WorldWideScience

Sample records for cca treated wood

  1. PRESERVATIVE LEACHING FROM WEATHERED CCA-TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disposal of discarded CCA-treated wood in landfills raises concerns with respect to leaching of preservative compounds. When unweathered CCA-treated wood is leached using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), arsenic concentrations exceed the toxicity characteris...

  2. Electrodialytic remediation of CCA treated waste wood in pilot scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2005-01-01

    When CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate) treated wood is removed from service and turns into waste, the contents of Cu, Cr and As is still high due to the strong fixation of CCA in the wood. This high content of toxic compounds presents a disposal challenge. Incineration of CCA treated waste wood......-ples of electrodialysis. It has previously been shown that it is possible to remove Cu, Cr and As from CCA treated wood using electrodialytic remediation in laboratory scale (Ribeiro et al., 2000; Kristensen et al., 2003), but until now, the method had not been studied in larger scale. The pilot scale plant used...

  3. ASSESSING CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE CCA (CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE) ON TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns have been raised regarding the safety of young children contacting arsenic and chromium residues while playing on and around Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) treated wood playground structures and decks. Although CCA registrants voluntarily canceled treated wood for re...

  4. The Feasibilty of Recycling CCA Treated Wood From Spent Residential Decks

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, David Samuel

    2003-01-01

    The amount of CCA treated wood being removed from spent residential decks is increasing at a tremendous rate. While most spent CCA treated wood is being disposed in landfills, further useful and environmentally beneficial alternatives have to be met. This research estimated the percentage of recoverable lumber from spent CCA decks that can be recycled into other usable products. Six residential decks were removed from service, by either demolition or deconstruction procedures. It was found...

  5. A pilot study of children's exposure to CCA-treated wood from playground equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalat, S L; Solo-Gabriele, H M; Fleming, L E; Buckley, B T; Black, K; Jimenez, M; Shibata, T; Durbin, M; Graygo, J; Stephan, W; Van De Bogart, G

    2006-08-15

    Arsenic from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood, widely used in playgrounds and other outdoor equipment, can persist as surface residues on wood. This raises concerns about possible health risks associated with children playing on CCA-treated playgrounds. In a Pilot Study, 11 children (13-71 months) in homes with and without CCA-treated playgrounds were evaluated with post-exposure hand rinses and urine for total arsenic. Samples of wood, soil, and mulch, as well as synthetic wipes, were sampled for total arsenic. In non-CCA-treated playgrounds vs. CCA-treated playgrounds, respectively, wood arsenic was soil arsenic was playground was 0.4 mg/kg vs. two CCA-treated playgrounds of 0.6 and 69 mg/kg. The arsenic removed using a synthetic wipe at non-CCA-treated playgrounds was playgrounds was playgrounds. Mean urinary total arsenic levels were 13.6 pg/ml (range 7.2-23.1 pg/ml) for all children evaluated, but there was no association between access to CCA-playgrounds and urinary arsenic levels. Arsenic speciation was not performed. This preliminary Pilot Study of CCA-treated wood playgrounds observed dislodgeable arsenic on 11 children's hands after brief periods of play exposure. Future efforts should increase the number of children and the play exposure periods, and incorporate speciation in order to discriminate between various sources of arsenic.

  6. Electron microscopic study on pyrolysis of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T.; Bronsveld, P.M; Vystavel, T.; Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Kakitani, T.; Otono, A.; Imamura, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The effectiveness of pyrolysis as a possible technique for disposing of CCA (chromium, copper and arsenic oxide)-treated wood was studied. A CCA-treated sample given an extra heat treatment at 450 degreesC for 10 min was thoroughly investigated in order to establish the details of the reaction in wh

  7. Exposure to wood dust and heavy metals in workers using CCA pressure-treated wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Paul; Cohen, Beverly; Butala, John H; Gordon, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Chemical pesticide treatment enables relatively nonresistant woods to be used in outdoor construction projects. The most prevalent procedure used to protect these woods is pressure treatment with chromium, copper, and arsenic (CCA). This pilot study examined the airborne concentration and particle size distribution of wood particles, chromium, copper, and arsenic at both outdoor (measured over the whole work day) and indoor (measured during the performance of specific tasks) work sites. At the outdoor residential deck construction sites, the arithmetic mean total dust concentration, measured using personal filter cassette samplers, was 0.57 mg/m3. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (da) of the outdoor wood dust was greater than 20 microm. Indoor wood dust concentrations were significantly greater than those measured outdoor and were job category-dependent. The highest mean breathing zone dust concentration, 49.0 mg/m3, was measured at the indoor sanding operation. Personal impactor sampling demonstrated that the mean total airborne concentration of arsenic, but not chromium or copper, was consistently above recommended occupational exposure levels at the indoor work site, and occasionally at the outdoor work sites. At the indoor sanding operation, the mean total chromium, copper, and arsenic concentrations were 345, 170, and 342 microg/m3, respectively. Thus, significant exposure to airborne heavy metals can occur as a result of indoor and outdoor exposure to CCA pressure-treated wood dust. Therefore, current standards for wood dust may not adequately protect workers from the heavy metals commonly used in CCA pressure-treated wood.

  8. Leaching from CCA-Treated Wood into Soils: Preliminary PIXE Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R. F.; Kravchenko, I. I.; Kuharik, J. C.; Van Rinsvelt, H. A.; Dunnam, F. E.; Huffman, J.

    2003-08-01

    Widespread use of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) as a wood preservative has led to increasing public concern regarding possible toxic contamination of areas surrounding CCA-treated structures, e.g., decks, playground equipment, etc. Appreciable leaching of arsenic, chromium, and copper into soils adjacent to such structures has been demonstrated via standard techniques of analytical chemistry. The advantages of PIXE [rapid analysis, quick sample turnover, possible lower cost] suggest its application to this area of interest. PIXE studies in our laboratory of CCA-contaminated soil samples show good agreement with previous analyses of As, Cu, Cr, and other heavy-elemental content, with some variability in diffusion rates.

  9. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD, INTERIM DATA REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is approximately 20 months into a project to evaluate the performance of wood coatings as a way to prevent arsenic, chromium and copper exposure from the surfaces of CCA treated wood. Potential dermal exposure, as measured by wipe sampling dislodgeable CCA chemical from wood ...

  10. EMISSIONS OF CHROMIUM, COPPER, ARSENIC AND PCDDS/FS FROM OPEN BURNING OF CCA TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aged and weathered chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood was burned in an open burn research facility to characterize the air emissions and residual bottom ash. In addition to continuous measurements of gases and temperature, samples were collected to characterize the emis...

  11. Decontamination of CCA-treated eucalyptus wood waste by acid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, Suzana Frighetto; dos Santos, Heldiane Souza; Miranda, Luciana Gampert; Azevedo, Carla Maria Nunes; Maia, Sandra Maria; Pires, Marçal

    2016-03-01

    Preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) are used to increase the resistance of wood to deterioration. The components of CCA are highly toxic, resulting in growing concern over the disposal of the waste generated. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of Cu, Cr and As present in CCA-treated eucalyptus wood from utility poles removed from service in southern Brazil, in order to render them non-hazardous waste. The removal was carried out by acid leaching in bench-scale and applying optimal extractor concentration, total solid content, reactor volume, temperature and reaction time obtained by factorial experiments. The best working conditions were achieved using three extraction steps with 0.1 mol L(-1) H2SO4 at 75°C for 2h each (total solid content of 15%), and 3 additional 1h-long washing steps using water at ambient temperature. Under these conditions, removal of 97%, 85% and 98% were obtained for Cu, Cr and As, respectively, rendering the decontaminated wood non-hazardous waste. The wastewater produced by extraction showed acid pH, high organic loading as well as high concentrations of the elements, needing prior treatment to be discarded. However, rinsing water can be recycled in the extraction process without compromising its efficiency. The acid extraction is a promising alternative for CCA removal from eucalyptus wood waste in industrial scale. PMID:26856447

  12. Electrodialytic remediation of CCA-treated waste wood in a 2 m3 pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2006-01-01

    Waste wood that has been treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) poses a potential environmental problem due to the content of copper, chromium and arsenic. A pilot plant for electrodialytic remediation of up to 2 m3 wood has been designed and tested and the results are presented here. Several...... fractions. The best remediation efficiency was obtained in an experiment with an electrode distance of 60 cm, and 100 kg wood chips. In this experiment 87% copper, 81% chromium and > 95% arsenic were removed. One other experiment was also analysed for arsenic. In this experiment the distance between...... the working electrodes was 1.5 m and here 95% As was removed. The results showed that arsenic may be the easiest removable of the copper, chromium and arsenic investigated here. This is very encouraging since arsenic is the CCA components of most environmental concern....

  13. Leaching characteristics of CCA-treated wood waste: a UK study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, T G; Frostick, L E

    2012-06-15

    CCA-treated wood is expected to increase in the UK waste stream over the next 20-50 years. The potential pollution from this waste has been evaluated through two leaching studies, one based upon batch leaching tests and another based upon a series of lysimeter tests. The aim of the studies was to characterise the behaviour of arsenic (As), chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) from this wood when applied to soil as a mulch. Results demonstrate that all three elements leach from CCA waste wood, occasionally in concentrations exceeding regulatory thresholds by two to three orders of magnitude. In the lysimeter study, wood mulch monofills and wood mulch in combination with soil were used to monitor the leaching of As, Cr and Cu. Peak concentrations for As, Cr and Cu were 1885 μg/l, 1243 μg/l and 1261 μg/l, respectively. Freshly treated wood leached 11, 23 and 33 times more Cu, Cr and As, respectively than weathered wood. The toxic and mobile species of arsenic (As III, As V) were detected. Leaching in the CCA wood monofill was influenced by rainfall, with higher concentrations of metal(loid)s produced in lower intensity events. As and Cu were mobilised preferentially, with all metals exhibiting similar temporal trends. Retention of leached metal(loid)s was observed in lysimeters containing soil. Leaching processes appear to be favoured by the chipping process, diffusion and weathering. This study has shown that weathered waste wood mulch can cause significant pollution in soil water with potential impacts on both the environment and human health. PMID:22575377

  14. Application of a CCA-treated wood waste decontamination process to other copper-based preservative-treated wood after disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janin, Amelie, E-mail: amelie.janin@ete.inrs.ca [University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry, 33, Willcocks St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3B3 (Canada); Coudert, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.coudert@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Riche, Pauline, E-mail: pauline.riche@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Mercier, Guy, E-mail: guy_mercier@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Cooper, Paul, E-mail: p.cooper@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry, 33, Willcocks St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3B3 (Canada); Blais, Jean-Francois, E-mail: blaisjf@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2011-02-28

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper describes a process for the metal removal from treated (CA-, ACQ- or MCQ-) wood wastes. {yields} This sulfuric acid leaching process is simple and economic. {yields} The remediated wood could be recycled in the industry. - Abstract: Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was widely used until 2004 for residential and industrial applications. Since 2004, CCA was replaced by alternative copper preservatives such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ), for residential applications due to health concerns. Treated wood waste disposal is becoming an issue. Previous studies identified a chemical process for decontaminating CCA-treated wood waste based on sulfuric acid leaching. The potential application of this process to wood treated with the copper-based preservatives (alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ)) is investigated here. Three consecutive leaching steps with 0.1 M sulfuric acid at 75 deg, C for 2 h were successful for all the types of treated wood and achieved more than 98% copper solubilisation. The different acidic leachates produced were successively treated by coagulation using ferric chloride and precipitation (pH = 7) using sodium hydroxide. Between 94 and 99% of copper in leachates could be recovered by electrodeposition after 90 min using 2 A electrical current. Thus, the process previously developed for CCA-treated wood waste decontamination could be efficiently applied for CA-, ACQ- or MCQ-treated wood.

  15. Bioremediation of CCA-Treated Wood By Brown-Rot Fungi Fomitopsis Palustris, Coniophora Puteana, and Laetiporus Sulphureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kartal, S Nami; Munir, Erman; Kamitani, Tomo

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated oxalic acid accumulation and bioremediation of chromated copper arscnate (CCA)-treated wood by three brown-rot fungi Fomitopsis palustris Coniophora puteane, and Laetiporus sulphureas. The fungi were first cultivated in a fermentation broth to accumulate oxalic acid. Bioremediation of CCA-treated wood was then carried out by leaching of heavy metals with oxalic acid over a 10-day fermentation period. Higher amounts of oxalic acid were produced by F. polustris and L. sulp...

  16. CCA-TREATED WOOD DISPOSED IN LANDFILLS AND LIFE-CYCLE TRADE-OFFS WITH WASTE-TO-ENERGY AND MSW LANDFILL DISPOSAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood is a preservative treated wood construction product that grew in use in the 1970s for both residential and industrial applications. In the U.S. CCA-treated wood is disposed primarily within landfills, however some of the wood is combu...

  17. MANAGING SOURCES TO REDUCE RISK IN AND AROUND THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT: IMPACT OF COATINGS ON DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC ON THE SURFACES OF CCA-TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the potential for ingestion of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) by the hand-to-mouth activities of young children who contact CCA treated wood, EPA has used wipe samples to study the potential benefits of paint-like coatings on CCA treated wood. Citizens who may be concern...

  18. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA TREATED WOOD; FINAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA conducted a study to evaluate the effect of coatings on dislodgeable arsenic, chromium, and copper residues on the surfaces of chromated copper arsenate (CAA) treated wood. Dislodgeable CCA, determined by wipe sampling the wood surfaces, was the primary evaluation criterion f...

  19. Arsenic levels in wipe samples collected from play structures constructed with CCA-treated wood: Impact on exposure estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraj, Leila M. [Chemical Regulation and Food Safety, Exponent, Inc., Suite 1100, 1150 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20036 (United States)], E-mail: lbarraj@exponent.com; Scrafford, Carolyn G. [Chemical Regulation and Food Safety, Exponent, Inc., Suite 1100, 1150 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20036 (United States); Eaton, W. Cary [RTI International, 3040 Cornwallis Road, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Rogers, Robert E.; Jeng, Chwen-Jyh [Toxcon Health Sciences Research Centre Inc., 9607 - 41 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6E 5X7 (Canada)

    2009-04-01

    Lumber treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) has been used in residential outdoor wood structures and playgrounds. The U.S. EPA has conducted a probabilistic assessment of children's exposure to arsenic from CCA-treated structures using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for the wood preservative scenario (SHEDS-Wood). The EPA assessment relied on data from an experimental study using adult volunteers and designed to measure arsenic in maximum hand and wipe loadings. Analyses using arsenic handloading data from a study of children playing on CCA-treated play structures in Edmonton, Canada, indicate that the maximum handloading values significantly overestimate the exposure that occurs during actual play. The objective of our paper is to assess whether the dislodgeable arsenic residues from structures in the Edmonton study are comparable to those observed in other studies and whether they support the conclusion that the values derived by EPA using modeled maximum loading values overestimate hand exposures. We compared dislodgeable arsenic residue data from structures in the playgrounds in the Edmonton study to levels observed in studies used in EPA's assessment. Our analysis showed that the dislodgeable arsenic levels in the Edmonton playground structures are similar to those in the studies used by EPA. Hence, the exposure estimates derived using the handloading data from children playing on CCA-treated structures are more representative of children's actual exposures than the overestimates derived by EPA using modeled maximum values. Handloading data from children playing on CCA-treated structures should be used to reduce the uncertainty of modeled estimates derived using the SHEDS-Wood model.

  20. Evaluating the potential for environmental pollution from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste: a new mass balance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, T G; Frostick, L E

    2014-07-15

    The potential for pollution from arsenic, chromium and copper in chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste was assessed using two lysimeter studies. The first utilised lysimeters containing soil and CCA wood waste mulch exposed to natural conditions over a five month period. The second study used the same lysimeter setup in a regulated greenhouse setting with a manual watering regime. Woodchip, soil and leachate samples were evaluated for arsenic, chromium and copper concentrations. Resultant concentration data were used to produce mass balances, an approach thus far unused in such studies. This novel analysis revealed new patterns of mobility and distribution of the elements in the system. The results suggest that CCA wood waste tends to leach on initial exposure to a leachant and during weathering of the wood. When in contact with soil, metal(loid) transport is reduced due to complexation reactions. With higher water application or where the adsorption capacity of the soil is exceeded, the metal(loid)s are transported through the soil column as leachate. Overall, there was an unexplained loss of metal(loid)s from the system that might be attributed to volatilisation of arsenic and plant uptake. This suggests a hitherto unidentified risk to both the environment and human health. PMID:24858049

  1. Elemental analysis of ash residue from combustion of CCA treated wood waste before and after electrodialytic extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Element distribution in a combined fly ash and bottom ash from combustion of copper chromate arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) before and after electrodialytic extraction. The untreated ash contained various particles, including pieces...... in the incompletely combusted wood pieces and was also found in almost pure form in a surface layer of some matrix particles – indicating surface condensation of volatile Cu species. In treated ash, Ca and As were no longer found together, indicating that Ca-arsenates had been dissolved due to the electrodialytic....... Chemical analyses of untreated and treated ash confirmed that most As, but only smaller amounts of Cu and Cr was removed due to the electrodialytic extraction. Overall metal contents in the original ash residue were: 1.4 g As, 2.76 g Cu and 2.48 g Cr, after electrodialytic extraction these amounts were...

  2. Exergy analysis of the Chartherm process for energy valorization and material recuperation of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, A; Auweele, M Vanden; Govaerts, J; Helsen, L

    2011-04-01

    The Chartherm process (Thermya, Bordeaux, France) is a thermochemical conversion process to treat chromated copper arsenate (CCA) impregnated wood waste. The process aims at maximum energy valorization and material recuperation by combining the principles of low-temperature slow pyrolysis and distillation in a smart way. The main objective of the exergy analysis presented in this paper is to find the critical points in the Chartherm process where it is necessary to apply some measures in order to reduce exergy consumption and to make energy use more economic and efficient. It is found that the process efficiency can be increased with 2.3-4.2% by using the heat lost by the reactor, implementing a combined heat and power (CHP) system, or recuperating the waste heat from the exhaust gases to preheat the product gas. Furthermore, a comparison between the exergetic performances of a 'chartherisation' reactor and an idealized gasification reactor shows that both reactors destroy about the same amount of exergy (i.e. 3500kWkg(wood)(-1)) during thermochemical conversion of CCA-treated wood. However, the Chartherm process possesses additional capabilities with respect to arsenic and tar treatment, as well as the extra benefit of recuperating materials.

  3. Determination of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in treated wood of Eucalyptus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parreira, Paulo S., E-mail: parreira@uel.b [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab.de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada; Vendrametto, Guilherme R.; Cunha, Magda E.T., E-mail: grvendrametto@gmail.co [Universidade Norte do Parana, Arapongas, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Humanas, da Saude, Exatas e Tecnologicas-A

    2009-07-01

    This work deals with the possible application of a portable energy dispersive handmade system (PXRF-LFNA-02) for the determination of Chromium, Copper and Arsenic in the preservative solution used to protect commercial wood of Eucalyptus, which are employed as wood fence, posts, contention fences, railroad sleepers, etc. It was prepared five body-of-proof made of eucalyptus alburnum with different concentrations for each element varying from 0.0061 to 0.0180 (g/g) for CrO{sub 3}, 0.0024 to 0.0070 (g/g) for CuO and 0.0044 to 0.0129 (g/g) for As{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Four of them were used for calibration curves and one used as reference sample. It was used a commercial CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate ) solution to prepare the samples. The results show a good linear regression between concentrations and X-rays intensities, after applied the multiple linear regression methodology for interelemental corrections. The values obtained with this methodology were 3.01(kg/m{sup 3}), 1.18 (kg/m{sup 3}) e 2.21 (kg/m{sup 3}) for CrO{sub 3}, CuO and As{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively, while the nominal values are 2.90 (kg/m{sup 3}) for CrO{sub 3}, 1.13 (kg/m{sup 3}) for CuO and 2.07 (kg/m{sup 3}) for As{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The ED-XRF (Energy Dispersive X-Rays Fluorescence) is a well established technique with high-speed of analytical procedure and its portable configuration allowing a multielemental, simultaneous and non destructive analyses besides in situ application. (author)

  4. CHROMATED COPPER ARSENATE (CCA TREATED WOOD: DESTINATION OPTIONS FOR WASTES GENERATED AND PERSPECTIVES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR TOXIC ELEMENTS REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PIRES, Marçal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The wood has been used for various functions, one of them is the manufacture of poles for electrification and telephony. However, this material has a big propensity to deteriorate. To increase its durability, some alternatives are employed, one of them is the incorporation of toxic substances (preservatives to protect the wood from agents such as fungi, bacteria and xylophagous insects that cause its decay. Currently, the preservative chromated copper arsenate (CCA is the most widely used for this purpose. However, when the CCA treated wood poles reach the end of their useful life, they become hazardous waste due to the presence of chromium and arsenic. In this work are presented the main methodologies for treatment, destination options and adequate disposal of these wastes, as well as different methods for toxic elements removal from the CCA-treated wood

  5. SYNERGISTIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR REPLACEMENT OF CCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential synergistic combinations of environmentally-safe biocides as wood preservatives. These wood preservatives could be potential replacements for the heavy-metal based CCA.Didecyldimethylammonium chloride [DDAC] was...

  6. Effect of different extracting solutions on the electrodialytic remediation of CCA-treated wood waste Part I. - Behaviour of Cu and Cr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velizarova, E.; Ribeiro, A. B.; Mateus, E.;

    2004-01-01

    Removal of Cu and Cr from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood waste under batch electrodialytic conditions was studied. The effect of different types of extracting solutions, such as deionised water or aqueous solutions of NaCl, formic acid, oxalic acid, and EDTA, on the magnitude...... for solubilising (re-mobilisation) of Cu but were less efficient for Cr removal (less than 20% removal). Overall, the results obtained show the important role of the proper selection of the type and composition of the extracting solution for the success of subsequent electrodialytic removal of Cu and Cr from CCA...

  7. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COATINGS IN REDUCING DISLODGEABLE ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA-TREATED WOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a 2 year study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of deck sealants in reducing or eliminating potential exposure to arsenic, chromium, and copper from chromated copper arsenate-treated wood used in residential settings, like decks and playsets.

  8. Modeling of electrodialytic and dialytic removal of Cr, Cu and As from CCA-treated wood chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Alexandra; Rodriguez-Maroto, J.M.; Mateus, Eduardo;

    2007-01-01

    A one-dimensional model is developed for simulating the electrodialytic and dialytic treatment of a saturated bed of wood chips containing chromium, copper and arsenic. The movement of Cr, Cu and As is mathematically modeled taking into account the diffusion transport resulting from the concentra...

  9. A comparative study on Cu, Cr and As removal from CCA-treated wood waste by dialytic and electrodialytic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velizarova, Emiliya; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2002-01-01

    with the performance of a pure dialytic experiment (without an external power supply) in order to reveal transport of charged particles induced solely by internal electrochemical potential differences in the system. Oxalic acid proved to be a more suitable pre-treatment solution than deionised water for wood chips...

  10. WASTE MINIMIZATION PRACTICES AT TWO CCA WOOD TREATMENT PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood-treatment plants were assessed for their waste minimization practices. These practices have been reflected in several areas, including facility designs, process controls, and management practices. he objectives were to estimate the amount...

  11. Cleaning-induced arsenic mobilization and chromium oxidation from CCA-wood deck: Potential risk to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, J; de Oliveira, L M; da Silva, E B; Lessl, J M; Wilson, P C; Townsend, T; Ma, L Q

    2015-09-01

    Concern about children's exposure to arsenic (As) from wood treated with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) led to its withdrawal from residential use in 2004. However, due to its effectiveness, millions of American homes still have CCA-wood decks on which children play. This study evaluated the effects of three deck-cleaning methods on formation of dislodgeable As and hexavalent chromium (CrVI) on CCA-wood surfaces and in leachate. Initial wipes from CCA-wood wetted with water showed 3-4 times more dislodgeable As than on dry wood. After cleaning with a bleach solution, 9.8-40.3μg/100cm(2) of CrVI was found on the wood surface, with up to 170μg/L CrVI in the leachate. Depending on the cleaning method, 699-2473mg of As would be released into the environment from cleaning a 18.6-m(2)-deck. Estimated As doses in children aged 1-6 after 1h of playing on a wet CCA-wood deck were 0.25-0.41μg/kg. This is the first study to identify increased dislodgeable As on wet CCA-wood and to evaluate dislodgeable CrVI after bleach application. Our data suggest that As and CrVI in 25-year old CCA-wood still show exposure risks for children and potential for soil contamination. PMID:26004992

  12. Children's exposure to arsenic from CCA-treated wooden decks and playground structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemond, Harold F; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2004-02-01

    CCA-treated wood is widely used in the fabrication of outdoor decks and playground equipment. Because arsenic can be removed from the surface of CCA-treated wood both by physical contact and by leaching, it is important to determine whether children who play on such structures may ingest arsenic in quantities sufficient to be of public health concern. Based on a review of existing studies, it is estimated that arsenic doses in amounts of tens of micrograms per day may be incurred by children having realistic levels of exposure to CCA-treated decks and playground structures. The most important exposure pathway appears to be oral ingestion of arsenic that is first dislodged from the wood by direct hand contact, then transferred to the mouth by children's hand-to-mouth activity. The next most important pathway appears to be dermal absorption of arsenic, while ingestion of soil that has become contaminated by leaching from CCA-treated structures appears to be of lesser importance, except possibly in the case of children with pica. Considerable uncertainty, however, is associated with quantitative estimates of children's arsenic exposure from CCA-treated wood. Priorities for refining estimates of arsenic dose include detailed studies of the hand-to-mouth transfer of arsenic, studies of the dermal and gastrointestinal absorption of dislodgeable arsenic, and studies in which doses of arsenic to children playing in contact with CCA-treated wood are directly determined by measurement of arsenic in their urine, hair, and nails.

  13. Potential arsenic exposures in 25 species of zoo animals living in CCA-wood enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, J; da Silva, E B; de Oliveira, L M; Zhao, Di; Anderson, G; Heard, D; Stuchal, L D; Ma, L Q

    2016-05-01

    Animal enclosures are often constructed from wood treated with the pesticide chromated copper arsenate (CCA), which leaches arsenic (As) into adjacent soil during normal weathering. This study evaluated potential pathways of As exposure in 25 species of zoo animals living in CCA-wood enclosures. We analyzed As speciation in complete animal foods, dislodgeable As from CCA-wood, and As levels in enclosure soils, as well as As levels in biomarkers of 9 species of crocodilians (eggs), 4 species of birds (feathers), 1 primate species (hair), and 1 porcupine species (quills). Elevated soil As in samples from 17 enclosures was observed at 1.0-110mg/kg, and enclosures housing threatened and endangered species had As levels higher than USEPA's risk-based Eco-SSL for birds and mammals of 43 and 46mg/kg. Wipe samples of CCA-wood on which primates sit had dislodgeable As residues of 4.6-111μg/100cm(2), typical of unsealed CCA-wood. Inorganic As doses from animal foods were estimated at 0.22-7.8μg/kg bw/d. Some As levels in bird feathers and crocodilian eggs were higher than prior studies on wild species. However, hair from marmosets had 6.37mg/kg As, 30-fold greater than the reference value, possibly due to their inability to methylate inorganic As. Our data suggested that elevated As in soils and dislodgeable As from CCA-wood could be important sources of As exposure for zoo animals.

  14. RETENTION AND PENETRATION OF CCA IN WOOD OF FIRST AND SECOND ROTATION OF Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Lúcia Agostini Valle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/198050989292This study aimed to evaluate the retention and penetration of copper chrome arsenate (CCA type C as well as some wood properties of two rotations of two natural hybrid of Eucalyptus urophylla S. T. Blake, aiming their use as treated wood. The study was conducted with material from commercial plantations, with 63 months of age. For the wood characterization, the relationship sapwood-heartwood, the basic density and the size of fibers and vessels were evaluated. For the evaluation of treated wood, the penetration and retention of copper chrome arsenate (CCA type C were determined. Four trees per rotation and genetic material were used, which subsequently were split into three logs, in a total of 12 logs for each treatment. The preservative treatment was performed using the full cell process in autoclave using CCA solution with 2% concentration of active ingredients. The treatment process used was effective under the conditions required by the NBR 9480, with retention values ​​higher than the minimum required by the standard, which is 6.5 kg/m3 of CCA per treated wood, and in addition, provided deep penetration and regular condom in sapwood of all timber treated. There are no restrictions on the use of wood from the first and second rotation for preservative treatment, based on the properties evaluated. There was no correlation between the type C CCA retention and wood properties evaluated.

  15. A PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FOR CHILDREN WHO CONTACT CCA-TREATED PLAYSETS AND DECKS USING THE STOCHASTIC HUMAN EXPOSURE AND DOSE SIMULATION (SHEDS) MODEL FOR THE WOOD PRESERVATIVE EXPOSURE SCENARIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a probabilistic exposure and dose assessment on the arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) components of Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for wood preservatives (SHEDS-Wood...

  16. Poisoned Playgrounds: Arsenic in "Pressure-Treated" Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Renee; Walker, Bill

    This study of 180 pressure-treated wood samples shows that treated wood is a much greater source of arsenic exposure for children than arsenic-contaminated drinking water. The report determines that an average 5-year-old, playing less than 2 weeks on a chromated-copper-arsenate-treated (CCA) wood play set would exceed the lifetime cancer risk…

  17. Dimensional stability of heat treated wood floorings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Živković

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat treated wood (HTW is successfully applied for floorings due to its better moisture resistance, increased dimensional stability, and uniform colour change to darker, brownish colours. The aim of this work was to define the hygroscopic range and equilibrium moisture content at ambient conditions of heat treated wood of two wood species – ash and beech. Material was treated at two temperature levels, 190 and 210 °C, and the properties were compared with native wood. The reduction in dimensional changes is expressed by volumetric shrinking and Anti Shrink Efficiency (ASE. Additionally, parquet elements were made out of such HTW, oil-impregnated and waxed, and subsequently tested for water vapour and liquid water permeability. Shrinking gradients of HTW were not reduced in comparison with native beech wood, but the absolute reduction in water uptake resulted in cca 50 % lower EMC values and up to cca 60 % improved ASE values. Surface treatment further improved the hygroscopic properties of HTW.

  18. Durabilidade de madeira de eucalipto citriodora (Corymbia citriodora (Hook. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson tratada com CCA em ambiente amazônico Durability of eucalyptus citriodora wood (Corymbia citriodora (Hook. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson treated with CCA in the Amazon environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique José Borges de Araujo

    2012-03-01

    alternative is the replacement by planted species of fast-growing treated with preservatives. Another advantage of to use species planted to replace the traditional species is environmental, because this will reduce the exploratory pressure on these species. The objective of this study is to evaluate the degree of biological degradation of eucalyptus citriodora wood (Corymbia citriodora (Hook. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA under vacuum and pressure process and exposed in field experiment in Rio Branco-AC. The experiment was implemented in May 2005 with cuttings treated with CCA and not treated. The variables evaluated were: 1 degradation by fungi, 2 degradation by termites, and 3 region or part of the piece affected. After the 3rd evaluation (47 months of test, 100% of the specimens without treated were classified with the maximum degree of degradation and, in contrast, 100% of the specimens treated with CCA, after 60 months of test, were classified with the minimum degree of degradation. The parties of the pieces without treatment with the higher and the lesser degrees of degradation were, respectively, the inferior head and the aerial part above 10 cm of soil. The degradation caused by fungi was slightly lower than that of termites. The field experiment has shown that is technically feasible the use of eucalyptus wood to replace the traditional species of the Amazon.

  19. Regressional modeling of electrodialytic removal of Cu, Cr and As from CCA treated timber waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, E.E.; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Mateus, Eduardo;

    2005-01-01

    Waste of wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is expected to increase in volume over the next decades. Alternative disposal options to landfilling are becoming more attractive to study, especially those that promote re-use. The authors have studied and modeled the electrodialytic (ED......) removal of Cu, Cr and As from CCA treated timber waste. The method uses a low-level direct current as the cleaning agent, combining the electrokinetic movement of ions in the matrix with the principle of electrodialysis. The technique was tested in eight experiments using a laboratory cell on sawdust...... of out-of-service CCA treated Pinus pinaster Ait. poles. The experiments differ because the sawdust was saturated with different assisting agents and different percentages of them. In order to select the best assisting agent in jointly removing the three metals and subsequently the best percentage...

  20. In vitro gastrointestinal bioavailability of arsenic in soils collected near CCA-treated utility poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouschat, Priscilla; Zagury, Gerald J

    2006-07-01

    Because of the potentially high arsenic concentrations found in soils immediately adjacent to chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood structures and utility poles, CCA-contaminated soil ingestion may be a significant exposure route to arsenic for children. Therefore, a strong need exists to provide accurate data on oral relative bioavailability (RBA) of arsenic (in vivo or in vitro) in field-collected CCA-contaminated soils. The objectives of this study were (1) to assess arsenic bioaccessibility in contaminated soils collected near in-service CCA-treated utility poles, (2) to determine the influence of soil properties and arsenic fractionation on arsenic bioaccessibility, and (3) to estimate an average daily arsenic intake from incidental soil ingestion. Arsenic bioaccessibility (in vitro gastrointestinal (IVG) method) was determined on surface soil samples collected immediately adjacent to 12 CCA-treated utility poles after 18 months of service. Bioaccessible arsenic was also determined in 3 certified reference materials. Total arsenic concentrations in soils (RBA reported by Casteel et al. (2003) in soil near CCA-treated utility poles. Bioaccessible arsenic was positively correlated with total organic carbon content (r2 = 0.36, p < 0.05) and with water-soluble arsenic (2 = 0.51, p < 0.01), and was negatively correlated with clay content (r2 = 0.43, p < 0.05). Using conservative exposure parameters, the mean daily arsenic intake from incidental ingestion of contaminated soil near CCA-treated utility poles was 0.18 +/- 0.09 microg As kg(-1) d(-1). This arsenic intake appeared negligible compared to the daily intake of inorganic arsenic from water and food ingestion for children. PMID:16856753

  1. Evaluation of the wood CCA preservative treatment process of Eucalyptus (Eucaliptus ssp) by X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil produces around 1,2 mi m3 of treated wood to meet the annual demand of railway, electric, rural and construction sectors. The treated woods used for poles, sleepers, fence posts and plywoods should be according to Brazilian norms requirements. The most used wood species are eucalyptus (Eucaliptus ssp)and pine (Pinus ssp). The most wood preservative products used in Brazil are CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate) and CCB (Copper Chromium and Boron Salt). The analytical methods, such as Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS) and Plasma Inductively Coupled Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICPOES) have been used for the evaluation of those treatment processes. In this work, the sapwood sample was obtained from eucalyptus trees (Eucaliptus ssp) obtained from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, cut plantation areas. Sawdust sapwood sample was grounded and submitted to different additions of CCA solutions (0.2, 0.7, 1.3, 2.3, 3.6, 6.3, 11.7and17.9 kg m-3). Power and pressed pellets sapwood samples, analyzed by EDXRFS, showed a good linear relation (r2>0.99) between the characteristic intensity fluorescent lines (CuΚα, CrΚαand AsΚΒ) and their concentration, also, showed adequate sensitivity (LQ -1) for Cu, Cr and As determination in treated woods. Cu, Cr and As were determined in powdered sawdust samples by FAA spectrometry, using the AWPA A11-93 standard method; the relation between the CCA retention and their concentration showed a lower linear relation than EDXRFS; the FAAS spreading result could be attributed to laboratorial CCA addition process. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the wood CCA preservative treatment process of Eucalyptus (Eucaliptus ssp) by X-ray fluorescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Junior, Sergio Matias, E-mail: matias@ipt.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Salvador, Vera Lucia Ribeiro; Sato, Ivone Mulako, E-mail: imsato@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Brazil produces around 1,2 mi m{sup 3} of treated wood to meet the annual demand of railway, electric, rural and construction sectors. The treated woods used for poles, sleepers, fence posts and plywoods should be according to Brazilian norms requirements. The most used wood species are eucalyptus (Eucaliptus ssp)and pine (Pinus ssp). The most wood preservative products used in Brazil are CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate) and CCB (Copper Chromium and Boron Salt). The analytical methods, such as Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS) and Plasma Inductively Coupled Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICPOES) have been used for the evaluation of those treatment processes. In this work, the sapwood sample was obtained from eucalyptus trees (Eucaliptus ssp) obtained from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, cut plantation areas. Sawdust sapwood sample was grounded and submitted to different additions of CCA solutions (0.2, 0.7, 1.3, 2.3, 3.6, 6.3, 11.7and17.9 kg m{sup -3}). Power and pressed pellets sapwood samples, analyzed by EDXRFS, showed a good linear relation (r{sup 2}>0.99) between the characteristic intensity fluorescent lines (CuΚα, CrΚαand AsΚΒ) and their concentration, also, showed adequate sensitivity (LQ < 5mgkg{sup -1}) for Cu, Cr and As determination in treated woods. Cu, Cr and As were determined in powdered sawdust samples by FAA spectrometry, using the AWPA A11-93 standard method; the relation between the CCA retention and their concentration showed a lower linear relation than EDXRFS; the FAAS spreading result could be attributed to laboratorial CCA addition process. (author)

  3. Biomonitoring for chromium and arsenic in timber treatment plant workers exposed to CCA wood Preservatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocker, J; Morton, J; Warren, N; Wheeler, J P; Garrod, A N I

    2006-07-01

    This study reports a survey of occupational exposure to copper chrome arsenic (CCA) based wood preservatives during vacuum pressure timber impregnation. The survey involved biological monitoring based on analysis of chromium and arsenic in urine samples collected from UK workers. The aim of the study was to determine the extent of occupational exposure to arsenic and chromium in the UK timber treatment industry. The objectives were to collect and analyse urine samples from as many workers as possible, where CCA wood preservatives might be used, at 6 monthly intervals for 2 years. In addition, to investigate day-to-day variations in urinary excretion of chrome and arsenic by collecting and analysing three samples a week for 3 weeks in subsets of workers and controls (people not occupationally exposed). All urine samples were analysed for chromium and inorganic arsenic. To investigate any residual interference every sample was accompanied by a short questionnaire about recent consumption of seafood and smoking. The analytical methods for arsenic used a hydride generation technique to reduce interference from dietary sources of arsenic and also a technique that would measure total arsenic concentration in urine. The main findings show that workers exposed to CCA wood preservatives have concentrations of inorganic arsenic and chromium in urine that are significantly higher than those from non-occupationally exposed people but below biological monitoring guidance values that would indicate inhalation exposure at UK occupational exposure limits for chromium and arsenic. The effects of consumption of seafood on urinary arsenic were not significant using the hydride generation method for inorganic arsenic but were significant if 'total' arsenic was measured. The 'total' arsenic method could not distinguish CCA workers from controls and is clearly unsuitable for assessment of occupational exposure to arsenic. There was a significant increase in the urinary concentration of

  4. Field-scale leaching of arsenic, chromium and copper from weathered treated wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, A. Rasem, E-mail: hasan@arij.or [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, 1251 Memorial Dr., Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Hu Ligang [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, University Park, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Solo-Gabriele, Helena M., E-mail: hmsolo@miami.ed [Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, 1251 Memorial Dr., Coral Gables, FL 33124 (United States); Fieber, Lynne [Division of Marine Biology and Fisheries, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149-1098 (United States); Cai Yong [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, University Park, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, University Park, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Townsend, Timothy G. [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, 217 A.P. Black Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-6450 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Earlier studies documented the loss of wood preservatives from new wood. The objective of this study was to evaluate losses from weathered treated wood under field conditions by collecting rainfall leachate from 5 different wood types, all with a surface area of 0.21 m{sup 2}. Wood samples included weathered chromate copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood at low (2.7 kg/m{sup 3}), medium (4.8 kg/m{sup 3}) and high (35.4 kg/m{sup 3}) retention levels, new alkaline copper quat (ACQ) treated wood (1.1 kg/m{sup 3} as CuO) and new untreated wood. Arsenic was found to leach at a higher rate (100 mg in 1 year for low retention) than chromium and copper (<40 mg) in all CCA-treated wood samples. Copper leached at the highest rate from the ACQ sample (670 mg). Overall results suggest that metals' leaching is a continuous process driven by rainfall, and that the mechanism of release from the wood matrix changes as wood weathers. - Metals leaching rates on a percent basis increase as treated wood weathers, although the mass released decreases.

  5. Pilot-scale investigation of the robustness and efficiency of a copper-based treated wood wastes recycling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coudert, Lucie [INRS-ETE (Canada); Blais, Jean-François, E-mail: blaisjf@ete.inrs.ca [INRS-ETE (Canada); Mercier, Guy [INRS-ETE (Canada); Cooper, Paul [University of Toronto (Canada); Gastonguay, Louis [IREQ (Canada); Morris, Paul [FPInnovations (Canada); Janin, Amélie; Reynier, Nicolas [INRS-ETE (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A leaching process was studied for metals removal from CCA-treated wood wastes. • This decontamination process was studied at pilot scale (130-L reactor). • Removals up to 98% of As, 88% of Cr, and 96% of Cu were obtained from wood wastes. • The produced leachates can be treated by chemical precipitation. -- Abstract: The disposal of metal-bearing treated wood wastes is becoming an environmental challenge. An efficient recycling process based on sulfuric acid leaching has been developed to remove metals from copper-based treated wood chips (0 < x < 12 mm). The present study explored the performance and the robustness of this technology in removing metals from copper-based treated wood wastes at a pilot plant scale (130-L reactor tank). After 3× 2 h leaching steps followed by 3× 7 min rinsing steps, up to 97.5% of As, 87.9% of Cr, and 96.1% of Cu were removed from CCA-treated wood wastes with different initial metal loading (>7.3 kg m{sup −3}) and more than 94.5% of Cu was removed from ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood. The treatment of effluents by precipitation–coagulation was highly efficient; allowing removals more than 93% for the As, Cr, and Cu contained in the effluent. The economic analysis included operating costs, indirect costs and revenues related to remediated wood sales. The economic analysis concluded that CCA-treated wood wastes remediation can lead to a benefit of 53.7 US$ t{sup −1} or a cost of 35.5 US$ t{sup −1} and that ACQ-, CA- and MCQ-treated wood wastes recycling led to benefits ranging from 9.3 to 21.2 US$ t{sup −1}.

  6. CCA transport in soil from treated-timber posts: pattern dynamics from the local to regional scale

    OpenAIRE

    Clothier, B.E.; Green, S. R.; Vogeler, I.; M. M. Greven; Agnew, R.; C. W. van den Dijssel; Neal, S; Robinson, B H; Davidson, P.

    2006-01-01

    Winegrape growing in many parts of the world, including Marlborough, New Zealand, uses treated-timber posts to act as supports for the grapevine's canopy. At a density of 580 posts per hectare, the H4-process treated supports result in an areal loading of CCA of: Copper (12 kg-Cu ha−1), Chromium (21 kg-Cr ha−1) and Arsenic (17 kg-As ha−1). Arsenic is the most mobile and toxic of the CCA-tre...

  7. Online sorting of recovered wood waste by automated XRF-technology. Part I: detection of preservative-treated wood waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasem Hasan, A; Schindler, John; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Townsend, Timothy G

    2011-04-01

    Waste wood is frequently contaminated with wood treatment preservatives including chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and alkaline copper quat (ACQ), both of which contain metals which contaminate recycled wood products. The objective of this research was to propose a design for online automated identification of As-based and Cu-based treated wood within the recovered wood waste stream utilizing an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) system, and to evaluate the detection parameters of such system. A full-scale detection unit was used for experimentation. Two main parameters (operational threshold (OT) and measurement time) were evaluated to optimize detection efficiencies. OTs of targeted metals, As and Cu, in wood were reduced to 0.02 and 0.05, respectively. The optimum minimum measurement time of 500 ms resulted in 98%, 91%, and 97% diversion of the As, Cu and Cr mass originally contained in wood, respectively. Comparisons with other detection methods show that XRF technology can potentially fulfill the need for cost-effective processing at large facilities (>30 tons per day) which require the removal of As-based preservatives from their wood waste stream. PMID:21186117

  8. BIOAVAILABILITY OF ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FROM CCA CONTAMINATED SOILS AND DUSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is estimated that 70% of single family homes have pressure-treated wood decks or porches and 14% of playground equipment uses pressure-treated wood. This popular form of wood contains chromated copper arsenate (CCA), which is an antimicrobial pesticide and is currently underg...

  9. BIOAVAILABILITY OF ARSENIC, CHROMIUM, AND COPPER FOR CCA CONTAMINATED SOILS AND DUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is estimated that 70% of single family homes have pressure-treated wood decks or porches and 14% of playground equipment uses pressure-treated wood. This popular form of wood contains chromated copper arsenate (CCA), which is an antimicrobial pesticide and is currently underg...

  10. METAL CORROSION IN WATERBORNE PRESERVATIVE- TREATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisdianto Sugiyanto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The rigidity and firmness of wooden construction and furniture those are joined by metal screws depend on corrosion rate of these metals. This paper examines the weight-loss percentage of metal screws used in wood samples that have been treated with water-borne preser vative (i.e.3% borax boric acid and 3% diffusol CB and concurrently investigates the effect of brake fluid on preventing metal corrosion. Wood samples tested included three acacia and one eucalypts wood species which were grouped into sapwood and heartwood containing samples. Wood samples fastened with metal screws were freely suspended in glass jars that contained 25 ml of sulphuric acid (H2SO4 to keep the humidity rate above 90%. After 12 months, the metal screws lost their weight due to the corrosion brought about by the related factors either in separate individual or in combination, which comprised brake and fluid-dipping , wood species, wood portion (sapwood and heartwood, kinds of preser vatives used. Corrosion rates of metal screws fastened in eucalypts wood sample as indicated by the screw-weight loss (i.e. 5.8% was more severe than that fastened in acacia wood. Furthermore, corrosion rate of metal screws as fixed firmly in sapwood sample proceeded faster than that in heartwood. This might be caused by the higher moisture content in sapwood. On the other hand, corrosion rate of the screws as fastened in waterborne-preser vative-treated wood samples was greater than that in non-preser ved wood due to electrokinetic characteristics and ionic potential exhibited by the preser vative thereby intensif ying the screw-corrosion process. Meanwhile, less severe corrosion was obser ved and recorded on the screws pre-dipped in brake fluid compared to those on the non-dipped screws

  11. Weathering of copper-amine treated wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the effect of ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation and water spray on color, contact angle and surface chemistry of treated wood was studied. Southern pine sapwood (Pinus Elliottii.Engelm.) treated with copper ethanolamine (Cu-MEA) was subjected to artificially accelerated weathering with a QUV Weathering Tester. The compositional changes and the surface properties of the weathered samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, color and contact angle measurements. FTIR indicated that MEA treatment was not found to slow down wood weathering. FTIR spectrum of MEA-treated sample was similar to that of the untreated SP. However, the Cu-MEA treatment retarded the surface lignin degradation during weathering. The main changes in FTIR spectrum of Cu-MEA treatment took place at 915, 1510, and 1595 cm-1. The intensity of the bands at 1510 and 1595 cm-1 increased with the Cu-MEA treatment. Both untreated and MEA-treated exhibited higher ΔE than the Cu-MEA treated samples, indicating that MEA treatment did not retard color changes. However, ΔE decreased with increasing copper concentration, suggesting a positive contribution of Cu-EA to wood color stability. The contact angle of untreated and MEA-treated samples changed rapidly, and dropped from 75 ± 5o to 0o after artificial weathering up to 600 h. Treatment with Cu-MEA slowed down the decreasing in contact angle. As the copper concentration increases, the rate of change in contact angle decreases.

  12. Effect of post treatment temperature and humidity conditions on fixation performance of CCA-C treated red pine and southern pine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Rates of fixation in chromated copper arsenate (CCA-C) treated red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) and southern pine (Pinus spp) sapwood specimens using retention of 1.5, 2.0, 6.4 kg·m-3 are compared at temperature (T) ranging from 70 ℃ to 50 ℃ and 5 different relative humidity (RH) conditions. The samples were investigated using the expressate method to follow chromium fixation. Red pine fixes faster than southern pine under all 11 post treatment schedules. The fixation rates for both species are not significantly different while the blocks were fixed under 6 fixation/drying schedules that differed only in the order of T/RH conditions applied. The rate of fixation of all samples in any fixation stage were reduced when the blocks were fixed under lower humidity conditions in spite of no change in chamber temperature. Some of this influence can be attributed to the effect of humidity on heat transfer into the wood and cooling of the wood surface.

  13. Accumulation of copper, chromium, and arsenic in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from laboratory and field exposures to wood treated with chromated copper arsenate type C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler-Ivanbrook, L.; Breslin, V.T. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to examine the uptake of Cu, Cr, and As leached from southern yellow pine (SYP) treated with chromated copper arsenate type C (CCA-C), as well as effects on mortality and growth, in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Mussels were exposed to CCA-C-treated wood at a preservative retention of 40 kg/m{sup 3} and control (nontreated) SYP in laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments for 9 months in 1994 and 3 months in 1995. Mussels were sampled at regular intervals to evaluate possible short- and long-term exposure effects., Individual mussels were measured to determine the length, dry weight, and condition index. Mussel tissues were than analyzed for Cu, Cr, and As. Results showed few significant differences in condition index, dry weight, and length between CCA-C-exposed and control mussels. In addition, no statistically significant differences in mortality were found between the mussels exposed to CCA-C-treated and nontreated SYP in the laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments. Significant differences in Cu, As, and Cr contents in mussel tissues between treatments were few, and generally cannot be attributed to exposure to CCA-C-treated SYP. The lack of Cu, Cr, and As uptake from CCA-C-treated SYP was attributed to the low, although continuous, rate of release of these elements from CCA-C-treated wood and to the experimental design, which allowed continuous flushing, prohibiting the accumulation of these elements in the water surrounding the mussels.

