parametrização do processo MIG/MAG CA A methodology for parameterization of the AC MIG/MAG process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Américo Scotti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O processo MIG/MAG CA tem um potencial muito grande de aplicação, por permitir unir as características da soldagem MIG/MAG convencional (corrente contínua, com o eletrodo no positivo com as de se usar corrente negativa na soldagem MIG/MAG. Entretanto, o formato de onda de corrente (alternada, pulsada no positivo e constante no negativo demanda uma seleção criteriosa de seus inúmeros parâmetros de regulagem, o que vem limitando o estudo e aplicação desta versão de processo MIG/MAG. O objetivo deste trabalho foi propor e avaliar uma metodologia capaz de estimar os parâmetros de regulagem do processo MIG/MAG CA, de tal forma a se obter soldas com estabilidade de comprimento de arco e cordões com geometria adequada. É feita uma descrição passo a passo da definição dos parâmetros de entrada e da forma de se obter experimentalmente alguns valores de parâmetros necessários para estimação de outros valores de regulagem. As equações de estimação são apresentadas e discutidas. É feita uma demonstração da aplicação da metodologia, com a validação dos resultados pela comparação entre valores estimados e reais.The AC MIG/MAG process presents remarkable application potential, since it allows join the characteristics of the conventional MIG/MAG process (direct current, electrode positive with the ones obtained when negative current is applied in MIG/MAG welding. However, the current wave shape (alternate, pulsed in positive and constant in negative polarities demands a criterions selection of its innumerous setting parameters, fact that limits the development and application of this process version. The objective of this work was to propose and assess a methodology able to estimate the setting parameters of the CA MIG/MAG welding process, in such a way to result in welds with arc length stability and adequate bead geometry. A step-a-step description of the input parameter definitions and of the way to experimentally obtain

  11. CCR5 Expression Levels Influence NFAT Translocation, IL-2 Production, and Subsequent Signaling Events during T Lymphocyte Activation1

    OpenAIRE

    Camargo, Jose F.; Quinones, Marlon P.; Mummidi, Srinivas; Srinivas, Sowmya; Gaitan, Alvaro A.; Begum, Kazi; Jimenez, Fabio; VanCompernolle, Scott; Unutmaz, Derya; Ahuja, Seema S.; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2009-01-01

    Ligands of CCR5, the major coreceptor of HIV-1, costimulate T lymphocyte activation. However, the full impact of CCR5 expression on T cell responses remains unknown. Here, we show that compared with CCR5+/+, T cells from CCR5−/− mice secrete lower amounts of IL-2, and a similar phenotype is observed in humans who lack CCR5 expression (CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes) as well as after Ab-mediated blockade of CCR5 in human T cells genetically intact for CCR5 expression. Conversely, overexpression of C...

  12. Synthesis and biological evaluation of technetium-99m MAG3 as a hippuran replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzberg, A.R.; Kasina, S.; Eshima, D.; Johnson, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A new technetium-chelating agent based on a triamide monomercaptide tetradentate set of donor groups, mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine (MAG3), was synthesized and evaluated. Chelation with /sup 99m/Tc resulted in a single radiochemical product as expected. Studies in mice of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 indicated excretion rates faster than omicron-iodohippurate (OIH) both in normal and in probenecid treated animals. Specificity for renal excretion was essentially complete. Clearance studies in rats resulted in 2.84 ml/min/100 g for (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3, 2.17 for OIH, and 1.29 for (125I)iothalamate. Extraction efficiencies were 85% for (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3, 69% for OIH and 39% for (125I)iothalamate. Probenicid depressed the clearance both of (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 and OIH at 25 and 50 mg/kg/hr, but to a greater extent with (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3. The greater effect is offset, however, by the larger fraction secreted by the renal tubular cells. The animal results suggest that (/sup 99m/Tc)MAG3 may be a useful alternative to (131I)OIH.

  13. ASTEROID LIGHTCURVE DERIVED DATA REFERENCES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the full text of the references cited by identification code in the Asteroid Lightcurve Derived Data dataset (EAR-A-5-DDR-DERIVED-LIGHTCURVE-V1.0).

  14. Metamorphosis of NPP A1, V1, V2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobak, D.; Moncekova, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this book the history of construction, commissioning and exploitation of NPP A1, NPP V1 and NPP V2 in Jaslovske Bohunice is presented on documentary photos. Vicinity around of these NPPs is presented, too

  15. Regridded Harmonized World Soil Database v1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set describes select global soil parameters from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v1.2, including additional calculated parameters such...

  16. Regridded Harmonized World Soil Database v1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set describes select global soil parameters from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v1.2, including additional calculated parameters such as area...

  17. Epitope Switching as a Novel Escape Mechanism of HIV to CCR5 Monoclonal Antibodies▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekle, Andreas; Chhabra, Milloni; Lochner, Adriane; Meier, Sonja; Chow, Eugene; Brandt, Michael; Sankuratri, Surya; Cammack, Nick; Heilek, Gabrielle

    2010-01-01

    In passaging experiments, we isolated HIV strains resistant to MAb3952, a chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) monoclonal antibody (MAb) that binds to the second extracellular domain (extracellular loop 2 [ECL-2]) of CCR5. MAb3952-resistant viruses remain CCR5-tropic and are cross-resistant to a second ECL-2-specific antibody. Surprisingly, MAb3952-resistant viruses were more susceptible to RoAb13, a CCR5 antibody binding to the N terminus of CCR5. Using CCR5 receptor mutants, we show that MAb3952-resistant virus strains preferentially use the N terminus of CCR5, while the wild-type viruses preferentially use ECL-2. We propose this switch in the CCR5 binding site as a novel mechanism of HIV resistance. PMID:19995923

  18. CCR Certification Form for Wyoming or EPA R8 Tribal Community Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CCR Certification Form can be used to certify that community water systems in Wyoming or on Tribal Lands in EPA Region 8 have completed and distributed their annual Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) or water quality report.

  19. In-silico guided discovery of novel CCR9 antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Cross, Jason B.; Romero, Jan; Heifetz, Alexander; Humphries, Eric; Hall, Katie; Wu, Yuchuan; Stucka, Sabrina; Zhang, Jing; Chandonnet, Haoqun; Lippa, Blaise; Ryan, M. Dominic; Baber, J. Christian

    2018-03-01

    Antagonism of CCR9 is a promising mechanism for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. There is limited experimental data on CCR9 and its ligands, complicating efforts to identify new small molecule antagonists. We present here results of a successful virtual screening and rational hit-to-lead campaign that led to the discovery and initial optimization of novel CCR9 antagonists. This work uses a novel data fusion strategy to integrate the output of multiple computational tools, such as 2D similarity search, shape similarity, pharmacophore searching, and molecular docking, as well as the identification and incorporation of privileged chemokine fragments. The application of various ranking strategies, which combined consensus and parallel selection methods to achieve a balance of enrichment and novelty, resulted in 198 virtual screening hits in total, with an overall hit rate of 18%. Several hits were developed into early leads through targeted synthesis and purchase of analogs.

  20. The chemokine receptor CCR2 maintains plasmacytoid dendritic cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, Oriane; Østerby Jørgensen, Line; Frank, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Thymic dendritic cells (DC) play a role in central tolerance. Three thymic DC subtypes have been described: plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two conventional DC (cDC), CD8α+ Sirpα- DC and Sirpα+ CD8α- cDC. Both pDC and Sirpα+ cDC can take up antigen in periphery and migrate into the thymus in response t...... by CCL2 or CCR2 deficiency. Although some thymic progenitors expressed CCR2, this did not include those that give rise to pDC. Based on these results, we propose that CCR2 is involved in pDC homeostasis but its ligand CCL2 does not play a major role....

  1. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Philippe; Bénureau, Yann; Staropoli, Isabelle; Wang, Yongjin; Gonzalez, Nuria; Alcami, Jose; Hartley, Oliver; Brelot, Anne; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2013-06-04

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp120, making chemokines weaker inhibitors of HIV infection than would be expected from their binding affinity constants for CCR5. These distinct CCR5 conformations rely on CCR5 coupling to nucleotide-free G proteins ((NF)G proteins). Whereas native CCR5 chemokines bind with subnanomolar affinity to (NF)G protein-coupled CCR5, gp120/HIV-1 does not discriminate between (NF)G protein-coupled and uncoupled CCR5. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of chemokines is G protein independent, suggesting that "low-chemokine affinity" (NF)G protein-uncoupled conformations of CCR5 represent a portal for viral entry. Furthermore, chemokines are weak inducers of CCR5 endocytosis, as is revealed by EC50 values for chemokine-mediated endocytosis reflecting their low-affinity constant value for (NF)G protein-uncoupled CCR5. Abolishing CCR5 interaction with (NF)G proteins eliminates high-affinity binding of CCR5 chemokines but preserves receptor endocytosis, indicating that chemokines preferentially endocytose low-affinity receptors. Finally, we evidenced that chemokine analogs achieve highly potent HIV-1 inhibition due to high-affinity interactions with internalizing and/or gp120-binding receptors. These data are consistent with HIV-1 evading chemokine inhibition by exploiting CCR5 conformational heterogeneity, shed light into the inhibitory mechanisms of anti-HIV-1 chemokine analogs, and provide insights for the development of unique anti-HIV molecules.

  2. Use of G-Protein-Coupled and -Uncoupled CCR5 Receptors by CCR5 Inhibitor-Resistant and -Sensitive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berro, Reem; Yasmeen, Anila; Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Abi-Habib, Sarya; Grunbeck, Amy; Lascano, Danny; Goddard, William A.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Small-molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as vicriviroc (VVC) and maraviroc (MVC) are allosteric modulators that impair HIV-1 entry by stabilizing a CCR5 conformation that the virus recognizes inefficiently. Viruses resistant to these compounds are able to bind the inhibitor-CCR5 complex while also interacting with the free coreceptor. CCR5 also interacts intracellularly with G proteins, as part of its signal transduction functions, and this process alters its conformation. Here we investigated whether the action of VVC against inhibitor-sensitive and -resistant viruses is affected by whether or not CCR5 is coupled to G proteins such as Gαi. Treating CD4+ T cells with pertussis toxin to uncouple the Gαi subunit from CCR5 increased the potency of VVC against the sensitive viruses and revealed that VVC-resistant viruses use the inhibitor-bound form of Gαi-coupled CCR5 more efficiently than they use uncoupled CCR5. Supportive evidence was obtained by expressing a signaling-deficient CCR5 mutant with an impaired ability to bind to G proteins, as well as two constitutively active mutants that activate G proteins in the absence of external stimuli. The implication of these various studies is that the association of intracellular domains of CCR5 with the signaling machinery affects the conformation of the external and transmembrane domains and how they interact with small-molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 entry. PMID:23468486

  3. Enriquecimento com calda do CCR para face de barragens

    OpenAIRE

    Wendler,A. P.; Marques Filho,J.; Franco Filho,J. M. M.; Bianchini,M.

    2014-01-01

    A construção de barragens de CCR prioriza a minimização de interferências, como a execução da face de montante, para garantia da produtividade. O estudo procurou avaliar as propriedades físicas do CCR enriquecido com calda, em substituição ao concreto convencional usualmente empregado na face, utilizando os mesmos materiais, central de concreto, mão de obra e equipamentos, empregados na construção da Usina Hidrelétrica Mauá. Para tanto foram feitos prismas experimentais de campo (com diferent...

  4. Solution Structure of LC4 Transmembrane Segment of CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2011-01-01

    CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific co-receptor allowing the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The LC4 region in CCR5 is required for HIV-1 entry into the cells. In this study, the solution structure of LC4 in SDS micelles was elucidated by using standard 1H two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and fluorescdence quenching. The LC4 structure adopts two helical structures, whereas the C-terminal part remains unstructured. The positions in which LC4 ...

  5. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of four fish-specific CC chemokine receptors CCR4La, CCR4Lc1, CCR4Lc2 and CCR11 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Holland, Jason W; Jiang, Yousheng; Secombes, Christopher J; Nie, Pin; Wang, Tiehui

    2017-09-01

    The chemokine and chemokine receptor networks regulate leukocyte trafficking, inflammation, immune cell differentiation, cancer and other biological processes. Comparative immunological studies have revealed that both chemokines and their receptors have expanded greatly in a species/lineage specific way. Of the 10 human CC chemokine receptors (CCR1-10) that bind CC chemokines, orthologues only to CCR6, 7, 9 and 10 are present in teleost fish. In this study, four fish-specific CCRs, termed as CCR4La, CCR4Lc1, CCR4Lc2 and CCR11, with a close link to human CCR1-5 and 8, in terms of amino acid homology and syntenic conservation, have been identified and characterized in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These CCRs were found to possess the conserved features of the G protein-linked receptor family, including an extracellular N-terminal, seven TM domains, three extracellular loops and three intracellular loops, and a cytoplasmic carboxyl tail with multiple potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Four cysteine residues known to be involved in forming two disulfide bonds are present in the extracellular domains and a DRY motif is present in the second intracellular loop. Signaling mediated by these receptors might be regulated by N-glycosylation, tyrosine sulfation, S-palmitoylation, a PDZ ligand motif and di-leucine motifs. Studies of intron/exon structure revealed distinct fish-specific CCR gene organization in different fish species/lineages that might contribute to the diversification of the chemokine ligand-receptor networks in different fish lineages. Fish-specific trout CCRs are highly expressed in immune tissues/organs, such as thymus, spleen, head kidney and gills. Their expression can be induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFNγ, by the pathogen associated molecular patterns, PolyIC and peptidoglycan, and by bacterial infection. These data suggest that fish-specific CCRs are likely to have an important role in immune

  6. Neuropathic pain inhibitor, RAP-103, is a potent inhibitor of microglial CCL1/CCR8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Mami; Tomonaga, Daichi; Kitazono, Kota; Yoshioka, Yusaku; Liu, Jiadai; Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Kinkead, Richard; Ruff, Michael R; Pert, Candace B

    2017-12-14

    Chemokine signaling is important in neuropathic pain, with microglial cells expressing chemokine (C-C motif) receptor CCR2, CCR5 and CCR8, all playing key roles. In the previous report (Padi et al., 2012), oral administration of a short peptide, RAP-103, for 7 days fully prevents mechanical allodynia and inhibits the development of thermal hyperalgesia after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rodents. As for the mechanism of the inhibiting effect of RAP-103, it was speculated to be due to dual blockade of CCR2 and CCR5. We report here that RAP-103 exhibits stronger antagonism for CCR8 (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC 50 ] 7.7 fM) compared to CCR5 (IC 50  < 100 pM) in chemotaxis using primary cultured mouse microglia. In addition, RAP-103 at a concentration of 0.1 pM completely inhibits membrane ruffling and phagocytosis induced by chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 (CCL1), an agonist for CCR8. It has been shown that CCL1/CCR8 signaling is important in tactile allodynia induced by nerve ligation. Therefore, CCR8, among other chemokine receptors such as CCR2/CCR5, could be the most potent target for RAP-103. Inhibitory effects of RAP-103 on plural chemokine receptors may play important roles for broad clinical use in neuropathic pain treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 77 FR 5471 - Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review AGENCY... stakeholder input on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule as part of the agency's Retrospective Review of... implementing CCR delivery certification, use of CCRs to meet Tier 3 Public Notification requirements, and how...

  8. 77 FR 55833 - Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review and Request for Public Comment on Potential Approaches to Electronic Delivery of the CCR AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... potential approaches for providing Consumer Confidence Reports (CCR) via electronic delivery. EPA plans to...

  9. Molecular requirements for inhibition of the chemokine receptor CCR8--probe-dependent allosteric interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rummel, Pia Cwarzko; Arfelt, K N; Baumann, L

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a novel series of CCR8 antagonists based on a naphthalene-sulfonamide structure. This structure differs from the predominant pharmacophore for most small-molecule CC-chemokine receptor antagonists, which in fact activate CCR8, suggesting that CCR8 inhibition requires alternative...

  10. Tumor hypoxia modulates podoplanin/CCL21 interactions in CCR7+ NK cell recruitment and CCR7+ tumor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejchman, Anna; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Jacquinet, Jean-Claude; Bielawska-Pohl, Aleksandra; Mleczko-Sanecka, Katarzyna; Grillon, Catherine; Chouaib, Salem; Ugorski, Maciej; Kieda, Claudine

    2017-05-09

    Podoplanin (PDPN), an O-glycosylated, transmembrane, mucin-type glycoprotein, is expressed by cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs). In malignant transformation, PDPN is subjected to changes and its role is yet to be established. Here we show that it is involved in modulating the activity of the CCL21/CCR7 chemokine/receptor axis in a hypoxia-dependent manner. In the present model, breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells and NKL3 cells express the surface CCR7 receptor for CCL21 chemokine which is a potent chemoattractant able to bind to PDPN. The impact of the CCL21/CCR7 axis in the molecular mechanism of the adhesion of NKL3 cells and of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells was reduced in a hypoxic tumor environment. In addition to its known effect on migration, CCL21/CCR7 interaction was shown to allow NK cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and its reduction by hypoxia. A PDPN expressing model of CAFs made it possible to demonstrate the same CCL21/CCR7 axis involvement in the tumor cells to CAFs recognition mechanism through PDPN binding of CCL21. PDPN was induced by hypoxia and its overexpression undergoes a reduction of adhesion, making it an anti-adhesion molecule in the absence of CCL21, in the tumor. CCL21/CCR7 modulated NK cells/ECs and MDA-MB-231 cells/CAF PDPN-dependent interactions were further shown to be linked to hypoxia-dependent microRNAs as miRs: miR-210 and specifically miR-21, miR-29b which influence PDPN expression.

  11. Gene polymorphisms in CCR5, CCR2, SDF1 and RANTES among Chinese Han population with HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Ting-Jun; Hong, Ze-Hui

    2014-06-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are crucial for immune response in HIV-1 infection. Although many studies have been done to investigate the relationship between chemokines and chemokine receptor gene polymorphisms and host's susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, the conclusions are under debate. In the present study, a cohort of 287 HIV-1 seropositive patients, 388 ethnically age-matched healthy controls and 49 intravenous drug users (IDUs) HIV-1 exposed seronegative individuals (HESN) from Chinese Han population were enrolled in order to determine the influence of host genetic factors on HIV-1 infection. Seven polymorphisms on four known chemokines/chemokine receptor genes (CCR5Δ32, CCR5 m303, CCR5 59029A/G, CCR2 64I, RANTES -403A/G, RANTES -28C/G and SDF1 3'-A) were screened. CCR5Δ32 and CCR5 m303 were absent or infrequent in Chinese Han population, which may not be hosts' genetic protective factors for HIV-1 infection. Our results showed the CCR5 59029A/G, CCR2 64I and SDF1 3'-A were not associated with host's resistance to HIV-1 infection. The frequency of RANTES -403A allele was significantly lower in HIV-1 patients than in healthy blood donors (p=0.0005) and HESN group (p=0.035), which implied the association between A allele and reduced HIV-1 infection risk. Different genetic models were assessed to investigate this association (AA vs. GG+AG, OR=0.38 95% CI, 0.22-0.65 p=0.0004; A vs. G, OR=0.66 95% CI, 0.52-0.84 p=0.0006), which supported this association, either. The genotype and allele distribution of RANTES -28 between HIV-1 patients and healthy controls (genotype profile: p=0.072; allele profile: p=0.027) or HIV-1 seronegative group (genotype profile: p=0.036; allele profile: p=0.383) were both at the marginal level of significance, which were not observed after Bonferroni correction. All these results suggest the RANTES -403A may be associated with reduced susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, while the RANTES -28 locus not. By lack of the patients

  12. Effects of CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, J P; Rosenberg, P S; Goedert, J J

    2001-01-01

    seroconversion. Data were combined with fixed-effects and random-effects models. RESULTS: Both the CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I alleles were associated with a decreased risk for progression to AIDS (relative hazard among seroconverters, 0.74 and 0.76, respectively; P = 0.01 for both), a decreased risk for death...... (relative hazard among seroconverters, 0.64 and 0.74; P CCR5-Delta32 or CCR2-64I allele had no clear protective effect on the risk for death.......00), or death after development of AIDS (relative hazard, 0.81 and 0.97; P > 0.5 for all). CONCLUSIONS: The CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I alleles had a strong protective effect on progression of HIV-1 infection, but SDF-1 3'A homozygosity carried no such protection....

  13. Feasibility of MR imaging in evaluating breast cancer lymphangiogenesis using Polyethylene glycol-GoldMag nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.; Zou, L.G.; Zhang, S.; Gong, M.F.; Zhang, D.; Qi, Y.Y.; Zhou, S.W.; Diao, X.W.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the feasibility of evaluating tumour lymphangiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo. Materials and methods: Water-soluble polyethylene glycol (PEG)-GoldMag nanoparticles were obtained by combining GoldMag with PEG. The PEG-GoldMag nanoparticles were bound to anti-podoplanin antibody (PodAb) to construct PEG-GoldMag-pod molecular probes targeting lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The characteristics of the PEG-GoldMag-pod nanoparticles were tested. Using these nanoparticles, tumour lymphangiogenesis was evaluated using MRI in vitro and in vivo. Results: The average size of PEG-GoldMag nanoparticles was about 66.8 nm, and the nanoparticles were stably dispersed in the liquid phase for at least 15 days. After incubation for 24 h at different iron concentrations ranging from 5–45 μg/ml, the LECs were labelled with PEG-GoldMag-pod nanoparticles, in particular the breast cancer LECs. Dose-dependence was observed in the labelling efficiencies and MRI images of the labelled cells. In vitro, the labelling efficiencies and MRI images showed that the nanoparticles could detect podoplanin expression in LECs. In induced rat models of breast cancer, PEG-GoldMag-pod nanoparticles combined with lymphatic vessels were significantly detectable at MRI 60 min after nanoparticle administration, the signal intensity was negatively correlated with the lymphatic vessel density of breast cancer (r = −0.864, P = 0.000). Conclusions: The present study proves the feasibility of evaluating tumour lymphangiogenesis with MRI in vivo

  14. Central extensions for the Weyl CCR in Curved space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emch, G.G.

    1993-01-01

    For non-necessarily flat homogeneous configuration spaces, we illustrate how the cohomological choices made in the definition a Weyl group of the CCR are reflected in the momentum map for the action of this group on its co-adjoint orbit of maximal dimension. (Author) 8 refs

  15. A New Interface for the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Shaar, R.; Jonestrask, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of uploading data, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Data uploading has been simplified and no longer requires the use of the Excel SmartBook interface. Instead, properly formatted MagIC text files can be dragged-and-dropped onto an HTML 5 web interface. Data can be uploaded one table at a time to facilitate ease of uploading and data error checking is done online on the whole dataset at once instead of incrementally in an Excel Console. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the ability to use them in complex combinations. Searches may also be saved as permanent URLs for easy reference or for use as a citation in a publication. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. Data from the MagIC database may be downloaded from individual contributions or from online searches for offline use and analysis in the tab delimited MagIC text file format. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  16. Gene editing using a zinc-finger nuclease mimicking the CCR5Δ32 mutation induces resistance to CCR5-using HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Roger; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Clotet, Bonaventura; Esté, José A; Ballana, Ester

    2014-07-01

    To characterize a new zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) that targets close to the sequence of the 32 bp deletion polymorphism in the CCR5 gene, and to generate cells resistant to HIV-1 strains that use CCR5. CCR5Δ32 is a naturally occurring deletion that provides genetic resistance to R5-tropic HIV-1. The specificity and efficacy of a newly identified target for CCR5 gene editing, near the CCR5Δ32 sequence (ZFNCCR5Δ32), was assessed as well as its ability to generate cells resistant to HIV infection with reduced off-target effects. ZFNCCR5Δ32 activity was evaluated by heteroduplex formation in human K562 cells. Assessment of ZFNCCR5Δ32 specificity was analysed in silico. The yield of ZFNCCR5Δ32 in cell culture was improved by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the anti-HIV potency of ZFNCCR5Δ32 was measured in vitro in TZM-bl cells against HIV-1 strains. ZFNCCR5Δ32 effectively recognized the CCR5Δ32 region, inducing a frameshift of the CCR5 coding region that resulted in the complete absence of CCR5 expression of mRNA and of protein at the cell surface. CCR5 knockout cells were refractory to HIV-1 infection by the R5-using strain BaL. Unlike previous CCR5 ZFN studies, the new ZFN has no detectable off-target activity. ZFNCCR5Δ32 is a specific and efficient tool for the generation of CCR5 knockouts. Its ability to mimic the natural CCR5Δ32 phenotype in the absence of relevant off-site cutting events suggests that ZFNCCR5Δ32 might be safe in clinical research. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Comet P/2010 V1 as a Natural Disintegration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewitt, David; Weaver, Harold A.; Mutchler, Maximilian J.; Agarwal, Jessica; Meech, Karen Jean; Li, Jing; Kleyna, Jan; Ishiguro, Masateru; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Hui, Man-To

    2016-10-01

    Discovered in outburst in 2010, Jupiter-family comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murukami) was found to be split in observations at the end of 2015. We used the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain deep images of P/2010 V1 at high angular resolution in the 2016 January to March period. The resulting data, by far the best yet obtained for any split or disrupting comet, show the astrometric, photometric and morphological evolution of about 30 fragments. We will present the first results for the velocity dispersion, photometric distribution and variability and discuss the measurements in terms of models for the breakup.

  18. An anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody and small molecule CCR5 antagonists synergize by inhibiting different stages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarian, Diana; Carnec, Xavier; Tsamis, Fotini; Kajumo, Francis; Dragic, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptors are attractive targets for novel antivirals. Here, inhibition of entry by two classes of CCR5 antagonists was investigated. We confirmed previous findings that HIV-1 isolates vary greatly in their sensitivity to small molecule inhibitors of CCR5-mediated entry, SCH-C and TAK-779. In contrast, an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody (PA14) similarly inhibited entry of diverse viral isolates. Sensitivity to small molecules was V3 loop-dependent and inversely proportional to the level of gp120 binding to CCR5. Moreover, combinations of the MAb and small molecules were highly synergistic in blocking HIV-1 entry, suggesting different mechanisms of action. This was confirmed by time course of inhibition experiments wherein the PA14 MAb and small molecules were shown to inhibit temporally distinct stages of CCR5 usage. We propose that small molecules inhibit V3 binding to the second extracellular loop of CCR5, whereas PA14 preferentially inhibits subsequent events such as CCR5 recruitment into the fusion complex or conformational changes in the gp120-CCR5 complex that trigger fusion. Importantly, our findings suggest that combinations of CCR5 inhibitors with different mechanisms of action will be central to controlling HIV-1 infection and slowing the emergence of resistant strains

  19. Development of experimental autoimmune uveitis: efficient recruitment of monocytes is independent of CCR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagkalis, Athanasios; Wallace, Carol; Xu, Heping; Liebau, Sebastian; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Stone, Michael A; Mack, Matthias; Liversidge, Janet; Crane, Isabel J

    2009-09-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to the damage occurring in the retina in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). CCR2 may be needed for efficient recruitment of monocytes to an inflammatory site, and the aim of this study was to determine whether this was the case in EAU. EAU was induced and graded in C57BL/6J and CCR2(-/-) mice. Macrophage infiltration and CCR2 expression were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Retinas were examined for MCP-1 expression using RT-PCR. Rolling and infiltration of labeled bone marrow monocytes at the inflamed retinal vasculature were examined by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and confocal microscopy, respectively. Effect of CCR2 deletion or blockade by antibody and antagonist was determined. Expression of mRNA for MCP-1 increased as EAU developed and was localized to the retina. CCR2 was associated with infiltrating macrophages. However, EAU induced in CCR2(-/-) mice was not reduced in severity, and neither was the percentage of macrophages in the retina. CCR2(-/-) monocytes, 48 hours after adoptive transfer to mice with EAU, showed no significant difference in percentage rolling or infiltration into the retina compared to WT. CCR2-independent rolling of monocytes was confirmed by CCR2 neutralizing antibody and antagonist treatment. CCR2 does not have a primary role in the recruitment of monocytes to the inflammatory site across the blood-retina barrier in well-developed EAU. Therapeutics targeting CCR2 are unlikely to be of value in treating human posterior uveitis.

  20. Marked differences in CCR5 expression and activation levels in two South African populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Anabela C P; Shalekoff, Sharon; Paximadis, Maria; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is pivotal in determining an individual’s susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and rate of disease progression. To establish whether population-based differences exist in cell surface expression of CCR5 we evaluated the extent of CCR5 expression across all peripheral blood cell types in individuals from two populations, South African Africans (SAA) and South African Caucasians (SAC). Significant differences in CCR5 expression, both in number of CCR5 molecules per cell (density) and the percentage of CCR5-expressing cells, were observed between the two study groups, within all cell subsets. Most notably, the percentage of all CCR5+ cell subsets was significantly lower in SAC compared with SAA individuals (P CCR5 density was significantly higher in SAC compared with SAA individuals in CCR5+ CD8+ T-cell subsets and CCR5+ NK-cell subsets (CD56+, CD16+ CD56+ and CD56dim) (all P CCR5 expression, which are likely to impact on both susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and the rate of HIV-1 disease progression. PMID:22509959

  1. Limited protective effect of the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype on human immunodeficiency virus infection incidence in a cohort of patients with hemophilia and selection for genotypic X4 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K N; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Attermann, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype (which occurs in approximately 2...... time were seen for CCR5/CCR5 patients. Surprisingly, no protective effect of the CCR5/CCR5Delta32 genotype on disease progression or survival was seen for children but was evident for adults. Age group-related immunologic differences might explain this variation, and transmission route and/or viral...... phenotype variation within donor virus may be related to the limited protection of the CCR5Delta32/CCR5Delta32 genotype. Sequence comparisons indicate that X4 virus can be selected in vivo due to either absence of CCR5 receptors or relative increase of CXCR4 receptors....

  2. The chemokine receptor CCR5 Δ32 allele in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Søndergaard, H B; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The chemokine receptor CCR5 may be important for the recruitment of pathogenic T cells to the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that this chemokine receptor might still be important for T-cell migration during treatment with anti-very late antigen (VLA)-4 antibody. We...... therefore analysed whether natalizumab-treated MS patients carrying the CCR5 Δ32 deletion allele, which results in reduced expression of CCR5 on the cell surface, had lower disease activity. METHODS: CCR5 Δ32 was analysed in 212 natalizumab-treated MS patients. RESULTS: CCR5 Δ32 status had no significant...... impact on the frequency of relapses 1 year prior to natalizumab treatment or during the first 48 weeks of treatment. The multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) was significantly lower at baseline in patients carrying CCR5 Δ32 (P = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: CCR5 Δ32 is not associated with lower disease...

  3. Retinal Inhibition of CCR3 Induces Retinal Cell Death in a Murine Model of Choroidal Neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    Full Text Available Inhibition of chemokine C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3 signaling has been considered as treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, CCR3 is expressed in neural retina from aged human donor eyes. Therefore, broad CCR3 inhibition may be harmful to the retina. We assessed the effects of CCR3 inhibition on retina and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs that develop into choroidal neovascularization (CNV. In adult murine eyes, CCR3 colocalized with glutamine-synthetase labeled Műller cells. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, CCR3 immunolocalized not only to lectin-stained cells in CNV lesions but also to the retina. Compared to non-lasered controls, CCR3 mRNA was significantly increased in laser-treated retina. An intravitreal injection of a CCR3 inhibitor (CCR3i significantly reduced CNV compared to DMSO or PBS controls. Both CCR3i and a neutralizing antibody to CCR3 increased TUNEL+ retinal cells overlying CNV, compared to controls. There was no difference in cleaved caspase-3 in laser-induced CNV lesions or in overlying retina between CCR3i- or control-treated eyes. Following CCR3i, apoptotic inducible factor (AIF was significantly increased and anti-apoptotic factor BCL2 decreased in the retina; there were no differences in retinal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. In cultured human Műller cells exposed to eotaxin (CCL11 and VEGF, CCR3i significantly increased TUNEL+ cells and AIF but decreased BCL2 and brain derived neurotrophic factor, without affecting caspase-3 activity or VEGF. CCR3i significantly decreased AIF in RPE/choroids and immunostaining of phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (p-VEGFR2 in CNV with a trend toward reduced VEGF. In cultured CECs treated with CCL11 and/or VEGF, CCR3i decreased p-VEGFR2 and increased BCL2 without increasing TUNEL+ cells and AIF. These findings suggest that inhibition of retinal CCR3 causes retinal cell death and that targeted inhibition of CCR3 in CECs may be a safer if CCR3

  4. MagPy: A Python toolbox for controlling Magstim transcranial magnetic stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Nicolas A

    2017-01-30

    To date, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies manipulating stimulation parameters have largely used blocked paradigms. However, altering these parameters on a trial-by-trial basis in Magstim stimulators is complicated by the need to send regular (1Hz) commands to the stimulator. Additionally, effecting such control interferes with the ability to send TMS pulses or simultaneously present stimuli with high-temporal precision. This manuscript presents the MagPy toolbox, a Python software package that provides full control over Magstim stimulators via the serial port. It is able to maintain this control with no impact on concurrent processing, such as stimulus delivery. In addition, a specially-designed "QuickFire" serial cable is specified that allows MagPy to trigger TMS pulses with very low-latency. In a series of experimental simulations, MagPy was able to maintain uninterrupted remote control over the connected Magstim stimulator across all testing sessions. In addition, having MagPy enabled had no effect on stimulus timing - all stimuli were presented for precisely the duration specified. Finally, using the QuickFire cable, MagPy was able to elicit TMS pulses with sub-millisecond latencies. The MagPy toolbox allows for experiments that require manipulating stimulation parameters from trial to trial. Furthermore, it can achieve this in contexts that require tight control over timing, such as those seeking to combine TMS with fMRI or EEG. Together, the MagPy toolbox and QuickFire serial cable provide an effective means for controlling Magstim stimulators during experiments while ensuring high-precision timing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of a cryogenically cooled platform for the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, T. J.; Shelton, K. P.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Baker, J. L.; Rovang, D. C.; Robertson, G. K.

    2017-09-01

    A cryogenically cooled hardware platform has been developed and commissioned on the Z Facility at Sandia National Laboratories in support of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) Program. MagLIF is a magneto-inertial fusion concept that employs a magnetically imploded metallic tube (liner) to compress and inertially confine premagnetized and preheated fusion fuel. The fuel is preheated using a ˜2 kJ laser that must pass through a ˜1.5-3.5-μm-thick polyimide "window" at the target's laser entrance hole (LEH). As the terawatt-class laser interacts with the dense window, laser plasma instabilities (LPIs) can develop, which reduce the preheat energy delivered to the fuel, initiate fuel contamination, and degrade target performance. Cryogenically cooled targets increase the parameter space accessible to MagLIF target designs by allowing nearly 10 times thinner windows to be used for any accessible gas density. Thinner LEH windows reduce the deleterious effects of difficult to model LPIs. The Z Facility's cryogenic infrastructure has been significantly altered to enable compatibility with the premagnetization and fuel preheat stages of MagLIF. The MagLIF cryostat brings the liquid helium coolant directly to the target via an electrically resistive conduit. This design maximizes cooling power while allowing rapid diffusion of the axial magnetic field supplied by external Helmholtz-like coils. A variety of techniques have been developed to mitigate the accumulation of ice from vacuum chamber contaminants on the cooled LEH window, as even a few hundred nanometers of ice would impact laser energy coupling to the fuel region. The MagLIF cryostat has demonstrated compatibility with the premagnetization and preheat stages of MagLIF and the ability to cool targets to liquid deuterium temperatures in approximately 5 min.

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornalusse, German G; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-08-25

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG -41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG -41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm(3)) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes.

  7. Role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean Louis; Lenglet, Sébastien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Galan, Katia; Pelli, Graziano; Spahr, Laurent; Mach, Francois; Hadengue, Antoine

    2011-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of variable severity. Leucocytes are thought to play a key role in the development of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. The interactions between inflammatory cells and their mediators are crucial for determining tissue damage. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (or CCL-2), CCR-2 and CCR-4 are chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leucocyte trafficking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. To address the role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 that attracts leucocytes cells in inflamed tissues, pancreatitis was induced by administering supramaximal doses of cerulein in mice that do not express CCL-2, CCR-2 or CCR-4. The severity of pancreatitis was measured by serum amylase, pancreatic oedema and acinar cell necrosis. Lung injury was quantitated by evaluating lung microvascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase activity. Chemokine and chemokine-receptor expression were quantitated by real-time PCR. The nature of inflammatory cells invading the pancreas and lungs was studied by immunostaining. The authors have found that pancreas CCL-2 and CCR-2 levels rise during pancreatitis. Both pancreatitis and the associated lung injury are blunted, but not completely prevented, in mice deficient in CCL-2, whereas the deficiency in either CCR-2 or CCR-4 does not reduce the severity of both the pancreatitis and the lung injury. The amounts of neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages (MOMA)-2 cells were significantly lower in mice deficient in CCL-2 compared with their sufficient littermates. These results suggest that CCL-2 plays a key role in pancreatitis by modulating the infiltration by neutrophils and MOMA-2 cells, and that its deficiency may improve the outcome of the disease.

  8. HIV-1 Escape from the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Associated with an Altered and Less-Efficient Mechanism of gp120-CCR5 Engagement That Attenuates Macrophage Tropism▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Ellett, Anne; Posta, Filippo; Lee, Benhur; Jubb, Becky; Westby, Mike; Lewin, Sharon R.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) inhibits the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by binding to and modifying the conformation of the CCR5 extracellular loops (ECLs). Resistance to MVC results from alterations in the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoproteins (Env) enabling recognition of the drug-bound conformation of CCR5. To better understand the mechanisms underlying MVC resistance, we characterized the virus-cell interactions of gp120 from in vitro-generated MVC-resistant HIV-1 (MVC-Res Env), comparing them with those of gp120 from the sensitive parental virus (MVC-Sens Env). In the absence of the drug, MVC-Res Env maintains a highly efficient interaction with CCR5, similar to that of MVC-Sens Env, and displays a relatively modest increase in dependence on the CCR5 N terminus. However, in the presence of the drug, MVC-Res Env interacts much less efficiently with CCR5 and becomes critically dependent on the CCR5 N terminus and on positively charged elements of the drug-modified CCR5 ECL1 and ECL2 regions (His88 and His181, respectively). Structural analysis suggests that the Val323 resistance mutation in the gp120 V3 loop alters the secondary structure of the V3 loop and the buried surface area of the V3 loop–CCR5 N terminus interface. This altered mechanism of gp120-CCR5 engagement dramatically attenuates the entry of HIV-1 into monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), cell-cell fusion activity in MDM, and viral replication capacity in MDM. In addition to confirming that HIV-1 escapes MVC by becoming heavily dependent on the CCR5 N terminus, our results reveal novel interactions with the drug-modified ECLs that are critical for the utilization of CCR5 by MVC-Res Env and provide additional insights into virus-cell interactions that modulate macrophage tropism. PMID:21345957

  9. The molecular cloning and functional expression of the dog CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Michael; Pullen, Sarah; Botham, Andrew; Gray, Andrew; Napier, Carolyn; Mansfield, Roy; Holbrook, Mark

    2006-10-15

    Activation of CCR5 by specific chemokines is involved in the regulation of the immunological response of leukocytes at sites of inflammation. In addition, CCR5 serves as a fusion co-factor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Consequently, several CCR5 antagonists are currently in development for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. The dog CCR5 gene was cloned in order to characterise the chemokine binding site of the dog receptor for comparison across species. The deduced amino acid sequence of the dog CCR5 has close homology to the human receptor (80% identity). A HEK-293 cell line expressing the dog recombinant receptor was generated and immunoblot analysis with an anti-human CCR5 antibody revealed a 58kDa band in the cell lysate. In functional calcium signalling assays, the CCR5 endogenous ligands MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta and RANTES evoked a robust response in the dog recombinant CCR5 cells. In a CRE-Luc (cAMP response element-luciferase) reporter gene assay, MIP-1beta (0.01-30nM) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin induced elevation in cAMP levels, and was equipotent in dog, human and macaque recombinant CCR5 cells (EC(50) 0.4, 0.21 and 0.47nM, respectively). These data suggest that chemokine signalling is conserved in the dog CCR5.

  10. Suppression of CCR impacts metabolite profile and cell wall composition in Pinus radiata tracheary elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Goeminne, Geert; Phillips, Lorelle; Flint, Heather; Steward, Diane; Torr, Kirk; Donaldson, Lloyd; Boerjan, Wout; Ralph, John

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of the lignin-related gene cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) in the Pinus radiata tracheary element (TE) system impacted both the metabolite profile and the cell wall matrix in CCR-RNAi lines. UPLC-MS/MS-based metabolite profiling identified elevated levels of p-coumaroyl hexose, caffeic acid hexoside and ferulic acid hexoside in CCR-RNAi lines, indicating a redirection of metabolite flow within phenylpropanoid metabolism. Dilignols derived from coniferyl alcohol such as G(8-5)G, G(8-O-4)G and isodihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (IDDDC) were substantially depleted, providing evidence for CCR's involvement in coniferyl alcohol biosynthesis. Severe CCR suppression almost halved lignin content in TEs based on a depletion of both H-type and G-type lignin, providing evidence for CCR's involvement in the biosynthesis of both lignin types. 2D-NMR studies revealed minor changes in the H:G-ratio and consequently a largely unchanged interunit linkage distribution in the lignin polymer. However, unusual cell wall components including ferulate and unsaturated fatty acids were identified in TEs by thioacidolysis, pyrolysis-GC/MS and/or 2D-NMR in CCR-RNAi lines, providing new insights into the consequences of CCR suppression in pine. Interestingly, CCR suppression substantially promoted pyrolytic breakdown of cell wall polysaccharides, a phenotype most likely caused by the incorporation of acidic compounds into the cell wall matrix in CCR-RNAi lines.

  11. CCR5 Conformations Are Dynamic and Modulated by Localization, Trafficking and G Protein Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegler, Ayanna J.; Cianci, Gianguido C.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 acts as the principal coreceptor during HIV-1 transmission and early stages of infection. Efficient HIV-1 entry requires a series of processes, many dependent on the conformational state of both viral envelope protein and cellular receptor. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are able to identify different CCR5 conformations, allowing for their use as probes to distinguish CCR5 populations. Not all CCR5 MAbs are able to reduce HIV-1 infection, suggesting the use of select CCR5 populations for entry. In the U87.CD4.CCR5-GFP cell line, we used such HIV-1-restricting MAbs to probe the relation between localization, trafficking and G protein association for individual CCR5 conformations. We find that CCR5 conformations not only exhibit different localization and abundance patterns throughout the cell, but that they also display distinct sensitivities to endocytosis inhibition. Using chemokine analogs that vary in their HIV-1 inhibitory mechanisms, we also illustrate that responses to ligand engagement are conformation-specific. Additionally, we provide supporting evidence for the select sensitivity of conformations to G protein association. Characterizing the link between the function and dynamics of CCR5 populations has implications for understanding their selective targeting by HIV-1 and for the development of inhibitors that will block CCR5 utilization by the virus. PMID:24586501

  12. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function.

  13. Interdisciplinary Collaboration amongst Colleagues and between Initiatives with the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.; Shaar, R.

    2014-12-01

    Earth science grand challenges often require interdisciplinary and geographically distributed scientific collaboration to make significant progress. However, this organic collaboration between researchers, educators, and students only flourishes with the reduction or elimination of technological barriers. The Magnetics Information Consortium (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) is a grass-roots cyberinfrastructure effort envisioned by the geo-, paleo-, and rock magnetic scientific community to archive their wealth of peer-reviewed raw data and interpretations from studies on natural and synthetic samples. MagIC is dedicated to facilitating scientific progress towards several highly multidisciplinary grand challenges and the MagIC Database team is currently beta testing a new MagIC Search Interface and API designed to be flexible enough for the incorporation of large heterogeneous datasets and for horizontal scalability to tens of millions of records and hundreds of requests per second. In an effort to reduce the barriers to effective collaboration, the search interface includes a simplified data model and upload procedure, support for online editing of datasets amongst team members, commenting by reviewers and colleagues, and automated contribution workflows and data retrieval through the API. This web application has been designed to generalize to other databases in MagIC's umbrella website (EarthRef.org) so the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (http://earthref.org/GERM/) portal, Seamount Biogeosciences Network (http://earthref.org/SBN/), EarthRef Digital Archive (http://earthref.org/ERDA/) and EarthRef Reference Database (http://earthref.org/ERR/) will benefit from its development.

  14. SuperMAG: The Road to 115,000 Plots Viewed in a Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    SuperMAG is a global collaboration that provides ground magnetic field perturbations from a long list of stations in the same coordinate system, identical time resolution and with a common baseline removal approach. This unique high quality dataset provides a continuous and nearly global monitoring of the ground magnetic field perturbation. Before SuperMAG, global or even local studies required painstaking and labor-intensive data-handling, which effectively limited research. Analysts faced several inherent complications: confusing or even unknown coordinate systems, a multitude of data artifacts and errors, unknown baselines, and even difficulties obtaining data. These problems have resulted in a serious underutilization of data from magnetometers. The SuperMAG service is a truly global initiative including a long list of organizations and agencies providing data obtained from more than 300 ground based stations. The website includes a list of user-friendly data products, data downloads and other helpful tools. To compliment the measured ground magnetic field perturbations SuperMAG now includes global auroral images and solar wind data. The talk will further focus on lessons learned in the process of developing this community service. One lesson learned is that the validity of SuperMAG or any other type of virtual observatory is not defined by the funding agencies or the website developers themselves but by the users.