  14. CCA Newsletters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding Financial Assistance Adisen Bauer Keegan Lacey Livie Rosemary Sydney One-Sheet Overviews Webinars Public Awareness Acceptance ... new? - CCA welcomes new staff - how to / dental health - how to / living with a disabled sibling - harley ...

  15. CCA transport in soil from treated-timber posts: pattern dynamics from the local to regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Clothier

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Winegrape growing in many parts of the world, including Marlborough, New Zealand, uses treated-timber posts to act as supports for the grapevine's canopy. At a density of 580 posts per hectare, the H4-process treated supports result in an areal loading of CCA of: Copper (12 kg-Cu ha−1, Chromium (21 kg-Cr ha−1 and Arsenic (17 kg-As ha−1. Arsenic is the most mobile and toxic of the CCA-treatment cocktail. We describe experiments which indicate that about 4–6 mg-As month−1 post−1 is released from the subterranean part of the post. We have used SPASMO (Soil Plant Atmosphere System Model to predict post-to-soil leakage, as well as the pattern dynamics of leaching and exchange around the post. Locally the pattern dynamics of transport and fate are controlled by the soil's chemical characteristics and the prevailing weather. Over its 20-year lifetime, the concentration of arsenic, both that adsorbed on the soil and in the soil solution, exceeds guideline values for soils (100 mg-As kg−1 and drinking water (10 μg-As L−1. Under a regime of 5% annual replacement of posts, the spatially averaged concentration of arsenic leaching through the soil is predicted to rise to 1.25 to 1.7 times the drinking water standard, depending only slightly on the soil type. The steady value is primarily controlled by the arsenic-release rate from the post. These steady values were used in a simple hydrogeological model of the major Marlborough aquifer systems to determine whether the subterranean flow of water could dilute the descending plumes of arsenic coming from above. Except for the sluggish aquifers of the southern valleys in Marlborough, most of the aquifer systems seem capable of diluting the leachate to between one tenth and one twentieth of the drinking water standard. The upscaling of our modelling of the local pattern dynamics spanned six orders of spatial

  16. CCA transport in soil from treated-timber posts: pattern dynamics from the local to regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, B. E.; Green, S. R.; Vogeler, I.; Greven, M. M.; Agnew, R.; van den Dijssel, C. W.; Neal, S.; Robinson, B. H.; Davidson, P.

    2006-08-01

    Winegrape growing in many parts of the world, including Marlborough, New Zealand, uses treated-timber posts to act as supports for the grapevine's canopy. At a density of 580 posts per hectare, the H4-process treated supports result in an areal loading of CCA of: Copper (12 kg-Cu ha-1), Chromium (21 kg-Cr ha-1) and Arsenic (17 kg-As ha-1). Arsenic is the most mobile and toxic of the CCA-treatment cocktail. We describe experiments which indicate that about 4-6 mg-As month-1 post-1 is released from the subterranean part of the post. We have used SPASMO (Soil Plant Atmosphere System Model) to predict post-to-soil leakage, as well as the pattern dynamics of leaching and exchange around the post. Locally the pattern dynamics of transport and fate are controlled by the soil's chemical characteristics and the prevailing weather. Over its 20-year lifetime, the concentration of arsenic, both that adsorbed on the soil and in the soil solution, exceeds guideline values for soils (100 mg-As kg-1) and drinking water (10 μg-As L-1). Under a regime of 5% annual replacement of posts, the spatially averaged concentration of arsenic leaching through the soil is predicted to rise to 1.25 to 1.7 times the drinking water standard, depending only slightly on the soil type. The steady value is primarily controlled by the arsenic-release rate from the post. These steady values were used in a simple hydrogeological model of the major Marlborough aquifer systems to determine whether the subterranean flow of water could dilute the descending plumes of arsenic coming from above. Except for the sluggish aquifers of the southern valleys in Marlborough, most of the aquifer systems seem capable of diluting the leachate to between one tenth and one twentieth of the drinking water standard. The upscaling of our modelling of the local pattern dynamics spanned six orders of spatial magnitude, and four orders of time dimension.

  17. Weathering properties of wood species treated with different coating applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Ozgenc

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the discoloration of European beech (Fagus sylvatica and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris specimens treated with different chemicals and surface coated with different UV absorbers before being subjected to artificial weathering. The results showed that the influence of coatings containing UV absorbers (UV screeners micronized TiO2 and UVA of hydroxyphenyl-s-triazine types were similar to each other. The UV screener TiO2 led to the least discoloration of the coated wood surface, closely followed by the UVA of hydroxyphenyl-s-triazines (HPT. The color stability was determined to be better for pine wood treated with micronized copper preservative coated with UV absorber, in comparison to when it was only coated with UV absorbers and then subjected to weathering. Microscopic observation revealed that the clear-coats penetration behavior was different in wood preservative-treated and in untreated wood of Scots pine, which has various extractives. However, the color stability and coating penetration was nearly the same in beech wood treated with preservatives and in untreated beech wood. We provide an explanation for why these effects occurred and discuss the implications of our findings for the development of weather-resistant wood materials.

  18. Biocide leaching from CBA treated wood — A mechanistic interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treated wood is frequently used for construction. However, there is a need to ensure that biocides used for the treatment are not a threat for people or environment. The paper focused on Pinus sylvestris treated with copper–boron–azole (CBA), containing tebuconazole as organic biocide and monoethanolamine (Mea). This study investigates chemical mechanisms of fixation and mobilisation involved in the leaching process of the used inorganic and organic biocides in CBA. A pH dependent leaching test was performed, followed by a set of complementary analysis methods in order to identify and quantify the species released from wood. The main findings of this study are: -Organic compounds are released from untreated and treated wood; the quantity of released total organic carbon, carboxylic and phenolic functions increasing with the pH. -Nitrogen containing compounds, i.e. mainly Mea and its reaction products with extractives, are released in important quantities from CBA treated wood, especially at low pH. -The release of copper is the result of competitive reactions: fixation via complexation reactions and complexation with extractives in the liquid phase. The specific pH dependency of Cu leaching is explained by the competition of ligands for protonation and complexation. -Tebuconazole is released to a lesser extent relative to its initial content. Its fixation on solid wood structure seems to be influenced by pH, suggesting interactions with -OH groups on wood. Boron release appears to be pH independent and very high. This confirms its weak fixation on wood and also no or weak interaction with the extractives. - Highlights: ► A pH dependent leaching mechanism for CBA treated wood is described. ► The fixation and mobilisation of inorganic and organic biocides was investigated. ► Extractives' quantity and nature depend on pH. ► Competition of ligands for protonation and complexation explains Cu behaviour. ► Tebuconazole seems to interact with -OH groups on

  19. Creep of Chinese Fir Wood Treated by Different Reagents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Feng-lian; Zhao Guang-jie; Lü Wen-hua

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of different reagents on changes of the crystalline region and amorphous region(Matrix) in wood cell walls, the creep behavior of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) wood treated with dimethyl sulfoxide(DMSO) and diethyl amine, sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfoxide mixture (DEA-SO2-DMSO), and the untreated wood at oven-dried,air-dry and water-saturated states during adsorption and desorption processes were all examined in air or in water. The measurements were carried out at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. The load is constant with 62 g or 0.607 6 N. The results obtained were as follows: 1) The instantaneous compliance Jo and the creep compliance J of specimens decrystallized with DEA-SO2-DMSO solution were bigger than those of DMSO swollen wood, and the latter was still much bigger than those of untreated wood. 2) For untreated wood, Jo and J increased with equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood, but there was not apparent correlation between wood EMC and the relative compliance. 3) Specimens treated with DMSO and DEA-SO2-DMSO mixture were recrystallized after immersion in water, and the degree of recrystallization of the former was larger. 4) For oven-dried specimens, the creep compliances in water were bigger than those in air. But for fiber-saturated and water-saturated specimens they were nearly equivalent to each other.

  20. Biological Durability of Oil Heat Treated Alder Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lacić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents preliminary results of the biological durability of oil heat treated (OHT alder wood (Alnus glutinosa against pure cultures of rot fungi (Postia placenta and Trametes versicolor in lab conditions. The modification was performed by heating of specimens immersed in soya oil. There were four heating regimes of different duration (6 and 10 hours at final temperature of 180 and 200 ºC. The increase in mass (MI caused by modification and mass loss of wood caused by fungal decay (ML were determined. In addition, the natural durability of alder wood was determined and compared to the natural durability of beech wood as the reference wood species. After modification of alder wood at 200 °C, MI was lower than after treatment at 180 °C. MI was also lower after 10 hours of treatment than after 6 hours of treatment. The results showed significantly increased biological durability of modified alder wood against both tested fungi. The effect of OHT on increasing the biological durability of alder wood was higher against the fungus P. placenta. It seems that the fungus T. versicolor favours the remained oil after modification causing higher mass loss. The results showed that alder wood, thermally modified in soya oil by testing regimens, is not suitable for applications in use classes 3-5.

  1. Characteristics of heat-treated Turkish pine and fir wood after ThermoWood processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin

    2010-11-01

    The Finnish wood heat treatment technology ThermoWood, was recently introduced to Turkey. Data about the mechanical and physical properties of Turkish wood species are important for industry and academia. In this study two industrially important Turkish wood species, pine (Pinus nigraArnold.) and fir (Abies bornmülleriana Matf.) were heat-treated using the ThermoWood process. Pine and fir samples were thermally modified for 2 hr at 212 and 190 degrees C, respectively. The modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity in bending (MOE), impact bending strength (IBS), and compression strength (CS), in addition to swelling (Sw) and shrinkage (Sh) of thermally-modified wood were examined. The results indicate that the heat treatment method clearly decreased the MOR, MOE and lBS of pine and fir. However, a small increase was observed for CS values of heat treated wood species. The most affected mechanical properties were MOR and lBS for both pine and fir. The reduction in MOE was smaller than that in MOR and lBS. Volumetric shrinkage and swelling of these species were also improved by approximately half. In Addition, the changes in the mechanical and physical properties studied in pine were larger than that of fir.

  2. WOOD-WATER RELATIONSHIPS AND BIOLOGICAL DURABILITY OF HEAT-TREATED TAURUS FIR WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Cihad BAL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Taurus Fir (Abies cilicica wood was treated with hot air at temperatures of 160, 190 and 220°C for 2h durations. After heat treatment, some physical properties and wood-water relationships were evaluated, such as mass loss, density, tangential swelling, radial swelling, volumetric swelling, swelling anisotropy, and fiber saturation point. In addition, the biological durability of Taurus Fir wood was tested in the laboratory with the soil contact test, and determined weight loss. The relationships between mass loss and some of the tested properties were determined using regression analysis. The results showed that heat treatment at 220°C had significant effects on the physical properties and the biological durability of Taurus Fir wood. Further, it was determined that there was a linear-negative correlation between weight loss and mass loss.

  3. DECAY RESISTANCE OF TREATED WOOD WITH FUNCTIONALISED COMMERCIAL SILICONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal C. Ghosh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Three commercial silicone emulsions with different functional groups i.e., quat-silicone micro-emulsion (<40 nm particle size, amino-silicone macro-emulsion (110 nm, and silicone macro-emulsion with alkyl-modified side groups (740 nm were used to protect wood samples against fungal decay. The addition of the emulsions to an agar growth medium revealed that all three silicone formulations inhibited the growth of Coniophora puteana and Trametes versicolor compared to the controls without silicone. Wood mini-blocks of pine sapwood and beech wood were treated with 2%, 5%, 10%, and 15% concentration of silicone emulsions and tested for their resistance against basidiomycete decay. Quat-silicone and amino-silicone emulsions at higher concentrations imparted resistance of wood to both types of basidiomycetes, while the alkyl-modified silicone formulation did not enhance the resistance. In a soft rot test according to ENV 807, wood treated with an amino-sililcone emulsion showed the lowest weight loss and loss of dynamic MOE. Quat-silicone micro-emulsion had a lower effect, while the alkyl-modified silicone emulsion did not cause reduction in weight and strength loss compared to the untreated controls. The increased resistance against soft rot might be attributed to a lag in fungal colonization rather than to a sustained effect of protection.

  4. Influence of impregnation method on metal retention of CCB-treated wood in slow pyrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► CCB-treated wood using dipping method contains more metals (Cu, Cr, B) than CCB-treated wood using pressure method. ► Cu, Cr, B contained in CCB-treated wood catalyze pyrolysis reaction of wood. ► This phenomenon is more pronounced for dipping CCB-treated wood than for pressure treated wood. ► The charcoal obtained by pyrolysis of CCB-treated wood using both methods is higher than the value obtained from untreated wood. ► More than 45% of Cu, Cr and B are captured in charcoal of CCB-treated wood. - Abstract: In the present work, the effects of copper, chromium and boron on the pyrolysis of wood and their distribution in the pyrolysis products were investigated. For this, the wood has been impregnated with chromium–copper–boron (CCB). In addition, to describe the effects of impregnation method, vacuum-pressure and dipping methods were also conducted. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results show that an increase in the final residue and decrease in degradation temperature on both methods of treated wood compared to untreated wood. Then, slow pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a laboratory reactor. The mass balance of pyrolysis products is confirmed by TGA. Furthermore, the concentration of metals in the final residue is measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The results show that the final residue contains more than 45% of the initial amount of metal present in the treated wood. The phenomenon is more pronounced with vacuum-pressure treated wood. The heating values of pyrolysis products were analyzed. The heating value of charcoal obtained from treated and untreated wood is approximately same. But the heating value of tar from untreated wood is higher than the heating value of the tar from treated wood.

  5. 76 FR 13616 - Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... AGENCY Picayune Wood Treating Site Picayune, Pearl River County, MS; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Picayune Wood Treating Site located in Picayune, Pearl River County, Mississippi for publication. DATES..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2011-0201 or Site name Picayune Wood Treating Superfund Site...

  6. Impact of fixation/drying conditions on fixation rate, leachability and bioefficacy in CCA-C treated red pine and southern pine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Red pine (Pinus resinosia Ait) and southern pine (Pinus spp.) sapwood blocks were pressure treated with CCA-C at retention of 6.4, 2.0, 1.5 kg?m-3 followed by fixation using 11 post-treatment schedules ranging from 50-70 °C and 5 different relative humidity conditions. The effect of these post-treatment schedules on fixation rate, chemical leachability and decay resistant once were evaluated to better understand the effects of fixation/drying conditions on leachability and biodeterioration. Southern pine blocks fixes slightly slower than red pine. Fixation of CCA at high temperature high humidity, essential initially fixation at high humidity for fixation/drying schedules, resulted in lower leaching of chromium and arsenic elements than high temperature low humidity or initially fixation at the high temperature low humidity conditions. Copper leaching was indicated no significant difference under 11 fixation/drying conditions for both species. Weight losses for southern pine by Chaetomium globosum was lower than red pine by Gloeophyllom trabeum. There were some different capacities of decay resistance for both species under those post treatment conditions.

  7. High-density polyethylene-based composites with pressure-treated wood fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Shang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE-based composites with alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ- and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ-treated wood fibers were manufactured through injection molding. The mechanical properties, water absorption, and biological resistance properties of the fabricated composites with different coupling treatments were investigated. Composites with ACQ- and MCQ-treated wood had mechanical properties comparable with those made of untreated wood. The different coupling agents worked well for the treated wood materials. Similar water absorption behaviors were observed for the HDPE composites containing treated wood and those containing untreated wood. The results of the termite test showed that the composites containing untreated wood had slightly more weight loss. The decay test revealed that the composites containing treated wood had less decay fungal growth on the surfaces, compared with samples from untreated wood, indicating enhanced decay resistance for the composites from the treated material. The stable mechanical properties and improved biological performances of the composites containing treated wood demonstrated the feasibility of making wood-plastic composites with pressure-treated wood materials, and thus offered a practical way to recycle treated wood into value-added composites.

  8. Characterization of the surface and the interphase of PVC-copper amine-treated wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haihong; Kamdem, D. Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Contact angles and surface energy of wood, as well as interfacial shear strength between wood and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) were investigated and used to monitor the modifications generated on the surfaces of wood treated with a copper ethanolamine solution. An increase in surface energy of wood after treatments promotes wetting of PVC on wood surfaces. Improved interfacial shear strength between treated wood and PVC matrix can be attributed to the formation of a stronger wood-PVC interphase. This suggests that treatment may be used to improve the adhesion between wood surface and PVC in the formulation of wood fiber composites to yield products with enhanced mechanical properties and better biological and physical performance against decay and insect destroying wood.

  9. Stress Relaxation of Chemically Treated Wood during Processes of Temperature Elevation and Decline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Man-hua; Zhao Guang-jie

    2005-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of drying on structural changes of DMSO swell treated and DEA-SO2-DMSO decrystallization treated Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolate) wood, the stress relaxation of treated oven-dry specimens during the processes of temperature elevation and reduction and that of treated wet specimens at constant temperature were determined. A stress decrease process and a stress increase process were observed in all stress ratio curves of wood during the processes of decreasing temperature. Untreated wood, during the process of temperature reduction under higher initial temperature conditions and during the process of temperature elevation, has a larger stress decrease than treated woods. In a wet state this trend is reversed. It indicated that the drying set made treated woods have a smaller increase in fluidity of wood constituents with increasing temperature. Some bonding between decrystallization reagents and wood molecules may occur.

  10. Sorption Properties of Steam Treated Wood and Plant Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Jensen, Signe Kamp; Jones, Dennis;

    2003-01-01

    mechanism may be the gradual filling of such micropores by lignin made to flow by further steam treatment. As a result of these counteractive mechanisms, sorption at high RH in steam treated fibres was seen to first grow, then drop and ultimately settle at a level corresponding to pure sorption at primary...... sorption sites. The annual plant fibres proved less susceptible than wood fibres to chemical breakdown from steam treatment. The component most susceptible to chemical breakdown was hemicellulose. Beech, wheat and hemp showed only a modest decrease of cellulose content, even at high temperatures, whereas...

  11. Comparing the VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Scots pine wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Anne-Marja; Pasanen, Pertti; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air-dried Scots pine wood and from heat-treated Scots pine wood were compared with GC-MS analysis. Air-dried wood blocks released about 8 times more total VOCs than heat-treated (24 h at 230°C) ones. Terpenes were clearly the main compound group in the air-dried wood samples, whereas aldehydes and carboxylic acids and their esters dominated in the heat-treated wood samples. Only 14 compounds out of 41 identified individual compounds were found in both wood samples indicating considerable changes in VOC emission profile during heat-treatment process. Of individual compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and hexanal were the most abundant ones in the air-dried wood. By contrast, in the heat-treated wood 2-furancarboxaldehyde, acetic acid and 2-propanone were the major compounds of VOC emission. Current emission results reveal that significant chemical changes have occurred, and volatile monoterpenes and other low-molecular-weight compounds have evaporated from the wood during the heat-treatment process when compared to air-dried wood. Major chemical changes detected in VOC emissions are explained by the thermal degradation and oxidation of main constituents in wood. The results suggest that if heat-treated wood is used in interior carpentry, emissions of monoterpenes are reduced compared to air-dried wood, but some irritating compounds might be released into indoor air.

  12. INFLUENCE OF STEAM PRESSURE ON CHEMICAL CHANGES OF HEAT-TREATED MONGOLIAN PINE WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Ding

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Properties of heat-treated wood have been studied extensively in recent years. However, study on wood that has been treated in pressurized steam is limited, as most wood heat treatments are carried out in atmospheric steam. The main purpose of this study was to explore the influence of steam pressure on chemical changes of heat-treated wood. Wet chemical analysis, elemental analysis, and FTIR analysis were performed to investigate the changes of cell wall components of Mongolian pine wood. Samples treated in pressurized steam had lower percentages of polysaccharides and higher percentages of lignin compared to those treated in atmospheric steam, indicating greater chemical changes during the treatment. It was also found that thermal degradation of both samples was modest at the treatment temperature of 205 °C. These results help to explain the better dimensional stability and limited strength deterioration of wood treated in pressurized steam.

  13. Subterranean Termite Resistance of Polystyrene-Treated Wood from Three Tropical Wood Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Yusuf Sudo; Massijaya, Muh Yusram; Arinana, A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the resistance of three Indonesian wood species to termite attack. Samples from sengon (Falcataria moluccana), mangium (Acacia mangium), and pine (Pinus merkusii) were treated with polystyrene at loading levels of 26.0%, 8.6%, and 7.7%, respectively. Treated and untreated samples were exposed to environmental conditions in the field for 3 months. Untreated specimens of sengon, mangium, and pine had resistance ratings of 3.0, 4.6, and 2.4, respectively, based on a 10-point scale from 0 (no resistance) to 10 (complete or near-complete resistance). Corresponding resistance values of 7.8, 7.2, and 8.2 were determined for specimens treated with polystyrene. Overall weight loss values of 50.3%, 23.3%, and 66.4% were found for untreated sengon, mangium, and pine samples, respectively; for treated samples, the values were 7.6%, 14.4%, and 5.1%, respectively. Based on the findings in this study, overall resistance to termite attack was higher for treated samples compared to untreated samples. PMID:27455331

  14. Subterranean Termite Resistance of Polystyrene-Treated Wood from Three Tropical Wood Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Yusuf Sudo; Massijaya, Muh Yusram; Arinana, A

    2016-07-21

    The objective of this work was to investigate the resistance of three Indonesian wood species to termite attack. Samples from sengon (Falcataria moluccana), mangium (Acacia mangium), and pine (Pinus merkusii) were treated with polystyrene at loading levels of 26.0%, 8.6%, and 7.7%, respectively. Treated and untreated samples were exposed to environmental conditions in the field for 3 months. Untreated specimens of sengon, mangium, and pine had resistance ratings of 3.0, 4.6, and 2.4, respectively, based on a 10-point scale from 0 (no resistance) to 10 (complete or near-complete resistance). Corresponding resistance values of 7.8, 7.2, and 8.2 were determined for specimens treated with polystyrene. Overall weight loss values of 50.3%, 23.3%, and 66.4% were found for untreated sengon, mangium, and pine samples, respectively; for treated samples, the values were 7.6%, 14.4%, and 5.1%, respectively. Based on the findings in this study, overall resistance to termite attack was higher for treated samples compared to untreated samples.

  15. Subterranean Termite Resistance of Polystyrene-Treated Wood from Three Tropical Wood Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Sudo Hadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the resistance of three Indonesian wood species to termite attack. Samples from sengon (Falcataria moluccana, mangium (Acacia mangium, and pine (Pinus merkusii were treated with polystyrene at loading levels of 26.0%, 8.6%, and 7.7%, respectively. Treated and untreated samples were exposed to environmental conditions in the field for 3 months. Untreated specimens of sengon, mangium, and pine had resistance ratings of 3.0, 4.6, and 2.4, respectively, based on a 10-point scale from 0 (no resistance to 10 (complete or near-complete resistance. Corresponding resistance values of 7.8, 7.2, and 8.2 were determined for specimens treated with polystyrene. Overall weight loss values of 50.3%, 23.3%, and 66.4% were found for untreated sengon, mangium, and pine samples, respectively; for treated samples, the values were 7.6%, 14.4%, and 5.1%, respectively. Based on the findings in this study, overall resistance to termite attack was higher for treated samples compared to untreated samples.

  16. Effects of Periodic Temperature Changes on Stress Relaxation of Chemically Treated Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Manhua; Zhao Guangjie

    2004-01-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between the microstructural changes and the rheological behaviors of four chemically treated woods (delignified wood, hemicellulose-removed wood, DMSO swollen and decrystallization treated wood), the stress relaxation of wood with three different moisture contents was determined during periodic temperature changes. The experimental results show that after wood relaxation for 4 h at 25 °C, the stress decays sharply when the temperature increases and 2 h later the stress recovers again when the temperature drops back to the original point. The additional stress relaxation, produced after temperature begins to increase, is mainly caused by the thermal swelling, molecular thermal movement and the break of a part of residual hydrogen bonds. The number of hydrogen bonds and the size and amount of cavities in various treated woods greatly affect the magnitude of the additional relaxed stress and the recovery stress.

  17. High-density polyethylene-based composites with pressure-treated wood fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Shang; Guangping Han; Fangzheng Zhu; Jiansheng Ding; Todd Shupe; Qingwen Wang; Qinglin Wu

    2012-01-01

    High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE)-based composites with alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ)- and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ)-treated wood fibers were manufactured through injection molding. The mechanical properties, water absorption, and biological resistance properties of the fabricated composites with different coupling treatments were investigated. Composites with ACQ- and MCQ-treated wood had mechanical properties comparable with those made of untreated wood. The different coupling ag...

  18. CHANGES IN THE CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF THERMALLY TREATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birol Uner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the chemical structure of hornbeam and uludag fir woods during thermal treatment were investigated at three temperatures (170, 190, and 210 oC and three durations (4, 8, and 12 hours. After thermal treatment, the extents of degradation in the chemical structure of the samples were determined, and the effects on the chemical composition of hornbeam wood and uludag fir wood were investigated. The data obtained were analyzed using variance analysis, and Tukey’s test was used to determine the changes in the chemical structure of uludag fir and hornbeam woods. The results showed that heating wood permanently changes several of its chemical structures and that the changes are mainly caused by thermal degradation of wood polymers. It was found that decreasing of the cellulose and holocelluloses ratio had a favorable effect on the interaction of the wood with moisture. According to the obtained results, hornbeam wood is affected more than uludag fir wood. For each wood, the maximum decreases of holocellulose and α-cellulose were found at 210oC for 12 hours, and the maximum increase of lignin occurred at the same treatment combination.

  19. Influence of impregnation method on metal retention of CCB-treated wood in slow pyrolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinata, Silao Espérance; Loubar, Khaled; Bouslamti, Amine; Belloncle, Christophe; Tazerout, Mohand

    2012-09-30

    In the present work, the effects of copper, chromium and boron on the pyrolysis of wood and their distribution in the pyrolysis products were investigated. For this, the wood has been impregnated with chromium-copper-boron (CCB). In addition, to describe the effects of impregnation method, vacuum-pressure and dipping methods were also conducted. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results show that an increase in the final residue and decrease in degradation temperature on both methods of treated wood compared to untreated wood. Then, slow pyrolysis experiments were carried out in a laboratory reactor. The mass balance of pyrolysis products is confirmed by TGA. Furthermore, the concentration of metals in the final residue is measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The results show that the final residue contains more than 45% of the initial amount of metal present in the treated wood. The phenomenon is more pronounced with vacuum-pressure treated wood. The heating values of pyrolysis products were analyzed. The heating value of charcoal obtained from treated and untreated wood is approximately same. But the heating value of tar from untreated wood is higher than the heating value of the tar from treated wood. PMID:22835770

  20. CCA Test Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Three sources have been considered to provide information allowing the evaluation of the Collision Conflict Avoidance (CCA) functional requirements: existing data, simulation, and flight test. The existing data sources that have been evaluated have been found to be lacking in two areas: The actual data that was recorded and missing elements to the system architecture. Many previous tests addressing collision avoidance were conducted without a remote operator. As such, they are missing critical elements that are required to assess the CCA functional requirements. Tests such as ERAST were conducted with all of the UAS elements. However, ERAST tests were conducted as a demonstration and the data recorded was of end-to-end performance. Many contributing elements of the system were not individually recorded or were recorded at a data rate insufficient for the purposes of evaluating the CCA functional requirements.

  1. Classification of waste wood treated with chromated copper arsenate and boron/fluorine preservatives; Classificacao de residuos de madeira tratada com preservativos a base de arseniato de cobre cromatado e de boro/fluor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrarini, Suzana Frighetto; Santos, Heldiane Souza dos; Miranda, Luciana Gampert; Azevedo, Carla M.N.; Pires, Marcal J.R., E-mail: suzana.ferrarini@gmail.com [Faculdade de Quimica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Maia, Sandra Maria [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Classification of waste wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and boron/fluorine preservatives, according to NBR 10004, was investigated. The leaching test (ABNT NBR 10005) for As and Cr, and solubilization test (ABNT NBR 10006) for F, were applied to out-of-service wooden poles. Concentrations of As and Cr in leachates were determined by ICP-MS and of F by ESI. Values for As were higher than 1 mg L{sup -1} classifying the waste as hazardous material (Class I) whereas values for F (> 1.5 mg L{sup -1}) were non-hazardous but indicated non-inert material (Class IIA). (author)

  2. Modification of static bending strength properties of Eucalyptus grandis heat-treated wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique Gonzalez de Cademartori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the effect of thermal rectification on physical and mechanical properties of Eucalyptus grandis wood at different levels of temperature and time. Samples of Eucalyptus grandis wood (10 × 10 × 200 mm were heat-treated at 180, 200, 220 and 240 °C during 4 and 8 hours. The mechanical properties of heat-treated and untreated samples were determined by static bending tests. The physical properties were determined by weight loss and swelling tests. The results showed that modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture, weight loss, volumetric swelling and linear swelling were affected significantly by the thermal rectification. However, the length of exposure influenced just weight loss, while the temperature influenced all the studied properties of heat-treated wood. More significant modifications with treatments at a temperature of 200 °C or higher were found in the properties of heat-treated wood.

  3. Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Wood – a sustainable building material ? For thousands of years and all over the planet, wood has been used as a building material and exciting architecture has been created in wood. The fantastic structural, physical and aesthetic properties of the material as well as the fact that wood...... is a renewable resource makes it predestinated for what is considered ´sustainable architecture´. But the reality is less linear and there are serious traps: In fact the lecture shows by examples that it is much easier to build very unsustainable buildings in wood than the other way round! Where does the wood...... has shrinked by 30% since the preindustrial times and in countries like China (with a historic tradition for wooden architecture) we could observe enormous desertification. What does this mean for the use of wood in modern architecture ? A critical reflection is needed. In too many cases...

  4. A spectrocolorimetric and chemical study on color modification of heat-treated wood during artificial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Pichette, Andre

    2012-05-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the wood surface color modifications of three North American species (jack pine, aspen, and birch) heat-treated under different temperatures was studied by spectrocolorimetric colormeter (datacolor, CHECK TM). Data was analyzed using the reflectance spectra (400-700 nm) as well as the CIE-L*a*b* system and ΔE. Kubelka-Munk (K-M) spectra of samples were recorded as a function of artificial weathering time to obtain the absorption maxima of the chromophore woods formed during artificial weathering. The results were compared with those of the respective untreated (Kiln-dried) species. Analysis of chemical components shows that the lignin percent of jack pine, aspen, and birch increased after heat treatment (28.66-35.9%, 20.27-26.41%, and 19.04-22.71% respectively) which might be due to smaller influence of heat treatment on lignin content than hemicelluloses. This improves the resistance of heat-treated wood to photo-degradation. This is also supported by the smaller change observed in K-M spectra and total color parameters in CIE-L*a*b* system of heat-treated wood samples compared to those of untreated wood when weathered for72 h. However, the lignin percent of heat-treated woods reduce to maximum 2.5% after artificial weathering of 1512 h. This suggests that the weathering degrades most lignin matrix; consequently, both the colors of heat-treated woods and untreated woods are lighter and very similar after a long period of artificial weathering.

  5. COLOR CHANGE — MASS LOSS CORRELATION FOR HEAT-TREATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marinela Olarescu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment is renowned as the most environmentally friendly process of dimensional stabilization that can be applied to wood, in order to make it suitable for outdoor uses. It also darkens wood color and improves wood durability. The intensity of heat treatment can be appreciated by means of two parameters: the color change occured in wood due to the high temperature, and the mass loss, which is a measure of the degree of thermal degradation. In order to find a mathematical correlation between these two parameters, an experimental study was conducted with four European wood species, which were heat-treated at 180°C and 200ºC, for 1-3 hours, under atmosheric pressure.The paper presents the results concerning the color changes and mass losses recorded for the heat-treated wood samples compared to untreated wood.  For all four species, the dependency between the color change and the mass loss was found to be best described by a logarithmic regression equation with R2 of 0.93 to 0.99 for the soft species (spruce, pine and lime, and R2 of 0.77 for beech. The results of this study envisage to simplify the assessment procedure of the heat treatment efficiency, by only measuring the color – a feature that is both convenient and cost-effective. 

  6. FIRE RESISTANCE OF DOUGLAS FIR [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco] WOOD TREATED WITH SOME CHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kemal YALINKILIÇ

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Combustible properties of treated douglas wood specimens and fire-retardancy of some preservatives were tested in this study. Crib test of ASTM E 160-150 was followed. Results indicated that, aqueous solutions of boric acid (BA, borax (Bx (Na2BO7 10H2O or BA + Bx mixture (7: 3, w: w had fire retardant efficacy (FRE over untreated wood and reduced the combustibility of vinil monomers (Styrene and methylmetacrylate which were applied as secondary treatment.

  7. Characterization of residues from thermal treatment of treated wood and extraction of Cu, Cr, As and Zn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Christensen, Iben Vernegren

    2005-01-01

    a matter to cope with when methods to avoid As emission are implemented: the residues with increased concentrations of Cu, Cr and As. In the present paper two different residues after thermal treatment are characterized: a mixed bottom and fly ash from combustion of CCA impregnated wood, and a charcoal......, that the charcoal contained a high concentration of Zn, probably from paint. Chemical extraction experiments in HNO were conducted with the charcoal and it was found that the order of extraction (in percentage) was Zn > Cu > As > Cr. A SEM/EDX investigation of the mixed ash from combustion showed the presence...

  8. STATIC BENDING STRENGHT OF WOOD TREATED WITH FIRE RETERDANT AND WATER REPELLENT PRESERVATION CHEMICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin PEKER

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has designed for determination of static bending strenght of mainly boron impregnated scots pine and east beech wood. Other chemicals used as control are polyethylene glycole (PEG-400 and some commercial preservatives such as Vacsol (V, Ammonıum sulphate (AS and Diammonium phospate (DAP were used by secondary process on the boron or PEG treated wood by the aim of improving static bending strenght and avoiding the leachability of both chemicals. Result indicated that static bending strenght of scots pine wood were reduced by acidic solutions of salts. In beech wood static bending strenght were also affected by neutral pH of the solution. Water repellent , surprisingly don't show their aspected protective properties of static bending strength, in general .

  9. Improved bondability of wax-treated wood following plasma treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Avramidis, Georg; Scholz, Gunthard; Nothnick, Evelyn; Militz, Holger; Viöl, Wolfgang; Wolkenhauer, Arndt

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the impact of a plasma treatment using dielectric barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure on wax-treated beech was investigated by surface energy determination and adhesion tests. Measurements of the surface energy revealed a strong increase in surface polarity along with increased surface energy as a result of the plasma treatment, pointing to increased adhesion properties. To evaluate the adhesion properties of a polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) adhesive on beech treated with monta...

  10. MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAT-TREATED ASH WOOD IN RELATION WITH STRUCTURAL TIMBER STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon HANNOUZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment is an attractive method to enhance wood durability, and valorize local hardwood species with natural low durability. Yet no standard allows the certification of such products. This study first aims to observe the influence of heat treatment on the different mechanical properties. The standard mechanical tests; bending, tension parallel and perpendicular to grain, compression parallel and perpendicular to grain and shear, have been performed on native and heat-treated woods samples. The measurements are then compared to values of EN 338 standard. Results reveal that shear strength is the property most affected by heat treatment and that the modulus of elasticity perpendicular to grain is increased. The values given by EN 338 standard are generally safe with the exception of shear strength which is underestimated by current relationships. It is suggested that new relationships have to be provided for heat-treated wood, taking into account the loss of shear resistance.

  11. Metals determination in wood treated by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Silva, Richard Maximiliano da Cunha [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maxcunha@cena.usp.br; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]. E-mail: jeangm@esalq.usp.br; mtomazel@esalq.usp.br; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: Silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda Luiza Araujo Domingues [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br; Barroso, Regina Cely [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: cely@uerj.br

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes the use of X-Ray fluorescence analysis for distribution and quantification of metals in the hardwood (Eucalyptus sp) and softwood (Pinus sp) treated with CCA (copper-chromium-arsenic). The sapwood/heartwood for hardwood sample and the growth-rings for softwood sample were analyzed. The samples were scanned in 320 mm steps in the vertical direction. For excitation of the elements a white beam synchrotron radiation of {approx} 320 x 180 mm was employed and for the X-ray detection a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn and As were determined. Fundamental parameters were used to quantify the elements concentrations. (author)

  12. Adhesive bond performance of heat-treated wood at various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin; Özbay, Günay

    2016-07-01

    Heat treatment of wood leads to chemical, structural and physical changes in wood constituents, which can significantly affect the bonding performance of wood in several ways depending on the adhesive type used. In the present study, fir (Abies bornmülleriana Mattf.) and beech (Fagus orientalis L.) were heat treated at 170 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 190 degrees C, 200 and 212 degrees C for 2 hours. Four different types of adhesives were used for bonding process: melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF), and polyurethane (PUR). For all the pretreatment conditions, highest shear strength of adhesive bonds of each adhesive system was observed for untreated samples and shear strength decreased with increasing heat treatment. The strength of each adhesive bond of samples which were soaked in water was much less than dry samples, approximately half of the dry strength. Generally, the shear strength of the adhesive bonds after boiling was smaller than or similar to the values obtained for soaking. The untreated samples lost more strength after soaking and boiling than heat treated samples. With increasing heat treatment severity, reduction in shear strength increased in dry samples while decreased in soaking and boiling samples. For instance, after soaking, the untreated samples lost more strength (almost 39%) than heat treated samples (almost 24% for most severely heat treated samples). The results showed that the shear strength of adhesive bonds was influenced by heat treatment and depended on pretreatment of samples prior to testing. In general, all adhesives used performed in quite a similar way for all pretreatment conditions, and the bonding performance of heat treated fir wood was less satisfactory than that of beech wood for all adhesive system and condition.

  13. Electron paramagnetic resonance and quantitative color investigations of various vacuum heat treated wood species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Kondratyeva, K.R. Safiullin, I.G. Motygullin, A.V. Klochkov, M.S. Tagirov, V.V. Kuzmin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the heat treatment duration on the electron paramagnetic resonance signal amplitude of free radicals for various wood species was observed. It was found that the amplitude of the electron paramagnetic resonance signal grows linearly with the vacuum heat treatment duration. The quantitative measurements of color changes for various wood species (pine, spruce, larch, birch and small-leaved lime were performed. It is found that results of EPR experiments and color measurements of heat treated samples correlate with each other.

  14. Variation of equilibrium moisture content of heat-treated Couratari oblongifolia, Fraxinus excelsior, and Quercus rubra wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaofang Zhou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment may result in variation of wood equilibrium moisture content (EMC. During this study, tauari (Couratari oblongifolia, ash (Fraxinus excelsior, and oak (Quercus rubra woods were heat-treated at 190, 200, and 210ºC for 3 hours and then put into a conditioning chamber with a temperature from 30 to 75ºC and a relative humidity from 50 to 90%. The isothermal moisture adsorption curve was subsequently analyzed. Results indicated that the EMC of heat-treated wood was reduced by 23.4 to 37.4% compared to non-treated wood, but the EMC difference at different heat-treated temperatures for three hardwoods was quite small and the EMC of heat-treated wood was inversely proportional to their dry density.

  15. THE EFFECTS OF NATURAL WEATHERING ON THE PROPERTIES OF HEAT-TREATED ALDER WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Yildiz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of natural weathering in ground contact on biological resistance, modulus of rupture, and color stability of heat-treated alder wood. Chemical composition of weathered wood was also studied by FTIR-ATR spectra. Wood stakes were heated at 150, 180, and 200°C for periods of 2, 6, and 10 hours, and the stakes were subsequently exposed to natural weathering and decay in a field area located in the north of Turkey for 3 years. The decay index of heat-treated stakes was lower than that of the controls. The weight loss prevention ratio had an increasing tendency with increasing treatment temperature and length of time. Depending on the treatment parameters, heat treatment reduced the modulus of rupture by up to 50%; however decay caused by soil micro-organisms gave rise to a greater loss of modulus of rupture than heat. Weathering processes caused remarkable color changes in the samples. FTIR-ATR spectra showed significant deformations and degradations in wood components, especially in the hemicelluloses of heat-treated samples. Degradation of hemicelluloses increased with an increase in heat temperature and exposure time.

  16. Properties of a Laminated Wood Composite Produced with Thermomechanically Treated Veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa M. Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed at evaluating the properties of plywood made from thermomechanically treated wood veneers. Veneers from Amescla (Trattinnickia burseraefolia wood were treated in a hydraulic press with electric resistance heating. Two temperature levels were applied, 140°C and 180°C, for 1 and 2 minutes with 2.7 N/mm2 of pressure. A total of 30 plywood boards were produced, including six boards produced from untreated veneers. The results showed that the thermomechanical treatment did not have any deleterious effect on glue line strength and most of the mechanical properties of plywood made from treated veneers were improved. On the other hand, plywood made from untreated veneers presented better dimensional stability. Dimensional stability properties were most affected by the temperature of the treatment, while mechanical stability, represented by the glue line shear strength, was positively affected by temperature and duration of the treatment.

  17. Soil quality in a cropland soil treated with wood ash containing charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omil, Beatriz; Balboa, Miguel A.; Fonturbel, M. Teresa; Gartzia-Bengoetxea, Nahia; Arias-González, Ander; Vega, Jose A.; Merino, Agustin

    2014-05-01

    The strategy of the European Union "Europe 2020" states that by 2020, 20% of final energy consumption must come from renewables. In this scenario, there is an increasing use of biomass utilization for energy production. Indeed, it is expected that the production of wood-ash will increase in coming years. Wood ash, a mixture of ash and charcoal, generated as a by-product of biomass combustion in power plants, can be applied to soil to improve the soil quality and crop production. Since the residue contains significant content of charcoal, the application of mixed wood ash may also improve the SOM content and soil quality in the long term, in soils degraded as a consequence of intensive management. The objective of this study was asses the changes in SOM quality and soil properties in a degraded soils treated with wood ash containing charcoal. The study was carried out in a field devoted to cereal crops during the last decades. The soil was acidic (pH 4.5) with a low SOC content (3 %) and fine texture. The experiment was based on a randomised block design with four replicates. Each block included the following four treatments: Control, 16 Mg fly wood ash ha-1, 16 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (16 Mg) and 32 Mg mixed wood ash ha-1 (32 Mg). The application was carried out once. The ash used in the study was obtained from a thermal power plant and was mainly derived from the combustion of Pinus radiata bark and branches. The wood ash is highly alkaline (pH= 10), contains 10 % of highly condensed black carbon (atomic H/C ratio Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). These techniques were applied in bulk samples and aggregates of different sizes. The changes in microbial activity were studied by analysis of microbial biomass C and basal respiration. The soil bacterial community was studied by the Biolog method. Several physical properties, such soil aggregate distribution, hydraulic conductivity and available water contente were also determined. Three years after applications

  18. Surface energy of preservative-treated southern yellow pine (Pinus spp.) by contact angle measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jinzhen; Pascal D.Kamdem

    2007-01-01

    In this study,the contact angles of four different reference liquids (including distilled water,diiodomethane,formadide and glycerol) formed on the surfaces of wood,treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and two other emerging copper-based water-borne systems (commercial names:NW and NS) were measured with sessile drop method.Based on the contact angle data,the surface energy was obtained from the acid-base approach.The total surface energy consisted of Lifshiz-van der Waals parameter and acid-base parameter.Results showed that the NW and CCA treatments made the wood surface more hydrophobic while the NS treatment had the reverse effect on the wood surface mainly owing to the increased penetration of earlywood.By using three liquids,diiodomethane,formamide and distilled water,the total surface energy obtained for untreated earlywood,untreated latewood, CCA-treated earlywood,CCA-treated latewood,NW-treated earlywood,NW-treated latewood,NS-treated earlywood and NS-treated latewood were 43.1,44.5,43.4,45.1,49.4,40.6,46.0 and 40.9 mJ/m2,respectively.The surface energy of CCA-treated wood was almost the same as untreated wood.After NW and NS treatments,the surface energy of both earlywood and latewood changed a little.However,the change was not so obvious as to draw any further conclusion concerning the influence of NW and NS treatments on the surface energy of wood.

  19. SHEAR STRENGTH OF HEAT-TREATED TALI (ERYTHROPHLEUM IVORENSE AND IROKO (CHLOROPHORA EXCELSA WOODS, BONDED WITH VARIOUS ADHESIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamiyet Sahin Kol

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on the shear strength of tali (Erythrophleum ivorense and iroko (Chlorophora excelsa woods, bonded with some structural adhesives. Shear strength of untreated and heat-treated woods bonded with phenol-formaldehyde (PF, melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF, melamine-formaldehyde (MF, and polyurethane (PUR adhesives was studied. An industrial heat treatment method (ThermoWood was used. The timbers were thermally modified for 2 hours at 180 ºC. Laminated samples having two sample sets were prepared from untreated and heat-treated wood for the shear strength test. The results of the tests showed that the heat treatment affected shear strength of laminated wood negatively. Although there was a considerable difference in adhesive bond shear strength between untreated and treated wood, both wood species bonded with the adhesives fulfilled the required value for shear strength of the adhesive bonds. PF, MUF, MF, and PUR adhesives performed in a rather similar way for both wood species.

  20. DECAY RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF OIL HEAT TREATED ASPEN WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Bazyar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The decay resistance of oil-heat treated aspen wood (Populus tremula l. against white rot fungi (Coriolus versicolor and brown rot fungi (Coniophora puteana was investigated. Three different temperature stages and two time levels for oil heat treatment for the selection of optimum conditions were determined. Linseed oil as a heating medium was used. The mass loss of treated samples that were exposed to both fungi was significantly lower than that of the control samples. Results also showed improvement in dimensional stability after oil heat treatment. Decay resistance and dimensional stability of aspen wood were increased significantly with temperature increasing, but time seemed to have no effect on those properties. Oil heat treatment is a suitable method to improve decay resistance of aspen wood as it reduced the mass loss by 71% and 77% against Coriolus versicolor and Coniophora puteana compared with control samples, respectively. On the other hand, oil heat treatment improved the dimensional stability by about 20.5%.

  1. An emissions audit of a biomass combustor burning treated wood waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the Emissions Audit carried out on a Biomass Combustor burning treated wood waste at the premises of a furniture manufacturer. The Biomass Combustor was tested in two firing modes; continuous fire and modulating fire. Combustion chamber temperatures and gas residence times were not measured. Boiler efficiencies were very good at greater than 75% in both tests. However, analysis of the flue gases indicated that improved efficiencies are possible. The average concentrations of CO (512mgm-3) and THC (34mgm-3) for Test 1 were high, indicating that combustion was poor. The combustor clearly does not meet the requirements of the Guidance Note for the Combustion of Wood Waste. CO2 and O2 concentrations were quite variable showing that combustion conditions were fairly unstable. Improved control of combustion should lead to acceptable emission concentrations. (Author)

  2. Cu,Cr and As determination in preserved woods (Eucalyptus ssp.) by X-ray fluorescence spectrometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil produces around 2.2 millions of cubic meters of treated wood to meet the annual demand of railway, electric, rural and construction sectors. The most used wood species are eucalyptus (Eucalyptus ssp.) and pine (Pinus ssp.).The treated woods used for poles, sleepers, fence posts and plywoods should be according to Brazilian norms requirements. The most usual wood preservative products used in Brazil are CCA (chromated copper arsenate) and CCB (copper chromium and boron salt). The analytical methods, such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), plasma inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) have been used for the analytical control of those treatment processes. In this work, the eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus ssp) samples was obtained from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, cut plantation areas. Under pressure, eucalyptus wood samples were submitted to different concentration of CCA solution reaching 3.9, 6.7, 9.1, 12.4 and 14.0 kg of CCA by m-³ sapwood retentions. Samples in cylinders and sawdust forms were obtained from treated wood samples. Copper, chromium and arsenic determination was performed using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRFS), portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (PXRFS), flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and instrumental neutron activation analysis. In this work, the method of analysis, sensitivity, precision and accuracy performances of the related techniques were outlined. (author)

  3. Mechanical properties of wood from Pinus sylvestris L. treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative and with waterborne Copper Azole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villasante, A.; Laina, R.; Rojas, J. A. M.; Rojas, I. M.; Vignote, S.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: To determine the effect on wood from Pinus sylvestris of treatment with preservatives on mechanical properties and to establish the relation between the penetration and compression strenght. Area of study: Spain. Material and methods: 40 samples of defect-free wood from Pinus sylvestris L. were treated with Light Organic Solvent Preservative (Vacsol Azure WR 2601) and 50 with waterborne Copper Azole (Tanalith E 3492). 40 control samples were not treated (water or preservative). Mechanical resistance to static bending, modulus of elasticity and compression strength parallel to the grain were compared with untreated wood. Regression analysis between the penetration and compression strength parallel was done with the samples treated with waterborne preservative. Main results: The results indicate that the treated wood (with either product) presents a statistically significant increase in mechanical resistance in all three mechanical characteristics. The results obtained differ from earlier studies carried out by other authors. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation of the wood with waterborne Copper Azole. The most probable explanation for these results concerns changes in pressure during treatment. The use of untreated control samples instead of samples treated only with water is more likely to produce significant results in the mechanical resistance studies. Research highlights: Treated wood presents a statistically significant increase in MOE, modulus of rupture to static bending and parallel compression strength. There was no correlation between parallel compression strength and the degree of impregnation with waterborne preservative. (Author)

  4. Determination of the distribution of copper and chromium in partly remediated CCA-treated pine wood using SEM and EDX analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Melcher, Eckhard;

    2005-01-01

    ) could be reduced to a large extent. Scanning electron microscopy with simultaneous electron dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX) clearly demonstrated a distinct difference in the distribution of Cu and Cr due to experimental conditions. Before soaking, the Cu and Cr was mainly located in the cell wall...

  5. Main: CCA1ATLHCB1 [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CCA1ATLHCB1 S000149 10-May-1998 (last modified) kehi CCA1 binding site; CCA1 protei...n (myb-related transcription factor) interact with two imperfect repeats of AAMAATCT in Lhcb1*3 gene of Arab

  6. Method development for the determination of wood preservatives in commercially treated wood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šťávová, Jana; Sedgeman, Carl A; Smith, Zachary T; Frink, Lillian A; Hart, Jessica A; Niri, Vadoud H; Kubátová, Alena

    2011-09-30

    Fungicides and insecticides are commonly used preservatives to protect wood products against microbiological degradations. Currently, there is a lack of analytical methods addressing the quantitative determination of a wide range of wood preserving species in wood matrices. In this study, a reliable method was developed for the determination of a mixture of wood preserving agents with differing chemical structures (i.e., properties), including tebuconazole (TAZ), propiconazole (PAZ), 3-iodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate (IPBC), and permethrin (PER), in pine wood. The analyte recoveries obtained by Soxhlet and multiple-stage sonication extractions were compared. While both extraction methods yielded similar results (80-100%), Soxhlet extraction was found to be less labor-intensive and thus preferred providing also lower RSDs of 1-6%. In comparison to methanol, commonly used as an extraction solvent for triazoles, acetone yielded similar extraction efficiencies for all analytes while reducing the time of sample concentration. The solid phase extraction method for triazoles was adapted to allow for a separation of IPBC and PER from the wood matrix. As opposed to previous studies, three recovery standards were employed, which enabled the correction of individual analyte losses during the sample preparation. The matrix-affected limits of detection (LODs) using gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection were nearly the same for triazoles 0.07 and 0.21 ng g(-1) for PAZ and TAZ in sapwood and 0.18 and 0.21 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. Higher LODs were observed for IPBC and PER: 3.9 and 1.7 ng g(-1) in sapwood, and 2.0 and 6.0 ng g(-1) in heartwood, respectively. The recoveries in the wood submitted to commercial sample treatment showed gradient distribution of analytes depending on the penetration of the treatment.

  7. Borate-treated strand board from southern wood species: Resistance against decay and mold fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwu Xu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Combined decay and mold resistance of zinc borate-(ZB and calcium borate-(CB treated oriented strand board (OSB from southern mixed hardwood (MHW and southern yellow pine (SYP was investigated. Tests were done with a brown-rot fungus, Gloeophyllum trabeum, and a white-rot fungus, Trametes versicolor, for 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Wood species and fungus type had significant influence on the decay resistance. Decay caused by the brown-rot fungus was evident for all untreated SYP and mixed MHW controls. White-rot fungus did not cause significant sample weight loss for either species group. In the SYP OSB control inoculated with G. trabeum, the hyphae were abundant in wood rays and cell walls where they primarily penetrated through bordered and simple pits. The incorporation of ZB and CB into OSB provided significant protection against the fungi with no significant weight loss observed in the treated OSB. Microscopic analysis showed distinct evidence of fungal colonization and a thinning pattern of cell wall material. Untreated OSB samples from MHW and commercial OSBs were most susceptible to mold growth after 6 weeks. The borate-modified OSB from MHW and SYP effectively prevented the mold growth.

  8. Methods of Assessing Replicability in Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jason E.

    Theoretical hypotheses generated from data analysis of a single sample should not be advanced until the replicability issue is treated. At least one of three questions usually arises when evaluating the invariance of results obtained from a canonical correlation analysis (CCA): (1) "Will an effect occur in subsequent studies?"; (2) "Will the size…

  9. A new shock wave assisted wood preservative injection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. S.; Ravikumar, G.; Lai, Ram; Jagadeesh, G.

    Preservative treatment of many tropical hard woods and bamboo pose severe problem. A number of wood preservatives (chemical formulations toxic to wood decay/ destroying organisms like fungi, wood destroying termites, marine borers etc.) and wood impregnating techniques are currently in use for improving bio resistance of timber and bamboo and thereby enhancing service life for different end uses. How ever, some species of tropical hardwoods and many species of bamboo are difficult to treat, posing technical problems. In this paper we report preliminary results of treatment of bamboo with a novel Shockwave assisted injection treatment. Samples (30×2.5×1.00 cm) of an Indian species of bamboo Dendrocalamus strictus prepared from defect free culms of dry bamboo are placed in the driven section of a vertical shock tube filled with the 4Coppepr-Chrome-Arsenic(CCA) preservative solution.The bamboo samples are subjected to repeated shock wave loading (3 shots) with typical over pressures of 30 bar. The results from the study indicate excellent penetration and retention of CCA preservative in bamboo samples. The method itself is much faster compared to the conventional methods like pressure treatment or hot and cold process.

  10. Comparison of VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Norway spruce ( Picea abies), Scots pine ( Pinus sylvesteris) and European aspen ( Populus tremula) wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyttinen, Marko; Masalin-Weijo, Marika; Kalliokoski, Pentti; Pasanen, Pertti

    2010-12-01

    Heat-treated wood is an increasingly popular decoration material. Heat-treatment improves dimensional stability of the wood and also prevents rot fungus growth. Although production of heat-treated wood has been rapidly increasing, there is only little information about the VOC emissions of heat-treated wood and its possible influences on indoor air quality. In the present study, VOC emissions from three untreated (air-dried) and heat-treated wood species were compared during a four weeks test period. It appeared that different wood species had clearly different VOC emission profiles. Heat-treatment was found to decrease VOC emissions significantly and change their composition. Especially, emissions of terpenes decreased from softwood samples and aldehydes from European aspen samples. Emissions of total aldehydes and organic acids were at the same level or slightly higher from heat treated than air-dried softwood samples. In agreement with another recent study, the emissions of furfural were found to increase and those of hexanal to decrease from all the wood species investigated. In contrast to air-dried wood samples, emissions of VOCs were almost in steady state from heat treated wood samples even in the beginning of the test.

  11. Combustion Properties of Calabrian Pine (Pinus brutia Ten.) Wood Treated with Vegetable Tanning Extracts and Boron Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    BAYSAL, Ergun; YALINKILIC, M. Kemal; ÇOLAK, Mehmet; Göktaş, Osman

    2003-01-01

    Specimens prepared from Calabrian pine (Pinus brutia Ten.) wood were treated with borate-supplemented aqueous solutions of Calabrian pine bark powder, acorn powder, sumach leaf powder and gall-nut powder. Then, fire test methods containing flame source, without flame source and glowing stages was performed according to the ASTM E 160-50 American Standard. The results showed that the lowest temperature (323 °C) for the flame source stage was recorded for specimens treated with mixtures of bor...

  12. Cu,Cr and As determination in preserved woods (Eucalyptus ssp.) by X-ray fluorescence spectrometries; Determinacao de cobre, cromo e arsenio em madeira preservada (Eucalyptus sp.) pelas espectrometrias de fluorescencia de raios X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Junior, Sergio Matias

    2014-07-01

    Brazil produces around 2.2 millions of cubic meters of treated wood to meet the annual demand of railway, electric, rural and construction sectors. The most used wood species are eucalyptus (Eucalyptus ssp.) and pine (Pinus ssp.).The treated woods used for poles, sleepers, fence posts and plywoods should be according to Brazilian norms requirements. The most usual wood preservative products used in Brazil are CCA (chromated copper arsenate) and CCB (copper chromium and boron salt). The analytical methods, such as flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), plasma inductively coupled optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) have been used for the analytical control of those treatment processes. In this work, the eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus ssp) samples was obtained from Minas Gerais State, Brazil, cut plantation areas. Under pressure, eucalyptus wood samples were submitted to different concentration of CCA solution reaching 3.9, 6.7, 9.1, 12.4 and 14.0 kg of CCA by m-³ sapwood retentions. Samples in cylinders and sawdust forms were obtained from treated wood samples. Copper, chromium and arsenic determination was performed using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRFS), portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (PXRFS), flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and instrumental neutron activation analysis. In this work, the method of analysis, sensitivity, precision and accuracy performances of the related techniques were outlined. (author)

  13. INVESTIGATING CHANGES IN THE CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS AND DIMENSIONAL STABILITY OF HEAT-TREATED HORNBEAM AND ULUDAG FIR WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Aydemir

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in chemical constituents and some physical properties such as swelling and water absorption of hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L and uludag fir (Abies bornmulleriana Mattf. wood were investigated after heat treatment at three different temperatures (170 oC, 190 oC, and 210 oC for three different durations (4, 8, and 12 hours by using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrometry. The results of TGA show that there was less weight loss in the main degradation region (300-500 oC for the heat-treated samples as compared to untreated (control samples. In addition, there was greater weight loss of hornbeam wood than of uludag fir wood in a similar degradation region. This difference could be due to the chemical constituents of softwoods and hardwoods. The results of FTIR spectrometry show that the chemical constituents of the hornbeam wood samples were more affected by heat treatment. All heat-treated samples exhibited lower water absorption and swelling compared to control samples. It was found that the relative decrease in swelling and water absorption for uludag fir was higher than for hornbeam. The maximum decrease in water absorption and swelling was found for both species that were heat-treated at 210 oC for 12 hours.

  14. Influence of corn steep liquor and glucose on colonization of control and CCB (Cu/Cr/B)-treated wood by brown rot fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are increasing problems with regard to the disposal of treated wood waste. Due to heavy metals or arsenic in impregnated wood waste, burning and landfill disposal options are not considered to be environmentally friendly solutions for dealing with this problem. Extraction of the heavy metals and recycling of the preservatives from the wood waste is a much more promising and environmentally friendly solution. In order to study the scale up of this process, copper/chromium/boron-treated wood specimens were exposed to copper tolerant (Antrodia vaillantii and Leucogyrophana pinastri) and copper sensitive wood decay fungi (Gloeophyllum trabeum and Poria monticola). Afterwards, the ability of fungal hyphae to penetrate and overgrow the wood specimens was investigated. The fungal growths were stimulated by immersing the specimens into aqueous solution of glucose or corn steep liquor prior to exposure to the fungi. The fastest colonization of the impregnated wood was by the copper tolerant A. vaillantii. Addition of glucose onto the surface of the wood specimens increased the fungi colonization of the specimens; however, immersion of the specimens into the solution of corn steep liquor did not have the same positive influence. These results are important in elucidating copper toxicity in wood decay fungi and for using these fungi for bioremediation of treated wood wastes

  15. Detection of environmentally persistent free radicals at a superfund wood treating site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Gehling, William; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Cook, Robert; Dellinger, Barry

    2011-08-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have previously been observed in association with combustion-generated particles and airborne PM(2.5) (particulate matter, d 2.5um). The purpose of this study was to determine if similar radicals were present in soils and sediments at Superfund sites. The site was a former wood treating facility containing pentachlorophenol (PCP) as a major contaminant. Both contaminated and noncontaminated (just outside the contaminated area) soil samples were collected. The samples were subjected to the conventional humic substances (HS) extraction procedure. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the EPFR concentrations and determine their structure for each sample fraction. Analyses revealed a ∼30× higher EPFR concentration in the PCP contaminated soils (20.2 × 10(17) spins/g) than in the noncontaminated soil (0.7 × 10(17) spins/g). Almost 90% of the EPFR signal originated from the minerals/clays/humins fraction. GC-MS analyses revealed ∼6500 ppm of PCP in the contaminated soil samples and none detected in the background samples. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrophotometry (ICP-AES) analyses revealed ∼7× higher concentrations of redox-active transition metals, in the contaminated soils than the noncontaminated soil. Vapor phase and liquid phase dosing of the clays/minerals/humins fraction of the soil with PCP resulted in an EPR signal identical to that observed in the contaminated soil, strongly suggesting the observed EPFR is pentachlorophenoxyl radical. Chemisorption and electron transfer from PCP to transition metals and other electron sinks in the soil are proposed to be responsible for EPFR formation.

  16. Selective reduction of Cr(VI) in chromium, copper and arsenic (CCA) mixed waste streams using UV/TiO2 photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shan; Jiang, Wenjun; Rashid, Mamun; Cai, Yong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; O'Shea, Kevin E

    2015-02-03

    The highly toxic Cr(VI) is a critical component in the Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) formulations extensively employed as wood preservatives. Remediation of CCA mixed waste and discarded treated wood products is a significant challenge. We demonstrate that UV/TiO2 photocatalysis effectively reduces Cr(VI) to less toxic Cr(III) in the presence of arsenate, As(V), and copper, Cu(II). The rapid conversion of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) during UV/TiO2 photocatalysis occurs over a range of concentrations, solution pH and at different Cr:As:Cu ratios. The reduction follows pseudo-first order kinetics and increases with decreasing solution pH. Saturation of the reaction solution with argon during UV/TiO2 photocatalysis had no significant effect on the Cr(VI) reduction demonstrating the reduction of Cr(VI) is independent of dissolved oxygen. Reduction of Cu(II) and As(V) does not occur under the photocatalytic conditions employed herein and the presence of these two in the tertiary mixtures had a minimal effect on Cr(VI) reduction. The Cr(VI) reduction was however, significantly enhanced by the addition of formic acid, which can act as a hole scavenger and enhance the reduction processes initiated by the conduction band electron. Our results demonstrate UV/TiO2 photocatalysis effectively reduces Cr(VI) in mixed waste streams under a variety of conditions.

  17. Understanding the CCA Standard Through Decaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumfert, G

    2003-04-17

    This document is a tutorial on the CCA Standard as realized through the Decaf implementation. Decaf does not equal the CCA standard much in the same way that Microsoft Visual C++ is not ANSI/ISO C++. This document was created because the CCA standard is evolving and still too fluid to nail down in a tutorial document. Because of its fluidity, and that it represents a hotbed of research and development, beginners can only start learning CCA by choosing one of the frameworks (warts and all). Decaf has just enough functionality to be a useful tool for beginners in the CCA to get started on. Though it lacks many features of the bigger CCA frameworks (CCAFE [3], XCAT [10], and SciRUN [8]) where the heavy-duty research is still going on, it is the first CCA framework that is underpinned by Babel, which provides its language interoperability features. This document can also serve the dual-purpose of providing a reasonable-sized example of building an application using Babel. The entire source for Decaf is included in the examples/subdirectory of the Babel code distribution. This manual assumes the reader is a programmer who has a conceptual understanding of the Babel Language Interoperability Tool. They should be proficient in two or more of the following languages: Fortran77, C, C++, Java, or Python. Furthermore, this manual assumes the reader is familiar with the SPMD{sup 2} programming model that pervades the scientific computing community. Knowledge of and experience with MPI programming is helpful, but not strictly required.

  18. Removal of arsenic from toxic ash after combustion of impregnated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosen, L. M.; Pedersen, A. J.; Kristensen, I. V.; Ribeiro, A. B.

    2003-05-01

    ln the next ten years the amounts of waste wood impregnated with Cu, Cr and As (CCA) is expected to increase dramatically. Mixed with municipal solid waste for incineration the wood constitutes a problem because As emission is not hindered through common flue gas treatment. Furthermore the ashes will contain higher concentrations of Cu, Cr and As. In different countries initiatives has been taken or are implemented to sort the impregnated wood from other waste and handle the wood separately. This handling can involve combustion in special plants. This paper deals with electrodialytic treatment of ash from combustion of CCA treated wood. The total concentrations in the ash were very high: 69gCu/kg, 62gCr/kg and 35gAs/kg. A SEM/EDX analysis showed that Cr was mainly build into the matrix structure of the ash. Cu, too, but some Cu was also precipitated on the surface of the particles. As, on the other hand, was only found associated with Ca and thus probably in a soluble form. As is the main problem of the ash due to the high toxicity and mobility and thus the treatment aims at removing this element. It was shown that during 5 days of electrodialytic treatment 92% As could be removed.

  19. Durability of the reaction to fire performance for fire retardant treated (FRT wood products in exterior applications – a ten years report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östman Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several long term experimental studies on the maintained reaction to fire performance of fire retardant treated (FRT wood products over time are presented. They are performed according to a European system based on earlier Nordic and North American systems and include accelerated ageing according to different procedures and natural weathering up to ten years. Main conclusions are: The hygroscopic properties are unchanged compared to untreated wood for most FRT wood products used commercially. The reaction to fire properties of FRT wood may be maintained after accelerated and natural ageing if the retention levels are high enough, but several FRT wood products loose most of their improved reaction to fire properties during weathering. Paint systems contribute considerably to maintain of the fire performance at exterior application and are usually needed to maintain the fire performance after weathering.

  20. Biodegradation of Phenolic Compounds in Creosote Treated Wood Waste by a Composting Microbial Culture Augmented with the Fungus Thermoascus aurantiacus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel E. Ghaly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Creosote is used as a wood preservative and water proof agent in railway sleepers, utility poles, buildings foundations and fences and garden furniture. It is a mixture of over 300 hydrocarbons which include 75% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 2-17% phenolic compounds and 10-18% heterocyclic organic compounds. Exposure to creosote may result in several health problems including damage to kidney, liver, eyes and skin. Potential contamination of soil and water exist from creosote treated wood from construction and demolition sites. Approach: The possibility of using an invessel composting process augmented with the ascomycetous fungus Thermoascus aurantiacus as a mesophilic/thermophilic bioremediation option for the degradation of phenolic compounds in creosote treated wood waste was evaluated. Results: The temperatures of bioremediation process reached thermophilic phase and the mesophilic and thermophilic lag phases were clearly identified. The moisture content decreased significantly indicating that the water produced by microbial respiration did not compensate for the water lost as vapor with the exhaust gases. Initial increases in pH due to the breakdown of organic nitrogen to ammonium and final drop in pH due to the formation of organic acids and the loss of ammonium with the exhaust gases in the latter stage were observed. Different degradation rates were observed in the mesophilic and thermophilic stages of composting. The control experiment achieved higher reductions of volatile solids, total carbon and TKN and higher degradation of phenolic compounds, cellulose and lignin, indicating a higher level of activity of microorganisms during the composting process compared with the inoculated experimental trial. The stability and maturity of the product of the control experiment were also better than those of the product from the inoculated experimental trial. Conclusion: The inoculation of the cellulolyticthermophilic

  1. Spelling CCA Basic Skills Curriculum. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    Designed and programmed by the staff of the Courseware and Curriculum Applications (CCA) Group (a unit of the Computer-Based Education Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), this instructor's guide describes a computer-based spelling curriculum designed to help adult and adolescent students learn basic rules of…

  2. Comparison of the protection effectiveness of acrylic polyurethane coatings containing bark extracts on three heat-treated North American wood species: Surface degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaefe, Duygu; Saha, Sudeshna

    2012-04-01

    High temperature heat-treatment of wood is a very valuable technique which improves many properties (biological durability, dimensional stability, thermal insulating characteristics) of natural wood. Also, it changes the natural color of wood to a very attractive dark brown color. Unfortunately, this color is not stable if left unprotected in external environment and turns to gray or white depending on the wood species. To overcome this problem, acrylic polyurethane coatings are applied on heat-treated wood to delay surface degradations (color change, loss of gloss, and chemical modifications) during aging. The acrylic polyurethane coatings which have high resistance against aging are further modified by adding bark extracts and/or lignin stabilizer to enhance their effectiveness in preventing the wood aging behavior. The aging characteristic of this coating is compared with acrylic polyurethane combined with commercially available organic UV stabilizers. In this study, their performance on three heat-treated North American wood species (jack pine, quaking aspen and white birch) are compared under accelerated aging conditions. Both the color change data and visual assessment indicate improvement in protective characteristic of acrylic polyurethane when bark extracts and lignin stabilizer are used in place of commercially available UV stabilizer. The results showed that although acrylic polyurethane with bark extracts and lignin stabilizer was more efficient compared to acrylic polyurethane with organic UV stabilizers in protecting heat-treated jack pine, it failed to protect heat-treated aspen and birch effectively after 672 h of accelerated aging. This degradation was not due to the coating adhesion loss or coating degradation during accelerated aging; rather, it was due to the significant degradation of heat-treated aspen and birch surface beneath this coating. The XPS results revealed formation of carbonyl photoproducts after aging on the coated surfaces and

  3. Perceptions & use of termite resistant treated wood products. Part I: The perspective of homeowners in Formosan subterranean termite infected States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Vlosky

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Formosan subterranean termites (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, is estimated to cause hundreds of millions of dollars in losses annually in North America. Unlike most subterranean species, Formosan termites often build nests (cartons in living trees and wooden buildings, and even penetrate plaster, plastic, asphalt, mortar, creosote, concrete, and rubber to reach wood. The study addresses issues that U.S. home owners consider in evaluating whether to buy or build homes that are built with termite resistant building materials. The sample frame for this study consisted of a random sample of 5.000 home owners in the region where Formosan subterranean termites are a current or potential problem. When examined by state, 50 percent of respondents in Hawaii said termites have damaged the home they currently live in followed by respondents from Louisiana and California. On average, respondents indicated that preservative pressure treated wood and regular fumigation as being most effective in protecting a house against termites and only 8 percent of respondents said they would not pay a premium for a guaranteed termite-free new home.

  4. Decay resistance of wood treated with boric acid and tall oil derivates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Ali; Alfredsen, Gry; Eikenes, Morten; Terziev, Nasko

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the effect of two boric acid concentrations (1% and 2%) and four derivates of tall oil with varying chemical composition were tested separately and in combination. The tall oil derivates were chosen in a way that they consist of different amounts of free fatty, resin acids and neutral compounds. Decay tests using two brown rot fungi (Postia placenta and Coniophora puteana) were performed on both unleached and leached test samples. Boric acid showed a low weight loss in test samples when exposed to fungal decay before leaching, but no effect after leaching. The tall oil derivates gave better efficacy against decay fungi compared to control, but are not within the range of the efficacy needed for a wood preservative. Double impregnation with boric acid and tall oil derivates gave synergistic effects for several of the double treatments both in unleached and leached samples. In the unleached samples the double treatment gave a better efficacy against decay fungi than tall oil alone. In leached samples a better efficacy against brown rot fungi were achieved than in samples with boron alone and a nearly similar or better efficacy than for tall oil alone. Boric acid at 2% concentration combined with the tall oil derivate consisting of 90% free resin acids (TO-III) showed the best performance against the two decay fungi with a weight loss less than 3% after a modified pure culture test.

  5. Performance Evaluation of LDA, CCA and AAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jasmine Pemeena Priyadarsini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wouldn't we love to replace passwords access control to avoid theft, forgotten passwords? Wouldn't we like to enter the security areas just in seconds? Yes the answer is face recognition. In this study we explore and compare the performance of three algorithms namely LDA, CCA, AAM. LDA (an evolution of PCA is a dimensionality reduction technique where it solves the problem of illumination to some extent, maximizing the inter class separation and minimizing the intra class variations. CCA, a measure of linear relationship between two multidimensional variables where it takes the advantage of PCA and LDA for maximizing the correlation and better performance. AAM is a model based approach where it just picks the landmarks of the images for recognition therefore reducing the error rate and producing good performance rate.

  6. Modelling inorganic and organic biocide leaching from CBA-amine (Copper–Boron–Azole) treated wood based on characterisation leaching tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupsea, Maria [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Tiruta-Barna, Ligia, E-mail: ligia.barna@insa-toulouse.fr [University of Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F–31077 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR 792, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Schiopu, Nicoleta [Paris-Est University, CSTB — Scientific and Technical Centre for the Building Industry, DEE/Environment and Life Cycle Engineering Team, 24 Rue Joseph Fourier, F-38400 Saint Martin d' Hères (France); Schoknecht, Ute [BAM — Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.1, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Numerical simulation of the leaching behaviour of treated wood is the most pertinent and less expensive method for the prediction of biocides' release in water. Few studies based on mechanistic leaching models have been carried out so far. In this work, a coupled chemistry-mass transport model is developed for simulating the leaching behaviour of inorganic (Cu, B) and organic (Tebuconazole) biocides from CBA-amine treated wood. The model is based on experimental investigations (lab-scale leaching tests coupled with chemical and structural analysis). It considers biocides' interactions with wood solid components and with extractives (literature confirmed reactions), as well as transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection) in different compartments. Simulation results helped at identifying the main fixation mechanisms, like (i) direct complexation of Cu by wood-phenolic and -carboxylic sites (and not via monoethanolamine; complex) on lignin and hemicellulose and strong dependence on extractives' nature, (ii) pH dependent binding of tebuconazole on polarized -OH moieties on wood. The role of monoethanolamine is to provide a pore-solution pH of about 7.5, when copper solubility is found to be weakest. The capability of the developed model to simulate the chemical and transport behaviour is the main result of this study. Moreover, it proved that characterization leaching tests (pH dependency and dynamic tests), combined with appropriate analytical methods are useful experimental tools. Due to its flexibility for representing and simulating various leaching conditions, chemical-transport model developed could be used to further simulate the leaching behaviour of CBA treated wood at larger scales. - Highlights: • Biocide and extractives leaching from ammonia-CBA treated wood were modelled. • The chemical-transport model identifies the main fixation/solubilisation mechanisms. • The model describes well the results of equilibrium and dynamic leaching

  7. Corrosão de parafusos fixados à madeira tratada com soluções de creosoto vegetal Corrosion of screws fixed into wood treated with wood tar creosote solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez Benigno Paes

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a corrosão de parafusos auto-rosqueáveis fixados à madeira tratada com soluções preservativas preparadas com creosoto vegetal, em condições de campo. Obteve-se o creosoto vegetal bruto por meio da destilação à temperatura de 110 - 255ºC do alcatrão vegetal. Uma fração dos destilados foi lavada com solução a 9% de bicarbonato de sódio, obtendo-se o creosoto vegetal purificado. Ambas as frações foram enriquecidas com 3% de naftenato de cobre; 3% de naftenato de zinco; 3% naftenato de cobalto; 2% de TBTO; 2% de tribromofenato de tubutil-estanho; 2% de pentaclorofenol; ou 0,4% de trióxido de arsênico. Foram preparadas 16 soluções, sendo 14 enriquecidas, além do creosoto vegetal bruto e do creosoto vegetal purificado. Estacas confeccionadas com madeira de alburno de Eucalyptus grandis foram tratadas pelo processo de célula- cheia (processo Bethell. Após o tratamento, parafusos auto-rosquéaveis de ferro zincado foram fixados às estacas. O ensaio foi instalado em três localidades da Zona da Mata de Minas Gerais (Viçosa, Ponte Nova e Leopoldina. A corrosividade das soluções de creosoto vegetal foi comparada à causada pelo creosoto mineral. As soluções preparadas com creosoto vegetal purificado foram menos corrosivas que suas similares preparadas com creosoto vegetal bruto, assemelhando-se ao creosoto mineral.The objective of this research was to evaluate the corrosion of screws fixed into wood treated with preservative solutions of wood tar creosote. The crude wood tar creosote was obtained through distillation of wood tar at 110 - 255ºC. A fraction of this product was washed with a solution of sodium bicarbonate at 9%, resulting in purified wood tar creosote. Both fractions were enriched with 3% of copper naphtenate, 3% of zinc naphtenate, 3% of cobalt naphtenate, 2% of TBTO, 2% of tributhyl-tin tribromophenate, 2% of pentachlorophenol, or with 0.4% of arsenic trioxide. A total

  8. Fire retardants for wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Jirouš-Rajković

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with many advantages, wood as traditional building material also has some disadvantages. One of them is the flammability. The most usual way to improve the fire performance of wood is by treating it with fire retardants that can be applied to wood composite products during manufacture, pressure impregnated into solid wood or wood products or added as a paint or surface coating. Fire retardants are formulated to control ignition, flame spread on the wood surface and to reduce the amount of heat released from wood. Fire retardants cannot make wood non combustible. According to the European reaction-to-fire “Euroclasses”classification system for construction products, wood treated with fire retardant can meet the requirements of Euroclass B, whereas ordinary wood products typically fall into class D. This article attempts to bring together information related to the burning of wood, fire performance of wood, types of fire retardants and mechanism of fire retardancy. Fire retardant coatings and chemical impregnation by pressure-treating are described separately.

  9. Catalytic hydroliquefaction of charcoal CCB (copper, chromium and boron)-treated wood for bio-oil production: Influence of CCB salts, residence time and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hydroliquefaction of CCB-treated wood charcoal is investigated using catalysts. • CCB salts increase charcoal conversion into bio-oil. • Na2CO3 increases gas yield. • Al2O3 improves both yield and quality of bio-oil. • CCB salts are distributed between bio-oil and coke products. - Abstract: Thermochemical processes offer a feasible option for wood waste management and the recovery of a variety of useful chemicals. In this paper, hydroliquefaction with the use of catalysts was optimized to provide bio-oil from CCB-treated wood by reducing gaseous emissions of copper, chromium and boron (hazardous materials). In addition, the influence of CCB salts, catalysts (Al2O3, Na2CO3, MgO and CaCO3) and residence time on the hydroliquefaction process was investigated. For this, hydroliquefaction of charcoal obtained by slow pyrolysis of CCB-treated wood was conducted under hydrogen pressure in presence of tetralin. The results showed that CCB salts and catalysts increase the yield of bio-oil compared to hydroliquefaction of charcoal from untreated wood. It was also observed, that the use of catalysts improves the residence time during the process. Among the catalysts employed, Al2O3 appears to be the most effective. Furthermore Na2CO3 promotes the formation of gaseous species particularly CH4. Analyses of hazardous materials in charcoal residue (coke) illustrate their transfer to the bio-oil with the increase of bio-oil yield and residence time except when Al2O3 was using. The bio-oil obtained contains aromatic compounds

  10. Effects of the thickness of the heat-treated wood specimen on water-soluble extractives and mechanical properties of merbau heartwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xiao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Merbau wood has a disadvantage in outdoor applications because its water-soluble extractives readily leach out and stain adjacent materials. This study examined the thickness of the heat-treated wood specimen on water-soluble extractives and some mechanical properties. The results show that heat treatment is efficient at removing the water-soluble extractives of merbau heartwood and overcoming the leaching problem. The absorbance of UV light decreased in intensity when the duration of heating was increased from 1 hour to 5 hours. The dominant absorbance peak increased from the surface layer to the core layer. The modulus of elasticity (MOE and modulus of rupture (MOR of heat-treated samples showed significant reductions when the heating duration exceeded a certain point. The total loss of mass during heat treatment and water extraction verified that heat treatment removes the water-soluble extractives efficiently.

  11. Durabilidade de madeira de eucalipto citriodora (Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson) tratada com CCA em ambiente amazônico Durability of eucalyptus citriodora wood (Corymbia citriodora (Hook.) K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson) treated with CCA in the Amazon environment

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique José Borges de Araujo; Washington Luiz Esteves Magalhães; Luís Cláudio de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    A intensa exploração econômica tem causado diminuição do estoque original das espécies madeireiras amazônicas, incluindo aquelas de alta durabilidade natural destinadas a usos em contato com o solo. A escassez dessas madeiras resulta na elevação do preço, inviabilizando economicamente seu uso, sendo uma alternativa a substituição por espécies plantadas de rápido crescimento tratadas com preservativos. Outra vantagem, além da econômica, de utilizar espécies plantadas em substituição às tradici...

  12. Review on Color Change of Heat Treated Wood at High Temperature%高温热处理对木材颜色变化影响综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江京辉; 吕建雄

    2012-01-01

    The authors reviewed the previous research results about the color changes in heat treated wood,and deeply analyzed the effect of heat treatment method and parameters inlucidng temperature and time of heat treatment,species and chemical composition on the color changes in heat treated wood.The relationships between color changes and chemical composition,physical and mechanical properties were found.The optical stability of the color of heat treated wood was studied.Some suggestions were proposed for the future research.%通过总结热处理对木材颜色变化的研究结果,分析热处理方式、热处理工艺参数包括温度和时间、树种与化学成分对热处理材颜色变化的影响,颜色变化与化学成分以及物理力学性能的相互关系,以及热处理材颜色光稳定性能。对今后研究提出几点建议。

  13. Surface free radicals detection using molecular scavenging method on black spruce wood treated with cold, atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jean-Michel; Levasseur, Olivier; Vlad, Mirela; Stafford, Luc; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Formation of surface free radicals on wood surfaces during plasma treatment could be an important factor when it comes to wood coating adhesion enhancement. In order to explore this aspect, freshly sanded black spruce (Picea mariana) wood samples were exposed to either plane-to-plane atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD) or the flowing afterglow of an AP-DBD and then dipped in a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) solution. Wood veneers (extracted to eliminate small molecules prior to each plasma treatment) showed an increase of their reaction rate toward DPPH after treatment in the AP-DBD operated in nominally pure He; a feature ascribed to the plasma-assisted formation of free radicals on the wood surface. Addition of trace amounts (0.1%) of O2 in the He plasma produced a decrease in DPPH reactivity, suggesting that oxygen-spruce interaction during plasma treatment quenches free radicals formation. Similar experiments performed using the flowing afterglow of AP-DBD operated in either N2 or N2/O2 showed that both treatments do not generate significant amount of surface free radicals. This partially results from oxygen-wood interactions due to the open-air configuration of the afterglow reactor.

  14. Photodegradation of thermally modified wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Kavyashree; Pandey, Krishna K

    2012-12-01

    Natural wood, being biological material, undergoes rapid degradation by ultraviolet (UV) radiations and other environmental factors under outdoor exposure. In order to protect wood from such degradation, the chemical structure of wood is altered by chemical modification or heat treatment. In the present study, heat treated specimens of rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis) were exposed to xenon light source in a weather-o-meter for different periods up to 300 h. Photostability of modified and unmodified wood was evaluated in terms of colour and chemical changes. Light coloured untreated wood became dark upon UV irradiation whereas, dark colour of heat treated wood lightened on UV exposure. CIE lightness parameter (L(*)) decreased for untreated wood whereas its value increased for heat treated wood upon irradiation. Other colour coordinates a(*) and b(*) increased with exposure duration for both untreated and heat treated wood. The overall colour change (ΔE(*)) increased for both untreated and heat treated wood. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies revealed severe lignin degradation of heat treated wood due to UV light exposure. Colour changes and FTIR measurements indicate that thermal modification of wood was ineffective in restricting light induced colour changes and photodegradation of wood polymers.

  15. Differentiation of Wines Treated with Wood Chips Based on Their Phenolic Content, Volatile Composition, and Sensory Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyraleou, Maria; Kallithraka, Stamatina; Chira, Kleopatra; Tzanakouli, Eleni; Ligas, Ioannis; Kotseridis, Yorgos

    2015-12-01

    The effects of both wood chips addition and contact time on phenolic content, volatile composition, color parameters, and organoleptic character of red wine made by a native Greek variety (Agiorgitiko) were evaluated. For this purpose, chips from American, French, Slavonia oak, and Acacia were added in the wine after fermentation. A mixture consisting of 50% French and 50% Americal oak chips was also evaluated. In an attempt to categorize wine samples, various chemical parameters of wines and sensory parameters were studied after 1, 2, and 3 mo of contact time with chips. The results showed that regardless of the type of wood chips added in the wines, it was possible to differentiate the samples according to the contact time based on their phenolic composition and color parameters. In addition, wood-extracted volatile compounds seem to be the critical parameter that could separate the samples according to the wood type. The wines that were in contact with Acacia and Slavonia chips could be separated from the rest mainly due to their distinct sensory characters.

  16. Hfq stimulates the activity of the CCA-adding enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betat Heike

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial Sm-like protein Hfq is known as an important regulator involved in many reactions of RNA metabolism. A prominent function of Hfq is the stimulation of RNA polyadenylation catalyzed by E. coli poly(A polymerase I (PAP. As a member of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily, this enzyme shares a high sequence similarity with an other representative of this family, the tRNA nucleotidyltransferase that synthesizes the 3'-terminal sequence C-C-A to all tRNAs (CCA-adding enzyme. Therefore, it was assumed that Hfq might not only influence the poly(A polymerase in its specific activity, but also other, similar enzymes like the CCA-adding enzyme. Results Based on the close evolutionary relation of these two nucleotidyltransferases, it was tested whether Hfq is a specific modulator acting exclusively on PAP or whether it also influences the activity of the CCA-adding enzyme. The obtained data indicate that the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme is substantially accelerated in the presence of Hfq. Furthermore, Hfq binds specifically to tRNA transcripts, which seems to be the prerequisite for the observed effect on CCA-addition. Conclusion The increase of the CCA-addition in the presence of Hfq suggests that this protein acts as a stimulating factor not only for PAP, but also for the CCA-adding enzyme. In both cases, Hfq interacts with RNA substrates, while a direct binding to the corresponding enzymes was not demonstrated up to now (although experimental data indicate a possible interaction of PAP and Hfq. So far, the basic principle of these stimulatory effects is not clear yet. In case of the CCA-adding enzyme, however, the presented data indicate that the complex between Hfq and tRNA substrate might enhance the product release from the enzyme.

  17. The thermal analysis of the heat-treated Okan wood%热处理圆盘豆木材的热分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史蔷; 鲍甫成; 江京辉; 黄荣凤; 赵有科

    2012-01-01

    以过热蒸汽为传热介质和保护性气体,在热处理温度为160℃、180℃、200℃和220℃,热处理时间均为4h的条件下对圆盘豆木材进行高温热处理后,采用综合热分析仪对圆盘豆热处理材和未处理对照材进行热重分析和差示扫描量热分析,结果表明,热处理使木材的颜色加深、尺寸稳定性增强、强度降低。强度降低的主要原因是热处理使木材中的半纤维素、纤维素、木素发生剧烈的热降解反应。%Okan wood was heat treated at temperature of 160℃, 180℃, 200℃, 220℃ and duration of 4h with the superheated steam as a heating medium and a shielding gas. The thermal gravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry analysis were carried out to the heat-treated and control okan wood specimens through integrated thermal analyzer. The results indicates that the heat-treatment make hemi-cellulous, cellulous and lignin degradation, which leads to the darkening color, the reducing mechanical properties and improving dimensional stability of the heat-treated okan wood.

  18. Modeling of Compressive Strength Parallel to Grain of Heat Treated Scotch Pine (Pinus sylvestris L. Wood by Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yapıcı

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the compressive strength of heat treated Scotch Pine was modeled using artificial neural network. The compressive strength (CS value parallel to grain was determined after exposing the wood to heat treatment at temperature of 130, 145, 160, 175, 190 and 205ºC for 3, 6, 9, 12 hours. The experimental data was evaluated by using multiple variance analysis. Secondly, the effect of heat treatment on the CS of samples was modeled by using artificial neural network (ANN.

  19. Rupture and Modulus of Elasticity of Heat Treated Anatolian Chestnut (Castanea Sativa Wood by Fuzzy Logic Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Yapıcı

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, test samples prepared from Anatolian chestnut (Castanea sativa wood were first exposed to heat treatment at 130, 145, 160, 175, 190 and 205 ºC for 3, 6, 9 and 12 hours. Then the values of the samples of the modulus of rupture (MOR and modulus of elasticity (MOE were determined and evaluated by multiple variance analysis. The aim of this study was to establish the effects of heat treatment on the MOR and MOE values of wood samples by using fuzzy logic classifier. Secondly, input and output values and rule base of the fuzzy logic classifier model were built by using the results obtained from the experiment. The developed fuzzy classifier model could predict the MOR and MOE values of test samples at the accuracy levels of 92.64 % and 90.35 %, respectively. The model could be especially employed in manufacturing stages of timber industry.

  20. Phylogeny of plant calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CCaMKs and functional analyses of tomato CCaMK in disease resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Peng eWang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK is a member of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase superfamily and is essential to microbe- plant symbiosis. To date, the distribution of CCaMK gene in plants has not yet been completely understood, and its function in plant disease resistance remains unclear. In this study, we systemically identified the CCaMK genes in genomes of 44 plant species in Phytozome and analyzed the function of tomato CCaMK (SlCCaMK in resistance to various pathogens. CCaMKs in 18 additional plant species were identified, yet the absence of CCaMK gene in green algae and cruciferous species was confirmed. Sequence analysis of full-length CCaMK proteins from 44 plant species demonstrated that plant CCaMKs are highly conserved across all domains. Most of the important regulatory amino acids are conserved throughout all sequences, with the only notable exception being observed in N-terminal autophosphorylation site corresponding to Ser 9 in the Medicago truncatula CCaMK. CCaMK gene structures are similar, mostly containing six introns with a phase profile of 200200 and the exception was only noticed at the first exons. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that CCaMK lineage is likely to have diverged early from a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK gene in the ancestor of all nonvascular plant species. The SlCCaMK gene was widely and differently responsive to diverse pathogenic stimuli. Furthermore, knock-down of SlCCaMK reduced tomato resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 and decreased H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000 inoculation. Our results reveal that SlCCaMK positively regulates disease resistance in tomato via promoting H2O2 accumulation. SlCCaMK is the first CCaMK gene proved to function in plant disease resistance.

  1. Evaluation of the Resistance of Gmelina arborea Wood Treated With Creosote Oil and Liquid Cashew Nut Shell to Subterranean Termites' Attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Mayowa OWOYEMI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the resistance of Creosote oil (CREO and Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL on theprotection of Gmelina arborea wood against subterranean termites’ attack. Gmelina wooden stakes weretreated with undiluted CREO and with diluted CREO/ kerosene mixtures ratio 1:1 and 1:3; undiluted CNSLand diluted CNSL/kerosene mixtures ratio 1:1 and 1:3, using cold dipping method. Termites’ field exposuretest was carried out at the timber grave yard for 36 months (3 years to test the resistance of CREO andCNSL preservatives to subterranean termites. Weekly visual observations according to American Standardsfor Testing Materials (ASTM were taken to find out the effect of prolonged exposure of treated woodsamples to termites’ attack. CREO treated samples had 54.2, 65.0 and 76.0% weight loss compared to thecontrol (untreated sample having 86.7% respectively for the same period. CNSL treated samples had 80.0,80.8 and 85.0% weight loss respectively compared with the control with 86.7%. These results indicated thatCREO treated samples provided a better protection against subterranean termites compared with CNSLtreated samples for the 36-month period.

  2. Hfq stimulates the activity of the CCA-adding enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Betat Heike; Hajnsdorf Eliane; Bonin Sonja; Scheibe Marion; Mörl Mario

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The bacterial Sm-like protein Hfq is known as an important regulator involved in many reactions of RNA metabolism. A prominent function of Hfq is the stimulation of RNA polyadenylation catalyzed by E. coli poly(A) polymerase I (PAP). As a member of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily, this enzyme shares a high sequence similarity with an other representative of this family, the tRNA nucleotidyltransferase that synthesizes the 3'-terminal sequence C-C-A to all tRNAs (CCA...

  3. Public health assessment for Escambia Wood-Pensacola (A/K/A Escambia Treating Company) Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida, Region 4. Cerclis No. FLD008168346. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-23

    The Escambia Wood-Pensacola hazardous waste site (EWP), also known as the Escambia Treating Company, is in Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida. From 1991 to 1993, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dug up contaminated soil and stored it under a secure high density polyethylene cover. Nearby residents believe that contamination released into the air during the excavation work has worsened their health problems. The authors focused their public health assessment on the following chemicals: arsenic, benzene, dioxins/furans, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Former workers at the plant and trespassers on the EWP site may have accidentally eaten contaminated soil or breathed contaminated dust in the air. Based on the information the authors have, this site is a public health hazard.

  4. Assessment of Ecotoxicity of Topsoils from a Wood Treatment Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.MENCH; C.BES

    2009-01-01

    A series of 9 soil samples were taken at a timber treatment site in SW Prance where Cu sulphate and chromated copper arsenate (CCA) have been used as wood preservatives (Sites P1 to P9) and one soil sample was collected at an adjacent site on the same soil type (Site P10).Copper was a major contaminant in all topsoils,varying from 65 (Soil P5)to 2600 mg Cu kg-1 (Soil P7),exceeding background values for French sandy soils.As and Cr did not accumulate in soil,except at Site P8 (52 mg As kg-1 and 87 mg Cr kg-1) where CCA-treated posts were stacked.Soil ecotoxicity was assessed with bioassays using radish,lettuce,slug Arion rufus L.,and earthworm Dendrobaena octaedra (Savigny).There werc significantly differences in lettuce germination rate,lettuce leaf yield,radish root and leaf yields,slug herbivory,and earthworm avoidance.An additional bioassay showed higher negative impacts on bean shoot and root yields,Rhizobium nodule counts on Bean roots,and guaiacol peroxidase activity in primary Bean leaves for soil from Site P7,with and without fertilisation,than for soil from Site P10,despite both soils having a similar value for computed free ion Cu2+ activity in the soil solution (pCu2+).Beans grown in soil from Site P7 that had been fertilised showed elevated foliar Cu content and phytotoxic symptoms.Soils from Sites P7 (treatment plant) and P6 (storage of treated utility poles) had the highest ecotoxicity,whereas soil from Site P10 (high organic matter content and cation exchange capacity) had the lowest.Except at Site P10,the soil factor pCu2+ computed with soil pH and total soil Cu could be used to predict soil ecotoxicity.

  5. Franklin University of Ohio and the Community College Alliance (CCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This document summarizes a request by Franklin University of Columbus, Ohio to receive approval from the Illinois Board of Higher Education to operate and grant degrees statewide in Illinois. The vehicle through which it proposed to offer instruction was the Community College Alliance (CCA), a creation of the university designed to offer…

  6. Reading Comprehension CCA Basic Skills Curriculum. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    Designed and programmed by the staff of the Courseware and Curriculum Applications (CCA) Group (a unit of the Computer-Based Education Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), this instructor's guide describes a computer-based reading comprehension curriculum designed for adults and adolescents who read at the…

  7. Language Arts CCA Basic Skills Curriculum. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Computer-Based Education Research Lab.

    Designed and programmed by the staff of the Courseware and Curriculum Applications (CCA) Group (a unit of the Computer-Based Education Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), this instructor's guide describes a computer-based language arts curriculum intended to move adult and adolescent students performing at the…

  8. Dynamic probabilistic CCA for analysis of affective behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaou, Mihalis A.; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Pantic, Maja

    2012-01-01

    Fusing multiple continuous expert annotations is a crucial problem in machine learning and computer vision, particularly when dealing with uncertain and subjective tasks related to affective behaviour. Inspired by the concept of inferring shared and individual latent spaces in probabilistic CCA (PCC

  9. 水对液相氧化处理聚乙烯木塑复合材胶接性能的影响%Effect of water on bonding properties for liquidoid chemical oxidation treated wood/PE composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕晓磊; 邸明伟

    2011-01-01

    The surface of wood/polyethylene (PE) composites was treated by liquidoid chemical oxidation to improve its adhesion properties.The water-resistance of treated wood/PE composites bonding joint was studied and the failure mechanism at soaking in water for the bonding joint was investigated by using analysis of contact angle,scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) through effect of water on the surface properties of treated wood/PE composites in soaking experiments.The results showed that the untreated wood/PE composites were hard to be adhered due to the polyethylene component gathered on the surface of composites, and the bonding strength and water-resistance for wood/PE composites bonding joint were improved after liquidoid chemical oxidation treatment.Water showed a remarkable effect on the surface properties for oxidation treated wood/PE composites,the surface structure changed and the crack appeared on the surface due to the moisture absorption and expansion of the wood fiber within composites under soaking in water,which resulted in the failure of bonding joint for wood/PE composites.%采用液相氧化方法对木粉/聚乙烯木塑复合材料进行表面处理以改善其胶接性能研究了氧化处理后木塑复合材料胶接接头的耐水性,并利用接触角测试、SEM、FT-IR等分析手段,探讨了木塑复合材料胶接接头在水环境下的老化失效原因 结果表明,未处理的聚乙烯木塑复合材料难以胶接,经过液相氧化处理后,不但可以提高聚乙烯木塑复合材料的胶接强度,还可改善木塑复合材料胶接接头的耐水性 在水的作用下,液相氧化处理聚乙烯木塑复合材的表面结构会发生改变,复合材料中木质纤维的吸水膨胀也会导致材料表面出现裂纹,致使胶接接头失效.

  10. Effects of Borate Impregnation on the Color and Mechanical Properties of Heat-treated Rubber Wood%硼预处理对橡胶木热改性材颜色和力学性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓文; 李民; 秦韶山; 李家宁

    2011-01-01

    研究硼琢处理对橡胶木热改性材颜色和力学性能的影响。结果显示,1%浓度硼砂溶液预处理,对热改性材的颜色没有影响,当硼砂浓度增加到4%或8%时,木材材色有偏红的趋势。在185℃的热改性条件下,经硼预处理的热改性材的抗弯强度高于对照,在200℃条件下热改性后则无此规律。分析认为,硼预处理对热改性过程有一定影响,但并不是影响热改性材颜色和力学性能的主要因素。%The color and strength of heat-treated rubber wood which were impregnated by sodium borate were evaluated. Wood treated with 1% sodium borate solution showed no significant difference compared with control samples; when treated with 4% or 8% sodium borate solution, the color of wood turned red slightly. When the temperature of heat treatment was at 185℃, borate impregnation had a positive effect on wood strength, but when the temperature of heat treatment went as high as 200℃, the positive effect could not be observed. Borate impregnation affected the property of heat-treated wood, but it was not one of the fatal factors.