  15. Magnetically separable polymer (Mag-MIP) for selective analysis of biotin in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina; Khan, Sabir; Wong, Ademar; Picasso, Gino; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar Taboada

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an efficient method for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles modified with molecularly imprinted polymers (Mag-MIP) through core-shell method for the determination of biotin in milk food samples. The functional monomer acrylic acid was selected from molecular modeling, EGDMA was used as cross-linking monomer and AIBN as radical initiator. The Mag-MIP and Mag-NIP were characterized by FTIR, magnetic hysteresis, XRD, SEM and N2-sorption measurements. The capacity of Mag-MIP for biotin adsorption, its kinetics and selectivity were studied in detail. The adsorption data was well described by Freundlich isotherm model with adsorption equilibrium constant (KF) of 1.46 mL g(-1). The selectivity experiments revealed that prepared Mag-MIP had higher selectivity toward biotin compared to other molecules with different chemical structure. The material was successfully applied for the determination of biotin in diverse milk samples using HPLC for quantification of the analyte, obtaining the mean value of 87.4% recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preparation and evaluation of freeze-dried Mag3 kits for 99m Tc-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mohty, A.A.; El-Ghany, E.A.; El-Kolaly, M.T.; Raieh, M.; EL-Bary, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The freeze-dried Mag 3 kits were designed for both ligand trans chelation and direct labelling techniques. The solution of Sn-Mag 3 was sterilized by 0.22 μU mill pore filtration and dispensed in a laminar flow hood (1 m I / vial) then, the vials were introduced to the lyophilized. The process of lyophilization was continued for 24 hours. At end of the cycle, the vials were closed under nitrogen. The moisture content of the freeze-dried Mag 3 kits was determined and it was found equal to 0.1% also, the losses of tin (II) during the freeze-drying cycle did not exceed 5%. It was found that the Mag 3 freeze-dried kits were sterile, pyrogen free and does not have any unexpected toxicity. The prepared Mag 3 freeze-dried kits have high radiochemical purity > 97% and high stability for more than 8 h after labelling. The biodistribution shows rapid renal excretion at 15 min post injection. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Effects of CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I alleles on HIV-1 disease progression: the protection varies with duration of infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulherin, Stephanie A.; O'Brien, Thomas R.; Ioannidis, John P.; Goedert, James J.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Jamieson, Beth D.; Meyer, Laurence; Michael, Nelson L.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Rizzardi, G. Paolo; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sheppard, Haynes W.; Theodorou, Ioannis D.; Vlahov, David; Rosenberg, Philip S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine temporal variation in the effects of CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I chemokine receptor gene polymorphisms on HIV-1 disease progression. DESIGN: Pooled analysis of individual patient data from 10 cohorts of HIV-1 seroconverters from the United States, Europe, and Australia. METHODS:

  18. Causal pathways of the effects of age and the CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles on AIDS development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geskus, Ronald B.; Meyer, Laurence; Hubert, Jean-Baptiste; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Berkhout, Ben; Rouzioux, Christine; Theodorou, Ioannis D.; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Prins, Maria; Coutinho, Roel A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the causal pathways by which age and the CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles influence progression to AIDS. DESIGN: Analysis of follow-up data from 2 cohort studies among homosexual men (n=400), having >10 years of follow-up. METHODS: The effects of the 4

  19. Distribution of CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029 A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A genetic polymorphisms in HIV-1 infected and uninfected patients in the west region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Mekue, Linda Chapdeleine Mouafo; Nana, Christelle Tafou; Kuiate, Jules Roger

    2013-07-23

    Genetic variants of the genes encoding human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) co-receptors and their ligands, like CC-chemokine receptor 5 delta 32 mutation (CCR5-Delta32), CCR5 promoter A/G (Adenine/Guanine), CC-chemokine receptor 2 mutation 64 isoleucine (CCR2-64I) and the stromal cell-derived factor 3'A mutation (SDF1-3'A), are involved in the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression. The prevalence of these mutations varies by region. However, little is known about their distribution in the population of Dschang, located in the west region of Cameroon. The prevalence of HIV in the west region of Cameroon is lower than elsewhere in Cameroon. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution of four AIDS Related Gene (ARG) variants in HIV-infected and non-infected population of Cameroon especially in the west region and to estimate the contribution of these variants to the susceptibility or resistance to HIV infection. We also aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of genotyping using dried blood spot (DBS) samples. A total of 179 participants were recruited from two hospitals in Dschang in the west region of Cameroon. Their genotypes for CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. A total of 179 participants were enrolled in the study. Among them, 32 (17.9%) were HIV positive and 147 (82.1%) were HIV negative. The allelic frequencies of these genes were: 0%, 49.72%, 17.6% and 100% respectively for CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A. No individual was found to carry the CCR5-Delta 32 mutation. All participants recruited were heterozygous for the SDF1-3'A allele. Our data suggest that the CCR5-Delta32 cannot account for the protection as it was completely absent in our population. SDF1-3'A variants, may be in association with other polymorphisms, may account for the overall protection from HIV-1 infection

  20. Preparation for and building of V-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smatlak, S.; Spirko, M.

    1981-01-01

    Some findings and problems encountered during the construction of the V-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice are discussed from the point of view of the investor, mainly problems associated with project preparation and relations between suppliers and the customer. The progress of construction is described and the dates are shown of the main stages of construction and tests. The construction proceeded according to a net diagram and was controlled by the construction management and a coordination group headed by the investor. An international start-up commission was established for the start-up stage. The fields are outlined of the participation and co-operation of Soviet organizations during project preparation, supplies, assembly, start-up, and fuel supplies for the V-1 nuclear power plant. (B.S.)

  1. CRISTAL V1: Criticality package for burn up credit calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomit, Jean-Michel; Cousinou, Patrick; Gantenbein, Francoise; Diop, Cheikh; Fernandez de Grado, Guy; Mijuin, Dominique; Grouiller, Jean-Paul; Marc, Andre; Toubon, Herve

    2003-01-01

    The first version of the CRISTAL package, created and validated as part of a joint project between IRSN, COGEMA and CEA, was delivered to users in November 1999. This fruitful cooperation between IRSN, COGEMA and CEA has been pursued until 2003 with the development and the validation of the package CRISTAL V1, whose main objectives are to improve the criticality safety studies including the Burn up Credit effect. (author)

  2. The graphical user interface for CRISTAL V1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heulers, L.; Courtois, G.; Fernex, F.; Gomit, J.M.; Letang, E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the new Graphical User Interface (GUI) of the CRISTAL V1 package devoted to criticality studies including burn up calculations. The aim of this GUI is to offer users a high level of user-friendliness and flexibility in the data description and the results analysis of codes of the package. The three main components of the GUI (CIGAIES, EJM and OPOSSUM) are presented. The different functionalities of the tools are explained through some applications. (author)

  3. Assessment of ICARE/CATHARE V1 Severe Accident Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelard, Patrick; Fleurot, Joelle; Marchand, Olivier; Drai, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The ICARE/CATHARE code system has been developed by the French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IRSN) in the last decade for the detailed evaluation of Severe Accident (SA) consequences in a primary system. It is composed of the coupling of the core degradation IRSN code ICARE2 and of the thermal-hydraulics French code CATHARE2. It has been extensively used to support the level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA-2) of the 900 MWe PWR. This paper presents the synthesis of the ICARE/CATHARE V1 assessment which was conducted in the frame of the 'International ICARE/CATHARE Users' Club', under the management of IRSN. The ICARE/CATHARE V1 validation matrix is composed of more than 60 experiments, distributed in few thermal-hydraulics non-regression tests (to handle the front end phase of a severe accident), numerous Separate-Effect Tests, about 30 Integral Tests covering both the early and the late degradation phases, as well as a 'circuit' experiment including hydraulics loops. Finally, the simulation of the TMI-2 accident was also added to assess the code against real conditions. This validation task was aimed at assessing the ICARE/CATHARE V1 capabilities (including the stand-alone ICARE2 V3mod1 version) and also at proposing recommendations for an optimal use of this version ('Users' Guidelines'). Thus, with a correct account for the recommended guidelines, it appeared that the last ICARE/CATHARE V1 version could be reasonably used to perform best-estimate reactor studies up to a large corium slumping into the lower head. (authors)

  4. Backfitting of the nuclear plant V1 power control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpeta, C.; Rubek, J.; Stirsky, P.

    1985-01-01

    The paper deals with some aspects of implementation of modifications into the Czechoslovak nuclear plant V1 control system as called for on the basis of experience gained during the first period of the plant operation. Brief description of the plant power control system and its main functions is given. Some deficiencies in the system performance during abnormal conditions are outlined and measures taken to overcome them are presented. (author)

  5. Solution structure of LC4 transmembrane segment of CCR5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhide Miyamoto

    Full Text Available CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 is a specific co-receptor allowing the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. The LC4 region in CCR5 is required for HIV-1 entry into the cells. In this study, the solution structure of LC4 in SDS micelles was elucidated by using standard 1H two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and fluorescence quenching. The LC4 structure adopts two helical structures, whereas the C-terminal part remains unstructured. The positions in which LC4 binds to the HIV-1 inhibitory peptide LC5 were determined by docking calculations in addition to NMR data. The poses showed the importance of the hydrophobic interface of the assembled structures. The solution structure of LC4 elucidated in the present work provides a structural basis for further studies on the HIV-1 inhibitory function of the LC4 region.

  6. Solution structure of LC4 transmembrane segment of CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2011-01-01

    CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific co-receptor allowing the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The LC4 region in CCR5 is required for HIV-1 entry into the cells. In this study, the solution structure of LC4 in SDS micelles was elucidated by using standard 1H two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and fluorescence quenching. The LC4 structure adopts two helical structures, whereas the C-terminal part remains unstructured. The positions in which LC4 binds to the HIV-1 inhibitory peptide LC5 were determined by docking calculations in addition to NMR data. The poses showed the importance of the hydrophobic interface of the assembled structures. The solution structure of LC4 elucidated in the present work provides a structural basis for further studies on the HIV-1 inhibitory function of the LC4 region.

  7. METEOR v1.0 - A usage example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-01-01

    This script describes a detailed example of the use of the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. A real spanish meteorological data set is chosen to show the capabilities of METEOR. Output files and resultant plots provided of their interpretations are compiled in three appendixes. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph. D.Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written is spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1 .0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  8. A neurodynamical model of brightness induction in v1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Penacchio

    Full Text Available Brightness induction is the modulation of the perceived intensity of an area by the luminance of surrounding areas. Recent neurophysiological evidence suggests that brightness information might be explicitly represented in V1, in contrast to the more common assumption that the striate cortex is an area mostly responsive to sensory information. Here we investigate possible neural mechanisms that offer a plausible explanation for such phenomenon. To this end, a neurodynamical model which is based on neurophysiological evidence and focuses on the part of V1 responsible for contextual influences is presented. The proposed computational model successfully accounts for well known psychophysical effects for static contexts and also for brightness induction in dynamic contexts defined by modulating the luminance of surrounding areas. This work suggests that intra-cortical interactions in V1 could, at least partially, explain brightness induction effects and reveals how a common general architecture may account for several different fundamental processes, such as visual saliency and brightness induction, which emerge early in the visual processing pathway.

  9. CCR5 and CXCR3 are dispensable for liver infiltration, but CCR5 protects against virus-induced T-cell-mediated hepatic steatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Orskov, C; Qvortrup, K

    2007-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR3 are important molecules in regulating the migration of activated lymphocytes. Thus, the majority of tissue-infiltrating T cells found in the context of autoimmune conditions and viral infections express CCR5 and CXCR3, and the principal chemokine ligands are expressed within inflamed...... tissues. Accordingly, intervention studies have pointed to nonredundant roles of these receptors in models of allograft rejection, viral infection, and autoimmunity. In spite of this, considerable controversy exists, with many studies failing to support a role for CCR5 or CXCR3 in disease pathogenesis....... One possible explanation is that different chemokine receptors may take over in the absence of any individual receptor, thus rendering individual receptors redundant. We have attempted to address this issue by analyzing CCR5(-/-), CXCR3(-/-), and CCR5/CXCR3(-/-) mice with regard to virus-induced liver...

  10. The architecture of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe CCR4-NOT complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukleja, Marta; Cuellar, Jorge; Siwaszek, Aleksandra; Kasprzak, Joanna M.; Czarnocki-Cieciura, Mariusz; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Dziembowski, Andrzej; M. Valpuesta, Jose

    2016-01-01

    CCR4-NOT is a large protein complex present both in cytoplasm and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Although it is involved in a variety of distinct processes related to expression of genetic information such as poly(A) tail shortening, transcription regulation, nuclear export and protein degradation, there is only fragmentary information available on some of its nine subunits. Here we show a comprehensive structural characterization of the native CCR4-NOT complex from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our cryo-EM 3D reconstruction of the complex, combined with techniques such as immunomicroscopy, RNA-nanogold labelling, docking of the available high-resolution structures and models of different subunits and domains, allow us to propose its full molecular architecture. We locate all functionally defined domains endowed with deadenylating and ubiquitinating activities, the nucleus-specific RNA-interacting subunit Mmi1, as well as surfaces responsible for protein–protein interactions. This information provides insight into cooperation of the different CCR4-NOT complex functions. PMID:26804377

  11. CCR5 Disruption in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9 Provides Selective Resistance of Immune Cells to CCR5-tropic HIV-1 Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, HyunJun; Minder, Petra; Park, Mi Ae; Mesquitta, Walatta-Tseyon; Torbett, Bruce E; Slukvin, Igor I

    2015-12-15

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5) serves as an HIV-1 co-receptor and is essential for cell infection with CCR5-tropic viruses. Loss of functional receptor protects against HIV infection. Here, we report the successful targeting of CCR5 in GFP-marked human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using CRISPR/Cas9 with single and dual guide RNAs (gRNAs). Following CRISPER/Cas9-mediated gene editing using a single gRNA, 12.5% of cell colonies demonstrated CCR5 editing, of which 22.2% showed biallelic editing as determined by a Surveyor nuclease assay and direct sequencing. The use of dual gRNAs significantly increased the efficacy of CCR5 editing to 27% with a biallelic gene alteration frequency of 41%. To ensure the homogeneity of gene editing within cells, we used single cell sorting to establish clonal iPSC lines. Single cell-derived iPSC lines with homozygous CCR5 mutations displayed the typical characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and differentiated efficiently into hematopoietic cells, including macrophages. Although macrophages from both wild-type and CCR5-edited iPSCs supported CXCR4-tropic virus replication, macrophages from CCR5-edited iPSCs were uniquely resistant to CCR5-tropic virus challenge. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying iPSC technology for the study of the role of CCR5 in HIV infection in vitro, and generation of HIV-resistant cells for potential therapeutic applications.

  12. CCR5 Disruption in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using CRISPR/Cas9 Provides Selective Resistance of Immune Cells to CCR5-tropic HIV-1 Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyunJun Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine (C-C motif receptor 5 (CCR5 serves as an HIV-1 co-receptor and is essential for cell infection with CCR5-tropic viruses. Loss of functional receptor protects against HIV infection. Here, we report the successful targeting of CCR5 in GFP-marked human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs using CRISPR/Cas9 with single and dual guide RNAs (gRNAs. Following CRISPER/Cas9-mediated gene editing using a single gRNA, 12.5% of cell colonies demonstrated CCR5 editing, of which 22.2% showed biallelic editing as determined by a Surveyor nuclease assay and direct sequencing. The use of dual gRNAs significantly increased the efficacy of CCR5 editing to 27% with a biallelic gene alteration frequency of 41%. To ensure the homogeneity of gene editing within cells, we used single cell sorting to establish clonal iPSC lines. Single cell-derived iPSC lines with homozygous CCR5 mutations displayed the typical characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and differentiated efficiently into hematopoietic cells, including macrophages. Although macrophages from both wild-type and CCR5-edited iPSCs supported CXCR4-tropic virus replication, macrophages from CCR5-edited iPSCs were uniquely resistant to CCR5-tropic virus challenge. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying iPSC technology for the study of the role of CCR5 in HIV infection in vitro, and generation of HIV-resistant cells for potential therapeutic applications.

  13. More Than a Magazine: Exploring the Links Between Lads' Mags, Rape Myth Acceptance, and Rape Proclivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Sánchez, Mónica; Toro-García, Virginia; Horvath, Miranda A H; Megías, Jesús L

    2015-06-03

    Exposure to some magazines aimed at young male readers-lads' mags-has recently been associated with behaviors and attitudes that are derogatory toward women, including sexual violence. In the present study, a group of Spanish adult men was exposed to the covers of a lads' mag while a second group was exposed to the covers of a neutral magazine. Results showed that, compared with participants in the second group, participants who were exposed to covers of lads' mags who also showed high rape myth acceptance and legitimized the consumption of such magazines reported higher rape proclivity in a hypothetical situation. These findings suggest the need to further explore the possible detrimental effects of some sexualized media that are widely accepted in many Western countries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. The CrowdMag App - turning your smartphone into a travelling magnetic observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltus, Richard; Nair, Manoj

    2017-04-01

    In 2014, we started the "CrowdMag" Project to collect vector magnetic data from digital magnetometers in smartphones. In October 2014, we released our first-generation Android and iOS apps. Currently, the CrowdMag Project has more than 15,000 enthusiastic users contributing more than 12 million magnetic data points from around the world. NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), in partnership with the University of Colorado's Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences (CIRES) develops magnetic field models to aid navigation, resource exploration and scientific research. We use observatories, satellites and ship/airborne surveys to measure the magnetic data. However, the measurements leave gaps in coverage, particularly for short-wavelength urban noise. Our ultimate goal is to use data from the CrowdMag Project to improve global magnetic data coverage. Here we present some early results from the analysis of the crowdsourced magnetic data. A global magnetic model derived solely based on CrowdMag data is generally consistent with satellite-derived models such as World Magnetic Model. A unique contribution of the CrowdMag Project is the collection of ground level magnetic data in densely populated regions with an unprecedented spatial resolution. For example, we show a magnetic map (by binning the data collected into 100x100m cells) of central Boulder using 170,000 data points collected by about 60 devices over the duration October 2014- January 2016. The median magnetic field value is consistent with the expected magnitude of the Earth's background magnetic field. The standard deviation of the CrowdMag total field (F) values is much higher than the expected natural (i.e., diurnal and geologic) magnetic field variation. However, the phone's magnetometer is sensitive enough to capture the larger magnitude magnetic signature from the urban magnetic sources. We discuss the reliability of crowdsourced magnetic maps and their

  15. Assessment of ICARE/CATHARE V1mod1 and V1 applications to full scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelard, P.; Barre, F.; Mutelle, H.

    2001-01-01

    The objective initially assigned to the ICARE/CATHARE V1mod1 validation task was to draw a synthesis of the ability of the code to correctly reproduce the main physical processes occurring during severe accidents. Therefore, both the domain in which the ICARE/CATHARE V1mod1 predictions are satisfactory (good confidence level) and, conversely, the identification of the main code deficiencies have to be highlighted. After a brief recall of the validation strategy and the current status of the work, this paper summarizes the main lessons which were drawn by IPSN from the validation activity which was conducted during the last two years (in 2000-2001) in the particular framework of the Users' Club (both IPSN and several foreign partners were involved in this task, under the management of IPSN). (authors)

  16. Homoeologous Recombination of the V1r1-V1r2 Gene Cluster of Pheromone Receptors in an Allotetraploid Lineage of Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to other olfactory receptor families that exhibit frequent lineage-specific expansions, the vomeronasal type 1 receptor (V1R family exhibits a canonical six-member repertoire in teleosts. V1r1 and V1r2 are present in no more than one copy in all examined teleosts, including salmons, which are ancient polyploids, implying strict evolutionary constraints. However, recent polyploids have not been examined. Here, we identified a young allotetraploid lineage of weatherfishes and investigated their V1r1-V1r2 cluster. We found a novel pattern that the parental V1r1-V1r2 clusters had recombined in the tetraploid genome and that the recombinant was nearly fixed in the tetraploid population. Subsequent analyses suggested strong selective pressure, for both a new combination of paralogs and homogeneity among gene duplicates, acting on the V1r1-V1r2 pair.

  17. Implication of Ccr4-Not complex function in mRNA quality control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assenholt, Jannie; Mouaikel, John; Saguez, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    RNPs are exported to the cytoplasm. The Ccr4-Not complex, which constitutes the major S. cerevisiae cytoplasmic deadenylase, has recently been implied in nuclear exosome–related processes. Consistent with a possible nuclear function of the complex, the deletion or mutation of Ccr4-Not factors also elicits...... transcription phenotypes. Here we use genetic depletion of the Mft1p protein of the THO transcription/mRNP packaging complex as a model system to link the Ccr4-Not complex to nuclear mRNP QC. We reveal strong genetic interactions between alleles of the Ccr4-Not complex with both the exosomal RRP6 and MFT1 genes....... Moreover, Rrp6p-dependent in vivo QC phenotypes of Δmft1 cells can be rescued by codeletion of several Ccr4-Not components. We discuss how the Ccr4-Not complex may connect with the mRNP QC pathway...

  18. Biased signaling of G protein-coupled receptors - From a chemokine receptor CCR7 perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Astrid Sissel; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Hjortø, Gertrud M

    2018-01-01

    findings related to ligand- and tissue-biased signaling of CCR7 and summarize what is known about bias at other chemokine receptors. CCR7 is expressed by a subset of T-cells and by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Together with its two endogenous ligands CCL19 and CCL21, of which the carboxy terminal tail...... of CCL21 displays an extraordinarily strong glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding, CCR7 plays a central role in coordinating the meeting between mature antigen presenting DCs and naïve T-cells which normally takes place in the lymph nodes (LNs). This process is a prerequisite for the initiation of an antigen......-specific T-cell mediated immune response. Thus CCR7 and its ligands are key players in initiating cell-based immune responses. CCL19 and CCL21 display differential interaction- and docking-modes for CCR7 leading to stabilization of different CCR7 conformations and hereby preferential activation of distinct...

  19. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    calcium mobilization as efficiently as the endogenous chemokine ligand CCL2 through the CCR2 receptor, whereas the virally encoded chemokine did not affect any of the other 17 human chemokine receptors tested. Mutual cross-desensitization between CCL2 and vCCL4 was demonstrated in the CCR2-transfected...... cells. The affinity of vCCL4 for the CCR2 receptor was 79 nm as determined in competition binding against radioactively labeled CCL2. In the murine pre-B lymphocyte cell line L1.2 stably transfected with the CCR2 receptor, vCCL4 acted as a relatively low potency but highly efficacious chemoattractant...... being equally or more efficacious in causing cell migration than CCL2 and CCL7 and considerably more efficacious than CCL8 and CCL13. It is concluded that human herpesvirus 6 encodes a highly selective and efficacious CCR2 agonist, which will attract CCR2 expressing cells, for example macrophages...

  20. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...... be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor...... approach to obtain insight into the binding site of the allosteric antagonists and additionally introduced eight single point mutations in CCR2 to further characterize the putative binding pocket. All constructs were studied in radioligand binding and/or functional IP turnover assays, providing evidence...

  1. Structural refinement and prediction of potential CCR2 antagonists through validated multi-QSAR modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sk Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Baidya, Sandip Kumar; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2018-01-03

    Chemokines trigger numerous inflammatory responses and modulate the immune system. The interaction between monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) may be the cause of atherosclerosis, obesity, and insulin resistance. However, CCR2 is also implicated in other inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, and neuropathic pain. Therefore, there is a paramount importance of designing potent and selective CCR2 antagonists despite a number of drug candidates failed in clinical trials. In this article, 83 CCR2 antagonists by Jhonson and Jhonson Pharmaceuticals have been considered for robust validated multi-QSAR modeling studies to get an idea about the structural and pharmacophoric requirements for designing more potent CCR2 antagonists. All these QSAR models were validated and statistically reliable. Observations resulted from different modeling studies correlated and validated results of other ones. Finally, depending on these QSAR observations, some new molecules were proposed that may exhibit higher activity against CCR2.

  2. MAG4 Versus Alternative Techniques for Forecasting Active-Region Flare Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F.; Khazanov, Igor

    2014-01-01

    MAG4 (Magnetogram Forecast), developed originally for NASA/SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), is an automated program that analyzes magnetograms from the HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager) instrument on NASA SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory), and automatically converts the rate (or probability) of major flares (M- and X-class), Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and Solar Energetic Particle Events. MAG4 does not forecast that a flare will occur at a particular time in the next 24 or 48 hours; rather the probability of one occurring.

  3. Antifibrotic Effects of the Dual CCR2/CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc in Animal Models of Liver and Kidney Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Lefebvre

    Full Text Available Interactions between C-C chemokine receptor types 2 (CCR2 and 5 (CCR5 and their ligands, including CCL2 and CCL5, mediate fibrogenesis by promoting monocyte/macrophage recruitment and tissue infiltration, as well as hepatic stellate cell activation. Cenicriviroc (CVC is an oral, dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist with nanomolar potency against both receptors. CVC's anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a range of preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis.Monocyte/macrophage recruitment was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of thioglycollate-induced peritonitis. CCL2-induced chemotaxis was evaluated ex vivo on mouse monocytes. CVC's antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a thioacetamide-induced rat model of liver fibrosis and mouse models of diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and renal fibrosis. Study assessments included body and liver/kidney weight, liver function test, liver/kidney morphology and collagen deposition, fibrogenic gene and protein expression, and pharmacokinetic analyses.CVC significantly reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in vivo at doses ≥20 mg/kg/day (p < 0.05. At these doses, CVC showed antifibrotic effects, with significant reductions in collagen deposition (p < 0.05, and collagen type 1 protein and mRNA expression across the three animal models of fibrosis. In the NASH model, CVC significantly reduced the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (p < 0.05 vs. controls. CVC treatment had no notable effect on body or liver/kidney weight.CVC displayed potent anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic activity in a range of animal fibrosis models, supporting human testing for fibrotic diseases. Further experimental studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms of CVC's antifibrotic effects. A Phase 2b study in adults with NASH and liver fibrosis is fully enrolled (CENTAUR Study 652-2-203; NCT02217475.

  4. METEOR v1.0 - A usage example; METEOR v1.0 - Un ejemplo de uso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script describes a detailed example of the use of the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. A real spanish meteorological data set is chosen to show the capabilities of METEOR. Output files and resultant plots provided of their interpretations are compiled in three appendixes. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph. D.Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written is spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1 .0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  5. METEOR v1.0 - User's Guide; METEOR v1.0 - Guia de Usuarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script is a User's Guide for the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  6. Relationship between the chemokine receptor CCR5 and microglia in neurological disorders: consequences of targeting CCR5 on neuroinflammation, neuronal death and regeneration in a model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2013-09-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a member of CC-chemokine receptor family that binds several chemokines, including CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, MIP-1alpha), CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, MIP-1beta) and CCL5 (RANTES). The current review examines the relationship between CCR5 and the microglia in different neurological disorders and models of CNS injury. CCR5 expression is upregulated in different neurological diseases, where it is often immunolocalized in microglial cells. A multistep cascade couples CCR5 activation by chemokines to Ca(2+) increases in human microglia. Because changes in [Ca(2+)] (i) affect chemotaxis, secretion, and gene expression, pharmacologic modulation of this pathway may alter inflammatory and degenerative processes in the CNS. Consequently, targeting CCR5 by using CCR5 antagonists may attenuate critical aspects of neuroinflammation in different models of neurological disorders. To illustrate the interaction between CCR5 and microglia in the CNS, we used a model of excitotoxicity, and demonstrate the intimate involvement of CCR5 in neuron injury and inflammation attendant to kainic acid (KA)-induced neurotoxicity. CCR5 participates in neuronal injury caused by the excitotoxin, KA, brings inflammatory cells to the sites of KA-induced CNS injury, defines the extent of tissue loss after KA exposure and limits reparative responses. We used a SV40-derived vector carrying an interfering RNA (RNAi) that targets CCR5. Delivered directly to the bone marrow, this vector decreased CCR5 expression in circulating cells. Animals so treated showed greatly reduced expression of CCR5 and its ligands (MIP-1alpha and RANTES) in the CNS, including in the brain vasculature, decreased BBB leakage, demonstrated greater KA-stimulated neurogenesis and increased

  7. CCR2 mediates Helicobacter pylori-induced immune tolerance and contributes to mucosal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Zhang, Min; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Huffnagle, Gray B; Kao, John Y

    2017-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that H. pylori infection leads to increased induction of regulatory T cells in local and systemic immune compartments. Here, we investigate the role of CCR2 in the tolerogenic programing of dendritic cells in a mouse model of H. pylori infection. CCR2 deficient (CCR2KO) mice and wild-type (Wt) mice infected with H. pylori SS1 strain were analyzed by qPCR and FACS analysis. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DC on day 6 from CCR2KO and Wt mice cocultured with or without H. pylori were examined to determine the impact of CCR2 signaling on dendritic cells function by qPCR, ELISA, and FACS analyses. Acute H. pylori infection was associated with a threefold increase in CCR2 mRNA expression in the gastric mucosa. H. pylori-infected CCR2KO mice exhibited a higher degree of mucosal inflammation, that is, increased gastritis scores and pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels, but lower degree of H. pylori gastric colonization compared to infected Wt mice. Peripheral H. pylori-specific immune response measured in the CCR2KO spleen was characterized by a higher Th17 response and a lower Treg response. In vitro, CCR2KO bone marrow-derived DC was less mature and shown a lower Treg/Th17 ratio. Moreover, blockade of CCR2 signaling by MCP-1 neutralizing antibody inhibited H. pylori-stimulated bone marrow-derived DC maturation. Our results indicate that CCR2 plays an essential role in H. pylori-induced immune tolerance and shed light on a novel mechanism of CCR2-dependent DC Treg induction, which appears to be important in maintaining mucosal homeostasis during H. pylori infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. CCL2 recruits T cells into the brain in a CCR2-independent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, Oriane; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Owens, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    CCR2, a receptor for CCL2. Expression of another receptor for CCL2, CCR4, and CXCR3, a receptor for CXCL10, which was also induced, were both increased in CCL2-treated CNS. CCR4 was expressed by neurons and astrocytes as well as CD4 T cells, and CXCR3 was expressed by CD4 and CD8 T cells. Chemokine...

  9. Pulmonary CCR2+CD4+T cells are immune regulatory and attenuate lung fibrosis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milger, Katrin; Yu, Yingyan; Brudy, Eva; Irmler, Martin; Skapenko, Alla; Mayinger, Michael; Lehmann, Mareike; Beckers, Johannes; Reichenberger, Frank; Behr, Jürgen; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne

    2017-11-01

    Animal models have suggested that CCR2-dependent signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, but global blockade of CCL2 failed to improve the clinical course of patients with lung fibrosis. However, as levels of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells in paediatric lung fibrosis had previously been found to be increased, correlating with clinical symptoms, we hypothesised that distinct CCR2 + cell populations might either increase or decrease disease pathogenesis depending on their subtype. To investigate the role of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells in experimental lung fibrosis and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other fibrosis. Pulmonary CCR2 + CD4 + T cells were analysed using flow cytometry and mRNA profiling, followed by in silico pathway analysis, in vitro assays and adoptive transfer experiments. Frequencies of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells were increased in experimental fibrosis-specifically the CD62L - CD44 + effector memory T cell phenotype, displaying a distinct chemokine receptor profile. mRNA profiling of isolated CCR2 + CD4 + T cells from fibrotic lungs suggested immune regulatory functions, a finding that was confirmed in vitro using suppressor assays. Importantly, adoptive transfer of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells attenuated fibrosis development. The results were partly corroborated in patients with lung fibrosis, by showing higher percentages of Foxp3 + CD25 + cells within bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CCR2 + CD4 + T cells as compared with CCR2 - CD4 + T cells. Pulmonary CCR2 + CD4 + T cells are immunosuppressive, and could attenuate lung inflammation and fibrosis. Therapeutic strategies completely abrogating CCR2-dependent signalling will therefore also eliminate cell populations with protective roles in fibrotic lung disease. This emphasises the need for a detailed understanding of the functions of immune cell subsets in fibrotic lung disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  10. Drugs interacting with organic anion transporter-1 affect uptake of Tc-99m-mercaptoacetyl-triglycine (MAG3) in the human kidney: Therapeutic drug interaction in Tc-99m-MAG3 diagnosis of renal function and possible application of Tc-99m-MAG3 for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Noriko; Saga, Tsuneo; Inubushi, Masayuki; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Seki, Chie; Ito, Sumito; Oyama, Nobuyuki; Yokoyama, Osamu; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Renal uptake of Tc-99m-MG3 involves organic anion transporter (OAT). Treatment with drugs showing OAT affinity might interfere with renal uptake of Tc-99m-MAG3, leading to misinterpretation in Tc-99m-MAG3. This study was conducted to discuss a possible drug interference with Tc-99m-MAG3 diagnosis on OAT sites. Methods: Renal uptake and plasma clearance of Tc-99m-MAG3 were analyzed in healthy volunteers under control and OAT1 and OAT3 related drug treatment conditions. An in vitro uptake study using OAT1 or OAT3 expressing cells was also conducted. Results: Both PAH and probenecid treatment induced delays in Tc-99m-MAG3 clearance from blood, and reductions in the renal uptake clearance. As a result, the normalized effective renal plasma flow estimated from Tc-99m-MAG3 clearance was significantly underestimated, whereas the glomerular filtration rate estimated from plasma creatinine levels was unchanged. The transport activity of Tc-99m-MAG3 was higher in OAT1-expressing cells than in OAT3-expressing cells. Conclusion: Drugs with OAT1 affinity affect the renal uptake of Tc-99m-MAG3 and blood clearance. This might cause misinterpretation of functional diagnosis of the kidney using Tc-99m-MAG3

  11. Seismic re-evaluation criteria for Bohunice V1 reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.; Schlund, H.; Warnken, L.

    2001-01-01

    Bohunice V1 in Slovakia is a Russian designed two unit WWER 440, Model 230 Pressurized Water Reactor. The plant was not originally designed for earthquake. Subsequent and ongoing reassessments now confirm that the seismic hazard at the site is significant. EBO, the plant owner has contracted with a consortium lead by Siemens AG (REKON) to do major reconstruction of the plant to significantly enhance its safety systems by the addition of new systems and the upgrading of existing systems. As part of the reconstruction, a complete seismic assessment and upgrading is required for existing safety relevant structures, systems and components. It is not practical to conduct this reassessment and upgrading using criteria applied to new design of nuclear power plants. Alternate criteria may be used to achieve adequate safety goals. Utilities in the U.S. have faced several seismic issues with operating NPPs and to resolve these issues, alternate criteria have been developed which are much more cost effective than use of criteria for new design. These alternate criteria incorporate the knowledge obtained from investigation of the performance of equipment in major earthquakes and include provisions for structures and passive equipment to deform beyond the yield point, yet still provide their essential function. IAEA has incorporated features of these alternate criteria into draft Technical Guidelines for application to Bohunice V1 and V2. REKON has developed plant specific criteria and procedures for the Bohunice V1 reconstruction that incorporate major features of the U.S. developed alternate criteria, comply to local codes and which envelop the draft IAEA Technical Guidelines. Included in these criteria and procedures are comprehensive walkdown screening criteria for equipment, piping, HVAC and cable raceways, analytical criteria which include inelastic energy absorption factors defined on an element basis and testing criteria which include specific guidance on interpretation

  12. Bohunice V-1. Review of safety upgrading and operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korec, J.; Kuschel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Bohunice site in the Slovak Republic has two Russian-designed twin-unit nuclear power plants, one equipped with reactors of the WWER 440/230 type, the other with type WWER 440/213 reactors. Two older units (V-1) started commercial operation in late 1978 and 1980 respectively and have been supplying electricity to the national grid since that time without any events that could have degraded plant safety level. In the period prior to 1990 the utility Slovenske Elektrarne (S.E.) performed extensive modifications and upgrades to the original design of the two older units V-1 NPP. Furthermore, significant steps in safety improvement for Bohunice NPP V-1 have been made since 1990. Following the political restructuring of the former Czechoslovakia and the country's new open-door policy towards western organizations, several international expert missions were focused on evaluation of Bohunice NPP safety status level and operational reliability, particularly targeting the two older units. Based on recommendations of individual expert missions and complementary deterministic and probabilistic safety analyses performed by S.E., the Czechoslovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority issued the Resolution No. 5/91 defining 81 measures concerning further safety and reliability improvement of Bohunice V1 .A range of short-term and long-term upgrades was prioritised in terms of importance to plant safety and work to implement these measures commenced in the early nineties. During the 'Small Reconstruction' from 1991 to 1993 some of the short term upgrading measures were realized to eliminate the most serious safety deficits, thus to achieve a significant reduction in core damage frequency and a major improvement in confinement integrity. In this paper and presentation the goals of the gradual reconstruction project, basic engineering, detailed engineering and realization, last major stage of Unit 2 upgrade, as well as final stage of Unit 1 upgrade in early 2000 are presented

  13. Sequence Handling by Sequence Analysis Toolbox v1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, Christian Ravnsborg; Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    analysis toolbox v1.0 was to have a general purpose sequence analyzing tool that can import sequences obtained by high-throughput sequencing methods. The program includes algorithms for calculation or prediction of isoelectric point, hydropathicity index, transmembrane segments, and glycosylphosphatidyl......The fact that mass spectrometry have become a high-throughput method calls for bioinformatic tools for automated sequence handling and prediction. For efficient use of bioinformatic tools, it is important that these tools are integrated or interfaced with each other. The purpose of sequence...... inositol-anchored proteins....

  14. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  15. Deficient Fas expression by CD4+ CCR5+ T cells in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julià, Eva; Montalban, Xavier; Al-Zayat, Hammad

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether T cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR3 from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are more resistant to apoptosis. METHODS: Expression of CD69, TNF-R1, Fas, FasL, bcl-2, and bax was investigated in 41 MS patients and 12 healthy controls by flow cytometry in CD4+ and CD8+ T...... cells expressing CCR5 and CXCR3. RESULTS: In MS patients, the percentage of CD69 was increased and Fas expression decreased in CD4+ CCR5+ T cells. INTERPRETATION: The lower Fas expression in activated CD4+ CCR5+ T cells might contribute to disease pathogenesis by prolonging cell survival and favoring...

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication by a dual CCR5/CXCR4 antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Princen, Katrien; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    Here we report that the N-pyridinylmethyl cyclam analog AMD3451 has antiviral activity against a wide variety of R5, R5/X4, and X4 strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] ranging from 1.2 to 26.5 microM) in various T-cell lines, CCR5...... at the virus entry stage. AMD3451 dose-dependently inhibited the intracellular Ca(2+) signaling induced by the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in T-lymphocytic cells and in CXCR4-transfected cells, as well as the Ca(2+) flux induced by the CCR5 ligands CCL5, CCL3, and CCL4 in CCR5-transfected cells. The compound did...... not interfere with chemokine-induced Ca(2+) signaling through CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, or CXCR3 and did not induce intracellular Ca(2+) signaling by itself at concentrations up to 400 microM. In freshly isolated monocytes, AMD3451 inhibited the Ca(2+) flux induced by CXCL12 and CCL4...

  17. A role for MCP-1/CCR2 in interstitial lung disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhardt Dietrich

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial lung diseases (ILD are chronic inflammatory disorders leading to pulmonary fibrosis. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 promotes collagen synthesis and deletion of the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 protects from pulmonary fibrosis in ILD mouse models. We hypothesized that pulmonary MCP-1 and CCR2+ T cells accumulate in pediatric ILD and are related to disease severity. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from 25 children with ILD and 10 healthy children. Levels of pulmonary MCP-1 and Th1/Th2-associated cytokines were quantified at the protein and the mRNA levels. Pulmonary CCR2+, CCR4+, CCR3+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ T cells were quantified by flow-cytometry. Results CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 levels were significantly elevated in children with ILD and correlated with forced vital capacity, total lung capacity and ILD disease severity scores. Children with lung fibrosis had significantly higher MCP-1 levels and CCR2+ T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared to non-fibrotic children. Conclusion The results indicate that pulmonary CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric ILD and might provide a novel target for therapeutic strategies.

  18. CCR5 is a suppressor for cortical plasticity and hippocampal learning and memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miou; Greenhill, Stuart; Huang, Shan; Silva, Tawnie K; Sano, Yoshitake; Wu, Shumin; Cai, Ying; Nagaoka, Yoshiko; Sehgal, Megha; Cai, Denise J; Lee, Yong-Seok; Fox, Kevin; Silva, Alcino J

    2016-01-01

    Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory is not understood. Here, we report that decreasing the function of CCR5 increases MAPK/CREB signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and hippocampus-dependent memory in mice, while neuronal CCR5 overexpression caused memory deficits. Decreasing CCR5 function in mouse barrel cortex also resulted in enhanced spike timing dependent plasticity and consequently, dramatically accelerated experience-dependent plasticity. These results suggest that CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation by viral proteins may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 peptide caused LTP, signaling and memory deficits that were prevented by Ccr5 knockout or knockdown. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in neuroplasticity, learning and memory, and indicate that CCR5 has a role in the cognitive deficits caused by HIV. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20985.001 PMID:27996938

  19. CCR5 is a suppressor for cortical plasticity and hippocampal learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miou; Greenhill, Stuart; Huang, Shan; Silva, Tawnie K; Sano, Yoshitake; Wu, Shumin; Cai, Ying; Nagaoka, Yoshiko; Sehgal, Megha; Cai, Denise J; Lee, Yong-Seok; Fox, Kevin; Silva, Alcino J

    2016-12-20

    Although the role of CCR5 in immunity and in HIV infection has been studied widely, its role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory is not understood. Here, we report that decreasing the function of CCR5 increases MAPK/CREB signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and hippocampus-dependent memory in mice, while neuronal CCR5 overexpression caused memory deficits. Decreasing CCR5 function in mouse barrel cortex also resulted in enhanced spike timing dependent plasticity and consequently, dramatically accelerated experience-dependent plasticity. These results suggest that CCR5 is a powerful suppressor for plasticity and memory, and CCR5 over-activation by viral proteins may contribute to HIV-associated cognitive deficits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the HIV V3 peptide caused LTP, signaling and memory deficits that were prevented by Ccr5 knockout or knockdown. Overall, our results demonstrate that CCR5 plays an important role in neuroplasticity, learning and memory, and indicate that CCR5 has a role in the cognitive deficits caused by HIV.

  20. CCR5 internalisation and signalling have different dependence on membrane lipid raft integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaba, Clara Moyano; Kerr, Jason S; Mueller, Anja

    2008-09-01

    The chemokine receptor, CCR5, acts as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus entry into cells. CCR5 has been shown to be targeted to cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts or caveolae. Cholesterol is essential for CCL4 binding to CCR5 and for keeping the conformational integrity of the receptor. Filipin treatment leads to loss of caveolin-1 from the membrane and therefore to a collapse of the caveolae. We have found here that sequestration of membrane cholesterol with filipin did not affect receptor signalling, however a loss of ligand-induced internalisation of CCR5 was observed. Cholesterol extraction with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) reduced signalling through CCR5 as measured by release of intracellular Ca(2+) and completely abolished the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with no effect on internalisation. Pertussis toxin (PTX) treatment inhibited the intracellular release of calcium that is transduced via Galphai G-proteins. Depletion of cholesterol destroyed microdomains in the membrane and switched CCR5/G-protein coupling to a PTX-independent G-protein. We conclude that cholesterol in the membrane is essential for CCR5 signalling via the Galphai G-protein subunit, and that integrity of lipid rafts is not essential for effective CCR5 internalisation however it is crucial for proper CCR5 signal transduction via Galphai G-proteins.

  1. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effect of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity on HIV-1 susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijie Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: So far, many studies have investigated the distribution of CCR5 genotype between HIV-1 infected patients and uninfected people. However, no definite results have been put forward about whether heterozygosity for a 32-basepair deletion in CCR5 gene (CCR5-Δ32 can affect HIV-1 susceptibility. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of 18 studies including more than 12000 subjects for whom the CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism was genotyped. Odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence interval (CI were employed to assess the association of CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism with HIV-1 susceptibility. RESULTS: Compared with the wild-type CCR5 homozygotes, the pooled OR for CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes was 1.02 (95%CI, 0.88-1.19 for healthy controls (HC and 0.95 (95%CI, 0.71-1.26 for exposed uninfected (EU controls. Similar results were found in stratified analysis by ethnicity, sample size and method of CCR5-Δ32 genotyping. CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis indicated that HIV-1 susceptibility is not significantly affected by heterozygosity for CCR5-Δ32.

  3. Targeting spare CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) as a principle to inhibit HIV-1 entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Colin, Philippe; Staropoli, Isabelle; Lima-Fernandes, Evelyne; Ferret, Cécile; Demir, Arzu; Rogée, Sophie; Hartley, Oliver; Randriamampita, Clotilde; Scott, Mark G H; Marullo, Stefano; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Brelot, Anne

    2014-07-04

    CCR5 binds the chemokines CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 and is the major coreceptor for HIV-1 entry into target cells. Chemokines are supposed to form a natural barrier against human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, we showed that their antiviral activity is limited by CCR5 adopting low-chemokine affinity conformations at the cell surface. Here, we investigated whether a pool of CCR5 that is not stabilized by chemokines could represent a target for inhibiting HIV infection. We exploited the characteristics of the chemokine analog PSC-RANTES (N-α-(n-nonanoyl)-des-Ser(1)-[l-thioprolyl(2), l-cyclohexylglycyl(3)]-RANTES(4-68)), which displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that native chemokines fail to prevent high-affinity binding of PSC-RANTES, analog-mediated calcium release (in desensitization assays), and analog-mediated CCR5 internalization. These results indicate that a pool of spare CCR5 may bind PSC-RANTES but not native chemokines. Improved recognition of CCR5 by PSC-RANTES may explain why the analog promotes higher amounts of β-arrestin 2·CCR5 complexes, thereby increasing CCR5 down-regulation and HIV-1 inhibition. Together, these results highlight that spare CCR5, which might permit HIV-1 to escape from chemokines, should be targeted for efficient viral blockade. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Adaptation of HIV-1 to cells with low expression of the CCR5 coreceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, Nicole; Pacheco, Beatriz; Sodroski, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    The binding of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer ((gp120/gp41) 3 ) to the receptors CD4 and CCR5 triggers virus entry into host cells. To identify Env regions that respond to CCR5 binding, HIV-1 was serially passaged on a CD4-positive canine cell line expressing progressively lower levels of CCR5. HIV-1 replication was observed in cells expressing ~1300 CCR5 molecules/cell. Env changes that conferred this low-CCR5 replication phenotype were located outside of the known CCR5-binding region of the gp120 Env subunit and did not apparently increase CCR5 binding affinity. The adaptation-associated changes, located in the gp120 α1 helix and in the gp41 HR1 heptad repeat and membrane-proximal external region (MPER), enhanced HIV-1 replication in cells at all levels of CCR5 expression. The adapted Envs exhibited a greater propensity to undergo conformational changes, as evidenced by increased exposure of conserved regions near the CD4- and CCR5-binding sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Frequency of polymorphisms of genes coding for HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 and CCR2 in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munerato Patrícia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entry of human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1 into target cells requires both CD4and one of the chemokine receptors. Viruses predominantly use one, or occasionally both, of the major co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, although other receptors, including CCR2B and CCR3, function as minor co-receptors. A 32-nucleotide deletion (delta32 within the beta-chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5 has been described in subjects who remain uninfected despite extensive exposition to HIV-1. The heterozygous genotype delays disease progression. This allele is common among Caucasians, but has not been found in people of African or Asian ancestry. A more common transition involving a valine to isoleucine switch in transmembrane domain I of CCR2B (64I, with unknown functional consequences, was found to delay disease progression but not to reduce infection risk. As the Brazilian population consists of a mixture of several ethnic groups, we decided to examine the genotype frequency of these polymorphisms in this country. There were 11.5% CCR5 heterozygotes among the HIV-1 infected population and 12.5% among uninfected individuals, similar to data from North America and Western Europe. The prevalence of CCR2-64I homozygotes and heterozygotes was 0.06 and 15.2%, respectively, also similar to what is known for North America and Western Europe.

  6. Preferential HIV infection of CCR6+ Th17 cells is associated with higher levels of virus receptor expression and lack of CCR5 ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Yelina; Tuen, Michael; Shen, Guomiao; Nawaz, Fatima; Arthos, James; Wolff, Martin J; Poles, Michael A; Hioe, Catarina E

    2013-10-01

    Th17 cells are enriched in the gut mucosa and play a critical role in maintenance of the mucosal barrier and host defense against extracellular bacteria and fungal infections. During chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, Th17 cells were more depleted compared to Th1 cells, even when the patients had low or undetectable viremia. To investigate the differential effects of HIV infection on Th17 and Th1 cells, a culture system was used in which CCR6(+) CD4(+) T cells were sorted from healthy human peripheral blood and activated in the presence of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-23 to drive expansion of Th17 cells while maintaining Th1 cells. HIV infection of these cultures had minimal effects on Th1 cells but caused depletion of Th17 cells. Th17 loss correlated with greater levels of virus-infected cells and cell death. In identifying cellular factors contributing to higher susceptibility of Th17 cells to HIV, we compared Th17-enriched CCR6(+) and Th17-depleted CCR6(-) CD4 T cell cultures and noted that Th17-enriched CCR6(+) cells expressed higher levels of α4β7 and bound HIV envelope in an α4β7-dependent manner. The cells also had greater expression of CD4 and CXCR4, but not CCR5, than CCR6(-) cells. Moreover, unlike Th1 cells, Th17 cells produced little CCR5 ligand, and transfection with one of the CCR5 ligands, MIP-1β (CCL4), increased their resistance against HIV. These results indicate that features unique to Th17 cells, including higher expression of HIV receptors and lack of autocrine CCR5 ligands, are associated with enhanced permissiveness of these cells to HIV.

  7. Radiation protection in decommissioning of the NPP V1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svitek, J.; Kaizer, J.; Siska, J.

    2014-01-01

    What's new in decommissioning of the NPP V1? In 2014 the first stage of the decommissioning should be finished. The program of the first stage was characterized by decommissioning of the non-contaminated facilities and buildings (facilities and buildings out of the control area). However, during the first stage, two key activities were done during which radiation protection had to be especially supervised: BIDSF project - Treatment and Conditioning of Wet Historical Waste - Sludge and Sorbents in the operational tanks NPP V1 (the treatment has been the condition of the regulatory body for the ending of the first stage) and preparation of decontamination of both primary circuits NPP (without reactors). In the year 2015, the second stage of decommissioning should be started. Program for the second stage is broad and it includes fragmentation and treatment of activated parts of the primary circuits (reactors, their internal parts, shielding cassettes). Modification of the radiation protection equipment on the NPP site has been made by BIDSF projects. During the first stage, two basic projects have been done: C12 - Refurbishment of the radiation protection monitoring equipment and C-10 - Free release of decommissioning materials. The present state of monitoring systems, as the result of the aforementioned projects, and the first experiences are main part of this presentation. Another activity, which prepared basic conditions for an execution of radiation protection in the second stage of decommissioning, was the preparation of documents for the procurement of license for the second stage of decommissioning. (authors)

  8. Attention and normalization circuits in macaque V1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, M; Herrero, J L; Distler, C; Thiele, A

    2015-01-01

    Attention affects neuronal processing and improves behavioural performance. In extrastriate visual cortex these effects have been explained by normalization models, which assume that attention influences the circuit that mediates surround suppression. While normalization models have been able to explain attentional effects, their validity has rarely been tested against alternative models. Here we investigate how attention and surround/mask stimuli affect neuronal firing rates and orientation tuning in macaque V1. Surround/mask stimuli provide an estimate to what extent V1 neurons are affected by normalization, which was compared against effects of spatial top down attention. For some attention/surround effect comparisons, the strength of attentional modulation was correlated with the strength of surround modulation, suggesting that attention and surround/mask stimulation (i.e. normalization) might use a common mechanism. To explore this in detail, we fitted multiplicative and additive models of attention to our data. In one class of models, attention contributed to normalization mechanisms, whereas in a different class of models it did not. Model selection based on Akaike's and on Bayesian information criteria demonstrated that in most cells the effects of attention were best described by models where attention did not contribute to normalization mechanisms. This demonstrates that attentional influences on neuronal responses in primary visual cortex often bypass normalization mechanisms. PMID:25757941

  9. MagCloud: magazine self-publishing for the long tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kok-Wei; Chatow, Ehud

    2010-02-01

    In June of 2008, Hewlett-Packard Labs launched MagCloud, a print-on-demand web service for magazine selfpublishing. MagCloud enables anyone to publish their own magazine by simply uploading a PDF file to the site. There are no setup fees, minimum print runs, storage requirements or waste due to unsold magazines. Magazines are only printed when an order is placed, and are shipped directly to the end customer. In the course of building this web service, a number of technological challenges were encountered. In this paper, we will discuss these challenges and the methods used to overcome them. Perhaps the most important decision in enabling the successful launch of MagCloud was the choice to offer a single product. This simplified the PDF validation phase and streamlined the print fulfillment process such that orders can be printed, folded and trimmed in batches, rather than one-by-one. In a sense, MagCloud adopted the Ford Model T approach to manufacturing, where having just a single model with little or no options allows for efficiencies in the production line, enabling a lower product price and opening the market to a much larger customer base. This platform has resulted in a number of new niche publications - the long tail of publishing.

  10. {sup 110m}Ag root and foliar uptake in vegetables and its migration in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Z.R.; Leung, J.K.C. E-mail: jkcleung@hku.hk

    2003-07-01

    {sup 110m}Ag, as a radionuclide of corrosion products in water-cooled nuclear reactors, was detected in the liquid effluents of Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) of Daya Bay under normal operation conditions. Experiments on a simulated terrestrial agricultural ecosystem were carried out using the pot experiment approach. The most common plants in Hong Kong and the South China vegetable gardens such as lettuce, Chinese spinach, kale, carrot, pepper, eggplant, bean, flowering cabbage, celery, European onion and cucumber were selected for {sup 110m}Ag root and foliar uptake tests. The results show that carrot, kale and flowering cabbage have the greatest values of soil to plant transfer factor among the vegetables, while{sup 110m}Ag can be transferred to Chinese spinach via foliar uptake. Flowering cabbage, the most popular leafy vegetable locally, could be used as a biomonitor for the radioisotope contamination in vegetables. Soil column and adsorption tests were also carried out to study the leaching ability and distributio coefficient (K{sub d}) of {sup 110m}Ag in the soil. The results show that most of the radionuclide was adsorbed in the top 1 cm of soil regardless of the pH value. The K{sub d} was also determined.

  11. What do galaxies look like beyond 31 mag/arcsec2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, María; Trujillo, Ignacio; Fliri, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Detection of optical surface brightness structures with magnitudes fainter than 30 mag/arcsec2 has remained elusive in current photometric deep surveys. We are conducting a new imaging strategy to cross that frontier and address the study of outskirts of galaxies and theories of galaxy formation.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cells Overexpressing MagA, an Endogenous Contrast Agent for Live Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna E. Goldhawk

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may benefit from the ferrimagnetic properties of magnetosomes, membrane-enclosed iron biominerals whose formation in magnetotactic bacteria is encoded by multiple genes. One such gene is MagA, a putative iron transporter. We have examined expression of MagA in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells and characterized their response to iron loading and cellular imaging by MRI. MagA expression augmented both Prussian blue staining and the elemental iron content of N2A cells, without altering cell proliferation, in cultures grown in the presence of iron supplements. Despite evidence for iron incorporation in both MagA and a variant, MagAE137V, only MagA expression produced intracellular contrast detectable by MRI at 11 Tesla. We used this stable expression system to model a new sequence for cellular imaging with MRI, using the difference between gradient and spin echo images to distinguish cells from artifacts in the field of view. Our results show that MagA activity in mammalian cells responds to iron supplementation and functions as a contrast agent that can be deactivated by a single point mutation. We conclude that MagA is a candidate MRI reporter gene that can exploit more fully the superior resolution of MRI in noninvasive medical imaging.

  13. Narcolepsy susceptibility gene CCR3 modulates sleep-wake patterns in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hiromi; Honda, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Susumu; Miyagawa, Taku; Honda, Makoto; Honda, Kazuki; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kodama, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (Hcrt) neurons and is associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although abnormalities in immunity are suggested to be involved in the etiology of narcolepsy, no decisive mechanism has been established. We previously reported chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 3 (CCR3) as a novel susceptibility gene for narcolepsy. To understand the role of CCR3 in the development of narcolepsy, we investigated sleep-wake patterns of Ccr3 knockout (KO) mice. Ccr3 KO mice exhibited fragmented sleep patterns in the light phase, whereas the overall sleep structure in the dark phase did not differ between Ccr3 KO mice and wild-type (WT) littermates. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promoted wakefulness and suppressed both REM and NREM sleep in the light phase in both Ccr3 KO and WT mice. Conversely, LPS suppressed wakefulness and promoted NREM sleep in the dark phase in both genotypes. After LPS administration, the proportion of time spent in wakefulness was higher, and the proportion of time spent in NREM sleep was lower in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice only in the light phase. LPS-induced changes in sleep patterns were larger in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we quantified the number of Hcrt neurons and found that Ccr3 KO mice had fewer Hcrt neurons in the lateral hypothalamus compared to WT mice. We found abnormalities in sleep patterns in the resting phase and in the number of Hcrt neurons in Ccr3 KO mice. These observations suggest a role for CCR3 in sleep-wake regulation in narcolepsy patients.

  14. Narcolepsy susceptibility gene CCR3 modulates sleep-wake patterns in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Toyoda

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (Hcrt neurons and is associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although abnormalities in immunity are suggested to be involved in the etiology of narcolepsy, no decisive mechanism has been established. We previously reported chemokine (C-C motif receptor 3 (CCR3 as a novel susceptibility gene for narcolepsy. To understand the role of CCR3 in the development of narcolepsy, we investigated sleep-wake patterns of Ccr3 knockout (KO mice. Ccr3 KO mice exhibited fragmented sleep patterns in the light phase, whereas the overall sleep structure in the dark phase did not differ between Ccr3 KO mice and wild-type (WT littermates. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS promoted wakefulness and suppressed both REM and NREM sleep in the light phase in both Ccr3 KO and WT mice. Conversely, LPS suppressed wakefulness and promoted NREM sleep in the dark phase in both genotypes. After LPS administration, the proportion of time spent in wakefulness was higher, and the proportion of time spent in NREM sleep was lower in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice only in the light phase. LPS-induced changes in sleep patterns were larger in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we quantified the number of Hcrt neurons and found that Ccr3 KO mice had fewer Hcrt neurons in the lateral hypothalamus compared to WT mice. We found abnormalities in sleep patterns in the resting phase and in the number of Hcrt neurons in Ccr3 KO mice. These observations suggest a role for CCR3 in sleep-wake regulation in narcolepsy patients.

  15. Association between HIV-1 tropism and CCR5 human haplotype E in a Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huik, Kristi; Avi, Radko; Uibopuu, Helen; Pauskar, Merit; Margus, Tõnu; Karki, Tõnis; Krispin, Tõnu; Kool, Piret; Rüütel, Kristi; Talu, Ave; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Uusküla, Anneli; Carrillo, Andrew; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K; Lutsar, Irja

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the diversity of CCR5 on HIV susceptibility and disease progression has been clearly demonstrated but how the variability of this gene influences the HIV tropism is poorly understood. We investigated whether CCR5 haplotypes are associated with HIV tropism in a Caucasian population. We evaluated 161 HIV-positive subjects in a cross-sectional study. CCR5 haplotypes were derived after genotyping 9 CCR2-CCR5 polymorphisms. The HIV subtype was determined by phylogenetic analysis using the maximum likelihood method and viral tropism by the genotypic tropism assay (geno2pheno). Associations between CCR5 haplotypes and viral tropism were determined using logistic regression analyses. Samples from 500 blood donors were used to evaluate the representativeness of HIV-positives in terms of CCR5 haplotype distribution. The distribution of CCR5 haplotypes was similar in HIV-positive subjects and blood donors. The majority of viruses (93.8%) belonged to HIV-1 CRF06_cpx; 7.5% were X4, and the remaining were R5 tropic. X4 tropic viruses were over represented among people with CCR5 human haplotype E (HHE) compared with those without this haplotype (13.0% vs 1.4%; P = 0.006). People possessing CCR5 HHE had 11 times increased odds (odds ratio = 11.00; 95% confidence interval: 1.38 to 87.38) of having X4 tropic viruses than those with non-HHE. After adjusting for antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, neither the presence of HHE nor the use of ARV was associated with X4 tropic viruses. Our results suggest that CCR5 HHE and ARV treatment might be associated with the presence of HIV-1 X4 tropic viruses.

  16. Increased brain damage after ischaemic stroke in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, S; Bonnefont, J; Julien, S; Marq-Lin, N; Rodriguez, I; Dubois-Dauphin, M; Krause, KH

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The chemokine receptor CCR5 is well known for its function in immune cells; however, it is also expressed in the brain, where its specific role remains to be elucidated. Because genetic factors may influence the risk of developing cerebral ischaemia or affect its clinical outcome, we have analysed the role of CCR5 in experimental stroke. Experimental approach: Permanent cerebral ischaemia was performed by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in wild-type and CCR5-deficient mice. Locomotor behaviour, infarct size and histochemical alterations were analysed at different time points after occlusion. Key results: The cerebral vasculature was comparable in wild-type and CCR5-deficient mice. However, the size of the infarct and the motor deficits after occlusion were markedly increased in CCR5-deficient mice as compared with wild type. No differences between wild-type and CCR5-deficient mice were elicited by occlusion with respect to the morphology and abundance of astrocytes and microglia. Seven days after occlusion the majority of CCR5-deficient mice displayed neutrophil invasion in the infarct region, which was not observed in wild type. As compared with wild type, the infarct regions of CCR5-deficient mice were characterized by increased neuronal death. Conclusions and implications: Lack of CCR5 increased the severity of brain injury following occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. This is of particular interest with respect to the relatively frequent occurrence of CCR5 deficiency in the human population (1–2% of the Caucasian population) and the advent of CCR5 inhibitors as novel drugs. PMID:20423342

  17. Norepinephrine inhibits macrophage migration by decreasing CCR2 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangming Xiu

    Full Text Available Increased incidences of infectious and septic complications during post-burn courses represent the main contributor to burn injury mortality. Sustained increases in catecholamine levels, especially norepinephrine (NE, contribute to immune disturbances in severely burned patients. The precise mechanisms underlying NE-mediated immunoregulation are not fully understood. Here we hypothesize that persistently elevated NE levels are associated with immunodysfunctions. We examined the effects of NE on the phenotype and functions of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs. Whole mouse bone marrow cells were treated in vitro with 40 ng/mL of M-CSF and with 1 x 10(-6 M or 1 x 10(-8 M of NE or without NE for 7 days; cells were collected and stained with antibodies for CD11b, F4/80, MHC II and the inflammatory CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2. We found 1 x 10(-6 M of NE inhibited MHC II and CCR2 expression on CD11b(+/F4/80(+ BMM cells. It also inhibited BMM proliferation by inhibiting CSF-1R expression. On the contrary, 1 x 10(-8 M of NE slightly increased both MHC II and CCR2 expression on CD11b(+/F4/80(+ BMM cells but inhibited CD11b(+/F4/80(+ BMM proliferation. MCP-1 based migration assay showed that the migration of 1 x 10(-6 M of NE-treated BMM toward MCP-1 was significantly decreased compared to BMM without NE treatment. Both 1 x 10(-8 M and 1 x 10(-6 M of NE enhanced TNF-α production and phagocytosis of FITC-Dextran. Intracellular staining of transcriptional factor MafB showed that 1 x 10(-6 M of NE treatment enhanced its expression, whereas 1 x 10(-8 M of NE decreased expression. Stimulation with LPS in the last 24-hours of BMM culture further decreased CCR2 and MHC II expression of these BMM, suggesting the synergistic effect of LPS and NE on macrophage. Our results demonstrate that NE regulates macrophage differentiation, proliferation and function, and may play a critical role in the dysfunctional immune response post-burn.

  18. Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc: Medicinal Chemistry and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc. PMID:25159165

  19. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Florida's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  20. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Arkansas' college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  1. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Minnesota's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  2. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alaska's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  3. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on South Carolina's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  4. 77 FR 57566 - Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-OW-2012-0035; FRL-9730-7] Announcement of Public Meeting on the Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) Rule Retrospective Review and Request for Public Comment on Potential Approaches to Electronic Delivery of the CCR; Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  5. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Kentucky's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  6. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Georgia's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  7. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on North Dakota's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  8. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Alabama's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  9. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on New Mexico's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  10. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Tennessee's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  11. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on California's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  12. Profile of State College and Career Readiness Assessments (CCR) Policy. West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on West Virginia's college and career readiness assessment policy. Some of the categories presented include: (1) CCR assessment policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in CCR assessment policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) State financial support for students to take the CCR…

  13. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Jin

    Full Text Available Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed.We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects.Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5.Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents.

  14. The Effects of the Recombinant CCR5 T4 Lysozyme Fusion Protein on HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qingwen; Chen, Hong; Wang, Xingxia; Zhao, Liandong; Xu, Qingchen; Wang, Huijuan; Li, Guanyu; Yang, Xiaofan; Ma, Hongming; Wu, Haoquan; Ji, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of T4 lysozyme (T4L) into the GPCR successfully enhanced GPCR protein stability and solubilization. However, the biological functions of the recombinant GPCR protein have not been analyzed. We engineered the CCR5-T4L mutant and expressed and purified the soluble recombinant protein using an E.coli expression system. The antiviral effects of this recombinant protein in THP-1 cell lines, primary human macrophages, and PBMCs from different donors were investigated. We also explored the possible mechanisms underlying the observed antiviral effects. Our data showed the biphasic inhibitory and promotion effects of different concentrations of soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L protein on R5 tropic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in THP-1 cell lines, human macrophages, and PBMCs from clinical isolates. We demonstrated that soluble recombinant CCR5-T4L acts as a HIV-1 co-receptor, interacts with wild type CCR5, down-regulates the surface CCR5 expression in human macrophages, and interacts with CCL5 to inhibit macrophage migration. Using binding assays, we further determined that recombinant CCR5-T4L and [125I]-CCL5 compete for the same binding site on wild type CCR5. Our results suggest that recombinant CCR5-T4L protein marginally promotes HIV-1 infection at low concentrations and markedly inhibits infection at higher concentrations. This recombinant protein may be helpful in the future development of anti-HIV-1 therapeutic agents.

  15. CCR5 receptor antagonists in preclinical to phase II clinical development for treatment of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michelle B; Giesler, Kyle E; Tahirovic, Yesim A; Truax, Valarie M; Liotta, Dennis C; Wilson, Lawrence J

    2016-12-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 has garnered significant attention in recent years as a target to treat HIV infection largely due to the approval and success of the drug Maraviroc. The side effects and inefficiencies with other first generation agents led to failed clinical trials, prompting the development of newer CCR5 antagonists. Areas covered: This review aims to survey the current status of 'next generation' CCR5 antagonists in the preclinical pipeline with an emphasis on emerging agents for the treatment of HIV infection. These efforts have culminated in the identification of advanced second-generation agents to reach the clinic and the dual CCR5/CCR2 antagonist Cenicriviroc as the most advanced currently in phase II clinical studies. Expert opinion: The clinical success of CCR5 inhibitors for treatment of HIV infection has rested largely on studies of Maraviroc and a second-generation dual CCR5/CCR2 antagonist Cenicriviroc. Although research efforts identified several promising preclinical candidates, these were dropped during early clinical studies. Despite patient access to Maraviroc, there is insufficient enthusiasm surrounding its use as front-line therapy for treatment of HIV. The non-HIV infection related development activities for Maraviroc and Cenicriviroc may help drive future interests.

  16. Elucidation of the CCR1- and CCR5-binding modes of MIP-1α by application of an NMR spectra reconstruction method to the transferred cross-saturation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiura, Chie; Ueda, Takumi; Kofuku, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Masahiko; Okude, Junya; Kondo, Keita; Shiraishi, Yutaro; Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    C–C chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) and CCR5 are involved in various inflammation and immune responses, and regulate the progression of the autoimmune diseases differently. However, the number of residues identified at the binding interface was not sufficient to clarify the differences in the CCR1- and CCR5-binding modes to MIP-1α, because the NMR measurement time for CCR1 and CCR5 samples was limited to 24 h, due to their low stability. Here we applied a recently developed NMR spectra reconstruction method, Conservation of experimental data in ANAlysis of FOuRier, to the amide-directed transferred cross-saturation experiments of chemokine receptors, CCR1 and CCR5, embedded in lipid bilayers of the reconstituted high density lipoprotein, and MIP-1α. Our experiments revealed that the residues on the N-loop and β-sheets of MIP-1α are close to both CCR1 and CCR5, and those in the C-terminal helix region are close to CCR5. These results suggest that the genetic influence of the single nucleotide polymorphisms of MIP-1α that accompany substitution of residues in the C-terminal helix region, E57 and V63, would provide clues toward elucidating how the CCR5–MIP-1α interaction affects the progress of autoimmune diseases.

  17. Limited protective effect of the CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32 genotype on human immunodeficiency virus infection incidence in a cohort of patients with hemophilia and selection for genotypic X4 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Astrid K. N.; Christiansen, Claus Bohn; Attermann, Jørn

    2003-01-01

    The relationship among CCR5 genotype, cytomegalovirus infection, and disease progression and death was studied among 159 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients with hemophilia. One patient (0.6%) had the CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32 genotype (which occurs in ∼2% of the Scandinavian population...

  18. The dual CCR5 and CCR2 inhibitor cenicriviroc does not redistribute HIV into extracellular space: implications for plasma viral load and intracellular DNA decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Victor G; Hassounah, Said; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Oliveira, Maureen; Lefebvre, Eric; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Cenicriviroc is a potent antagonist of the chemokine coreceptors 5 and 2 (CCR5/CCR2) and blocks HIV-1 entry. The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has been shown in tissue culture to be able to repel cell-free virions from the cell surface into extracellular space. We hypothesized that cenicriviroc might exhibit a similar effect, and tested this using clinical samples from the Phase IIb study 652-2-202, by measuring rates of intracellular DNA decline. We also monitored viral RNA levels in culture fluids. We infected PM-1 cells with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL in the presence or absence of inhibitory concentrations of cenicriviroc (20 nM) or maraviroc (50 nM) or controls. Viral load levels and p24 were measured by ELISA, quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR at 4 h post-infection. Frozen PBMC DNA samples from 30 patients with virological success in the Phase IIb study were studied, as were early and late reverse transcript levels. Docking studies compared binding between cenicriviroc/CCR5 and maraviroc/CCR5. Unlike maraviroc, cenicriviroc did not cause an increase in the amount of virus present in culture fluids at 4 h compared with baseline. The use of cenicriviroc did, however, result in lower levels of intracellular viral DNA after 4 h. Structural modelling indicates that cenicriviroc binds more deeply than maraviroc to the hydrophobic pocket of CCR5, providing an explanation for the absence of viral rebound with cenicriviroc. In contrast to maraviroc, cenicriviroc does not repel virus back into extracellular space. Differences in results may be due to superior binding of cenicriviroc to CCR5 compared with maraviroc. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Analysis of CCR5 and SDF-1 genetic variants and HIV infection in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Padh, Harish

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 infection and progression exhibits interindividual variation. The polymorphism in the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, the principal coreceptors for HIV-1 and their ligands like SDF-1 have a profound effect in altering the HIV-1 disease progression rate. A single nucleotide polymorphism designated SDF1-3'UTR-801G-A has been associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection or delayed progression to AIDS. In this study, the SDF1-3'A polymorphism, CCR5∆32 polymorphism and CCR5 promoter polymorphism at positions 58934 G/T, 59029 G/A, 59353 T/C, 59356 C/T, 59402 A/G and 59653 C/T were analysed in Indian population. The polymorphisms in HIV-1 patients and healthy individuals were evaluated by conventional PCR, RFLP-PCR and direct sequencing techniques. The CCR5∆32 mutant allele was found to be almost absent in Indian population. The analysis of the CCR5-59356C/T polymorphism revealed a trend towards an association of the C allele with an increased risk of HIV-1 infection. The frequency of allele CCR5-59356C was higher in HIV-1 patients (100%) as compared to healthy control subjects (89%, P = 0.003). The correlation of SDF1-3'A and CCR5 promoter CCR5-58934G/T, CCR5-59029G/A, CCR5-59353T/C, CCR5-59402 A/G and CCR5-59653C/T polymorphisms and protection to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS was found to be nonsignificant. Nine haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected but were not significant in their protective role against HIV. Comparative analysis with global populations showed a noteworthy difference in CCR5 and SDF-1 polymorphisms' frequency distribution, indicating the ethnic variability of Indians. Although susceptibility to infections cannot be completely dependent on one or few genetic variants, it is important to remember that SDF-1 and CCR5 variants have been correlated globally with HIV-1 infection and disease progression. In the light of that, higher frequency of SDF-1 variants in the Indian population is noteworthy. © 2015 John

  20. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linker...

  1. Usefulness of competitive inhibitors of protein binding for improving the pharmacokinetics of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-conjugated bisphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP), an agent for treatment of painful bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuma [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan)]|[Kanazawa University, Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa (Japan); Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan)]|[Kyushu University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan)]|[University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Yoshida, Fukui (Japan); Takamura, Norito [Kyushu University of Health and Welfare, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nobeoka (Japan); Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Saji, Hideo [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hirofumi [Kanazawa University, Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    We have developed a {sup 186}Re-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine complex-conjugated bisphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP) for the treatment of painful bone metastases. We assumed competitive inhibitors of protein binding to be useful for procuring a favorable biodistribution of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP for the palliation of bone pain because it has been reported that the concurrent administration of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 and drugs with high affinity for serum protein produced competitive displacement at specific binding sites and enhanced total clearance and tissue distribution. The displacement effects of several protein-binding inhibitors on the protein binding of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP were investigated. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenously administering {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP into rats with ceftriaxone as a competitive protein-binding inhibitor or saline. The protein binding of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP in rat serum, human serum, and a human serum albumin solution was significantly decreased by the addition of ceftriaxone, which has high affinity for binding site I on serum albumin. In the biodistribution experiments, pretreatment with ceftriaxone enhanced the clearance of the radioactivity of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP in blood and nontarget tissues but had no effect on accumulation in bone. The findings suggested that the use of protein-binding competitive inhibitors would be effective in improving the pharmacokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals with high affinity for serum protein. (orig.)

  2. Frequency of CCR5delta32 in Brazilian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Vargas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A sample of 103 randomly chosen healthy individuals from Alegrete, RS, Brazil, was tested for the CCR5delta32 allele, which is known to influence susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. The CCR5delta32 allele was identified by PCR amplification using specific primers flanking the region of deletion, followed by electrophoresis on a 3% agarose gel. The data obtained were compared to those reported for other populations and interpreted in terms of Brazilian history. The individuals studied came from a highly admixed population. Most of them were identified as white (N = 59, while blacks and browns (mulattoes were N = 13 and N = 31, respectively. The observed frequencies, considering the white, black and brown samples (6.8, 3.8, and 6.4%, respectively, suggest an important European parental contribution, even in populations identified as black and brown. However, in Brazil as a whole, this allele shows gradients indicating a relatively good correlation with the classification based on skin color and other physical traits, used here to define major Brazilian population groups.

  3. Enriquecimento com calda do CCR para face de barragens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Wendler

    Full Text Available A construção de barragens de CCR prioriza a minimização de interferências, como a execução da face de montante, para garantia da produtividade. O estudo procurou avaliar as propriedades físicas do CCR enriquecido com calda, em substituição ao concreto convencional usualmente empregado na face, utilizando os mesmos materiais, central de concreto, mão de obra e equipamentos, empregados na construção da Usina Hidrelétrica Mauá. Para tanto foram feitos prismas experimentais de campo (com diferentes relações água/cimento e quantidades de calda e posterior extração de testemunhos, os quais foram submetidos a ensaios mecânicos e de permeabilidade. Os resultados mostraram que para relações água/cimento 0,74, o material resultante atendeu às especificações de projeto, para consumos de cimento notadamente menores (entre 70 e 85% do CCV.

  4. Amino- and Carboxyl-Terminal CCR5 Mutations in Brazilian HIV-1-Infected Women and Homology Model of p.L55Q CCR5 Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Giselle Calasans de Souza; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T; Jesus, Jaqueline Goes; Novaes, Thiago; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Sousa Júnior, Edivaldo Costa; Santos, Edson de Souza; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Zanette, Dalila Luciola; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior

    2015-07-01

    Genetic factors from an HIV-1 host can affect the rate of progression to AIDS and HIV infection. To investigate the frequency of mutations in the CCR5 gene, HIV-1 samples from infected women and uninfected individuals were selected for sequencing of the CCR5 gene regions encoding the N- and C-terminal protein domains. Physicochemical CCR5 modeling and potential protein domain analysis were performed in order to evaluate the impact of the mutations found in the properties and structure of CCR5. The p.L55Q mutation in the N-terminal protein domain was observed only in uninfected individuals, with an allelic frequency of 1.8%. Physicochemical analysis revealed that the p.L55Q mutation magnified the flexibility and accessibility profiles and the modeling of CCR5 structures showed resulting in a small deviation to the right, as well as a hydrophobic to hydrophilic property alteration. The p.L55Q mutation also resulted in a slight modification of the electrostatic load of this region. Additionally, three novel silent mutations were found at the C-terminal coding region among HIV-1-infected women. The results suggest that the p.L55Q mutation might alter CCR5 conformation. Further studies should be conducted to verify the role of this mutation in HIV-1 susceptibility.

  5. DMPD: Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited signalingpathways. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960231 Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-mediated gp120-elicited sign...82. Epub 2003 Jul 22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Macrophage activation through CCR5- and CXCR4-media...ted gp120-elicited signalingpathways. PubmedID 12960231 Title Macrophage activation through CCR

  6. The functional antagonist Met-RANTES: a modified agonist that induces differential CCR5 trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Debra L; Longden, James; Fechner, Gregory A; Avery, Vicky M

    2009-01-01

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a pro-inflammatory chemokine receptor that is expressed on cells of the immune system, and specializes in cell migration in response to inflammation and tissue damage. Due to its key role in cell communication and migration, this receptor is involved in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, in addition to HIV infection. Met-RANTES is a modified CCR5 ligand that has previously been shown to antagonize CCR5 activation and function in response to its natural ligands in vitro. In vivo, Met-RANTES is able to reduce inflammation in models of induced inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, due to the fact that Met-RANTES is also capable of partial agonist activity regarding receptor signaling and internalization, it is clear that Met-RANTES does not function as a conventional receptor antagonist. To further elucidate the effect of Met-RANTES on CCR5, receptor trafficking was investigated in a CHO-CCR5-GFP cell line using the Opera confocal plate reader. The internalization response of CCR5 was quantified, and showed that Met-RANTES internalized CCR5 in a slower, less potent manner than the agonists CCL3 and CCL5. Fluorescent organelle labeling and live cell imaging showed CCL3 and CCL5 caused CCR5 to traffic through sorting endosomes, recycling endosomes and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, Met-RANTES caused CCR5 to traffic through sorting endosomes and the Golgi apparatus in a manner that was independent of recycling endosomes. As receptor trafficking impacts on cell surface expression and the ability of the receptor to respond to more ligand, this information may indicate an alternative regulation of CCR5 by Met-RANTES that allows the modified ligand to reduce inflammation through stimulation of a pro-inflammatory receptor.

  7. CCR5 Haplotypes Influence HCV Serostatus in Caucasian Intravenous Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huik, Kristi; Avi, Radko; Carrillo, Andrew; Harper, Nathan; Pauskar, Merit; Sadam, Maarja; Karki, Tõnis; Krispin, Tõnu; Kongo, Ulvi-Kaire; Jermilova, Tatiana; Rüütel, Kristi; Talu, Ave; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Uusküla, Anneli; Ahuja, Sunil K.; He, Weijing; Lutsar, Irja

    2013-01-01

    Background Up to 90% HIV-1 positive intravenous drug users (IDUs) are co-infected with HCV. Although best recognized for its function as a major co-receptor for cell entry of HIV, CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. Here, we investigated whether CCR5 haplotypes influence HIV-1 and HCV seropositivity among 373 Caucasian IDUs from Estonia. Methods Of these IDUs, 56% and 44% were HIV and HCV seropositive, respectively, and 47% were coinfected. 500 blood donors seronegative for HIV and HCV were also evaluated. CCR5 haplotypes (HHA to HHG*2) were derived after genotyping nine CCR2–CCR5 polymorphisms. The association between CCR5 haplotypes with HIV and/or HCV seropositivity was determined using logistic regression analysis. Co-variates included in the models were length of intravenous drug use, HBV serostatus and copy number of CCL3L1, the gene encoding the most potent HIV-suppressive chemokine and ligand for CCR5. Results Compared to IDUs seronegative for both HCV and HIV (HCV−/HIV-), IDUs who were HCV+/HIV- and HCV+/HIV+were 92% and 82%, respectively, less likely to possess the CCR5-HHG*1 haplotype, after controlling for co-variates (Padjusted = 1.89×10−4 and 0.003, respectively). This association was mostly due to subjects bearing the CCR5 HHE and HHG*1 haplotype pairs. Approximately 25% andHIV- IDUs and HCV−/HIV- blood donors, respectively, possessed the HHE/HHG*1 genotype. Conclusions Our findings suggest that HHG*1-bearing CCR5 genotypes influence HCV seropositivity in a group of Caucasian IDUs. PMID:23936229

  8. ICARE/CATHARE V1: Capabilities and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabiego, M.; Guillard, V.; Fichot, F.; Marchand, O.; Chatelard, P.; Camous, F.; Barre, F.; Lefevre, B.

    2001-01-01

    The ICARE/CATHARE code is designed to calculate in a mechanistic way reactor core damage and primary circuit behaviour in PWRs. It is developed at the French Institute for Nuclear Protection and Safety (IPSN), as an analytical support of the in-pile experimental PHEBUS programs and for studies of reactor sequences in nuclear reactors. ICARE/CATHARE V1 includes the latest version of ICARE2 (V3Mod0) which features a comprehensive set of models for late degradation allowing to follow the materials from their early melting in the core region to their later relocation into the lower plenum. It also includes the thermal-hydraulics code CATHAREZ (V1.3L/b 1) which enables to take into account the whole primary circuit and its impact on the degradation. ICARE2 describes a set of components representing either the vessel structures (fuel and control rods, barrel, vessel, etc.) or the solid debris, or the melt, or the gas. The vessel volume is discretized on a two-dimensional cylindrical meshing. Each component is described by its volume fraction in the mesh, its composition and its temperature. The solid components also have a specific geometry: rods are represented as cylinders, debris particles as a set of spheres, etc.. Several applications have already been performed, either with the stand-alone version of ICARE2 or with the coupled ICARE/CATHARE version. An application of the coupled version to the calculation of the first two phases of the TMI2 accident is presented. It shows that the coupling enables both codes to extend their range of application towards the complete calculation of a severe accident sequence. Although the calculation could not be performed up to the late degradation phase, it proves the operability of the coupled version. The results are in good agreement with TMI data during the LOCA phase, and the core uncover and degradation phenomena are qualitatively well reproduced. An application of the stand-alone ICARE2 version, including all the late

  9. ICARE/CATHARE V1: Capabilities and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabiego, M.; Guillard, V.; Fichot, F.; Marchand, O.; Chatelard, P.; Camous, F.; Barre, F. [IPSN, CEA de Cadarache (France); Lefevre, B. [CS-SI Cadarache (France)

    2001-07-01

    The ICARE/CATHARE code is designed to calculate in a mechanistic way reactor core damage and primary circuit behaviour in PWRs. It is developed at the French Institute for Nuclear Protection and Safety (IPSN), as an analytical support of the in-pile experimental PHEBUS programs and for studies of reactor sequences in nuclear reactors. ICARE/CATHARE V1 includes the latest version of ICARE2 (V3Mod0) which features a comprehensive set of models for late degradation allowing to follow the materials from their early melting in the core region to their later relocation into the lower plenum. It also includes the thermal-hydraulics code CATHAREZ (V1.3L/b 1) which enables to take into account the whole primary circuit and its impact on the degradation. ICARE2 describes a set of components representing either the vessel structures (fuel and control rods, barrel, vessel, etc.) or the solid debris, or the melt, or the gas. The vessel volume is discretized on a two-dimensional cylindrical meshing. Each component is described by its volume fraction in the mesh, its composition and its temperature. The solid components also have a specific geometry: rods are represented as cylinders, debris particles as a set of spheres, etc.. Several applications have already been performed, either with the stand-alone version of ICARE2 or with the coupled ICARE/CATHARE version. An application of the coupled version to the calculation of the first two phases of the TMI2 accident is presented. It shows that the coupling enables both codes to extend their range of application towards the complete calculation of a severe accident sequence. Although the calculation could not be performed up to the late degradation phase, it proves the operability of the coupled version. The results are in good agreement with TMI data during the LOCA phase, and the core uncover and degradation phenomena are qualitatively well reproduced. An application of the stand-alone ICARE2 version, including all the late

  10. Molecular cloning, structure and expressional profiles of two novel single-exon genes (PoCCR6A and PoCCR6B) in the Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yong-zhen; Xu, Wen-teng; Jia, Xiao-dong; Chen, Song-lin

    2016-05-01

    CCR6 is an important binding receptor of CCL20 and beta-defensins, and has multiple functions in the innate and acquired immune responses. In this study, we cloned the PoCCR6A and PoCCR6B genes of the Japanese flounder and studied the gene structure and expression patterns of these two genes in bacterial infection. The full-length PoCCR6A cDNA is 1415 bp and the open reading frame (ORF) is 1113 bp, encoding a 370-amino-acid peptide. The full-length PoCCR6B cDNA is 2193 bp and the ORF is 1029 bp, encoding a 363-amino-acid peptide. The structures of PoCCR6A and PoCCR6B indicate that they are single-exon genes. The predicted proteins encoded by PoCCR6A and PoCCR6B have the typical G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family signature of seven transmembrane domains and several conserved structural features. A tissue distribution analysis showed that PoCCR6A is predominately expressed in the intestine, gill, and blood, and PoCCR6B in the gill, spleen, and liver. The expression patterns of the two chemokine receptors were analyzed during bacterial infection. In spleen and kidney, the expression of PoCCR6A was significantly upregulated at 24 h after infection, whereas the expression of PoCCR6B was steady at these time points. While in intestine, both of them were upregulated at 6 h-12 h after infection, and in gill the expression levels of them were upregulated at 24 h. The patterns of expression suggested that PoCCR6A and PoCCR6B play an important role in the immune response of the Japanese flounder, especially in the mucosal tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of 99mTc/99Tc-MAG3-biotin conjugates for antibody pretargeting strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gog, Frank B. van; Visser, Gerard W.M.; Gowrising, Radjish W.A.; Snow, Gordon B.; Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van

    1998-01-01

    Four 99m Tc-MAG3-biotin conjugates were synthesized to determine their potential use in antibody pretargeting strategies for radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS). To use these 99m Tc-MAG3-biotin conjugates as model compounds for 186 Re-MAG3-biotin conjugates for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), nanomolar amounts of 99 Tc were added as carrier to 99m Tc. The biotin derivatives used for the preparation of the conjugates - biocytin, biotin hydrazide, biotinyl-piperazine, and biotinyl-diaminosuccinic acid - differed at the site that is regarded to be susceptible to hydrolysis by biotinidase present in human plasma. All four conjugates were produced with high radiochemical purity, were stable in PBS, and demonstrated full binding capacity to streptavidin. The 99m Tc/ 99 Tc-MAG3-labeled biotinyl-piperazine and biotinyl-diaminosuccinic acid conjugates were stable in mouse as well as human plasma, whereas the corresponding biocytin and biotin hydrazide conjugates were rapidly degraded. The biodistribution in nude mice at 30 min after injection was similar for all conjugates, and a rapid blood clearance and high intestinal excretion were both observed. It is concluded that the metabolic routing of a conjugate containing biotin and MAG3 is dominated by these two moieties. For this reason, MAG3-biotin conjugates do not seem suited for pretargeted RIT, for which quantitative and fast renal excretion is a prerequisite to minimize radiation toxicity. However, in a pretargeted RIS approach the 99m Tc-MAG3-biotin conjugates might have potential

  12. Expression pattern of Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 in inherited retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Hideo; Koso, Hideto; Okano, Kiichiro; Sundermeier, Thomas R; Saito, Saburo; Watanabe, Sumiko; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    Though accumulating evidence suggests that microglia, resident macrophages in the retina, and bone marrow-derived macrophages can cause retinal inflammation which accelerates photoreceptor cell death, the details of how these cells are activated during retinal degeneration (RD) remain uncertain. Therefore, it is important to clarify which cells play a dominant role in fueling retinal inflammation. However, distinguishing between microglia and macrophages is difficult using conventional techniques such as cell markers (e.g., Iba-1). Recently, two mouse models for visualizing chemokine receptors were established, Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. As Cx3cr1 is expressed in microglia and Ccr2 is reportedly expressed in activated macrophages, these mice have the potential to distinguish microglia and macrophages, yielding novel information about the activation of these inflammatory cells and their individual roles in retinal inflammation. In this study, c-mer proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (Mertk) (-/-) mice, which show photoreceptor cell death due to defective retinal pigment epithelium phagocytosis, were employed as an animal model of RD. Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were established by breeding Mertk (-/-) , Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) , and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. The retinal morphology and pattern of inflammatory cell activation and invasion of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were evaluated using retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) flat mounts, retinal sections, and flow cytometry. Four-week-old Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice showed Cx3cr1-GFP-positive microglia in the inner retina. Cx3cr1-GFP and Ccr2-RFP dual positive activated microglia were observed in the outer retina and subretinal space of 6- and 8-week-old animals. Ccr2-RFP single positive bone marrow-derived macrophages were observed to migrate into the retina of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice. These invading cells were still observed in the

  13. Association of TGFβ1, TNFα, CCR2 and CCR5 gene polymorphisms in type-2 diabetes and renal insufficiency among Asian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Arvind

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines play an important role in the development of diabetic chronic renal insufficiency (CRI. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF β1 induces renal hypertrophy and fibrosis, and cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and regulated upon activation and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES mediate macrophage infiltration into kidney. Over expression of these chemokines leads to glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The effect of MCP-1 and RANTES on kidney is conferred by their receptors i.e., chemokine receptor (CCR-2 and CCR-5 respectively. We tested association of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from TGFβ1, TNFα, CCR2 and CCR5 genes among individuals with type-2 diabetes with and without renal insufficiency. Methods Type-2 diabetes subjects with chronic renal insufficiency (serum creatinine ≥ 3.0 mg/dl constituted the cases, and matched individuals with diabetes of duration ≥ 10 years and normoalbuminuria were evaluated as controls from four centres in India. Allelic and genotypic contributions of nine SNPs from TGFβ1, TNFα, CCR2 and CCR5 genes to diabetic CRI were tested by computing odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Sub-analysis of CRI cases diabetic retinopathy status as dependent variable and SNP genotypes as independent variable in a univariate logistic regression was also performed. Results SNPs Tyr81His and Thr263Ile in TGF β1 gene were monomorphic, and Arg25Pro in TGF β1 gene and Δ32 polymorphism in CCR5 gene were minor variants (minor allele frequency A SNP of CCR5 gene has been observed and the allele 59029A seems to confer predisposition to development of diabetic CRI (OR 1.39; CI 1.04–1.84. In CRI subjects a compound group of genotypes "GA and AA" of SNP G>A -800 was found to confer predisposition for proliferative retinopathy (OR 3.03; CI 1.08–8.50, p = 0.035. Conclusion Of the various cytokine gene

  14. Acetazolamide assisted Tc-99m MAG3 renography to assess renal blood flow reserve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horita, Yoshio; Hayashida, Kohei; Fukuchi, Kazuki

    2003-01-01

    The present study examines whether or not baseline and acetazolamide (ACZ) Tc-99m MAG3 renography can assess renal blood flow reserve. Renography proceeded for 50 min after sequential injections of 370 MBq Tc-99m MAG3 for baseline renography and 10 min after a 1,000 mg injection of ACZ for ACZ renography. Effective renal plasma flow of renal cortex (cERPF) in each kidney and the percentage change in cERPF of those parameters (ΔERPF) were obtained before and after the administration of ACZ in 10 subjects without hypertension or diabetes (normal group), in 10 with essential hypertension (hypertensive group) and in 10 who had Type 2 diabetes with hypertension (diabetic group). A placebo test was performed in the 10 without hypertension or diabetes using distilled water instead of ACZ (placebo group). The placebo test performed in the 10 without hypertension or diabetes using distilled water instead of ACZ indicated that the parameter variance between the two types of renogram was below 3.2%. The cERPF of baseline and ACZ Tc-99m MAG3 renography and ΔERPF in the normal, hypertensive and diabetic groups were 89±10 and 110±10 ml/min, 89±14 and 117±22 ml/min, 100±23 and 112±23 ml/min, respectively, and 24.5±13.5%, 26.0±9.7% and 12.3±11.1%, respectively. The difference in the cERPF value was significant in the normal and hypertensive groups whereas this did not change in the diabetic group before or after ACZ administration. We suggested that the ΔERPF determined by baseline and ACZ Tc-99m MAG3 renography is a useful parameter for assessing renal blood flow reserve. (author)

  15. TetraMag: a compact magnetizing device based on eight rotating permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, M; Mertins, H-Ch; Tesch, M; Berges, O; Feilbach, Herbert; Schneider, C M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we describe a novel magnetizing device based on eight rotatable permanent magnets arranged in a quadrupolar configuration, which is termed the TetraMag. TetraMag creates stable and homogeneous magnetic fields at the sample position with a resolution of 0.02 mT tunable between -570 mT and +570 mT. The field direction is continuously rotatable between 0° and 360° within the sample plane, while the field strength is maintained. A simplified mathematical description of TetraMag is developed leading to magnetic field calculations which are in good agreement with the experimental results. This versatile device avoids electrical energy dissipation, cooling mechanisms, and hysteresis effects known from classical electromagnets. It is ultrahigh vacuum compatible and it offers a completely free optical path over 180° for magneto-optical experiments. It is suitable for scattering experiments with synchrotron radiation and neutrons and may be employed in a large class of magnetization experiments.