  11. Heat-treated wood and its development in Europe%热处理木材及其在欧洲的发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢延军; 刘一星; 孙耀星

    2002-01-01

    Efficient use of timber is a vital concern problem, especially in these regions where the forestry coverage ratio is decreasing. Studies on physical modification of wood have been taken more attention due to the increasing attentions on environmental protection. Thermal modification is emphasized and developed quickly in developing countries, especially in European countries. A large number of researches have been conducted and some industrial production plants have been built. This paper reviewed the history of heat treatment, exemplifies the industrial developments in several European countries, summarized the basic principle of heat treatment and describes the environmental characteristics. The properties of heat-treated wood and its usage are also summed up.%有效的利用木材资源是一个令人们关注的重要课题,尤其是在森林覆盖率低的国家。由于环保意识的增强,人们对木材的功能性改良越来越多地侧重于采用物理处理方法。在这样的背景下,木材热处理在许多发达国家迅速的蓬勃发展起来,尤其是在欧洲。欧洲许多国家的科研机构和生产企业都进行了大量的研究,一些大的木材热处理厂也相继建立。本文回顾了木材热处理技术的发展历程,列举了热处理木材在以荷兰、德国、法国和芬兰为代表的欧洲国家中的工业化现状,总结了热处理材性能改善的原因、环境特性以及性能和用途。

  12. LWD–TCP complex activates the morning gene CCA1 in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Fen; Tsai, Huang-Lung; Joanito, Ignasius; Wu, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chin-Wen; Li, Yi-Hang; Wang, Ying; Hong, Jong Chan; Chu, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    A double-negative feedback loop formed by the morning genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1)/LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the evening gene TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1) contributes to regulation of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis. A 24-h circadian cycle starts with the peak expression of CCA1 at dawn. Although CCA1 is targeted by multiple transcriptional repressors, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR9 (PRR9), PRR7, PRR5 and CCA1 HIKING EXPEDITION (CHE), activators of CCA1 remain elusive. Here we use mathematical modelling to infer a co-activator role for LIGHT-REGULATED WD1 (LWD1) in CCA1 expression. We show that the TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF20 (TCP20) and TCP22 proteins act as LWD-interacting transcriptional activators. The concomitant binding of LWD1 and TCP20/TCP22 to the TCP-binding site in the CCA1 promoter activates CCA1. Our study reveals activators of the morning gene CCA1 and provides an action mechanism that ensures elevated expression of CCA1 at dawn to sustain a robust clock. PMID:27734958

  13. Changes in swelling properties and moisture uptake rate of oil-heat-treated poplar (Populus x euramericana cv. Pannónia wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Bak

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effect of oil heat treatment (OHT on the swelling properties and changes in the rate of moisture uptake of poplar wood (Populus × euramericana cv. Pannónia were investigated. Eighteen different treatments (combinations of three vegetable oils, two temperatures, and three durations were studied. The results showed that OHT decreases the equilibrium moisture content (EMC and the swelling of poplar wood. The degree of swelling and the EMC are influenced by both the duration and temperature of treatment. With an increase in duration and temperature, the EMC decreased. Consequently, the anti-swelling efficiency (ASE increased. OHT wood adsorbs less moisture than natural wood, but it reaches a maximum – EMC at the momentary climate – at the same time under all the investigated treatments. The moisture uptake is fastest in the beginning and thereafter it slows significantly. Decreasing the moisture uptake by OHT wood is due to the decreasing of its water storage capacity.

  14. Study on the decay resistance and chemical properties of heat treated masson's pine wood with N2%马尾松N2热处理材耐腐性能及化学性质的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈居静; 陈瑞英; 马军军

    2012-01-01

    Uniform design experimentation was used to conduct decay resistance and chemical properties of heat treated masson's pine wood in the medium of nitrogen (N2). The results showed that the decay resistance was improved with the treatment temperature increasing and heat preservation time prolonged. The cellulose decreased by 0.9% and the semi-jcellulose decreased by 6.5% after heat treated. The fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis showed that: after treated, the O—H decreased. The optimum technology of heat treatment of masson's pine wood with N2 as a medium is; temperature 220℃ , heat preservation time 4 hours, temperature increasing rate 15℃min-1, the weight-loss ratio of treated wood is 16.4% after decayed, reached the level 2 of the decay resistance.%采用均匀设计法探讨氮气(N2)热处理工艺对人工林马尾松木材耐腐性能及化学性质的影响.结果表明,随处理温度升高,保温时间增加,木材耐腐性能提高;N2热处理使其纤维素含量减少0.9%,半纤维素减少6.5%.红外光谱分析(FTIR)表明,N2热处理使木材内部O-H减少.马尾松N2热处理的较佳工艺条件:处理温度220℃,保温时间4h,升温速率15℃·min -1,此时处理材腐朽后失重率16.4%,已达到Ⅱ级(耐腐).

  15. 铜唑(CA-C)/石蜡防水剂复配处理材的金属腐蚀性能%Metal Corrosion of Copper Azole(CA-C)/Paraffin Wax Emulsion Compound System Treated Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳敏; 马尔妮; 曹金珍

    2015-01-01

    Objective]Copper azole ( CA ) as a new generation of environmentally friendly water-borne wood preservative,its treated wood tends to accelerate the corrosion process of mental. To provide technical basis for reducing metal corrosion issue in wood preservation,the effects of adding paraffin wax emulsion into CA preservative on the metal corrosion of treated wood was investigated.[Method]In this work,two concentrations of CA(0. 3% and 0. 5%) were combined with three concentrations of paraffin wax emulsion(0. 5%,1% and 2%)to treat sapwood of Pinus spp. with the size of 19 mm(T) × 38 mm(R) × 89 mm(L),using a full-cell process. Weight percent gain(WPG)and retention of copper in treated wood were calculated. Furthermore,the metal corrosion of 304 stainless steel,hot dip galvanized steel and Q235 A steel contacted with CA /paraffin wax emulsion compound system treated wood were tested according to the American Wood Protection Association Standard AWPA E12-08,respectively.[Result]1) The retentions of copper in CA treated wood were(1. 81 ± 0. 12)kg·m - 3 and(3. 80 ± 0. 03)kg·m - 3 respectively,reaching use category C3(≥1. 7 kg·m - 3) and C4A(≥3. 3 kg·m - 3). 2) Q235A was the most prone to corrosion with a large area of red copper element on the surface. Hot dip galvanized steel showed mild corrosion and 304 stainless steel was almost not corroded. 3) All corrosion rate of 304 stainless steel was 0; corrosion rate of Q235 A steel contacted with CA treated wood was twice or three times as much as the control,adding paraffin wax emulsion could obviously reduce the metal corrosion rate; the tendency in corrosion of hot dip galvanized steel was similar to that of Q235A steel,but its corrosion rate was much lower.[Conclusion]1 ) Corrosion rate of the three metals contacted with treated wood was exhibited in the following order:Q235A steel > hot dip galvanized steel > 304 stainless steel. 2) After CA treatment,wood presented much more serious corrosion for Q235A steel

  16. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Wood Powder /Polypropylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of wood powder/polypropylene composites with different wood content treated and untreated with the compatibilizer have been studied. It has been found that addition of wood powders and the compatibilizer can both improve the viscoelasticity of composites. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of appropriate wood powder-filled composites decreased. The value for the storage modulus (G') increased gradually with increasing wood powder content. The addition of the compatibiliz...

  17. Thermal analysis about Cryptomeria Fortunei wood treated by the compounds of MUF-Boron%MUF复配硼系化合物处理柳杉木材的热分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴宇博; 刘君良; 邢珍

    2012-01-01

    通过热重(TG)和差热分析(DTA),考察经不同浓度的MUF及其与硼酸、硼砂复配的改性液处理后柳杉木材的热分解过程,结果表明:MUF对木材具有一定的催化成炭作用,复配硼酸、硼砂后其催化成炭作用得到进一步的加强;MUF促进了木材燃烧时的氧化分解,但复配硼酸、硼砂后,氧化分解反应得到明显抑制,放热量降低,剩炭率提高。%The thermal decomposition of Cryptomeria Fortunei wood treated by melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF) resin and the mixture of MUF/boric acid/borax (MBB) with different concentrations were studied by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Results showed that MUF had certain catalytic effect on carbon forming, and the effect was further enhanced after adding boric acid and borax into MUF. The oxidative decomposition of wood in combustion was accelerated due to the treatment of MUF, but obviously restrained after the treatment of MBB. The heat release quantity of wood in combustion was reduced and the char yield ratio of wood after combustion was increased by the treatments of MUF and MBB.

  18. Membrane-less cloth cathode assembly (CCA) for scalable microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui; Wang, Yueqiang; Liu, Chengshuai; Geng, Shu

    2009-08-15

    One of the main challenges for scaling up microbial fuel cell (MFC) technologies is developing low-cost cathode architectures that can generate high power output. This study developed a simple method to convert non-conductive material (canvas cloth) into an electrically conductive and catalytically active cloth cathode assembly (CCA) in one step. The membrane-less CCA was simply constructed by coating the cloth with conductive paint (nickel-based or graphite-based) and non-precious metal catalyst (MnO(2)). Under the fed-batch mode, the tubular air-chamber MFCs equipped with Ni-CCA and graphite-CCA generated the maximum power densities of 86.03 and 24.67 mW m(-2) (normalized to the projected cathode surface area), or 9.87 and 2.83 W m(-3) (normalized to the reactor liquid volume), respectively. The higher power output of Ni-CCA-MFC was associated with the lower volume resistivity of Ni-CCA (1.35 x 10(-2)Omega cm) than that of graphite-CCA (225 x 10(-2)Omega cm). At an external resistance of 100 Omega, Ni-CCA-MFC and graphite-CCA-MFC removed approximately 95% COD in brewery wastewater within 13 and 18d, and achieved coulombic efficiencies of 30.2% and 19.5%, respectively. The accumulated net water loss through the cloth by electro-osmotic drag exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.999) with produced coulombs. With a comparable power production, such CCAs only cost less than 5% of the previously reported membrane cathode assembly. The new cathode configuration here is a mechanically durable, economical system for MFC scalability. PMID:19556120

  19. CcaR is an autoregulatory protein that binds to the ccaR and cefD-cmcI promoters of the cephamycin C-clavulanic acid cluster in Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarta, Irene; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Pérez-Redondo, Rosario; Martín, Juan F; Liras, Paloma

    2002-06-01

    The putative regulatory CcaR protein, which is encoded in the beta-lactam supercluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus, has been partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and heparin affinity chromatography. In addition, it was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified as a His-tagged recombinant protein (rCcaR), and used to raise anti-rCcaR antibodies. The partially purified CcaR protein from S. clavuligerus was able to bind DNA fragments containing the promoter regions of the ccaR gene itself and the bidirectional cefD-cmcI promoter region. In contrast, CcaR did not bind to DNA fragments with the promoter regions of other genes of the cephamycin-clavulanic acid supercluster including lat, blp, claR, car-cyp, and the unlinked argR gene. The DNA shifts obtained with CcaR were prevented by anti-rCcaR immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies but not by anti-rabbit IgG antibodies. ccaR and the bidirectional cefD-cmcI promoter region were fused to the xylE reporter gene and expressed in Streptomyces lividans and S. clavuligerus. These constructs produced low catechol dioxygenase activity in the absence of CcaR; activity was increased 1.7- to 4.6-fold in cultures expressing CcaR. Amplification of the ccaR promoter region lacking its coding sequence in a high-copy-number plasmid in S. clavuligerus ATCC 27064 resulted in a reduced production of cephamycin C and clavulanic acid, by 12 to 20% and 40 to 60%, respectively, due to titration of the CcaR regulator. These findings confirm that CcaR is a positively acting autoregulatory protein able to bind to its own promoter as well as to the cefD-cmcI bidirectional promoter region.

  20. STS-42 Pilot Oswald dons CCA prior to egress exercises in JSC's WETF pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES), dons his communications carrier assembly (CCA) prior to launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29.

  1. Evaluation of Strength Characteristics of Laterized Concrete with Corn Cob Ash (CCA) Blended Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikponmwosa, E. E.; Salau, M. A.; Kaigama, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    Agricultural wastes are dumped in landfills or left on land in which they constitute nuisance. This study presents the results of investigation of strength characteristics of reinforced laterized concrete beams with cement partially replaced with corn cob (agricultural wastes) ash (CCA). Laterized concrete specimen of 25% laterite and 75% sharp sand were made by blending cement with corn cob ash at 0 to 40% in steps of 10%. A concrete mix ratio of 1:2:4 was used to cast 54 cubes of 150×150×150mm size and 54 beams of dimension 750×150×150mm. The results show that the consistency and setting time of cement increased as the percentage replacement of cement with CCA increased while the workability and density of concrete decreased as the percentage of CCA increased. There was a decrease in compressive strength when laterite was introduced to the concrete from 25.04 to 22.96N/mm2 after 28 days and a continual reduction in strength when CCA was further added from 10% to 40% at steps of 10%. Generally, the beam specimens exhibited majorly shear failure with visible diagonal cracks extending from support points to the load points. The corresponding central deflection in beams, due to two points loading, increased as the laterite was added to the concrete mix but reduced and almost approaching that of the control as 10% CCA was added. The deflection then increased as the CCA content further increased to 20%, 30% and 40% in the mix. It was also noted that the deflection of all percentage replacement including 40% CCA is less than the standard recommended maximum deflection of the beam. The optimal flexural strength occurred with 10% CCA content.

  2. Determination of total arsenic in coal and wood using oxygen flask combustion method followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and sensitive procedure for the determination of total arsenic in coal and wood was conducted by use of oxygen flask combustion (OFC) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). The effect of various items (composition of absorbent, standing time between the combustion and filtration, particle size and mass of sample) was investigated. Under the optimized conditions of the OFC method, nine certified reference materials were analyzed, and the values of arsenic concentration obtained by this method were in good accordance with the certified values. The limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method were 0.29 μg g-1 and less than 8%, respectively. In addition, eight kinds of coals and four chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood wastes were analyzed by the present method, and the data were compared to those from the microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) method. The determination of arsenic in solid samples was discussed in terms of applicable scope and concentration range of arsenic.

  3. Focal adhesion kinase and Src phosphorylations in HGF-induced proliferation and invasion of human cholangiocarcinoma cell line, HuCCA-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Urai Pongchairerk; Jun-Lin Guan; Vijittra Leardkamolkarn

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and its association with Src in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced cell signaling in cholangiocarcinoma progression.METHODS: Previously isolated HuCCA-1 cells were re-characterized by immunofluorescent staining and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay for the expression of cytokeratin 19, HGF and c-Met mRNA. Cultured HuCCA-1 cells were treated with HGF and determined for cell proliferation and invasion effects by MTT and invasion assays. Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and co-immunoprecipitation were also performed to study the phosphorylation and interaction of FAK and Src. A novel Src inhibitor (AZM555130) was applied in cultures to investigate the effects on FAK phosphorylation inhibition and on cell proliferation and invasion.RESULTS: HGF enhanced HuCCA-1 cell proliferation and invasion by mediating FAK and Src phosphorylations.FAK-Src interaction occurred in a time-dependent manner that Src was proved to be an upstream signaling molecule to FAK. The inhibitor to Src decreased FAK phosphorylation level in correlation with the reduction of cell proliferation and invasion.CONCLUSION: FAK plays a significant role in signaling pathway of HGF-responsive cell line derived from cholangiocarcinoma. Autophosphorylated Src, induced by HGF, mediates Src kinase activation, which subsequently phosphorylates its substrate, FAK, and signals to cell proliferation and invasion.

  4. IMPROVING OF THE IMPREGNABILITY OF REFRACTORY SPRUCE WOOD BY BACILLUS LICHENIFORMIS PRETREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Yildiz,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study it was aimed to improve impregnability of spruce (Picea orientalis L. wood with bacteria (Bacillus licheniformis A1 pretreatment, using copper/chromium/arsenic Type C (CCA-C and copper azole Type A (CBA-A. The effects of Bacillus licheniformis A1 on weight loss, copper uptake, and compression strength of samples were determined. Weight loss was slightly changed by bacterial degradation in all test groups. The best copper uptake cases were 1466 ppm for CCA-C and 2730 ppm for CBA-A. Improvement on copper uptake with bacteria pretreatment was in a range of 18 to 103% compared to control samples. Compression strength was decreased by bacterial degradation. However strength losses might be acceptable for several construction applications. Bacillus licheniformis A1 seems to have a good potential for increasing the permeability of spruce wood.

  5. Fire Reterdant Chemicals Affecting Combustion Resistance of Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın ÖRS; Sönmez, Abdullah

    1998-01-01

    Wood is an important material used in construction elements. However since it can be affected by biotic and abiotic deteriorating agents, it should be treated with chemical impregnating materials prior to use. In this study, the effects of water-soluble impregnating chemicals on the combustion resistance of wood was investigated. For this purpose, panels were prepared with oriental beech wood (Fagus orientalis L.) and pine wood (Pinus silvestris L.), which are widely used in industry. These ...

  6. 2D-3D Face Recognition Method Based on a Modified CCA-PCA Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Kamencay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a proposed methodology for face recognition based on an information theory approach to coding and decoding face images. In this paper, we propose a 2D-3D face-matching method based on a principal component analysis (PCA algorithm using canonical correlation analysis (CCA to learn the mapping between a 2D face image and 3D face data. This method makes it possible to match a 2D face image with enrolled 3D face data. Our proposed fusion algorithm is based on the PCA method, which is applied to extract base features. PCA feature-level fusion requires the extraction of different features from the source data before features are merged together. Experimental results on the TEXAS face image database have shown that the classification and recognition results based on the modified CCA-PCA method are superior to those based on the CCA method. Testing the 2D-3D face match results gave a recognition rate for the CCA method of a quite poor 55% while the modified CCA method based on PCA-level fusion achieved a very good recognition score of 85%.

  7. Study on Antibacterial Properties of Poplar Wood Treated with CuO-ZnO Nanocomposite Preservative%CuO-ZnO纳米复合防腐剂对杨木抑菌性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许民; 李凤竹; 王佳贺; 李坚

    2014-01-01

    以普通CuO、ZnO粉体为原料,在分散剂柠檬酸铵作用下,用纳米研磨机,通过湿法研磨技术制备CuO-ZnO纳米复合防腐剂,用激光粒度仪检测不同浓度纳米粒子粒径及其分布,参照LY/T 1283-2011研究CuO-ZnO纳米复合防腐剂的抑菌性能,借助扫描电子显微镜观察木材腐朽12周后菌丝生长情况,分析复合防腐剂中药物浓度与木材抑菌性的关系以及防腐剂在木材中的留存率。结果表明:测定纳米复合防腐剂的最小平均粒径为41.7 nm;CuO-ZnO纳米复合防腐剂对白腐菌和褐腐菌均有一定的抑菌性,其处理后木材的防腐性和抗流失性能均较好;药剂浓度达到1.25%时即可达到强耐腐Ⅰ级标准,此时平均载药量为4.81 kg/m3,质量损失率8.2%,符合性能优良的木材防腐剂指标要求。%Taking common CuO and ZnO powder as raw materials,ammonium citrate as dispersant to be pro-cessed with nano grinding machine,the CuO-ZnO nanocomposite preservative was prepared by wet grinding technol-ogy.The size and distribution of nanocomposite particles under different preservative concentrations were measured by ZetaPALS.The decay resistance of CuO-ZnO nanocomposite preservative was studied by referring to‘Method of la-boratory test for toxicity of wood preservatives to decay fungi’(LY/T1283-2011),and by means of the scanning e-lectron microscope (SEM)to observe the wood decay mycelia growth after 12 weeks of treatment.The average parti-cle diameter of the nanocomposite preservative and its left-over ratio were analyzed,the relationship between the par-ticle diameter and the decay resistance of the timber was studied.The results showed that the average minimum parti-cle diameter of the nanocomposite preservative was 41.7 nm,the CuO-ZnO nanocomposite preservative showed some antibacterial property against the white and brown rot fungi,because the treated wood blocks had pretty good decay resistance and leach

  8. Transgenic plants expressing GLK1 and CCA1 having increased nitrogen assimilation capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A.; Nero, Damion C.

    2012-04-10

    Provided herein are compositions and methods for producing transgenic plants. In specific embodiments, transgenic plants comprise a construct comprising a polynucleotide encoding CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1, operably linked to a plant-specific promote, wherein the CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 is ectopically overexpressed in the transgenic plants, and wherein the promoter is optionally a constitutive or inducible promoter. In other embodiments, transgenic plants in which express a lower level of CCA1, GLK1 or bZIP1 are provided. Also provided herein are commercial products (e.g., pulp, paper, paper products, or lumber) derived from the transgenic plants (e.g., transgenic trees) produced using the methods provided herein.

  9. Citation content analysis (cca): A framework for syntactic and semantic analysis of citation content

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guo; Milojević, Staša

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new framework for Citation Content Analysis (CCA), for syntactic and semantic analysis of citation content that can be used to better analyze the rich sociocultural context of research behavior. The framework could be considered the next generation of citation analysis. This paper briefly reviews the history and features of content analysis in traditional social sciences, and its previous application in Library and Information Science. Based on critical discussion of the theoretical necessity of a new method as well as the limits of citation analysis, the nature and purposes of CCA are discussed, and potential procedures to conduct CCA, including principles to identify the reference scope, a two-dimensional (citing and cited) and two-modular (syntactic and semantic modules) codebook, are provided and described. Future works and implications are also suggested.

  10. Evaluation of urine CCA assays for detection of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillary L Shane

    Full Text Available Although accurate assessment of the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni is important for the design and evaluation of control programs, the most widely used tools for diagnosis are limited by suboptimal sensitivity, slow turn-around-time, or inability to distinguish current from former infections. Recently, two tests that detect circulating cathodic antigen (CCA in urine of patients with schistosomiasis became commercially available. As part of a larger study on schistosomiasis prevalence in young children, we evaluated the performance and diagnostic accuracy of these tests--the carbon test strip designed for use in the laboratory and the cassette format test intended for field use. In comparison to 6 Kato-Katz exams, the carbon and cassette CCA tests had sensitivities of 88.4% and 94.2% and specificities of 70.9% and 59.4%, respectively. However, because of the known limitations of the Kato-Katz assay, we also utilized latent class analysis (LCA incorporating the CCA, Kato-Katz, and schistosome-specific antibody results to determine their sensitivities and specificities. The laboratory-based CCA test had a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 89.4% by LCA while the cassette test had a sensitivity of 96.3% and a specificity of 74.7%. The intensity of the reaction in both urine CCA tests reflected stool egg burden and their performance was not affected by the presence of soil transmitted helminth infections. Our results suggest that urine-based assays for CCA may be valuable in screening for S. mansoni infections.

  11. A General Construction of IND-CCA2 Secure Public Key Encryption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiltz, Eike; Malone-Lee, John

    2003-01-01

    We propose a general construction for public key encryption schemes that are IND-CCA2 secure in the random oracle model. We show that the scheme proposed in [1, 2] fits our general framework and moreover that our method of analysis leads to a more efficient security reduction.......We propose a general construction for public key encryption schemes that are IND-CCA2 secure in the random oracle model. We show that the scheme proposed in [1, 2] fits our general framework and moreover that our method of analysis leads to a more efficient security reduction....

  12. A kind of Face Recognition Method Based on CCA Feature Information Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Xia NIU; Li, Guo

    2013-01-01

    In order to achieve more local facial feature, a kind of sub image face recognition method based on RS-Sp CCA feature information fusion is proposed in this paper. According to take samples for the local facial feature of sub image and use CCA to fuse the global facial feature and the local facial feature information after sampling, the global feature of image can be fully used to construct much more different kinds of component classifiers. Then, make experimental analysis on databases of 3 ...

  13. Narrowing the Broader Autism Phenotype: A Study Using the Communication Checklist-Adult Version (CC-A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Coon, Hilary; Miller, Judith; Salisbury, Bryanna; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether the Communication Checklist-Adult (CC-A) could identify subtypes of social and communication dysfunction in autism probands and their parents. The CC-A is divided into subscales measuring linguistic ability as well as two aspects of social communication: the Pragmatic Skills subscale assesses the level of pragmatic…

  14. Accuracy of urine circulating cathodic antigen (CCA test for Schistosoma mansoni diagnosis in different settings of Cote d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean T Coulibaly

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Promising results have been reported for a urine circulating cathodic antigen (CCA test for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni. We assessed the accuracy of a commercially available CCA cassette test (designated CCA-A and an experimental formulation (CCA-B for S. mansoni diagnosis. METHODOLOGY: We conducted a cross-sectional survey in three settings of Côte d'Ivoire: settings A and B are endemic for S. mansoni, whereas S. haematobium co-exists in setting C. Overall, 446 children, aged 8-12 years, submitted multiple stool and urine samples. For S. mansoni diagnosis, stool samples were examined with triplicate Kato-Katz, whereas urine samples were tested with CCA-A. The first stool and urine samples were additionally subjected to an ether-concentration technique and CCA-B, respectively. Urine samples were examined for S. haematobium using a filtration method, and for microhematuria using Hemastix dipsticks. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Considering nine Kato-Katz as diagnostic 'gold' standard, the prevalence of S. mansoni in setting A, B and C was 32.9%, 53.1% and 91.8%, respectively. The sensitivity of triplicate Kato-Katz from the first stool and a single CCA-A test was 47.9% and 56.3% (setting A, 73.9% and 69.6% (setting B, and 94.2% and 89.6% (setting C. The respective sensitivity of a single CCA-B was 10.4%, 29.9% and 75.0%. The ether-concentration technique showed a low sensitivity for S. mansoni diagnosis (8.3-41.0%. The specificity of CCA-A was moderate (76.9-84.2%; CCA-B was high (96.7-100%. The likelihood of a CCA-A color reaction increased with higher S. mansoni fecal egg counts (odds ratio: 1.07, p<0.001. A concurrent S. haematobium infection or the presence of microhematuria did not influence the CCA-A test results for S. mansoni diagnosis. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: CCA-A showed similar sensitivity than triplicate Kato-Katz for S. mansoni diagnosis with no cross-reactivity to S. haematobium and microhematuria. The low sensitivity

  15. CCA 3101/4101 Environmental Humanities: The History of a Unit through an Ecopedagogical Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John Charles

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 the author taught, for the first time, the well-established unit CCA3101/4101 Environmental Humanities in the School of Communications and Arts at ECU (Edith Cowan University) in Western Australia. The unit has a 20-year history through associate professor Rod Giblett and parallels the development of the environmental humanities as a field…

  16. A new version of code Java for 3D simulation of the CCA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kebo; Xiong, Hailing; Li, Chao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a new version of the program of CCA model. In order to benefit from the advantages involved in the latest technologies, we migrated the running environment from JDK1.6 to JDK1.7. And the old program was optimized into a new framework, so promoted extendibility.

  17. STS-53 Pilot Cabana adjusts CCA during JSC launch emergency egress training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-53 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Robert D. Cabana, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), adjusts communications carrier assembly (CCA) chin strap and microphones before donning his helmet. Cabana is preparing for launch emergency egress bailout procedures in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9NE.

  18. Glycerin Pretreatment Effect on Heat-treated Wood Dimensional Stability%甘油预处理对热处理材尺寸稳定性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党娅萍; 闫丽; 雷亚芳

    2012-01-01

    为提高木材的尺寸稳定性,采用甘油水溶液对毛白杨和云杉进行预处理,然后再进行热处理.通过检测处理材的密度、平衡含水率、吸水和吸湿抗胀率等,结果表明:与未预处理的热处理材相比,经甘油水溶液预处理后,热处理材的密度增加率提高;平衡含水率先降低后增加;吸水和吸湿抗胀率均显著增加.%Poplar (Populus tomentosa) and spruce iPicea asperata) samples were pretreated by soaking them in a glycerin solution before further heat treatment. Density increasing rate, moisture content, moisture adsorption antiswelling efficiency (ASE), and water absorption ASE of the treated wood samples were measured. The results showed that after glycerin pretreatment the sample's density increasing rate increased, their equilibrium moisture content first decreased but then increased, and both moisture adsorption and water absorption ASEs also increased.

  19. 扩增ccaR基因提高棒状链霉菌克拉维酸产量的研究%Study on application of ccaR Streptomyces clavuligerus to increase clavulanic acid production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左志晗; 郑津辉

    2011-01-01

    在棒状链霉菌B71-14中扩增对克拉维酸具有正调控作用的基因ccaR,构建了ccaR的重组质粒pSET152-ccaR,通过接合转移将重组质粒pSET152-ccaR转入了S.clavuligerus B71-14中,通过pSET15 2-ccaR中的attP位点整个质粒插入到S.clavuligerus B71-14基因组中的attB位点,实现了S.clavuligerus B71-14基因组DNA中增加一个拷贝ccaR基因的目的,所得突变株S.clavuligerus::ccaR产酸量可达820.91 mg/L,较出发菌株提高了54%.

  20. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Focus Areas About RWJF Search Menu How We ... lives. Learn more For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation supports a wide array of ...

  1. Mechanics of Wood Machining

    CERN Document Server

    Csanády, Etele

    2013-01-01

    Wood is one of the most valuable materials for mankind, and since our earliest days wood materials have been widely used. Today we have modern woodworking machine and tools; however, the raw wood materials available are continuously declining. Therefore we are forced to use this precious material more economically, reducing waste wherever possible. This new textbook on the “Mechanics of Wood Machining” combines the quantitative, mathematical analysis of the mechanisms of wood processing with practical recommendations and solutions. Bringing together materials from many sources, the book contains new theoretical and experimental approaches and offers a clear and systematic overview of the theory of wood cutting, thermal loading in wood-cutting tools, dynamic behaviour of tool and work piece, optimum choice of operational parameters and energy consumption, the wear process of the tools, and the general regularities of wood surface roughness. Diagrams are provided for the quick estimation of various process ...

  2. Ethanolamine iin impregnated wood

    OpenAIRE

    Humar, Miha; Petrič, Marko

    2000-01-01

    Wood preservation is necessary and is economically important. Copper compoundsare used for wood preservation because of their good fungicidal properties. Since copper compounds do not fix into wood, they can leach out ofit. A presence of chromium prevents leaching of copper from wood. Recently, many countries intend to bound or limit the use of chromium salts. Therefore, experts looking for other suitable compounds to fix copper and amines seem to be suitable substitutes for chromium. We repo...

  3. Non_standard Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    . Using parametric design tools and computer controlled production facilities Copenhagens Centre for IT and Architecture undertook a practice based research into performance based non-standard element design and mass customization techniques. In close cooperation with wood construction software......, but the integration of traditional wood craft techniques. The extensive use of self adjusting, load bearing wood-wood joints contributed to ease in production and assembly of a performance based architecture....

  4. The effect of some wood preservatives on the thermal degradation of Scots pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomak, Eylem D., E-mail: eylemdizman@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Industrial Engineering Department, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Baysal, Ergun, E-mail: bergun@mu.edu.tr [Mugla University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Wood Science and Technology, Kotekli, 48000 Mugla (Turkey); Peker, Huseyin, E-mail: peker100@hotmail.com [Artvin Coruh University, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Industrial Engineering Department, 06100 Artvin (Turkey)

    2012-11-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scots pine samples were impregnated with 10 commercial wood preservatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal degradation of wood was evaluated by TG, DTG and DTA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal behavior of treated wood differed from that of untreated wood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boron containing wood preservatives yielded more charcoal than other preservatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Boric oxide and metal compounds in the formulations may affect char weight. - Abstract: Wood has been a structural material for many years; however, its ability to burn has limited its use in some applications. This study aims to evaluate the effect of commercial wood preservatives having concentration of 4% on the thermal behavior of Scots pine wood, and compare the fire retardant effectiveness of these preservatives with that of boron compounds. Thermal degradation of treated and untreated wood samples was evaluated by thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermogravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Thermal behavior of treated wood differed from thermal behavior of untreated wood in terms of a high char yield. Results showed that weight loss of wood reduced while char yield increased in the charring phase of the pyrolysis in the boron containing preservative treated wood accompanying with pyrolysis temperature lowered. The highest char yield was obtained from the samples treated with disodium octaborate tetrahydrate in the all treated groups.

  5. Request for wood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the wood collection at the Rijksherbarium was greatly expanded following a renewed interest in wood anatomy as an aid for solving classification problems. Staff members of the Rijksherbarium added to the collection by taking interesting wood samples with them from their expeditions (

  6. Limited oxygen index levels of impregnated Scots pine wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomak, Eylem Dizman, E-mail: eylemdizman@yahoo.com [Forest Industry Engineering Department, Faculty of Forestry, Bursa Technical University, 16200 Bursa (Turkey); Cavdar, Ayfer Donmez [Interior Architecture Department, Faculty of Architecture, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2013-12-10

    Highlights: • Scots pine samples were treated with 4 wood preservatives with various concentrations. • Limited oxygen index level was evaluated both for leached and un-leached samples. • All treatments improved fire retardance of samples despite some chemicals leached out. • Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results. • LOI of samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil was not changed by leaching. - Abstract: In this study, effect of various concentrations of boron powder, mixture of boric acid and borax, fireproof agent based on liquid blend of limestone, and silicon oil on limited oxygen index levels (LOI) of S. pine wood was investigated. Wood samples were first vacuum treated with the preservatives, and then were subjected to leaching procedure. Samples treated with fireproof agent showed the best results for improving the fire retardancy of wood, furthermore, samples treated with 25%, 50% and 100% of the solution did not burn. Leaching did not considerably change the LOI of wood samples treated with boron powder and silicon oil; however, LOI levels of samples treated with the mixture of boric acid and borax and fireproof agent were affected by leaching procedure probably arising those preservatives did not chemically bond to main wood components. All treatments improved fire retardancy of samples despite some amount of preservatives leached out from wood.

  7. Wood production, wood technology, and biotechnological impacts.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In the year 2001, Prof. Dr. Ursula Kües was appointed at the Faculty of Forest Sciences and Forest Ecology of the Georg-August-University Göttingen to the chair Molecular Wood Biotechnology endowed by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU). Her group studies higher fungi in basic and applied research. Research foci are on mushroom development and on fungal enzymes degrading wood and their applications in wood biotechnology. This book has been edited to thank the DBU for all support given to...

  8. 傅萍教授培土抑木法治疗经行咳血验案举隅%Professor Fu Ping's Case in Using Method of Breeding Earth and Suppressing Wood to Treat the Hemoptysis in Menstrual Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王月星; 傅萍

    2016-01-01

    Objective]The article summarizes professor Fu Ping clinical evidence-based medicine in the experience of vicarious menstruation. [Methods] From disease name,pathogenesis,therapy and so on,summarize the experience and thoughts of treating,and for a case to analyze treatment characteristics and therapeutic effect. [Results]Fu Ping holds the view that the reason for the occurrence of vicarious menstruation is liver fire invading lung,lung or kidney Yin deficiency,qi stagnation blood stasis or liver-yang hyperactivity and spleen deficienty; The location of disease is in the lung,closely related with liver and kidney.The main therapy is to nourish Yin and moisten lung or clear liver and decrease internal heat. For the syndrome of liver-yang hyperactivity and spleen deficiently,Fu Ping using method of breeding earth and suppressing wood to treat is medicable.[Conclusion]Professor Fu Ping's experience in treating vicarious menstruation is worthy of study.%[目的]介绍全国名中医傅萍教授临床辨证施治经行咳血的经验。[方法]从病名、病因病机、治法治则等方面总结傅师治疗经行咳血的学术观点,选择傅师验案举隅,并归纳分析其诊治特色与治疗效果。[结果]傅萍教授认为经行咳血多是肝火犯肺、肺肾阴虚、气滞血瘀或脾虚肝旺所致,其病位在肺,与肝、肾密切相关,治疗上以中药滋阴润肺,清肝降火为主。临床上偶遇一例经行咳血患者证属脾虚肝旺,傅师以培土抑木法治疗疗效显著。[结论]傅萍教授辨治经行咳血的经验,特色鲜明,疗效确定,值得深入学习和推广运用。

  9. Wood quality changes caused by mineral fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Sette Jr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The diverse and important use of wood from fast growth eucalyptus plantations requires the analysis of the effect of mineral fertilizers on wood quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical characteristics and wood density from Eucalyptus grandis trees (3 m x 2 m spacing fertilized with potassium and sodium (at planting, 6 th and 12th month. Fifteen (15 6 years old eucalyptus trees were selected (5 trees/treatment, cut and wood samples at DBH (1,3 m were taken for anatomical characteristics (fiber and vessels and wood density analysis. Results showed that eucalyptus trees treated with mineral fertilizers did not show significant alteration in average wood density, with radial profile model common to all three treatments, characterized by a values increase in the region next to the pith, toward to bark. Mineral fertilization influenced wood anatomical characteristics: treatment with sodium was characterized by thinner walls and lumen larger diameter; in treatment with potassium, larger vessels were detected.

  10. Isolation and characterization of Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 exhibiting ligninolytic potential

    OpenAIRE

    Akita, Hironaga; Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Mohd Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Microbial degradation of lignin releases fermentable sugars, effective utilization of which could support biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. In the present study, a lignin-degrading bacterium was isolated from leaf soil and identified as Burkholderia sp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This strain was named CCA53, and its lignin-degrading capability was assessed by observing its growth on medium containing alkali lignin or lignin-associated aromatic monomers as the sole carbo...

  11. Getting full control of canonical correlation analysis with the AutoBiplot.CCA function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. Rui

    2016-06-01

    Function AutoBiplot.CCA was built in R language. Given two multivariate data sets, this function carries out a conventional canonical correlation analysis, followed by the automatic production of predictive biplots based on the accuracy of readings as assessed by a mean standard predictive error and a user defined tolerance value. As the user's intervention is mainly restricted to the choice of the magnitude of the t.axis value, common misinterpretations, overestimations and adjustments between outputs and personal beliefs are avoided.

  12. STS-39 MS McMonagle adjusts CCA microphones prior to simulation in JSC's WETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Donald R. McMonagle, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), adjusts the microphones on his communications carrier assembly (CCA) prior to underwater simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. McMonagle will be lowered into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool for an underwater simulation of contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) procedures. He is scheduled as a crewmember aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103 in the spring of 1991.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia sp. Strain CCA53, Isolated from Leaf Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Zen-ichiro; Yusoff, Mohd Zulkhairi Mohd; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain CCA53 was isolated from leaf soil collected in Higashi-Hiroshima City in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. Here, we present a draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of a total of 4 contigs containing 6,647,893 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0% and comprising 9,329 predicted coding sequences. PMID:27389268

  14. Anonymous Multi-Receiver Identity-Based Authenticated Encryption with CCA Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-I Fan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In a multi-receiver encryption system, a sender chooses a set of authorized receivers and sends them a message securely and efficiently, as the message is well encrypted and only one ciphertext corresponding to the message is generated no matter how many receivers the sender has chosen. It can be applied to video conferencing systems, pay-per-view channels, remote education, and so forth. Due to privacy considerations, an authorized receiver may not expect that his identity is revealed. In 2010, anonymous multi-receiver identity-based (ID-based encryption was first discussed, and furthermore, many works on the topic have been presented so far. Unfortunately, we find that all of those schemes fail to prove the chosen ciphertext attacks (CCA security in either confidentiality or anonymity. In this manuscript, we propose the first anonymous multi-receiver ID-based authenticated encryption scheme with CCA security in both confidentiality and anonymity. In the proposed scheme, the identity of the sender of a ciphertext can be authenticated by the receivers after a successful decryption. In addition, the proposed scheme also is the first CCA-secure one against insider attacks. Moreover, only one pairing computation is required in decryption.

  15. Antibacterial Performance of Solid Wood Flooring Treated by Modified Melamine Formaldehyde Resin%改性三聚氰胺树脂用于实木地板抗菌处理的工艺及性能评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田野; 张洋; 崔举庆; 贾翀; 周兆兵; 吴羽飞

    2013-01-01

    为使杉木实木地板具有抗菌功能,以三聚氰胺(MF)树脂作为抗菌剂载体,采用真空浸渍工艺处理杉木地板基材,探讨浸渍时间、MF树脂固体含量和相对真空度对杉木试样增重率的影响,并评价地板基材的抗菌效果.结果表明:随着浸渍时间、树脂固体含量、相对真空度的增加,试样的增重率提高,抗菌性亦随之增强.采用试验得出的较佳工艺处理的杉木地板基材,其抗菌性可达到LY/T 1926-2010中规定的Ⅰ级强抗菌级别.%In order to prevent bacteria spread on Chinese fir solid wood flooring samples,the authors impregnated the surfaces with melamine formaldehyde (MF) resin mixed with an antibacterial agent and dispersant through a vacuum process.The effects of impregnation time,MF resin solids content and vacuum level on the weight gain of samples were studied.The results showed that samples treated with 50% MF (by weight) solution under-0.095 MPa vacuum pressure for 2 h reached the antibacterial requirements for level 1 of the Chinese Industry Standard LY/T 1926-2010.

  16. Wood decay at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  17. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N.; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect. PMID:27649315

  18. STRENGTH OF ADHESIVE JOINTS OF WOOD ON THE BASIS OF ELECTRICALLY TREATED GLUES Прочность клеевых соединений древесины на основе электрообработанных клеев

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozgovoy N. V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of creating of wood adhesive joints of high strength, through the use of adhesives, which were subjected to electrical treat-ment. We study the effect on the cohesive and adhe-sive strength of the joints on glues on the wet ability of wood adhesives and adhesive viscosity, exposed to electric field treatment

  19. STRENGTH OF ADHESIVE JOINTS OF WOOD ON THE BASIS OF ELECTRICALLY TREATED GLUES Прочность клеевых соединений древесины на основе электрообработанных клеев

    OpenAIRE

    Mozgovoy N. V.

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the problem of creating of wood adhesive joints of high strength, through the use of adhesives, which were subjected to electrical treat-ment. We study the effect on the cohesive and adhe-sive strength of the joints on glues on the wet ability of wood adhesives and adhesive viscosity, exposed to electric field treatment

  20. State-of-the-art of the European regulation on wood wastes and wood ashes valorization. Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has the objective of comparing the regulations of 10 European countries with that of France, in relation to the classification and recycling of wood waste, in particular lightly treated wood, as well as recycling of wood ash. The first part relating to wood waste presents a detailed analysis by country as well as a summary, on the one hand, of the various sectors for recycling waste wood and, on the other, the emission limits for their energy recovery. Generally, there is a distinction between waste covered by the incineration directive, and the others, without any particular category for lightly treated wood. However, recommendations emerge from this that are based essentially on the regulations or guidelines observed in Germany, Austria and the United Kingdom. The second part relating to wood ash also a presents a detailed analysis by country as well as a summary of the various sectors of recycling and limit values for spreading. Ash is generally considered as waste, and is recycled on a case-by case basis. Only Germany and Austria have clearly integrated wood ash in their regulatory framework. Overall this study shows the need for uniform regulation at European level, establishing environment requirements for recycling wood waste and wood ash, in order to encourage development of the use of biomass

  1. 超临界CO2流体处理对木材浸注性的影响%Study of Influence on Wood Impregnation Treated with Supercritical CO2 Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李君; 李坚; 李龙

    2011-01-01

    Timber of Ochroma lagopus and Bombax malabaricum was treated with supercritical CO2 fluid under different pressure, time duration and temperature conditions, and the weight reduction rate (WRR) and the weight increase rate ( WIR) post impregnation of the specimen were determined to explore the influence of technological conditions for supercritical CO2 fluid on the timber impregnation. The results showed that the WIR value of specimen of both tree species treated with supercritical CO2 fluid was greater than that of the control, which indicated that the process of supercritical CO2 fluid treatment could improve the impregnation of the wood. The pressure, temperature and time duration of supercritical CO2 fluid treatment all inlfuenced on WRR and WIR values of the specimen, but the inluence pattern varied. The experiments also showed that when ethanol was added into the supercritical CO2 fluid as entrainer before impregnation treatment, both the WRR and WIR values of the specimen were higher than those of the control.%采用不同压力、时间、温度的超临界CO2流体对轻木、木棉进行处理,测试试件的失重率和浸注后增重率,探究超临界CO2流体处理工艺条件对木材浸注性的影响.结果表明:经过超临界CO2流体处理的轻木和木棉增重率大于未经过处理的,超临界CO2流体处理能提高木材的浸注性;超临界CO2流体处理的压力、温度、时间对试件的失重率、增重率均有影响,但影响规律不同;在加入乙醇作携带剂后,试件的失重率均高于不加携带剂的,浸注试验的增重率也高于不加携带剂的处理.

  2. The effects of heat treatment on the physical properties of juvenile wood and mature wood of Eucalyptus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir Cihad Bal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment can be used to improve the physical properties and durability of wood. The results achieved by heat treatment can be affected significantly by various factors. Juvenile wood and mature wood from the same trunk have different properties, and the effects of heat treatment on their physical properties have not been well defined. Thus, a study to determine the differences in the physical properties of juvenile wood and mature wood of E. grandis after heat treatment was conducted. Samples of both types of wood were treated at temperatures of 120, 150, and 180 oC for durations of 4, 6, and 8 h. The results showed that the physical properties of juvenile and mature wood, e.g., swelling, moisture content, and fiber saturation point, did not decrease to the same extent. Mass loss of mature wood was higher than that of juvenile wood. Generally, percentage decreases of volumetric swelling, moisture content, and fiber saturation point of juvenile wood were more affected than those of mature wood.

  3. Mobility of copper, chromium and arsenic from treated timber into grapevines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byong-Gu; Vogeler, Iris; Bolan, Nanthi S; Clothier, Brent; Green, Steve; Kennedy, John

    2007-12-15

    The use of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) treated timber posts as support structures in New Zealand vineyards has raised concerns regarding the release of heavy metal(loid)s from the treated timber into the environment. A laboratory experiment was set up to evaluate if post sealing by painting reduces the release rate of CCA metal(loid)s from timber posts. Three posts were painted (Gripset 38, Multi Purpose Bitumen Rubber) on the bottom part, submerged in freshwater, and the concentrations of copper (Cu), chromium (Cr) and arsenic (As) in the water were monitored over a period of 8 months. Three additional, unpainted posts were also used. The CCA contents in the water showed a clear difference between the painted and the unpainted posts, and painting the bottom of the posts reduced the release rate by 50-75%. To monitor the possible mobility of CCA from treated posts into grapevines further, an experiment with four-year-old grapevines planted into sixteen lysimeters was set up in a greenhouse. To half the lysimeters Cu, Cr and As were added to the soil surface at rates of 16, 20, and 12.5 mg/month from 15 November 2005 to 5 May 2006. The other lysimeters acted as a control. Soil solutions were collected at 50, 150 and 300 mm depths using suction cups after seven application of the CCA solution. The results showed that all the elements moved to a depth of 50 mm. Grape fruit, leaves and rachis were analysed for CCA metal(loid)s, but did not show any differences between the CCA-treated and control lysimeters. This indicated either that these metals were not taken up by grapevines or that their translocation from roots to the upper part of the vine was negligible. Further monitoring of CCA metal(loid)s in various parts of the grapevines, including roots, needs to be undertaken. PMID:17889258

  4. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust parame...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  5. Ecological risks of an old wood impregnation mill: application of the Triad approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Anne-Mari; Kilpi-Koski, Johanna; Väisänen, Ari O; Penttinen, Sari; van Gestel, Cornelius A M; Penttinen, Olli-Pekka

    2009-07-01

    Although many studies deal with the distribution and mobility of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) metals in soil, the ecotoxicity of CCA-contaminated soils is rarely studied. The Triad approach was applied to determine the ecological risks posed by a CCA mixture at a decommissioned wood impregnation mill in southern Finland. A combination of (1) chemical analyses; (2) toxicity tests with plants (aquatic: Lemna minor; terrestrial: Lactuca sativa), earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus), and enchytraeids (Enchytraeus albidus) conducted on contaminated soils, their aqueous extracts, and well water collected from the site; and (3) determination of the abundance of enchytraeids and nematodes and the bioaccumulation of metals in plants (horsetail) collected from the field were used to assess the actual risk. Although metal concentrations were low, L. minor growth appeared to be reduced by As contamination of the well water. In soil, metals were heterogeneously distributed with total concentrations of 14.8 to 4360 mg As/kg, 15.2 to 1740 mg Cr/kg, and 4.83 to 790 mg Cu/kg. In several samples, concentrations were above Finnish regulatory guideline values and exceeded the half maximal effective concentration (EC50) or 50% lethal concentration (LC50) values for the toxicity of the individual metals to earthworms and enchytraeids, indicating hazards to the ecosystem. (Bio)availability of metals was high, as indicated by weak electrolyte extractions and body residues in L. rubellus and E. albidus exposed in bioassays. Earthworm survival correlated significantly with body metal concentrations, but not with soil total metal concentrations. Enchytraeid responses in the soil bioassays were less sensitive to CCA metal exposure. Plant growth was affected by CCA pollution, with L. sativa root elongation correlating significantly with total and available As concentrations and L. minor development being significantly reduced in H2O extracts of the most contaminated soil sample. Abundance of

  6. 铬化砷酸铜防腐处理木材对环境安全的影响综述%The Evaluation of the Impact of Chromated Copper Arsenate Treated Wood on the Environmental Safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于丽丽; 唐镇忠; 马晓军; 朱礼智

    2013-01-01

    对长期以来在木材防腐市场居于主导地位的铬化砷酸铜(CCA)处理木材对环境的影响进行了较为系统、全面的介绍,其中包括CCA防腐剂中铜、铬、砷等元素对环境的影响,以及CCA防腐处理木材使用过程中对环境的影响,旨在促进CCA处理木材的科学生产,保证CCA防腐处理木材的使用安全.

  7. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.;

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of Streptomyces clavuligerus ΔccaR::tsr: effects of the cephamycin C-clavulanic acid cluster regulator CcaR on global regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Álvarez, R; Rodríguez-García, A; Santamarta, I; Pérez-Redondo, R; Prieto-Domínguez, A; Martínez-Burgo, Y; Liras, P

    2014-05-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 and S. clavuligerus ΔccaR::tsr cultures were grown in asparagine-starch medium, and samples were taken in the exponential and stationary growth phases. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the expression of 186 genes was altered in the ccaR-deleted mutant. These genes belong to the cephamycin C gene cluster, clavulanic acid gene cluster, clavams, holomycin, differentiation, carbon, nitrogen, amino acids or phosphate metabolism and energy production. All the clavulanic acid biosynthesis genes showed Mc values in the order of -4.23. The blip gene-encoding a β-lactamase inhibitory protein was also controlled by the cephamycin C-clavulanic acid cluster regulator (Mc -2.54). The expression of the cephamycin C biosynthesis genes was greatly reduced in the mutant (Mc values up to -7.1), while the genes involved in putative β-lactam resistance were less affected (Mc average -0.88). Genes for holomycin biosynthesis were upregulated. In addition, the lack of clavulanic acid and cephamycin production negatively affected the expression of genes for the clavulanic acid precursor arginine and of miscellaneous genes involved in nitrogen metabolism (amtB, glnB, glnA3, glnA2, glnA1). The transcriptomic results were validated by quantative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and luciferase assay of luxAB-coupled promoters. Transcriptomic analysis of the homologous genes of S. coelicolor validated the results obtained for S. clavuligerus primary metabolism genes.

  9. Evaluation of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA urine-tests for diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Albert Tchuem Tchuenté

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Kato-Katz is the most common diagnostic method for Schistosoma mansoni infection. However, the day-to-day variability in host egg-excretion and its low detection sensitivity are major limits for its use in low transmission zones and after widespread chemotherapy. We evaluated the accuracy of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA urine-assay as a diagnostic tool of S. mansoni. In comparison, a low sensitive CCA test (CCA-L was assessed. METHODOLOGY: THE STUDY WAS CONDUCTED IN THREE SETTINGS: two foci with single S. mansoni infections (settings A and B, and one mixed S. mansoni - S. haematobium focus (setting C. Stool and urine samples were collected from school-children on three consecutive days. Triplicate Kato-Katz readings were performed per stool sample. Each urine sample was tested with one CCA and only the first urine sample was subjected to CCA-L. Urine samples were also examined for S. haematobium eggs using the filtration method and for microhaematuria using urine reagent strips. Overall, 625 children provided three stool and three urine samples. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Considering nine Kato-Katz thick smears as 'reference' diagnostic test, the prevalence of S. mansoni was 36.2%, 71.8% and 64.0% in settings A, B and C, respectively. The prevalence of S. haematobium in setting C was 12.0%. The sensitivities of single Kato-Katz, CCA and CCA-L from the first stool or urine samples were 58%, 82% and 46% in setting A, 56.8%, 82.4% and 68.8% in setting B, and 49.0%, 87.7% and 55.5% in setting C. The respective specificities were 100%, 64.7% and 100%; 100%, 62.3% and 91.3%; and 100%, 42.5% and 92.0%. Mixed infection with S. haematobium did not influence the CCA test results for S. mansoni diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Urine CCA revealed higher sensitivity than CCA-L and triplicate Kato-Katz, and produced similar prevalence as nine Kato-Katz. It seems an attractive method for S. mansoni diagnosis.

  10. Chelating efficiency and thermal, mechanical and decay resistance performances of chitosan copper complex in wood-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, John Z; Duan, Xinfang; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun

    2008-09-01

    Wood-polymer composites (WPC) have been extensively used for building products, outdoor decking, automotive, packaging materials, and other applications. WPC is subject to fungal and termite attacks due to wood components enveloped in the thermoplastic matrix. Much effort has been made to improve decay resistance of WPC using zinc borate and other chemicals. In this study, chitosan copper complex (CCC) compounds were used as a potential preservative for wood-HDPE composites. CCC was formulated by reacting chitosan with copper salts under controlled conditions. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analytical results indicated that chitosan had high chelating efficiency with copper cations. CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites had a thermal behavior similar to untreated and zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites. Incorporation of CCC in wood-HDPE composites did not significantly influence board density of the resultant composites, but had a negative effect on tensile strength at high CCC concentration. In comparison with solid wood and the untreated wood-HDPE composites, 3% CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites significantly improved the decay resistance against white rot fungus Trametes versicolor and brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum. Especially, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites were more effectively against the brown rot than the untreated and chitosan-treated wood-HDPE composites. Moreover, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites performed well as zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites on fungal decay resistance. Accordingly, CCC can be effectively used as a preservative for WPC. PMID:18248812

  11. Biological durability of wood modified by citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogoslav Šefc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of measurement of durability of beech wood (Fagus sylvatica modified by Citric Acid (CA against brown rot fungus Poria placenta according to EN 113. Modification was performedby impregnation with 7.0% CA and 6.5% sodium-hypophosphite (SHP water solution and 10-hour curing at 140 °C. The influence of thermal treatment on durability was also researched. Weight percentage gain (WPG caused by modification, moisture content (MC and mass loss of wood (dm after fungal nutrition were measured. WPG of modified beech wood was 6.1% and that of thermally treated wood was -0.3%. The results showed increased durability of modified wood to be 8.3 times greater than nonmodified, while thermal treatment did not give significant durability improvement. These results indicate modification by CA as a promising alternative, but further research on optimisation of modification parameters is needed to achieve improvement of wood properties.

  12. Remarks on orthotropic elastic models applied to wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Tadeu Mascia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood is generally considered an anisotropic material. In terms of engineering elastic models, wood is usually treated as an orthotropic material. This paper presents an analysis of two principal anisotropic elastic models that are usually applied to wood. The first one, the linear orthotropic model, where the material axes L (Longitudinal, R( radial and T(tangential are coincident with the Cartesian axes (x, y, z, is more accepted as wood elastic model. The other one, the cylindrical orthotropic model is more adequate of the growth caracteristics of wood but more mathematically complex to be adopted in practical terms. Specifically due to its importance in wood elastic parameters, this paper deals with the fiber orientation influence in these models through adequate transformation of coordinates. As a final result, some examples of the linear model, which show the variation of elastic moduli, i.e., Young´s modulus and shear modulus, with fiber orientation are presented.

  13. Method of stabilizing wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood is impregnated with a mixture of a vinyl or an allyl monomer (20 - 90 wt. %) and unsaturated polyester resins. The impregnated wood is then exposed to ionizing radiation at doses of 0.1 to 20 Mrad at a temperature of 60 to 180 degC. (B.S.)

  14. Mineralization of fossil wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, P.

    1972-01-01

    Several pieces of fossil wood have been analyzed with X-ray diffraction and were grouped on the basis of mineralogical composition. Various mineralizations were studied in thin sections and by means of the scanning electron microscope. Wood-opals appear to show a structure preservation that points t

  15. Energy Efficient Wood Fuel Drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renstroem, Roger

    2004-04-01

    With reference to the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions, biofuel is pointed out as an important substitute for fossil fuels. The Swedish Government favours the use of biofuel by imposing taxes on fossil fuels. However, biofuel is a limited resource and it is therefore important that we develop efficient systems for the production and utilization of this limited resource. This thesis is based on six papers out of which five are experimental and treats the drying of wood in spouted bed co-generation dryers. The sixth paper deals with the integration of a co-generation dryer into the energy system of a sawmill.

  16. EVALUATION OF STRENGTH TO SHEAR AND DELAMINATION IN GLUED LAMINATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlito Calil Neto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Glued Laminated Wood has a large range of applications. In Brazil, its employment as cross-piece poles for overhead electrical power has attracted the attention of companies in the industry, motivated by the potential use of this material. Among the factors that influence the mechanical performance of Glulam solutions stand out efficiency and affinity of the adhesives to the species of wood used, the type of treatment and moisture content of wood veneer, motivating the development of new research on this topic. This research aimed to investigate, by Design of Experiments (DOE, the influence of wood (pinus, teca, eucalipto, adhesive (Purbond; Cascophen and treatment (CCA, CCB, CCBS in the variable responses shear strength and delamination, consisting in the same combination factors evaluated in ANEEL/EESC-PD220-07 project: Head Crosshead Glulam Series. The results of the statistical analysis showed that the species factor expressed significant effect for both response variables evaluated, did not occur with adhesive and treatment factors. Moisture content was significant in the wood evaluated when analyzed the shear strength, and the teca wood showed the highest shear strength and also relating to the delamination.

  17. Assessment of the bioaccessibility of micronized copper wood in synthetic stomach fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The widespread use of copper in treated lumber may result in a potential for human exposure. Due to a lack of information concerning the release of copper from treated wood particles following oral ingestion, the in vitro bioaccessibility of copper from copper-treated wood dust i...

  18. STS-34 Mission Specialist (MS) Chang-Diaz tests CCA prior to WETF exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-34 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), tests his communications carrier assembly (CCA) with the help of Rockwell Space Operations (RSO) technician Pam S. Peters (right) prior to donning his EMU helmet. These procedures are necessary for an extravehicular activity (EVA) contingency exercise (underwater simulation) in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Chang-Diaz stands on a platform that will lower him into the WETF's 25 ft deep pool.

  19. Astronaut Dunbar adjusts CCA before donning EMU helmet in JSC's WETF Bldg 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut Bonnie J. Dunbar, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU), adjusts the communications carrier assembly (CCA) ('Snoopy' cap) microphones before donning EMU helmet. Dunbar is preparing for an underwater simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. When fully suited, Dunbar will be lowered into the pool to rehearse planned and contingency extravehicular activities (EVAs). NOTE: Since this photograph was taken, Dunbar has been named as the payload commander (PLC) for STS-50 United States Microgravity Laboratory 1 (USML-1) mission aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102.

  20. Caracterización de las cibercomunidades de aprendizaje (cCA)

    OpenAIRE

    Murua Anzola, Iñaki; Gallego Gil, Domingo; Cacheiro González, María Luz

    2015-01-01

    En este artículo se presentan los principales resultados de la investigación exploratoria llevada a cabo sobre las cibercomunidades de aprendizaje (cCA) y la formación del profesorado aplicando, entre otros, el método Delphi; el marco teórico y contextual de la misma se presentó en el número 43 de la revista RED. Los participantes del panel de expertos han sido 31 encuestados online con el instrumento Delphi-cCA, y 19 responsables de comunidades que han contestado al cuestionario-cCA. Entre l...

  1. Modification of the original color of the Eucalyptus grandis wood by heat treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilei Aparecida Garcia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the modification of original color of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex. Maiden wood after heat-treatment. Wood samples were heat-treated under different temperatures (180, 200, 215 and 230ºC and time conditions (15 minutes, 2 and 4 hours. Color analysis were performed on the CIE L*a*b* system by using a Color Eye XTH-X-Rite 200d spectrophotometer. All heat treatments promoted an alteration of the original color of wood. Heat-treated woods presented lower L* (lightness values than untreated wood (control, characterizing the wood darkness, mainly for more severe conditions of temperature and time. Chromatic coordinates (a* and b* showed different behaviors depending on the temperature-time combination. The modification of the original color of the wood allowed the creation of new color patterns, which can add greater value to the studied wood.

  2. IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION STRATEGIES FOR ORGANIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory biotreatability studies evaluated the use of bioventing and biosparging plus groundwater circulation (UVB technology) for their potential abililty to treat soil and groundwater containing creosote and pentachlorophenol. Soils from two former wood-treatment facilities w...

  3. Expert consensus document: Cholangiocarcinoma: current knowledge and future perspectives consensus statement from the European Network for the Study of Cholangiocarcinoma (ENS-CCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banales, Jesus M; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Carpino, Guido; Marzioni, Marco; Andersen, Jesper B; Invernizzi, Pietro; Lind, Guro E; Folseraas, Trine; Forbes, Stuart J; Fouassier, Laura; Geier, Andreas; Calvisi, Diego F; Mertens, Joachim C; Trauner, Michael; Benedetti, Antonio; Maroni, Luca; Vaquero, Javier; Macias, Rocio I R; Raggi, Chiara; Perugorria, Maria J; Gaudio, Eugenio; Boberg, Kirsten M; Marin, Jose J G; Alvaro, Domenico

    2016-05-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies with features of biliary tract differentiation. CCA is the second most common primary liver tumour and the incidence is increasing worldwide. CCA has high mortality owing to its aggressiveness, late diagnosis and refractory nature. In May 2015, the "European Network for the Study of Cholangiocarcinoma" (ENS-CCA: www.enscca.org or www.cholangiocarcinoma.eu) was created to promote and boost international research collaboration on the study of CCA at basic, translational and clinical level. In this Consensus Statement, we aim to provide valuable information on classifications, pathological features, risk factors, cells of origin, genetic and epigenetic modifications and current therapies available for this cancer. Moreover, future directions on basic and clinical investigations and plans for the ENS-CCA are highlighted.

  4. A story with a good ending: tRNA 3'-end maturation by CCA-adding enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yong; Steitz, Thomas A

    2006-02-01

    CCA-adding enzymes (tRNA nucleotidyltransferases) are responsible for the maturation or repair of the functional 3' end of tRNAs. These enzymes are remarkable because they polymerize the essential nucleotides CCA onto the 3' terminus of tRNA precursors without using a nucleic acid template. Recent crystal structures, plus three decades of enzymology, have revealed the elegant mechanisms by which CCA-adding enzymes achieve their substrate specificity in a nucleic acid template independent fashion. The class I CCA-adding enzyme employs both an arginine sidechain and backbone phosphates of the bound tRNA to recognize incoming nucleotides. It switches from C to A addition through changes in the size and shape of the nucleotide-binding pocket, which is progressively altered by the elongating 3' terminus of the tRNA. By contrast, the class II CCA-adding enzyme uses only amino acid sidechains, which form a protein template for incoming nucleotide selection. PMID:16364630

  5. Surveillance of Populations at Risk of Cholangiocarcinoma Development in Rural Communities of Thailand Using the Korat-CCA Verbal Screening Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpitoon, Soraya J; Rujirakul, Ratana; Loyd, Ryan A; Panpimanmas, Sukij; Matrakool, Likit; Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kompor, Porntip; Norkaew, Jun; Chavengkun, Wasugree; Wakkhuwattapong, Parichart; Kujapun, Jirawoot; Ponphimai, Sukanya; Phatisena, Tanida; Eaksunti, Thawatchai; Polsripradist, Poowadol; Joosiri, Apinya; Sukkasam, Inchat; Padchasuwan, Natnapa; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a serious problem in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern region. Active surveillance in rural communities with an appropriat low-cost screening tool is required to facilitate early detection. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the population at risk of CCA in Bua Yai district, Nakhon Ratchasima province, Northeastern Thailand using the Korat-CCA verbal screening test (KCVST) during June to October 2015. Reliability of KCVST demonstrated a Cronbach alpha coefficient=0.75 Stepwise-multiple regression showed that alcohol consumption was important for CCA screened, followed by agriculture and pesticide use, under-cooked cyprinoid fish consumption, praziquantel use, naïve northeastern people, opisthorchiasis, family relatives with CCA, and cholangitis or cholecystitis or gallstones, respectively. Population at risk for CCA was classified to low risk (63.4%), moderate risk (33.7%), and high risk (1.32%) for CCA. When CCA was screened using ultrasonography, 4 of 32 high risk participants had an abnormal biliary tract with dilated bile ducts. This study indicates that KCVST is a potential useful too which decrease the cost of large scale CCA screening. PMID:27221919

  6. Graphic-Card Cluster for Astrophysics (GraCCA) -- Performance Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Wong, Shing-Kwong; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the architecture and performance of the GraCCA system, a Graphic-Card Cluster for Astrophysics simulations. It consists of 16 nodes, with each node equipped with 2 modern graphic cards, the NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GTX. This computing cluster provides a theoretical performance of 16.2 TFLOPS. To demonstrate its performance in astrophysics computation, we have implemented a parallel direct N-body simulation program with shared time-step algorithm in this system. Our system achieves a measured performance of 7.1 TFLOPS and a parallel efficiency of 90% for simulating a globular cluster of 1024K particles. In comparing with the GRAPE-6A cluster at RIT (Rochester Institute of Technology), the GraCCA system achieves a more than twice higher measured speed and an even higher performance-per-dollar ratio. Moreover, our system can handle up to 320M particles and can serve as a general-purpose computing cluster for a wide range of astrophysics problems.

  7. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trojanowski, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wei, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  8. Fatigue Damage in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Fatigue failure is found to depend both on the total time under load and on the number of cycles.Recent accelerated fatigue research on wood is reviewed, and a discrepancy between...... to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation between stiffness reduction...

  9. [The influence of oil heat treatment on wood decay resistance by Fourier infrared spectrum analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ling; Feng, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Wood preservative treatment can improve defects of plantation wood such as easy to corrupt and moth eaten. Among them heat-treatment is not only environmental and no pollution, also can improve the corrosion resistance and dimension stability of wood. In this test Poplar and Mongolian Seoteh Pine was treated by soybean oil as heat-conducting medium, and the heat treatment wood was studied for indoor decay resistance; wood chemical components before and after treatment, the effect of heat treatment on wood decay resistance performance and main mechanism of action were analysed by Fourier infrared spectrometric. Results showed that the mass loss rate of poplar fell from 19.37% to 5% and Mongolian Seoteh Pine's fell from 8.23% to 3.15%, so oil heat treatment can effectively improve the decay resistance. Infrared spectrum analysis shows that the heat treatment made wood's hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl groups in largely reduced, absorbing capacity decreased and the moisture of wood rotting fungi necessary was reduced; during the heat treatment wood chemical components such as cellulose, hemicellu lose were degraded, and the nutrient source of wood rotting fungi growth necessary was reduced. Wood decay fungi can grow in the wood to discredit wood is because of that wood can provide better living conditions for wood decay fungi, such as nutrients, water, oxygen, and so on. The cellulose and hemicellulose in wood is the main nutrition source of wood decay fungi. So the oil heat-treatment can reduce the cellulose, hemicellulose nutrition source of wood decay fungi so as to improve the decay resistance of wood.

  10. [The influence of oil heat treatment on wood decay resistance by Fourier infrared spectrum analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ling; Feng, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Wood preservative treatment can improve defects of plantation wood such as easy to corrupt and moth eaten. Among them heat-treatment is not only environmental and no pollution, also can improve the corrosion resistance and dimension stability of wood. In this test Poplar and Mongolian Seoteh Pine was treated by soybean oil as heat-conducting medium, and the heat treatment wood was studied for indoor decay resistance; wood chemical components before and after treatment, the effect of heat treatment on wood decay resistance performance and main mechanism of action were analysed by Fourier infrared spectrometric. Results showed that the mass loss rate of poplar fell from 19.37% to 5% and Mongolian Seoteh Pine's fell from 8.23% to 3.15%, so oil heat treatment can effectively improve the decay resistance. Infrared spectrum analysis shows that the heat treatment made wood's hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl groups in largely reduced, absorbing capacity decreased and the moisture of wood rotting fungi necessary was reduced; during the heat treatment wood chemical components such as cellulose, hemicellu lose were degraded, and the nutrient source of wood rotting fungi growth necessary was reduced. Wood decay fungi can grow in the wood to discredit wood is because of that wood can provide better living conditions for wood decay fungi, such as nutrients, water, oxygen, and so on. The cellulose and hemicellulose in wood is the main nutrition source of wood decay fungi. So the oil heat-treatment can reduce the cellulose, hemicellulose nutrition source of wood decay fungi so as to improve the decay resistance of wood. PMID:25208386

  11. Inventory of contaminants in waste wood; Inventering av foeroreningar i returtrae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermer, Joeran; Ekvall, Annika; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Waste wood is increasingly used as fuel in Sweden. It is of Swedish origin as well as imported, mainly from Germany and the Netherlands. The waste wood is contaminated by e.g. paint and wood preservatives and objects of metal, glass, plastics etc. The contaminants may cause technical problems such as deposits and corrosion as well as plugging of air openings. The present study has focussed on potential contaminants in waste wood that could cause problems of technical as well as environmental nature. The major chemical contaminants are surface treatments (paints etc) and wood preservatives. The surface treatments contribute in particular to contaminants of zinc and lead. In some cases zinc has been found to cause severe deposits in the furnaces. Surface treatments also contribute to increased levels of sodium, chlorine, sulphur and nitrogen. Preservative-treated wood is the most important source of increased levels of copper, chromium and arsenic in the waste wood. Waste wood imported from Germany contains less arsenic but the same amount of copper and chromium as Swedish waste wood. The contents of mercury in German waste wood can be expected to be higher than in waste wood of Swedish origin. The fraction consisting of wood-based panels is comparably free from contaminants but as a result of the high contents of adhesives wood-based panels contribute to a higher proportion of nitrogen in waste wood than in forest residues. A great number of non-wood compounds (such as plastics and metals) do also contaminate waste wood. By careful and selective demolition and various sorting procedures most non-wood compounds will be separated from the waste wood. Waste sorting analyses carried out indicate that the waste wood contains approximately 1% non-wood compounds, mainly plastic and metal compounds, glass, dirt, concrete, bricks and gypsum. This may seem to be a small proportion, but if large amounts of waste wood are incinerated the non-wood compounds will inevitably cause

  12. Characterization of DNA-binding sequences for CcaR in the cephamycin-clavulanic acid supercluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamarta, I; López-García, M T; Kurt, A; Nárdiz, N; Alvarez-Álvarez, R; Pérez-Redondo, R; Martín, J F; Liras, P

    2011-08-01

    RT-PCR analysis of the genes in the clavulanic acid cluster revealed three transcriptional polycistronic units that comprised the ceaS2-bls2-pah2-cas2, cyp-fd-orf12-orf13 and oppA2-orf16 genes, whereas oat2, car, oppA1, claR, orf14, gcaS and pbpA were expressed as monocistronic transcripts. Quantitative RT-PCR of Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064 and the mutant S. clavuligerus ccaR::aph showed that, in the mutant, there was a 1000- to 10,000-fold lower transcript level for the ceaS2 to cas2 polycistronic transcript that encoded CeaS2, the first enzyme of the clavulanic acid pathway that commits arginine to clavulanic acid biosynthesis. Smaller decreases in expression were observed in the ccaR mutant for other genes in the cluster. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF analysis confirmed the absence in the mutant strain of proteins CeaS2, Bls2, Pah2 and Car that are required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis, and CefF and IPNS that are required for cephamycin biosynthesis. Gel shift electrophoresis using recombinant r-CcaR protein showed that it bound to the ceaS2 and claR promoter regions in the clavulanic acid cluster, and to the lat, cefF, cefD-cmcI and ccaR promoter regions in the cephamycin C gene cluster. Footprinting experiments indicated that triple heptameric conserved sequences were protected by r-CcaR, and allowed identification of heptameric sequences as CcaR binding sites.

  13. Wood pellet research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohkansanj, S.; Bi, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Wood pellets are composed of waste wood materials such as sawmill residue, municipal landfill waste and grain crops. Due to the high temperature combustion used to form the waste materials into the pellet, no additives or glues are necessary to bind them. The pellets are typically used for home heating; heat and power production; poultry bedding; and in biorefineries. This presentation provided an outline of the University of British Columbia wood pellet research and development program. Research at the university is being conducted to develop new types of pellets. Researchers at the program also analyze the physical and chemical properties of pellets in order to optimize pellet density and heating values. Wood pellet modelling and simulation studies are carried out, and various training and education programs are also offered. Research is currently being conducted to develop a reactor for off-gassing experiments. This presentation also provided details of a study investigating the economics of wood pellet production and transport. Pellet production costs and feedstock costs were compared. A summary of the costs and energy inputs of pellet production included details of product storage; transportation and transfer; handling; and transportation to energy plants. It was concluded that more than 35 per cent of the energy content of biomass is used up in the processing and transport of Canadian wood pellets to Europe. refs., tabs., figs.

  14. Wood pellet research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood pellets are composed of waste wood materials such as sawmill residue, municipal landfill waste and grain crops. Due to the high temperature combustion used to form the waste materials into the pellet, no additives or glues are necessary to bind them. The pellets are typically used for home heating; heat and power production; poultry bedding; and in biorefineries. This presentation provided an outline of the University of British Columbia wood pellet research and development program. Research at the university is being conducted to develop new types of pellets. Researchers at the program also analyze the physical and chemical properties of pellets in order to optimize pellet density and heating values. Wood pellet modelling and simulation studies are carried out, and various training and education programs are also offered. Research is currently being conducted to develop a reactor for off-gassing experiments. This presentation also provided details of a study investigating the economics of wood pellet production and transport. Pellet production costs and feedstock costs were compared. A summary of the costs and energy inputs of pellet production included details of product storage; transportation and transfer; handling; and transportation to energy plants. It was concluded that more than 35 per cent of the energy content of biomass is used up in the processing and transport of Canadian wood pellets to Europe. refs., tabs., figs

  15. Metal contaminated biochar and wood ash negatively affect plant growth and soil quality after land application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D L; Quilliam, R S

    2014-07-15

    Pyrolysis or combustion of waste wood can provide a renewable source of energy and produce byproducts which can be recycled back to land. To be sustainable requires that these byproducts pose minimal threat to the environment or human health. Frequently, reclaimed waste wood is contaminated by preservative-treated timber containing high levels of heavy metals. We investigated the effect of feedstock contamination from copper-preservative treated wood on the behaviour of pyrolysis-derived biochar and combustion-derived ash in plant-soil systems. Biochar and wood ash were applied to soil at typical agronomic rates. The presence of preservative treated timber in the feedstock increased available soil Cu; however, critical Cu guidance limits were only exceeded at high rates of feedstock contamination. Negative effects on plant growth and soil quality were only seen at high levels of biochar contamination (>50% derived from preservative-treated wood). Negative effects of wood ash contamination were apparent at lower levels of contamination (>10% derived from preservative treated wood). Complete removal of preservative treated timber from wood recycling facilities is notoriously difficult and low levels of contamination are commonplace. We conclude that low levels of contamination from Cu-treated wood should pose minimal environmental risk to biochar and ash destined for land application. PMID:24915641

  16. Migration of vascular plant species to a recent wood adjoining ancient woodland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Dzwonko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Woodland communities can be restored by natural succession in sites adjoining ancient woodlands which can act as seed sources for trees, shrubs and woodland herbs. The influence of dominant tree species and the distance from an adjacent ancient oak-hornbeam woodland upon the floristic composition of species in a recent pine wood planted on dry rendzina soil were studied. It was found that, in spite of a 52-year long succession, the border between woods was sharp and the composition of species in the recent wood were significantly different than in the adjacent ancient woodland. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA showed that the distance to the ancient woodland had a significant influence on species distributions in the recent wood. The numbers of species from the Querco-Fagetea class, vegetatively reproducing species and myrmecochores decreased with this distance, whereas the numbers of anemochores increased. The migration rate of many woodland species, calculated on occurrence of the farthest individuals was very slow, varying from 0.0 m year-1 to 0.38 m year-1. The restoration of the field layer vegetation in the studied pine wood was much slower than in recent deciduous woods on rich and moist soils where the migration rate of some species exceeded 1.50 m year-1. Recent woods adjacent to ancient woodlands can be more effectively colonised by woodland species only when they are dominated by broad-leaved trees with quickly decomposing litter, and the spatial continuity of these woods persists for a long period.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS OF THERMALLY MODIFIED WOOD AND THEIR REDUCTION BY CHEMICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Peters

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal treatment is a suitable method for improving the quality of wood types like spruce, beech or poplar, and thus to open up new fields of application that used to be limited to tropical woods or woods treated with timber preservatives. These thermally treated woods are characterized by a typical odor caused by degradation products of miscellaneous wood components. The characterization and removal of those odorous substances were investigated using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Headspace gas chromatography (GC in combination with solid-phase microextraction (SPME was used for a qualitative analysis of volatile wood emissions, and the detectable volatiles were compared before and after solvent extraction. Wood solvent extractives were investigated by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and then evaluated in terms of changes in composition caused by the thermal treatment process.

  18. STS-55 MS3 Harris, wearing EMU and CCA, prepares for EVA simulation at JSC WETF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr, suited in the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) upper torso and communications carrier assembly (CCA), smiles as he prepares for an underwater simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. This portrait-like view captures Harris as he checks out his communications equipment. Once fully suited, Harris will be lowered into the WETF's 25-foot deep pool for an underwater contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) simulation. There is no scheduled EVA for the 1993 flight but each spaceflight crew includes astronauts trained for a variety of contingency tasks that could require exiting the shirt-sleeve environment of a Shuttle's cabin.

  19. STS-54 MS3 Helms tests CCA equipment prior to an underwater simulation at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Susan J. Helms, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), verifies that the communications equipment is working while listening to instructions via the headset. Helms is preparing for an extravehicular activity (EVA) underwater simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Though not assigned to the scheduled EVA, Helms is trained in the WETF for familiarization and backup purposes. Wearing this high fidelity training version of the EMU, Helms was later lowered int the 25-foot deep WETF pool. The pressurized suit is weighted so as to allow Helms to achieve neutral buoyancy and simulate the warious chores of the spacewalk.

  20. Wood for the trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Garbutt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the materiality, cultural history and cultural relations of selected artworks in the exhibition Wood for the trees (Lismore Regional Gallery, New South Wales, Australia, 10 June – 17 July 2011. The title of the exhibition, intentionally misreading the aphorism “Can’t see the wood for the trees”, by reading the wood for the resource rather than the collective wood[s], implies conservation, preservation, and the need for sustaining the originating resource. These ideas have particular resonance on the NSW far north coast, a region once rich in rainforest. While the Indigenous population had sustainable practices of forest and land management, the colonists deployed felling and harvesting in order to convert the value of the local, abundant rainforest trees into high-value timber. By the late twentieth century, however, a new wave of settlers launched a protest movements against the proposed logging of remnant rainforest at Terania Creek and elsewhere in the region. Wood for the trees, curated by Gallery Director Brett Adlington, plays on this dynamic relationship between wood, trees and people. We discuss the way selected artworks give expression to the themes or concepts of productive labour, nature and culture, conservation and sustainability, and memory. The artworks include Watjinbuy Marrawilil’s (1980 Carved ancestral figure ceremonial pole, Elizabeth Stops’ (2009/10 Explorations into colonisation, Hossein Valamanesh’s (2008 Memory stick, and AñA Wojak’s (2008 Unread book (in a forgotten language. Our art writing on the works, a practice informed by Bal (2002, Muecke (2008 and Papastergiadis (2004, becomes a conversation between the works and the themes or concepts. As a form of material excess of the most productive kind (Grosz, 2008, p. 7, art seeds a response to that which is in the air waiting to be said of the past, present and future.

  1. COLOUR CHARACTESISTICS OF PINE WOOD AFFECTED BY TERMAL COMPRESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celil Atik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/198050989291The goal of this study was to determine the effects of thermal modification and hot-pressing on the colour characteristics of pine wood as bio-resource. The experimental wood boards with dimensions of 250 mm in width by 500 mm in length by 18 mm in thickness were thermally compressed at a temperature of 120˚C or 150˚C, press pressure of 5 or 7 MPa for 60 min in a hot press. Results obtained in this study showed that the colour characteristics of the pine wood boards were affected by press pressure and temperature. The resin leakages significantly increased the chromacity (a* - 25.99 and b* - 43.18 of the treated wood samples. Thermally compressing caused browning of wood colour, which rate increases with pressure at high temperature conditions.

  2. 水环境下偶联剂处理聚乙烯木塑复合材表面性质的演变%Evolvement of Surface Properties for Wood/Polyethylene Composites Treated by Silicane Coupling Agent under Water Immersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸明伟; 王辉

    2013-01-01

    The surface of wood/polyethylene(PE) composites was treated by silicane coupling agent to improve its adhesion properties.To explore the durability of the bonding joint in water,the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) were employed in the water immersion experiment to investigate the effect of water on the surface properties of coating treated wood/PE composites.The results show that there is a chemical combination between silicane coupling agent and the surface of the composite after the coating treatment.With the immersion time extended,the new groups are not formed on the surface for the composite,but the chemical environment for the chemical elements on the surface is changed.The contents of-OH and the C=O groups on the surface of wood/PE composites are increased,which is resulted from swelling of wood fiber within wood/PE composite caused by absorbing water.There exists a homeostasis of the bond forming and bond rupturing for silicane coupling agent on the surface of the composite.And the swelling of wood fiber within wood/PE composite caused by absorbing water could result in further changes of surface properties.And the changes would have a considerable effect on the durability of the bonding joint.%将木粉/聚乙烯复合材料进行硅烷偶联剂表面涂覆处理以改善其胶接性能.为探究胶接接头在水环境下的耐久性,利用傅里叶变换红外光谱(FTIR)和X射线光电子能谱(XPS),研究了水对表面涂覆处理后的木塑复合材料表面性质的影响.结果表明:经表面涂覆处理后,硅烷偶联剂与材料表面形成化学结合;随着水浸时间的延长,表面没有新的化学基团产生,但表面元素的化学环境会发生改变,-OH,C=O等基团含量增加,这是复合材料中木粉吸水膨胀所导致的表面粗糙度变化引起的;水浸环境下硅烷偶联剂在材料表面会形成键的形成与断裂的动态平衡,且木粉的吸水膨

  3. Boron impregnation treatment of Eucalyptus grandis wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamodaran, T K; Gnanaharan, R

    2007-08-01

    Eucalyptus grandis is suitable for small timber purposes, but its wood is reported to be non-durable and difficult to treat. Boron compounds being diffusible, and the vacuum-pressure impregnation (VPI) method being more suitable for industrial-scale treatment, the possibility of boron impregnation of partially dry to green timber was investigated using a 6% boric acid equivalent (BAE) solution of boric acid and borax in the ratio 1:1.5 under different treatment schedules. It was found that E. grandis wood, even in green condition, could be pressure treated to desired chemical dry salt retention (DSR) and penetration levels using 6% BAE solution. Up to a thickness of 50mm, in order to achieve a DSR of 5 kg/m(3) boron compounds, the desired DSR level as per the Indian Standard for perishable timbers for indoor use, it was found that neither the moisture content of wood nor the treatment schedule posed any problem as far as the treatability of E. grandis wood was concerned. PMID:17046244

  4. A Hybrid LDA+gCCA Model for fMRI Data Classification and Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshin-Pour, Babak; Shams, Seyed-Mohammad; Strother, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Linear predictive models are applied to functional MRI (fMRI) data to estimate boundaries that predict experimental task states for scans. These boundaries are visualized as statistical parametric maps (SPMs) and range from low to high spatial reproducibility across subjects (e.g., Strother , 2004; LaConte , 2003). Such inter-subject pattern reproducibility is an essential characteristic of interpretable SPMs that generalize across subjects. Therefore, we introduce a flexible hybrid model that optimizes reproducibility by simultaneously enhancing the prediction power and reproducibility. This hybrid model is formed by a weighted summation of the optimization functions of a linear discriminate analysis (LDA) model and a generalized canonical correlation (gCCA) model (Afshin-Pour , 2012). LDA preserves the model's ability to discriminate the fMRI scans of multiple brain states while gCCA finds a linear combination for each subject's scans such that the estimated boundary map is reproducible. The hybrid model is implemented in a split-half resampling framework (Strother , 2010) which provides reproducibility (r) and prediction (p) quality metrics. Then the model was compared with LDA, and Gaussian Naive Bayes (GNB). For simulated fMRI data, the hybrid model outperforms the other two techniques in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, particularly for detecting less predictable but spatially reproducible networks. These techniques were applied to real fMRI data to estimate the maps for two task contrasts. Our results indicate that compared to LDA and GNB, the hybrid model can provide maps with large increases in reproducibility for small reductions in prediction, which are jointly closer to the ideal performance point of (p=1, r=1).

  5. CSMA/CCA: A Modified CSMA/CA Protocol Mitigating the Fairness Problem for IEEE 802.11 DCF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA has been adopted by the IEEE 802.11 standards for wireless local area networks (WLANs. Using a distributed coordination function (DCF, the CSMA/CA protocol reduces collisions and improves the overall throughput. To mitigate fairness issues arising with CSMA/CA, we develop a modified version that we term CSMA with copying collision avoidance (CSMA/CCA. A station in CSMA/CCA contends for the shared wireless medium by employing a binary exponential backoff similar to CSMA/CA. Different from CSMA/CA, CSMA/CCA copies the contention window (CW size piggybacked in the MAC header of an overheard data frame within its basic service set (BSS and updates its backoff counter according to the new CW size. Simulations carried out in several WLAN configurations illustrate that CSMA/CCA improves fairness relative to CSMA/CA and offers considerable advantages for deployment in the 802.11-standard-based WLANs.

  6. Comportamento da cor de lâminas de madeira de Pau-marfim (Balfourodendron riedelianum tratada com produtos de acabamento Color behavior of Pau-marfim (Balfourodendron riedelianum wood laminates treated with finishing products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Melo Lima

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho testou produtos no combate ao envelhecimento da madeira. Através de uma câmara de envelhecimento e aparelho de espectrocolorimetria, caracterizou-se a influência de produtos químicos de acabamentos aplicados à madeira durante processo artificial de fotodegradação. Acompanhou-se o envelhecimento do Pau-marfim (Balfourodendron riedelianum por 8.807 medições colorimétricas, após receber ciclos de radiação ultravioleta durante períodos: 20, 40, 60, 80, 120, 180, 250, 310, 410 e 500 horas. O sistema CIE La*b* de 1976 mostrou as modificações das cores. O uso da seladora provocou uma maior variação dos parâmetros colorimétricos da madeira quando comparado aos demais tratamentos.This study tested products to combat aging of wood. Through an aging chamber and a spectrocolorimetry device, the influence of chemical finishing products applied to wood were characterized during artificial photodegradation process. The aging of Balfourodendron riedelianum was monitored through 8.807 colorimetry measurements, with the samples undergoing cycles of ultraviolet radiation for periods of: 20, 40, 60, 80, 120, 180, 250, 310, 410 and 500 hours. The data was loaded to Excel and processed. The CIE La*b* system of 1976 showed the color changes. The use of a sealant caused a greater variation in the wood's colorimetric parameters when compared to other treatment methods.

  7. Evaluation of the CCA Immuno-Chromatographic Test to Diagnose Schistosoma mansoni in Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alda Maria Soares Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kato-Katz (KK stool smear is the standard test for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection, but suffers from low sensitivity when infections intensities are moderate to low. Thus, misdiagnosed individuals remain untreated and contribute to the disease transmission, thereby forestalling public health efforts to move from a modality of disease control to one of elimination. As an alternative, the urine-based diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni via the circulating cathodic antigen immuno-chromatographic test (CCA-ICT has been extensively evaluated in Africa with the conclusion that it may replace the KK test in areas where prevalences are moderate or high.The objective was to measure the performance of the CCA-ICT in a sample study population composed of residents from non-endemic and endemic areas for schistosomiasis mansoni in two municipalities of Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Volunteers (130 were classified into three infection status groups based on duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears from one stool sample (2KK test: 41 negative individuals from non-endemic areas, 41 negative individuals from endemic areas and 48 infected individuals from endemic areas. Infection status was also determined by the CCA-ICT and infection exposure by antibody ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to S. mansoni soluble egg antigen (SEA and soluble (adult worm antigen preparation (SWAP. Sensitivity and specificity were influenced by whether the trace score visually adjudicated in the CCA-ICT was characterized as positive or negative for S. mansoni infection. An analysis of a two-graph receiver operating characteristic was performed to change the cutoff point. When the trace score was interpreted as a positive rather than as a negative result, the specificity decreased from 97.6% to 78.0% whereas sensitivity increased from 68.7% to 85.4%. A significantly positive correlation between the CCA-ICT scores and egg counts was identified (r = 0.6252, p = 0

  8. Review on Preservative Treatment and Decay Resistance of Wood-based Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi; CAO Jinzhen

    2006-01-01

    To extend the service life and explore the use of wood-based composites, it is quite necessary to improve the decay resistance of wood-based composites through preservative treatments. Researchers have studied the methods of preservative treatment and the decay resistance of treated wood-based composites. In this paper, the categories of wood-based composites are briefly summarized and the previous and present investigations on the preservative treatment and decay resistance of different categories of wood-based composites are introduced. Some problems are also put forward and suggestions are given for future studies.

  9. Performance of waterborne acrylic surface coatings on wood impregnated with Cu-ethanolamine preservatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Humar; M Pavlič; D Žlindra; M Tomažič; M Petrič

    2011-02-01

    Two waterborne acrylic coatings were applied on spruce wood, impregnated with two copperethanolamine containing preservatives (CuE and CuEQ), one of them (CuEQ) containing a boron compound, octanoic acid and a quaternary ammonium compound as additives. Lower contact angles and deeper penetration of both coating types were observed on CuEQ treated, compared to untreated or CuE-treated wood. Improved adhesion of coatings on CuEQ impregnated wood was exhibited as well. In general, characteristics of surface finishes on copper-ethanolamine treated wood were comparable to untreated wood. It was also shown that copper leaching from the preserved wood was significantly reduced by application of the surface finishes.

  10. Physical and mechanical characteristics of poor-quality wood after heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romagnoli M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Poor-quality Corsican pine (Pinus nigra subsp. laricio (Poir. Maire and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco wood samples were heat treated with the aim of testing the improvement of wood quality that could increase their economic value. Wood properties were measured to assess quality in treated and non-treated materials, including density, hardness, anti-swelling efficiency (ASE, modulus of elasticity (MOE, modulus of rupture (MOR, and compression strength. The results showed higher dimensional stability in heat-treated wood, yet mechanical performance in compression and bending strength were only marginally affected by loss of density. Despite having a re­latively low density after heat treatment, Corsican pine sapwood has potential in manufacturing higher-value products. In contrast, heat treatment applied to Douglas fir wood did not appear economically viable; insufficient differences were detected between the naturally desirable characteristics of this species and heat-treated samples.

  11. Methane from wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S

    2005-07-15

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  12. Methane from wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  13. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  14. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Circadian Clock Gene CCA1 in Maize%玉米昼夜节律钟基因CCA1的克隆及表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国芳; 杜伟建; 张雁明; 韩浩坤; 韩渊怀

    2011-01-01

    昼夜节律钟基因CCA1在调解水稻和拟南芥的光周期反应中起着重要作用.本研究利用从水稻和拟南芥中分离到的CCA1基因序列作为靶序列BLAST获取Genbank中的信息,通过RT-PCR方法克隆获得了一条2326bp的玉米CCA1基因cDNA序列.BLAST比对发现其与水稻、大麦和拟南芥的序列相似性分别达73.7%、69.4%和39.8%.利用NCBI中的ORF Finder软件分析,发现该序列包含一个2163bp的开放阅读框,编码720个氨基酸残基,蛋白的分子量约为78819.17Da,等电点为6.468.推测其含有3个myb-DNA结合域、7个N-豆蔻酰化位点、1个G-box蛋白结合域以及1个蛋白跨膜结合域.采用实时荧光定量PCR分析发现,随光照时间的变化,该基因在玉米叶片中的表达量呈现出白天不断降低而夜晚逐渐升高的昼夜变化趋势.本研究为进一步研究玉米CCA1基因在调控玉米光周期敏感现象中的功能,阐明玉米光周期敏感机制提供了科学依据.%CCA 1 gene plays an important role in circadian clock sensitivity in rice (Oryza sative L. ) and Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, CCA1 (2326 bp) was cloned by RT-PCR using homological primers based on the highly conserved region of the multiple alignment of the rice and Arabidopsis. CCA1 from GenBank of NCBI. The similarities of these sequences were up to 73. 7% ,69. 4 and 39. 8% , respectively, to corresponding mRNA sequences of rice, barley and Arabidopsis in BLAST/nr of GenBank database. Using ORF Finder software, a 2163 bp open reading frame was found to code 720 amino acids. Analyzing this ami no acid sequence by Compute pI/Mw tool revealed that the molecular weight of this protein was about 78819.17 Da , and isoelectric point was about 6. 468. The amino acid sequence contained three myb-DNA binding domains, seven N-myristoylation sites, one G-box binding domain and one putative transmembrane spanning region. We established fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR system with maize

  15. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  16. False "highlighting" with Wood's lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Wood's lamp evaluation is used to diagnose pigmentary disorders. For example, vitiligo typically demonstrates lesional enhancement under Wood's lamp evaluation. Numerous false positive enhancing lesions can be noted in the skin. We describe a 5-year-old Hispanic boy who had painted his face with highlighter, producing enhancing lesions under Wood's lamp. Physicians who use Wood's lamp should be aware that the appearance of markers and highlighter can mimic that of true clinical illnesses.

  17. Status of wood energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this address, the potential of wood and wood residues to supply future energy needs is examined. In addition, the possible environmental impact of the use of wood fuels on global climate change is discussed. Technologies for the development of new fuels are described

  18. Wood waste in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, O.; Ribeiro, R. [Biomass Centre for Energy - CBE, Miranda do Corvo (Portugal)

    1997-12-31

    The energy policy of the EC, as well as most of member states points to a sizeable increase of energy production based on renewable energy sources, wood, wood residues, agricultural residues, energy crops including SRF, organic sludges, solid residues, etc. Most recent goals indicate a desirable duplication of today`s percentage by 2010. The reasons for this interest, besides diversification of sources, less dependence on imported fuels, use of endogenous resources, expected decrease of fossil fuel reserves, use of available land, additional employment and income for rural communities, etc., are related to important environmental benefits namely in terms of emissions of hot house gases. Wood waste, resulting from forest operations, cleaning, cultural and final cuttings, and from wood based industries, constitute a special important resource by reason of quality and availability. In addition to this they do not require additional land use and the removal is beneficial. In the run-up to the becoming December`s 1997 `Climate Change Summit` in Kioto, there is mounting pressure on companies to plan on carbon cuts. (author) 6 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Tannins in tropical woods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the chemistry of pyrogallol- and catecholtannins, their general properties and methods of extraction and determination. Three methods of estimation - Lowenthal, powdered hide and spectrophotometry - were compared using two control solutions, four samples of wood and one of bark. Using the empirical powdered hide method, tannins of both types were estimated in wood and bark of various tropical species (some separately and some as a mixture), Moroccan oaks (Quercus suber and Q. ilex), and European oak 9Q. petraea). Further tests were made on the wood and bark of the two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and R. racemosa, by subjecting them to successive extraction with a range of solvents. None of the woods tested had as much as the 10% of tannins considered necessary in economic sources. The bark of the two mangroves, of Eucalyptus urophylla and of Prosopis africana had tannin contents over 10% and the latter two species had very favorable tannin/non-tannin ratios. All the tropical species, with the probable exception of E. urophylla, had only catecholtannins. Only the oaks and E. urophylla bark gave positive results when tested for gallotannins.

  20. Developing multi-cellular tumor spheroid model (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Zheng; Zhu, Yu-Xia; Ma, Hui-Chao; Chen, Si-Nan; Chao, Ji-Ye; Ruan, Wen-Ding; Wang, Duo; Du, Feng-guang; Meng, Yue-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a 3D MCTS-CCA system was constructed by culturing multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening. The CCA scaffolds were fabricated by spray-spinning. The interactions between the components of the spray-spun fibers were evidenced by methods of Coomassie Blue stain, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Co-culture indicated that MCF-7 cells showed a spatial growth pattern of multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the CCA fibrous scaffold with increased proliferation rate and drug-resistance to MMC, ADM and 5-Aza comparing with the 2D culture cells. Significant increases of total viable cells were found in 3D MCTS groups after drug administration by method of apoptotic analysis. Glucose-lactate analysis indicated that the metabolism of MCTS in CCA scaffold was closer to the tumor issue in vivo than the monolayer cells. In addition, MCTS showed the characteristic of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is subverted by carcinoma cells to facilitate metastatic spread. These results demonstrated that MCTS in CCA scaffold possessed a more conservative phenotype of tumor than monolayer cells, and anticancer drug screening in 3D MCTS-CCA system might be superior to the 2D culture system. PMID:26952417

  1. Health evaluation of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from wood and wood-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L K; Larsen, A; Mølhave, L; Hansen, M K; Knudsen, B

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe a method for evaluation of material emissions. The study was based on chemical analysis of emissions from 23 materials representing solid wood and wood-based materials commonly used in furniture, interior furnishings, and building products in Denmark in the 1990s. The authors used the emission chamber testing method to examine the selected materials with a qualitative screening and quantitative determination of volatile organic compounds. The authors evaluated the toxicological effects of all substances identified with chamber testing. Lowest concentration of interest and standard room concentrations were assessed, and the authors calculated an S-value for each wood and wood-based material. The authors identified 144 different chemical substances with the screening analyses, and a total of 84 individual substances were quantified with chamber measurements. The irritative effects dominated at low exposure levels; therefore, the lowest concentration of interest and the S-value were based predominantly on these effects. The S-values were very low for solid ash, oak, and beech. For solid spruce and pine, the determining substances for size of the S-value were delta3-carene, alpha-pinene, and limonene. For the surface-treated wood materials, the S-value reflected the emitted substances from the surface treatment. PMID:11777023

  2. Partial transparency of compressed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed novel wood composite with optical transparency at arbitrary region. Pores in wood cells have a great variation in size. These pores expand the light path in the sample, because the refractive indexes differ between constituents of cell and air in lumen. In this study, wood compressed to close to lumen had optical transparency. Because the condition of the compression of wood needs the plastic deformation, wood was impregnated phenolic resin. The optimal condition for high transmission is compression ratio above 0.7.