  16. Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screening (MagMass) of Botanical Extracts for Inhibitors of 15-Lipoxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Michael D.; Walker, Elisabeth M.; Burton, Tristesse; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    To expedite the identification of active natural products in complex mixtures such as botanical extracts, a Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screening (MagMASS) procedure was developed. This technique utilizes target proteins immobilized on magnetic beads for rapid bioaffinity isolation of ligands from complex mixtures. A MagMASS method was developed and validated for 15-lipoxygenase. As a proof of concept, several North American prairie plants used medicinally by Native Americans were extracted with MeOH and screened. A hit from an extract of Proserpinaca palustris, also known as mermaid weed, was flagged for further characterization using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, dereplication, and identification using XCMS online. Through the application of high-resolution product ion tandem mass spectrometry, comparison with natural product databases and confirmation using standards, the hit was identified as quercitrin, which is a known inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase. The overall workflow of MagMASS is faster and more amendable to automation than alternative methods designed for screening botanical extracts or complex mixtures of combinatorial libraries. PMID:27802026

  17. Magnetic Microbead Affinity Selection Screening (MagMASS) of Botanical Extracts for Inhibitors of 15-Lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Michael D; Walker, Elisabeth M; Burton, Tristesse; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-11-23

    To expedite the identification of active natural products in complex mixtures such as botanical extracts, a magnetic microbead affinity selection screening (MagMASS) procedure was developed. This technique utilizes target proteins immobilized on magnetic beads for rapid bioaffinity isolation of ligands from complex mixtures. A MagMASS method was developed and validated for 15-lipoxygenase. As a proof of concept, several North American prairie plants used medicinally by Native Americans were extracted with MeOH and screened. A hit from an extract of Proserpinaca palustris, also known as mermaid weed, was flagged for further characterization using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, dereplication, and identification using XCMS online. Through the application of high-resolution product ion tandem mass spectrometry, comparison with natural product databases, and confirmation using standards, the hit was identified as quercitrin, which is a known inhibitor of 15-lipoxygenase. The overall workflow of MagMASS is faster and more amendable to automation than alternative methods designed for screening botanical extracts or complex mixtures of combinatorial libraries.

  18. The development and characterization of Tc-99m mecaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Eshima, D.

    1990-01-01

    I-131 orth-iodohippuric (OIH) acid is a widely used renal radiopharmaceutical but it is limited due to the suboptimal imaging properties of the I-131 radionuclide and the relatively high radiation dose. Recent work has focused on the development of Tc-99m renal tubular function agents which would utilize the optimal radionuclidic properties and availability of Tc-99m, provide comparable clinical information to that obtained with OIH and allow the evaluation of renal perfusion. The triamide mercaptide (N 3 S) donor ligand system has yielded the most promising Tc-99m tubular function agent to date. Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine MAG 3 does not enter the red blood cell. A simple kit formulation has been developed which yields a stable Tc-99m MAG 3 complex in high radiochemical purity. Studies in normal volunteers and patients indicate that Tc-99m MAG 3 is an excellent Tc-99m renal tubular agent but its clearance is only 50-60% that of OIH. 42 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  19. The Effect of External Magnetic Fields on the MRT Instability in MagLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Mark; Peterson, Kyle; Weis, Matthew; Lau, Yue Ying

    2014-10-01

    Recent experiments on MagLIF which incorporate an external B-field suggest that the MRT instability within the liner has a different behavior than without the B-field. Previous work by Chandrasekhar and Harris have illustrated how the MRT growth rate, assuming fixed liner density and fixed acceleration, can change due to the presence of an external B-field. In this work, we show how the growth rate of the MRT instability is dynamically affected by the rapidly varying acceleration, liner density, and surface magnetic field, which is composed of the external B-field and the drive B-field of the liner in the MagLIF experiments. In addition, we also examine the effects of finite liner resistivity on MRT growth, which gives rise to an additional time scale corresponding to magnetic diffusion. We discuss the implications of this result for future MagLIF designs. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. The coreceptor mutation CCR5Δ32 influences the dynamics of HIV epidemics and is selected for by HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Amy D.; Wigginton, Janis; Kirschner, Denise

    2001-01-01

    We explore the impact of a host genetic factor on heterosexual HIV epidemics by using a deterministic mathematical model. A protective allele unequally distributed across populations is exemplified in our models by the 32-bp deletion in the host-cell chemokine receptor CCR5, CCR5Δ32. Individuals homozygous for CCR5Δ32 are protected against HIV infection whereas those heterozygous for CCR5Δ32 have lower pre-AIDS viral loads and delayed progression to AIDS. CCR5Δ32 may limit HIV spread by decre...

  1. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, James M.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4+ T lymphocytes. Howeve...

  2. Effects of chemokine receptor signalling on cognition-like, emotion-like and sociability behaviours of CCR6 and CCR7 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaehne, E J; Baune, B T

    2014-03-15

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism of neuropsychiatric disorders. Chemokines, which are a part of the immune system, have effects on various aspects of brain function, but little is known about their effects on behaviour. We have compared the cognition-like behaviour (learning and spatial memory) of CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice with wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, in the Barnes maze, as well as a range of other behaviours, including exploratory, anxiety and depression-like behaviour, using a battery of tests. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also measured. In the Barnes maze, CCR7(-/-) mice were shown to take longer to learn the location of the escape box on the 1st of 4 days of training. In the behavioural battery, CCR6(-/-) mice showed higher locomotor activity and lower anxiety in the open field test, and a lack of preference for social novelty in a sociability test. CCR7(-/-) mice behaved much like WT mice, although showed higher anxiety in Elevated Zero Maze. While baseline saccharin preference in a 2-bottle choice test, a test for anhedonia depression-like behaviour, was equal in all strains at baseline, weekly tests showed that both CCR6(-/-) and CCR7(-/-) mice developed a decreased preference for saccharin compared to WT over time. There were no differences between strains in any of the cytokines measured. These results suggest that chemokine receptors may play a role in cognition and learning behaviour, as well as anxiety and other behaviours, although the biological mechanisms are still unclear. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CCR5 down-regulates osteoclast function in orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, I; Taddei, S R A; Garlet, G P; Garlet, T P; Teixeira, A L; Silva, T A; Teixeira, M M

    2009-11-01

    During orthodontic tooth movement, there is local production of chemokines and an influx of leukocytes into the periodontium. CCL5 plays an important role in osteoclast recruitment and activation. This study aimed to investigate whether the CCR5-receptor influences these events and, consequently, orthodontic tooth movement. An orthodontic appliance was placed in wild-type mice (WT) and CCR5-deficient mice (CCR5(-/-)). The expression of mediators involved in bone remodeling was evaluated in periodontal tissues by Real-time PCR. The number of TRAP-positive osteoclasts and the expression of cathepsin K, RANKL, and MMP13 were significantly higher in CCR5(-/-). Meanwhile, the expression of two osteoblastic differentiation markers, RUNX2 and osteocalcin, and that of bone resorption regulators, IL-10 and OPG, were lower in CCR5(-/-). Analysis of the data also showed that CCR5(-/-) exhibited a greater amount of tooth movement after 7 days of mechanical loading. The results suggested that CCR5 might be a down-regulator of alveolar bone resorption during orthodontic movement.

  4. Molecular recognition of CCR5 by an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2014-01-01

    The binding of protein HIV-1 gp120 to coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4 is a key step of the HIV-1 entry to the host cell, and is predominantly mediated through the V3 loop fragment of HIV-1 gp120. In the present work, we delineate the molecular recognition of chemokine receptor CCR5 by a dual tropic HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop, using a comprehensive set of computational tools predominantly based on molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. We report, what is to our knowledge, the first complete HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structure, which includes the whole V3 loop and the N-terminus of CCR5, and exhibits exceptional agreement with previous experimental findings. The computationally derived structure sheds light into the functional role of HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop and CCR5 residues associated with the HIV-1 coreceptor activity, and provides insights into the HIV-1 coreceptor selectivity and the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 gp120 by maraviroc. By comparing the binding of the specific dual tropic HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop with CCR5 and CXCR4, we observe that the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop residues 13-21, which include the tip, share nearly identical structural and energetic properties in complex with both coreceptors. This result paves the way for the design of dual CCR5/CXCR4 targeted peptides as novel potential anti-AIDS therapeutics.

  5. Decreased HIV type 1 transcription in CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes during suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C; Lada, Steven M; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D; Deeks, Steven G; Pillai, Satish K

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P=.035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P=.013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2-long terminal repeat circular DNA (P=.013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2=0.136; P=.002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Renal scintigraphy in the 21st Century 99m Tc-MAG3 with zero time injection of furosemide (MAG3-F0): a fast and easy protocol, one for all indications. Part 1. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfakianakis, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    In this work the MAG 3 -F 0 protocol is presented. Did you ever want to have one fast and easy protocol for Scintirenography?. The same for all indications. (Parenchymal and Drainage ). Irrespective of the age of the patient, the degree of impairment of the renal function, the general clinical condition of the patient, and obtain also information about prognosis absolutely safely and reproducibly. This is the MAG 3 -F 0 protocol. (Author)

  7. Control of Both Myeloid Cell Infiltration and Angiogenesis by CCR1 Promotes Liver Cancer Metastasis Development in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Paul Rodero

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1 by tumor cells has been associated with protumoral activity; however, its role in nontumoral cells during tumor development remains elusive. Here, we investigated the role of CCR1 deletion on stromal and hematopoietic cells in a liver metastasis tumor model. Metastasis development was strongly impaired in CCR1-deficient mice compared to control mice and was associated with reduced liver monocyte infiltration. To decipher the role of myeloid cells, sublethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with CCR1-deficient bone marrow (BM and showed better survival rates than the control reconstituted mice. These results point toward the involvement of CCR1 myeloid cell infiltration in the promotion of tumor burden. In addition, survival rates were extended in CCR1-deficient mice receiving either control or CCR1-deficient BM, indicating that host CCR1 expression on nonhematopoietic cells also supports tumor growth. Finally, we found defective tumor-induced neoangiogenesis (in vitro and in vivo in CCR1-deficient mice. Overall, our results indicate that CCR1 expression by both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells favors tumor aggressiveness. We propose CCR1 as a potential therapeutical target for liver metastasis therapy.

  8. A case study presentation: The MAG3 captopril renal scan, which side are you on ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, A. [The Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC (Australia). Departmen of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: A 68-year-old woman with widespread vascular disease presented to the Nuclear Medicine Department with severe hypertension, (a blood pressure of 200/160 supine), a known small right kidney, and a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. A baseline renal scan was performed with IV administration of 300 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled MAG3. A normal left kidney was demonstrated, with a Grade 0 renogram pattern. The right kidney was non visualised and non functioning. The patient was then administered orally with 25 mg of A.C.E. inhibitor captopril and her blood pressure fell by greater than 100 mm Hg. A second MAG3 Renal Scan was performed. The finding conflicted with results of a Renal Artery Angiogram and Renal Artery Doppler Ultrasound, both demonstrating a normal left renal artery. A repeat MAG3 Renal scan with captopril challenge was performed. Differential diagnosis included: 1.Left sided microvascular disease; 2. A functioning though very ischaemic right kidney that was producing renin, suggested by contrast opacification of the right renal cortex on CT; or 3. A false negative renal artery angiogram, with non-visualisation of an arterial stenosis caused by thrombus or compression of the left renal artery by the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Subsequent Renal Vein Renin Sampling measured left renal vein renin activity at 4.50,{mu}g/L/h, (compared with 4.80{mu}g/L/h in the IVC). Right renal vein renin activity was 13.20{mu}g/L/h. This lateralization of renin secretion to the right side with suppression of left sided secretion suggested that the renovascular hypertension was caused by the right kidney. This was a very unusual result, as the MAG3 captopril renal scan had incorrectly and strongly suggested a left sided origin to the renovascular hypertension. In addition, the right kidney not seen to accumulate MAG3 was in fact functioning sufficiently to produce renin. It is hypothesized that the left kidney had adjusted to allow normal function only at very high

  9. A case study presentation: The MAG3 captopril renal scan, which side are you on ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A 68-year-old woman with widespread vascular disease presented to the Nuclear Medicine Department with severe hypertension, (a blood pressure of 200/160 supine), a known small right kidney, and a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. A baseline renal scan was performed with IV administration of 300 MBq of 99m Tc-labelled MAG3. A normal left kidney was demonstrated, with a Grade 0 renogram pattern. The right kidney was non visualised and non functioning. The patient was then administered orally with 25 mg of A.C.E. inhibitor captopril and her blood pressure fell by greater than 100 mm Hg. A second MAG3 Renal Scan was performed. The finding conflicted with results of a Renal Artery Angiogram and Renal Artery Doppler Ultrasound, both demonstrating a normal left renal artery. A repeat MAG3 Renal scan with captopril challenge was performed. Differential diagnosis included: 1.Left sided microvascular disease; 2. A functioning though very ischaemic right kidney that was producing renin, suggested by contrast opacification of the right renal cortex on CT; or 3. A false negative renal artery angiogram, with non-visualisation of an arterial stenosis caused by thrombus or compression of the left renal artery by the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Subsequent Renal Vein Renin Sampling measured left renal vein renin activity at 4.50,μg/L/h, (compared with 4.80μg/L/h in the IVC). Right renal vein renin activity was 13.20μg/L/h. This lateralization of renin secretion to the right side with suppression of left sided secretion suggested that the renovascular hypertension was caused by the right kidney. This was a very unusual result, as the MAG3 captopril renal scan had incorrectly and strongly suggested a left sided origin to the renovascular hypertension. In addition, the right kidney not seen to accumulate MAG3 was in fact functioning sufficiently to produce renin. It is hypothesized that the left kidney had adjusted to allow normal function only at very high circulating

  10. Epigenetic control of Ccr7 expression in distinct lineages of lung dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Timothy P; Nakano, Hideki; Kondilis-Mangum, Hrisavgi D; Wade, Paul A; Cook, Donald N

    2014-11-15

    Adaptive immune responses to inhaled allergens are induced following CCR7-dependent migration of precursor of dendritic cell (pre-DC)-derived conventional DCs (cDCs) from the lung to regional lymph nodes. However, monocyte-derived (moDCs) in the lung express very low levels of Ccr7 and consequently do not migrate efficiently to LN. To investigate the molecular mechanisms that underlie this dichotomy, we studied epigenetic modifications at the Ccr7 locus of murine cDCs and moDCs. When expanded from bone marrow precursors, moDCs were enriched at the Ccr7 locus for trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), a modification associated with transcriptional repression. Similarly, moDCs prepared from the lung also displayed increased levels of H3K27me3 at the Ccr7 promoter compared with migratory cDCs from that organ. Analysis of DC progenitors revealed that epigenetic modification of Ccr7 does not occur early during DC lineage commitment because monocytes and pre-DCs both had low levels of Ccr7-associated H3K27me3. Rather, Ccr7 is gradually silenced during the differentiation of monocytes to moDCs. Thus, epigenetic modifications of the Ccr7 locus control the migration and therefore the function of DCs in vivo. These findings suggest that manipulating epigenetic mechanisms might be a novel approach to control DC migration and thereby improve DC-based vaccines and treat inflammatory diseases of the lung. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Involvement of CCR6/CCL20/IL-17 Axis in NSCLC Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Gail; Demma, Jonathan; Vernea, Fiona; Beider, Katia; Shlomai, Zippora; Wald, Hanna; Zamir, Gideon; Shapira, Oz M.; Peled, Amnon; Wald, Ori

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Autocrine and paracrine chemokine/chemokine receptor-based interactions promote non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) carcinogenesis. CCL20/CCR6 interactions are involved in prostatic and colonic malignancy pathogenesis. The expression and function of CCL20/CCR6 and its related Th-17 type immune response in NSCLC is not yet defined. We sought to characterize the role of the CCL20/CCR6/IL-17 axis in NSCLC tumor growth. Methods A specialized histopathologist blindly assessed CCL20/CCR6 expression levels in 49 tissue samples of NSCLC patients operated in our department. Results were correlated to disease progression. Colony assays, ERK signaling and chemokine production were measured to assess cancer cell responsiveness to CCL20 and IL-17 stimulation. Results CCL20 was highly expressed in the majority (38/49, 77.5%) of tumor samples. Only a minority of samples (8/49, 16.5%) showed high CCR6 expression. High CCR6 expression was associated with a shorter disease-free survival (P = 0.008) and conferred a disease stage-independent 4.87-fold increased risk for disease recurrence (P = 0.0076, CI 95% 1.52–15.563). Cancerous cell colony-forming capacity was increased by CCL20 stimulation; this effect was dependent in part on ERK phosphorylation and signaling. IL-17 expression was detected in NSCLC; IL-17 potentiated the production of CCL20 by cancerous cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the CCL20/CCR6 axis promotes NSCLC disease progression. CCR6 is identified as a potential new prognostic marker and the CCL20/CCR6/IL-17 axis as a potential new therapeutic target. Larger scale studies are required to consolidate these observations. PMID:21949768

  12. DISTRIBUTION OF CCR2-64I GENE AMONG THE TRIBES AND CASTE POPULATION OF VIDARBHA, INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind B Chavhan

    2013-08-01

    Results: The genotyping for the CCR2-64I mutation among the selected tribe and a caste reveal that all of the tribes and a caste was found to be heterozygous for the CCR2-64I mutation. Among the tribes Gonds showed highest genotype frequency (29.28% and (11.76% for heterozygous (CCR2/64I and Homozygous (64I/64I respectively, having an allelic frequency (0.233. A pooled allelic frequencies of the wild-type allele CCR2 and CCR2 64I the variant were found to be 0.854 and 0.146, respectively. No significant deviations from the HWE were observed for tribes and a caste population for the CCR2- 64I mutant χ2=2.76. The study reports the presence of mutant CCR2- 64I gene in tribes and caste population from Vidarbha region.

  13. Quantum continual measurements and a posteriori collapse on CCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belavkin, V.P.

    1992-01-01

    A quantum stochastic model for the Markovian dynamics of an open system under the nondemolition unsharp observation which is continuous in time, is given. A stochastic equation for the posterior evolution of a quantum continuously observed system is derived and the spontaneous collapse (stochastically continuous reduction of the wave packet) is described. The quantum Langevin evolution equation is solved for the case of a quasi-free Hamiltonian in the initial CCR algebra with a linear output channel, and the posterior dynamics corresponding to an initial Gaussian state is found. It is shown for an example of the posterior dynamics of a quantum oscillator that any mixed state under a complete nondemolition measurement collapses exponentially to a pure Gaussian one. (orig.)

  14. Synthesis, formulation of nucleo-equipment and biological studies of the {sup 99m} Tc-MAG{sub 3}; Sintesis, formulacion de nucleo-equipos y estudios biologicos de la {sup 99m} Tc-MAG{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes H, L.; Lezama C, J.; Ferro F, G

    1991-10-15

    Technetium-99m-mercaptoacetyl glycylglycylglycine ({sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}) is introduced to replace o-iodohippurate (OIH) for renal function studies. In this paper we present the synthesis, labelling and biological evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc- MAG{sub 3} prepared in our laboratory. The precursor s-benzoyl-mercaptoacetyl glycyl glycylglycine (Bz-MAG{sub 3} ) was synthesized by condensation of glycylglycylglycine with chloroacetyl chloride to obtain chloroacetyl glycylglycylglycine and this product was condensate with sodium thiobenzoate. The Bz-MAG{sub 3} was characterized by IR and NMR. The labelling with {sup 99m}Tc was carried out at pH 9.0 using stannous chloride as a reducing agent with heating to boiling for 15 min. The benzoyl group is lost in this step, forming {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} complex with radiochemical purity of 99%. The biodistribution properties were evaluated in mice and a rapid renal extraction was apparent at the 10 minutes value (51.65% of the injected dose). The radiotracer was administered to 5 patients showing a good biological behavior. Based on these results, the {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} is expected to have widespread clinical utility in Mexico. (Author)

  15. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in in...

  16. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motley, Michael P; Madsen, Daniel H; Jürgensen, Henrik J

    2016-01-01

    cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished...... by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin...

  17. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  18. Synergistic combinations of the CCR5 inhibitor VCH-286 with other classes of HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asin-Milan, Odalis; Sylla, Mohamed; El-Far, Mohamed; Belanger-Jasmin, Geneviève; Haidara, Alpha; Blackburn, Julie; Chamberland, Annie; Tremblay, Cécile L

    2014-12-01

    Here, we evaluated the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of the experimental CCR5 inhibitor VCH-286 as a single agent or in combination with various classes of HIV-1 inhibitors. Although VCH-286 used alone had highly inhibitory activity, paired combinations with different drug classes led to synergistic or additive interactions. However, combinations with other CCR5 inhibitors led to effects ranging from synergy to antagonism. We suggest that caution should be exercised when combining CCR5 inhibitors in vivo. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. CD4-independent use of the CCR5 receptor by sequential primary SIVsm isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorstensson Rigmor

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD4-independence has been taken as a sign of a more open envelope structure that is more accessible to neutralizing antibodies and may confer altered cell tropism. In the present study, we analyzed SIVsm isolates for CD4-independent use of CCR5, mode of CCR5-use and macrophage tropism. The isolates have been collected sequentially from 13 experimentally infected cynomolgus macaques and have previously been shown to use CCR5 together with CD4. Furthermore, viruses obtained early after infection were neutralization sensitive, while neutralization resistance appeared already three months after infection in monkeys with progressive immunodeficiency. Results Depending whether isolated early or late in infection, two phenotypes of CD4-independent use of CCR5 could be observed. The inoculum virus (SIVsm isolate SMM-3 and reisolates obtained early in infection often showed a pronounced CD4-independence since virus production and/or syncytia induction could be detected directly in NP-2 cells expressing CCR5 but not CD4 (CD4-independent-HIGH. Conversely, late isolates were often more CD4-dependent in that productive infection in NP-2/CCR5 cells was in most cases weak and was revealed only after cocultivation of infected NP-2/CCR5 cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (CD4-independent-LOW. Considering neutralization sensitivity of these isolates, newly infected macaques often harbored virus populations with a CD4-independent-HIGH and neutralization sensitive phenotype that changed to a CD4-independent-LOW and neutralization resistant virus population in the course of infection. Phenotype changes occurred faster in progressor than long-term non-progressor macaques. The phenotypes were not reflected by macrophage tropism, since all isolates replicated efficiently in macrophages. Infection of cells expressing CCR5/CXCR4 chimeric receptors revealed that SIVsm used the CCR5 receptor in a different mode than HIV-1. Conclusion Our

  20. Diuresis renography; A simultaneous comparison between sup 131 I-hippuran and sup 99 Tc sup m -MAG sub 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hvid-Jacobsen, K.; Thomsen, H.S.; Nielsen, S.L. (Koebenhavns Amts Sygehus, Herlev (Denmark). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1990-01-01

    In 20 patients investigated for unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction diuresis renography was performed simultaneously with {sup 131}I-hippuran and {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-MAG{sub 3} using a gamma camera with dual isotope facilities. Furosemide was administered routinely 20 min after radionuclide injection. No significant differences were found in fractional share between the two kidneys, time to maximal activity, residual activity at 20 and 30 min, or rate of emptying after furosemide administration. The MAG{sub 3} curves showed, however, better counting statistics and on scintigrams with MAG{sub 3} more anatomic details (extent of dilation and site of obstruction) could be seen. It is concluded, that MAG{sub 3} is superior to hippuran in the evaluation of patients with possible unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction by diuresis renography. (orig.).

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Leukocidin LukED and HIV-1 gp120 Target Different Sequence Determinants on CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kayan; Schultz, Megan; Reyes-Robles, Tamara; Vanwalscappel, Bénédicte; Horton, Joshua; Alonzo, Francis; Wu, Beili; Landau, Nathaniel R; Torres, Victor J

    2016-12-13

    Leukocidin ED (LukED) is a bicomponent pore-forming toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that lyses host cells by targeting the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), CXCR1, CXCR2, and DARC. In addition to its role as a receptor for LukED, CCR5 is the major coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and has been extensively studied. To compare how LukED and HIV-1 target CCR5, we analyzed their respective abilities to use CCR5/CCR2b chimeras to mediate cytotoxicity and virus entry. These analyses showed that the second and third extracellular loops (ECL) of CCR5 are necessary and sufficient for LukED to target the receptor and promote cell lysis. In contrast, the second ECL of CCR5 is necessary but not sufficient for HIV-1 infectivity. The analysis of CCR5 point mutations showed that glycine-163 is critical for HIV-1 infectivity, while arginine-274 and aspartic acid-276 are critical for LukED cytotoxicity. Point mutations in ECL2 diminished both HIV-1 infectivity and LukED cytotoxicity. Treatment of cells with LukED did not interfere with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infectivity, demonstrating that LukED and the viral envelope glycoprotein use nonoverlapping sites on CCR5. Analysis of point mutations in LukE showed that amino acids 64 to 69 in the rim domain are required for CCR5 targeting and cytotoxicity. Taking the results together, this study identified the molecular basis by which LukED targets CCR5, highlighting the divergent molecular interactions evolved by HIV-1 and LukED to interact with CCR5. The bicomponent pore-forming toxins are thought to play a vital role in the success of Staphylococcus aureus as a mammalian pathogen. One of the leukocidins, LukED, is necessary and sufficient for lethality in mice. At the molecular level, LukED causes cell lysis through binding to specific cellular receptors. CCR5 is one of the receptors targeted by LukED and is the major coreceptor for CCR5-tropic HIV-1. While the

  2. Annulus fibrosus cells express and utilize C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) for migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weijun; Liu, David; Zheng, Justin; Shi, Peng; Chou, Po-Hsin; Oh, Chundo; Chen, Di; An, Howard S; Chee, Ana

    2017-05-01

    Disc degeneration is associated with the progressive loss of the proteoglycan content of the intervertebral disc, decreased matrix synthesis, higher concentrations of proteolytic enzymes, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In previous studies, we have shown that C-C chemokine ligand (CCL)2, CCL3, and CCL5 are highly expressed by cultured nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells that have been treated by interleukin-1. The major function of these chemokines is to recruit immune cells into the disc. It is unclear if disc cells can respond to these chemokines. Recent studies by Phillips et al. (2015) showed that NP cells express a number of cytokines and chemokine receptors. The purpose of this study is to determine the gene and protein expression of C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)1, CCR2, and CCR5 in NP and AF cells, and to test if these receptors can respond to their ligands in these cells by cell signaling and migration. This is an in vitro study. For RNA, surface expression, and cell signaling studies, human cells were isolated from the NP and AF tissues collected after spine surgery or from donated spine segments (Gift of Hope Human Donor & Tissue Network of Illinois) and cultured in monolayer. The gene expression of human CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The surface expression of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was analyzed using flow cytometry and fluorescently tagged antibodies specific for these proteins. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation was analyzed from the cell lysates of NP and AF cells treated with CCL2 and CCL5 for 1 hour using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Migration of primary rabbit AF cells was assayed using 8-µm Corning Transwell inserts in the presence or absence of CCL5. This study was partially funded by a North American Spine Society 2014 Basic Research Grant Award ($50,000). RNA analysis showed that gene expression of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was evident in

  3. Poor Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid uptake, re-evaluation with Tc-99m MAG3 scintigraphy in Lowe syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca, Gokhan; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Demirel, Koray; Korkmaz, Meliha; Diri, Akif

    2011-01-01

    99m Tc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) is filtered through the glomeruli and reabsorbed by the proximal tubules as low molecular weight proteins. In Lowe syndrome this mechanism is impaired and so poor DMSA uptake is seen. Poor DMSA uptake was shown in very few studies, but none mentioned normal 99m Tc MAG3 uptake. In this case, the patient had poor DMSA uptake, normal MAG3 uptake and a neurogenic bladder in anterior to the left kidney that attenuates left kidney. (author)

  4. Advantages of MAG-STT Welding Process for Root Pass Welding in the Oil and Gas Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandzic Adi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper describesthe basics of modern MAG-STT welding process and its advantages for root pass welding of construction steels in oil and gas industry. MAG-STT welding process was compared with competitive arc welding processes (SMAW and TIG, which are also used for root pass welding on pipes and plates. After experimental tests, the obtained results are analyzed and presented in this paper

  5. Synthesis, formulation of nucleo-equipment and biological studies of the 99m Tc-MAG3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes H, L.; Lezama C, J.; Ferro F, G.

    1991-10-01

    Technetium-99m-mercaptoacetyl glycylglycylglycine ( 99m Tc-MAG 3 ) is introduced to replace o-iodohippurate (OIH) for renal function studies. In this paper we present the synthesis, labelling and biological evaluation of 99m Tc- MAG 3 prepared in our laboratory. The precursor s-benzoyl-mercaptoacetyl glycyl glycylglycine (Bz-MAG 3 ) was synthesized by condensation of glycylglycylglycine with chloroacetyl chloride to obtain chloroacetyl glycylglycylglycine and this product was condensate with sodium thiobenzoate. The Bz-MAG 3 was characterized by IR and NMR. The labelling with 99m Tc was carried out at pH 9.0 using stannous chloride as a reducing agent with heating to boiling for 15 min. The benzoyl group is lost in this step, forming 99m Tc-MAG 3 complex with radiochemical purity of 99%. The biodistribution properties were evaluated in mice and a rapid renal extraction was apparent at the 10 minutes value (51.65% of the injected dose). The radiotracer was administered to 5 patients showing a good biological behavior. Based on these results, the 99m Tc-MAG 3 is expected to have widespread clinical utility in Mexico. (Author)

  6. Chemokine CCL2 and chemokine receptor CCR2 in early active multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M; Strieter, R M

    2004-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 have been strongly implicated in disease pathogenesis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), whereas data on the CCL2-CCR2 axis are scarce in MS. We studied...... the expression of CCR2 on leukocytes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis and MS, and the concentration of CCL2 in the CSF from these patients. Results were compared with the results in non-inflammatory neurological controls and were correlated with other...... parameters (magnetic resonance imaging and CSF data). Our findings suggest a limited role for CCL2/CCR2 in early active MS....

  7. Biased small-molecule ligands for selective inhibition of HIV-1 cell entry via CCR5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Christian; Spiess, Katja; von Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV's use of CCR5 as the primary coreceptor in fusion, the focus on developing small-molecule receptor antagonists for inhibition hereof has only resulted in one single drug, Maraviroc. We therefore investigated the possibility of using small-molecule CCR5 agonists as HIV-1...... fusion inhibitors. A virus-free cell-based fusion reporter assay, based on mixing "effector cells" (expressing HIV Env and luciferase activator) with "target cells" (expressing CD4, CCR5 wild type or a selection of well-described mutations, and luciferase reporter), was used as fusion readout. Receptor...... expression was evaluated by ELISA and fluorescence microscopy. On CCR5 WT, Maraviroc and Aplaviroc inhibited fusion with high potencies (EC 50 values of 91 and 501 nM, respectively), whereas removal of key residues for both antagonists (Glu283Ala) or Maraviroc alone (Tyr251Ala) prevented fusion inhibition...

  8. [Novel echogenic needle for ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block "Hakko type CCR"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Wataru; Yasumura, Rie; Kaneko, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Yoshiro; Kamada, Takaaki; Yoshikawa, Tamotsu; Aoyama, Yasuhiko

    2009-04-01

    A novel echogenic insulated nerve block needle (CCR-needle: Echogenic Needle Type CCR; Hakko, Japan) is commercially available since 2006 in Japan. This needle has three echogenic dimples, namely corner cube reflectors (CCR) on its tip. The CCR-needle will potentially provide a significant advantage for detecting the needle tip. In this report, we firstly evaluated this new disposable echogenic needle in simulation phantom, and demonstrated improved visibility of the needle tip. Afterwards, an interscalene brachial plexus block was performed on a male patient undergoing shoulder surgery. The needle insertion procedure was the "out of plane" ultrasound-guided technique using simultaneous electrical nerve stimulation. The surgery was successfully conducted without any complications.

  9. Study progress of CCR3 in wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Wei Wu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the study, chemokine receptor 3(CCR3in the eye is mainly distributed in retinal pigment epithelial cells, and also expressed in the choroidal vascular endothelial cells(CECs. The specificity of CCR3's high expression in wet age-related macular degeneration(AMDwas found, and it is proved that in wet-AMD patients, it plays an important role in the formation of choroidal neovascularization(CNV. In this paper, the structure, function, the problem of current research and the future direction of CCR3 were summarized. It is believed that with the further research on CCR3, it will not only help us to find a new method of wet-AMD diagnosis and treatment, but also may provide an important reference for other CNV disease research and new anti-CNV drugs.

  10. Quantifying CD4/CCR5 Usage Efficiency of HIV-1 Env Using the Affinofile System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas E; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells involves the interaction of the HIV envelope (Env) with both a primary receptor (CD4) and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5). The relative efficiency with which a particular Env uses these receptors is a major component of cellular tropism in the context of entry and is related to a variety of pathological Env phenotypes (Chikere et al. Virology 435:81-91, 2013). The protocols outlined in this chapter describe the use of the Affinofile system, a 293-based dual-inducible cell line that expresses up to 25 distinct combinations of CD4 and CCR5, as well as the associated Viral Entry Receptor Sensitivity Assay (VERSA) metrics used to summarize the CD4/CCR5-dependent infectivity results. This system allows for high-resolution profiling of CD4 and CCR5 usage efficiency in the context of unique viral phenotypes.

  11. CCR5 as a natural and modulated target for inhibition of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Bryan P; Boyd, Maureen P; Impey, Helen; Breton, Louis R; Bartlett, Jeffrey S; Symonds, Geoff P; Hütter, Gero

    2013-12-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of target cells requires CD4 and a co-receptor, predominantly the chemokine receptor CCR5. CCR5-delta32 homozygosity results in a truncated protein providing natural protection against HIV infection-this without detrimental effects to the host-and transplantation of CCR5-delta32 stem cells in a patient with HIV ("Berlin patient") achieved viral eradication. As a more feasible approach gene-modification strategies are being developed to engineer cellular resistance to HIV using autologous cells. We have developed a dual therapeutic anti-HIV lentiviral vector (LVsh5/C46) that down-regulates CCR5 and inhibits HIV-1 fusion via cell surface expression of the gp41-derived peptide, C46. This construct, effective against multiple strains of both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, is being tested in Phase I/II trials by engineering HIV-resistant hematopoietic cells.

  12. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili [Scripps; (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  13. CCR5 limits cortical viral loads during West Nile virus infection of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Douglas M; Daniels, Brian P; Pasieka, TracyJo; Dorsey, Denise; Klein, Robyn S

    2015-12-15

    Cell-mediated immunity is critical for clearance of central nervous system (CNS) infection with the encephalitic flavivirus, West Nile virus (WNV). Prior studies from our laboratory have shown that WNV-infected neurons express chemoattractants that mediate recruitment of antiviral leukocytes into the CNS. Although the chemokine receptor, CCR5, has been shown to play an important role in CNS host defense during WNV infection, regional effects of its activity within the infected brain have not been defined. We used CCR5-deficient mice and an established murine model of WNV encephalitis to determine whether CCR5 activity impacts on WNV levels within the CNS in a region-specific fashion. Statistical comparisons between groups were made with one- or two-way analysis of variance; Bonferroni's post hoc test was subsequently used to compare individual means. Survival was analyzed by the log-rank test. Analyses were conducted using Prism software (GraphPad Prism). All data were expressed as means ± SEM. Differences were considered significant if P ≤ 0.05. As previously shown, lack of CCR5 activity led to increased symptomatic disease and mortality in mice after subcutaneous infection with WNV. Evaluation of viral burden in the footpad, draining lymph nodes, spleen, olfactory bulb, and cerebellum derived from WNV-infected wild-type, and CCR5(-/-) mice showed no differences between the genotypes. In contrast, WNV-infected, CCR5(-/-) mice exhibited significantly increased viral burden in cortical tissues, including the hippocampus, at day 8 post-infection. CNS regional studies of chemokine expression via luminex analysis revealed significantly increased expression of CCR5 ligands, CCL4 and CCL5, within the cortices of WNV-infected, CCR5(-/-) mice compared with those of similarly infected WT animals. Cortical elevations in viral loads and CCR5 ligands in WNV-infected, CCR5(-/-) mice, however, were associated with decreased numbers of infiltrating mononuclear cells

  14. CCR7 expressing mesenchymal stem cells potently inhibit graft-versus-host disease by spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    Full Text Available The clinical acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD-therapy of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is not as satisfactory as expected. Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs are the major niches serve to initiate immune responses or induce tolerance. Our previous study showed that CCR7 guide murine MSC line C3H10T1/2 migrating to SLOs. In this study, CCR7 gene was engineered into murine MSCs by lentivirus transfection system (MSCs/CCR7. The immunomodulatory mechanism of MSCs/CCR7 was further investigated. Provoked by inflammatory cytokines, MSCs/CCR7 increased the secretion of nitric oxide and calmed down the T cell immune response in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining results showed that transfused MSCs/CCR7 can migrate to and relocate at the appropriate T cell-rich zones within SLOs in vivo. MSCs/CCR7 displayed enhanced effect in prolonging the survival and alleviating the clinical scores of the GvHD mice than normal MSCs. Owing to the critical relocation sites, MSCs/CCR7 co-infusion potently made the T cells in SLOs more naïve like, thus control T cells trafficking from SLOs to the target organs. Through spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet, MSCs/CCR7 potently inhibited the development of GvHD. The study here provides a novel therapeutic strategy of MSCs/CCR7 infusion at a low dosage to give potent immunomodulatory effect for clinical immune disease therapy.

  15. Concordance of CCR5 Genotypes that Influence Cell-Mediated Immunity and HIV-1 Disease Progression Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catano, Gabriel; Chykarenko, Zoya A.; Mangano, Andrea; Anaya, J-M; Smith, Alison; Bologna, Rosa; Sen, Luisa; Clark, Robert A.; Lloyd, Andrew; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    We used cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, a powerful in vivo measure of cell-mediated immunity, to evaluate the relationships among cell-mediated immunity, AIDS, and polymorphisms in CCR5, the HIV-1 coreceptor. There was high concordance between CCR5 polymorphisms and haplotype pairs that influenced delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in healthy persons and HIV disease progression. In the cohorts examined, CCR5 genotypes containing -2459G/G (HHA/HHA, HHA/HHC, HHC/HHC) or -2459A/A (HHE/HHE) associated with salutary or detrimental delayed-type hypersensitivity and AIDS phenotypes, respectively. Accordingly, the CCR5-Δ32 allele, when paired with non-Δ32-bearing haplotypes that correlate with low (HHA, HHC) versus high (HHE) CCR5 transcriptional activity, associates with disease retardation or acceleration, respectively. Thus, the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity partly reflect the effect of the non-▵32 haplotype in a background of CCR5 haploinsufficiency. The correlations of increased delayed-type hypersensitivity with -2459G/G-containing CCR5 genotypes, reduced CCR5 expression, decreased viral replication, and disease retardation suggest that CCR5 may influence HIV infection and AIDS, at least in part, through effects on cell-mediated immunity. PMID:21288827

  16. Haplotypes in CCR5-CCR2, CCL3 and CCL5 are associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection in a Colombian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jorge A; Villegas-Ospina, Simón; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Rugeles, María T; Bedoya, Gabriel; Zapata, Wildeman

    2017-06-01

    Variants in genes encoding for HIV-1 co-receptors and their natural ligands have been individually associated to natural resistance to HIV-1 infection. However, the simultaneous presence of these variants has been poorly studied. To evaluate the association of single and multilocus haplotypes in genes coding for the viral co-receptors CCR5 and CCR2, and their ligands CCL3 and CCL5, with resistance or susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Nine variants in CCR5-CCR2, two SNPs in CCL3 and two in CCL5 were genotyped by PCR-RFLP in 35 seropositive (cases) and 49 HIV-1-exposed seronegative Colombian individuals (controls). Haplotypes were inferred using the Arlequin software, and their frequency in individual or combined loci was compared between cases and controls by the chi-square test. A p' value ;0.05 after Bonferroni correction was considered significant. Homozygosis of the human haplogroup (HH) E was absent in controls and frequent in cases, showing a tendency to susceptibility. The haplotypes C-C and T-T in CCL3 were associated with susceptibility (p'=0.016) and resistance (p';0.0001) to HIV-1 infection, respectively. Finally, in multilocus analysis, the haplotype combinations formed by HHC in CCR5-CCR2, T-T in CCL3 and G-C in CCL5 were associated with resistance (p'=0.006). Our results suggest that specific combinations of variants in genes from the same signaling pathway can define an HIV-1 resistant phenotype. Despite our small sample size, our statistically significant associations suggest strong effects; however, these results should be further validated in larger cohorts.

  17. Vasopressin receptors V1a and V2 are not osmosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Lykke; Assentoft, Mette; Fenton, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we investigated whether G protein-coupled signaling via the vasopressin receptors of the V1a and V2 subtypes (V1aR and V2R) could be obtained as a direct response to hyperosmolar challenges and/or whether hyperosmolar challenges could augment classical vasopressin-dependent V1aR signaling...... in AQP4-dependent water permeability was observed, although osmotic challenges failed to mimic vasopressin-dependent V1aR-mediated internalization of AQP4. Direct monitoring of inositol phosphate (IP) production of V1aR-expressing COS-7 cells demonstrated an efficient vasopressin-dependent response...

  18. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. CCR5 receptor antagonists: discovery and SAR study of guanylhydrazone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Robert G; Arnaiz, Damian O; Chou, Yuo-Ling; Davey, Dave; Dunning, Laura; Lee, Wheeseong; Lu, Shou-Fu; Onuffer, James; Ye, Bin; Phillips, Gary

    2007-01-01

    High throughput screening (HTS) led to the identification of the guanylhydrazone of 2-(4-chlorobenzyloxy)-5-bromobenzaldehyde as a CCR5 receptor antagonist. Initial modifications of the guanylhydrazone series indicated that substitution of the benzyl group at the para-position was well tolerated. Substitution at the 5-position of the central phenyl ring was critical for potency. Replacement of the guanylhydrazone group led to the discovery of a novel series of CCR5 antagonists.

  20. Ccr2 deletion dissociates cavity size and tau pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Kim, Daniel; Katsumoto, Atsuko; Kokiko-Cochran, O Nicole; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2015-12-03

    Millions of people experience traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a result of falls, car accidents, sports injury, and blast. TBI has been associated with the development of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In the initial hours and days, the pathology of TBI comprises neuronal injury, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and inflammation. At the cellular level, the inflammatory reaction consists of responses by brain-resident microglia, astrocytes, and vascular elements as well as infiltration of peripheral cells. After TBI, signaling by chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) to the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) is a key regulator of brain infiltration by monocytes. We utilized mice with one or both copies of Ccr2 disrupted by red fluorescent protein (RFP, Ccr2 (RFP/+) and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) ). We subjected these mice to the mild lateral fluid percussion model of TBI and examined several pathological outcomes 3 days later in order to determine the effects of altered monocyte entry into the brain. Ccr2 deletion reduced monocyte infiltration, diminished lesion cavity volume, and lessened axonal damage after mild TBI, but the microglial reaction to the lesion was not affected. We further examined phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which aggregates in brains of people with TBI, AD, and CTE. Surprisingly, Ccr2 deletion was associated with increased tau mislocalization to the cell body in the cortex and hippocampus by tissue staining and increased levels of phosphorylated tau in the hippocampus by Western blot. Disruption of CCR2 enhanced tau pathology and reduced cavity volume in the context of TBI. The data reveal a complex role for CCR2(+) monocytes in TBI, as monitored by cavity volume, axonal damage, and tau phosphorylation.

  1. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Adler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12% and lower in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%. Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Hercegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy subjects from Bosnia and Herzegovina (DNA collected 2011-2013.  Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (±10.7 years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary. 

  2. Biased small-molecule ligands for selective inhibition of HIV-1 cell entry via CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christian; Spiess, Katja; Lüttichau, Hans R; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2016-12-01

    Since the discovery of HIV's use of CCR5 as the primary coreceptor in fusion, the focus on developing small-molecule receptor antagonists for inhibition hereof has only resulted in one single drug, Maraviroc. We therefore investigated the possibility of using small-molecule CCR5 agonists as HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. A virus-free cell-based fusion reporter assay, based on mixing "effector cells" (expressing HIV Env and luciferase activator) with "target cells" (expressing CD4, CCR5 wild type or a selection of well-described mutations, and luciferase reporter), was used as fusion readout. Receptor expression was evaluated by ELISA and fluorescence microscopy. On CCR5 WT, Maraviroc and Aplaviroc inhibited fusion with high potencies (EC 50 values of 91 and 501 nM, respectively), whereas removal of key residues for both antagonists (Glu283Ala) or Maraviroc alone (Tyr251Ala) prevented fusion inhibition, establishing this assay as suitable for screening of HIV entry inhibitors. Both ligands inhibited HIV fusion on signaling-deficient CCR5 mutations (Tyr244Ala and Trp248Ala). Moreover, the steric hindrance CCR5 mutation (Gly286Phe) impaired fusion, presumably by a direct hindrance of gp120 interaction. Finally, the efficacy switch mutation (Leu203Phe) - converting small-molecule antagonists/inverse agonists to full agonists biased toward G-protein activation - uncovered that also small-molecule agonists can function as direct HIV-1 cell entry inhibitors. Importantly, no agonist-induced receptor internalization was observed for this mutation. Our studies of the pharmacodynamic requirements for HIV-1 fusion inhibitors highlight the possibility of future development of biased ligands with selective targeting of the HIV-CCR5 interaction without interfering with the normal functionality of CCR5.