  3. Wood construction under cold climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror;

    2014-01-01

    As wood constructions increasingly use engineered wood products worldwide, concerns arise about the integrity of the wood and adhesives system. The glueline stability is a crucial issue for engineered wood application, especially under cold climate. In this study, Norway spruce (Picea abies...... affected shear strength of wood joints. As temperature decreased, the shear strength decreased. PUR resin resulted in the strongest shear strength at all temperatures tested. MF resin responded to temperature changes in a similar ways as the PUR resin. The shear strength of wood joints with EPI resins...... specimens need to be tested in further work to more completely present the issue. The EN 301 and EN 302 may need to be specified based on wood species....

  4. Application of CCA for study on modern lake diatoms and environment in the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    羊向东; 王苏民; 夏威岚; 李万春

    2001-01-01

    The relations between lake surface sediment diatoms and water environmental variables were revealed effectively by use of a new multivariate canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) based on 45 lakes in the Tibetan Plateau. Water depth, conductivity, Cl-, Mg2+, K+ and pH, identified from 12 contemporary water environmental variables, can significantly and independently explain the diatom distributions (p<0.05). The first two axes (λ1=0.34, λ2=0.27) capture 16.1% of the variance in the species data, and account for 57.4% of the variance in diatom-environment relationship. The deletion of redundant environmental variables and unusual samples do not influence the explanation to diatom data. The final CCA result indicates that the water depth and the salinity are the two important environmental gradients and influence the diatom distribution in the plateau lakes. The water depth correlates with axis 1, while conductivity, Cl-, Mg2+ and K+, indicating the direction of salinity changes, corr

  5. Properties of Esterified Wood Prepared with Maleic Anhydride / Tetrabr Omophthalic Anhydride / Glycerol Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jianzhang; Furuno Takeshi; Zhou Wenrui; Yu Zhiming; Sun Yanling; Zhang Derong

    2003-01-01

    For overcoming disadvantages of wood, an esterification process was employed and tetrabromophthalic anhydride (TBPA) was used as a reactive chemical agent to prepare an esterified wood with the high dimensional stability, flame resistance, and resistance to biodegradation from water-leaching. The experimental results indicated that esterification of wood plus maleic anhydride / tetrabromophthalic anhydride / glycerol could endow wood with dimensional stability, the antiswelling efficiency during water absorption (ASEw), reduction in water absorptivity (RWA), antiswelling efficiency during moisture absorption (ASEm), moisture excluding efficiency (MEE), and oxygen index (OI) of treated wood increased with an increase in the weight percent gain (WPG). And the treated wood showed great decay resistance and resistance to water leaching, too.

  6. WMAP 3yr data with the CCA: anomalous emission and impact of component separation on the CMB power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaldi, A; Leach, S; Stivoli, F; Baccigalupi, C; De Zotti, G

    2007-01-01

    The Correlated Component Analysis (CCA) allows us to estimate how the different diffuse emissions mix in CMB experiments, exploiting also complementary information from other surveys. It is especially useful to deal with possible additional components. An application of CCA to WMAP maps assuming that only the canonical Galactic emissions are present, highlights the widespread presence of a spectrally flat "synchrotron" component, largely uncorrelated with the synchrotron template, suggesting that an additional foreground is indeed required. We have tested various spectral shapes for such component, namely a power law as expected if it is flat synchrotron, and two spectral shapes that may fit the spinning dust emission: a parabola in the logS - log(frequency) plane, and a grey body. Quality tests applied to the reconstructed CMB maps clearly disfavour two of the models. The CMB power spectra, estimated from CMB maps reconstructed exploiting the three surviving foreground models, are generally consistent with t...

  7. Nanoscale in Wood, Nanowood and Wood-Inorganic Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Guangjie; Lu Wenhua

    2003-01-01

    In order to introduce nano science and technology (NST) into the research field of wood science and technology, andpromote the research of wood science and wood-inorganic composites to nanoscale, some new concepts, such as the nano space inwood, nano structure units of wood and nanowood are put forward in this paper based on the layer structure of wood cell wall and thepile-up model of its main components. Furthermore, the process of preparing nanowood is discussed, and wood-inorganic nanocom-posites may be operated in three ways with wood (matrix) and inorganic filler phase in 0-2, 0-3 or 2-3 dimensions respectively. Thefollowing results are obtained: (1) The nanoscale voids in wood indicate that wood has inherent space to accommodate nanosizedmaterials, such as nanoparticles, nanotubes and nanosticks; (2) According to the size from top down, the nano structure units in woodcan be classified as: nanolayers, nano CMF (cellulose microfibril) and matrix, nano crystallite units and cellulose chain clusters, andthese can theoretically form nanowood; (3) The preparation of wood-inorganic nanocomposites can be operated on 0-2, 0-3 or 2-3dimensions.

  8. Acetylation of Wood Flour from Four Wood Species Grown in Nigeria Using Vinegar and Acetic Anhydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakubu Azeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of acetylation on pretreated wood flour of four different wood species, Boabab (Adansonia digitata, Mahoganny (Daniella oliveri, African locust bean (Parkia biglobosa and Beech wood (Gmelina arborea, had been investigated. The first batch of wood species were acetylated using acetic anhydride while the second batch were acetylated with commercial vinegar. Both experiments were conducted in the presence of varying amount of CaCl2 as catalyst and at temperature of 120°C for 3 h. The success of acetylation was determined based on Weight Percent Gain for each sample treated with either chemicals used. FT-IR, a veritable tool was used for the analysis of both treated and untreated samples to further investigate the success of acetylation. The results showed the presence of important band such as carbonyl absorptions at 1743, 1744, 1746, 1731, 1718 and 1696 cm−1 as appeared separately in the spectra of acetylated samples, confirming esterification occurred. The purpose of this work was to investigate the applicability of vinegar for acetylation of lignocellulosic fibers. Blends/composites were prepared by solution casting and their kinetics investigated in distilled water. The results indicated they could be used in outdoor applications such as, decking and packaging.

  9. STS-32 MS G. David Low dons LES CCA in KSC LC Pad 39A white room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) G. David Low, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), fastens strap on LES communications carrier assembly (CCA) cap in the white room on the orbiter access arm at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. Technicians oversee the suiting operations. MS Marsha S. Ivins sits next to Low. When fully equipped, Low and Ivins will enter Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, side hatch which appears in the background.

  10. Measuring Strain Variation of Pretreated Wood during Drying Using an Optical Measurement System

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ho–Yang; Hong, Seung–Hyun; Kang, Chun–Won; Matsumura, Junji

    2014-01-01

    Surfacing, steaming and freezing are widely used pretreatment methods to improve the drying rate and to reduce drying defects of wood. In this study, Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) wood samples were treated with steaming or freezing, and the resulting drying behaviors such as drying rate, drying strain and drying defects were investigated and compared with those of control wood using an optical measurement system and a digital image correlation (DIC) method. In the case of steaming pretr...

  11. EVALUATION OF CHEMICALS INCORPORATED WOOD FIBRE CEMENT MATRIX PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MST. SADIA MAHZABIN

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wood fibre cement (WFC boards are well established commercially and widely used in many developed countries. The combination of the properties of two important materials, i.e., cement, and previously treated fibrous materials like wood or agricultural residues; which made up the board, contributed in the performance of the board as building material. In this work, the WFC matrix (WFCM samples are produced to determine the physical properties of WFCM such as the density and water absorption. The wood fibres are incorporated/treated with three different chemical additives; calcium formate (Ca(HCOO2, sodium silicate (Na2.SiO3 and magnesium chloride (MgCl2 prior to mixing with cement. The mechanical properties of the WFCM, with or without chemicals treatment of fibres, such as the compressive strength and flexural strength are evaluated. Three wood/cement ratios (50:50, 40:60, 30:70 are used and the percentages of water and accelerator were 80% and 3% based on the cement weight, respectively. Three moisture-conditioned samples; accelerated aging, dry and wet conditions are used for flexural test. The results reveal that the wood/cement ratio, chemical additives and moisture content had a marked influence on the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix. Finally, it has been shown that the 40:60 wood/cement ratio samples with prior chemicals treatment of the fibres that undergo accelerated aging conditioning achieve higher strength then dry and wet-conditioned boards.

  12. Effects of heat treatment of wood on hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation and biomechanical properties in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekola, J; Lassila, L V J; Hirvonen, J; Lahdenperä, M; Grenman, R; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2010-08-01

    Wood is a natural fiber reinforced composite. It structurally resembles bone tissue to some extent. Specially heat-treated birch wood has been used as a model material for further development of synthetic fiber reinforced composites (FRC) for medical and dental use. In previous studies it has been shown, that heat treatment has a positive effect on the osteoconductivity of an implanted wood. In this study the effects of two different heat treatment temperatures (140 and 200 degrees C) on wood were studied in vitro. Untreated wood was used as a control material. Heat treatment induced biomechanical changes were studied with flexural and compressive tests on dry birch wood as well as on wood after 63 days of simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion. Dimensional changes, SBF sorption and hydroxylapatite type mineral formation were also assessed. The results showed that SBF immersion decreases the biomechanical performance of wood and that the heat treatment diminishes the effect of SBF immersion on biomechanical properties. With scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis it was shown that hydroxylapatite type mineral precipitation formed on the 200 degrees C heat-treated wood. An increased weight gain of the same material during SBF immersion supported this finding. The results of this study give more detailed insight of the biologically relevant changes that heat treatment induces in wood material. Furthermore the findings in this study are in line with previous in vivo studies.

  13. Antioxidant properties of wood extracts and colour stability of woods

    OpenAIRE

    Diouf, Papaniokhor; Merlin, André; Perrin, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Industrial wood extracts were selected and other extracts were prepared in the laboratory from some chosen wood species. Antioxidant capacities of extracts were measured by three methods: the oxygen uptake method, the kinetic DPPH method, and the equilibrium DPPH method. There is a fair correlation between the three methods. Total phenol contents of the extracts and colour stability of woods were measured. For the same phenol content, extracts containing condensed tannins are more antioxidant...

  14. Performance of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA urine-dipsticks for rapid detection of intestinal schistosomiasis in schoolchildren from shoreline communities of Lake Victoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariuki HC

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For disease surveillance and mapping within large-scale control programmes, RDTs are becoming popular. For intestinal schistosomiasis, a commercially available urine-dipstick which detects schistosome circulating cathodic antigen (CCA in host urine is being increasingly applied, however, further validation is needed. In this study, we compared the CCA urine-dipstick test against double thick Kato-Katz faecal smears from 171 schoolchildren examined along the Tanzanian and Kenyan shorelines of Lake Victoria. Diagnostic methods were in broad agreement; the mean prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis inferred by Kato-Katz examination was 68.6% (95% confidence intervals (CIs = 60.7-75.7% and 71.3% (95% CIs = 63.9-78.8% by CCA urine-dipsticks. There were, however, difficulties in precisely 'calling' the CCA test result, particularly in discrimination of 'trace' reactions as either putative infection positive or putative infection negative, which has important bearing upon estimation of mean infection prevalence; considering 'trace' as infection positive mean prevalence was 94.2% (95% CIs = 89.5-97.2%. A positive association between increasing intensity of the CCA urine-dipstick test band and faecal egg count was observed. Assigning trace reactions as putative infection negative, overall diagnostic sensitivity (SS of the CCA urine-dipstick was 87.7% (95% CIs = 80.6-93.0%, specificity (SP was 68.1% (95% CIs = 54.3-80.0%, positive predictive value (PPV was 86.1% (95% CIs = 78.8-91.7% and negative predictive value (NPV was 71.1% (95% CIs = 57.2-82.8%. To assist in objective defining of the CCA urine-dipstick result, we propose the use of a simple colour chart and conclude that the CCA urine-dipstick is a satisfactory alternative, or supplement, to Kato-Katz examination for rapid detection of intestinal schistosomiasis.

  15. Construction of hydrophobic wood surfaces by room temperature deposition of rutile (TiO2) nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A room temperature method for coating wood surfaces with rutile TiO2 nanostructures. • PFDTS-TiO2 treatment provided a highly hydrophobic wood surface. • PFDTS-TiO2 treatment of the wood decreased the rate of liquid water uptake. • PFDTS-TiO2 treatment delayed the onset of water saturation point of the wood. • This coating method may be applicable to the other forest biopolymer materials. - Abstract: A convenient room temperature approach was developed for growing rutile TiO2 hierarchical structures on the wood surface by direct hydrolysis and crystallization of TiCl3 in saturated NaCl aqueous solution. The morphology and the crystal structure of TiO2 coated on the wood surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The TiO2 morphology on the wood surface could be tuned by simply changing either the reaction time or pH value of the reaction mixture. After modification with perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane (PFDTS), the water contact angle (WCA) of the TiO2-treated wood (T1) surface increased to 140.0 ± 4.2°, which indicated a highly hydrophobic wood surface. In addition, compared with untreated control wood, PFDTS-TiO2 treatment (PFDTS-T1-treated) not only reduced liquid water uptake, but also delayed the onset of water saturation point of the wood substrate. The weight change of PFDTS-T1-treated wood after 24 h of water immersion was 19.3%, compared to 81.3% for the untreated control wood. After 867 h of water immersion, the weight change for the treated and untreated wood specimens was 117.1%, and 155.1%, respectively. The untreated control wood reached the steady state after 187 h, while the PFDTS-T1-treated wood did not reach the steady state until after 600 h of immersion

  16. HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN WOOD CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    YOUNG, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    Wood are one of the most important raw material source for forest products industry. Due to technological developments, researchers in the area of wood chemistry have been showing increased interest in the benefits of utilization wood based materials alone or together as an alternative lignocellulosic fiber sources for forest products industry. However, utilization of woody matrials more efficiently and conservation natural resources have been paid special attention. For that reason...

  17. Horizontal Stiffness of Wood Diaphragms

    OpenAIRE

    Bott, James Wescott

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the stiffness of wood diaphragms. Currently there is no method to calculate wood diaphragm stiffness that can reliably account for all of the various framing configurations. Diaphragm stiffness is important in the design of wood framed structures to calculate the predicted deflection and thereby determine if a diaphragm may be classified as rigid or flexible. This classification controls the method by which load is transferred from the d...

  18. Wood products and green chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio PIZZI

    2016-01-01

    International audience Key message Green chemistry for and from wood has developed numerous industrial products, namely biosourced, green wood adhesives and preservatives, foams, composite matrices, laminates, hard and flexible plastics, flexible films, and abrasive grinding discs, and their number is still growing.IntroductionThis review addresses (1) the elimination of toxic aldehydes from the most common wood panel adhesive, the one based on urea, itself a natural product, (2) biosource...

  19. Comparison of Physical Properties of Untreated and Heat Treated Beech and Hornbeam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Sinković

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of physical properties of heat treated beech wood and hornbeam wood found that their average value is lower and significantly different from average values of physical properties of untreated beech wood and hornbeam wood. The average value of density in absolutely dry condition of heat treated beech wood is smaller by 8.5% from the untreated, and the hornbeam wood is smaller by 7.5%. Reduction of average values of maximum shrinkage of heat treated beech wood and hornbeam wood is even bigger in relation to the untreated wood. Maximum radial shrinkage of heat treated beech wood is smaller by 7%, maximum tangential shrinkage by 23.5% and maximum volumetric shrinkage by 19.3% compared to the same physical properties of untreated beech wood. Heat treated hornbeam wood has an average value of maximum radial shrinkage smaller by 123%, maximum tangential shrinkage by 86% and maximum volume shrinkage by 99.5% compared to the same physical properties of untreated hornbeam wood. With such reduction in the maximum shrinkage in radial and tangential direction using heat treatment, hornbeam becomes particulary suitable for making products where dimensional stability is important.

  20. Effect of fixation time on leaching of copper-ethanolamine based wood preservatives

    OpenAIRE

    Žlindra, Daniel; Franc POHLEVEN; Humar, Miha

    2015-01-01

    Fixation in copper-ethanolamine treated Norway spruce wood is finished in the first or in the second week after impregnation depending on the concentration of wood preservatives used. However, copper losses increased after four weeks of fixation again, presumably due to lignin depolymerisation caused by ethanolamine.

  1. The Fabrication and Properties Characterization of Wood-Based Flame Retardant Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood-based flame retardant composites were fabricated based on vacuum-pressure impregnating method after high intensive microwave pretreatment. The effects of ammonium polyphosphate (APP and modified nano-zinc borate (nZB addition on flame-retardation and smoke-suppression properties of wood were investigated by cone calorimeter method (CONE and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The results show that the heat release rate (HRR, peak heat release rate (pk-HRR, and total heat release (THR of APP-treated woods decreased greatly with increasing concentration of APP. However, mean yield of CO (Mean COY of APP-treated wood was much higher (3.5 times than that of untreated wood. Compared with wood treated with APP at a concentration of 15%, the total smoke product (TSP, Mean COY, and pk-HRR decreased by 78.4%, 71.43%, and 31.23%, when wood was treated with APP and nZB (both concentrations were at 15%. APP and nZB have synergistic effects of flame-retardation and smoke-suppression. Nano-zinc borate combined with APP would be used in wood-based composites to efficiently retard flame, reduce fire intensity, and decrease noxious (CO/smoke release.

  2. Effects of copper amine treatments on mechanical, biological and surface/interphase properties of poly (vinyl chloride)/wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haihong

    2005-11-01

    The copper ethanolamine (CuEA) complex was used as a wood surface modifier and a coupling agent for wood-PVC composites. Mechanical properties of composites, such as unnotched impact strength, flexural strength and flexural toughness, were significantly increased, and fungal decay weight loss was dramatically decreased by wood surface copper amine treatments. It is evident that copper amine was a very effective coupling agent and decay inhibitor for PVC/wood flour composites, especially in high wood flour loading level. A DSC study showed that the heat capacity differences (DeltaCp) of composites before and after PVC glass transition were reduced by adding wood particles. A DMA study revealed that the movements of PVC chain segments during glass transition were limited and obstructed by the presence of wood molecule chains. This restriction effect became stronger by increasing wood flour content and by using Cu-treated wood flour. Wood flour particles acted as "physical cross-linking points" inside the PVC matrix, resulting in the absence of the rubbery plateau of PVC and higher E', E'' above Tg, and smaller tan delta peaks. Enhanced mechanical performances were attributed to the improved wetting condition between PVC melts and wood surfaces, and the formation of a stronger interphase strengthened by chemical interactions between Cu-treated wood flour and the PVC matrix. Contact angles of PVC solution drops on Cu-treated wood surfaces were decreased dramatically compared to those on the untreated surfaces. Acid-base (polar), gammaAB, electron-acceptor (acid) (gamma +), electron-donor (base) (gamma-) surface energy components and the total surface energies increased after wood surface Cu-treatments, indicating a strong tendency toward acid-base or polar interactions. Improved interphase and interfacial adhesion were further confirmed by measuring interfacial shear strength between wood and the PVC matrix.

  3. Congenital chylous ascites treated successfully with MCT-Based formula and octreotide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radheshyam Purkait

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medium chain triglyceride (MCT-based diet, total parenteral nutrition (TPN and repeated paracentesis are considered as supportive management for congenital chylous ascites (CCA. TPN is considered where therapy with oral MCT is poorly tolerated by the patient especially young infant with unstable hemodynamic. Surgery is recommended when medical therapy fails. Herein, we report a 2΍-month-old infant with CCA, treated successfully with octreotide intravenous infusion after the initial failure to response to conventional conservative therapy with MCT-enriched formula and paracentesis.

  4. Wood pole overhead lines

    CERN Document Server

    Wareing, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This new book concentrates on the mechanical aspects of distribution wood pole lines, including live line working, environmental influences, climate change and international standards. Other topics include statutory requirements, safety, profiling, traditional and probabilistic design, weather loads, bare and covered conductors, different types of overhead systems, conductor choice, construction and maintenance. A section has also been devoted to the topic of lightning, which is one of the major sources of faults on overhead lines. The book focuses on the effects of this problem and the strate

  5. Wood-Based Bioenergy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoel, Michael; Sletten, Thea Marcelia

    2014-01-01

    During recent years increased attention has been given to second-generation wood-based bioenergy. The carbon stored in the forest is highest when there is little or no harvest from the forest. Increasing the harvest from a forest, in order to produce more bioenergy, may thus conflict with the direct benefit of the forest as a carbon sink. We analyze this conflict using a simple model where bioenergy and fossil energy are perfect substitutes. Our analysis shows how the social optimum will depe...

  6. Online sorting of recovered wood waste by automated XRF-technology: part II. Sorting efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A Rasem; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Townsend, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Sorting of waste wood is an important process practiced at recycling facilities in order to detect and divert contaminants from recycled wood products. Contaminants of concern include arsenic, chromium and copper found in chemically preserved wood. The objective of this research was to evaluate the sorting efficiencies of both treated and untreated parts of the wood waste stream, and metal (As, Cr and Cu) mass recoveries by the use of automated X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. A full-scale system was used for experimentation. This unit consisted of an XRF-detection chamber mounted on the top of a conveyor and a pneumatic slide-way diverter which sorted wood into presumed treated and presumed untreated piles. A randomized block design was used to evaluate the operational conveyance parameters of the system, including wood feed rate and conveyor belt speed. Results indicated that online sorting efficiencies of waste wood by XRF technology were high based on number and weight of pieces (70-87% and 75-92% for treated wood and 66-97% and 68-96% for untreated wood, respectively). These sorting efficiencies achieved mass recovery for metals of 81-99% for As, 75-95% for Cu and 82-99% of Cr. The incorrect sorting of wood was attributed almost equally to deficiencies in the detection and conveyance/diversion systems. Even with its deficiencies, the system was capable of producing a recyclable portion that met residential soil quality levels established for Florida, for an infeed that contained 5% of treated wood. PMID:21194917

  7. Preparation and characterization of wood-polymer composites obtained by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work studies the improvement of the physical properties wood-polymer composites obtained by means of infiltration in vacuum of styrene-polyester, methyl methacrylate, and their mixtures. The polymerization was done by gamma radiation and microwaves. Capirona, Oje Blanco and Cumala woods, were used in this study. The polymerization by microwaves depends on the working power. High power produces bubbles, deformation and fractures of the obtained polymer. The minimum dose to provoke the polymerization by gamma radiation is 14 kGy. The wood-polymer composites show low water absorption in comparison with the non-treated wood. (author)

  8. Improvment of wood-residues conversion technology

    OpenAIRE

    Posharnikov, Feliks; Bazarskaya, Nina; Bulanov, Aleksandr

    2011-01-01

    The problem of wood residues conversion is considered. The sizes-based types of wood residues and results of wood residues conversion are presented. Sawdust-based-cement a new original product is offered

  9. 基于XRD和FTIR的香樟木质部提取物处理材褐腐的光谱学分析%Spectroscopic Analysis of the Decay Resistance of Wood Treated with Extracts from the Xylem of Cinnamomum Camphora with XRD and FTIR Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李权; 王晓娴; 林金国

    2014-01-01

    Four kinds of extracts from the xylem of C .Camphora ,ACQ and camphor were selected to make wood preservatives for laboratory toxicity test of wood preservatives for decay fungus .The results showed that the treated blocks with 4% ACQ and 10% methanol extracts could meet the demand of degree Ⅰ of preservation and showed strong resistance to brown-rot fungus at-tack .The wood treated with 4% camphor extracts ,10% ethyl acetate extracts ,and 10% acetone extracts reached the demand of degree Ⅱ and showed moderate decay resistance .The blocks treated with 10% hot water extracts and untreated samples meet the demand of degree Ⅲ .Through XRD comparison ,the author was found that the preservative effects of four extracts are pro-portional to the degree of crystallinity .Crystallization fields 2θdiffraction angle were ordered from larger to little as 10% hot wa-ter extracts>untreated samples>10% acetone extracts>10% methanol extracts>10% ethyl acetate extracts .According to FT-IR analysis ,the amount of degraded cellulose and hemicellulose increased with the decline of characteristic absorption peak at 1 374 ,1 160 ,1 106 ,1 056 and 897 cm -1 ,meaning that the preservative effect of corresponding preservatives were getting worse .The peak height of characterization of lignin is higher compared to the untreated wood .I1510/I1738 ,I1510/I1374 ,I1510/I1 160 of the treated blocks with 10% methanol extracts and 4% ACQ are the smallest in all the treated blocks ,which proved that the degradation ability of brown -rot fungus to the holocellulose is the weakest ,and the wood preservative is best .%植物源防腐剂因其环保、广谱、高效等特点越来越受到木材防腐行业的重视,从微观层面探索香樟提取物影响木材腐朽的机理是发展利用植物源防腐剂的重要基础。试验采用香樟木质部的四种溶剂提取物、ACQ及樟脑配制成防腐剂进行防腐试验,结果表明:10%浓度的香樟

  10. Wood-related occupations, wood dust exposure, and sinonasal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, R B; Gerin, M; Raatgever, J W; de Bruyn, A

    1986-10-01

    A case-control study was conducted to examine the relations between type of woodworking and the extent of wood dust exposure to the risks for specific histologic types of sinonasal cancer. In cooperation with the major treatment centers in the Netherlands, 116 male patients newly diagnosed between 1978 and 1981 with primary malignancies of epithelial origin of this site were identified for study. Living controls were selected from the municipal registries, and deceased controls were selected from the national death registry. Interviews were completed for 91 (78%) cases and 195 (75%) controls. Job histories were coded by industry and occupation. An index of exposure was developed to classify the extent of occupational exposure to wood dust. When necessary, adjustment was made for age and usual cigarette use. The risk for nasal adenocarcinoma was elevated by industry for the wood and paper industry (odds ratio (OR) = 11.9) and by occupation for those employed in furniture and cabinet making (OR = 139.8), in factory joinery and carpentry work (OR = 16.3), and in association with high-level wood dust exposure (OR = 26.3). Other types of nasal cancer were not found to be associated with wood-related industries or occupations. A moderate excess in risk for squamous cell cancer (OR = 2.5) was associated with low-level wood dust exposure; however, no dose-response relation was evident. The association between wood dust and adenocarcinoma was strongest for those employed in wood dust-related occupations between 1930 and 1941. The risk of adenocarcinoma did not appear to decrease for at least 15 years after termination of exposure to wood dust. No cases of nasal adenocarcinoma were observed in men whose first exposure to wood dust occurred after 1941.

  11. Wood decay in desert riverine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Douglas; Stricker, Craig A.; Nelson, S. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Floodplain forests and the woody debris they produce are major components of riverine ecosystems in many arid and semiarid regions (drylands). We monitored breakdown and nitrogen dynamics in wood and bark from a native riparian tree, Fremont cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. wislizeni), along four North American desert streams. We placed locally-obtained, fresh, coarse material [disks or cylinders (∼500–2000 cm3)] along two cold-desert and two warm-desert rivers in the Colorado River Basin. Material was placed in both floodplain and aquatic environments, and left in situ for up to 12 years. We tested the hypothesis that breakdown would be fastest in relatively warm and moist aerobic environments by comparing the time required for 50% loss of initial ash-free dry matter (T50) calculated using exponential decay models incorporating a lag term. In cold-desert sites (Green and Yampa rivers, Colorado), disks of wood with bark attached exposed for up to 12 years in locations rarely inundated lost mass at a slower rate (T50 = 34 yr) than in locations inundated during most spring floods (T50 = 12 yr). At the latter locations, bark alone loss mass at a rate initially similar to whole disks (T50 = 13 yr), but which subsequently slowed. In warm-desert sites monitored for 3 years, cylinders of wood with bark removed lost mass very slowly (T50 = 60 yr) at a location never inundated (Bill Williams River, Arizona), whereas decay rate varied among aquatic locations (T50 = 20 yr in Bill Williams River; T50 = 3 yr in Las Vegas Wash, an effluent-dominated stream warmed by treated wastewater inflows). Invertebrates had a minor role in wood breakdown except at in-stream locations in Las Vegas Wash. The presence and form of change in nitrogen content during exposure varied among riverine environments. Our results suggest woody debris breakdown in desert riverine ecosystems is primarily a microbial process with rates determined by landscape position

  12. A Study on the Effect of Plasma Treatment for Waste Wood Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MiMi Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface modification of wood powder by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was investigated. The composites were manufactured using wood powder and polypropylene (wood powder: polypropylene = 55 wt% : 45 wt%. Atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was applied under the condition of 3 KV, 17±1 KHz, 2 g/min. Helium was used as the carrier gas and hexamethyl-disiloxane (HMDSO as the monomer to modify the surface property of the waste wood biocomposites by plasma polymerization. The tensile strengths of untreated waste wood powder (W3 and single species wood powder (S3 were about 18.5 MPa and 21.5 MPa while those of plasma treated waste wood powder (PW3 and plasma treated single species wood powder (PS3 were about 21.2 MPa and 23.4 MPa, respectively. Tensile strengths of W3 and S3 were improved by 14.6% and 8.8%, respectively. From the analyses of mechanical properties and morphology, we conclude that the interfacial bonding of polypropylene and wood powder can be improved by atmospheric pressure plasma treatment.

  13. Arsenic Specitation in Multiple Metal Environments: II. Micro-Spectroscopic Investigation of a CCA Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe,M.; Tappero, R.; Marcus, M.; Sparks, D.

    2008-01-01

    The speciation of arsenic (As) in a copper-chromated-arsenate (CCA) contaminated soil was investigated using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (microXRF) and micro-focused X-ray absorption fine structure (microXAFS) spectroscopies to determine if and how the co-contaminating metal cations (Cu, Zn, Cr) influenced the speciation of As. 15 microXRF images were collected on 30-mum polished thin sections and powder-on-tape samples from which Pearson correlation coefficients (rho) between As and various metal species were determined based on the fluorescence intensity of each element in each image pixel. 29 microXAFS and two bulk-XAFS spectra were collected from depths of 0-20 cm (LM-A) and 20-40 cm (LM-B) to determine the chemical speciation of As in the soil by target analyses of principal components with circa 52 reference spectra and linear least-square combination fitting of individual experimental spectra with a refined reference phase list (32) of likely As species. Arsenic and metal cations (Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) accumulated in distinct, isolated areas often not larger than 50 x 50 microm in which the Pearson correlation between the elements was strongly positive (rho>0.75). The correlation of As to Zn and Cr decreased from >0.9 to <0.8 and increased to Cu from approximately 0.6 to >0.8 with depth. Arsenic occurred predominantly in the +5 oxidation state. Abstract factor analysis and linear least square combination fit analysis suggested that As occurred as a continuum of fully and poorly-ordered copper-arsenate precipitates with additional components being characterized by surface adsorption complexes on goethite and gibbsite in the presence and absence of Zn. Precipitates other than copper-based ones, e.g., scorodite, adamite and ojuelaite were also identified. The significant co-localization and chemical speciation of As with Cu suggest that the speciation of As in a contaminated soils is not solely controlled by surface adsorption reactions, but significantly

  14. Serpula lacrymans, The Dry Rot Fungus and Tolerance Towards Copper-Based Wood Preservatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Jensen, Bo; Clausen, Carol;

    2005-01-01

    wood preservatives were the most commonly used preservatives for pressure treatment of wood for building constructions. Because of a suspicion about tolerance toward copper components, a soil block test was undertaken to clarify the effect of two copper based preservatives, copper citrate and ACQ......-D, on the dry rot fungus, Serpula lacrymans compared to an alternative non-copper containing wood preservative. The extensive use of copper-based wood preservatives has hastened the need for understanding why some fungi are able to attack copper-treated wood. The copper tolerance of S. lacrymans and other brown...... against the dry rot isolates. These wood preservatives are less toxic toward the environment than traditional copper based preservatives....

  15. Wood gas; Holz gibt Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilgers, Claudia

    2011-06-17

    Sixty years ago, wood gas was even used as a car fuel. Today, this ancient technology is experiencing a renaissance. Small cogeneration plants with wood gasifiers are ideal for renewable and decentral power supply concepts for tomorrow. Until then, there is much pioneering work to do until plants will be ready for serial production.

  16. Preservation of forest wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofman, P.D.; Thomsen, I.M.; Ohlsson, C.; Leer, E.; Ravn Schmidt, E.; Soerensen, M.; Knudsen, P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Danish Energy Research Programme on biomass utilisation for energy production (EFP), this project concerns problems connected to the handling and storing of wood chips. In this project, the possibility of preserving wood chips of the Norway Spruce (Picea Abies) is addressed, and the potential improvements by anaerobic storage are tested. Preservation of wood chips aims at reducing dry matter losses from extensive heating during storage and to reduce production of fungal spores. Fungal spores pose a health hazards to workers handling the chips. Further the producers of wood chips are interested in such a method since it would enable them to give a guarantee for the delivery of homogeneous wood chips also during the winter period. Three different types of wood chips were stored airtight and further one of these was stored in accordance with normal practise and use as reference. The results showed that airtight storage had a beneficial impact on the quality of the chips: no redistribution of moisture, low dry matter losses, unfavourable conditions for microbial activity of most fungi, and the promotion of yeasts instead of fungi with airborne spores. Likewise the firing tests showed that no combustion problems, and no increased risk to the environment or to the health of staff is caused by anaerobic storage of wood chips. In all, the tests of the anaerobic storage method of forest wood chips were a success and a large-scale test of the method will be carried out in 1999. (au)

  17. The role of particle size of particulate nano-zinc oxide wood preservatives on termite mortality and leach resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartal S Nami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically most residential wood preservatives were aqueous soluble metal formulations, but recently metals ground to submicron size and dispersed in water to give particulate formulations have gained importance. In this study, the specific role nano-zinc oxide (ZnO particle size and leach resistance plays in termite mortality resulting from exposure to particulate ZnO-treated wood was investigated. Southern yellow pine (SYP sapwood impregnated with three concentrations of two particle sizes (30 and 70 nm of ZnO were compared to wood treated with soluble zinc sulphate (ZnSO4 preservative for leach resistance and termite resistance. Less than four percent leached from the particulate nano-ZnO-treated specimens, while 13 to 25% of the zinc sulphate leached from the soluble treated wood. Nano-ZnO was essentially non-leachable from wood treated with 5% formulation for the 30-nm particle size. In a no-choice laboratory test, eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes consumed less than 10% of the leached nano-ZnO-treated wood with 93 to 100% mortality in all treatment concentrations. In contrast, termites consumed 10 to 12% of the leached ZnSO4-treated wood, but with lower mortality: 29% in the 1% treatment group and less than 10% (5 and 8%, respectively in the group of wood blocks treated with 2.5 and 5.0% ZnSO4. We conclude that termites were repelled from consuming wood treated with nano-ZnO, but when consumed it was more toxic to eastern subterranean termites than wood treated with the soluble metal oxide formulation. There were no differences in leaching or termite mortality between the two particle sizes of nano-ZnO.

  18. Design Wood Nanocomposites from Polymer Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LVWenhua; ZHAOGuangjie

    2004-01-01

    Researches on wood nanocomposites, which involve nano science and technology, wood science,materials science and other related subjects, have important science signification and promising prospect for the development and study of new wood composites with high appending values and multi-properties. This paper reviewed the conventional wood composites, and then discussed the approaches to prepare wood nanocomposites. Based on the achievements of researches on polymer/montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposites, the design ideas of preparing nanocomposites of wood and inorganic MMT were systematically put forward. Nano compounding of wood and other materials is an effective approach to greatly improve or modify wood.

  19. 竹材铜唑防腐剂处理工艺及力学性能研究%Process and Mechanical Properties of Bamboo Wood Treated with CuAz Preservative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦韶山; 刘君良; 赵荣军; 李家宁

    2012-01-01

    以竹材为试验材料.采用新型水溶性铜唑(CopperAzole,即CuAz)防腐剂对其进行防腐处理.分析药剂质量分数、压力、前真空时间及加压时间对防腐处理效果的影响,比较处理前后对竹材力学性能的影响。研究结果表明,药剂质量分数是影响竹材防腐处理效果的显著因子;经铜唑防腐处理后,竹材的弹性模量(MOE)、顺纹抗拉强度和抗压强度无显著变化,抗弯强度(MOR)稍有降低。%In this study, CuAz preservative was used to treat bamboo by means of vacuum-pressure impregnation. The effects of preservative concentration, pressure, pre-vacuum time and press time on bamboo were analyzed, and the mechanical properties of treated bamboo were determined. The results showed that preservative concentration was the most significant affection factors on treatment result of bamboo. In comparison with untreated samples, the modulus of elasticity (MOE), tensile strength and compressive strength of treated samples did not significantly changed. However, the modulus of rupture (MOR) was decreased slightly compared to untreated ones.

  20. The effect of heat treatment of wood on osteoconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekola, J; Aho, A J; Gunn, J; Matinlinna, J; Hirvonen, J; Viitaniemi, P; Vallittu, P K

    2009-06-01

    Wood is a natural porous fibre composite, which has some structural similarities to bone. Recently, it has been used as a modelling material in developing synthetic fibre-reinforced composite to be used as load-bearing non-metallic artificial bone material. In this study, the behaviour of wood implanted into bone was studied in vivo in the femur bone of the rabbit. Wood was pre-treated by heat, which altered its chemical composition and structure, as well as the biomechanical properties. In the heat treatment, wood's dimensional stability is enhanced, equilibrium moisture content reduces and the biological durability increases. Cone-shaped implants were manufactured from heat-treated (at 200 and 140 degrees C) birch wood (Betula pubescens) and from untreated birch. A total of 62 implants were placed in the distal femur of 50 white New Zealand rabbits. The behaviour of the implants was studied at 4, 8 and 20 weeks with histological and histometrical analysis. Osteoconductive contact line and the presence of fibrous tissue and foreign body reaction were determined. The amount of fibrous tissue diminished with time, and the absence of foreign body reaction was found to be in correlation to the amount of heat treatment. Histologically found contact between the implant and the host bone at the interface was significantly more abundant in the 200 degrees C group (avg. 12.8%) vs. the 140 degrees C (avg. 2.7%) and the untreated groups (avg. 0.6%). It was observed that the heat treatment significantly modified the biological behaviour of the implanted wood. The changes of the wood by heat treatment showed a positive outcome concerning osteoconductivity of the material.

  1. A Potential Criterion to Evaluate Copper Adsorption in Wood Cell Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinzhen Cao; Donatien P. Kamdem

    2003-01-01

    A geometrical definition, fractal dimension, was introduced in this study to evaluate copper adsorption in wood treated with copper-containing preservatives. It is based on the assumption that some copper would compete the hydroxyl groups in wood cell wall with water molecules, and therefore influence the fractal dimension of internal wood surfaces revealed by the moisture adsorption in wood. Southern yellow pine (Pinus spp.) specimens were treated with different concentrations of copper ethanolamine (Cu-EA) solution to obtain different copper retention levels. Then the adsorption isotherms of untreated and Cu-EA treated specimens were determined at 4, 15, 30, and 40 ℃ to provide the source data for fractal dimension calculation. The results showed that, at all temperatures, the fractal dimension of the internal wood surfaces had a decreasing trend with increasing copper retention. That is, the internal spaces in wood become "thinner" due to the copper adsorption on some hydroxyl groups in wood cell wall. The correlation between the fractal dimension and adsorbed copper ions makes it possible to evaluate the copper adsorption in wood cell wall.

  2. Utilizing wood wastes as reinforcement in wood cement composite bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusirat Aderinsola Sadiku

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research work undertaken to study the properties of Wood Cement Composite Bricks (WCCB from different wood wastes and cement / wood content. The WCBBs with nominal density of 1200 kg m-3 were produced from three tropical wood species and at varying cement and wood content of 2:1, 2.5:1 and 3:1 on a weight to weight basis. The properties evaluated were compressive strength, Ultra Pulse Velocity (UPV, water absorption (WA and thickness swelling (TS. The Compressive strength values ranged from 0.25 to 1.13 N mm-2 and UPV values ranged from 18753 to 49992 m s-1. The mean values of WA after 672 hours (28 days of water soaking of the WCCBs ranged from 9.50% to 47.13% where there were no noticeable change in the TS of the bricks. The observed density (OD ranged from 627 to 1159 kg m-3. A. zygia from the three wood/cement content were more dimensionally stable and better in compressive strength than the other two species where T. scleroxylon had the best performance in terms of UPV. All the properties improved with increasing cement content. WCCBs at 3.0:1 cement/wood content are suitable for structural application such as panelling, ceiling and partitioning

  3. Carbohydrate reactions during high-temperature steam treatment of aspen wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiebing; Henriksson, Gunnar; Gellerstedt, Göran

    2005-06-01

    Aspen wood was treated with steam at different time-temperature severity factors. Analysis of the amounts of acids released revealed a relationship between the acidity and the formation of furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural as degradation products from carbohydrates. It is suggested that two concurrent or consecutive mechanisms are responsible for the observed results: a homolytic cleavage and an acid hydrolysis of glucosidic linkages in the polysaccharides. By preimpregnating the wood with alkali, hydrolysis can be eliminated, resulting in a much cleaner depolymerization of the polysaccharides without any further acid-catalyzed degradation. The enzymatic digestibility of the steam-treated wood material for the formation of glucose was compared with that of steam-exploded wood. A more efficient route for glucose production from steam-exploded wood was found as long as the biomass-pretreated material was homogeneous and without shives.

  4. Nondestructive wood discrimination: FTIR - Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in the characterization of different wood species used for artistic objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoso, Maria Crista; de Poli, Mario; Matthaes, Peter; Silvestrin, Luca; Zafiropoulos, Demetre

    2016-09-01

    Wooden artifacts represent a significant component of past cultures. Successful conservation of wooden artifacts depends on the knowledge of wood structure and types. It is critical that conservators know the category of wood that they are treating in order to successfully conserve it. Recently, vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully applied to determine the chemical structure of wood and to characterize wood types. FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) is a useful nondestructive or micro-destructive analytical technique providing information about chemical bonding and molecular structure. Its application in the discrimination between softwoods (conifers) and hardwoods (broad-leafs) has already been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of FTIR as a tool for the discrimination between different wood types belonging to the same genus. Three different hardwood species, namely poplar (Populus spp), lime (Tilia spp) and birch (Betula spp), were investigated by means of FTIR spectroscopy. The woods were first inspected using a light microscope to certify the wood essence types through micrographic and morphoanatomical features. The FTIR spectra in the 4000 cm-1 to 450 cm-1 region were recorded using a Perkin-Elmer Spectrum 100 spectrometer. To enhance the qualitative interpretation of the IR spectra, second derivatives of all spectra were calculated using the Spectrum software to separate superimposed bands and to extract fine spectral details. To obtain a comprehensive characterization, the essences under investigation were also analyzed by means of Raman Spectroscopy. Clear differences were found in the spectra of the three samples confirming FTIR to be a powerful tool for wood type discrimination.

  5. Cooling of wood briquettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Miroljub M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the experimental research of surface temperature of wood briquettes during cooling phase along the cooling line. The cooling phase is an important part of the briquette production technology. It should be performed with care, otherwise the quality of briquettes could deteriorate and possible changes of combustion characteristics of briquettes could happen. The briquette surface temperature was measured with an IR camera and a surface temperature probe at 42 sections. It was found that the temperature of briquette surface dropped from 68 to 34°C after 7 minutes spent at the cooling line. The temperature at the center of briquette, during the 6 hour storage, decreased to 38°C.

  6. Wood Bond Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  7. Wood would burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absract: In view of the world-wide problem of energy sustainability and greenhouse gas production (carbon dioxide), it is timely to review the issues involved in generating heat and power from all fuels and especially new (to the UK) solid fuels, including high moisture fuels such as wood, SRF, oil shale, tar sands and brown coal, which will become major international fuels as oil and gas become depleted. The combustion properties of some of these materials are significantly different from traditional coal, oil and gas fuels, however the technology proposed herein is also applicable to these conventional fuels. This paper presents some innovative combustion system options and the associated technical factors that must be considered for their implementation. For clarity of understanding, the novel concepts will be largely presented in terms of a currently developing solid fuel market; biomass wood chips. One of the most important characteristics of many solid fuels to be used in the future (including oil shale and brown coal) is their high moisture content of up to 60%. This could be removed by utilising low grade waste heat that is widely available in industry to dry the fuel and thus reduce transport costs. Burning such dried wood for power generation also increases the energy available from combustion and thus acts as a thermal transformer by upgrading the low grade heat to heat available at combustion temperatures. The alternative approach presented here is to recover the latent heat by condensing the extrinsic moisture and the water formed during combustion. For atmospheric combustion, the temperature of the condensed combustion products is below the dew point at about 55-65 oC and is only suitable for recovery in an efficient district heating system. However, in order to generate power from the latent heat, the condensation temperature must be increased to the level where the heat can be used in the thermodynamic power cycle. This can be achieved by increasing

  8. 基于CCA模型和OGSI架构的XCAT开发%XCAT Development Based on CCA Model and OGSI Framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李剑平

    2011-01-01

    To solve the problem that the general CCA of large-scale parallel supercomputing cannot be applied in the grid environment,on the basis of combination and implementation technical analysis in terms of time and space when CCA is oriented towards grid-based%针对大规模并行超级计算的通用构件体系结构(Construction Component Architecture,CCA)并不能适用于网格环境中的问题,在分析CCA面向分布式网格应用构件框架在时间和空间上的结合与实现技术的基础上,首先提出了开发基于CCA模型和开放网格服务基础设施(Open Grid Services Infrastructure,OGSI)上的分布式网格应用构件(Extreme Cluster Administration Toolkit,XCAT)的思想,以此实现构件之间的无缝互操作,

  9. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  10. A CONTINUING REVERENCE FOR WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Hubbe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Our ancestors knew a great deal about wood. They had to in order to do well in life. Wood has played a dominant role in human infrastructure for many generations, and for most of that time woodcraft has depended on the decentralized knowledge passed down among families and guilds. This editorial, while celebrating the knowledge, skills, and insights of the woodworkers of past generations, also calls for a renewed attention to wood’s unique character, including characteristics that today are too often classified as “defects.” We may need to take lessons from generations past to truly derive the best value from wood resources.

  11. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  12. Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2006-01-01

    Lecture Notes on Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures including charring of wood and load bearing capacity of beams, columns, and connections.......Lecture Notes on Fire Safety Design of Wood Structures including charring of wood and load bearing capacity of beams, columns, and connections....

  13. Potential wood protection strategies using physiological requirements of wood degrading fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sailer, M.F.; Etten, B.D. van

    2004-01-01

    Due to the increasing restrictions in the use of wood preserving biocides a number of potential biocide free wood preserving alternatives are currently assessed. Wood degrading fungi require certain conditions in the wood in order to be able to use wood as a food source. This paper discusses the phy

  14. Research on CCA technology and implements in geodynamics%CCA技术的研究及其在地球动力学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李姗姗; 王群

    2009-01-01

    大规模科学应用建模和模拟的特殊需求及其复杂性为科学家的研究带来了巨大的挑战.现今被广泛应用的组件技术不能应对这些问题.美国新近提出了一种适用于大规模科学领域的组件规范--CCA(Common Component Architecture),它将基于组件的软件开发方法引入到大规模科学领域中,能够很好地满足其特殊需求,解决建模和模拟过程中的复杂性.首先对CCA规范做了简要介绍,然后对基于CCA的框架进行深入分析,并通过实验证实了CCA的可行性.最后将CCA技术引入到地球动力学的研究中,更好地实现地球动力学模拟.%The special requirements and complexity of large-scale scientific applications bring enormous challenge to scientists' researches.Today's wildly used component technology can't solve this problem.A new component specification is presented suited for large-scale scientific field,CCA(Common Component Architecture) in American,it introduces component based software engineering into large-scale scientific field meeting the special requirements and solving the complexity in modeling and simulation.This paper firstly gives an overview of CCA specification,and then analyzes the CCA framework and gives a test to validate the feasibility of CCA,finally introduces CCA into the geodynamic research to facilitate simulation.

  15. Wood-pastures of Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Hartel, Tibor; Martín-López, Berta;

    2015-01-01

    and conservation policies has proved to be complicated, because institutional structures are traditionally organized within mono-functional sectors. We offer suggestions as to how these shortcomings might be overcome in the Common Agricultural Policy, including Rural Development policy, and the Habitats Directive......Wood-pastures are archetypes of High Nature Value Farmlands in Europe and hold exceptional ecological, social, and cultural values. Yet, wood-pastures have been through a sharp decline all over Europe, mainly due to processes of agricultural intensification and abandonment. Recently, wood......-pastures have found increasing attention from conservation science and policy across Europe. In this paper we (i) perform the first pan-European assessment of wood-pastures, considering individual countries and biogeographic regions, (ii) present the ecological and social-cultural values of a wide diversity...

  16. Marketing for Wood Products Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Robert L; Hansen, Eric; Ola, David

    2009-01-01

    Explains the principles of marketing for wood products organizations and their managers, and includes a list of information resources and agencies that can assist in development of a good marketing program.

  17. EVOLUTION OF LIGHTWEIGHT WOOD COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Marius C. BARBU

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight boards and beams in the wood-based construction and furniture industry are not a new topic. The density reduction of panels using sandwich structure with light cores was confirmed by users like doors or mobile homes more than three decades ago. Today many ways to attain a lighter wooden structure are on offer, partially in industrial application. The first one is the use of light-weight wood species like balsa, lime, pine from southern hemisphere plantations etc. limit...

  18. Exposure assessment of residents living near a wood treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the results of environmental sampling and modeling in a neighborhood adjacent to a wood processing plant. This plant used creosote and pentachlorophenol (PCP) to treat wood for over 70 years. Between 1999 and 2001, environmental samples were obtained to quantify the level of environmental contamination from the wood processing plant. Blood from 10 residents was measured for chlorinated dioxins and dibenzofurans. Soil sediment samples from drainage ditches and attic/dust samples from nearby residents' homes were tested for polychlorinated dioxins, furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The dioxin congeners analysis of the 10 residents revealed elevated valued for octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and heptachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin compatible with PCP as the source. The levels of carcinogenic PAHs were higher than background levels and were similar to soil contamination on wood preserving sites. Wipe sampling in the kitchens of 11 homes revealed that 20 of the 33 samples were positive for octachlorinated dioxins with a mean value of 10.27 ng/m2. The soil, ditch samples, and positive wipe samples from the homes indicate a possible ongoing route of exposure to the contaminants in the homes of these residents. Modeled air exposure estimated for the wood processing waste chemicals indicate some air exposure to combustion products. The estimated air levels for benzo(a)pyrene and tetrachlorodibenzodiozin in this neighborhood exceeded the recommended levels for these compounds in some states. The quantitative data presented suggest a significant contamination of a neighborhood by wood processing waste chemicals. These findings suggest the need for more stringent regulations on waste discharges from wood treatment plants

  19. Tribology in secondary wood machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, P.L.; Hawthorne, H.M.; Andiappan, J.

    1998-07-01

    Secondary wood manufacturing covers a wide range of products from furniture, cabinets, doors and windows, to musical instruments. Many of these are now mass produced in sophisticated, high speed numerical controlled machines. The performance and the reliability of the tools are key to an efficient and economical manufacturing process as well as to the quality of the finished products. A program concerned with three aspects of tribology of wood machining, namely, tool wear, tool-wood friction characteristics and wood surface quality characterization, was set up in the Integrated Manufacturing Technologies Institute (IMTI) of the National Research Council of Canada. The studies include friction and wear mechanism identification and modeling, wear performance of surface-engineered tool materials, friction-induced vibration and cutting efficiency, and the influence of wear and friction on finished products. This research program underlines the importance of tribology in secondary wood manufacturing and at the same time adds new challenges to tribology research since wood is a complex, heterogeneous, material and its behavior during machining is highly sensitive to the surrounding environments and to the moisture content in the work piece.

  20. Ecological issues of byproducts in hydrothermal wood processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stjepan Pervan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on previous research, this paper presents the basic characteristics of chemical substances formed as a result of hydrothermal wood processing. Wood that had been exposed to a mild thermal treatment was extracted with organic solvents to determine the presence of potentially toxic compounds. The formation of some toxic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons derivatives of phenantrene were detected as well as other classes of polyaromatic compounds. It is most likely that the presence of all such compounds contributes to a relatively substantial extent to the reported resistance of heat treated timber to fungal and other biological attack. Other allegedly non-toxic compounds were also found, mainly the by-products of lignin pyrolysis. The extent of toxic and non-toxic compounds in heat treated wood were not quantified, and therefore it is not determined whether the final product (thermal treated wood is toxic or not, and to what extent. The two major volatile organic compounds found while researching atmospheric emissions from an industrial kiln, drying radiata pine, were alpha – pinene and beta – pinene, which accounted for up to 90% of the total discharge (405 g/m3 wood. Most of the volatile organic compounds were released during early stages of drying. The release of potentially hazardous components (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural was found to be relatively low (1.1, 8.7, and 0.1 g/m3 wood and well dispersed all over the kiln. These levels of release are unlikely to cause adverse environmental effects. Volatile organic components were also researched on radiata pine wood dried in an experimental vacuum kiln. The condensate (volitilased components with water vapour was sampled at regular time intervals throughout a 114 h drying period. Chemical analysis data from a green wood sample indicated that 10% of monoterpenes present were recovered in the kiln condensate. The main classes of organic compounds identified in the condensate were

  1. 大麦(Hordeum vulgare)昼夜节律钟基因CCA1的克隆及表达分析%Cloning and Expression Analysis of Circadian Clock Gene CCA1 in Barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国芳; 宋萌; 姚涵; 韩渊怀

    2012-01-01

    CCA 1 gene plays an important role in circadian clock sensitivity in rice (Oryza sativa L. ) and Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, CCAl gene in barley was cloned by RT-PCR using homological primers based on the highly conserved region of the multiple alignments of the rice and Arabidopsis. The similarities of this sequence were up to 72% and 69%, respectively, to corresponding mRNA sequences of rice and maize in BLASTx of GenBank database. Using ORF Finder software, a 2157 bp open reading frame was found to code 718 amino acids. Using Compute pI/Mw tool, the amino acid sequence was analyzed, and it revealed that the molecular weight of this protein was about 77 769. 4 Da, and isoelectric point was about 6. 55. We established fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR system with barley inbred lines HUADAMAI 1 and HUADAMAI 2, and studied the expression of CCAl in leaf under 16h/8h (light/ dark) conditions. Expression analysis showed that the gene expression peaked at dawn (ZTO) then gradually declined from ZTO to ZT15, bottomed at ZT15, then increased and returned to the initial level at ZT24. This study will provide information of barley CCAl gene for further studying the function in regulating photoperiod sensitivity in barley, and provide scientific basis for clarifying the mechanism of the circadian synchronization in barley.%昼夜节律钟基因CCA1在调解水稻和拟南芥的光周期反应中起着重要作用.利用BLAST手段以玉米中的CCA1基因序列作为靶序列,调取Genbank数据库信息,并结合RT-PCR方法获得了大麦的cDNA同源序列.BLASTx分析发现其与水稻和玉米的序列相似性分别达到72%和69%.通过ORF Finder软件分析发现,该序列包含一个2157 bp的开放阅读框,编码一个由718个氨基酸残基组成的蛋白序列,其分子量为77769.4 Da,等电点为6.55.采用实时荧光定量PCR分析发现,随光照时间的变化,该基因在大麦叶片中的表达量呈现出白天不断降低而夜晚逐渐

  2. The Efficacy of Organo-Complex-Based Wood Preservative Formula Against Dry-Wood Termite Cryptotermes cynocephalus Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoirul Himmi Setiawan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of pesticides often leaves residues which potentially pollute the environment. This journal issue has been encouraging some researchers to find an environmentally friendly insecticide by a cheaper wood preservative method. The International Standard for Phytosanitary Measures 15 (ISPM 15 [1] that is adopted in wood packaging protection in Europe is not suitable for tropical countries like Indonesia. Therefore, the treatment by Organo-Complex-based wood preservation, which consists of copper chromium combined with natural organic compounds, is proposed for effective treatment at a lower cost. The bioassay test was subjected to dry wood termite Cryptotermes cynocephalus Light. The result showed that wood materials treated by 10 ppm Organo-Complex formula gave good results which were indicated by the low consumption and the fast termination of the termites. The toxicity analysis of C-C organic compound solution is classified as grade IV (WHO, 2003 [2], or not harmful. Analysis of the residual content four weeks after the spraying treatment showed a significant reduction in the inorganic content (copper chromate complex, in the range of 35%, and in extracts of natural materials (natural extracts, above 80%.

  3. wood burns down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Bukh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available To relax the local authorities and to receive the guests of high rank «with no tie» the so-called «Fisherman's House» was built at the source of Angara-river, near Lake Baikal. Vladimir Ivanov, a young architect, was noticed by his skillful performa nee of exclusive orders and became the author of this house. At the time of ferroconcrete boom the proposal to build a wooden guest house turned out to be unexpectedly to the point and was graciously approved. The economic department was entrusted to select the men good for carpenter's work, and the forestry department was entrusted to provide thick round timber. And the work started. But, as it usually happens, the workers did not take the trouble and made the first eight rims of the current timber with an inappropriate diameter.And when Pavlov insisted on demolishing the construction and replacing the logs by the logs with the necessary diameter, the building work obeyed to his will and was finished suecessfully.The architecture of the house is not the derived action of the saw and the fret-saw. It is a technology of the axe. It is natural, convincing and original. It is no use to look for the local sources in it. It grew up in the area of timber and cold winter. And this clear and efficient action kept the construction from the annoying vulgarity and provided Siberian exotics easily penetrating into one's soul, refined as it may be.One of the eminent guests said with admiration: «Even if Pavlov had created nothing more, he would have justified his professional choice with this single house.» Why not to say it as a good toast. However, this is a suitable case to add: style is an absence of style. It is a taste.After the Fisherman's House Irkutsk architects were attracted by wood. They followed the strictness in wood and, as much as they could, created a couple of successful remakes, until the cylinder logs and ... new

  4. The donor substrate site within the peptidyl transferase loop of 23 S rRNA and its putative interactions with the CCA-end of N-blocked aminoacyl-tRNA(Phe)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, B T; Thi-Ngoc, H P; Garrett, R A

    1996-01-01

    was employed to test for Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions between the -CCA end of the P-site bound tRNA(Phe) and this region of the peptidyl-transferase loop. Single nucleotide substitutions were introduced into the -CCA end of tRNA(Phe) and the ability of the 3'-terminal pentanucleotide fragments to act...

  5. STS-55 MS3 Harris in EMU and CCA tests equipment prior to EVA simulation at JSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist 3 (MS3) Bernard A. Harris, Jr, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), listens to instructions during a communications check prior to an underwater simulation in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. When checkout procedures are complete, Harris will don EMU helmet (held by technician in the foreground). Then, the platform he is standing on will be lowered into the WETF's 25-foot deep pool. Once underwater, Harris will perform contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) procedures. There is no scheduled EVA for the 1993 flight but each space flight crew includes astronauts trained for a variety of contingency tasks that could require exiting the shirt-sleeve environment of a Shuttle's cabin.

  6. Swelling of acetylated wood in organic liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Obataya, E; Obataya, Eiichi; Gril, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the affinity of acetylated wood for organic liquids, Yezo spruce wood specimens were acetylated with acetic anhydride, and their swelling in various liquids were compared to those of untreated specimens. The acetylated wood was rapidly and remarkably swollen in aprotic organic liquids such as benzene and toluene in which the untreated wood was swollen only slightly and/or very slowly. On the other hand, the swelling of wood in water, ethylene glycol and alcohols remained unchanged or decreased by the acetylation. Consequently the maximum volume of wood swollen in organic liquids was always larger than that in water. The effect of acetylation on the maximum swollen volume of wood was greater in liquids having smaller solubility parameters. The easier penetration of aprotic organic liquids into the acetylated wood was considered to be due to the scission of hydrogen bonds among the amorphous wood constituents by the substitution of hydroxyl groups with hydrophobic acetyl groups.

  7. Effect of Wood Variables on the Properties of Wood Fiber-Polypropylene Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The effect of wood species (Chinese fir and Poplar), wood fiber content (10%, 25%, 40%) and wood fiber sizes (16 to 32 mesh, 32-65 mesh, above 65 mesh) on the properties of the wood fiber-Polypropylene composites were studied in this paper. The results indicate that the effect of wood fiber content and size in composite were more important than that of chosen wood species. Compared with polypropylene without wood fiber, the flexural strength of the composites increased when adding wood fiber into polypr...

  8. Acoustic and adsorption properties of submerged wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilde, Calvin Patrick

    Wood is a common material for the manufacture of many products. Submerged wood, in particular, is used in niche markets, such as the creation of musical instruments. An initial study performed on submerged wood from Ootsa Lake, British Columbia, provided results that showed that the wood was not suitable for musical instruments. This thesis re-examined the submerged wood samples. After allowing the wood to age unabated in a laboratory setting, the wood was retested under the hypothesis that the physical acoustic characteristics would improve. It was shown, however, that the acoustic properties became less adequate after being left to sit. The adsorption properties of the submerged wood were examined to show that the submerged wood had a larger accessible area of wood than that of control wood samples. This implied a lower amount of crystalline area within the submerged wood. From the combined adsorption and acoustic data for the submerged wood, relationships between the moisture content and speed of sound were created and combined with previous research to create a proposed model to describe how the speed of sound varies with temperature, moisture content and the moisture content corresponding to complete hydration of sorption sites within the wood.

  9. Structural studies of TiO2/wood coatings prepared by hydrothermal deposition of rutile particles from TiCl4 aqueous solutions on spruce (Picea Abies) wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pori, Pavel; Vilčnik, Aljaž; Petrič, Marko; Sever Škapin, Andrijana; Mihelčič, Mohor; Šurca Vuk, Angela; Novak, Urban; Orel, Boris

    2016-05-01

    A low temperature approach was developed for the deposition of rutile TiO2 particles on a wood surface by hydrolysis of TiCl4 in aqueous solutions acidified with HCl, and crystallization at 75 and 90 °C (1 h). Prior to hydrothermal treatment, Picea Abies wood was first soaked in a 0.5 mmol/l aqueous solution containing anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, Sigma Aldrich) for 2 h at 80 °C. The crystal structure of the hydrothermally made rutile particles was determined with XRD, while the morphology of the deposited TiO2 particles and their distribution in the wood were examined with SEM and EDX measurements. The penetration and amount of deposited rutile particles could be modified by changing the deposition conditions. Thicker layers were obtained from more concentrated aqueous TiCl4 solutions with and without added HCl, and with longer deposition times and higher temperatures of the hydrothermal treatment. The interaction of TiO2 particles with hemicellulose and lignin in wood was established from infrared attenuated total reflection (FT-IR ATR) and Raman spectra measurements, from which the spectra of wood were subtracted. Analysis of the subtraction spectra showed the presence of titania particles on the wood surface, revealing also the establishment of TiO2-wood coordinative bonds of titanium ions with hemicellulose and lignin. The red frequency shift of the OH stretching modes suggested interaction of the TiO2 particles with water molecules of wood. TiO2 deposited on wood treated with SDS became hydrophobic (water contact angles (WCA) of 150°), contrasting the properties of untreated wood with a deposited TiO2 particle coating, which remained hydrophilic.

  10. Differentiation of walnut wood species and steam treatment using ATR-FTIR and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobro, Alison J; Kuligowski, Julia; Döll, Markus; Lendl, Bernhard

    2010-11-01

    Wood is a ubiquitous material used in everyday life. Accurate identification of species can be of importance in a historical context enabling appropriate conservation treatment and adequate choice of material to be applied to historic wooden objects, and in a more modern context, in the identification of forgeries. Wood is also often treated to improve certain physical characteristics, often strength and durability. However, determination of whether or not a piece of wood has been treated can be very difficult. Infrared spectroscopy has previously been applied to differentiate between different wood species or between treated and untreated wood, often in conjunction with chemometric analysis techniques. Here, we report the use of mid-IR spectroscopy, coupled with partial least squares discriminant analysis for the discrimination between two walnut wood species and to differentiate between steam-treated and untreated samples of each of these wood species. We show that the discrimination between species and between steam-treated and non-steam-treated wood from Juglans nigra is very clear and, while analysis of the quality of the discrimination between steam-treated and non-steam-treated J. regia samples is not as good, it is, nevertheless, sufficient for discrimination between the two groups with a statistical significance of P < 0.0001.

  11. Research on Dimension Reduction of Speaker's Characteristics Based on CCA and PCA%基于CCA和PCA的说话人特征降维研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈觉之; 张贵荣; 周宇欢

    2013-01-01

    为提高说话人识别的性能,提出将CCA与PCA联合用于说话人特征降维的方法:先用CCA融合基于声道模型的LPC特征和基于听觉模型的MFCC特征,提升这两类不同特征的相关性;然后用PCA进一步去除冗余特征,降低有效特征的维数.实验显示,这两种降维方法联合的降维效果与单一的CCA降维、PCA降维或手动降维的效果比有明显提高.%With the purpose of improving the performance of speaker recognition,a method of dimension reduction in speaker's characteristics by jointing CCA and PCA is proposed.Firstly,LPC characteristics based on acoustic models and MFCC characteristics based on auditory models are blended by CCA method so as to enhance the correlativity between LPC and MFCC.After that the PCA method is used to eliminate redundant characteristics so as to reduce the effective characteristic dimensions of speech signal.Experiments show that the efficiency of dimension reduction of this novel method that joints CCA and PCA is significantly improved comparing to that of traditional methods while only using CCA dimension reduction,PCA dimension reduction or manual dimension reduction.

  12. Design of Linear System Solver on CCA%CCA环境下构件化线性解法器的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周静静; 盛鑫芽

    2011-01-01

    Programming based on component is an important way for decreasing complexity and program development time in high performance computing. In this paper we introduced CCA, which is a component architecture towards HPC. Programming in CCA environment,design and implementation of CCA were also discussed. According to design and implement linear system solver, people can realize advantages of HPC software based on component. Result of experirnent shows different performance between running MPI application and component application.%基于构件的程序设计是解决高性能科学计算软件开发复杂度高、周期长的重要途径.首先介绍了CCA(Common Component Architecture)论坛提出的针对高性能科学计算的构件体系结构.然后介绍了CCA构件程序设计方法,分析了其设计原理和实现思想,并基于CCA环境设计实现了一款偏微分方程线性解法器.对构件化软件与传统并行程序的性能进行了比较,分析了构件化软件的优势.

  13. The functional interplay between protein kinase CK2 and CCA1 transcriptional activity is essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Portolés

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are daily biological oscillations driven by an endogenous mechanism known as circadian clock. The protein kinase CK2 is one of the few clock components that is evolutionary conserved among different taxonomic groups. CK2 regulates the stability and nuclear localization of essential clock proteins in mammals, fungi, and insects. Two CK2 regulatory subunits, CKB3 and CKB4, have been also linked with the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian system. However, the biological relevance and the precise mechanisms of CK2 function within the plant clockwork are not known. By using ChIP and Double-ChIP experiments together with in vivo luminescence assays at different temperatures, we were able to identify a temperature-dependent function for CK2 modulating circadian period length. Our study uncovers a previously unpredicted mechanism for CK2 antagonizing the key clock regulator CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1. CK2 activity does not alter protein accumulation or subcellular localization but interferes with CCA1 binding affinity to the promoters of the oscillator genes. High temperatures enhance the CCA1 binding activity, which is precisely counterbalanced by the CK2 opposing function. Altering this balance by over-expression, mutation, or pharmacological inhibition affects the temperature compensation profile, providing a mechanism by which plants regulate circadian period at changing temperatures. Therefore, our study establishes a new model demonstrating that two opposing and temperature-dependent activities (CCA1-CK2 are essential for clock temperature compensation in Arabidopsis.

  14. Interface Characteristics of Wood-hybrid Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUEFenglian; ZHAOGuangjie

    2005-01-01

    In order to understand the current interface characteristics of wood-hybrid composites, this paper starts off from the concept of composite interface and general theory of interface form, then the inner-surface and microstructure of wood and the interface characteristics of composites, such as wood- inorganic, wood-plastic and wood- metal made by electroless plating technique, are concluded and discussed in detail. Meanwhile,on the basis of that, some points of view about how to develop the wood-hybrid composites interface research in the future are also proposed.

  15. WOOD MODIFICATION BY HEAT TREATMENT: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno M. Esteves

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Wood heat treatment has increased significantly in the last few years and is still growing as an industrial process to improve some wood properties. The first studies on heat treatment investigated mainly equilibrium mois-ture, dimensional stability, durability and mechanical properties. Mass loss, wettability, wood color, and chemical transformations have been subsequently extensively studied, while recent works focus on quality control, modeling, and study the reasons for the improvements. This review explains the recent interest on the heat treatment of wood and synthesizes the major publications on this subject on wood properties, chemical changes, wood uses, and quality control.

  16. Facial expression recognition based on fuzzy-LDA/CCA%基于模糊LDA/CCA的面部表情识别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓彦; 郑文明; 邹采荣; 赵力

    2008-01-01

    提出了一种新颖的基于典型相关分析(CCA)的模糊判别分析方法(fuzzy-LDA/CCA),并应用于面部表情识别问题.首先为每幅表情图像建立一个相关联的类模糊隶属度矢量,用于表示表情图像与基本表情类别的隶属关系,在此基础上应用CCA方法建立表情图像同表情类别的关系表达式,最后通过对表情图像的类隶属度矢量的估计来实现表情的分类.此外,还将fuzzy-LDA/CCA方法在核空间中进行了非线性推广,从而来解决非线性判别分析的问题.实验证明提出的方法获得了更好的识别效果.%A novel fuzzy linear discriminant analysis method by the canonical correlation analysis (fuzzy-LDA/CCA)is presented and applied to the facial expression recognition. The fuzzy method is used to evaluate the degree of the class membership to which each training sample belongs. CCA is then used to establish the relationship between each facial image and the corresponding class membership vector, and the class membership vector of a test image is estimated using this relationship. Moreover, the fuzzy-LDA/CCA method is also generalized to deal with nonlinear discriminant analysis problems via kernel method. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated using real data.

  17. FLEXURAL FATIGUE OF LAMINATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Bondarev

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. Local damage accumulation in goods and construction elements ultimately leading to a failure occurs due to fluctuating load effect. Results and conclusions. The results of the analysis of the experimentally obtained analytical dependences of strength characteristics and resistance to cracks of profiled laminated wood during bending in products and designs are presented. This products and designs operate under static and cyclic loading. Stresses under which cracks form in pilot samples are established from the results, as well as maximum permissible lengths of cracks for static and cyclic load. Effect of natural and technological defects of laminated wood is taken into account. Recommendation on application of laminated wood in products and designs which experience force cyclic loading under operation are given.

  18. The international comparative wood treatment study WOAM Freemantle 1987 - Trondheim 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botfeldt, Knud Bo; Petersen, Maj Britt

    2016-01-01

    , Netherlands, Japan, Germany, Australia, Austria, England and Norway. In all 26 different treatment programs - of which 23 treatments involved PEG. From 1989 the wood samples have been kept for perpetuity at Vitenskapsmuseet (Museum of Science) in Trondheim, Norway in a climate controlled environment....... This paper evaluates and documents changes in the condition of the wood samples from the WOAM project in 1987, with focus on the PEG/water treated samples. In Trondheim, visual assessment and evaluation of the samples was performed, without removing the wood samples from the climate controlled storage...... PEG in the samples. With the exception of the samples treated with low molecular weight PEG (i.e. PEG 400), there are very few and very small changes in the samples 25 years (1987-2012) after treatment. Low molecular weight PEG has a good bulking effect on well-preserved wood, but has a negative...

  19. Effect of the heat treatment on physical and chemical properties of Pinus caribaea wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallyene da Silva Poubel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of the heat treatment on physical properties (density, equilibrium moisture content, mass loss, volumetric and linear swelling and shrinkage and chemical composition of normal (opposite side and compression wood of Pinus caribaea Morelet. Samples of 25 x 25 x 50 mm were heat-treated under two different temperatures: 200 and 220 ºC. The results indicated a reduction in equilibrium moisture content and swelling and shrinkage following heat treatment, independent of wood type. The compression wood showed higher longitudinal swelling than normal one, however, after heat treatment, the improvements were similar between both wood types. Samples heat-treated at 200 and 220 ºC had mass losses of 9.94 and 21.03 %, respectively. The heat treatment promoted a relative increase in lignin content and a decrease in holocellulose and α-cellulose contents, indicating the occurrence of thermal degradation of these components.

  20. Fuel wood symposium; Symposium Energieholz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, C.; Wauer, A. (comps.)

    2001-07-01

    The Bavarian State Institute of Forestry (LWF) organised a 'Fuel Wood Symposium' in Freising-Weihenstephan on 17.11.2000. The purpose of this specialist conference was to give an overview of the use of biomass, especially wood, as an source of energy. (orig.) [German] Die Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Wald und Forstwirtschaft richtete am 17.11.2000 in Freising-Weihenstephan das 'Symposium Energieholz' aus. Ziel der Fachtagung war es, einen Ueberblick ueber die energetische Nutzung von Biomasse, insbesondere Holz, zu geben. (orig.)

  1. Enhanced lignin biodegradation by a laccase-overexpressed white-rot fungus Polyporus brumalis in the pretreatment of wood chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sun-Hwa; Cho, Myung-Kil; Kim, Myungkil; Jung, Sang-Min; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2013-11-01

    The laccase gene of Polyporus brumalis was genetically transformed to overexpress its laccase. The transformants exhibited increased laccase activity and effective decolorization of the dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R than the wild type. When the transformants were pretreated with wood chips from a red pine (softwood) and a tulip tree (hardwood) for 15 and 45 days, they showed higher lignin-degradation activity as well as higher wood-chip weight loss than the wild type. When the wood chips treated with the transformant were enzymatically saccharified, the highest sugar yields were found to be 32.5 % for the red pine wood and 29.5 % for the tulip tree wood, on the basis of the dried wood weights, which were 1.6-folds higher than those for the wild type. These results suggested that overexpression of the laccase gene from P. brumalis significantly contributed to the pretreatment of lignocellulose for increasing sugar yields. PMID:23975277

  2. Effect of Hydro- and Hygro-Thermal Treatments on Some Wood Properties of Pinus Radiata and Pseudotsuga Menziesii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Burgos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatments are related to the action of temperature in successive stages and under controlled conditions, changing the chemical structure of wood. However, the method of treatment used may have a significant effect on the properties of the heat treated wood. In order to assess the effect of the heat treatments on the wood properties, two conifer species were considered, as well as the absence of the air through water and vapor and three levels of temperature (130, 145 and 160 °C. The experiments resulted in twelve treatments or interactions plus controls. This study describes the changes in chemical composition of wood at relatively low temperatures and its interactions with the physical and mechanical properties of the new thermally-modified wood. The analysis of the results indicates that the extractives and degradation products that remain in the wood processed in a closed reactor seem to be a very important factor affecting the results.

  3. Composite structure of wood cells in petrified wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Jakub [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Florek, Marek [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Kwiatek, Wojciech [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Lekki, Janusz [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Chevallier, Pierre [LPS, CEN Saclay et LURE, Universite Paris-Sud, Bat 209D, F-91405 Orsay (France); Zieba, Emil [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland); Mestres, Narcis [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB), Campus de la UAB, E-08193-Bellaterra (Spain); Dutkiewicz, E.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Kuczumow, Andrzej [Department of Chemistry, Catholic University of Lublin, 20-718 Lublin (Poland)

    2005-04-28

    Special kinds of petrified wood of complex structure were investigated. All the samples were composed of at least two different inorganic substances. The original cell structure was preserved in each case. The remnants of the original biological material were detected in some locations, especially in the cell walls. The complex inorganic structure was superimposed on the remnant organic network. The first inorganic component was located in the lumena (l.) of the cells while another one in the walls (w.) of the cells. The investigated arrangements were as follows: calcite (l.)-goethite-hematite (w.)-wood from Dunarobba, Italy; pyrite (l.)-calcite (w.)-wood from Lukow, Poland; goethite (l.)-silica (w.)-wood from Kwaczala, Poland. The inorganic composition was analysed and spatially located by the use of three spectral methods: electron microprobe, X-ray synchrotron-based microprobe, {mu}-PIXE microprobe. The accurate mappings presenting 2D distribution of the chemical species were presented for each case. Trace elements were detected and correlated with the distribution of the main elements. In addition, the identification of phases was done by the use of {mu}-Raman and {mu}-XRD techniques for selected and representative points. The possible mechanisms of the described arrangements are considered. The potential synthesis of similar structures and their possible applications are suggested.

  4. Review on Wood Discoloration and its Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zehui; LV Wenhua; FEI Benhua; REN Haiqing; WU Yuzhang

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms,types, compositions, affecting factors,prevention and remediable treatments of wood discoloration, and especially puts forward the biological control against wood stain and wood induced coloration.The authors think the followings are important:1)Developing the low poisonous or non-toxic, high-efficient and multi-functional anti-stain chemicals is still an important research direction to control wood discoloration.2)It is still very necessary to remove wood stain and restore wood original color and commercial value.3)The biological control has little environmental pollution and its cost is low.Researches on its theories and application should be strengthened.4)Wood color can be induced and turned to be the needed through heat treatment or ultraviolet irradiation without coloring materials,i.e.induced coloration,is a good idea to modulate wood,bamboo or rattan cane color.Itis becoming a new study field.

  5. The influence of chlorine on the gasification of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, C. von; Struis, R.; Stucki, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Chlorides of the heavy metals copper, lead and zinc inhibit the CO{sub 2}-gasification reaction of charcoal. This is observed either by impregnation the wood with the salts before pyrolysis or by mechanically mixing the salts with the charcoal before gasification. Charcoal impregnated or mixed with ammonium chloride reacts more slowly than untreated charcoal. Treating the charcoal with HCl also influences negatively the gasification reactivity, indicating that chlorine plays an important role in the gasification. (author) 2 figs., 4 refs.

  6. Body of Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Michon

    2014-12-01

    not only a defrocked friar with the guys or on the street; he donned the silk babouches when he went home too. He dispossessed himself of the Seine that rolled on before his eyes; the small girl who lived on her feet, whom he puts to death in all his books, he hardly saw her; the loveliest girls of his day, the finest too for sure, who wanted him, so that he happened to come – he dispossessed himself of them, whether he came or opted to come no more, which amounted to the same thing; no apples from Norman orchards, no trees deep in the woods, no unlaced Louise Colet, no lilies, no young laughter, no Louise Colet weeping at his door, he kissed it all off, laughed over it and kissed it off, cried about it and kissed it off, he was not there. In fact he had nothing, he was deprived of everything, since it was in his head.

  7. Regulatory Promotion of Waste Wood Reused as an Energy Source and the Environmental Concerns about Ash Residue in the Industrial Sector of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tien Tsai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to provide a preliminary analysis of the utilization of energy derived from waste wood in Taiwan, a highly industrialized country with a high dependence (over 99% on imported energy. The discussion focuses on the status of waste wood generation and its management over the past decade. Findings show that the quantities of biomass waste collected for reuse purposes in the industrial sectors of Taiwan has exhibited an increasing trend, from about 4000 tons in 2001 to over 52,000 tons in 2010. Although waste wood can be reused as a fuel and raw material for a variety of applications based on regulatory promotion, the most commonly used end use is to directly utilize it as an auxiliary fuel in industrial utilities (e.g., boilers, heaters and furnaces for the purpose of co-firing with coal/fuel oil. The most progressive measure for promoting biomass-to-power is to introduce the feed-in tariff (FIT mechanism according to the Renewable Energy Development Act passed in June 2009. The financial support for biomass power generation has been increasing over the years from 0.070 US$/kWh in 2010 to 0.094 US$/kWh in 2012. On the other hand, the environmental regulations in Taiwan regarding the hazard identification of wood-combusted ash (especially in filter fly-ash and its options for disposal and utilization are further discussed in the paper, suggesting that waste wood impregnated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA and other copper-based preservatives should be excluded from the wood-to-energy system. Finally, some recommendations for promoting wood-to-energy in the near future of Taiwan are addressed.

  8. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke.

    OpenAIRE

    Pierson, W E; Koenig, J Q; Bardana, E J

    1989-01-01

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo[a]pyrene and formaldehyde-...

  9. Use of nanofillers in wood coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Lawther, John Mark; Sanadi, Anand Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Wood has been used for thousands of years and remains an important material in the construction industry, most often protected with coatings. Development of nanotechnology allows further improvements or new performance properties to be achieved in wood coatings. Increased UV protection...... like a low level of loading, have already established nanoparticles in some areas of wood coatings. This article is a comprehensive scientific review of the published work in the use of nanofillers in wood coatings....

  10. Brazilian sawn wood price and income elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Rommel Noce; José Luiz Pereira de Rezende; Agostinho Lopes de Souza; Lourival Marin Mendes; Márcio Lopes; Rosa Maria Miranda Armond Carvalho; Juliana Mendes de Oliveira; Juliana Lorensi do Canto

    2010-01-01

    This study estimated the sawn wood demand price and income elasticity. Specifically it was estimated the priceelasticity of sawn wood, the cross price elasticity of wood panels and the income elasticity of Brazilian GDP. A log-log model withcorrection through outline of the mobile average (MA(1)) was used, adjusted for the period of 1971 to 2006, which showed to bestable, with satisfactory significance levels. It was observed that sawn wood demand is inelastic in relation to price and elastic...

  11. Sustainable wood waste management in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owoyemi Jacob Mayowa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wood industries produce large volumes of residues which must be utilized, marketed or properly disposed of. Heaps of wood residues are common features in wood industries throughout the year. In Nigeria, this residue is generally regarded as waste and this has led to open burning practices, dumping in water bodies or dumping in an open area which constitutes environmental pollution. Sawmills in Nigeria generated over 1,000,000 m3 of wood waste in 2010 while about 5000 m3 of waste was generated in plywood mills. Nigeria generates about 1.8 million tons of sawdust annually and 5.2 million tons of wood wastes. The impact of improper disposal of waste wood on the environment affects both the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Also burning of waste wood releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere causing various health issues. Reuse/recycling of these wood residues in Nigeria will reduce the pressure on our ever decreasing forests, reduce environmental pollution, create wealth and employment. The literature available on this subject was reviewed and this article, therefore, focuses on the various methods of wood waste disposal and its utilization in Nigerian wood industries, the effects of wood waste on the environment as well as on human health and the benefits of proper wood waste management practices.

  12. WOOD COLOR CHANGES BY AMMONIA FUMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Miklečić,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the influence of ammonia gas on wood color changes in response to an increasing demand for dark colored wood specimens. The darker wood color in ammonia fuming is accomplished through chemical reactions between ammonia gas and wood compounds. We exposed oak, maple, spruce, and larch wood samples to ammonia gas for 16 days. During fuming, the color changes were studied using CIE L*a*b* parameters. After fuming, the changes in extractives content, tannin, and nitrogen content were analyzed. The chemical changes of wood and residues of wood extractives after fuming were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. Oak wood reacted intensively with ammonia gas in a very short time, and the darkening was prominent for all the investigated wood species. It was established that tannin had no major influence on color changes of maple and larch wood in the ammonia-fuming process. The FTIR spectra of fumed wood indicated involvement of carbonyl groups, and the FTIR spectra of wood extractives indicated involvement of carbonyl, aromatic, and alcohol groups in reaction with ammonia gas.

  13. Wood science professor honored by international academy

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Audrey Zink-Sharp, a wood science and forest products professor in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources, has been elected a Fellow of the International Academy of Wood Science (IAWS), a non-profit assembly of scientists representing all facets of wood science.

  14. Isolation and characterization of mold fungi and insects infecting sawmill wood, and their inhibition by gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalawate, Aparna; Mehetre, Sayaji

    2015-12-01

    This article describes the isolation, identification, and characterization of wood-rotting fungi and insects, and their inhibition was studied using gamma radiation. Products manufactured from plantation timber species are deteriorated by wood-rotting fungi such as Hypocrea lixii, Fusarium proliferatum, and Aspergillus flavus, and insects such as powderpost beetles. Proper preservation methods are necessary for ensuring a long service life of wood products. In this study, wood samples were treated with 2.5% copper ethanolamine boron (CEB) (10% w/v) and subsequently irradiated with gamma rays (10 kGy). It was observed that CEB-treated and gamma-irradiated samples controlled fungi and powderpost beetles significantly. As wood is a dead organic material, penetration of chemicals into it is very difficult. Gamma rays easily pass through wooden objects with hidden eggs and dormant spores of insects and fungi, respectively. Gamma irradiation was proved very effective in reducing damage caused by both fungi and insects.

  15. Wood and concrete polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several ways to prepare and use wood and concrete polymer composites. The most important improvements in the case of concrete polymer composites are obtained for compressive and tensile strengths. The progress in this field in United States and other countries is discussed in this rview. (M.S.)

  16. Wood quality of white willow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leclercq

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Based upon an exhaustive work made by Sacré (1974 and a review of the literature sine 1960, the author gathered together the anatomical, physical and mechanical characteristics, the machining behaviour (industrial sawing, planing, surfacing, shaping, mortising and nailing and wood end-uses of white willow.

  17. Wood quality of white willow

    OpenAIRE

    André Leclercq

    1997-01-01

    Based upon an exhaustive work made by Sacré (1974) and a review of the literature sine 1960, the author gathered together the anatomical, physical and mechanical characteristics, the machining behaviour (industrial sawing, planing, surfacing, shaping, mortising and nailing) and wood end-uses of white willow.

  18. Mathematical Simulation of Temperature Profiles within Microwave Heated Wood Made for Wood-Based Nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Xianjun Li; Yongfeng Luo; Hongbin Chen; Xia He; Jianxiong Lv; Yiqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    High intensive microwave pretreatment is a new method to modify wood for the fabrication of wood-based nanocomposites. Based on the physical law on heat transfer, a mathematical model to describe the temperature profiles within wood heated by high intensive microwave was established and simulated in this research. The results showed that the temperature profiles within wood were related to microwave heating methods; The temperature inside wood firstly increased and then gradually decreased al...

  19. Meeting China’s Demands for Imported Wood and Wood Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Midgley, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    China has developed a large, flourishing and rapidly modernising wood and wood fibre industry. China consumes an estimated 365 million m3 (roundwood equivalent) of wood and wood fibre annually and relies heavily upon imports. These imports increased nearly 10-fold between 1996 and 2004 to 106 million m3, making China the world’s largest importer of forest and wood products. As China enjoys substantial economic growth, buoyant housing construction and improving living standards, it is likely t...

  20. Wood Microstructure Effects on Chinese White Poplar Dyeing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUANXinfang; BAOFucheng

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the influence of wood microstructure on wood dyeing, eleven parameters of wood microstructure and 5 parameters of wood dyeing effects for 34 pieces of wood boards from 5 trees of Chinese white poplar (Populus tornentosa) were determined and the multiple regression analysis between the factors of wood microstructures and the parameters of wood dyeing effects were made. The regression results show that each variable of wood dyeing effects has higher relationship with wood microstructures,and multiple correlation coefficients between each variable of wood dyeing effects and wood microstructures are 0.483 6-0.799 8. The main factors of wood microstructures influencing wood dyeing of Chinese whitep oplar are proportion of wood ray, proportion of vessel and proportion of wood fiber according to comparing the standardized regression coefficients of multiple regression equation.

  1. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF WOOD-LEATHER PANELS BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Grünewald,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Besides other ligno-cellulosic materials such as straw, rice husks, or bagasse, wet blue particles from leather production are a promising new raw material stock for wood-based panels, as they offer not only a high availability, but increase the properties of the panel with regard to fire resistance or mechanical characteristics. A panel with a mixture of 42.5% wood fibers, 42.5% wet blue leather particles, and 15% lignin adhesive was produced, and an inhomogeneous sample was prepared. An area of 9 x 10 mm was rasterized and scanned by means of Raman Spectroscopy. Furthermore, the reference spectra of the constituents, i.e. wood fiber, wet blue leather particle, and lignin powder were recorded. The obtained data were treated and analyzed using chemometric methods (principal components analysis PCA and cluster analysis. An important finding was that the reference data were not directly represented in the panels’ spectra, and the correlation matrix of the PCA was not applicable to the panel data. This indicated that chemical changes might take place during the pressing. After processing the panel Raman spectra with the help of PCA and cluster analysis, three distinctive clusters were obtained, discriminating wood, leather, and mixed regions. With the assigned spectral information, it was possible to create a spectral image of the surface.

  2. Spatial variability of arsenic and chromium in the soil water at a former wood preserving site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Luisa; Peiffer, Stefan; Durner, Wolfgang

    2006-05-01

    Contamination of industrial sites by wood preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) may pose a serious threat to groundwater quality. The objective of this study was to characterise the spatial variability of As and Cr concentrations in the solid phase and in the soil water at a former wood impregnation plant and to reveal the fundamental transport processes. The soil was sampled down to a depth of 2 m. The soil water was extracted in situ from the vadose zone over a period of 10 months at depths of 1 and 1.5 m, using large horizontally installed suction tubes. Groundwater was sampled from a depth of 4.5 m. Results showed that arsenic and chromium had accumulated in the upper region of the profile and exhibited a high spatial variability (As: 21-621 mg kg - 1 ; Cr: 74-2872 mg kg - 1 ). Concentrations in the soil water were high (mean As 167 μg L - 1 ; Cr: 62 μg L - 1 ) and also showed a distinct spatial variability, covering concentration ranges up to three orders of magnitude. The variability was caused by the severe water-repellency of the surface soil, induced by the concurrent application of creosote wood preservatives, which leads to strong preferential flow as evident from a dye experiment. In contrast to soil water concentrations, only low As concentrations (flow system in the vadose zone a disparity between flux-averaged and volume-averaged concentrations may occur, and sampling of soil water might not be adequate for assessing groundwater concentrations. In these cases long-term monitoring of the groundwater appears to be the best strategy for a groundwater risk assessment.

  3. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, W.E.; Koenig, J.Q.; Bardana, E.J. Jr.

    1989-09-01

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal.29 references.

  4. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, W E; Koenig, J Q; Bardana, E J

    1989-09-01

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo[a]pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal. PMID:2686171

  5. Influence of wood structure on wood properties of tropical species

    OpenAIRE

    Baar, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The presented thesis is focused on aesthetical and acoustic properties of tropical wood. The discussed tropical species are utilized in Europe mainly for their unusual appearance and colour in joinery and furniture production. The irreplacable acoustic properties like low internal friction predestine specific species for production of musical instruments. The colour of six selected tropical species - jatoba (Hymenea courbaril L.), massaranduba (Manilkara bidentata A. Chev.), muiracatiara (Ast...

  6. Oracle Contact Center Anywhere Used in Yaofang.cn%药房网利用Oracle联络中心(Oracle CCA)推动业务发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ 日前,中国领先的网上药店--药房网部署了Oracle无处不在的联络中心(Oracle Contact CenterAnywhere,简称Oracle CCA),作为其正在进行的呼叫中心现代化项目的最新进展,这也是Oracle CCA在中国赢得的第一家客户.通过Oracle CCA,药房网将进一步加强与客户的联系沟通,提高客户的满意度与服务水平,并降低药房网呼叫中心的运营成本,使呼叫中心从成本中心转变成赢利中心.

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment upon Dimensional Stability and Static Bending Strength of Sessile Oak Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin OLARESCU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an experimentalstudy performed with sessile oak wood (Quercuspetrea L.. After drying and conditioning at 12%MC,the test pieces were heat-treated at three differenthigh temperatures (120, 130 and 140°C for 1h, 2hand 3h. After the treatment and cooling, standardsamples for physical and mechanical tests were cut,in order to determine comparatively the density, thedimensional stability, the static bending strength andMOE of the differently treated samples.Based on the obtained results, the optimumtreatment schedule was established, namely the onewhich enables improved dimensional stability withoutaffecting significantly the wood strength. Theseresults can be applied at the manufacturing of solidwood panels with improved dimensional stabilityusing heat-treated wood lamellas.

  8. Mathematical Simulation of Temperature Profiles within Microwave Heated Wood Made for Wood-Based Nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High intensive microwave pretreatment is a new method to modify wood for the fabrication of wood-based nano composites. Based on the physical law on heat transfer, a mathematical model to describe the temperature profiles within wood heated by high intensive microwave was established and simulated in this research. The results showed that the temperature profiles within wood were related to microwave heating methods; The temperature inside wood firstly increased and then gradually decreased along the direction of microwave transmission when the unilateral microwave heating was applied, and the temperature difference along the thickness direction of wood was very significant; The temperature with wood firstly increased and then gradually decreased from the wood surface to interior when the bilateral microwave heating was applied. Compared with the unilateral microwave heating, bilateral microwave heating is a better microwave heating method for the more uniform wood microwave pretreatment.

  9. Wood impregnated with metal chelates dissolved in organic media tested for termite resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Maistrello

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Wood manufactured products are subjected to biological decay due to fungi and insects. The use of copper chelates as biocides was proposed, due to their high stability which minimizes copper leaching into the environment. Considering the remarkable effectiveness showed by copper chelates on brown rot fungi, zinc and copper salicylate complexes were prepared in order to have metal chelates soluble in organic media available. The present study aimed at evaluating these metal chelates complexes as preservative agents for wood treatment against termites. Trials were performed on Reticulitermes lucifugus (Rossi and Kalotermes flavicollis (Fabricius. Results showed that in both termite species wood consumption was significantly lower on Cu-chelates treated samples compared to untreated wood, whereas the wood slices impregnated with Zn-chelates and the organic media alone gave an intermediate response. Interestingly, in one case solvent-impregnated wood was significantly more attractive than untreated wood for both species and further investigations are being carried out to clarify this behaviour.

  10. The urine circulating cathodic antigen (CCA dipstick: a valid substitute for microscopy for mapping and point-of-care diagnosis of intestinal schistosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Sousa-Figueiredo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization now recommends the provision of praziquantel treatment to preschool-aged children infected with schistosomiasis. For intestinal schistosomiasis the current operational field diagnostic standard is examination of a thick Kato-Katz smear by microscopy prepared from a single stool specimen, and although pragmatic, this methodology has well-known shortcomings. Here, as a potential alternative, the performance of the urine circulating cathodic antigen (CCA dipstick test was assessed in terms of disease-mapping and point-of-care diagnosis for intestinal schistosomiasis in preschool-aged children. Our manuscript reports on findings at baseline and at the end of a one-year longitudinal treatment study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 925 children (mean age 2.8 years were initially recruited from six lakeshore villages representative of high, moderate and low levels of disease transmission. At baseline, all children were tested for intestinal schistosomiasis by microscopic examination of duplicate Kato-Katz smears prepared from a single stool faecal, by antigen detection with the urine CCA dipstick test and by serology with a commercially available ELISA test (as 'gold-standard' that measures host antibody titres to soluble egg antigens. As a point-of-care diagnosis, the urine CCA dipstick test achieved sensitivity and specificity values ranging from 52.5-63.2% and 57.7-75.6%, respectively, with faecal microscopy achieving very high specificities (>87% but sensitivities as low as 16.7% in the low transmission setting. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The urine CCA test was shown to be more effective than faecal microscopy especially in lower transmission settings. The diagnostic performance of this test was not significantly impacted by treatment history or co-infections with other intestinal helminths.

  11. The Clock Protein CCA1 and the bZIP Transcription Factor HY5 Physically Interact to Regulate Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos Andronis; Simon Barak; Stephen M.Knowles; Shoji Sugano; Elaine M.Tobin

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates the expression of an array of Arabidopsis genes such as those encoding the LIGHT-HARVESTING CHLOROPHYLL A/B (Lhcb) proteins. We have previously studied the promoters of two of these Arabidopsis genes-Lhcb1*1 and Lhcb1*3-and identified a sequence that binds the clock protein CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). This sequence, designated CCAl-binding site (CBS), is necessary for phytochrome and circadian responsiveness of these genes. In close proximity to this sequence, there exists a G-box core element that has been shown to bind the bZIP transcription factor HY5 in other light-regulated plant promoters. In the present study, we examined the importance of the interaction of transcription factors binding the CBS and the G-box core element in the control of normal circadian rhythmic expression of Lhcb genes. Our results show that HY5 is able to specifically bind the G-box element in the Lhcb promoters and that CCA1 can alter the binding activity of HY5. We further show that CCA1 and HY5 can physically interact and that they can act synergistically on transcription in a yeast reporter gene assay. An absence of HY5 leads to a shorter period of Lhcb1*1 circadian expression but does not affect the circadian expression of CATALASE3 (CAT3), whose promoter lacks a G-box element. Our results suggest that interaction of the HY5 and CCA1 proteins on Lhcb promoters is necessary for normal circadian expression of the Lhcb genes.

  12. Wood energy and air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication first recalls the main benefits of the use of wood, the first source of renewable energy in France: abundant and local resource, low CO2 emission, competitiveness, job creation. It comments the relationship between the use of this source of energy and the compliance with air quality standards as they are notably defined by European directives, as the use of wood as heating source is one of the recommended lever to improve air quality. The publication comments emissions generated by this type of heating (mainly in the housing sector, with some critical meteorological periods). Levers for actions are discussed: fleet renewal to promote the best performing equipment, practice improvements (fuel quality, apparatus maintenance). Actions undertaken by the ADEME are briefly reviewed: support to individual equipment fleet modernisation, support to R and D, support to the sector, and information and communication

  13. Alkaline disinfection of urban wastewater and landfill leachate by wood fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna; Itskos, Grigorios; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Kovačević, Davor; Milenković, Jelena

    2014-12-01

    Wood fly ash is an industrial by-product of the combustion of different wood materials and is mostly disposed of as waste on landfills. In our preliminary experiments, wood ash exhibited antibacterial activity against urban wastewater bacteria and we focused on wood fly ash as a potential substrate for wastewater disinfection. The addition of ash at a concentration of 10 g L⁻¹ (1%) caused an instant increase of pH in urban wastewater and landfill leachate. High pH (10.1-12.7) inactivated bacterial populations in the wastewater and the removal of faecal coliforms and intestinal enterococci after 6 h of contact was 100% (below the detection limit; ash sample (ash from combustion of beech) both in urban wastewater and landfill leachate. Properly chosen wood fly ash, i.e. one that tends to increase the pH to the greatest extent, proved to be a very effective disinfection substrate. Considering that water treated with wood ash has a high pH and needs to be neutralised before discharge, ash would be suitable for disinfection of leachates when smaller volumes are treated. PMID:25720024

  14. Wood Xylowall: New process to reduce water exchange by an intra-graft of polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenhove, Anne; Tilquin, Bernard

    2005-07-01

    Our research shows that poplar treated with selected monomer mixture and then irradiated at 50 kGy reduces the water exchange without adversely altering the desirable qualities of wood. Moreover, the environment is not polluted. To retard changes in moisture content and dimensions, different commercial Radcures (UCB) were tested. A comparative study on the water retention showed significant reduction between non-treated and Xylowall wood for the species: poplar. The physical and mechanical measurements (density, volumetric shrinkage, elasticity, rupture, impact bending, hardness, compression strength) on poplar and pine show that the properties of the wood are not affected negatively by Xylowall treatment with irradiation. Moreover, the process does not discharge any toxic volatile residues into the atmosphere as proven by GC-MS trace analysis of heated wood samples. The stereomicroscope by imagery reveals an impregnation of 0.5 mm on cross-section of darker-stained areas, and sometimes more due to the texture (the relative size and arrangement of the wood cells) of the wood.