  3. VEGF-production by CCR2-dependent macrophages contributes to laser-induced choroidal neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten A Krause

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most prevalent cause of blindness in the elderly, and its exsudative subtype critically depends on local production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF. Mononuclear phagocytes, such as macrophages and microglia cells, can produce VEGF. Their precursors, for example monocytes, can be recruited to sites of inflammation by the chemokine receptor CCR2, and this has been proposed to be important in AMD. To investigate the role of macrophages and CCR2 in AMD, we studied intracellular VEGF content in a laser-induced murine model of choroidal neovascularisation. To this end, we established a technique to quantify the VEGF content in cell subsets from the laser-treated retina and choroid separately. 3 days after laser, macrophage numbers and their VEGF content were substantially elevated in the choroid. Macrophage accumulation was CCR2-dependent, indicating recruitment from the circulation. In the retina, microglia cells were the main VEGF+ phagocyte type. A greater proportion of microglia cells contained VEGF after laser, and this was CCR2-independent. On day 6, VEGF-expressing macrophage numbers had already declined, whereas numbers of VEGF+ microglia cells remained increased. Other sources of VEGF detectable by flow cytometry included in dendritic cells and endothelial cells in both retina and choroid, and Müller cells/astrocytes in the retina. However, their VEGF content was not increased after laser. When we analyzed flatmounts of laser-treated eyes, CCR2-deficient mice showed reduced neovascular areas after 2 weeks, but this difference was not evident 3 weeks after laser. In summary, CCR2-dependent influx of macrophages causes a transient VEGF increase in the choroid. However, macrophages augmented choroidal neovascularization only initially, presumably because VEGF production by CCR2-independent eye cells prevailed at later time points. These findings identify macrophages as a relevant source

  4. Assessing tubular damage due to Cisplatin nephrotoxicity, using Tc-99m MAG3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohaib, M.; Zehra, T.; Saeed, S.; Yousuf, M.; Khan, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    Cisplatin causes direct injury to proximal convoluted tubules of the kidneys, toxicity similar to its tumour cytotoxicity. This study was performed to assess the utility of Tc-99m MAG3 to detect tubular damage. Ten patients, who were advised Cisplatin therapy as a part of chemotherapy plan for various types of cancers, were recruited to the study following ethical approval and informed consent. A baseline dynamic renal study was performed in all patients and was repeated approximately 5 weeks after the first dose of Cisplatin. All patients had normal serum urea and creatinine levels at the time of both visits. T-max and T 1/2 were determined from renograms time activity curves. Total renal uptake (TRU) of Tc-99m MAG3 was calculated from the integrated area under the curve from 1-2 minutes of the renogram. Furthermore ERPF was also estimated by using the single plasma sample method for Tc-99m MAG3. Results showed no significant difference in mean pre-therapy and post-therapy values of T-max (p=0.407) and T 1/2 (p=0.922). TRU was reduced from 27.8±8.2% at baseline to 24.5±8.7% after Cisplatin therapy, a reduction of 11.9% from the base line value. However this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.121). The reduction in ERPF was found to be 17.9% with mean ± SD value of 487.3±79.4 ml/min/1.73m 2 in the pre-treatment study and 400.0±38.8 ml/min/1.73m 2 in the post-treatment study. This was found to be statistically significant (p=0.009). It was concluded that ERPF determined from single sample formula using Tc-99m MAG3 may be used clinically to evaluate the tubular damage by cytotoxic drugs. The renogram parameters have less value in this regard. (author)

  5. Creating a FIESTA (Framework for Integrated Earth Science and Technology Applications) with MagIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (https://earthref.org/MagIC) has recently developed a containerized web application to considerably reduce the friction in contributing, exploring and combining valuable and complex datasets for the paleo-, geo- and rock magnetic scientific community. The data produced in this scientific domain are inherently hierarchical and the communities evolving approaches to this scientific workflow, from sampling to taking measurements to multiple levels of interpretations, require a large and flexible data model to adequately annotate the results and ensure reproducibility. Historically, contributing such detail in a consistent format has been prohibitively time consuming and often resulted in only publishing the highly derived interpretations. The new open-source (https://github.com/earthref/MagIC) application provides a flexible upload tool integrated with the data model to easily create a validated contribution and a powerful search interface for discovering datasets and combining them to enable transformative science. MagIC is hosted at EarthRef.org along with several interdisciplinary geoscience databases. A FIESTA (Framework for Integrated Earth Science and Technology Applications) is being created by generalizing MagIC's web application for reuse in other domains. The application relies on a single configuration document that describes the routing, data model, component settings and external services integrations. The container hosts an isomorphic Meteor JavaScript application, MongoDB database and ElasticSearch search engine. Multiple containers can be configured as microservices to serve portions of the application or rely on externally hosted MongoDB, ElasticSearch, or third-party services to efficiently scale computational demands. FIESTA is particularly well suited for many Earth Science disciplines with its flexible data model, mapping, account management, upload tool to private workspaces, reference metadata, image

  6. Evaluation of 99mTc-MAG3 (mercaptoacetyltriglycine) renography for pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Kojiro; Adachi, Itaru; Doi, Kenji; Hou, Nobuyoshi; Komori, Tsuyoshi; Nakata, Yasunobu; Matsui, Ritsuo; Sueyoshi, Kouzou; Narabayashi, Isamu

    1999-01-01

    It is difficult to evaluate renal function with 99m Tc-MAG 3 renography in both adult and pediatric patients. We examined 109 pediatric patients with various renal diseases using 99m Tc-MAG 3 renography. Tenal diseases were classified as follows: 9 vesicoureteral reflux, 4 ureteropelvic junctional stenosis, 3 double pelvis, 23 hydronephrosis, 4 glomerulonephritis, 4 nephrotic syndrome, 24 hemolytic uremic syndrome, 10 others; and 24 patients without abnormal findings on other examinations. After hydration and sedation, 100-200 MBq of 99m Te-MAG 3 was injected intravenously. All patients were placed in the supine position, and dynamic data acquisition at 12 sec/frame x 100 frames was performed from the back. The renograms were prepared with the ROIs (regions of interest) set to include the entire kidney. Tmax and T1/2 of renograms were measured for 26 kidneys with no abnormal findings. The correlations between Tmax or T1/2 and age (days after birth) were determined by a linear or logarithmic function. The logarithmic function (Y=7.49-0.56 log e X, r 2 =0.134) yielded a higher correlation than did the linear function (Y=5.16-0.00194X, r 2 =0.089) between Tmax and age. For T1/2 and age (days after birth), the linear function (Y=8.07-0.00451X, r 2 =0.222) yielded a higher correlation than the logarithmic function (Y=11.9-0.986 log e X, r 2 =0.192). Our findings suggest that prolonged Tmax is normalized more rapidly than T1/2 after birth in infants. A delayed excretion phase is not suggestive of renal dysfunction, but is characteristic of renograms in pediatric patients. Abnormality was detected in all patients with hydronephrosis using 99m Tc-MAG 3 renography. On the other hand, a quantitative study was required because renography detected no abnormality for some of patients with disorders of renal parenchyma. (author)

  7. An alkaline kit formulation to obtain [99mTc]MAG3 in high radiochemical yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Herrera, L.; Urena-Nunez, F.; Ferro-Flores, G.; Lezama-Carrasco, J.; Gonzalez-Zavala, M.A.; Avila-Ramirez, E.

    1995-01-01

    An alkaline kit formulation (ph 9) to obtain [ 99m Tc]MAG 3 with radiochemical purities over 98% has been developed, avoiding the addition of filtered air to the vial, the use of large amounts of 99m Tc activity (i.e., 3.7 GBq) or the reconstitution of large volumes. The use of this radiopharmaceutical in mice showed a minimal accumulation in the hepatobiliary system (0.37 ± 0.3 % I.D., 1 h postinjection). However, in rabbits we always obtained good image quality. (author) 7 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  8. Investigating the laser heating of underdense plasmas at conditions relevant to MagLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) scheme has achieved thermonuclear fusion yields on Sandia's Z Facility by imploding a cylindrical liner filled with D2 fuel that is preheated with a multi-kJ laser and pre-magnetized with an axial field Bz = 10 T. The challenge of fuel preheating in MagLIF is to deposit several kJ's of energy into an underdense (ne/ncritfusion fuel over ~ 10 mm target length efficiently and without introducing contaminants that could contribute to unacceptable radiative losses during the implosion. Very little experimental work has previously been done to investigate laser heating of gas at densities, scale lengths, modest intensities (Iλ2 ~ 1014 watts- μm2 /cm2) and magnetization parameters (ωceτe ~ 10) necessary for MagLIF. In particular, magnetization of the preheated plasma suppresses electron thermal conduction, which can modify laser energy coupling. Providing an experimental dataset in this regime is essential to not only understand the dynamics of a MagLIF implosion and stagnation, but also to validate magnetized transport models and better understand the physics of laser propagation in magnetized plasmas. In this talk, we present data and analysis of several experiments conducted at OMEGA-EP and at Z to investigate laser propagation and plasma heating in underdense D2 plasmas under a range of conditions, including densities (ne = 0.05-0.1 nc) and magnetization parmaters (ωceτe ~ 0-10). The results show differences in the electron temperature of the heated plasma and the velocity of the laser burn wave with and without an applied magnetic field. We will show comparisons of these experimental results to 2D and 3D HYDRA simulations, which show that the effect of the magnetic field on the electron thermal conduction needs to be taken into account when modeling laser preheat. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under

  9. Renal scintigraphy in the 21st Century {sup 99m} Tc-MAG{sub 3} with zero time injection of furosemide (MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0}): a fast and easy protocol, one for all indications. Part 3. Clinical experience. Congenital disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfakianakis, G.N. [Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, Director Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Miami, School of Medicine, Florida (United States)

    2007-07-01

    In this work the Protocol for MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0} is presented. Patient preparation, easy (only restriction, oral hydration, no bladder cathartic). Dynamic study (iv 1-10 mCi MAG{sub 3} + 40-80 mg LASIX), simultaneous injection of furosemide: MAG{sub 3}-F{sub 0}, duration of the study: 25 minutes. Tomography-SPECT (20 mCi MAG{sub 3}). No diuretic needed, duration of the study: 4 minutes. (Author)

  10. CCL5 and CCR5 interaction promotes cell motility in human osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteosarcoma is characterized by a high malignant and metastatic potential. CCL5 (previously called RANTES was originally recognized as a product of activated T cells, and plays a crucial role in the migration and metastasis of human cancer cells. It has been reported that the effect of CCL5 is mediated via CCR receptors. However, the effect of CCL5 on migration activity and integrin expression in human osteosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we found that CCL5 increased the migration and expression of αvβ3 integrin in human osteosarcoma cells. Stimulation of cells with CCL5 increased CCR5 but not CCR1 and CCR3 expression. CCR5 mAb, inhibitor, and siRNA reduced the CCL5-enhanced the migration and integrin up-regulation of osteosarcoma cells. Activations of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB pathways after CCL5 treatment were demonstrated, and CCL5-induced expression of integrin and migration activity was inhibited by the specific inhibitor and mutant of MEK, ERK, and NF-κB cascades. In addition, over-expression of CCL5 shRNA inhibited the migratory ability and integrin expression in osteosarcoma cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CCL5 and CCR5 interaction acts through MEK, ERK, which in turn activates NF-κB, resulting in the activations of αvβ3 integrin and contributing the migration of human osteosarcoma cells.

  11. Functional characterization of CCR in birch (Betula platyphylla × Betula pendula) through overexpression and suppression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Wei, Rui; Chen, Su; Jiang, Jing; Li, Huiyu; Huang, Haijiao; Yang, Guang; Wang, Shuo; Wei, Hairong; Liu, Guifeng

    2015-06-01

    We cloned a Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductase gene (BpCCR1) from an apical meristem and first internode of Betula platyphylla and characterized its functions in lignin biosynthesis, wood formation and tree growth through transgenic approaches. We generated overexpression and suppression transgenic lines and analyzed them in comparison with the wild-type in terms of lignin content, anatomical characteristics, height and biomass. We found that BpCCR1 overexpression could increase lignin content up to 14.6%, and its underexpression decreased lignin content by 6.3%. Surprisingly, modification of BpCCR1 expression led to conspicuous changes in wood characteristics, including xylem vessel number and arrangement, and secondary wall thickness. The growth of transgenic trees in terms of height was also significantly influenced by the modification of BpCCR1 genes. We discuss the functions of BpCCR1 in the context of a phylogenetic tree built with CCR genes from multiple species. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  12. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hütter, Gero; Bodor, Josef; Ledger, Scott; Boyd, Maureen; Millington, Michelle; Tsie, Marlene; Symonds, Geoff

    2015-07-27

    Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32) homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9), transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN), short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape.

  13. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gero Hütter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN, clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9, transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN, short hairpin RNA (shRNA, and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape.

  14. Performance Evaluation of Manual and Automated (MagNA Pure Nucleic Acid Isolation in HPV Detection and Genotyping Using Roche Linear Array HPV Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Chranioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids of human papillomavirus (HPV isolated by manual extraction method (AmpliLute and automated MagNA pure system were compared and evaluated with cytohistological findings in 253 women. The concordance level between AmpliLute and MagNA was very good 93.3% (=0.864, <.0001. Overall HPVpositivity detected by AmpliLute was 57.3% (30.4% as single and 27% as multiple infections in contrast to MagNA 54.5% (32% and 23%, resp.. Discrepant results observed in 25 cases: 11 MagNA(−/AmpliLute(+, 10 of which had positive histology; 5 MagNA(+/AmpliLute(− with negative histology; 8 MagNA(+/AmpliLute(+: in 7 of which AmpliLute detected extra HPV genotypes and 1 MagNA(invalid/AmpliLute(+ with positive histology. Both methods performed well when compared against cytological (area under curve (AUC of AmpliLute 0.712 versus 0.672 of MagNA and histological diagnoses (AUC of AmpliLute 0.935 versus 0.877 of MagNA, with AmpliLute showing a slightly predominance over MagNA. However, higher sensitivities, specificities, and positive/negative predictive values were obtained by AmpliLute.

  15. The SOGS-RA vs. the MAGS-7: prevalence estimates and classification congruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Rohling, Martin L; Rohde, Paul; Seeley, John R

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence rate estimates and congruence in classification status derived from two popular measures of adolescent gambling (SOGS-RA and MAGS-7). Adolescents from three states (Alabama, Mississippi, and Oregon) completed an anonymous questionnaire ( n =1846 high school students total). Results indicate that the prevalence of probable adolescent pathological gambling varied both as a function of instrument and cut-off point utilized for classification (range 1.7%-8.2%). Classification groups (non-problem, at-risk, and problem gamblers) generated by both instruments were found to be associated with reports of gambling frequency, amount of money lost in one gambling occasion, and parental gambling problems. However, concern was raised because the MAGS-7 and the SOGS-RA had little congruence in their three-group classification decisions for specific individuals (e.g., only 20.5% agreement for problem gamblers). To improve clinical utility, an empirical case was made for using the SOGS-RA to generate a fourth group of adolescent gamblers, which we labeled "probable pathological gamblers" (SOGS-RA > or = 6). This group was differentiated from the remaining gambling groups on all the validity indices. The implications and limitations of these findings, as well as future directions, are discussed.

  16. Effect of narrow groove MAG welding oscillation parameters on weld formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu LUO

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problem of narrow groove wall fusion, improving the weld formation, the welding test of different oscillation width and frequency is carried out by adopting the narrow high-speed swing MAG welding torch. On the basis of measuring the macro metallographic to determine the weld cross section size, the curve fitting of the variation trend of the weld section size with the swing width and the swing frequency is carried out. The effect of the high speed swing arc narrow groove welding MAG parameters on weld formation is studied. The results show that increasing the swing width or frequency can reduce the weld penetration and increase lateral wall penetration; when the swinging width makes side spacing greater than -05 mm and less than 1 mm, good weld forming will be gained; when the oscillation frequency increases to more than 5 Hz, weld finger penetration can be eliminated, but when it is above 9 Hz, increasing the swing frequency cannot cause obvious change of the dimension of weld. The effects of these oscillating parameters on weld formation can provide guidance for the selection of welding parameters.

  17. Selective chemokine receptor usage by central nervous system myeloid cells in CCR2-red fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Saederup

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte subpopulations distinguished by differential expression of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are difficult to track in vivo, partly due to lack of CCR2 reagents.We created CCR2-red fluorescent protein (RFP knock-in mice and crossed them with CX3CR1-GFP mice to investigate monocyte subset trafficking. In mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CCR2 was critical for efficient intrathecal accumulation and localization of Ly6C(hi/CCR2(hi monocytes. Surprisingly, neutrophils, not Ly6C(lo monocytes, largely replaced Ly6C(hi cells in the central nervous system of these mice. CCR2-RFP expression allowed the first unequivocal distinction between infiltrating monocytes/macrophages from resident microglia.These results refine the concept of monocyte subsets, provide mechanistic insight about monocyte entry into the central nervous system, and present a novel model for imaging and quantifying inflammatory myeloid populations.

  18. The Online MagIC Database: Data Archiving, Compilation, and Visualization for the Geomagnetic, Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, N. A.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.; Minnett, R.; Constable, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is dedicated to supporting the geomagnetic, paleomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities through the development and maintenance of an online database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/), data upload and quality control, filtered searches, data downloads, and visualization tools. MagIC continues to import updated versions of the IAGA paleomagnetic databases (TRANS, PINT, PSVRL, GPMDB, ARCHEO, MAGST and SECVR) into the MagIC database, but data uploading from individuals in the community is now essential for the MagIC database project to succeed. The highly diverse datasets stored in the database require an extensive data model of over thirty tables and 1000 columns. However, any individual dataset generally requires only a small fraction of these. To promote data uploading from the community, entering data into the MagIC database is facilitated by using Excel on the Mac or PC and the data format is checked by the MagIC console software before uploading. Many data entry errors can be caught and corrected at this stage. After uploading, datasets can be flagged as either public or private, and private datasets can be shared with others using a group name and password. Over 4,000 archived datasets can be queried on-line (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/search/) using an advanced filtering and sorting-type search. A hierarchical system is in place for searching over contributions, locations, sites, samples, specimens or measurements. The Excel spreadsheet and MagIC text format file from each contribution can be accessed and data recovered from searches can be downloaded in the MagIC text format. Searches themselves (reproducing the state of the database at a specific time) can be saved as a permanent URL, if desired, and cited in publications. Where appropriate, plots (equal area, Zijderveld, ARAI, demagnetization, etc.) are associated with the data to give the user a quicker understanding of the underlying dataset and improved browsing

  19. Periaqueductal gray knockdown of V2, not V1a and V1b receptor influences nociception in the rat. yj6676@yahoo.com.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Yang, Yu; Chen, Jian-Min; Wang, Gen; Xu, Hong-Tao; Liu, Wen-Yan; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Our pervious study has proved that arginine vasopressin (AVP) in periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a role in antinociception. After establishing a model of local special gene knockdown, the nociceptive effect of vasopressin receptor subunit in PAG was investigated in the rat. Microinjection of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) into PAG, which targeted vasopressin receptor subtypes (V(1a), V(1b) and V(2)), locally weakened the associated mRNA expression and depressed the related receptor synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, in which the significant inhibitive effect occurred on from 7th day to 14th day following 1microg or 2microg siRNA administration. PAG knockdown of V(2) receptor gene markedly decreased pain threshold in from 6th day to 13th day after siRNA administration, whereas local knockdown of either V(1a) or V(1b) receptor gene could not influence pain threshold. The data suggest that V(2) rather than V(1a) and V(1b) receptor in PAG involves in nociception.

  20. Results from the magnetic electron ion spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Joseph; O'Brien, Paul; Roeder, James; Reeves, Geoffrey; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Spence, Harlan; Blake, Bernard

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  1. Initial Results from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) Instruments Aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Van Allen Probes ECT Team

    2013-05-01

    The Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instruments aboard the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft (formerly RBSP) measure electrons and ions in the Earth's inner and outer radiation belts. The MagEIS instruments are part of the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma Suite (ECT), which also includes the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) analyzer. MagEIS consists of four magnetic electron spectrometers aboard each of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft that measure the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of electrons from 20 keV to 4 MeV. The MagEIS suite also contains a silicon-detector telescope that measures the differential fluxes, energies, and angular distributions of protons from 60 keV to 20 MeV, and helium and oxygen ions above a hundred keV/AMU. We briefly describe the instrument design and measurement technique and present a set of initial results from the MagEIS observations, including ultra-low frequency (ULF) modulations of energetic electron flux, and observations of electron flux enhancements associated with the recent BARREL x-ray observations.

  2. [Synthesis of hybrid antimicrobial peptide CecA-mag gene and it's secretion expression in Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-qing; Su, Chun-xia; Zhou, Bin; Cao, Rui-bing; Chen, Pu-yan

    2007-02-01

    According to the partiality codon of Pichia pastoris, hybrid antimicrobial peptide CecA-mag gene was synthesized and cloned into pPICZa-A to construct the recombinant expression vector pPICZa-A-CA. The SacI-linearized plasmid pPICZalpha-A-CA was transformed into P. pastoris SMD1168 by electroporation. Under the control of the promoter AOX'(alcoholoxidase') , an approximately 1.9kDa cecA-mag protein was expressed. Antibacterial assays demonstrated that cecA-mag had broad spectrum of antimicrobial property against Gram-positive as well as Gram-negative bacteria especially showed potent antibacterial activity against ampicillin resistant bacteria, such as pathogenic E. coli. In addition, the hybrid antibacterial peptide showed an extreme heat stable and acid stable characteristic. These results suggest that the P. pastoris expression system can be used to produce large quantities of fully functional cecA-mag for both research and industrial purpose. Based on these characteristics, the recombinant antibacterial peptide cecA-mag displays application foreground in the field of prevention of disease, and can be used as additives of animal feedstuff and so on.

  3. Transmitted/Founder and Chronic HIV-1 Envelope Proteins Are Distinguished by Differential Utilization of CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Zahra F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Wilen, Craig B.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Chikere, Kelechi C.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Didigu, Chuka A.; Berro, Reem; Klasse, Per Johan; Lee, Benhur; Moore, John P.; Shaw, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by HIV-1 most often results from the successful transmission and propagation of a single virus variant, termed the transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we compared the attachment and entry properties of envelope (Env) glycoproteins from T/F and chronic control (CC) viruses. Using a panel of 40 T/F and 47 CC Envs, all derived by single genome amplification, we found that 52% of clade C and B CC Envs exhibited partial resistance to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (MVC) on cells expressing high levels of CCR5, while only 15% of T/F Envs exhibited this same property. Moreover, subtle differences in the magnitude with which MVC inhibited infection on cells expressing low levels of CCR5, including primary CD4+ T cells, were highly predictive of MVC resistance when CCR5 expression levels were high. These results are consistent with previous observations showing a greater sensitivity of T/F Envs to MVC inhibition on cells expressing very high levels of CCR5 and indicate that CC Envs are often capable of recognizing MVC-bound CCR5, albeit inefficiently on cells expressing physiologic levels of CCR5. When CCR5 expression levels are high, this phenotype becomes readily detectable. The utilization of drug-bound CCR5 conformations by many CC Envs was seen with other CCR5 antagonists, with replication-competent viruses, and did not obviously correlate with other phenotypic traits. The striking ability of clade C and B CC Envs to use MVC-bound CCR5 relative to T/F Envs argues that the more promiscuous use of CCR5 by these Env proteins is selected against at the level of virus transmission and is selected for during chronic infection. PMID:23269796

  4. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  5. Heroin use in Indonesia is associated with higher expression of CCR5 on CD4+ cells and lower ex-vivo production of CCR5 ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, H.; Indrati, A.R.; Soedarmo, S.; Utami, F.; Jong, C.A.J. de; Alisjahbana, B.; Crevel, R. van; Wisaksana, R.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Opioid use may affect HIV infection through altered expression of HIV co-receptors. This was examined in Indonesia among antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV patients, many of whom use drugs. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) expression on CD4+ cells was higher in heroin (P = 0.007), methadone

  6. Possible Impact of 190G > A CCR2 and Δ32 CCR5 Mutations on Decrease of the HBV Vaccine Immunogenicity—A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ganczak

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokine genetic variations are involved in infectious diseases such as hepatitis B virus (HBV. Several allelic variants might, in theory, affect the outcome of vaccination. Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the associations of Δ32 CCR5 and 190G > A CCR2 polymorphisms with a response to a primary course of three HBV vaccinations. Methods: Between December 2014 and December 2016, patients from three randomly selected primary care clinics in the West Pomeranian region (Poland, 1 month after receiving the third dose of HBV vaccine, were enrolled. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA system version 3.0 was used to detect anti-HBs and anti-HBc totals. The identification of polymorphisms were performed by a polymerase chain reaction technique using a single primer extension assay. Genotype distributions of responders versus non-responders to HBV vaccination were compared on the basis of anti-HBs level. Results: In 149 patients (mean age 60 years the mean anti-HBs level was 652.2 ± 425.9 mIU/mL (range: 0–1111.0 mIU/mL. There were 14.1% (n = 21 non-responders to the HBV vaccine (anti-HBs < 10.0 mIU/mL. The wild type/Δ32 genotype of CCR5 gene was found in 18.1% participants, and 1.3% were Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes. The frequency of allele A of the CCR2 gene was 11.1%. Lower anti-HBs levels in Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes were observed (Me = 61 mIU/mL vs. Me = 660.2 mIU/mL; p = 0.048. As age was found to be a correlate to the anti-HBs titer (r = −0.218, p = 0.0075; 95% CI: −0.366–−0.059—an analysis of a co-variance was performed which found a statistically significant (p = 0.04 difference in anti-HBs titres between Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes and other CCR5 genotypes. The association between anti-HBs titres and CCR2 genotypes was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our study—which is a preliminary report that suggest this topic deserves further observation with larger sample sizes, different ethnicities, and other

  7. Exacerbation of Facial Motoneuron Loss after Facial Nerve Axotomy in CCR3-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A Wainwright

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a neuroprotective mechanism of FMN (facial motoneuron survival after facial nerve axotomy that is dependent on CD4+ Th2 cell interaction with peripheral antigen-presenting cells, as well as CNS (central nervous system-resident microglia. PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is expressed by injured FMN and increases Th2-associated chemokine expression in cultured murine microglia. Collectively, these results suggest a model involving CD4+ Th2 cell migration to the facial motor nucleus after injury via microglial expression of Th2-associated chemokines. However, to respond to Th2-associated chemokines, Th2 cells must express the appropriate Th2-associated chemokine receptors. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that Th2-associated chemokine receptors increase in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy at timepoints consistent with significant T-cell infiltration. Microarray analysis of Th2-associated chemokine receptors was followed up with real-time PCR for CCR3, which indicated that facial nerve injury increases CCR3 mRNA levels in mouse facial motor nucleus. Unexpectedly, quantitative- and co-immunofluorescence revealed increased CCR3 expression localizing to FMN in the facial motor nucleus after facial nerve axotomy. Compared with WT (wild-type, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in CCR3–/– mice. Additionally, compared with WT, a significant decrease in FMN survival 4 weeks after axotomy was observed in Rag2 –/– (recombination activating gene-2-deficient mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells isolated from CCR3–/– mice, but not in CCR3–/– mice adoptively transferred CD4+ T-cells derived from WT mice. These results provide a basis for further investigation into the co-operation between CD4+ T-cell- and CCR3-mediated neuroprotection after FMN injury.

  8. CCR7 Modulates the Generation of Thymic Regulatory T Cells by Altering the Composition of the Thymic Dendritic Cell Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zicheng Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of auto-antigens, thymocytes are negatively selected or diverted to a regulatory T cell (Treg fate. CCR7 is required for negative selection of auto-reactive thymocytes in the thymic medulla. Here, we describe an unanticipated contribution of CCR7 to intrathymic Treg generation. Ccr7−/− mice have increased Treg cellularity because of a hematopoietic but non-T cell autonomous CCR7 function. CCR7 expression by thymic dendritic cells (DCs promotes survival of mature Sirpα− DCs. Thus, CCR7 deficiency results in apoptosis of Sirpα− DCs, which is counterbalanced by expansion of immature Sirpα+ DCs that efficiently induce Treg generation. CCR7 deficiency results in enhanced intrathymic generation of Tregs at the neonatal stage and in lymphopenic adults, when Treg differentiation is critical for establishing self-tolerance. Together, these results reveal a complex function for CCR7 in thymic tolerance induction, where CCR7 not only promotes negative selection but also governs intrathymic Treg generation via non-thymocyte intrinsic mechanisms.

  9. CCR9+ T cells contribute to the resolution of the inflammatory response in a mouse model of intestinal amoebiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-López, A E; Soldevila, G; Meza-Pérez, S; Dupont, G; Ostoa-Saloma, P; Wurbel, M A; Ventura-Juárez, J; Flores-Romo, L; García-Zepeda, E A

    2012-08-01

    Analysis of the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response in amoebiasis is important to understand the immunopathology of the disease. Mucosal associated effector and regulatory T cells may play a role in regulating the inflammatory immune response associated to Entamoeba histolytica infection in the colon. A subpopulation of regulatory T cells has recently been identified and is characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR9. In this report, we used CCR9 deficient (CCR9(-/-)) mice to investigate the role of the CCR9(+) T cells in a murine model of E. histolytica intestinal infection. Intracecal infection of CCR9(+/+), CCR9(+/-) and CCR9(-/-) mice with E. histolytica trophozoites, revealed striking differences in the development and nature of the intestinal inflammatory response observed between these strains. While CCR9(+/+) and CCR9(+/-) mice were resistant to the infection and resolved the pathogen-induced inflammatory response, CCR9(-/-) mice developed a chronic inflammatory response, which was associated with over-expression of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-17, while IL-10 was not present. In addition, increased levels of CCL11, CCL20 and CCL28 chemokines were detected by qRT-PCR in CCR9(-/-) mice. E. histolytica trophozoites were identified in the lumen of the cecum of CCR9(-/-) mice at seven days post infection (pi), whereas in CCR9(+/+) mice trophozoites disappeared by day 1 pi. Interestingly, the inflammation observed in CCR9(-/-) mice, was associated with a delayed recruitment of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells to the cecal epithelium and lamina propria, suggesting that this population may play a role in the early regulation of the inflammatory response against E. histolytica, likely through IL-10 production. In support of these data, CCR9(+) T cells were also identified in colon tissue sections obtained from patients with amoebic colitis. Our data suggest that a population of CCR9(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells may

  10. Margatoxin binds to a homomultimer of K(V)1.3 channels in Jurkat cells. Comparison with K(V)1.3 expressed in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, L M; Felix, J P; Bugianesi, R M; Garcia, M L; Stevens, S; Leonard, R J; Knaus, H G; Koch, R; Wanner, S G; Kaczorowski, G J; Slaughter, R S

    1997-03-25

    Voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels play key roles in setting the resting potential and in the activation cascade of human peripheral T lymphocytes. Margatoxin (MgTX), a 39-amino acid peptide from Centruroides margaritatus, is a potent inhibitor of lymphocyte K(V) channels. The binding of monoiodotyrosinyl margatoxin ([125I]MgTX) to plasma membranes prepared from either Jurkat cells, a human leukemic T cell line, or CHO cells stably transfected with the Shaker-type voltage-gated K+ channel, K(V)1.3, has been used to investigate the properties of lymphocyte K(V) channels. These data were compared with [125I]MgTX binding to heterotetrameric K(V) channels in rat brain synaptic plasma membranes [Knaus, H. G., et al. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 13627-13634]. The affinity for [125I]MgTX is 100-200 fM in either Jurkat or CHO/K(V)1.3 membranes, and the receptor density is 20-120 fmol/mg in Jurkat membranes or 1000 fmol/mg in CHO/K(V)1.3 membranes. In contrast to rat brain, [125I]MgTX binding to Jurkat and CHO/K(V)1.3 membranes exhibits an absolute requirement for K+, with no potentiation of binding by Na+. K(V)1.3 was the only K(V)1 series channel present in either CHO/K(V)1.3 or Jurkat plasma membranes as determined by immunoprecipitation of [125I]MgTX binding or by Western blot analyses using sequence-specific antibodies prepared against members of the K(V)1 family. The relative potencies of a series of peptidyl K(V) channel inhibitors was essentially the same for inhibition of [125I]MgTX binding to Jurkat, CHO, or rat brain membranes and for blocking 86Rb+ efflux from the CHO/K(V)1.3 cells, except that alpha-dendrotoxin was more potent at blocking binding to rat brain membranes than in the other assays. The characteristics of [125I]MgTX binding, the antibody profiles, and the effects of the peptidyl K(V) inhibitors all indicate that the [125I]MgTX receptor in Jurkat lymphocytes is comprised of a homomultimer of K(V)1.3, unlike the heteromultimeric arrangement of the

  11. Structure-Activity Relationships and Identification of Optmized CC-Chemokine Receptor CCR1, 5, and 8 Metal-Ion Chelators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chalikiopoulos, Alexander; Thiele, Stefanie; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are involved in trafficking of leukocytes and represent targets for autoimmune conditions, inflammatory diseases, viral infections, and cancer. We recently published CCR1, CCR8, and CCR5 agonists and positive modulators based on a three metal-ion chelator series: 2,2'-bipyridine...... better accommodated in the receptors than polar groups. The new analog brominated terpyridine (29) resulted in the highest chelator potencies observed so far CCR1 (EC50: 0.49 μM) and CCR8 (EC50: 0.28 μM). Furthermore, we identified the first selective CCR5 agonist chelator, meta dithiomethylated...

  12. POSTNATAL PHENOTYPE AND LOCALIZATION OF SPINAL CORD V1 DERIVED INTERNEURONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Francisco J.; Jonas, Philip C.; Sapir, Tamar; Hartley, Robert; Berrocal, Maria C.; Geiman, Eric J.; Todd, Andrew J.; Goulding, Martyn

    2010-01-01

    Developmental studies identified four classes (V0, V1, V2, V3) of embryonic interneurons in the ventral spinal cord. Very little however is known about their adult phenotypes. In order to further characterize interneuron cell types in the adult, the location, neurotransmitter phenotype, calcium-buffering protein expression and axon distributions of V1-derived neurons in the mouse spinal cord was determined. In the mature (P20 and older) spinal cord, most V1-derived neurons are located in lateral LVII and in LIX, few in medial LVII and none in LVIII. Approximately 40% express calbindin and/or parvalbumin, while few express calretinin. Of seven groups of ventral interneurons identified according to calcium-buffering protein expression, two groups (1 and 4) correspond with V1-derived neurons. Group 1 are Renshaw cells and intensely express calbindin and coexpress parvalbumin and calretinin. They represent 9% of the V1 population. Group 4 express only parvalbumin and represent 27% of V1-derived neurons. V1-derived group 4 neurons receive contacts from primary sensory afferents and are therefore proprioceptive interneurons and the most ventral neurons in this group receive convergent calbindin-IR Renshaw cell inputs. This subgroup resembles Ia inhibitory interneurons (IaINs) and represents 13% of V1-derived neurons. Adult V1-interneuron axons target LIX and LVII and some enter the deep dorsal horn. V1-axons do not cross the midline. V1 derived axonal varicosities were mostly (>80%) glycinergic and a third were GABAergic. None were glutamatergic or cholinergic. In summary, V1 interneurons develop into ipsilaterally projecting, inhibitory interneurons that include Renshaw cells, Ia inhibitory interneurons and other unidentified proprioceptive interneurons. PMID:16255029

  13. Association of CCR2-CCR5 haplotypes and CCL3L1 copy number with Kawasaki Disease, coronary artery lesions, and IVIG responses in Japanese children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Mamtani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of Kawasaki Disease (KD is enigmatic, although an infectious cause is suspected. Polymorphisms in CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 and/or its potent ligand CCL3L1 influence KD susceptibility in US, European and Korean populations. However, the influence of these variations on KD susceptibility, coronary artery lesions (CAL and response to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG in Japanese children, who have the highest incidence of KD, is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used unconditional logistic regression analyses to determine the associations of the copy number of the CCL3L1 gene-containing duplication and CCR2-CCR5 haplotypes in 133 Japanese KD cases [33 with CAL and 25 with resistance to IVIG] and 312 Japanese controls without a history of KD. We observed that the deviation from the population average of four CCL3L1 copies (i.e., four copies was associated with an increased risk of KD and IVIG resistance (adjusted odds ratio (OR=2.25, p=0.004 and OR=6.26, p=0.089, respectively. Heterozygosity for the CCR5 HHF*2 haplotype was associated with a reduced risk of both IVIG resistance (OR=0.21, p=0.026 and CAL development (OR=0.44, p=0.071. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CCL3L1-CCR5 axis may play an important role in KD pathogenesis. In addition to clinical and laboratory parameters, genetic markers may also predict risk of CAL and resistance to IVIG.

  14. NMR resonance assignments of a hypoallergenic isoform of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahammer, Linda; Grutsch, Sarina; Wallner, Michael; Ferreira, Fatima; Tollinger, Martin

    2017-10-01

    In Northern America and Europe a great number of people are suffering from birch pollen allergy and pollen related food allergies. The trigger for these immunological reactions is the 17.5 kDa major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, which belongs to the family of PR-10 (pathogenesis-related) proteins. In nature, Bet v 1 occurs as a mixture of various isoforms that possess different immunological properties despite their high sequence identities. Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d), which is investigated here, is a hypoallergenic isoform of Bet v 1 and a potential candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy. We assigned the backbone and side chain 1 H, 13 C and 15 N resonances of this protein and predicted its secondary structure. The NMR-chemical shift data indicate that Bet v 1.0102 is composed of three α-helices and a seven stranded β-sheet, in agreement with the known structure of the hyperallergenic isoform Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a). Our resonance assignments create the foundation for detailed characterization of the dynamic properties of Bet v 1 isoforms by NMR relaxation measurements.

  15. History and evaluation of the operation of Jaslovske Bohunice V-1 NPP Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obert, M.; Kovac, V.

    2007-01-01

    The following information is provided: Deadline and reasons for discontinuation of operation of V-1 reactor unit 1; improvements of V-1 reactor units in early 1990s ('Minor Reconstruction'); 'Gradual Reconstruction': underlying requirements, systems concerned, implementation process and results; technical and economic indicators of operation of V-1 unit 1; reasons for and way of transfer of the V-1 NPP to a new company within the process of privatization of the Slovenske elektrarne Inc. utility; and, in conclusion, assessment of the operation and outline of planned activities within the decommissioning process. (orig.)

  16. Correlation between differential renal uptake of 99mTc-MAG3 and 99mTc-DMSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaldo, J.M.; Gruenwald, F.; Menzel, C.; Biersack, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed the quantitative indices obtained from sequential 99m Tc-MAG3 and 99m Tc-DMSA imaging studies performed in 134 patients with a variety of renal disorders in order to determine the correlation between the measured differential renal function using these two agents. Overall correlation was high with r=.86 and the derived regression equation was R.F. DMSA =8.2+0.84 (R.F. MAG3 ), where F.F. is the relative function. Highly divergent values for differential function were obtained however in some subjects. Patients with renal obstructive disorders had a correlation coefficient of.81 which was lower than those with nonobstructive pathologies (r=.95). Although relative kidney function measured using 99m Tc-MAG3 and 99m Tc-DMSA correlate significantly, certain patients such as those with renal obstruction may necessitate quantitation using different renal parameters. (orig.) [de

  17. Use of Mini-Mag Orion and superconducting coils for near-term interstellar transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Andrews, Dana G.

    2007-06-01

    Interstellar transportation to nearby star systems over periods shorter than the human lifetime requires speeds in the range of 0.1-0.15 c and relatively high accelerations. These speeds are not attainable using rockets, even with advanced fusion engines because at these velocities, the energy density of the spacecraft approaches the energy density of the fuel. Anti-matter engines are theoretically possible but current physical limitations would have to be suspended to get the mass densities required. Interstellar ramjets have not proven practicable, so this leaves beamed momentum propulsion or a continuously fueled Mag-Orion system as the remaining candidates. However, deceleration is also a major issue, but part of the Mini-Mag Orion approach assists in solving this problem. This paper reviews the state of the art from a Phases I and II SBIT between Sandia National Laboratories and Andrews Space, applying our results to near-term interstellar travel. A 1000 T crewed spacecraft and propulsion system dry mass at .1c contains ˜9×1021J. The author has generated technology requirements elsewhere for use of fission power reactors and conventional Brayton cycle machinery to propel a spacecraft using electric propulsion. Here we replace the electric power conversion, radiators, power generators and electric thrusters with a Mini-Mag Orion fission-fusion hybrid. Only a small fraction of fission fuel is actually carried with the spacecraft, the remainder of the propellant (macro-particles of fissionable material with a D-T core) is beamed to the spacecraft, and the total beam energy requirement for an interstellar probe mission is roughly 1020J, which would require the complete fissioning of 1000 ton of Uranium assuming 35% power plant efficiency. This is roughly equivalent to a recurring cost per flight of 3.0 billion dollars in reactor grade enriched uranium using today's prices. Therefore, interstellar flight is an expensive proposition, but not unaffordable, if the

  18. Lack of adrenoleukodystrophy protein enhances oligodendrocyte disturbance and microglia activation in mice with combined Abcd1/Mag deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumser, Martina; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Berger, Johannes; Forss-Petter, Sonja

    2007-12-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is an inherited neurometabolic disease associated with the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding ALD protein (ALDP) cause this clinically heterogeneous disorder, ranging from adrenocortical insufficiency and neurodegeneration to severe cerebral inflammation and demyelination. ALDP-deficient mice replicate metabolic dysfunctions and develop late-onset axonopathy but lack histological signs of cerebral inflammation and demyelination. To test the hypothesis that subtle destabilization of myelin may initiate inflammatory demyelination in Abcd1 deficiency, we generated mice with the combined metabolic defect of X-ALD and the mild myelin abnormalities of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) deficiency. A behavioural phenotype, impaired motor performance and tremor, developed in middle-aged Mag null mice, independent of Abcd1 genotype. Routine histology revealed no signs of inflammation or demyelination in the CNS, but immunohistochemical analyses of spinal cord neuropathology revealed microglia activation and axonal degeneration in Mag and Abcd1/Mag double-knockout (ko) and, less severe and of later onset, in Abcd1 mutants. While combined Abcd1/Mag deficiency showed an additive effect on microglia activation, axonal degeneration, quantified by accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in axonal spheroids, was not accelerated. Interestingly, abnormal APP reactivity was enhanced within compact myelin of Abcd1/Mag double-ko mice compared to single mutants already at 13 months. These results suggest that ALDP deficiency enhances metabolic distress in oligodendrocytes that are compromised a priori by destabilised myelin. Furthermore, the age at which this occurs precedes by far the onset of axonal degeneration in Abcd1-deficient mice, implying that oligodendrocyte/myelin disturbances may precede axonopathy in X-ALD.

  19. Microwave-promoted Morita-Baylis-Hillman reactions: efficient synthesis of new monoacylglycerols (MAGs) as potential anti-parasitic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Suervy C.O.; Lima Junior, Claudio G.; Silva, Fabio P.L.; Andrade, Natalia G.; Barbosa, Ticiano P.; Vasconcellos, Mario L.A.A., E-mail: mlaav@quimica.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2011-09-15

    In this article we describe microwave irradiation promoting the synthesis of a hydrophilic monoacylglycerol, MAG, by hydrolysis of acrylate (15 min, 100%). After, MAG was transformed in hydrophilic Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts (MBHA), (54-82%, pathway 1). In pathway 2, the different lipophilic MBHAs were prepared in high yields (90-100%) and transformed on hydrophilic MBHA, in 70-90%. Through the high temperature synthesis of one MBHA, a unprecedented indolizine formation was detected by GC-MS,. All results are in agreement with the new unified mechanism to the Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction. These new monoacylglycerols, as well the its synthetic precursors, are new potential antiparasitic compounds. (author)

  20. Colorectal carcinoma metastases: Detection with In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody CCR 086

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Nabi, H.H.; Levine, G.; Lamki, L.M.; Murray, J.L.; Tauxe, W.N.; Shah, A.N.; Patt, Y.Z.; Doerr, R.J.; Klein, H.A.; Gona, J. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Buffalo, NY (USA))

    1990-07-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial with indium-111-labeled antimucin murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CCR 086 was conducted. Seventeen patients with histologically proved colorectal carcinoma and known metastatic disease underwent external scintigraphy after administration of 5.5 mCi (203.5 MBq) of In-111 CCR 086 at doses of 5 and 20 mg. Of 25 known lesions, 17 were detected (sensitivity, 68%). The smallest detected lesion in the lung was 1 cm and in the liver was 1.5 cm. The serum half-life of In-111-labeled CCR 086 MoAb was approximately 64 hours. The formation of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) was detected in the serum of four of five patients who received 20 mg of MoAb. No HAMAs were detected in four patients receiving 5 mg of MoAb. No side effects were encountered. Because of effective detection of liver and lung metastases with lower doses (5-20 mg) of CCR 086 conjugated with In-111, further investigations are warranted to assess clinical and therapeutic potentials of CCR 086 in the management of colorectal cancer.

  1. Colorectal carcinoma metastases: detection with In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody CCR 086.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Nabi, H H; Levine, G; Lamki, L M; Murray, J L; Tauxe, W N; Shah, A N; Patt, Y Z; Doerr, R J; Klein, H A; Gona, J

    1990-07-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial with indium-111-labeled antimucin murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CCR 086 was conducted. Seventeen patients with histologically proved colorectal carcinoma and known metastatic disease underwent external scintigraphy after administration of 5.5 mCi (203.5 MBq) of In-111 CCR 086 at doses of 5 and 20 mg. Of 25 known lesions, 17 were detected (sensitivity, 68%). The smallest detected lesion in the lung was 1 cm and in the liver was 1.5 cm. The serum half-life of In-111-labeled CCR 086 MoAb was approximately 64 hours. The formation of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) was detected in the serum of four of five patients who received 20 mg of MoAb. No HAMAs were detected in four patients receiving 5 mg of MoAb. No side effects were encountered. Because of effective detection of liver and lung metastases with lower doses (5-20 mg) of CCR 086 conjugated with In-111, further investigations are warranted to assess clinical and therapeutic potentials of CCR 086 in the management of colorectal cancer.

  2. Direct measurement of thermal stability of expressed CCR5 and stabilization by small molecule ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepp, Adam M; Grunbeck, Amy; Banerjee, Sourabh; Sakmar, Thomas P; Huber, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    The inherent instability of heptahelical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) during purification and reconstitution is a primary impediment to biophysical studies and to obtaining high-resolution crystal structures. New approaches to stabilizing receptors during purification and screening reconstitution procedures are needed. Here we report the development of a novel homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay (HTRF) to quantify properly folded CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5). The assay permits high-throughput thermal stability measurements of femtomole quantities of CCR5 in detergent and in engineered nanoscale apolipoprotein-bound bilayer (NABB) particles. We show that recombinantly expressed CCR5 can be incorporated into NABB particles in high yield, resulting in greater thermal stability compared with that of CCR5 in a detergent solution. We also demonstrate that binding of CCR5 to the HIV-1 cellular entry inhibitors maraviroc, AD101, CMPD 167, and vicriviroc dramatically increases receptor stability. The HTRF assay technology reported here is applicable to other membrane proteins and could greatly facilitate structural studies of GPCRs.

  3. Design of a Base Station for MEMS CCR Localization in an Optical Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Gook Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a design and implementation of a base station, capable of positioning sensor nodes using an optical scheme. The base station consists of a pulse laser module, optical detectors and beam splitter, which are mounted on a rotation-stage, and a Time to Digital Converter (TDC. The optical pulse signal transmitted to the sensor node with a Corner Cube Retro-reflector (CCR is reflected to the base station, and the Time of Flight (ToF data can be obtained from the two detectors. With the angle and flight time data, the position of the sensor node can be calculated. The performance of the system is evaluated by using a commercial CCR. The sensor nodes are placed at different angles from the base station and scanned using the laser. We analyze the node position error caused by the rotation and propose error compensation methods, namely the outlier sample exception and decreasing the confidence factor steadily using the recursive least square (RLS methods. Based on the commercial CCR results, the MEMS CCR is also tested to demonstrate the compatibility between the base station and the proposed methods. The result shows that the localization performance of the system can be enhanced with the proposed compensation method using the MEMS CCR.

  4. Colorectal carcinoma metastases: Detection with In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody CCR 086

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Nabi, H.H.; Levine, G.; Lamki, L.M.; Murray, J.L.; Tauxe, W.N.; Shah, A.N.; Patt, Y.Z.; Doerr, R.J.; Klein, H.A.; Gona, J.

    1990-01-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial with indium-111-labeled antimucin murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CCR 086 was conducted. Seventeen patients with histologically proved colorectal carcinoma and known metastatic disease underwent external scintigraphy after administration of 5.5 mCi (203.5 MBq) of In-111 CCR 086 at doses of 5 and 20 mg. Of 25 known lesions, 17 were detected (sensitivity, 68%). The smallest detected lesion in the lung was 1 cm and in the liver was 1.5 cm. The serum half-life of In-111-labeled CCR 086 MoAb was approximately 64 hours. The formation of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) was detected in the serum of four of five patients who received 20 mg of MoAb. No HAMAs were detected in four patients receiving 5 mg of MoAb. No side effects were encountered. Because of effective detection of liver and lung metastases with lower doses (5-20 mg) of CCR 086 conjugated with In-111, further investigations are warranted to assess clinical and therapeutic potentials of CCR 086 in the management of colorectal cancer

  5. Design of a base station for MEMS CCR localization in an optical sensor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Gook; Jeon, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Hyoun Jin; Kim, Jae Yoon

    2014-05-08

    This paper introduces a design and implementation of a base station, capable of positioning sensor nodes using an optical scheme. The base station consists of a pulse laser module, optical detectors and beam splitter, which are mounted on a rotation-stage, and a Time to Digital Converter (TDC). The optical pulse signal transmitted to the sensor node with a Corner Cube Retro-reflector (CCR) is reflected to the base station, and the Time of Flight (ToF) data can be obtained from the two detectors. With the angle and flight time data, the position of the sensor node can be calculated. The performance of the system is evaluated by using a commercial CCR. The sensor nodes are placed at different angles from the base station and scanned using the laser. We analyze the node position error caused by the rotation and propose error compensation methods, namely the outlier sample exception and decreasing the confidence factor steadily using the recursive least square (RLS) methods. Based on the commercial CCR results, the MEMS CCR is also tested to demonstrate the compatibility between the base station and the proposed methods. The result shows that the localization performance of the system can be enhanced with the proposed compensation method using the MEMS CCR.

  6. Influence of CCR7 ligand DNA preexposure on the magnitude and duration of immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yunsang; Seong, Kug Eo; Rouse, Richard J.D.; Rouse, Barry T.

    2003-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 7 ligands CCL21 and CCL19 were recently described as essential elements for establishing the microenvironment needed to initiate optimal immune responses in secondary lymphoid tissues. In the present study we have kinetically investigated the primary responses of naive DO11.10 TCR-transgenic CD4+ T cells (OVA323-339 peptide specific) adoptively transferred into normal BALB/c mice given plasmid DNA encoding CCR7 ligands. The primary responses of CD4+ Tg-T cells in CCR7 ligand DNA recipients occurred more promptly, reaching levels higher than those observed in vector controls. In line with enhanced specific immunity, the T-cell population in CCR7 ligand recipients underwent more in vivo cell division following Ag stimulation, and a higher percentage of Ag-specific T cells expressed an activation phenotype. Moreover, the enhanced primary responses of naive CD4+ T cells appeared to act via affects on migration and maturation of CD11c+ dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes. In addition following mucosal challenge of herpes simplex virus-immune mice with virus, those that had received CCL21 or CCL19 during priming contained a higher frequency of responding CD4 T cells in lymph nodes and the site of infection. Moreover, CCL21- and CCL19-treated mice showed less severe disease and better survival following challenge. Our results are discussed in terms of the relevance of CCR7 ligand preimmunization to improve vaccine

  7. Fully human antagonistic antibodies against CCR4 potently inhibit cell signaling and chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs B Hagemann

    Full Text Available CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis.Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies.For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing. The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer.

  8. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1 IIIB infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent

  9. CCL3L1 copy number, CCR5 genotype and susceptibility to tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Danielle; Taype, Carmen; Goulding, Jon; Levin, Mike; Eley, Brian; Anderson, Suzanne; Shaw, Marie-Anne; Armour, John A L

    2014-01-09

    Tuberculosis is a major infectious disease and functional studies have provided evidence that both the chemokine MIP-1α and its receptor CCR5 play a role in susceptibility to TB. Thus by measuring copy number variation of CCL3L1, one of the genes that encode MIP-1α, and genotyping a functional promoter polymorphism -2459A > G in CCR5 (rs1799987) we investigate the influence of MIP-1α and CCR5, independently and combined, in susceptibility to clinically active TB in three populations, a Peruvian population (n = 1132), a !Xhosa population (n = 605) and a South African Coloured population (n = 221). The three populations include patients with clinically diagnosed pulmonary TB, as well as other, less prevalent forms of extrapulmonary TB. Copy number of CCL3L1 was measured using the paralogue ratio test and exhibited ranges between 0-6 copies per diploid genome (pdg) in Peru, between 0-12 pdg in !Xhosa samples and between 0-10 pdg in South African Coloured samples. The CCR5 promoter polymorphism was observed to differ significantly in allele frequency between populations (*A; Peru f = 0.67, !Xhosa f = 0.38, Coloured f = 0.48). The case-control association studies performed however find, surprisingly, no evidence for an influence of variation in genes coding for MIP-1α or CCR5 individually or together in susceptibility to clinically active TB in these populations.

  10. CCR5 polymorphism and plague resistance in natural populations of the black rat in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, C; Rahalison, L; Ranjalahy, M; Rahelinirina, S; Duplantier, J-M; Brouat, C

    2008-12-01

    Madagascar remains one of the world's largest plague foci. The black rat, Rattus rattus, is the main reservoir of plague in rural areas. This species is highly susceptible to plague in plague-free areas (low-altitude regions), whereas rats from the plague focus areas (central highlands) have evolved a disease-resistance polymorphism. We used the candidate gene CCR5 to investigate the genetic basis of plague resistance in R. rattus. We found a unique non-synonymous substitution (H184R) in a functionally important region of the gene. We then compared (i) CCR5 genotypes of dying and surviving plague-challenged rats and (ii) CCR5 allelic frequencies in plague focus and plague-free populations. Our results suggested a higher prevalence of the substitution in resistant animals compared to susceptible individuals, and a tendency for higher frequencies in plague focus areas compared to plague-free areas. Therefore, the CCR5 polymorphism may be involved in Malagasy black rat plague resistance. CCR5 and other undetermined plague resistance markers may provide useful biological information about host evolution and disease dynamics.

  11. Preventing HIV transmission through blockade of CCR5: rationale, progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Oliver; Martins, Elsa; Scurci, Ilaria

    2018-01-29

    Of the two million people estimated to be newly infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) every year, 95% live in poorer regions of the world where effective HIV treatment is not universally available. Strategies to reduce the spread of HIV infection, which predominantly occurs via sexual contact, are urgently required. In the absence of an effective vaccine, a number of approaches to prevent HIV infection have been developed. These include using potent anti-HIV drugs prophylactically, either through systemic administration or topical application to the mucosal tissues that HIV initially encounters during sexual transmission. Genetic deficiency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 provides individuals with a remarkable degree of protection from HIV acquisition. This is because CCR5 is the major coreceptor used by HIV to infect new target cells. Since CCR5 deficiency does not appear to carry any health disadvantages, targeting the receptor is a promising strategy for both therapy and prevention of HIV. In this review we first describe the advantages and limitations of the currently available strategies for HIV prevention, then we focus on strategies targeting CCR5, covering the progress that has been made in developing different classes of CCR5 inhibitors for prophylaxis, and the perspectives for their future development as new weapons in the global fight against HIV/AIDS.

  12. Neutron activation analysis of the MIBI, MAG-3 and sodium fitate active principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote Rodriguez, G.; Perez Sayaz, G.; Moreno Bermudez, J.; Ribeiro Guevara, S.; Molina Insfran, J.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) both instrumental (INAA) and radiochemical (RNAA) are extensively applied for determination of minor and trace elements in samples of quite different origin and composition. Particularly, the application of INAA is well recognized for analysis of microquantitis of heavy metals as well as toxic elements in biological samples. In this work the possibility of the determination of MIBI, MAG-3 and sodium fitate elemental composition by INAA was investigated Analytical information about the concentration and/or detection limits of some toxic elements (Hg, Cd, As, Se, Sb) and other trace elements of interest (Fe, Cr, Co, Zn, Br) was obtained. The samples were irradiated in the CAb Ra-6 nuclear research reactor

  13. MagLIF Pre-Heat Optimization on the PECOS Surrogacy Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Ampleford, D.; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Glinsky, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P. F.; Lewis, S. M.; Peterson, K.; Rochau, G. A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schwarz, J.; Shores, J. E.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Weis, M. R.; Porter, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    Sandia's MagLIF Program is using the PECOS target area as a platform to optimize the coupling of laser energy into the fuel. After developing laser pulse shapes that reduced SBS and improved energy deposition (presented last year), we will report on the effect on integrated experiments with Z. Despite encouraging results, questions remained about the equivalency of He, (PECOS studies), versus D2 (Z). Furthermore, simulations imply that the goal of at least 1 kJ in the fuel will require higher pressures, requiring a re-design of the gas delivery system. We will present recent results for backscatter measurements and energy deposition profiles in 60 psi and 90 psi deuterium fills and compare them to previously studied helium fills. Sandia National Labs is managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for U.S. DoE/NNSA under contract DE-NA0003525.

  14. Preparation of Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes (Mag-CNTs) for Biomedical and Biotechnological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masotti, Andrea; Caporali, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied for their potential applications in many fields from nanotechnology to biomedicine. The preparation of magnetic CNTs (Mag-CNTs) opens new avenues in nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications as a consequence of their multiple properties embedded within the same moiety. Several preparation techniques have been developed during the last few years to obtain magnetic CNTs: grafting or filling nanotubes with magnetic ferrofluids or attachment of magnetic nanoparticles to CNTs or their polymeric coating. These strategies allow the generation of novel versatile systems that can be employed in many biotechnological or biomedical fields. Here, we review and discuss the most recent papers dealing with the preparation of magnetic CNTs and their application in biomedical and biotechnological fields. PMID:24351838

  15. First industrial application of MAG STT welding with auto adaptative joint control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Tien, Thong

    2006-01-01

    The Welding Institute has participated to an extraordinary plan: the manufacture of the new LHC (Large Hadron Collider) particles accelerator in a circular tunnel of 27 km of circumference, at the European laboratory for particles physics (CERN) located at the Franco-Swiss frontier. The LHC dipolar magnets wires constituted in semi-cylinders of 15 m length in 316 LN, thickness 10 mm, are assembled in horizontal-vertical position. The Welding Institute has developed a software allowing to implement the auto-adaptative welding with follow of laser joint, using the MAG STT (Surface Tension Transfer) process. The modeling of welding laws connected with the strategy of joints filling runs (in multi-passes), absorb the physical tolerances of the preparation (clearance, poor alignment, root of joint...) and this in welding dynamical condition. (O.M.)

  16. Multi-Objective data analysis using Bayesian Inference for MagLIF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Patrick; Glinksy, Michael; Evans, Matthew; Gom, Matth; Han, Stephanie; Harding, Eric; Slutz, Steve; Hahn, Kelly; Harvey-Thompson, Adam; Geissel, Matthias; Ampleford, David; Jennings, Christopher; Schmit, Paul; Smith, Ian; Schwarz, Jens; Peterson, Kyle; Jones, Brent; Rochau, Gregory; Sinars, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    The MagLIF concept has recently demonstrated Gbar pressures and confinement of charged fusion products at stagnation. We present a new analysis methodology that allows for integration of multiple diagnostics including nuclear, x-ray imaging, and x-ray power to determine the temperature, pressure, liner areal density, and mix fraction. A simplified hot-spot model is used with a Bayesian inference network to determine the most probable model parameters that describe the observations while simultaneously revealing the principal uncertainties in the analysis. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA-0003525.

  17. Murine macrophage response from peritoneal cavity requires signals mediated by chemokine receptor CCR-2 during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-02-01

    C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2) is a cognate receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and recent studies revealed that MCP-1-CCR-2 signaling is involved in several inflammatory diseases characterized by macrophage infiltration. Currently, there is no study on the involvement of CCR-2 in the killing of S. aureus by macrophages of Swiss albino mice, and its substantial role in host defense against S. aureus infection in murine macrophages is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the functional and interactive role of CCR-2 and MCP-1 in regulating peritoneal macrophage responses with respect to acute S. aureus infection. We found that phagocytosis of S. aureus can serve as an important stimulus for MCP-1 production by peritoneal macrophages, which is dependent directly or indirectly on cytokines, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Neutralization of CCR-2 in macrophages leads to increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-6. In CCR-2 blocked macrophages, pretreatment with specific blocker of NF-κB or p38-MAPK causes elevation in MCP-1 level and subsequent downregulation of CCR-2 itself. We speculate that CCR-2 is involved in S. aureus-induced MCP-1 production via NF-κB or p38-MAPK signaling. We also hypothesized that unnaturally high level of MCP-1 that build up upon CCR-2 neutralization might allow promiscuous binding to one or more other chemokine receptors, a situation that would not occur in CCR-2 non-neutralized condition. This may be the plausible explanation for such observed Th-2 response in CCR-2 blocked macrophages infected with S. aureus in the present study.

  18. CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101 preferentially inhibit drug-bound CCR5 infection and restore drug sensitivity of Maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 in primary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latinovic, Olga; Reitz, Marvin; Le, Nhut M.; Foulke, James S.; Faetkenheuer, Gerd; Lehmann, Clara; Redfield, Robert R.; Heredia, Alonso

    2011-01-01

    R5 HIV-1 strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc (MVC) can use drug-bound CCR5. We demonstrate that MVC-resistant HIV-1 exhibits delayed kinetics of coreceptor engagement and fusion during drug-bound versus free CCR5 infection of cell lines. Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CCR5 had greater antiviral activity against MVC-bound compared to MVC-free CCR5 infection. However, in PBMCs, only ECL2 CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, inhibited infection by MVC resistant HIV-1 more potently with MVC-bound than with free CCR5. In addition, HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, restored the antiviral activity of MVC against resistant virus in PBMCs. In flow cytometric studies, CCR5 binding by the HGS mAbs, but not by 2D7, was increased when PBMCs were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC increases exposure of the relevant epitope. Thus, HGS004 and HGS101 have antiviral mechanisms distinct from 2D7 and could help overcome MVC resistance.

  19. HIV-1 adaptation to low levels of CCR5 results in V3 and V2 loop changes that increase envelope pathogenicity, CCR5 affinity and decrease susceptibility to Maraviroc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Himanshu; Lee, Raphael T C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-06-01

    Variability in CCR5 levels in the human population is suggested to affect virus evolution, fitness and the course of HIV disease. We previously demonstrated that cell surface CCR5 levels directly affect HIV Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis. In this study, we attempted to understand HIV evolution in the presence of low levels of CCR5, mimicking the limiting CCR5 levels inherent to the host. HIV-1 adaptation in a T cell line expressing low levels of CCR5 resulted in two specific mutations; N302Y and E172K. The N302Y mutation led to accelerated virus replication, increase in Maraviroc IC50 and an increase in Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis in low CCR5 expressing cells. Analysis of subtype B sequences showed that N302Y is over-represented in CXCR4 tropic viruses in comparison to CCR5 tropic isolates. Considering the variability in CCR5 levels between individuals, our findings have implications for virus evolution, MVC susceptibility as well as HIV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101 preferentially inhibit drug-bound CCR5 infection and restore drug sensitivity of Maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 in primary cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinovic, Olga; Reitz, Marvin; Le, Nhut M.; Foulke, James S.; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Lehmann, Clara; Redfield, Robert R.; Heredia, Alonso

    2010-01-01

    R5 HIV-1 strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc (MVC) can use drug-bound CCR5. We demonstrate that MVC-resistant HIV-1 exhibits delayed kinetics of coreceptor engagement and fusion during drug-bound versus free CCR5 infection of cell lines. Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CCR5 had greater antiviral activity against MVC-bound compared to MVC-free CCR5 infection. However, in PBMCs, only ECL2 CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, inhibited infection by MVC resistant HIV-1 more potently with MVC-bound than with free CCR5. In addition, HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, restored the antiviral activity of MVC against resistant virus in PBMCs. In flow cytometric studies, CCR5 binding by the HGS mAbs, but not by 2D7, was increased when PBMCs were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC increases exposure of the relevant epitope. Thus, HGS004 and HGS101 have antiviral mechanisms distinct from 2D7 and could help overcome MVC resistance. PMID:21232779

  1. No evidence for an effect of the CCR5 delta32/+ and CCR2b 64I/+ mutations on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 disease progression among HIV-1-infected injecting drug users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, J.; Langendam, M. W.; Coutinho, R. A.; Krol, A.; Brouwer, M.; Schuitemaker, H.

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between CCR5 and CCR2b genotypes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 disease progression was studied among the 108 seroconverters of the Amsterdam cohort of injecting drug users (IDUs). In contrast to earlier studies among homosexual men, no effect on disease progression of the

  2. A V1-vascular vasopressin antagonist suitable for radioiodination and photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibonnier, M.; Chehade, N.; Hinko, A.

    1990-01-01

    We have previously characterized the V1-vascular arginine vasopressin (AVP) receptors of human platelets. We now report on a radiomonoiodinated and photoreactive V1-vascular AVP antagonist (V1-ag) to be used for the purification of human V1-vascular AVP receptors. The V1-ag, d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)Tyr(NH2)AVP was modified by radiomonoiodination of d(CH2)5-Tyr(Me)Tyr(NH2)AVP with the Iodogen technique, and derivatization of d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)Tyr[125I](NH2)-AVP with the photoreactive crosslinker, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB) (each step included HPLC purification). In competition experiments, the affinity of these V1-ag for the human platelet AVP receptors remained excellent. Irreversible photoaffinity labeling of the platelet V1-vascular AVP receptor was successfully achieved by UV lamp exposure (365 nm, 20 min). Thus, AzBz-d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)Tyr[125I](NH2)AVP is a promising tool to use for the purification of human V1-vascular AVP receptors

  3. USEEIO v1.1 - Elementary Flows and Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) Characterization Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset is part of the USEEIO v1.1 model release. It provides the elementary flows used in the USEEIO v1.1 Satellite Tables (DOI: 10.23719/1365565) and their...

  4. Renal scintigraphy in the 21st Century 99m Tc-MAG3 with zero time injection of furosemide (MAG3-F0): a fast and easy protocol, one for all indications. Part 2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfakianakis, G.N.

    2007-01-01

    Current research on renal function to develop a method to calculate from the MAG 3 -F 0 study the renal global function (RGF) we use: a) the kidney uptake/body background activity (at 2 minutes), b) the residual cortical activity (at 20 minutes). Both these parameters are related with the creatinine levels. (Author)

  5. Resistance to the CCR5 inhibitor 5P12-RANTES requires a difficult evolution from CCR5 to CXCR4 coreceptor use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Nedellec

    Full Text Available Viral resistance to small molecule allosteric inhibitors of CCR5 is well documented, and involves either selection of preexisting CXCR4-using HIV-1 variants or envelope sequence evolution to use inhibitor-bound CCR5 for entry. Resistance to macromolecular CCR5 inhibitors has been more difficult to demonstrate, although selection of CXCR4-using variants might be expected. We have compared the in vitro selection of HIV-1 CC1/85 variants resistant to either the small molecule inhibitor maraviroc (MVC or the macromolecular inhibitor 5P12-RANTES. High level resistance to MVC was conferred by the same envelope mutations as previously reported after 16-18 weeks of selection by increasing levels of MVC. The MVC-resistant mutants were fully sensitive to inhibition by 5P12-RANTES. By contrast, only transient and low level resistance to 5P12-RANTES was achieved in three sequential selection experiments, and each resulted in a subsequent collapse of virus replication. A fourth round of selection by 5P12-RANTES led, after 36 weeks, to a "resistant" variant that had switched from CCR5 to CXCR4 as a coreceptor. Envelope sequences diverged by 3.8% during selection of the 5P12-RANTES resistant, CXCR4-using variants, with unique and critical substitutions in the V3 region. A subset of viruses recovered from control cultures after 44 weeks of passage in the absence of inhibitors also evolved to use CXCR4, although with fewer and different envelope mutations. Control cultures contained both viruses that evolved to use CXCR4 by deleting four amino acids in V3, and others that maintained entry via CCR5. These results suggest that coreceptor switching may be the only route to resistance for compounds like 5P12-RANTES. This pathway requires more mutations and encounters more fitness obstacles than development of resistance to MVC, confirming the clinical observations that resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors very rarely involves coreceptor switching.

  6. Insights into the structure and architecture of the CCR4-NOT complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Bai, Yuwei; Zhang, Aili; Zhang, Qionglin; Bartlam, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    The CCR4-NOT complex is a highly conserved, multifunctional machinery with a general role in controlling mRNA metabolism. It has been implicated in a number of different aspects of mRNA and protein expression, including mRNA degradation, transcription initiation and elongation, ubiquitination, and protein modification. The core CCR4-NOT complex is evolutionarily conserved and consists of at least three NOT proteins and two catalytic subunits. The L-shaped complex is characterized by two functional modules bound to the CNOT1/Not1 scaffold protein: the deadenylase or nuclease module containing two enzymes required for deadenylation, and the NOT module. In this review, we will summarize the currently available information regarding the three-dimensional structure and assembly of the CCR4-NOT complex, in order to provide insight into its roles in mRNA degradation and other biological processes.

  7. Insights into the structure and architecture of the CCR4–NOT complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Bai, Yuwei; Zhang, Aili; Zhang, Qionglin; Bartlam, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    The CCR4–NOT complex is a highly conserved, multifunctional machinery with a general role in controlling mRNA metabolism. It has been implicated in a number of different aspects of mRNA and protein expression, including mRNA degradation, transcription initiation and elongation, ubiquitination, and protein modification. The core CCR4–NOT complex is evolutionarily conserved and consists of at least three NOT proteins and two catalytic subunits. The L-shaped complex is characterized by two functional modules bound to the CNOT1/Not1 scaffold protein: the deadenylase or nuclease module containing two enzymes required for deadenylation, and the NOT module. In this review, we will summarize the currently available information regarding the three-dimensional structure and assembly of the CCR4–NOT complex, in order to provide insight into its roles in mRNA degradation and other biological processes. PMID:24904637

  8. Molecular interaction of a potent nonpeptide agonist with the chemokine receptor CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Nygaard, Rie; Thiele, Stefanie

    2007-01-01

    Most nonpeptide antagonists for CC-chemokine receptors share a common pharmacophore with a centrally located, positively charged amine that interacts with the highly conserved glutamic acid (Glu) located in position 6 of transmembrane helix VII (VII:06). We present a novel CCR8 nonpeptide agonist......, 8-[3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl]-1-phenethyl-1,3,8-triaza-spiro[4.5]decan-4-one (LMD-009), that also contains a centrally located, positively charged amine. LMD-009 selectively stimulated CCR8 among the 20 identified human chemokine receptors. It mediated chemotaxis, inositol phosphate accumulation......-binding pockets of CCR8 uncovered that the binding of LMD-009 and of four analogs [2-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-4-yl)benzoic acid (LMD-584), N-ethyl-2-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (LMD-902), N-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)piperidin-4-yl)-2-phenyl-4-(pyrrolidin-1yl)butanamide (LMD-268...

  9. Characterization of developmental and stress mediated expression of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) is an important enzyme for lignin biosynthesis as it catalyzes the first specific committed step in monolignol biosynthesis. We have cloned a full length coding sequence of CCR from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), which contains a 1,020-bp open reading frame (ORF), enco...

  10. DOWN-REGULATION OF CINNAMOYL-COA REDUCTASE (CCR) IN POPLAR INVESTIGATED WITH CHEMOMETRICS AND 2D-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    An understanding of the lignification process is of vital importance, especially for the pulp and paper industry. Cinnamoyl-coa reductase (CCR) is an enzyme that plays a central role in the lignification process. Previous results have shown that down-regulation of CCR decreases the lignin content. B...

  11. Blood expression levels of chemokine receptor CCR3 and chemokine CCL11 in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the CCR3/CCL11 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularisation, a common feature of late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of CCR3 and its ligand CCL11 in peripheral blood in patients...

  12. MC148 encoded by human molluscum contagiosum poxvirus is an antagonist for human but not murine CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Gerstoft, J; Schwartz, T W

    2001-01-01

    The viral CC chemokines MC148, encoded by the poxvirus molluscum contagiosum, and viral macrophage inflammatory protein (vMIP)-I and vMIP-II, encoded by human herpesvirus 8, were probed on the murine CC receptor (CCR) 8 in parallel with human CCR8. In calcium mobilization assays, vMIP-I acted...... as a high-affinity agonist, whereas vMIP-II acted as a low-affinity antagonist on the murine CCR8 as well as the human CCR8. MC148 was found to bind and block responses through the human CCR8 with high affinity, but surprisingly MC148 was unable to bind and block responses through the murine CCR8. Because...... MC148 is the only high-affinity antagonist known to target and be selective for CCR8, MC148 is a valuable tool to decipher the role played by CCR8 in the immune system. This study shows that MC148 could not be used in murine inflammatory models; however, it will be interesting to see whether it can...

  13. Evidence favoring the involvement of CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 in T-lymphocyte accumulation in optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M; Jensen, J

    2003-01-01

    To define the relationships between levels of chemokine receptor (CCR)5+ T-cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of optic neuritis (ON) and control patients (CON).......To define the relationships between levels of chemokine receptor (CCR)5+ T-cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of optic neuritis (ON) and control patients (CON)....

  14. Exploring a model of human chemokine receptor CCR2 in presence of TAK779: A membrane based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balupuri, Anand; Sobhia, M. Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and a crucial target for various inflammation-driven diseases. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed on a CCR2 homology model. This work includes the comparative MD simulations of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models. These simulations yield insights into the binding mechanism of antagonist TAK779 and improve the understanding of various structural changes induced by the ligand in the CCR2 protein. Here, one 20 ns MD simulation was carried out on the uncomplexed CCR2 model in lipid bilayer to explore the effects of lipid membrane on the protein. Another 20 ns MD simulation was performed under the similar conditions on the docked CCR2-TAK779 complex. An alteration in the position and orientation of the ligand in binding site was observed after the simulation. Examination of protein-ligand complex suggested that TAK779 produced a greater structural change on the TM-III, TM-IV, TM-V and TM-VI than TM-I, TM-II and TM-VII. Interaction networks involving the conserved residues of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models were also examined. The major difference was observed to be the role of conserved residues of the DRY motif of TM-III and the NPxxY motif of TM-VII of CCR2.

  15. Preclinical development and qualification of ZFN-mediated CCR5 disruption in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L DiGiusto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for HIV-1 infection is a promising alternative to lifelong combination antiviral drug treatment. Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 is the coreceptor required for R5-tropic HIV-1 infection of human cells. Deletion of CCR5 renders cells resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1 infection, and the potential for cure has been shown through allogeneic stem cell transplantation with naturally occurring homozygous deletion of CCR5 in donor hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC. The requirement for HLA-matched HSPC bearing homozygous CCR5 deletions prohibits widespread application of this approach. Thus, a strategy to disrupt CCR5 genomic sequences in HSPC using zinc finger nucleases was developed. Following discussions with regulatory agencies, we conducted IND-enabling preclinical in vitro and in vivo testing to demonstrate the feasibility and (preclinical safety of zinc finger nucleases-based CCR5 disruption in HSPC. We report here the clinical-scale manufacturing process necessary to deliver CCR5-specific zinc finger nucleases mRNA to HSPC using electroporation and the preclinical safety data. Our results demonstrate effective biallelic CCR5 disruption in up to 72.9% of modified colony forming units from adult mobilized HSPC with maintenance of hematopoietic potential in vitro and in vivo. Tumorigenicity studies demonstrated initial product safety; further safety and feasibility studies are ongoing in subjects infected with HIV-1 (NCT02500849@clinicaltrials.gov.

  16. Structural insight into a novel human CCR5-V130I variant associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambouli, Nejla; Wei, Ning-Ning; Jlizi, Asma; Aissa, Samah; Abdelmalek, Rim; Kilani, Baderredine; Slim, Amine; Tiouiri, Ben Aissa Hanen; Dridi, Mahdi; Hamza, Adel; Ben Ammar Elgaied, Amel

    2014-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) variant that seems associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection. The V130I mutation of the CCR5 receptor is located in the intracellular loop ICL2 known as DRY box and described in the literature as a nonsynonymous mutation present in nonhuman primates group. Extensive molecular modeling and dynamics simulations were performed to elucidate the mechanism by which the V130I mutation may induce conformational change of the CCR5 folding protein and prevent the interaction with the β-arrestin protein. Our study provides new mechanistic insight into how a specific mutation in the regulatory domain of CCR5 might alter the structural folding of the DRY box and the possible ICL2 loop binding with the β-arrestin protein, as described in our previous computational study. The results from our large-scale simulations complement recent experimental results and clinical features and offer useful insights into the mechanism behind CCR5 protein folding and signal transduction. In order for HIV, the entry of the virus to the cells must fuse with the CCR5 receptor that sits on the surface of T-helper immune cells. The described V130I mutation in the gene encoding the CCR5 protein may results in a defective CCR5-Arrestin binding complex that blocks entry of the virus.

  17. CCR5 mediates HIV-1 Tat-induced neuroinflammation and influences morphine tolerance, dependence, and reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonek, Maciej; McLane, Virginia D; Stevens, David L; Lippold, Kumiko; Akbarali, Hamid I; Knapp, Pamela E; Dewey, William L; Hauser, Kurt F; Paris, Jason J

    2017-11-13

    The HIV-1 regulatory protein, trans-activator of transcription (Tat), interacts with opioids to potentiate neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration within the CNS. These effects may involve the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5); however, the behavioral contribution of CCR5 on Tat/opioid interactions is not known. Using a transgenic murine model that expresses HIV-1 Tat protein in a GFAP-regulated, doxycycline-inducible manner, we assessed morphine tolerance, dependence, and reward. To assess the influence of CCR5 on these effects, mice were pretreated with oral vehicle or the CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, prior to morphine administration. We found that HIV-1 Tat expression significantly attenuated the antinociceptive potency of acute morphine (2-64 mg/kg, i.p.) in non-tolerant mice. Consistent with this, Tat attenuated withdrawal symptoms among morphine-tolerant mice. Pretreatment with maraviroc blocked the effects of Tat, reinstating morphine potency in non-tolerant mice and restoring withdrawal symptomology in morphine-tolerant mice. Twenty-four hours following morphine administration, HIV-1 Tat significantly potentiated (∼3.5-fold) morphine-conditioned place preference and maraviroc further potentiated these effects (∼5.7-fold). Maraviroc exerted no measurable behavioral effects on its own. Protein array analyses revealed only minor changes to cytokine profiles when morphine was administered acutely or repeatedly; however, 24 h post morphine administration, the expression of several cytokines was greatly increased, including endogenous CCR5 chemokine ligands (CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5), as well as CCL2. Tat further elevated levels of several cytokines and maraviroc pretreatment attenuated these effects. These data demonstrate that CCR5 mediates key aspects of HIV-1 Tat-induced alterations in the antinociceptive potency and rewarding properties of opioids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential evolution of a CXCR4-using HIV-1 strain in CCR5wt/wt and CCR5∆32/∆32 hosts revealed by longitudinal deep sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Anh Q; Taylor, Jeremy; Dong, Winnie; McCloskey, Rosemary; Woods, Conan; Danroth, Ryan; Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, M-J; Poon, Art F Y; Brumme, Zabrina L

    2015-12-03

    Rare individuals homozygous for a naturally-occurring 32 base pair deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5∆32/∆32) are resistant to infection by CCR5-using ("R5") HIV-1 strains but remain susceptible to less common CXCR4-using ("X4") strains. The evolutionary dynamics of X4 infections however, remain incompletely understood. We identified two individuals, one CCR5wt/wt and one CCR5∆32/∆32, within the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study who were infected with a genetically similar X4 HIV-1 strain. While early-stage plasma viral loads were comparable in the two individuals (~4.5-5 log10 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml), CD4 counts in the CCR5wt/wt individual reached a nadir of 250 cells/mm(3) in the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual. Ancestral phylogenetic reconstructions using longitudinal envelope-V3 deep sequences suggested that both individuals were infected by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) X4 virus that differed at only one V3 site (codon 24). While substantial within-host HIV-1 V3 diversification was observed in plasma and PBMC in both individuals, the CCR5wt/wt individual's HIV-1 population gradually reverted from 100% X4 to ~60% R5 over ~4 years whereas the CCR5∆32/∆32 individual's remained consistently X4. Our observations illuminate early dynamics of X4 HIV-1 infections and underscore the influence of CCR5 genotype on HIV-1 V3 evolution.

  19. Reduced PCR sensitivity due to impaired DNA recovery with the MagNA pure LC total nucleic acid isolation kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, T; van Breda, A; Kooistra-Smid, Mirjam; Beld, M; Savelkoul, P; Boom, R; de Boer, R.A.

    The increasing demand for molecular diagnostics in clinical microbiology laboratories necessitates automated sample processing. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the MagNA Pure LC total nucleic acid isolation kit (M extraction) in comparison with the manual method (Si extraction)

  20. Reduced PCR sensitivity due to impaired DNA recovery with the MagNA Pure LC total nucleic acid isolation kit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, Tim; van Breda, Alex; de Boer, Richard; Kooistra-Smid, Mirjam; Beld, Marcel; Savelkoul, Paul; Boom, René

    2005-01-01

    The increasing demand for molecular diagnostics in clinical microbiology laboratories necessitates automated sample processing. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the MagNA Pure LC total nucleic acid isolation kit (M extraction) in comparison with the manual method (Si extraction)

  1. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER type nuclear reactors. I. 110mAg

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hirschberg, G

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation, presence and deposition of corrosion product radionuclides (such as 60Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe and/or 110mAg) in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors (PWRs) throw many obstacles in the way of normal operation. During...

  2. Differential CCR7 Targeting in Dendritic Cells by Three Naturally Occurring CC-Chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorto, Gertrud M.; Larsen, Olav; Steen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The CCR7 ligands CCL19 and CCL21 are increasingly recognized as functionally different (biased). Using mature human dendritic cells (DCs), we show that CCL19 is more potent than CCL21 in inducing 3D chemotaxis. Intriguingly, CCL21 induces prolonged and more efficient ERK1/2 activation compared...... identify a molecular switch in the top of TM7 important for keeping CCR7 in an inactive conformation (Tyr312), as introduction of the chemokine receptor-conserved Glu (or Ala) induces high constitutive activity. Summarized, we show that the interaction of the tail of CCL21 with polysialic acid is needed...

  3. CCR1, an enzyme required for lignin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, mediates cell proliferation exit for leaf development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Jingshi; Luo, Dexian; Xu, Deyang

    2015-01-01

    development is as yet poorly understood. By genetic screening and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in exit from cell proliferation, we show that the product of the CINNAMOYL CoA REDUCTASE (CCR1) gene, which is required for lignin biosynthesis, participates in the process of cell proliferation...... exit in leaves. CCR1 is expressed basipetally in the leaf, and ccr1 mutants exhibited multiple abnormalities, including increased cell proliferation. The ccr1 phenotypes are not due to the reduced lignin content, but instead are due to the dramatically increased level of ferulic acid (Fe......A), an intermediate in lignin biosynthesis. FeA is known to have antioxidant activity, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ccr1 were markedly reduced. We also characterized another double mutant in CAFFEIC ACID O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (comt) and CAFFEOYL CoA 3-O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (ccoaomt), in which the Fe...

  4. The impact of CCR5-Δ32 deletion on C-reactive protein levels and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khoa M; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The C-C chemokine receptor 5-Δ32 deletion (CCR5-Δ32) has been associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), but the effect on cardiovascular diseases is uncertain. This study addresses the impact of CCR5-Δ32 on the risk of low-grade inflammation...... and hospitalization with cardiovascular diseases in a large cohort of blood donors. METHODS: Genotyping of 15,206 healthy participants from The Danish Blood Donor Study for CCR5-Δ32 was performed and combined with CRP measurements and questionnaire data. Cardiovascular disease diagnoses were identified by ICD-10...... codes in the Danish National Patient Registry. RESULTS: CCR5-Δ32-carriers had a higher risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases when compared with wild-type homozygotes (hazard ratio = 1.35, 95%-confidence interval: 1.00-1.87). CRP levels were unaffected by the CCR5-Δ32 deletion. CONCLUSION...

  5. Co-evolutionary dynamics of the bacteria Vibrio sp. CV1 and phages V1G, V1P1, and V1P2: implications for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Camilo; Venail, Patrick; Holguin, Angela V; Vives, Martha J

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial infections are the second largest cause of mortality in shrimp hatcheries. Among them, bacteria from the genus Vibrio constitute a major threat. As the use of antibiotics may be ineffective and banned from the food sector, alternatives are required. Historically, phage therapy, which is the use of bacteriophages, is thought to be a promising option to fight against bacterial infections. However, as for antibiotics, resistance can be rapidly developed. Since the emergence of resistance is highly undesirable, a formal characterization of the dynamics of its acquisition is mandatory. Here, we explored the co-evolutionary dynamics of resistance between the bacteria Vibrio sp. CV1 and the phages V1G, V1P1, and V1P2. Single-phage treatments as well as a cocktail composed of the three phages were considered. We found that in the presence of a single phage, bacteria rapidly evolved resistance, and the phages decreased their infectivity, suggesting that monotherapy may be an inefficient treatment to fight against Vibrio infections in shrimp hatcheries. On the contrary, the use of a phage cocktail considerably delayed the evolution of resistance and sustained phage infectivity for periods in which shrimp larvae are most susceptible to bacterial infections, suggesting the simultaneous use of multiple phages as a serious strategy for the control of vibriosis. These findings are very promising in terms of their consequences to different industrial and medical scenarios where bacterial infections are present.

  6. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  7. CCR5 gene disruption via lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and single guided RNA renders cells resistant to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiming; Ye, Chaobaihui; Liu, Jingjing; Zhang, Di; Kimata, Jason T; Zhou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    CCR5, a coreceptor for HIV-1 entry, is a major target for drug and genetic intervention against HIV-1. Genetic intervention strategies have knocked down CCR5 expression levels by shRNA or disrupted the CCR5 gene using zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) or Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN). In the present study, we silenced CCR5 via CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single guided RNAs (sgRNAs). We constructed lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs. We show that a single round transduction of lentiviral vectors expressing Cas9 and CCR5 sgRNAs into HIV-1 susceptible human CD4+ cells yields high frequencies of CCR5 gene disruption. CCR5 gene-disrupted cells are not only resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1, including transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 isolates, but also have selective advantage over CCR5 gene-undisrupted cells during R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. Importantly, using T7 endonuclease I assay we did not detect genome mutations at potential off-target sites that are highly homologous to these CCR5 sgRNAs in stably transduced cells even at 84 days post transduction. Thus we conclude that silencing of CCR5 via Cas9 and CCR5-specific sgRNAs could be a viable alternative strategy for engineering resistance against HIV-1.

  8. Cytokine-mediated downregulation of vasopressin V(1A) receptors during acute endotoxemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Michael; Hobbhahn, Jonny; Taeger, Kai; Kurtz, Armin

    2002-04-01

    The reduced pressure response to vasopressin during acute sepsis has directed our interest to the regulation of vasopressin V(1A) receptors. Rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide for induction of experimental gram-negative sepsis. V(1A) receptor gene expression was downregulated in the liver, lung, kidney, and heart during endotoxemia. Inasmuch as the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma were highly increased during sepsis, the influence of these cytokines on V(1A) receptor expression was investigated in primary cultures of hepatocytes and in the aortic vascular smooth muscle cell line A7r5. V(1A) receptor expression was downregulated by the cytokines in a nitric oxide-independent manner. Blood pressure dose-response studies after injection of endotoxin showed a diminished responsiveness to the selective V(1) receptor agonist Phe(2),Ile(3),Orn(8)-vasopressin. Our data show that sepsis causes a downregulation of V(1A) receptors and suggest that this effect is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines. We propose that this downregulation of V(1A) receptors contributes to the attenuated responsiveness of blood pressure in response to vasopressin and, therefore, contributes to the circulatory failure in septic shock.

  9. Depletion of host CCR7(+) dendritic cells prevented donor T cell tissue tropism in anti-CD3-conditioned recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Racine, Jeremy J; Johnston, Heather F; Li, Xiaofan; Li, Nainong; Cassady, Kaniel; Liu, Can; Deng, Ruishu; Martin, Paul; Forman, Stephen; Zeng, Defu

    2014-07-01

    We reported previously that anti-CD3 mAb treatment before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) prevented graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and preserved graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects in mice. These effects were associated with downregulated donor T cell expression of tissue-specific homing and chemokine receptors, marked reduction of donor T cell migration into GVHD target tissues, and deletion of CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). MLN CD103(+) DCs and peripheral lymph node (PLN) DCs include CCR7(+) and CCR7(-) subsets, but the role of these DC subsets in regulating donor T cell expression of homing and chemokine receptors remain unclear. Here, we show that recipient CCR7(+), but not CCR7(-), DCs in MLN induced donor T cell expression of gut-specific homing and chemokine receptors in a retinoid acid-dependent manner. CCR7 regulated activated DC migration from tissue to draining lymph node, but it was not required for the ability of DCs to induce donor T cell expression of tissue-specific homing and chemokine receptors. Finally, anti-CD3 treatment depleted CCR7(+) but not CCR7(-) DCs by inducing sequential expansion and apoptosis of CCR7(+) DCs in MLN and PLN. Apoptosis of CCR7(+) DCs was associated with DC upregulation of Fas expression and natural killer cell but not T, B, or dendritic cell upregulation of FasL expression in the lymph nodes. These results suggest that depletion of CCR7(+) host-type DCs, with subsequent inhibition of donor T cell migration into GVHD target tissues, can be an effective approach in prevention of acute GVHD and preservation of GVL effects. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavioral Abnormalities in a Mouse Model of Chronic Toxoplasmosis Are Associated with MAG1 Antibody Levels and Cyst Burden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianchun Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There is marked variation in the human response to Toxoplasma gondii infection. Epidemiological studies indicate associations between strain virulence and severity of toxoplasmosis. Animal studies on the pathogenic effect of chronic infection focused on relatively avirulent strains (e.g. type II because they can easily establish latent infections in mice, defined by the presence of bradyzoite-containing cysts. To provide insight into virulent strain-related severity of human toxoplasmosis, we established a chronic model of the virulent type I strain using outbred mice. We found that type I-exposed mice displayed variable outcomes ranging from aborted to severe infections. According to antibody profiles, we found that most of mice generated antibodies against T. gondii organism but varied greatly in the production of antibodies against matrix antigen MAG1. There was a strong correlation between MAG1 antibody level and brain cyst burden in chronically infected mice (r = 0.82, p = 0.0021. We found that mice with high MAG1 antibody level displayed lower weight, behavioral changes, altered levels of gene expression and immune activation. The most striking change in behavior we discovered was a blunted response to amphetamine-trigged locomotor activity. The extent of most changes was directly correlated with levels of MAG1 antibody. These changes were not found in mice with less cyst burden or mice that were acutely but not chronically infected. Our finding highlights the critical role of cyst burden in a range of disease severity during chronic infection, the predictive value of MAG1 antibody level to brain cyst burden and to changes in behavior or other pathology in chronically infected mice. Our finding may have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous effects of T. gondii infections in human.

  11. Making the MagIC (Magnetics Information Consortium) Web Application Accessible to New Users and Useful to Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.

    2017-12-01

    Challenges are faced by both new and experienced users interested in contributing their data to community repositories, in data discovery, or engaged in potentially transformative science. The Magnetics Information Consortium (https://earthref.org/MagIC) has recently simplified its data model and developed a new containerized web application to reduce the friction in contributing, exploring, and combining valuable and complex datasets for the paleo-, geo-, and rock magnetic scientific community. The new data model more closely reflects the hierarchical workflow in paleomagnetic experiments to enable adequate annotation of scientific results and ensure reproducibility. The new open-source (https://github.com/earthref/MagIC) application includes an upload tool that is integrated with the data model to provide early data validation feedback and ease the friction of contributing and updating datasets. The search interface provides a powerful full text search of contributions indexed by ElasticSearch and a wide array of filters, including specific geographic and geological timescale filtering, to support both novice users exploring the database and experts interested in compiling new datasets with specific criteria across thousands of studies and millions of measurements. The datasets are not large, but they are complex, with many results from evolving experimental and analytical approaches. These data are also extremely valuable due to the cost in collecting or creating physical samples and the, often, destructive nature of the experiments. MagIC is heavily invested in encouraging young scientists as well as established labs to cultivate workflows that facilitate contributing their data in a consistent format. This eLightning presentation includes a live demonstration of the MagIC web application, developed as a configurable container hosting an isomorphic Meteor JavaScript application, MongoDB database, and ElasticSearch search engine. Visitors can explore the Mag

  12. Introducing a New Interface for the Online MagIC Database by Integrating Data Uploading, Searching, and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Constable, C.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is dedicated to supporting the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities through the development and maintenance of an online database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/), data upload and quality control, searches, data downloads, and visualization tools. While MagIC has completed importing some of the IAGA paleomagnetic databases (TRANS, PINT, PSVRL, GPMDB) and continues to import others (ARCHEO, MAGST and SECVR), further individual data uploading from the community contributes a wealth of easily-accessible rich datasets. Previously uploading of data to the MagIC database required the use of an Excel spreadsheet using either a Mac or PC. The new method of uploading data utilizes an HTML 5 web interface where the only computer requirement is a modern browser. This web interface will highlight all errors discovered in the dataset at once instead of the iterative error checking process found in the previous Excel spreadsheet data checker. As a web service, the community will always have easy access to the most up-to-date and bug free version of the data upload software. The filtering search mechanism of the MagIC database has been changed to a more intuitive system where the data from each contribution is displayed in tables similar to how the data is uploaded (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/search/). Searches themselves can be saved as a permanent URL, if desired. The saved search URL could then be used as a citation in a publication. When appropriate, plots (equal area, Zijderveld, ARAI, demagnetization, etc.) are associated with the data to give the user a quicker understanding of the underlying dataset. The MagIC database will continue to evolve to meet the needs of the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities.

  13. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touska, Filip; Sattler, Simon; Malsch, Philipp; Lewis, Richard J.; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX) reduce CGRP release by 53–75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics. PMID:28867800

  14. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Touska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatoxins (CTXs are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1 into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX reduce CGRP release by 53–75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC. Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  15. The role of the N-terminal segment of CCR5 in HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and the mechanism of virus adaptation to CCR5 lacking this segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabat David

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env induces membrane fusion as a result of sequential binding to CD4 and chemokine receptors (CCR5 or CXCR4. The critical determinants of CCR5 coreceptor function are the N-terminal domain (Nt and the second extracellular loop. However, mutations in gp120 adapt HIV-1 to grow on cells expressing the N-terminally truncated CCR5(Δ18 (Platt et al., J. Virol. 2005, 79: 4357–68. Results We have functionally characterized the adapted Env (designated Env(NYP using a quantitative cell-cell fusion assay. The rate of fusion with target cells expressing wild-type CCR5 and the resistance to fusion inhibitors was virtually identical for wild-type Env and Env(NYP, implying that the coreceptor affinity had not increased as a result of adaptation. In contrast, Env(NYP-induced fusion with cells expressing CCR5(Δ18 occurred at a slower rate and was extremely sensitive to the CCR5 binding inhibitor, Sch-C. Resistance to Sch-C drastically increased after pre-incubation of Env(NYP- and CCR5(Δ18-expressing cells at a temperature that was not permissive to fusion. This indicates that ternary Env(NYP-CD4-CCR5(Δ18 complexes accumulate at sub-threshold temperature and that low-affinity interactions with the truncated coreceptor are sufficient for triggering conformational changes in the gp41 of Env(NYP but not in wild-type Env. We also demonstrated that the ability of CCR5(Δ18 to support fusion and infection mediated by wild-type Env can be partially reconstituted in the presence of a synthetic sulfated peptide corresponding to the CCR5 Nt. Pre-incubation of wild-type Env- and CCR5(Δ18-expressing cells with the sulfated peptide at sub-threshold temperature markedly increased the efficiency of fusion. Conclusion We propose that, upon binding the Nt region of CCR5, wild-type Env acquires the ability to productively engage the extracellular loop(s of CCR5 – an event that triggers gp41 refolding and membrane merger

  16. The Bet v 1 fold: an ancient, versatile scaffold for binding of large, hydrophobic ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breiteneder Heimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, is a member of the ubiquitous PR-10 family of plant pathogenesis-related proteins. In recent years, a number of diverse plant proteins with low sequence similarity to Bet v 1 was identified. In addition, determination of the Bet v 1 structure revealed the existence of a large superfamily of structurally related proteins. In this study, we aimed to identify and classify all Bet v 1-related structures from the Protein Data Bank and all Bet v 1-related sequences from the Uniprot database. Results Structural comparisons of representative members of already known protein families structurally related to Bet v 1 with all entries of the Protein Data Bank yielded 47 structures with non-identical sequences. They were classified into eleven families, five of which were newly identified and not included in the Structural Classification of Proteins database release 1.71. The taxonomic distribution of these families extracted from the Pfam protein family database showed that members of the polyketide cyclase family and the activator of Hsp90 ATPase homologue 1 family were distributed among all three superkingdoms, while members of some bacterial families were confined to a small number of species. Comparison of ligand binding activities of Bet v 1-like superfamily members revealed that their functions were related to binding and metabolism of large, hydrophobic compounds such as lipids, hormones, and antibiotics. Phylogenetic relationships within the Bet v 1 family, defined as the group of proteins with significant sequence similarity to Bet v 1, were determined by aligning 264 Bet v 1-related sequences. A distance-based phylogenetic tree yielded a classification into 11 subfamilies, nine exclusively containing plant sequences and two subfamilies of bacterial proteins. Plant sequences included the pathogenesis-related proteins 10, the major latex proteins/ripening-related proteins subfamily, and

  17. Visual recognition memory, manifested as long-term habituation, requires synaptic plasticity in V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Sam F; Komorowski, Robert W; Kaplan, Eitan S; Gavornik, Jeffrey P; Bear, Mark F

    2015-02-01

    Familiarity with stimuli that bring neither reward nor punishment, manifested through behavioral habituation, enables organisms to detect novelty and devote cognition to important elements of the environment. Here we describe in mice a form of long-term behavioral habituation to visual grating stimuli that is selective for stimulus orientation. Orientation-selective habituation (OSH) can be observed both in exploratory behavior in an open arena and in a stereotyped motor response to visual stimuli in head-restrained mice. We found that the latter behavioral response, termed a 'vidget', requires V1. Parallel electrophysiological recordings in V1 revealed that plasticity, in the form of stimulus-selective response potentiation (SRP), occurred in layer 4 of V1 as OSH developed. Local manipulations of V1 that prevented and reversed electrophysiological modifications likewise prevented and reversed memory demonstrated behaviorally. These findings suggest that a form of long-term visual recognition memory is stored via synaptic plasticity in primary sensory cortex.

  18. Ly-6G+CCR2- myeloid cells rather than Ly-6ChighCCR2+ monocytes are required for the control of bacterial infection in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildner, Alexander; Djukic, Marija; Garbe, David; Wellmer, Andreas; Kuziel, William A; Mack, Matthias; Nau, Roland; Prinz, Marco

    2008-08-15

    Myeloid cell recruitment is a characteristic feature of bacterial meningitis. However, the cellular mechanisms important for the control of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection remain largely undefined. Previous pharmacological or genetic studies broadly depleted many myeloid cell types within the meninges, which did not allow defining the function of specific myeloid subsets. Herein we show that besides CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+)CCR2(-) granulocytes, also CD11b(+)Ly-6C(high)CCR2(+) but not Ly-6C(low)CCR2(-) monocytes were recruited in high numbers to the brain as early as 12 h after bacterial challenge. Surprisingly, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(high)CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes modulated local CXCL2 and IL-1beta production within the meninges but did not provide protection against bacterial infection. Consistent with these results, CCR2 deficiency strongly impaired monocyte recruitment to the infected brains but was redundant for disease pathogenesis. In contrast, specific depletion of polymorphonuclear granulocytes caused elevated local bacterial titer within the brains, led to an aggravated clinical course, and enhanced mortality. These findings demonstrate that Ly-6C(high)CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes play a redundant role for the host defense during bacterial meningitis and that predominantly CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+)CCR2(-) myeloid cells are involved in the restriction of the extracellular bacteria.

  19. Uploading, Searching and Visualizing of Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Data in the Online MagIC Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Donadini, F.

    2007-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by both rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all available measurements and derived properties from paleomagnetic studies of directions and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). MagIC is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and will soon implement two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Currently the PMAG node is operational. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual map interface to browse and select locations. Users can also browse the database by data type or by data compilation to view all contributions associated with well known earlier collections like PINT, GMPDB or PSVRL. The query result set is displayed in a digestible tabular format allowing the user to descend from locations to sites, samples, specimens and measurements. At each stage, the result set can be saved and, where appropriate, can be visualized by plotting global location maps, equal area, XY, age, and depth plots, or typical Zijderveld, hysteresis, magnetization and remanence diagrams. User contributions to the MagIC database are critical to achieving a useful research tool. We have developed a standard data and metadata template (version 2.3) that can be used to format and upload all data at the time of publication in Earth Science journals. Software tools are provided to facilitate population of these templates within Microsoft Excel. These tools allow for the import/export of text files and provide advanced functionality to manage and edit the data, and to perform various internal checks to maintain data integrity and prepare for uploading. The MagIC Contribution Wizard at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/upload.htm executes the upload

  20. Coincident natural selection of CCR5∆32 and C282Y in Europe: to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    population, comparable to the mortality in North Africa and the Near East. China, India, and the rest of the Far. East are commonly believed to be severely affected (Norris. 1977; Drancourt and Raoult 2002; Wheelis 2002). As a result, lack of plague mortality is unlikely to be related to low frequencies of CCR5∆32 and C282Y ...

  1. Recent updates for designing CCR5 antagonists as anti-retroviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Harshil R; Savjani, Jignasa Ketan

    2018-03-10

    The healthcare system faces various challenges in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy due to resistance to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) as a consequence of the evolutionary process. Despite the success of antiretroviral drugs like Zidovudine, Zalcitabine, Raltegravir WHO ranks HIV as one of the deadliest diseases with a mortality of one million lives in 2016. Thus, there emerges an urgency of developing a novel anti-retroviral agent that combat resistant HIV strains. The clinical development of ART from a single drug regimen to current triple drug combination is very slow. The progression in the structural biology of the viral envelope prompted the discovery of novel targets, which can be demonstrated a proficient approach for drug design of anti-retroviral agents. The current review enlightens the recent updates in the structural biology of the viral envelope and focuses on CCR5 as a validated target as well as ways to overcome CCR5 resistance. The article also throws light on the SAR studies and most prevalent mutations in the receptor for designing CCR5 antagonists that can combat HIV-1 infection. To conclude, the paper lists diversified scaffolds that are in pipeline by various pharmaceutical companies that could provide an aid for developing novel CCR5 antagonists. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. (CCR2) G190A polymorphism in chronic renal failure patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End-stage renal disease is associated with the inflammatory state characterized by infiltrating macrophages/lymphocytes, a major source of chemokines. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CCR2 G190A polymorphism in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) requiring hemodialysis. Seventy CRF ...

  3. CCR5 as a Natural and Modulated Target for Inhibition of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P. Burke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection of target cells requires CD4 and a co-receptor, predominantly the chemokine receptor CCR5. CCR5-delta32 homozygosity results in a truncated protein providing natural protection against HIV infection—this without detrimental effects to the host—and transplantation of CCR5-delta32 stem cells in a patient with HIV (“Berlin patient” achieved viral eradication. As a more feasible approach gene-modification strategies are being developed to engineer cellular resistance to HIV using autologous cells. We have developed a dual therapeutic anti-HIV lentiviral vector (LVsh5/C46 that down-regulates CCR5 and inhibits HIV-1 fusion via cell surface expression of the gp41-derived peptide, C46. This construct, effective against multiple strains of both R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, is being tested in Phase I/II trials by engineering HIV-resistant hematopoietic cells.

  4. Orphan chemokine receptors in neuroimmunology : functional and pharmacological analysis of L-CCR and HCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurman, Michael Wilhelmer

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we have investigated the expression and biological activity of the orphan chemokine receptors L-CCR/HCR in astrocytes and microglia. Several lines of evidence indicate that the chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CCL7 and CCL8 are agonists for these receptors. Although a variety of biological

  5. Why CCR: A conversation with Physician Assistant Julia Friend | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    "Where else can you make such a profound difference not only for the individual now, but for those who come in the future? It is hard work, good work and worth doing well.” Physician Assistant Julia Friend answers our questions about why she loves working for CCR. Read more...

  6. Impact of CCR5 Delta32/+ deletion on herpes zoster among HIV-1-infected homosexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, Anneke; Lensen, Ruud; Veenstra, Jan; Prins, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Coutinho, Roel A.

    2006-01-01

    The association between the presence of CCR5 Delta32 heterozygosity and incidence of clinical herpes zoster was studied among 296 homosexual men from the Amsterdam cohort study (ACS) infected with human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) with an estimated date of seroconversion. Of them 63 were

  7. Targeting of Gr-1+,CCR2+ monocytes in collagen-induced arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brühl, H.; Cihak, J.; Plachý, Jiří; Kunz-Schughart, L.; Niedermeier, M.; Denzel, A.; Gomez, M.R.; Talke, Y.; Luckow, B.; Stangassinger, M.; Mack, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 9 (2007), s. 2975-2985 ISSN 0004-3591 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemenschaft(DE) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : arthritis * CCR2 * monocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.677, year: 2007

  8. Development of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV, using a novel tropism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ryst, Elna; Heera, Jayvant; Demarest, James; Knirsch, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Assays to identify infectious organisms are critical for diagnosis and enabling the development of therapeutic agents. The demonstration that individuals with a 32-bp deletion within the CCR5 locus were resistant to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while those heterozygous for the mutation progressed more slowly, led to the discovery of maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist. As MVC is only active against CCR5-tropic strains of HIV, it was critical to develop a diagnostic assay to identify appropriate patients. Trofile™, a novel phenotypic tropism assay, was used to identify patients with CCR5-tropic virus for the MVC development program. Results of these clinical studies demonstrated that the assay correctly identified patients likely to respond to MVC. Over time, the performance characteristics of the phenotypic assay were enhanced, necessitating retesting of study samples. Genotypic tropism tests that have the potential to allow for local use and more rapid turnaround times are also being developed. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. IFN-alpha-induced upregulation of CCR5 leads to expanded HIV tropism in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Stoddart

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic immune activation and inflammation (e.g., as manifest by production of type I interferons are major determinants of disease progression in primate lentivirus infections. To investigate the impact of such activation on intrathymic T-cell production, we studied infection of the human thymus implants of SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice with X4 and R5 HIV. X4 HIV was observed to infect CD3(-CD4(+CD8(-CXCR4(+CCR5(- intrathymic T-cell progenitors (ITTP and to abrogate thymopoiesis. R5 HIV, by contrast, first established a nonpathogenic infection of thymic macrophages and then, after many weeks, began to replicate in ITTP. We demonstrate here that the tropism of R5 HIV is expanded and pathogenicity enhanced by upregulation of CCR5 on these key T-cell progenitors. Such CCR5 induction was mediated by interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha in both thymic organ cultures and in SCID-hu mice, and antibody neutralization of IFN-alpha in R5 HIV-infected SCID-hu mice inhibited both CCR5 upregulation and infection of the T-cell progenitors. These observations suggest a mechanism by which IFN-alpha production may paradoxically expand the tropism of R5 HIV and, in so doing, accelerate disease progression.

  10. Detection of new mutant sites of HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 among Saudi populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelsaad, Abdelaziz S A; Al-Ghamdi, Abdullhamid S; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed N; Alakkas, Eyad A; Alsulaimani, Adnan A; Al-Harthi, Abdulla A; Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S

    2013-12-01

    The genetic association of CCR5 with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis is well known. The HIV-1 entry into target cells is initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoproteins (gp120-gp41) with the cell surface receptor (CD4) and the coreceptor (CCR5), followed by fusion of the viral and cell membranes. Genetic variants of the gene-encoding HIV-1 coreceptor are implicated in the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. The prevalence of these mutations may vary according to population ethnicity. In the current study, characterization and frequency distribution of the HIV-related gene variants in 135 samples of the Saudi populations were conducted. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 276 bp amplicons was used to rapidly detect Δ32 deletion in the initial sample of DNA. The direct sequence of 2 overlapping PCR amplicons flanking 1,059 bp was used to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms. A single hetrozygous Δ32 deletion allele and 6 single-nucleotide polymorphisms were detected. Only one of the identified haplotypes, Taif-1, which was found in the majority of the tested sample, is identical to CCR5 wild-type alleles. Furthermore, the results of this study raised a concern about the prospective role of the mutations detected among Saudi nationals in the HIV pathogenesis and the clinical use of CCR5 antagonists, which are currently being developed as therapeutics for HIV-1 and inflammatory diseases.

  11. Jak3 is involved in dendritic cell maturation and CCR7-dependent migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rivas-Caicedo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CCR7-mediated signalling is important for dendritic cell maturation and homing to the lymph nodes. We have previously demonstrated that Jak3 participates in the signalling pathway of CCR7 in T lymphocytes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we used Jak3(-/- mice to analyze the role of Jak3 in CCR7-mediated dendritic cells migration and function. First, we found no differences in the generation of DCs from Jak3(-/- bone marrow progenitors, when compared to wild type cells. However, phenotypic analysis of the bone marrow derived DCs obtained from Jak3(-/- mice showed reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules compared to wild type (Jak3(+/+. In addition, when we analyzed the migration of Jak3(-/- and Jak3(+/+ mature DCs in response to CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, we found that the absence of Jak3 results in impaired chemotactic responses both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, lymphocyte proliferation and contact hypersensitivity experiments showed that DC-mediated T lymphocyte activation is reduced in the absence of Jak3. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, our data provide strong evidence that Jak3 is important for DC maturation, migration and function, through a CCR7-mediated signalling pathway.

  12. MAC-v1: A new global aerosol climatology for climate studies

    OpenAIRE

    Kinne, S.; O’Donnel, D.; Stier, P.; Kloster, S.; Zhang, K.; Schmidt, H.; Rast, S.; Giorgetta, M.; Eck, T.; Stevens, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Hamburg Aerosol Climatology version 1 (HAC-v1) is introduced. It describes the optical properties of tropospheric aerosols on monthly timescales and with global coverage at a spatial resolution of 1 degree in latitude and longitude. By providing aerosol radiative properties for any wavelength of the solar (or shortwave) and of the terrestrial (or longwave) radiation spectrum, as needed in radiative transfer applications, this HAC-v1 data-set lends itself to simplified and computationally ...

  13. Multinational Experiment 7: A Process for Deterring and Influencing Actors in Space, v1.01

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    UNCLASSIFIED Page 1 of 29 UNCLASSIFIED Version 1·01 A Process for Deterring and Influencing Actors in Space v1.01 31 Jan 2013...COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multinational Experiment 7: Outcome 3: Space-A Process for Deterring and Influencing Actors in Space v1.01 31 Jan... PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) JOINT STAFF-MN//ACT Integration 116 Lakeview Parkway Suffolk, VA 23435 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  14. Effects of surround suppression on response adaptation of V1 neurons to visual stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    LI, Peng; JIN, Cai-Hong; JIANG, San; LI, Miao-Miao; WANG, Zi-Lu; ZHU, Hui; CHEN, Cui-Yun; HUA, Tian-Miao

    2014-01-01

    The influence of intracortical inhibition on the response adaptation of visual cortical neurons remains in debate. To clarify this issue, in the present study the influence of surround suppression evoked through the local inhibitory interneurons on the adaptation effects of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) were observed. Moreover, the adaptations of V1 neurons to both the high-contrast visual stimuli presented in the classical receptive field (CRF) and to the costimulation presented ...

  15. Diagnosing the Stagnation Conditions of MagLIF Implosions Using Co and Kr dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Weis, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Gomez, M. R.; Knapp, P. F.; Slutz, S. A.; Geissel, M.; Ampleford, D. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Peterson, K.; Rochau, G. A.; Doron, R.; Stambulchik, E.; Nedostup, O.; Maron, Y.; Golovkin, I.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments on the Z-machine tested several new diagnostic techniques for investigating the stagnation conditions and the origins of the mix present in a Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) target. For the first time we have collected K-shell spectra from a low-concentration, Kr dopant placed in the gaseous D2 fuel. In addition, thin Co coatings were strategically applied to three different internal surfaces of the target in order to assess which surfaces actively contribute to the contamination of the fuel. Both imaging spectroscopy and narrow-band crystal imaging were used to identify the location of He-like Co ions. The Te and ne of the Co is inferred by fitting the He-alpha lines and the near-by Li-like satellites. The experimental measurements and the challenges associated with the analysis will be discussed. Sandia Natl Lab is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. DOE NNSA under contract DE-NA-0003525.

  16. Discovery of two neighbouring satellites in the Carina constellation with MagLiteS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrealba, G.; Belokurov, V.; Koposov, S. E.; Bechtol, K.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Vivas, A. K.; Yanny, B.; Jethwa, P.; Walker, A. R.; Li, T. S.; Allam, S.; Conn, B. C.; Gallart, C.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Johnson, M. D.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Martin, N. F.; Martinez-Delgado, D.; Nidever, D. L.; Noël, N. E. D.; Simon, J. D.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Tucker, D. L.

    2018-04-01

    We report the discovery of two ultra-faint satellites in the vicinity of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in data from the Magellanic Satellites Survey (MagLiteS ). Situated 18 deg (˜20 kpc) from the LMC and separated from each other by only 18 arcmin, Carina II and III form an intriguing pair. By simultaneously modelling the spatial and the colour-magnitude stellar distributions, we find that both Carina II and Carina III are likely dwarf galaxies, although this is less clear for Carina III. There are in fact several obvious differences between the two satellites. While both are well described by an old and metal poor population, Carina II is located at ˜36 kpc from the Sun, with MV ˜ -4.5 and rh ˜ 90 pc, and it is further confirmed by the discovery of 3 RR Lyrae at the right distance. In contrast, Carina III is much more elongated, measured to be fainter (MV ˜ -2.4), significantly more compact (rh ˜ 30 pc), and closer to the Sun, at ˜28 kpc, placing it only 8 kpc away from Car II. Together with several other systems detected by the Dark Energy Camera, Carina II and III form a strongly anisotropic cloud of satellites in the vicinity of the Magellanic Clouds.

  17. Study of laser preheating dependence on laser wavelength and intensity for MagLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, M. S.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Glinsky, M.; Nagayama, T.; Weis, M.; Geissel, M.; Peterson, K.; Fooks, J.; Krauland, C.; Giraldez, E.; Davies, J.; Campbell, E. M.; Bahr, R.; Edgell, D.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Emig, J.; Heeter, R.; Strozzi, D.

    2017-10-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) scheme requires preheating underdense fuel to 100's eV temperature by a TW-scale long pulse laser via collisional absorption. To better understand how laser preheat scales with laser wavelength and intensity as well as to provide data for code validation, we have conducted a well-characterized experiment on OMEGA to directly compare laser propagation, energy deposition and laser plasma instabilities (LPI) using 2 ω (527 nm) and 3 ω (351 nm) lasers with intensity in the range of (1-5)x1014 Wcm-2. The laser beam (1 - 1.5 ns square pulse) enters the gas-filled plastic liner though a 2-µm thick polyimide window to heat an underdense Ar-doped deuterium gas with electron density of 5.5% of critical density. Laser propagation and plasma temperature are diagnosed by time-resolved 2D x-ray images and Ar emission spectroscopy, respectively. LPI is monitored by backscattering and hard x-ray diagnostics. The 2 ω beam propagation shows a noticeable larger lateral spread than the 3 ω beam, indicating laser spray due to filamentation. LPI is observed to increase with laser intensity and the 2 ω beam produces more hot electrons compared with the 3 ω beam under similar conditions. Results will be compared with radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Work supported by the U.S. DOE ARPA-E and NNSA.

  18. Quantification of MagLIF stagnation morphology using the Mallat Scattering Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Michael; Weis, Matthew; Jennings, Christopher; Ampleford, David; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Gomez, Matthew

    2017-10-01

    The morphology of the stagnated plasma resulting from MagLIF is measured by imaging the self-emission x-rays coming from the multi-keV plasma. Equivalent diagnostic response can be derived from integrated rad-hydro simulations from programs such as Hydra and Gorgon. There have been only limited quantitative ways to compare the image morphology, that is the texture, of the simulations to that of the experiments, to compare one experiment to another, or to compare one simulation to another. We have developed a metric of image morphology based on the Mallat Scattering Transformation, a transformation that has proved to be effective at distinguishing textures, sounds, and written characters. This metric has demonstrated excellent performance in classifying an ensemble of synthetic stagnations images. A good regression of the scattering coefficients to the parameters used to generate the synthetic images was found. Finally, the metric has been used to quantitatively compare simulations to experimental self-emission images. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by NTESS, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the USDoEs NNSA under contract DE-NA0003525.

  19. Single-molecule analysis of inhibitory pausing states of V1-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uner, Naciye Esma; Nishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okuno, Daichi; Nakano, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Ken; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2012-08-17

    V(1)-ATPase, the hydrophilic V-ATPase domain, is a rotary motor fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Here, we found that Thermus thermophilus V(1)-ATPase shows two types of inhibitory pauses interrupting continuous rotation: a short pause (SP, 4.2 s) that occurred frequently during rotation, and a long inhibitory pause (LP, >30 min) that terminated all active rotations. Both pauses occurred at the same angle for ATP binding and hydrolysis. Kinetic analysis revealed that the time constants of inactivation into and activation from the SP were too short to represent biochemically predicted ADP inhibition, suggesting that SP is a newly identified inhibitory state of V(1)-ATPase. The time constant of inactivation into LP was 17 min, consistent with one of the two time constants governing the inactivation process observed in bulk ATPase assay. When forcibly rotated in the forward direction, V(1) in LP resumed active rotation. Solution ADP suppressed the probability of mechanical activation, suggesting that mechanical rotation enhanced inhibitory ADP release. These features were highly consistent with mechanical activation of ADP-inhibited F(1), suggesting that LP represents the ADP-inhibited state of V(1)-ATPase. Mechanical activation largely depended on the direction and angular displacement of forced rotation, implying that V(1)-ATPase rotation modulates the off rate of ADP.

  20. Characterization of V1R receptor (ora) genes in Lake Victoria cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Tomoki; Nikaido, Masato; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko; Okada, Norihiro

    2012-05-15

    Although olfaction could play a crucial role in underwater habitats by allowing fish to sense a variety of nonvolatile chemical signals, the importance of olfaction in species-rich cichlids is still controversial. In particular, examining whether cichlids rely on olfaction for reproduction is of primary interest to understand the mechanisms of speciation. In the present study, we explored the V1R (also known as ora) genes, which are believed to encode reproductive pheromone receptors in fish, in the genomes of Lake Victoria cichlids. By screening a bacterial artificial chromosome library, we identified all six intact V1R genes (V1R1 to V1R6) that have been reported in other teleost fish. Furthermore, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that all of the V1R genes were expressed in the olfactory epithelium, indicating that these receptors are functional in cichlids. These observations indicate that cichlids use V1R-mediated olfaction in some ways for their social behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. G Protein-Dependent CCR5 Signaling Is Not Required for Efficient Infection of Primary T Lymphocytes and Macrophages by R5 Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Amara, Ali; Vidy, Aurore; Boulla, Genevieve; Mollier, Karine; Garcia-Perez, Javier; Alcamí, Jose; Blanpain, Cedric; Parmentier, Marc; Virelizier, Jean-Louis; Charneau, Pierre; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The requirement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced CCR5 activation for infection by R5 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) strains remains controversial. Ectopic CCR5 expression in CD4+-transformed cells or pharmacological inhibition of Gαi proteins coupled to CCR5 left unsolved whether CCR5-dependent cell activation is necessary for the HIV life cycle. In this study, we investigated the role played by HIV-induced CCR5-dependent cell signaling during infection of primary CD4-expressing leukocytes. ...

  2. Migration to Current Open Source Technologies by MagIC Enables a More Responsive Website, Quicker Development Times, and Increased Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Jonestrask, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) supports an online database for the paleo, geo, and rock magnetic communities ( https://earthref.org/MagIC ). Researchers can upload data into the archive and download data as selected with a sophisticated search system. MagIC has completed the transition from an Oracle backed, Perl based, server oriented website to an ElasticSearch backed, Meteor based thick client website technology stack. Using JavaScript on both the sever and the client enables increased code reuse and allows easy offloading many computational operations to the client for faster response. On-the-fly data validation, column header suggestion, and spreadsheet online editing are some new features available with the new system. The 3.0 data model, method codes, and vocabulary lists can be browsed via the MagIC website and more easily updated. Source code for MagIC is publicly available on GitHub ( https://github.com/earthref/MagIC ). The MagIC file format is natively compatible with the PmagPy ( https://github.com/PmagPy/PmagPy) paleomagnetic analysis software. MagIC files can now be downloaded from the database and viewed and interpreted in the PmagPy GUI based tool, pmag_gui. Changes or interpretations of the data can then be saved by pmag_gui in the MagIC 3.0 data format and easily uploaded to the MagIC database. The rate of new contributions to the database has been increasing with many labs contributing measurement level data for the first time in the last year. Over a dozen file format conversion scripts are available for translating non-MagIC measurement data files into the MagIC format for easy uploading. We will continue to work with more labs until the whole community has a manageable workflow for contributing their measurement level data. MagIC will continue to provide a global repository for archiving and retrieving paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data and, with the new system in place, be able to more quickly respond to the community

  3. METEOR v1.0 - Design and structure of the software package; METEOR v1.0 - Estructura y modulos informaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script describes the structure and the separated modules of the software package METEOR for the statistical analysis of meteorological data series. It contains a systematic description of the subroutines of METEOR and, also, of the required shape for input and output files. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds thc graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v 1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  4. Relationship between CCR and NT-proBNP in Chinese HF patients, and their correlations with severity of HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhigang; Wang, Bo; Wang, Yunliang; Qian, Xueqing; Zheng, Wei; Wei, Meng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between creatinine clearance rate (CCR) and the level of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in heart failure (HF) patients and their correlations with HF severity. Two hundred and one Chinese patients were grouped according to the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification as NYHA 1-2 and 3-4 groups and 135 cases out of heart failure patients as control group. The following variables were compared among these three groups: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, hypertension, diabetes, NT-proBNP, creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), and CCR. The biomarkers of NT-proBNP, Cr, UA, LVEDD, and CCR varied significantly in the three groups, and these variables were positively correlated with the NHYA classification. The levels of NT-proBNP and CCR were closely related to the occurrence of HF and were independent risk factors for HF. At the same time, there was a significant negative correlation between the levels of NT-proBNP and CCR. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve suggested that the NT-proBNP and CCR have high accuracy for diagnosis of HF and have clinical diagnostic value. NT-proBNP and CCR may be important biomarkers in evaluating the severity of HF.

  5. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.; Burnett, John; Rossi, John

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T-cells and macrophages that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here we combine the live cell-based SELEX with high throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as siRNA delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5 expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4+ T cells with a nanomolar IC50. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5 expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. PMID:25754473

  6. Novel AgoshRNA molecules for silencing of the CCR5 co-receptor for HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Berkhout, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic transplantation of blood stem cells from a CCR5-Δ32 homozygous donor to an HIV-infected individual, the "Berlin patient", led to a cure. Since then there has been a search for approaches that mimic this intervention in a gene therapy setting. RNA interference (RNAi) has evolved as a powerful tool to regulate gene expression in a sequence-specific manner and can be used to inactivate the CCR5 mRNA. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) molecules can impair CCR5 expression, but these molecules may cause unintended side effects and they will not be processed in cells that lack Dicer, such as monocytes. Dicer-independent RNAi pathways have opened opportunities for new AgoshRNA designs that rely exclusively on Ago2 for maturation. Furthermore, AgoshRNA processing yields a single active guide RNA, thus reducing off-target effects. In this study, we tested different AgoshRNA designs against CCR5. We selected AgoshRNAs that potently downregulated CCR5 expression on human T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and that had no apparent adverse effect on T cell development as assessed in a competitive cell growth assay. CCR5 knockdown significantly protected T cells from CCR5 tropic HIV-1 infection.

  7. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible cells and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V; Burnett, John C; Rossi, John J

    2015-03-19

    The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T cells and macrophages that serves as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here, we combine the live-cell-based SELEX with high-throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as small interfering RNA [siRNA] delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5-expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4(+) T cells with a nanomolar inhibitory concentration 50%. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5-expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [sup 99m]TC-MAG[sub 3] renal function scintigraphy and captopril in the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. [sup 99m]Tc-MAG[sub 3]-Nierenfunktionsszintigraphie ohne und mit Captopril zur Diagnostik der renovaskulaeren Hypertonie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepenburg, R. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin); Bockisch, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin); Andreas, J. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin); Dueber, C. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Roentgendiagnostik); Kann, P. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). 3. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Innere Medizin und Endokrinologie); Maier, G. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin); Hahn, K. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1993-08-01

    In this study, the diagnostic value of renal function scintigraphy performed both without and with ACE inhibition has been evaluated using the new radiopharmaceutical [sup 99m]Tc-MAG[sub 3]. In cases of decompensated renal artery stenoses, the typical scan finding with this tubular excreted agent was shown to be a distinct parenchymal nuclide retention in combination with a delayed appearance of the radiotracer in the pelvic system. Using this criterion in 43 patients with suspected renovascular hypertension, sensitivity and specificity were 89 and 88%, respectively. Bilateral positive findings were non-specific; excluding them from the study, specificity increased to 100%. In renal insufficiency, captopril scans seem to be of reduced diagnostic value. Summarising our experiences, renal function scintigraphy using [sup 99m]Tc-MAG[sub 3] without and with captopril was proved to be a reliable non-invasive method to detect or exclude haemodynamically relevant renal artery stenosis. (orig.)

  9. CCR5-edited gene therapies for HIV cure: Closing the door to viral entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Kevin G; Peterson, Christopher W; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2017-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was first reported and characterized more than three decades ago. Once thought of as a death sentence, HIV infection has become a chronically manageable disease. However, it is estimated that a staggering 0.8% of the world's population is infected with HIV, with more than 1 million deaths reported in 2015 alone. Despite the development of effective anti-retroviral drugs, a permanent cure has only been documented in one patient to date. In 2007, an HIV-positive patient received a bone marrow transplant to treat his leukemia from an individual who was homozygous for a mutation in the CCR5 gene. This mutation, known as CCR5Δ32, prevents HIV replication by inhibiting the early stage of viral entry into cells, resulting in resistance to infection from the majority of HIV isolates. More than 10 years after his last dose of anti-retroviral therapy, the transplant recipient remains free of replication-competent virus. Multiple groups are now attempting to replicate this success through the use of other CCR5-negative donor cell sources. Additionally, developments in the use of lentiviral vectors and targeted nucleases have opened the doors of precision medicine and enabled new treatment methodologies to combat HIV infection through targeted ablation or down-regulation of CCR5 expression. Here, we review historical cases of CCR5-edited cell-based therapies, current clinical trials and future benefits and challenges associated with this technology. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CCR-2 neutralization augments murine fresh BMC activation by Staphylococcus aureus via two distinct mechanisms: at the level of ROS production and cytokine response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2017-05-01

    CCR-2 signaling regulates recruitment of monocytes from the bone marrow into the bloodstream and then to sites of infection. We sought to determine whether CCL-2/CCR-2 signaling is involved in the killing of Staphylococcus aureus by murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The intermittent link of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-NF-κB/p38-MAPK-mediated CCL-2 production in CCR-2 signaling prompted us to determine whether neutralization of CCR-2 augments the response of murine fresh BMCs (FBMCs) after S. aureus infection. It was observed that anti-CCR-2 Ab-treated FBMCs released fewer ROS on encountering S. aureus infection than CCR-2 non-neutralized FBMCs, also correlating with reduced killing of S. aureus in CCR-2 neutralized FBMCs. Staphylococcal catalase and SOD were also found to play a role in protecting S. aureus from the ROS-mediated killing of FBMC. S. aureus infection of CCR-2 intact FBMCs pre-treated with either NF-κB or p-38-MAPK blocker induced less CCL-2, suggesting that NF-κB or p-38-MAPK is required for CCL-2 production by FBMCs. Moreover, blocking of CCR-2 along with NF-κB or p-38-MAPK resulted in elevated CCL-2 production and reduced CCR-2 expression. Inhibition of CCR-2 impairs the response of murine BMCs to S. aureus infection by attenuation ROS production and modulating the cytokine response.

  11. Preferential recognition of monomeric CCR5 expressed in cultured cells by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 for the entry of R5 HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yusuke; Monde, Kazuaki; Terasawa, Hiromi; Yuan, Yuzhe; Yusa, Keisuke; Harada, Shinji; Maeda, Yosuke

    2014-03-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and western blot analysis demonstrated that CCR5 exists as constitutive homo-oligomers, which was further enhanced by its antagonists such as maraviroc (MVC) and TAK-779. Staining by monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes of CCR5 revealed that CCR5 oligomer was structurally different from the monomer. To determine which forms of CCR5 are well recognized by CCR5-using HIV-1 for the entry, BiFC-positive and -negative cell fractions in CD4-positive 293T cells were collected by fluorescent-activated cell sorter, and infected with luciferase-reporter HIV-1 pseudotyped with CCR5-using Envs including R5 and R5X4. R5 and dual-R5 HIV-1 substantially infected BiFC-negative fraction rather than BiFC-positive fraction, indicating the preferential recognition of monomeric CCR5 by R5 and dual-R5 Envs. Although CCR5 antagonists enhanced oligomerization of CCR5, MVC-resistant HIV-1 was found to still recognize both MVC-bound and -unbound forms of monomeric CCR5, suggesting the constrained use of monomeric CCR5 by R5 HIV-1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of nuclear moments and nuclear radii changes of the metastable silverisotopes sup(108m)Ag and sup(110m)Ag from the hyperfine structure of silver-I-resonance lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, T.

    1973-01-01

    The hyperfine structure of the resonance lines of the metastable silver isotopes sup(108m), sup(110m)Ag were investigated by means of optical interference spectroscopy. Both radioactive silver isotopes were obtained by irradiating isotope-pure 107 Ag or 109 Ag with neutrons in the reactor. In spite of the slight enrichment of the isotopes to be investigated compared to the stable isotopes ( [de

  13. The Ccr4-Pop2-NOT mRNA Deadenylase Contributes to Septin Organization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traven, Ana; Beilharz, Traude H.; Lo, Tricia L.; Lueder, Franziska; Preiss, Thomas; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    In yeast, assembly of the septins at the cell cortex is required for a series of key cell cycle events: bud-site selection, the morphogenesis and mitotic exit checkpoints, and cytokinesis. Here we establish that the Ccr4-Pop2-NOT mRNA deadenylase contributes to septin organization. mRNAs encoding regulators of septin assembly (Ccd42, Cdc24, Rga1, Rga2, Bem3, Gin4, Cla4, and Elm1) presented with short poly(A) tails at steady state in wild-type (wt) cells, suggesting their translation could be restricted by deadenylation. Deadenylation of septin regulators was dependent on the major cellular mRNA deadenylase Ccr4-Pop2-NOT, whereas the alternative deadenylase Pan2 played a minor role. Consistent with deadenylation of septin regulators being important for function, deletion of deadenylase subunits CCR4 or POP2, but not PAN2, resulted in septin morphology defects (e.g., ectopic bud-localized septin rings), particularly upon activation of the Cdc28-inhibitory kinase Swe1. Aberrant septin staining was also observed in the deadenylase-dead ccr4-1 mutant, demonstrating the deadenylase activity of Ccr4-Pop2 is required. Moreover, ccr4Δ, pop2Δ, and ccr4-1 mutants showed aberrant cell morphology previously observed in septin assembly mutants and exhibited genetic interactions with mutations that compromise septin assembly (shs1Δ, cla4Δ, elm1Δ, and gin4Δ). Mutations in the Not subunits of Ccr4-Pop2-NOT, which are thought to predominantly function in transcriptional control, also resulted in septin organization defects. Therefore, both mRNA deadenylase and transcriptional functions of Ccr4-Pop2-NOT contribute to septin organization in yeast. PMID:19487562

  14. CXC chemokine ligand 12 promotes CCR7-dependent naive T cell trafficking to lymph nodes and Peyer's patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhongbin; Hayasaka, Haruko; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Li, Wenzhe; Guo, Zijin; Jang, Myoung Ho; Kondo, Akihiro; Choi, Byung-il; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2009-02-01

    A number of chemokines, including CCL21, CCL19, CXCL12, and CXCL13, are coexpressed on the lumen or basal lamina of high endothelial venules (HEVs) in lymph nodes (LNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs), consistent with the idea that they might cooperate to regulate lymphocyte trafficking into these lymphoid tissues. In this study we report that CXCL12, acting through its receptor, CXCR4, cooperates with CCR7 ligands to promote T cell trafficking across HEVs. CXCL12 enhanced the CCR7-induced chemotaxis of wild-type but not CXCR4-deficient T cells in vitro at suboptimal concentrations of a CCR7 ligand, but without affecting the expression level or ligand-binding ability of CCR7. Real-time chemotaxis analysis showed that CXCL12 substantially shortened the lag time before cell migration began in vitro, but not the migration speed of T cells responding to suboptimal CCR7 ligand concentrations. In addition, CXCL12 augmented the CCR7 ligand-driven ERK phosphorylation and actin polymerization in T cells under the same conditions. In adoptive transfer experiments, CXCL12 promoted naive T cell trafficking to LNs and PPs in wild-type but not CCR7 ligand-deficient plt/plt recipient mice; this increased T cell trafficking was associated with enhanced binding of the T cells to HEVs and their subsequent migration into the LN parenchyma. Thus, CXCL12 synergizes with CCR7 ligands to promote T cell migration by sensitizing T cells through CXCR4, thus enabling them to respond to lower concentrations of CCR7 ligands. Such concerted action of chemokines provides an additional, previously unknown mechanism for efficient lymphocyte trafficking across HEVs into LNs and PPs.

  15. CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygosity, HIV-1 Reservoir Size, and Lymphocyte Activation in Individuals Receiving Long-term Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hanhauser, Emily; Harrison, Linda J; Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Jost, Stephanie; Bosch, Ronald J; Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a case-controlled study of the associations of CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reservoir size, lymphocyte activation, and CCR5 expression in 114 CCR5(Δ32/WT) and 177 wild-type CCR5 AIDS Clinical Trials Group participants receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Overall, no significant differences were found between groups for any of these parameters. However, higher levels of CCR5 expression correlated with lower amounts of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA. The relationship between CCR5-Δ32 heterozygosity, CCR5 expression, and markers of HIV-1 persistence is likely to be complex and may be influenced by factors such as the duration of ART. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Expression of RANTES, eotaxin-2, ICAM-1, LFA-1 and CCR-3 in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with nasal polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Fransérgio Emílio; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Gallego, Aline Jorge; Malinsky, Rafael Rossell; Küpper, Daniel Salgado; Milanezi, Cristiane; Silva, João Santana da; Tamashiro, Edwin; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2012-09-01

    To compare gene expression of the chemokines RANTES and eotaxin-2, its receptor, CCR-3, adhesion molecule ICAM-1 and its receptor LFA-1 in eosinophilic polyps and in control normal nasal mucosa. Gene expression was quantified by Real Time PCR in polyps (n=35) and in healthy nasal mucosa (n=15). Eosinophilic polyps showed a higher expression of eotaxin-2 and RANTES, but not of CCR-3, ICAM-1 or LFA-1 compared to control nasal mucosa. Eosinophilic polyps present greater expression of eotaxin-2 and RANTES, but not of CCR-3, ICAM-1 or LFA-1 compared to control nasal mucosa.

  17. Structure activity relationships of fused bicyclic and urea derivatives of spirocyclic compounds as potent CCR1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Nafizal; Mensonides-Harsema, Marguérite; Cooper, Martin E; Eriksson, Tomas; Ivanova, Svetlana; Bergström, Lena

    2014-01-01

    A series of fused bicyclic and urea derivatives of spirocyclic compounds were designed, synthesised and evaluated in vitro as potent CCR1 antagonists. In particular, 4 (7nM), 44 (1.3nM), 48 (0.89nM) and 50 (0.63nM) were the most potent hCCR1 antagonists in this series of compounds. Moreover, some of these substances demonstrated good rodent cross-over, especially 46 which exhibited very high rat CCR1 binding affinity with an IC50 value of 16nM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Learning Enhances Sensory Processing in Mouse V1 before Improving Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurjut, Ovidiu; Georgieva, Petya; Busse, Laura; Katzner, Steffen

    2017-07-05

    A fundamental property of visual cortex is to enhance the representation of those stimuli that are relevant for behavior, but it remains poorly understood how such enhanced representations arise during learning. Using classical conditioning in adult mice of either sex, we show that orientation discrimination is learned in a sequence of distinct behavioral stages, in which animals first rely on stimulus appearance before exploiting its orientation to guide behavior. After confirming that orientation discrimination under classical conditioning requires primary visual cortex (V1), we measured, during learning, response properties of V1 neurons. Learning improved neural discriminability, sharpened orientation tuning, and led to higher contrast sensitivity. Remarkably, these learning-related improvements in the V1 representation were fully expressed before successful orientation discrimination was evident in the animals' behavior. We propose that V1 plays a key role early in discrimination learning to enhance behaviorally relevant sensory information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Decades of research have documented that responses of neurons in visual cortex can reflect the behavioral relevance of visual information. The behavioral relevance of any stimulus needs to be learned, though, and little is known how visual sensory processing changes, as the significance of a stimulus becomes clear. Here, we trained mice to discriminate two visual stimuli, precisely quantified when learning happened, and measured, during learning, the neural representation of these stimuli in V1. We observed learning-related improvements in V1 processing, which were fully expressed before discrimination was evident in the animals' behavior. These findings indicate that sensory and behavioral improvements can follow different time courses and point toward a key role of V1 at early stages in discrimination learning. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376460-15$15.00/0.

  19. A Comparative Pharmacokinetic and Biodistributional Study of {sup 131}I OIH and {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min; Yeom, Mi Kyoung; Kim, Moon Hae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-03-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-MAG, was synthesized, and biodistribution and blood clearance rate were compared with those of {sup 131}I-OIH in mice and rats respectively. Finally renal image was obtained from a normal male volunteer before and after prescription of probenecid. The results obtained were as follows: 1) The uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} by kidney was higher than that of {sup 131}I-OIH in mice 10 mins after injection (n=6, p<0.05), but slightly lower uptakes were found in all organs (kidney, blood, stomach, intestinge and liver) 2 hrs after injection. 2) For {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} t{sub 1}/2 alpha=2.4 +- 0.0 min, t{sub 1}/2beta=44.3 +- +7.4 min, and blood clearance=3.4 +- 0.5 ml/min, and for {sup 131}I-OIH t{sub 1}/2 alpha=1.8 +- 0.2 min, t{sub 1}/2beta=69.1 +- 9.5 min, and blood clearance=1.3 +- 0.l min were found in rats. 3) From the renogram of normal male volunteer, we could find that tmax=130 sec and t{sub 1}/2=430 sec before probenecid prescription, and tmax 150-170 sec and t{sub 1}/2=810-1,170 sec after probenecid prescription. From these results we concluded that {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}, can be used instead of {sup 131}I-OIH for obtaining renal image.

  20. Mice lacking Gpr37 exhibit decreased expression of the myelin-associated glycoprotein MAG and increased susceptibility to demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brilee M; Giddens, Michelle M; Neil, Jessica; Owino, Sharon; Nguyen, TrangKimberly T; Duong, Duc; Li, Fengqiao; Hall, Randy A

    2017-09-01

    GPR37 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is predominantly expressed in the brain and found at particularly high levels in oligodendrocytes. GPR37 has been shown to exert effects on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination during development, but the molecular basis of these actions is incompletely understood and moreover nothing is known about the potential role(s) of this receptor under demyelinating conditions. To shed light on the fundamental biology of GPR37, we performed proteomic studies comparing protein expression levels in the brains of mice lacking GPR37 and its close relative GPR37-like 1 (GPR37L1). These studies revealed that one of the proteins most sharply decreased in the brains of Gpr37/Gpr37L1 double knockout mice is the myelin-associated glycoprotein MAG. Follow-up Western blot studies confirmed this finding and demonstrated that genetic deletion of Gpr37, but not Gpr37L1, results in strikingly decreased brain expression of MAG. Further in vitro studies demonstrated that GPR37 and MAG form a complex when expressed together in cells. As loss of MAG has previously been shown to result in increased susceptibility to brain insults, we additionally assessed Gpr37-knockout (Gpr37 - / - ) vs. wild-type mice in the cuprizone model of demyelination. These studies revealed that Gpr37 - / - mice exhibit dramatically increased loss of myelin in response to cuprizone, yet do not show any increased loss of oligodendrocyte precursor cells or mature oligodendrocytes. These findings reveal that loss of GPR37 alters oligodendrocyte physiology and increases susceptibility to demyelination, indicating that GPR37 could be a potential drug target for the treatment of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinetics of manganese in MAG/MIG welding with a 18/8/6 wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek, Janez

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a study of MAG/MIG welding of low-alloy ferritic steel and highalloy austenitic steel with a 18/8/6 wire. Manganese burn-off from the wire in welding a single-V butt weld was studied. It was found that manganese burns off in the arc during melting of a droplet at the wire end, and from the weld pool during weld formation. The range of manganese burn-off depends mainly on the type of shielding gas used and the arc length, i.e., from the arc voltage. The manganese burn-off increases with an increase of the content of active gases, i.e., CO2 and O2, in the neutral gas, i.e., argon. It also increases with an increase in arc voltage. The longer the welding arc, the longer exposition of the filler material to the welding arc and the wider the penetration, which allows manganese vapours to evaporate from the weld pool. The most important finding is that manganese burn-off from the 18/8/6 wire during welding of austenitic stainless steel with low-alloy ferritic steel is considerably strong, i.e., from 20% to 30%; nevertheless the wire concerned is perfectly suitable for welding of different types of steel.

    El artículo describe el estudio de un acero ferrítico poco aleado con un acero austenítico altamente aleado con el alambre 18/8/6 mediante el procedimiento MAG/MIG. Se ha investigado el consumo del manganeso del alambre durante la soldadura a tope con la preparación en V. Con los análisis se ha comprobado que el manganeso se consume en el arco desde la formación de la gota en la punta del alambre hasta la solidificación del metal aportado fundido. La cantidad perdida del manganeso depende, sobre todo, del tipo del gas de protección y de la longitud del arco, esto es, de la tensión convencional en el arco. Con el aumento de los gases activos (CO2 y O2 respecto al gas neutro argon, el consumo del manganeso va aumentando. También se observó que el consumo del manganeso va

  2. Bet v 1 homologues in strawberry identified as IgE-binding proteins and presumptive allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, A L; Alm, R; Ekstrand, B; Fjelkner-Modig, S; Schiött, A; Bengtsson, U; Björk, L; Hjernø, K; Roepstorff, P; Emanuelsson, C S

    2004-12-01

    No strawberry allergen has so far been identified and characterized. Serum samples were collected from patients with a suggestive case history of adverse reactions to strawberry and other fruits. Extracts from fresh and frozen strawberries were analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting and mass spectrometry. Patient blood samples were analysed for inhibition of IgE binding and basophil degranulation. Several IgE-binding proteins could be detected. In more than half of the patient sera, a 20/18-kDa doublet band was observed in Western blotting. These two bands were excised and analysed by mass spectrometry showing the presence of proteins belonging to the Bet v 1 family of allergens. Inhibition of the IgE binding to the 20/18-kDa doublet was obtained by addition of two recombinantly expressed allergens belonging to the Bet v 1 family (Bet v 1 and Mal d 1) and strawberry protein extract. In a cell-based assay of patient blood samples, basophil degranulation could be induced by strawberry protein extract and by Bet v 1 and Mal d 1. We conclude that strawberry homologues to Bet v 1 may be allergens of importance for adverse reactions to strawberry.

  3. Effects of surround suppression on response adaptation of V1 neurons to visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Jin, Cai-Hong; Jiang, San; Li, Miao-Miao; Wang, Zi-Lu; Zhu, Hui; Chen, Cui-Yun; Hua, Tian-Miao

    2014-09-01

    The influence of intracortical inhibition on the response adaptation of visual cortical neurons remains in debate. To clarify this issue, in the present study the influence of surround suppression evoked through the local inhibitory interneurons on the adaptation effects of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) were observed. Moreover, the adaptations of V1 neurons to both the high-contrast visual stimuli presented in the classical receptive field (CRF) and to the costimulation presented in the CRF and the surrounding nonclassical receptive field (nCRF) were compared. The intensities of surround suppression were modulated with different sized grating stimuli. The results showed that the response adaptation of V1 neurons decreased significantly with the increase of surround suppression and this adaptation decrease was due to the reduction of the initial response of V1 neurons to visual stimuli. However, the plateau response during adaptation showed no significant changes. These findings indicate that the adaptation effects of V1 neurons may not be directly affected by surround suppression, but may be dynamically regulated by a negative feedback network and be finely adjusted by its initial spiking response to stimulus. This adaptive regulation is not only energy efficient for the central nervous system, but also beneficially acts to maintain the homeostasis of neuronal response to long-presenting visual signals.

  4. HIV-infected individuals with the CCR delta32/CCR5 genotype have lower HIV RNA levels and higher CD4 cell counts in the early years of the infection than do patients with the wild type. Copenhagen AIDS Cohort Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katzenstein, T L; Eugen-Olsen, J; Hofmann, B

    1997-01-01

    The relations among serum HIV RNA levels, CD4 cell counts, presence of the mutant CCR5-allele in heterozygous form, and clinical outcome was analyzed in 96 patients from the Copenhagen AIDS Cohort. In the early years of the infection, patients with the CCR5 delta32/CCR5 genotype had significantly...

  5. Cenicriviroc, a Novel CCR5 (R5) and CCR2 Antagonist, Shows In Vitro Activity against R5 Tropic HIV-2 Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visseaux, Benoit; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Bertine, Mélanie; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Matheron, Sophie; Lefebvre, Eric; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Maraviroc activity against HIV-2, a virus naturally resistant to different HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs, has been recently demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, a novel, once-daily, dual CCR5 and CCR2 antagonist that has completed Phase 2b development in HIV-1 infection. Cenicriviroc phenotypic activity has been tested using a PBMC phenotypic susceptibility assay against four R5-, one X4- and one dual-tropic HIV-2 clinical primary isolates. All isolates were obtained by co-cultivation of PHA-activated PBMC from distinct HIV-2-infected CCR5-antagonist-naïve patients included in the French HIV-2 cohort and were previously tested for maraviroc susceptibility using the same protocol. HIV-2 tropism was determined by phenotypic assay using Ghost(3) cell lines. Regarding the 4 R5 HIV-2 clinical isolates tested, effective concentration 50% EC50 for cenicriviroc were 0.03, 0.33, 0.45 and 0.98 nM, similar to those observed with maraviroc: 1.13, 0.58, 0.48 and 0.68 nM, respectively. Maximum percentages of inhibition (MPI) of cenicriviroc were 94, 94, 93 and 98%, similar to those observed with maraviroc (93, 90, 82, 100%, respectively). The dual- and X4-tropic HIV-2 strains were resistant to cenicriviroc with EC50 >1000 nM and MPI at 33% and 4%, respectively. In this first study assessing HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, we observed an in vitro activity against HIV-2 R5-tropic strains similar to that observed with maraviroc. Thus, cenicriviroc may offer a once-daily treatment opportunity in the limited therapeutic arsenal for HIV-2. Clinical studies are warranted.

  6. Reactions of sulphur mustard and sarin on V 1.02 O 2.98 nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, T H; Prasad, G K; Singh, Beer; Srivastava, A R; Ganesan, K; Acharya, J; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2009-07-30

    Reactions of sulphur mustard and sarin were studied on the surface of V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotubes by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. The V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotube samples were made by using hydrothermal method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetry. Later, they were exposed to sulphur mustard and sarin separately at ambient temperature (30+/-2 degrees C). The data explored the formation of sulphoxide of sulphur mustard, thiodiglycol for sulphur mustard and isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid for sarin on V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotubes illustrating the role of oxidation and hydrolysis reactions in the decontamination.

  7. Inhibition of human Na(v)1.5 sodium channels by strychnine and its analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chunhua; Sun, Lirong; Zhang, Meng; Li, Shuji; Wang, Xuemin; Gao, Tianming; Zhu, Xinhong

    2011-08-15

    Strychnine and brucine from the seeds of the plant Strychnos nux vomica have been shown to have interesting pharmacological effects on several neurotransmitter receptors. In this study, we have characterized the pharmacological properties of strychnine and its analogs on human Na(v)1.5 channels to assess their potential therapeutic advantage in certain arrhythmias. Among the eight alkaloids, only strychnine and icajine exhibited inhibition potency on the Na(v)1.5 channel with the half-maximum inhibition (IC(50)) values of 83.1μM and 104.6μM, respectively. Structure-function analysis indicated that the increased bulky methoxy groups on the phenyl ring or the negatively charged oxygen atom may account for this lack of inhibition on the Na(v)1.5 channel. Strychnine and icajine may bind to the channel by cation-π interactions. The substitution with a large side chain on the phenyl ring or the increased molecular volume may alter the optimized position for the compound close to the binding sites of the channel. Strychnine and icajine bind to the Na(v)1.5 channel with a new mechanism that is different from TTX and local anesthetics. They bind to the outer vestibule of the channel pore with fast association and dissociation rates at resting state. Strychnine and icajine had little effect on steady-state fast inactivation but markedly shifted the slow inactivation of Na(v)1.5 currents toward more hyperpolarized potentials. The property of icajine influencing slow-inactivated state of Na(v)1.5 channel would be potential therapeutic advantages in certain arrhythmias. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of Bet v 1-related allergens in fig and other Moraceae fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, W; Focke, M; Marzban, G; Swoboda, I; Jarisch, R; Laimer, M

    2010-04-01

    Allergy to fig fruit (Ficus carica) has been described in patients allergic to Ficus benjamina or rubber latex but may occur also in pollen-allergic patients. To study the potential cross-reactivity between fig and taxonomically related fruits with the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1. One hundred and eighty-eight patients with or without birch pollen allergy were prick-to-prick tested with fig (F. carica), mulberry (Morus alba), jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus; all family Moraceae) and other pollen-associated foods. Moraceae fruit extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE and tested with patient sera and polyclonal antisera against Mal d 1. Western blot inhibition was performed with Moraceae fruit extracts, birch pollen and recombinant Bet v 1. Putative Bet v 1 homologs in Moraceae fruits were analysed by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry. Among 85 patients with isolated birch pollen allergy, 78% had a positive skin test to fresh fig, 10% to dried fig, 91% to mulberry, 91% to jackfruit, 77% to Rosaceae fruits and 83% to hazelnut. Sixty-six per cent of birch pollen-allergic patients positive for fig, reported symptoms after consumption of fresh figs, whereas dried figs were mostly well tolerated. In 60 patients with isolated Ficus benjamina sensitization, the reactivity rates to the same foods were 83-40-0-0-0-0%. None of 32 mugwort pollen-allergic patients reacted to Moraceae fruits. Rabbit anti-Mal d 1 and patient sera reacted to a 17 kDa band in all Moraceae extracts. IgE binding to these proteins was completely inhibited by birch pollen and rBet v 1. Mass spectrometry identified several peptides from the 17 kDa fig, mulberry and jackfruit allergen with respectively 60%, 56% and 76% homology to Bet v 1. Fig and other Moraceae fruits contain allergens homologous to Bet v 1 and represent clinically relevant birch pollen-associated foods.

  9. Diversity of mecA and ccrB in SCCmec type III of methicillin-resistant staphylococci.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Peter Panduro; Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit

    in mecA and ccrB were used as markers to study evolution and possible transfer of SCCmec III across distinct staphylococcal species. Materials and Methods: A collection of genetically and epidemiologically diverse animal and human S. aureus (n=5), S. fleurettii (n=5), S. capitis (n=4), S...... positions. As for ccrB, species-specific clustering of mecA sequences was not observed as exemplified by mecA allele 5 being present in four species (S. pseudintermedius, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus and S. vitulinus). Similarly, mecA allele 1 was found in three species (S. aureus, S. capitis and S....... pseudintermedius). Although various combinations of mecA and ccrB alleles were detected, seven isolates representing S. aureus (n=2), S. pseudintermedius (n=2) and S. capitis (n=3) had the same combination of ccrB and mecA alleles, suggesting interspecies horizontal transfer of SCCmec III. Conclusion...

  10. C-C chemokine receptor type five (CCR5: An emerging target for the control of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Barmania

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When HIV was initially discovered as the causative agent of AIDS, many expected to find a vaccine within a few years. This has however proven to be elusive; it has been approximately 30 years since HIV was first discovered, and a suitable vaccine is still not in effect. In 2009, a paper published by Hutter et al. reported on a bone marrow transplant performed on an HIV positive individual using stem cells that were derived from a donor who was homozygous for a mutation in the CCR5 gene known as CCR5 delta-32 (Δ32 (Hütter et al., 2009. The HIV positive individual became HIV negative and remained free of viral detection after transplantation despite having halted anti-retroviral (ARV treatment. This review will focus on CCR5 as a key component in HIV immunity and will discuss the role of CCR5 in the control of HIV infection.

  11. Operating principles of rotary molecular motors: differences between F1and V1motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Ichiro; Kakinuma, Yoshimi; Murata, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Among the many types of bioenergy-transducing machineries, F- and V-ATPases are unique bio- and nano-molecular rotary motors. The rotational catalysis of F 1 -ATPase has been investigated in detail, and molecular mechanisms have been proposed based on the crystal structures of the complex and on extensive single-molecule rotational observations. Recently, we obtained crystal structures of bacterial V 1 -ATPase (A 3 B 3 and A 3 B 3 DF complexes) in the presence and absence of nucleotides. Based on these new structures, we present a novel model for the rotational catalysis mechanism of V 1 -ATPase, which is different from that of F 1 -ATPases.

  12. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Online Database: Uploading, Searching and Visualizing Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Pisarevsky, S. A.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.; Banerjee, S.; Johnson, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is commissioned to implement and maintain an online portal to a relational database populated by both rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to archive all measurements and the derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). MagIC is hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ and has two search nodes, one for paleomagnetism and one for rock magnetism. Both nodes provide query building based on location, reference, methods applied, material type and geological age, as well as a visual map interface to browse and select locations. The query result set is displayed in a digestible tabular format allowing the user to descend through hierarchical levels such as from locations to sites, samples, specimens, and measurements. At each stage, the result set can be saved and, if supported by the data, can be visualized by plotting global location maps, equal area plots, or typical Zijderveld, hysteresis, and various magnetization and remanence diagrams. User contributions to the MagIC database are critical to achieving a useful research tool. We have developed a standard data and metadata template (Version 2.1) that can be used to format and upload all data at the time of publication in Earth Science journals. Software tools are provided to facilitate population of these templates within Microsoft Excel. These tools allow for the import/export of text files and provide advanced functionality to manage and edit the data, and to perform various internal checks to maintain data integrity and prepare for uploading. The MagIC Contribution Wizard at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/upload.htm executes the upload and takes only a few minutes to process several thousand data records. The standardized MagIC template files are stored in the digital archives of EarthRef.org where they

  13. Gating function of isoleucine-116 in TM-3 (position III:16/3.40) for the activity state of the CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, A; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Thiele, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    TM receptors - it is a leucine indicating an altered function. Here, we describe the significance of this position and its possible interaction with TM-3 for CCR5 activity. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: The effects of [L203F]-CCR5 in TM-5 (position V:13/5.47), [I116A]-CCR5 in TM-3 (III:16/3.40) and [L203F......;G286F]-CCR5 (V:13/5.47;VII:09/7.42) were determined in G-protein- and β-arrestin-coupled signalling. Computational modelling monitored changes in amino acid conformation. KEY RESULTS: [L203F]-CCR5 increased the basal level of G-protein coupling (20-70% of Emax ) and β-arrestin recruitment (50% of Emax...... ) with a threefold increase in agonist potency. In silico, [I116A]-CCR5 switched χ1-angle in [L203F]-CCR5. Furthermore, [I116A]-CCR5 was constitutively active to a similar degree as [L203F]-CCR5. Tyr(244) in TM-6 (VI:09/6.44) moved towards TM-5 in silico, consistent with its previously shown function for CCR5...

  14. Partial protective effect of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygosity in a cohort of heterosexual Italian HIV-1 exposed uninfected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cauda Roberto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite multiple sexual exposure to HIV-1 virus, some individuals remain HIV-1 seronegative (exposed seronegative, ESN. The mechanisms underlying this resistance remain still unclear, although a multifactorial pathogenesis can be hypothesised. Although several genetic factors have been related to HIV-1 resistance, the homozigosity for a mutation in CCR5 gene (the 32 bp deletion, i.e. CCR5-Delta32 allele is presently considered the most relevant one. In the present study we analysed the genotype at CCR5 locus of 30 Italian ESN individuals (case group who referred multiple unprotected heterosexual intercourse with HIV-1 seropositive partner(s, for at least two years. One hundred and twenty HIV-1 infected patients and 120 individuals representative of the general population were included as control groups. Twenty percent of ESN individuals had heterozygous CCR5-Delta 32 genotype, compared to 7.5% of HIV-1 seropositive and 10% of individuals from the general population, respectively. None of the analysed individuals had CCR5-Delta 32 homozygous genotype. Sequence analysis of the entire open reading frame of CCR5 was performed in all ESN subjects and no polymorphisms or mutations were identified. Moreover, we determined the distribution of C77G variant in CD45 gene, which has been previously related to HIV-1 infection susceptibility. The frequency of the C77G variant showed no significant difference between ESN subjects and the two control groups. In conclusion, our data show a significantly higher frequency of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygous genotype (p = 0.04 among the Italian heterosexual ESN individuals compared to HIV-1 seropositive patients, suggesting a partial protective role of CCR5-Delta 32 heterozygosity in this cohort.

  15. A rhodanine derivative CCR-11 inhibits bacterial proliferation by inhibiting the assembly and GTPase activity of FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Parminder; Jindal, Bhavya; Surolia, Avadhesha; Panda, Dulal

    2012-07-10

    A perturbation of FtsZ assembly dynamics has been shown to inhibit bacterial cytokinesis. In this study, the antibacterial activity of 151 rhodanine compounds was assayed using Bacillus subtilis cells. Of 151 compounds, eight strongly inhibited bacterial proliferation at 2 μM. Subsequently, we used the elongation of B. subtilis cells as a secondary screen to identify potential FtsZ-targeted antibacterial agents. We found that three compounds significantly increased bacterial cell length. One of the three compounds, namely, CCR-11 [(E)-2-thioxo-5-({[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]furan-2-yl}methylene)thiazolidin-4-one], inhibited the assembly and GTPase activity of FtsZ in vitro. CCR-11 bound to FtsZ with a dissociation constant of 1.5 ± 0.3 μM. A docking analysis indicated that CCR-11 may bind to FtsZ in a cavity adjacent to the T7 loop and that short halogen-oxygen, H-bonding, and hydrophobic interactions might be important for the binding of CCR-11 with FtsZ. CCR-11 inhibited the proliferation of B. subtilis cells with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 1.2 ± 0.2 μM and a minimal inhibitory concentration of 3 μM. It also potently inhibited proliferation of Mycobacterium smegmatis cells. Further, CCR-11 perturbed Z-ring formation in B. subtilis cells; however, it neither visibly affected nucleoid segregation nor altered the membrane integrity of the cells. CCR-11 inhibited HeLa cell proliferation with an IC(50) value of 18.1 ± 0.2 μM (∼15 × IC(50) of B. subtilis cell proliferation). The results suggested that CCR-11 inhibits bacterial cytokinesis by inhibiting FtsZ assembly, and it can be used as a lead molecule to develop FtsZ-targeted antibacterial agents.

  16. Tolerability and efficacy of inhaled AZD4818, a CCR1 antagonist, in moderate to severe COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerstjens, Huib A; Bjermer, Leif; Eriksson, Leif

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the tolerability and efficacy of inhaled AZD4818, a CCR1 antagonist, in patients with COPD. METHODS: This double-blind, placebo-controlled study (NCT00629239) randomised patients with moderate to severe COPD to AZD4818 300mug or placebo twice daily via Turbuhaler....... These findings in COPD are in line with other studies reporting a lack of clinical efficacy with CCR1 antagonists in other therapy areas....

  17. CCR5 knockout prevents neuronal injury and behavioral impairment induced in a transgenic mouse model by a CXCR4-using HIV-1 glycoprotein 120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Ricky; Hoefer, Melanie M; Sanchez, Ana B; Sejbuk, Natalia E; Medders, Kathryn E; Desai, Maya K; Catalan, Irene C; Dowling, Cari C; de Rozieres, Cyrus M; Garden, Gwenn A; Russo, Rossella; Roberts, Amanda J; Williams, Roy; Kaul, Marcus

    2014-08-15

    The innate immune system has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including HIV-1-associated dementia. In this study, we show that genetic ablation of CCR5 prevents microglial activation and neuronal damage in a transgenic model of HIV-associated brain injury induced by a CXCR4-using viral envelope gp120. The CCR5 knockout (KO) also rescues spatial learning and memory in gp120-transgenic mice. However, the CCR5KO does not abrogate astrocytosis, indicating it can occur independently from neuronal injury and behavioral impairment. To characterize further the neuroprotective effect of CCR5 deficiency we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis of brains from HIVgp120tg mice expressing or lacking CCR5 and nontransgenic controls. A comparison with a human brain microarray study reveals that brains of HIVgp120tg mice and HIV patients with neurocognitive impairment share numerous differentially regulated genes. Furthermore, brains of CCR5 wild-type and CCR5KO gp120tg mice express markers of an innate immune response. One of the most significantly upregulated factors is the acute phase protein lipocalin-2 (LCN2). Using cerebrocortical cell cultures, we find that LCN2 is neurotoxic in a CCR5-dependent fashion, whereas inhibition of CCR5 alone is not sufficient to abrogate neurotoxicity of a CXCR4-using gp120. However, the combination of pharmacologic CCR5 blockade and LCN2 protects neurons from toxicity of a CXCR4-using gp120, thus recapitulating the finding in CCR5-deficient gp120tg mouse brain. Our study provides evidence for an indirect pathologic role of CCR5 and a novel protective effect of LCN2 in combination with inhibition of CCR5 in HIV-associated brain injury. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-23

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV ('Berlin patient'). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Translational Capacity of a Cell Is Determined during Transcription Elongation via the Ccr4-Not Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaan Gupta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current understanding of gene expression considers transcription and translation to be independent processes. Challenging this notion, we found that translation efficiency is determined during transcription elongation through the imprinting of mRNAs with Not1, the central scaffold of the Ccr4-Not complex. We determined that another subunit of the complex, Not5, defines Not1 binding to specific mRNAs, particularly those produced from ribosomal protein genes. This imprinting mechanism specifically regulates ribosomal protein gene expression, which in turn determines the translational capacity of cells. We validate our model by SILAC and polysome profiling experiments. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate that enhanced translation compensates for transcriptional elongation stress. Taken together, our data indicate that in addition to defining mRNA stability, components of the Ccr4-Not imprinting complex regulate RNA translatability, thus ensuring global gene expression homeostasis.

  20. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies in HIV-infection and -exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopalco Lucia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural antibodies constitute a first-line of defence against pathogens; they may also play other roles in immune regulation and homeostasis, through their ability to bind host antigens, surface molecules and receptors. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies can be decisive in preventing HIV infection in mucosal tissues and offer prompt and effective protection just at major sites of virus entry. Among natural anti-CCR5 antibodies, IgG and IgA to the ECL1 domain have been shown to block HIV effectively and durably without causing harm to the host. Their biological properties and their uncommon generation in subsets of HIV-infected and HIV-exposed individuals (so called ESN will be introduced and discussed, with the aim at exploiting their potential in therapy and prevention.

  1. HIV-1 CCR5 gene therapy will fail unless it is combined with a suicide gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Aridaman; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-12-17

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) has successfully turned Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from a deadly pathogen into a manageable chronic infection. ART is a lifelong therapy which is both expensive and toxic, and HIV can become resistant to it. An alternative to lifelong ART is gene therapy that targets the CCR5 co-receptor and creates a population of genetically modified host cells that are less susceptible to viral infection. With generic mathematical models we show that gene therapy that only targets the CCR5 co-receptor fails to suppress HIV-1 (which is in agreement with current data). We predict that the same gene therapy can be markedly improved if it is combined with a suicide gene that is only expressed upon HIV-1 infection.

  2. CCR2 and CD44 promote inflammatory cell recruitment during fatty liver formation in a lithogenic diet fed mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E Egan

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a common disease with a spectrum of presentations. The current study utilized a lithogenic diet model of NAFLD. The diet was fed to mice that are either resistant (AKR or susceptible (BALB/c and C57BL/6 to hepatitis followed by molecular and flow cytometric analysis. Following this, a similar approach was taken in congenic mice with specific mutations in immunological genes. The initial study identified a significant and profound increase in multiple ligands for the chemokine receptor CCR2 and an increase in CD44 expression in susceptible C57BL/6 (B6 but not resistant AKR mice. Ccr2(-/- mice were completely protected from hepatitis and Cd44(-/- mice were partially protected. Despite protection from inflammation, both strains displayed similar histological steatosis scores and significant increases in serum liver enzymes. CD45(+CD44(+ cells bound to hyaluronic acid (HA in diet fed B6 mice but not Cd44(-/- or Ccr2(-/- mice. Ccr2(-/- mice displayed a diminished HA binding phenotype most notably in monocytes, and CD8(+ T-cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that absence of CCR2 completely and CD44 partially reduces hepatic leukocyte recruitment. These data also provide evidence that there are multiple redundant CCR2 ligands produced during hepatic lipid accumulation and describes the induction of a strong HA binding phenotype in response to LD feeding in some subsets of leukocytes from susceptible strains.

  3. Interleukin 4 increases CCR9 expression and homing of lymphocytes to gut-associated lymphoid tissue in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Thavamathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2012-01-15

    The effects of in vitro and in vivo IL-4 supplementation on thymocyte and splenocyte CCR9 mRNA amount and migration were studied. Thymocytes, splenocytes, splenocytes+thymocytes (2:1), and splenocytes+bursocyte cells (2:1) were supplemented with either 0 or 5 ng/ml IL-4 for 5d. CCR9 mRNA was undetectable in all experimental groups supplemented with 0 ng/ml IL-4. IL-4 treatment (5 ng/ml) upregulated (P=0.01) CCR9 mRNA only in the splenocyte+thymocyte cell culture. IL-4-mediated CCR9 mRNA induction in the splenocyte+thymocyte cell culture was dependent on the in vitro dose of IL-4 supplementation. IL-4-treated splenocyte+thymocyte cells when injected in vivo preferentially migrated to cecal tonsils. In vivo supplementation of IL-4 was achieved through in ovo injection of recombinant chicken IL-4 plasmid. Cecal tonsils in chicks hatched from IL-4-plasmid-injected eggs weighed more, had a higher amount of CCR9 mRNA, and had a higher percentage of CD8(+) cells than cecal tonsils from chicks hatched from PBS-injected eggs. It could be concluded that IL-4 induces CCR9 mRNA in thymocytes and splenocytes and directs the migration of cells to gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Increased Expression of CCL20 and CCR6 in Rectal Mucosa Correlated to Severe Inflammation in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Uchida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. The aim of this study is to clarify the differences of CCL20 and CCR6 expression, chemokine correlated to intestinal homeostasis, between pediatric and adult ulcerative colitis (UC patients. Methods. Onehundred forty-one patients who underwent proctocolectomy were divided to two groups including childhood-onset UC (CUC, <16 years old, n=24 and adult-onset UC (AUC, ≧16 years old, n=117. A total of 141 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of rectum were obtained from these patients. Histological inflammation of rectum in resected specimen was evaluated by using Geboes histological assessment. In immunohistochemistry study, the CCL20 expression was evaluated by intensity and the stained area, and the CCR6 expression was evaluated by lymphocytes infiltration pattern. Results. CCL20 score and CCR6 positive lymphocytes infiltration pattern were statistically significantly correlated with histological inflammation severity of UC in all patients (P<0.05. CCL20 and CCR6 expression in CUC were statistically significantly higher than that in AUC in all or pathologically severe cases (P<0.05. Conclusions. CCL20 and CCR6 may play a significant role in local damage and pathological changes in UC especially pediatric patients. In the future, our understanding of the differences in CCL-CCR6 interaction between adults and children may lead to the pathogenesis of IBD.

  5. A novel dual-luciferase assay for anti-HIV drug screening based on the CCR5/CXCR4 promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Long; Lu, Wuhao; Ma, Yunyun; Guo, Wentao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Qianqian; Wu, Jianbo; Zhao, Guoqiang; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2018-02-23

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a serious worldwide disease caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) are important coreceptors mediating HIV-1 cell entry. Many new anti-HIV drugs are currently in preclinical and clinical trials; however, drug development has proceeded slowly partly because of the lack of a high-throughput system to screen these drugs. Here, we describe the development of a novel dual-luciferase assay using a CCR5/CXCR4 promoter-driven firefly and Renilla luciferase vector (pGL4.10-RLUC-CCR5 /CXCR4). Drugs were screened for the ability to regulate CCR5 and CXCR4 promoter activities. The CCR5 and CXCR4 promoters were inserted separately into the recombinant vector and transfected into the acute T lymphocyte leukemia cell line H9. Treatment of stable transfected cells with four traditional Chinese medicine compounds resulted in the dose-dependent inhibition of the CXCR4 and CCR5 promoter activities. The dual-luciferase reporter assay provides a rapid and direct method to screen anti-AIDS/HIV drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Santiago, César; Rodríguez Frade, José Miguel; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-05-13

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention.

  7. Impact of MCP-1 and CCR-2 gene polymorphisms on coronary artery disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Ling; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2012-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) was the second leading cause of death during the last 3 years in Taiwan. Smooth muscle cells, monocytes/macrophages, and endothelial cells produce monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) within atherosclerotic plaques following binding to the chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2). Previous studies have well-documented the association between MCP-1 expression and susceptibility to, or clinicopathological features, of CAD. This study investigated the relationships between MCP-1-2518A/G and CCR-2-V64I genetic polymorphisms and CAD in the Taiwanese population. A total of 608 subjects, including 392 non-CAD controls and 216 patients with CAD, were recruited and subjected to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to evaluate the effects of these two polymorphic variants on CAD. Results indicated a significant association between MCP-1 -2548 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to CAD. GG genotypes (OR = 1.629; 95 % CI = 1.003-2.644), or individuals with at least one G allele (OR = 1.511; 95 % CI = 1.006-2.270), had a higher risk of CAD as compared with AA genotypes. Results also revealed that subjects with at least one A allele of the V64I CCR2 gene polymorphism had significantly increased risk of CAD. G allele in MCP-1-2518 might contribute to higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation in CAD patients (OR = 4.254; p CCR-2 64I gene polymorphisms represent important factors in determining susceptibility to CAD, and the contribution of MCP-1-2518G could be through effects on atrial fibrillation in CAD patients.

  8. Inflammatory monocytes promote progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and can be therapeutically targeted via CCR2

    OpenAIRE

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Liang, Feng; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Danialou, Gawiyou; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Bourdon, Johanne; Rafei, Moutih; Galipeau, Jacques; Divangahi, Maziar; Petrof, Basil J

    2014-01-01

    Myofiber necrosis and fibrosis are hallmarks of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), leading to lethal weakness of the diaphragm. Macrophages (MPs) are required for successful muscle regeneration, but the role of inflammatory monocyte (MO)-derived MPs in either promoting or mitigating DMD is unclear. We show that DMD (mdx) mouse diaphragms exhibit greatly increased expression of CCR2 and its chemokine ligands, along with inflammatory (Ly6Chigh) MO recruitment and accumulation of CD11bhigh MO-de...

  9. Screening of chemokine receptor CCR4 antagonists by capillary zone electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Sun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4 is a kind of G-protein-coupled receptor, which plays a pivotal role in allergic inflammation. The interaction between 2-(2-(4-chloro-phenyl-5-{[(naphthalen-1-ylmethyl-carbamoyl]-methyl}-4-oxo-thiazolidin-3-yl-N-(3-morpholin-4-yl-propyl-acetamide (S009 and the N-terminal extracellular tail (ML40 of CCR4 has been validated to be high affinity by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE. The S009 is a known CCR4 antagonist. Now, a series of new thiourea derivatives have been synthesized. Compared with positive control S009, they were screened using ML40 as target by CZE to find some new drugs for allergic inflammation diseases. The synthesized compounds XJH-5, XJH-4, XJH-17 and XJH-1 displayed the interaction with ML40, but XJH-9, XJH-10, XJH-11, XJH-12, XJH-13, XJH-14, XJH-3, XJH-8, XJH-6, XJH-7, XJH-15, XJH-16 and XJH-2 did not bind to ML40. Both qualification and quantification characterizations of the binding were determined. The affinity of the four compounds was valued by the binding constant, which was similar with the results of chemotactic experiments. The established CEZ method is capable of sensitive and fast screening for a series of lactam analogs in the drug discovery for allergic inflammation diseases. Keywords: Capillary zone electrophoresis, CCR4 antagonist, 2-(2-(4-chloro-phenyl-5-{[(naphthalen-1-ylmethyl-carbamoyl]-methyl}-4-oxo-thiazolidin-3-yl-N-(3-morpholin-4-yl-propyl-acetamide, Interactions, Structural modification

  10. $200,000 Grants Awarded to CCR Researchers for HIV/AIDS Studies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) awarded two, two-year grants of $200,000 each to Anu Puri, Ph.D., and Robert Blumenthal, Ph.D., both of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Nanobiology Program, and to Eric Freed, Ph.D., of the HIV Drug Resistance Program, for their research on potential new treatments for HIV.

  11. Chemokines (RANTES and MCP-1) and chemokine-receptors (CCR2 and CCR5) gene polymorphisms in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Cecilia; Alvarez, Victoria; Mata, Ignacio F; Coto, Eliecer; Ribacoba, René; Martínez, Carmen; Blázquez, Marta; Guisasola, Luis M; Salvador, Carlos; Lahoz, Carlos H; Peña, Joaquín

    2004-11-11

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting about 5% of the population older than 65 years. Several works have demonstrated the involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of both, PD and LOAD. Genetic susceptibility to develop PD and LOAD has also been widely recognised. Thus, functional polymorphisms at the genes encoding inflammatory proteins could influence the overall risk of developing these neurodegenerative disorders. We examined whether DNA-polymorphisms at the genes encoding chemokines MCP-1 (-2518 A/G) and RANTES (-403 A/G), and chemokine receptors 5 (CCR5, Delta32) and 2 (CCR2,V64I), were associated with the risk and/or the clinical outcome of LOAD and PD. A total of 200 PD, 326 LOAD, and 370 healthy controls were genotyped for the four polymorphisms, and genotype frequencies statistically compared. We did not find significant differences in the frequencies of the different genotypes between both groups of patients and controls. We conclude that the four DNA polymorphisms, which have been associated with several immuno-modulated diseases, did not contribute to the risk of PD or LOAD.

  12. Combined sodium ion sensitivity in agonist binding and internalization of vasopressin V1b receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Taka-Aki; Kashiwazaki, Aki; Taniguchi, Junichi

    2016-05-03

    Reducing Na(+) in the extracellular environment may lead to two beneficial effects for increasing agonist binding to cell surface G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): reduction of Na(+)-mediated binding block and reduce of receptor internalization. However, such combined effects have not been explored. We used Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing vasopressin V1b receptors as a model to explore Na(+) sensitivity in agonist binding and receptor internalization. Under basal conditions, a large fraction of V1b receptors is located intracellularly, and a small fraction is in the plasma membrane. Decreases in external Na(+) increased cell surface [(3)H]AVP binding and decreased receptor internalization. Substitution of Na(+) by Cs(+) or NH4(+) inhibited agonist binding. To suppress receptor internalization, the concentration of NaCl, but not of CsCl, had to be less than 50 mM, due to the high sensitivity of the internalization machinery to Na(+) over Cs(+). Iso-osmotic supplementation of glucose or NH4Cl maintained internalization of the V1b receptor, even in a low-NaCl environment. Moreover, iodide ions, which acted as a counter anion, inhibited V1b agonist binding. In summary, we found external ionic conditions that could increase the presence of high-affinity state receptors at the cell surface with minimum internalization during agonist stimulations.

  13. Visual recognition memory, manifest as long-term habituation, requires synaptic plasticity in V1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Sam F.; Komorowski, Robert W.; Kaplan, Eitan S.; Gavornik, Jeffrey P.; Bear, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Familiarity with stimuli that bring neither reward nor punishment, manifested through behavioural habituation, enables organisms to detect novelty and devote cognition to important elements of the environment. Here we describe in mice a form of long-term behavioural habituation to visual grating stimuli that is selective for stimulus orientation. Orientation-selective habituation (OSH) can be observed both in exploratory behaviour in an open arena, and in a stereotyped motor response to visual stimuli in head-restrained mice. We show that the latter behavioural response, termed a vidget, requires V1. Parallel electrophysiological recordings in V1 reveal that plasticity, in the form of stimulus-selective response potentiation (SRP), occurs in layer 4 of V1 as OSH develops. Local manipulations of V1 that prevent and reverse electrophysiological modifications likewise prevent and reverse memory demonstrated behaviourally. These findings suggest that a form of long-term visual recognition memory is stored via synaptic plasticity in primary sensory cortex. PMID:25599221

  14. Developing iCare v.1.0: an academic electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tami H; Li, Xueping; Indranoi, Chayawat; Bell, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    An electronic health record application, iCare v.1.0, was developed and tested that allows data input and retrieval while tracking student performance over time. The development and usability testing of iCare v.1.0 followed a rapid prototyping software development and testing model. Once the functionality was tested by engineers, the usability and feasibility testing began with a convenience sample of focus group members including undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. Three focus groups were created, and four subjects participated in each focus group (n = 12). Nielsen's usability heuristics and methods of evaluation were used to evaluate data captured from each focus group. Overall, users wanted a full-featured electronic health record with features that coached or guided users. The earliest versions of iCare v.1.0 did not provide help features and prompts to guide students but were later added. Future versions will incorporate a full-featured help section. The interface and design of iCare v.1.0 are similar to professional electronic health record applications. As a result of this usability study, future versions of iCare will include more robust help features along with advanced reporting and elements specific to specialty populations such as pediatrics and mental health services.

  15. A new allergen from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with homology to art v 1 from mugwort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, Renaud; Wopfner, Nicole; Pabst, Martin; Stadlmann, Johannes; Petersen, Bent O; Duus, Jens Ø; Himly, Martin; Radauer, Christian; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Ferreira, Fatima; Altmann, Friedrich

    2010-08-27

    Art v 1, the major pollen allergen of the composite plant mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) has been identified recently as a thionin-like protein with a bulky arabinogalactan-protein moiety. A close relative of mugwort, ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is an important allergen source in North America, and, since 1990, ragweed has become a growing health concern in Europe as well. Weed pollen-sensitized patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to a ragweed pollen protein of apparently 29-31 kDa. This reaction could be inhibited by the mugwort allergen Art v 1. The purified ragweed pollen protein consisted of a 57-amino acid-long defensin-like domain with high homology to Art v 1 and a C-terminal proline-rich domain. This part contained hydroxyproline-linked arabinogalactan chains with one galactose and 5 to 20 and more alpha-arabinofuranosyl residues with some beta-arabinoses in terminal positions as revealed by high field NMR. The ragweed protein contained only small amounts of the single hydroxyproline-linked beta-arabinosyl residues, which form an important IgE binding determinant in Art v 1. cDNA clones for this protein were obtained from ragweed flowers. Immunological characterization revealed that the recombinant ragweed protein reacted with >30% of the weed pollen allergic patients. Therefore, this protein from ragweed pollen constitutes a novel important ragweed allergen and has been designated Amb a 4.

  16. Optical, mechanical and TEM assessment of titania-doped Bi2V1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 7. Optical, mechanical and TEM assessment of titania-doped Bi2V1−TiO5.5−δ bismuth vanadate oxides. Gurbinder Kaur Gary Pickrell Vishal Kumar Om Prakash Pandey Kulvir Singh Daniel Homa. Volume 37 Issue 7 December 2014 pp ...

  17. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L.; Bhiman, Jinal N.; Dekosky, Brandon J.; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kim, Helen J.; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P.; Altae-Tran, Han R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Crooks, Ema T.; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J.; Hoi, Kam H.; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Longo, Nancy S.; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O'Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S.; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Sheward, Daniel J.; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C.; Binley, James M.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Wilson, Ian A.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Becker, Jesse; Benjamin, Betty; Blakesley, Robert; Bouffard, Gerry; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Dekhtyar, Mila; Gregory, Michael; Guan, Xiaobin; Gupta, Jyoti; Han, Joel; Hargrove, April; Ho, Shi-ling; Johnson, Taccara; Legaspi, Richelle; Lovett, Sean; Maduro, Quino; Masiello, Cathy; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jenny; Montemayor, Casandra; Mullikin, James; Park, Morgan; Riebow, Nancy; Schandler, Karen; Schmidt, Brian; Sison, Christina; Stantripop, Mal; Thomas, James; Thomas, Pam; Vemulapalli, Meg; Young, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics

  18. GEOCLIM reloaded (v 1.0): a new coupled earth system model for past climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, S.; Regnier, P.; Goddéris, Y.; Donnadieu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new version of the coupled Earth system model GEOCLIM. The new release, GEOCLIM reloaded (v 1.0), links the existing atmosphere and weathering modules to a novel, temporally and spatially resolved model of the global ocean circulation, which provides a physical framework for a

  19. Multicenter trial validation of a camera-based method to measure Tc-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine, or Tc-99m MAG3, clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Manatunga, A; Morton, K; Reese, L; Prato, F S; Greenberg, E; Folks, R; Kemp, B J; Jones, M E; Corrigan, P E; Galt, J; Eshima, L

    1997-07-01

    To evaluate an improved camera-based method for calculating the clearance of technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) in a multicenter trial. Tc-99m MAG3 scintigraphy was performed in 49 patients at three sites in the United States and Canada. The percentage of the injected dose of Tc-99m MAG3 in the kidney at 1-2, 1.0-2.5, and 2-3 minutes after injection was correlated with the plasma-based Tc-99m MAG3 clearances. The data were combined with the results obtained in 20 additional patients in a previously published pilot study. Regression models correlating the plasma-based Tc-99m MAG3 clearance with the percentage uptake in the kidney for each time interval were developed; there was no statistically significant difference among sites in the regression equations. Correction for body surface area statistically significantly (P time interval. For the 1.0-2.5-minute interval, the body surface area-corrected correlation coefficient for the four combined sites was .87, and it improved to .93 when one outlier was omitted from the analysis. Similar results were obtained with the other time intervals. Independent processing by two observers showed no clinically important differences in the percentage dose in the kidney or in relative function. An improved camera-based method to calculate the clearance of Tc-99m MAG3 was validated in a multicenter trial.

  20. Differential CCR4 Expression And Function in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Shan Wu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL is a clonal epidermotropic malignancy of memory T cells primarily involving the skin. However, the mechanisms governing migration of CTCL cells have not been fully clarified. It has been shown that certain chemokine receptors are upregulated in CTCL cells, but it remains unanswered whether these chemokine receptors play a critical role in the migration dynamics of CTCL. Using cell lines originally derived from patients with different subtypes of CTCL, we have shown higher CCR4 expression in the line derived from the mycosis fungoides (MJ, compared with the line derived from Sézary syndrome (Hut78. In specific responses to CCL22 (a CCR4 ligand treatments, MJ cells showed significant chemotactic migration, enhanced activation and adhesion of certain integrins (CD49d and CD29 in vitro, while the control cells (Hut78, CD4+CD45RO+ memory T cells, and Jurkat cells did not. Furthermore, compared with Hut78 cells, MJ cells manifested significantly more transendothelial migration in responses to treatments with either CCL22 or conditioned medium from dendritic cells in vitro. These results provide further dynamic evidence, in line with the multistep cascade paradigm for leukocyte transendothelial migration, to support a critical role for CCR4 in CTCL migration.