  15. VARNISH LAYER HARDNESS, SCRATCH RESISTANCE, AND GLOSSINESS OF VARIOUS WOOD SPECIES AS AFFECTED BY HEAT TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzat Çakıcıer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the effects of different heat treatment and varnish application combinations on hardness, scratch resistance, and glossiness of wood materials sampled from limba (Terminalia superba, iroko (Chlorophora excelsa, ash (Fraxinus excelsior L., and Anatolian chestnut (Castenea sativa Mill. species. The heat treatment was applied at two levels (150 and 180 oC for both 3 and 6 hour periods. After the heat treatment, four types of varnish (cellulose lacquer, synthetic varnish, polyurethane varnish, and water based varnish were applied, and hardness, scratch resistance, and glossiness of varnish film layers of the treated woods were measured. The effects of heat treatment and varnish combination applications on above mentioned variables were analyzed according to the study design (factorial design with 4 (species x 2 (heat x 2(duration x 4 (varnish = 64 experimental units with 10 samples for each combination of parameters. Glossiness increased on wood samples for all of the four wood species treated with cellulose lacquer and synthetic varnish and across all heating treatments. However, glossiness values were decreased for all the wood species depending on heating temperature and time. Values of hardness and scratch resistance were also decreased for all the four wood species across all the treatment combinations. The results were obtained from the upper surface of the application process and are thought to contribute to the national economy.

  16. FLEXURAL FATIGUE OF LAMINATED WOOD

    OpenAIRE

    B. A. Bondarev; S. V. Povetkin

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement. Local damage accumulation in goods and construction elements ultimately leading to a failure occurs due to fluctuating load effect. Results and conclusions. The results of the analysis of the experimentally obtained analytical dependences of strength characteristics and resistance to cracks of profiled laminated wood during bending in products and designs are presented. This products and designs operate under static and cyclic loading. Stresses under which cracks form in pi...

  17. Hypermedia in the Ambient Wood

    OpenAIRE

    Weal, Mark J; Michaelides, Danius T.; Thompson, Mark K.; De Roure, David C

    2003-01-01

    The Ambient Wood project, carried out as part of the Equator IRC, set out to provide an augmented learning experience for children in an outdoor environment. Using a variety of devices, the children gathered information about the woodland habitats performing basic scientific enquiry and hypothesis testing. In this paper we describe the supporting information infrastructure used in the project, focusing on how hypermedia tools and techniques were used to structure and deliver the information t...

  18. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng Ning

    2008-01-01

    Abstract To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux...

  19. Nonisothermal moisture movement in wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianjun; ZHANG Biguang; LI Wenjun; LI Yanjun

    2006-01-01

    In order to analyze the effect of temperature gradient on moisture movement during highly intensive drying,such as microwave-vacuum drying,the profile of the temperature and moisture content in sealed wood whose opposite faces were subjected to temperature gradient for a short time was measured.The ratio of the moisture content (MC) gradient to the temperature gradient (dM/dT) was calculated and the factors influencing moisture movement under nonisothermal conditions were discussed.The results indicate that moisture moved in wood from the warm surface to the cold one even if opposite faces of the sealed wood assembly were exposed continuously to different but constant temperatures for a short period.The moisture content on the cold surface was higher than that on the warm surface.The moisture content gradient opposite to the temperature gradient was established,and the dM/dT was below 0.9%/℃.The temperature in the sample and the distance from the hot surface of the sample was strongly linearly correlated.With an increase in temperature,initial moisture content and experimental time,the dM/dT was significantly increased.

  20. Perception of Wood in River Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A.

    2003-12-01

    In managing river channels, wood is often perceived as hazardous and has traditionally been removed. On the other hand, wood provides many benefits including food and habitat for fish and mechanisms for energy dissipation. Increasing recognition of the positive role of wood has encouraged the reintroduction of wood to restore rivers. However, it is not clear how widely this practice is accepted, and whether traditional views of wood hazards may influence the success of such restoration projects. This paper describes a large-scale effort to increase understanding of how wood is perceived in stream channels. This project, led by H. Piegay and K.J. Gregory, involves an international group of workers from 9 countries in contrasting parts of the world. A total of 1886 surveys were given to students 20-25 years of age to test the hypothesis that the perception of wood is related to one's socio-cultural environment. Students were asked to view a set of 20 standard photographs, 10 with wood and 10 without, and to answer a set of questions related to how hazardous the scenes are perceived. Results show clear differences in perception, with students from Texas, USA, viewing streams with wood to be more dangerous, less aesthetic, and to need more improvement than those without. These perceptions contrast with those from the Pacific northwest and some areas around the world, providing clues to the potential success and acceptance of reintroducing wood in stream restoration.

  1. WOOD BIOMASS FOR ENERGY IN MONTENEGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradimir Danon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood biomass has got its place in the energy balance of Montenegro. A little more than 6% of the total energy consumption is obtained by burning wood. Along with the appropriate state measures, it is economically and environmentally justified to expect Montenegro to more than double the utilization of the existing renewable energy sources including wood biomass, in the near future. For the purpose of achieving this goal, ‘Commercial Utilisation of the Wood Residue as a Resource for Economic Development in the North of Montenegro' project was carried out in 2007. The results of this project were included in the plan of the necessary interventions of the Government and its Agencies, associations or clusters, non-government organisations and interested enterprises. The plan was made on the basis of the wood residue at disposal and the attitude of individual subjects to produce and/or use solid bio-fuels and consists of a proposal of collection and utilisation of the wood residue for each individual district in the north of Montenegro. The basic factors of sustainability of future commercialisation of the wood residue were: availability of the wood raw material, and thereby the wood residue; the development of wood-based fuel markets, and the size of the profit.

  2. Discover the benefits of residential wood heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This publication described how residential wood-heating systems are being used to reduce energy costs and increase home comfort. Biomass energy refers to all forms are renewable energy that is derived from plant materials. The source of fuel may include sawmills, woodworking shops, forest operations and farms. The combustion of biomass is also considered to be carbon dioxide neutral, and is not considered to be a major producer of greenhouse gases (GHG) linked to global climate change. Wood burning does, however, release air pollutants, particularly if they are incompletely burned. Incomplete combustion of wood results in dense smoke consisting of toxic gases. Natural Resources Canada helped create new safety standards and the development of the Wood Energy Technical Training Program to ensure that all types of wood-burning appliances are installed correctly and safely to reduce the risk of fire and for effective wood heating. In Canada, more than 3 million families heat with wood as a primary or secondary heating source in homes and cottages. Wood heating offers security from energy price fluctuations and electrical power failures. This paper described the benefits of fireplace inserts that can transform old fireplaces into modern heating systems. It also demonstrated how an add-on wood furnace can be installed next to oil furnaces to convert an oil-only heating system to a wood-oil combination system, thereby saving thousands of dollars in heating costs. Wood pellet stoves are another wood burning option. The fuel for the stoves is produced from dried, finely ground wood waste that is compressed into hard pellets that are loaded into a hopper. The stove can run automatically for up to 24 hours. New high-efficiency advanced fireplaces also offer an alternative heating system that can reduce heating costs while preserving Canada's limited supply of fossil fuels such as oil and gas. 13 figs.

  3. Investigation of diverse leaf-wood and coniferous wood regardin their usability for the production of wood-plastic-combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By impregnation with an acrylic monomer mixture and by polymerization with gamma radiation wood-plastic combinations with high dimensional stability have been made from 34 wood species. Data for monomer uptake, density, hardness, impact bending, swelling by volume and weight, and weatherability are presented. Furthermore the attempt of an aesthetic evaluation of the wood-plastic combinations has been made. The optical impression has been compared with the technological behaviour. As a result several wood species turned out to be especially suitable for the production of wood-plastic combinations of high quality. These woods are ramin, lime, abachi, walnut, bubinga, niangon and mutenye, with some restrictions also spruce, okoume, corola pine and dibetou. (author)

  4. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Ning

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1, followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1 and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC, lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  5. EVOLUTION OF LIGHTWEIGHT WOOD COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius C. BARBU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight boards and beams in the wood-based construction and furniture industry are not a new topic. The density reduction of panels using sandwich structure with light cores was confirmed by users like doors or mobile homes more than three decades ago. Today many ways to attain a lighter wooden structure are on offer, partially in industrial application. The first one is the use of light-weight wood species like balsa, lime, pine from southern hemisphere plantations etc. limited by the availability, strength properties, gluability and so on. A second one is the sandwich structure made from hard faces like thick veneer, thin plywood, particleboard or high density thin fiberboard and cores made from honeycomb paper, very light wood species or foams like the polystyrene one. A third way to produce a light structure is to reduce the core drastically, using predesigned skeletons with special shapes and connections to the faces. The engines for these developments are on the one hand the fast growing market of knockdown furniture and on the other hand the increasing costs for energy and raw materials. Additional factors that make weight saving a primary economical objective for most producers are transportation costs, easier handling and higher acceptance among the end users. Moreover, customers demand more for ergonomical solutions regarding packaging. Many patents were generated by researchers and developers for new one-stage production processes for sandwich panels with wood- and impregnated paper-based facings made from veneers, particles or fibres and a core consisting of expandable foams, particles or embedded hard skeletons. These ideas or prototypes could be integrated in existing continuous pressing lines for wood based panels keeping some of the advantages of the continuous production technique in matters of efficiency. Some of the challenges of the light weight wooden structure are the connection in half or final parts, resistance to

  6. Wood ash treatment, a cost-effective way to deactivate tannins in Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage and to improve digestion by Barbarine sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three in vitro experiments and one in vivo experiment were carried out to study the effect of wood ash sources (6 L wood ash solution/kg fresh plant leaves) and levels and treatment duration on the nutritive value of acacia leaves. In Experiment 1, samples of fresh (F), dried (D), or dried and ground (DG) acacia were soaked for 6 h in water or acacia wood ash solution (120 g of wood ash dry matter/L of water). Soaking acacia in water decreased total extractable phenols (TP), total extractable tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT). Wood ash treatment led to a further decrease of these phenolic compounds and was highest with DG acacia. Experiment 2 investigated different levels of acacia wood ash (0, 120, 180 and 240 g wood ash dry matter/L of water) and treatment duration (1, 2 and 3 days). The higher the level of wood ash, the lower proportion of TP and CT in acacia was noted. In Experiment 3, two sources of wood ash (i.e., acacia and Aleppo pine) and the same solution of each source of wood ash were used eight times. The two sources of wood ash had similar deactivating effect on TP and CT. The rate of decrease of TP and CT was highest when the same wood ash solution was used four consecutive times and decreased progressively thereafter. In these three experiments, water and wood ash treatment reduced organic matter and crude protein content but substantially increased the neutral detergent fibre (NDFom) content of treated acacia. In the fourth experiment, we treated acacia with acacia wood ash (180 g/L of water for 2 days) and the same solution was used five times. Treated and untreated acacia were air-dried and fed ad libitum to two groups, each of four Barbarine rams together with 300 g of concentrate. Wood ash treatment did not affect intake and OM digestibility of the diet but increased crude protein and NDFom digestibility (P < 0.05). Feeding untreated acacia resulted in negative N balances but with wood ash treatment, N balance was positive

  7. Wood ash treatment, a cost-effective way to deactivate tannins in Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage and to improve digestion by Barbarine sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Abidi, S. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia); Makkar, H.P.S. [Animal Production and Health Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nefzaoui, A. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Three in vitro experiments and one in vivo experiment were carried out to study the effect of wood ash sources (6 L wood ash solution/kg fresh plant leaves) and levels and treatment duration on the nutritive value of acacia leaves. In Experiment 1, samples of fresh (F), dried (D), or dried and ground (DG) acacia were soaked for 6 h in water or acacia wood ash solution (120 g of wood ash dry matter/L of water). Soaking acacia in water decreased total extractable phenols (TP), total extractable tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT). Wood ash treatment led to a further decrease of these phenolic compounds and was highest with DG acacia. Experiment 2 investigated different levels of acacia wood ash (0, 120, 180 and 240 g wood ash dry matter/L of water) and treatment duration (1, 2 and 3 days). The higher the level of wood ash, the lower proportion of TP and CT in acacia was noted. In Experiment 3, two sources of wood ash (i.e., acacia and Aleppo pine) and the same solution of each source of wood ash were used eight times. The two sources of wood ash had similar deactivating effect on TP and CT. The rate of decrease of TP and CT was highest when the same wood ash solution was used four consecutive times and decreased progressively thereafter. In these three experiments, water and wood ash treatment reduced organic matter and crude protein content but substantially increased the neutral detergent fibre (NDFom) content of treated acacia. In the fourth experiment, we treated acacia with acacia wood ash (180 g/L of water for 2 days) and the same solution was used five times. Treated and untreated acacia were air-dried and fed ad libitum to two groups, each of four Barbarine rams together with 300 g of concentrate. Wood ash treatment did not affect intake and OM digestibility of the diet but increased crude protein and NDFom digestibility (P < 0.05). Feeding untreated acacia resulted in negative N balances but with wood ash treatment, N balance was positive

  8. Tension wood and opposite wood in 21 tropical rain forest species. 1. Occurence and efficiency of G-layer

    OpenAIRE

    Clair, Bruno; Ruelle, Julien; Beauchêne, Jacques; Prévost, Marie-Françoise; Fournier, Meriem

    2006-01-01

    Wood samples were taken from the upper and lower sides of 21 naturally tilted trees from 18 families of angiosperms in the tropical rainforest in French Guyana. The measurement of growth stresses ensured that the two samples were taken from wood tissues in a different mechanical state: highly tensile stressed wood on the upper side, called tension wood and lower tensile stressed wood on the lower side, called opposite wood. Eight species had tension wood fibres with a distinct gelatinous laye...

  9. Swedish recovered wood waste: linking regulation and contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krook, J; Mårtensson, A; Eklund, M; Libiseller, C

    2008-01-01

    In Sweden, large amounts of wood waste are generated annually from construction and demolition activities, but also from other discarded products such as packaging and furniture. A large share of this waste is today recovered and used for heat production. However, previous research has found that recovered wood waste (RWW) contains hazardous substances, which has significant implications for the environmental performance of recycling. Improved sorting is often suggested as a proper strategy to decrease such implications. In this study, we aim to analyse the impacts of waste regulation on the contamination of RWW. The occurrence of industrial preservative-treated wood, which contains several hazardous substances, was used as an indicator for contamination. First the management of RWW during 1995-2004 was studied through interviews with involved actors. We then determined the occurrence of industrial preservative-treated wood in RWW for that time period for each supplier (actor). From the results, it can be concluded that a substantially less contaminated RWW today relies on extensive source separation. The good news is that some actors, despite several obstacles for such upstream efforts, have already today proved capable of achieving relatively efficient separation. In most cases, however, the existing waste regulation has not succeeded in establishing strong enough incentives for less contaminated waste in general, nor for extensive source separation in particular. One important factor for this outcome is that the current market forces encourage involved actors to practice weak quality requirements and to rely on end-of-pipe solutions, rather than put pressure for improvements on upstream actors. Another important reason is that there is a lack of communication and oversight of existing waste regulations. Without such steering mechanisms, the inherent pressure from regulations becomes neutralized. PMID:17509861

  10. Violates stem wood burning sustainable development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    friendly effects of substituting wood burning for fossil fuels. With reference to Bent Sørensen's classical work on 'Renewable Energy' the assumption of CO2-neutrality regarding incineration is problematised when applied to plants with long rotation periods as trees. Registered CO2-emissions from wood...... burning are characterised together with particle and PAH emissions. The positive treatment of wood stove-technology in the Danish strategy for sustainable development (draft 2007) is critically evaluated and approaches to better regulation are identified....

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF A ORGANIC IODINE COMPOUND AGAINST WOOD DECAYING FUNGI AND TERMITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Weber Scheeren

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a low toxicity organic compound as fungicide and insecticide was studied by a accelerated laboratory bioassay according to the japanese standard. The compound was evaluated at concentrations of 0,5, 0,75 and 1,0% using ethanol as solvent. The subterraneous termites Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and the decay fungi Coriolus versicolor (white rot and Tyromyces palustris (brown rot were used in the trials to evaluate the insecticide and fungicide action respectively. The wood specimens with dimensions of 40 x 20 x 5mm were treated by surface coating (brushing method at a rate of 110±10g/m2. The percentage weight loss of the wood blocks and the termite mortality (insecticide action and the weight loss of the wood blocks before and after the fungi attack (fungicide action were determined. The efficiency of the formulations were evaluated according to the Value of Efficiency. Results showed that the compound was of little or no efficient as insecticide against Coptotermes formosanus in the three concentrations analysed. The compound showed a good performance as fungicide against Coriolus versicolor and Tyromyces palustris with a Value of Efficiency higher than 90 in the three concentrations analysed. The best results were obtained with the product at 1,0% concentration in the treated and unleached wood specimens. Tyromyces palustris caused a larger damage in the wood blocks than Coriolus versicolor. The product showed a low capacity of fixation in the wood; therefore, it is not indicated for treating wood that will be in direct contact with the soil or under outdoor conditions.

  12. Novel perspectives in wood certification and forensics: dry wood as a source of DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Deguilloux, Marie-France; Pemonge, Marie-Hélène; Rémy J Petit

    2002-01-01

    The importance of wood for human societies can hardly be understated. If dry wood were amenable to molecular genetic investigations, this could lead to major applications in wood forensics, certification, archaeology and palaeobotany. To evaluate the potential of wood for molecular genetic investigations, we have attempted to isolate and amplify, by PCR, DNA fragments of increasing size corresponding to all three plant genomes from different regions of 10 oak logs. Stringent procedures to avo...

  13. Reliable and non-destructive positioning of larvae of wood-destroying beetles in wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living larvae of wood-destroying insects (house longhorn beetle, deathwatch) can be determined in wood by both X-ray technique and vibration measurements. For such examinations convenient commercial devices were used and tested under laboratory conditions. The methods complement each other and lead to a rationalization of the tests of wood preservatives against wood-destroying insects. It seems to be promising to apply the test methods also to timber already used for building

  14. Brazilian sawn wood price and income elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Noce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study estimated the sawn wood demand price and income elasticity. Specifically it was estimated the priceelasticity of sawn wood, the cross price elasticity of wood panels and the income elasticity of Brazilian GDP. A log-log model withcorrection through outline of the mobile average (MA(1 was used, adjusted for the period of 1971 to 2006, which showed to bestable, with satisfactory significance levels. It was observed that sawn wood demand is inelastic in relation to price and elastic inrelation to income.

  15. European wood-pastures in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood-pastures are important elements of European cultural identity and have an exceptional ecological value, yet they are in decline all over Europe. The structure of wood-pastures is strongly influenced by grazing and multiple other land uses and by local and regional environmental conditions....... European Wood-Pastures in Transition examines the diverse expressions of wood-pastures across Europe. It provides a new perspective, using a social-ecological framework to explore social and ecological values, governing institutions, threats and conservation approaches. It explores the major drivers...

  16. George Woods and the World Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE. George David Woods became the fourth president of the World Bank on January 1, 1963. John F. Kennedy, personally, urged Woods to accept. In August, 1962, Eugene Black invited Woods to the White House where Kennedy told Woods, in effect: Everything we in the United States have done since the end of the war, including the Marshall Plan, to try to build a peaceful and stable world is threatened by the growing gap between the poor and the rich countries. If that is not sol...

  17. Characteristics of Wood ASH/OPC Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullahi, M

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the behaviour of wood ash / OPC concrete. Chemical analysis of wood ash, bulk density, sieve analysis and specific gravity of wood ash and aggregates, consistency, setting time and slump test of the fresh paste were conducted to determine the suitability of the materials for concrete making. Mix ratio of 1:2:4 and percentage replacement level of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 percents of cement by wood ash were used. 150mm´150mm cubes were cast, cured and crushed at 28 and 60 days to...

  18. Wood energy 2000; Bois energie 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druette, L. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment, (CSTB), 44 - Nantes (France); Lacome, T. [AFNOR, 75 - Paris (France); Roy, C. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, ADEME, 75 - Paris (France)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The deregulation of the Electric Market and the opening of the Green Certificate exchange market force the set up of renewable energies. The wood, which is for most of european countries an important part of renewable fuel, should see the increase of its utilization. This conference on the wood energy deals the main aspects of this energy development. The papers present the wood burning furnaces technology assessment, the wood fuel market and the standardization of the appliances in this domain. Some papers also include the consequences of the big storms of december 1999. (A.L.B.)

  19. Study on Organic Wood-flour Putty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This work was undertaken to research organic wood-flour putty as wooden surface undercoat. Four types of wood-flour (300, 500, 800 and 1 000 mesh) were prepared through the technological processes of shattering, coarse grinding and fine grinding. And latex (16% of solid content) and two kinds of agents (A and B) were added into the putty. In this experiment, effects of agent and particle size of wood-flour on properties of organic wood-flour putty, such as painting properties, water resistance, and abrasive...

  20. Social Housing: wood prefabrication techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Ferrante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Student housing, a particular and quite significant part of social housing, and innovation in processing and production of industrial building components made of a material (wood not adequately inquired: two fields of research that have been explored for a long time allowing here to share and compare experiences gained thus far. By a selection of samples of wooden student housing in Europe we have documented the performances of this material and we have underlined, at the same time, through what happens abroad, the need of an organic national social housing plan that can meet an unsatisfied demand and boost the construction industry during this particular stage of economic crisis.

  1. THERMO-VACUUM MODIFICATION OF SPRUCE (PICEA ABIES KARST. AND FIR (ABIES ALBA MILL. WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviano Allegretti,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study presents results of the characterization of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst. and fir (Abies alba Mill. wood thermally modified by TERMOVUOTO® technology at temperatures in the range of 160 to 220°C in vacuum conditions. Sixteen thermo-vacuum treatment tests were carried out using a pilot laboratory unit on 30-mm-thick spruce and fir boards in various combinations of the process parameters, i.e. temperature (T, duration (t, and pressure (p. The treated material was characterized to reveal the changes of the physical-mechanical properties including color and durability. The treated wood showed an improved performance with relation to the dimensional stability and durability. The measured mechanical properties did not show any significant decrease. Analytical models, based on the existing correlations between wood properties and process parameters, were assessed, thus allowing the control of the process.

  2. Variation in wood nutrients along a tropical soil fertility gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Katherine D; Turner, Benjamin L; Dalling, James W

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains the majority of the nutrients in tropical trees, yet controls over wood nutrient concentrations and their function are poorly understood. We measured wood nutrient concentrations in 106 tree species in 10 forest plots spanning a regional fertility gradient in Panama. For a subset of species, we quantified foliar nutrients and wood density to test whether wood nutrients scale with foliar nutrients at the species level, or wood nutrient storage increases with wood density as predicted by the wood economics spectrum. Wood nutrient concentrations varied enormously among species from fourfold in nitrogen (N) to > 30-fold in calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and phosphorus (P). Community-weighted mean wood nutrient concentrations correlated positively with soil Ca, K, Mg and P concentrations. Wood nutrients scaled positively with leaf nutrients, supporting the hypothesis that nutrient allocation is conserved across plant organs. Wood P was most sensitive to variation in soil nutrient availability, and significant radial declines in wood P indicated that tropical trees retranslocate P as sapwood transitions to heartwood. Wood P decreased with increasing wood density, suggesting that low wood P and dense wood are traits associated with tree species persistence on low fertility soils. Substantial variation among species and communities in wood nutrient concentrations suggests that allocation of nutrients to wood, especially P, influences species distributions and nutrient dynamics in tropical forests. PMID:26922861

  3. The use of treated sewage from a wetland system for irrigation of plants for the productive sector that uses wood in the Northeast semiarid; O uso do esgoto tratado de um sistema Wetland para irrigacao de plantas destinadas ao setor produtivo que utiliza lenha no semiarido nordestino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ednaldo de Paiva; Sena, Jose Antonio Nascimento; Freitas, Marcos Aurelio Vasconcelos de; Rosa, Luiz Pinguelli [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Eletrica], emails: ednaldopp@gmail.com, jsena@ivig.coppe.ufrj.br, mfreitas@ivig.coppe.ufrj.br, lpr@adc.coppe.ufrj.br; Silva, Neilton Fidelis da; Rola, Sylvia Meimaridou [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (IVIG/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. Virtual Internacional de Mudancas Globais], emails: neilton@ivig.coppe.ufrj.br, sylvia@ivig.coppe.ufrj.br

    2010-07-01

    The analysis of the production sector that uses wood for burning shows that for ovens in bakeries, potteries, and other activities in the Serido region of Rio Grande do Norte, even with the possibility of using gas in the energy matrix, the wood is highly used. This is mainly due to the cost of investments and purchase. Thus, as the use of firewood should be a practice maintained for a long period, and thus contribute to accelerated desertification process, the experimental work of sewage treatment developed in the city of Parelhas in Rio Grande do Norte can contribute to mitigating the negative impact, given the possibility of reuse of sewage water for growing plants that are suitable for burning in the economic activities of industries that use energy as input. (author)

  4. The Wood Anatomy of Rubiaceae tribes Anthospermeae and Paederieae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Puff, Ch.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed wood anatomical descriptions are given for the genera Anthospermum, Nenax, Phyllis, Carpacoce, Coprosma, Neogaillonia, Crocyllis, Plocama and Spermadictyon, and miscellaneous wood anatomical data on the genera Normandia, Pomax, Opercularia, Leptodermis and Aitchisonia. The wood anatomical v

  5. MILD ALKALINE TREATMENT ACTIVATES SPRUCE WOOD FOR ENZYMATIC PROCESSING: A POSSIBLE STAGE IN BIO-REFINERY PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of wood is so compact that enzymes are too large to penetrate into the structure and thereby attack the wood components for modifications that can be valuable for various purposes. Here we present a pretreatment method based on traditional kraft pulping, which opens the wood structure, so that enzymes are able to attack the wood components. To study this kind of chemical pretreatment, spruce wood samples were treated at similar conditions used in kraft cooking at varying intensities (H-factors. To verify if the structure was “opened” for enzymes, the pretreated wood samples were incubated with a cellulolytic culture filtrate, and the released reducing sugar concentration after the enzymatic hydrolysis was measured. The results indicated that un-pretreated wood fibers could not be attacked by the enzymes, but already relatively mild pretreatment was sufficient for letting the culture filtrate attack wood polysaccharides, and more intensive treatments opened the structure further. The mildest treatments did not cause any significant yield losses of lignin (Klason lignin. Some galactogluco-mannans were however lost during the pretreatments. The mechanisms behind the effect and the technical significance of the method are discussed.

  6. THE RESISTANCE OF WOOD PLASTIC COMPOSITE TO THE DRY-WOOD TERMITE Cryptotermes cynocephalus Light. AND THE SUBTERRANEAN TERMITE Coptotermes curvignathus Holmgren INFESTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasni Jasni

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Wood  plastic  composites   (WPC were made  by impregnating  monomer   and  vinyl acetate monomer  with addition  of  terbutyl peroxide  catalyst. This laboratory  scale experiment  aimed at looking into  the durability of  WPC polymerized  at varying mixture  ratios between  styrene and vinyl acetate monomers,  compared  to the natural   durability of  the corresponding   wood  treated with impralit CKB.  In this  regard,  wood  samples were dried until 10 % moisture  content,   and then  they were put in the tank under  20 mm Hg vacuum was being released.   Styrene  monomer with vinyl acetate  addition was flown to the tank, and the wood  samples were immersed  in the monomer   for  24 hours.   Furthermore,   the wood  samples  were taken  out,  and  wrapped  with aluminum  foil, and then were   put in the oven for 24 hours at 60° C. The  wraps were opened, and the samples were  conditioned.   The  samples were tested  to dry wood  termite  (Cryptotermes cynocephalus Light.,  and the Subterranean  termite (Coptotermes curvignathus Holmgren..  Investigated factors were (i wood species consisting of sengon, pine, and rubber wood, and (ii ratio of styrene to vinyl acetate. i.e.  90/10;  80/20;  70/30;  and 60/40.   For comparison,  each wood samples  treated with  Impralit  CKB  3% and untreated   (unpolymerized    wood  samples  (a control  were  also prepared.  The  results showed  that polymer  loadings  in the  sengon, pine and rubber  wood were 118 %, 72 % and  44%  respectively. Increasing  of  vinyl acetate  to styrene  tended  to decrease polymer loading,  the addition  of  10% gave 96% polymer  loading,  20% gave 108%,  30% gave 71 %, and 30% gave 38 % respectively.  It appeared that treatment  of styrene with low vinyl acetate additions  (60:40 had resulted  in consecutively  95.67%  and 97.75 % mortality  of  the dry

  7. Microwave Irradiation Treatment of Wood Flour and Its Application in PVC-Wood Flour Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shengfei; CHEN Wen; LIU Weihua; LI Huaxing

    2007-01-01

    The technique of microwave irradiation induced free radical bulk- polyaddition reactions in porous wood flour was used to modify wood flour. The behaviors of the modified wood flour under microwave irradiation, such as thermal stability and moisture sorption properties, were studied. A kind of semiinterpenetrating polymer network wood four (Semi-IPN-WF) can be formed through polymerization of MMA in the porous wood flour by microwave irradiation, and the thermal decomposition temperature of the semi-IPN-WF is considerably increased. PVC/Semi-IPN-WF composites were prepared by melt mixing in double rolls,which exhibit improved rheological properties, lower water sorption properties and outstanding mechanical performances.

  8. Effect of Wood Fillers on the Viscoelastic and Thermophysical Properties of HDPE-Wood Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tazi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wood polymer composites (WPC have well proven their applicability in several fields of the plasturgy sector, due to their aesthetics and low maintenance costs. However, for plasturgy applications, the characterization of viscoelastic behavior and thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of WPC with the temperature and wood filler contents is essential. Therefore, the processability of polymer composites made up with different percentage of wood particles needs a better understanding of materials behaviors in accordance with temperature and wood particles contents. To this end, a numerical analysis of the viscoelastic, mechanical, and thermophysical properties of composite composed of high density polyethylene (HDPE reinforced with soft wood particles is evaluated.

  9. Laser Treatment of Wood Surfaces for Ski Cores: An Experimental Parameter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Petutschnigg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the production of skis with wooden cores has increased due to changes in customer awareness concerning ecological issues and rising raw material costs for mineral oil resources. The preparation of ski surfaces is one of the main expense factors in the production of skis. Thus, one perspective of the AMER SPORTS CORPORATION is to treat wood surfaces with laser beams to develop new aesthetic possibilities in ski design. This study deals with different laser treatments for samples from various wood species: beech, ash, lime, and spruce. The parameters investigated are laser beam intensity and number of laser points on the surface. To evaluate the aesthetic changes, the CIELab color measurements were applied. Changes in the main wood components were observed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR using an ATR (attenuated total reflectance unit. The results show that the laser treatments on wood surfaces have an influence on wood color and the chemical composition. Especially the intensity of laser beams affects the color changes in different patterns for the parameters observed. These findings will be useful to develop innovative design possibilities of wood surfaces for ski cores as well as for further product design applications (e.g., mass customization.

  10. Chemical composition changes in eucalyptus and pinus woods submitted to heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, J O; Silva, F G; Leão, M M; Almeida, G

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of heat treatment on the chemical composition of Eucalyptus saligna and Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis woods to understand its role in wood processing. E. saligna and P. caribaea var. hondurensis woods were treated in a laboratorial electric furnace at 120, 140, 160 and 180 degrees C to induce their heat treatment. The chemical composition of the resulting products and those from original wood were determined by gas chromatography. Eucalyptus and Pinus showed a significant reduction in arabinose, manose, galactose and xylose contents when submitted to increasing temperatures. No significant alteration in glucose content was observed. Lignin content, however, increased during the heat process. There was a significant reduction in extractive content for Eucalyptus. On the other hand, a slight increase in extractive content has been determined for the Pinus wood, and that only for the highest temperature. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in chemical constituents between softwoods and hardwoods. The results obtained in this study provide important information for future research and utilization of thermally modified wood.

  11. COMPOSITES FROM RECYCLED WOOD AND PLASTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultimate goal of this research was to develop technology to convert recycled wood fiber and plastics into durable products that are recyclable and otherwise environmentally friendly. Two processing technologies were used to prepare wood-plastic composites: air-laying and melt...

  12. Wood and leaf anatomy of Opiliaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Rijckevorsel, v. P.

    1983-01-01

    The wood and leaf anatomy of representatives of the 9 genera of the Opiliaceae are described in detail. It is possible to separate the genera on the base of both wood- and leaf anatomical characters. Herein the presence of cystoliths of varying shape and size is important. Some comments on the taxon

  13. Reactivity and burnout of wood fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall'Ora, Michelangelo

    This thesis deals with the combustion of wood in pulverised fuel power plants. In this type of boiler, the slowest step in the wood conversion process is char combustion, which is one of the factors that not only determine the degree of fuel burnout, but also affect the heat release profile...

  14. Turbulence and Araki-Woods factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasyk, R.; Törnquist, A.; Törnquist, Asger Dag

    2010-01-01

    Using Baire category techniques we prove that Araki-Woods factors are not classifiable by countable structures. As a result, we obtain a far reaching strengthening as well as a new proof of the well-known theorem of Woods that the isomorphism problem for ITPFI factors is not smooth. We derive...

  15. Least cost supply strategies for wood chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Bernd

    The abstract presents a study based on a geographical information system, which produce  cost-supply curves by location for forest woods chips in Denmark.......The abstract presents a study based on a geographical information system, which produce  cost-supply curves by location for forest woods chips in Denmark....

  16. Evaluation of Paulownia elongata wood polyethylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulownia wood flour (PWF), a byproduct of milling lumber, was employed as a bio-filler and blended with high density polyethylene (HDPE) via extrusion. Paulownia wood (PW) shavings were milled through a 1-mm screen then separated via shaking into various particle fractions using sieves (#30 - < #2...

  17. Over-expression of the β-carboxysomal CcmM protein in Synechococcus PCC7942 reveals a tight co-regulation of carboxysomal carbonic anhydrase (CcaA) and M58 content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Benedict M; Rae, Benjamin D; Badger, Murray R; Price, G Dean

    2011-09-01

    Carboxysomes, containing the cell's complement of RuBisCO surrounded by a specialized protein shell, are a central component of the cyanobacterial CO(2)-concentrating mechanism. The ratio of two forms of the β-carboxysomal protein CcmM (M58 and M35) may affect the carboxysomal carbonic anhydrase (CcaA) content. We have over-expressed both M35 and M58 in the β-cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC7942. Over-expression of M58 resulted in a marked increase in the amount of this protein in carboxysomes at the expense of M35, with a concomitant increase in the observed CcaA content of carboxysomes. Conversely, M35 over-expression diminished M58 content of carboxysomes and led to a decrease in CcaA content. Carboxysomes of air-grown wild-type cells contained slightly elevated CcaA and M58 content and slightly lower M35 content compared to their 2% CO(2)-grown counterparts. Over a range of CcmM expression levels, there was a strong correlation between M58 and CcaA content, indicating a constant carboxysomal M58:CcaA stoichiometry. These results also confirm a role for M58 in the recruitment of CcaA into the carboxysome and suggest a tight regulation of M35 and M58 translation is required to produce carboxysomes with an appropriate CA content. Analysis of carboxysomal protein ratios, resulting from the afore-mentioned over-expression studies, revealed that β-carboxysomal protein stoichiometries are relatively flexible. Determination of absolute protein quantities supports the hypothesis that M35 is distributed throughout the β-carboxysome. A modified β-carboxysome packing model is presented.

  18. Improvement of POC-CCA Interpretation by Using Lyophilization of Urine from Patients with Schistosoma mansoni Low Worm Burden: Towards an Elimination of Doubts about the Concept of Trace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Marcos Zech Coelho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnostic techniques for schistosomiasis are essential for prevalence determination and identification of positive patients. A point-of-care test for detecting schistosome circulating cathodic antigen (POC-CCA has been evaluated for its accuracy in different endemic regions. This reagent strip/dipstick based assay has showed high sensitivity for individuals with high or moderate worm burden, but the interpretation of light infections is less clear, especially for trace readings.We introduced a urine lyophilization step to the POC-CCA assay to improve its sensitivity and clarify the interpretation of traces. We evaluated POC-CCA sensitivity and specificity within individuals with low parasite burdens in a Brazilian endemic area where a high number of traces were detected. Patients that were positive for other helminths were also evaluated for cross reactions. In all cases, a combined parasitological diagnosis using Kato-Katz (24 slides and Saline Gradient (1 g of feces were used as reference. At baseline, diagnosis by POC-CCA (1-2 cassettes showed 6% sensitivity, inaccurately predicting a low prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni infections (2 POC-CCA positives/32 egg positives. After urine lyophilization, the sensitivity was increased significantly (p < 0.05. Prevalence rates changed from 2% to 32% (27 POC-CCA positives/32 egg positives, equivalent to parasitological techniques. Most of the trace readings changed to positive after lyophilization while some negatives turned into traces. Cross reaction analysis confirmed the specificity of POC-CCA.Trace readings cannot be primarily defined as positive or negative cases. It is critical to verify case-by-case by concentrating urine 10 fold by lyophilization for the diagnosis. Following lyophilization, persistent trace readings should be read as negatives. No trained technician is needed and cost is restricted to the cost of a lyophilizer and the electricity to run it.

  19. Copper naphthenate treatments for engineered wood composite panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J W; Barnes, H M

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports on preliminary investigation of the properties of randomly oriented strandboard which had waterborne or powdered copper naphthenate incorporated into the board during manufacture. When compared to zinc borate-treated controls, the mechanical properties of strandboard were not adversely affected by treatment with either form of copper naphthenate. In general, values for mechanical properties followed the trend untreated controls > waterborne CuN = powdered CuN > ZnB. Water absorption and dimensional properties followed a similar trend. This preliminary study suggests that CuN is a viable alternative treatment for engineered wood composites. PMID:16226025

  20. Strength and stiffness of thermally rectified eucalyptus wood under compression

    OpenAIRE

    Marcio Rogério da Silva; Gilmara de Oliveira Machado; José Otávio Brito; Carlito Calil Junior

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of the thermal-rectification process of reforestation wood Corymbia citriodora Hook by measuring of mechanical properties under compression parallel to the grain and also determining of chemical composition. The tested samples were thermally treated in a furnace with nitrogen-atmosphere at heating rate of 0.033 ºC.min-1, at temperatures of 160, 180, 200, 220 and 240 ºC. The chemical components and mechanical properties were affected with the thermal rec...

  1. STUDY OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF WOOD POLYACRYLONITRILE COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abid Ali

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Wood polyacrolonitrile composite (WPC from neem ,mango andcork wood was synthesized. The process was carried out through benzoyl peroxide(0.05mol/lcatalyzed impregnation polymerization of acrylonitrile,4mol/l,6mol/l into cork woodand mango wood in benzene medium at 75+-10c.The properties of WPCs over untreated woods were evaluated in terms of compressive test ,hardness of wood were improvedwith impregnation of polyacrylonitrile .Impregnation of polyacyrlonitrile (PAN into neem wood,mango wood and cork woods were was confirmed through scanning electron microscope.

  2. Wood for energy production. Technology - environment - economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serup, H.; Falster, H.; Gamborg, C. [and others

    1999-10-01

    `Wood for Energy Production`, 2nd edition, is a readily understood guide to the application of wood in the Danish energy supply. The first edition was named `Wood Chips for Energy Production`. It describes the wood fuel from forest to consumer and provides a concise introduction to technological, environmental, and financial matters concerning heating systems for farms, institutions, district heating plants, and CHP plants. The individual sections deal with both conventional, well known technology, as well as the most recent technological advances in the field of CHP production. The purpose of this publication is to reach the largest possible audiance, and it is designed so that the layman may find its background information of special relevance. `Wood for Energy Production` is also available in German and Danish. (au)

  3. Particulate emissions from residential wood combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Tarelho, Luis A. C.;

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) in fireplaces and conventional appliances is the main contributor to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions in Denmark and Portugal representing more than 30% of the total emissions [1;2]. Such estimations are uncertain concerning the wood consumption.......5 emissions within a specific “wood burning living area”, but one Danish study exists [4]. In previous inventories distinct combustion air operation modes and the growing penetration of automate wood-burning stoves have not been considered. The present work aims to discuss opportunities for improving...... Portuguese combustion practices in laboratory tests. This study highlights that the previous PM2.5 emission inventories in Denmark and Portugal did not consider the possible variations on fuel moisture, dimensions of wood-logs and air-inlet operation patterns, although they are very important, especially...

  4. Wood for energy production. Technology - environment - economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Wood for Energy Production', 2nd edition, is a readily understood guide to the application of wood in the Danish energy supply. The first edition was named 'Wood Chips for Energy Production'. It describes the wood fuel from forest to consumer and provides a concise introduction to technological, environmental, and financial matters concerning heating systems for farms, institutions, district heating plants, and CHP plants. The individual sections deal with both conventional, well known technology, as well as the most recent technological advances in the field of CHP production. The purpose of this publication is to reach the largest possible audiance, and it is designed so that the layman may find its background information of special relevance. 'Wood for Energy Production' is also available in German and Danish. (au)

  5. Penetration of deltamethrin in micro-emulsion formulation after injection in wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esser, P.M.; Suitela, W.L.D.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands (and some other European Countries) the remedial treatment of Death watch beetle is stil) a problem. This is because the larvae of this insect pen-etrate the centra) heartwood of mainly large Oak beams. The heartwood is difficult to treat. The preventive treatment of wood boring i

  6. The role of natural wood constituents on the anaerobic treatability of forest industry wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra-Alvarez, R.

    1990-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment has been shown to be an efficient and energy conserving method for treating various types of readily biodegradable non-inhibitory forest industry wastewaters. However, the high toxicity of paper mill effluents derived from chemical wood processing operations has hampered the wide

  7. Wood Identification of 18th Century Furniture. Interpreting Wood Naming Inventoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Astrid BERNAL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The 18th century Portuguese church furniture represents an extraordinary richness recognised worldwide, which demands safeguarding and valorisation. The identification of the wood of furniture artworks is the most important component for its comprehension and preservation. In this work wood anatomical characters of an 18th century Portuguese decorative furniture set from the Colegiada de São Martinho de Cedofeita, in Porto, were analysed to identify the woods used for manufacturing and to clarify their common names. Furthermore, the objectives were to recognise some of the criteria for choice of wood as well as the source of each wood. The woods identified from 16 fragments belong to Apuleia sp., Acacia sp., Neolamarckia sp. and Castanea sativa. Apuleia sp. and Acacia sp. woods most likely arrived from Brazil, while the Neolamarckia sp. woods likely arrived from India and the C. sativa woods from Portugal. The results are in accordance with the known Portuguese colonial sea routes of the 15th -18th centuries. Interestingly the terms found in the inventories can refer to finishing methods instead to the name of the woods, as for instance “oil wood” can refer to “oiled wood” or “linseed oiled wood”. The species choice may be related to the mechanical properties of the wood as well as the original tree size. Two large planks of Acacia sp. were used for the top of the “Portuguese arcaz”, and Apuleia sp. was found on main structural elements of this set of furniture, suggesting that wood colour was also important. Woods from Neolamarckia sp. and C. sativa, were also identified, being Castanea wood present only in the most recent pieces of the furniture set.

  8. Evaluation of potentical use of the wood of Schizolobium amazonicum “Paricá” and Cecropia hololeuca “Embaúba” for wood cement board manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Yurk da Rocha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was developed to evaluate the potential use of Schizolobium amazonicum “Paricá” and Cecropia hololeuca “Embaúba” wood for wood cement board manufacture. Panels with the density of 1.200 kg/m³ were made, using cement CP V ARI as mineral bonding and wood particles without treatment and treated with immersion in cold water, hot water and sodium hydroxide. The panels were pressed at the pressure of 40 kgf/cm², room temperature and press / clipping time of 24 hours and maturation time of 28 days. The evaluation of the properties of water absorption, thickness swelling, internal bond, modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture, showed that Schizolobium amazonicum “Paricá” and Cecropia hololeuca “Embaúba” wood are technically feasible for wood-cement board manufacture. It was also found that the panels of embaúba exhibit some properties superior to those of the paricá, and the particles do not necessarily need treatment.

  9. Plantetilgjengelighet av kobber, krom og arsen i jord gjødslet med askeresten fra cca-impregnert og mikrobølgepyrolysert trevirke.

    OpenAIRE

    Hildonen, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Sammendrag Målet med denne oppgaven var å bestemme biotilgjengeligheten og planteopptaket av kobber (Cu), krom (Cr) og arsen (As) i askeresten fra Cu-, Cr- og As-impregnert (cca-impregnert) og mikrobølgepyrolysert trevirke. Dette for å undersøke om asken fra biooljeproduksjon med mikrobølgepyrolyse som teknikk, kan tilbakeføres til jorden som et gjødsels- og jordforbedringsprodukt når forurenset trevirke blir benyttet som råstoff. Forsøket ble satt opp i form av et kontrollert pottef...

  10. Changes Caused by Heat Treatment in Color and Dimensional Stability of Beech (Fagus sylvatica L. Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Barboutis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal modification of wood permanently alters several of its chemical and physical properties. Beech wood is one of the most important hardwoods in Central and Eastern Europe and is extensively used in furniture production. In this study the effects of thermal modification of beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L. on hygroscopic properties were examined and the color changes of the treated wood were determined. Beech wood has been subjected to a heat treatment at the temperature of 180 °C for five different durations ranging from 2 to 10 h. A more intense, gradual color change of the treated samples was observed after 4-h treatment, whereas in some other cases the recorded alterations were less intense. The most pronounced color differentiations compared to untreated samples occurred in 8-h and 10-h treatments. Dimensional stability and absorption were measured after 1-h, 3-h, 6-h, 1 day and 3 days immersion in water. The 8-h treatment duration exhibits the greatest reduction of swelling and absorption percentage.

  11. Quantitative wood anatomy - practical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg evon Arx

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative wood anatomy analyzes the variability of xylem anatomical features in trees, shrubs and herbaceous species to address research questions related to plant functioning, growth and environment. Among the more frequently considered anatomical features are lumen dimensions and wall thickness of conducting cells, fibers and several ray properties. The structural properties of each xylem anatomical feature are mostly fixed once they are formed, and define to a large extent its functionality, including transport and storage of water, nutrients, sugars and hormones, and providing mechanical support. The anatomical features can often be localized within an annual growth ring, which allows to establish intra-annual past and present structure-function relationships and its sensitivity to environmental variability. However, there are many methodological obstacles to overcome when aiming at producing (large data sets of xylem anatomical data.Here we describe the different steps from wood sample collection to xylem anatomical data, provide guidance and identify pitfalls, and present different image-analysis tools for the quantification of anatomical features, in particular conducting cells. We show that each data production step from sample collection in the field, microslide preparation in the lab, image capturing through an optical microscope and image analysis with specific tools can readily introduce measurement errors between 5 to 30% and more, whereby the magnitude usually increases the smaller the anatomical features. Such measurement errors – if not avoided or corrected – may make it impossible to extract meaningful xylem anatomical data in light of the rather small range of variability in many anatomical features as observed, for example, within time series of individual plants. Following a rigid protocol and quality control as proposed in this paper is thus mandatory to use quantitative data of xylem anatomical features as a powerful

  12. Implementation of new technologies in wood industry and their effect in wood products quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELVA ÇAUSHI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There are about 300 companies producing furniture and about 250 small and medium enterprises (SME producing sawn timber, which operate in the field of wood industry in Albania. This wood industry production is being challenged by the increasing demand in the domestic market, ranging from kitchen furniture to office and schools furniture, bedroom furniture, doors, windows, and saw timber in different dimensions. The production from the wood industry can fulfill about 80% of the domestic market demand. The remaining 20% of domestic market needs in wood furniture are afforded by import. Small entities do not make serious investment in technology. Big enterprises such as Ardeno in Tirana, Biçaku in Durres, Shaga in Tirana, Ital-wood in Elbasan, Dafinori in Shkoder, etc., have made remarkable investments in their technology. They have installed several mechanized lines of production. So, Ital-wood has invested in a mechanized saw timber production line; Bicaku in wood panels coated with PVC lines; Dafinori in a wood handrail production technologic line; Ardeno in wooden chairs production technologic lines, and Shaga in the production of furniture with particle panels. These enterprises are using modern numerical command machines, vacuum presses for gluing PVC, cutting equipment for panels with laser ray, finishing lines with electrostatic field, modern lines of pneumatic transport for wood dust etc. These investments in new technologies have increased the quantity and quality of native wood products.

  13. Propagation behavior of acoustic wave in wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huadong Xu; Guoqi Xu; Lihai Wang; Lei Yu

    2014-01-01

    We used acoustic tests on a quarter-sawn poplar timbers to study the effects of wood anisotropy and cavity defects on acoustic wave velocity and travel path, and we investigated acoustic wave propagation behavior in wood. The timber specimens were first tested in unmodified condition and then tested after introduction of cavity defects of varying sizes to quantify the transmitting time of acoustic waves in laboratory conditions. Two-dimensional acoustic wave contour maps on the radial section of specimens were then simulated and analyzed based on the experimental data. We tested the relationship between wood grain and acoustic wave velocity as waves passed in various directions through wood. Wood anisotropy has significant effects on both velocity and travel path of acoustic waves, and the velocity of waves passing longitudinally through timbers exceeded the radial velocity. Moreover, cavity defects altered acoustic wave time contours on radial sections of timbers. Acous-tic wave transits from an excitation point to the region behind a cavity in defective wood more slowly than in intact wood.

  14. Utilisation of Estonian energy wood resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the end of the Soviet period in the 1980s, a long-term energy programme for Estonia was worked out. The energy system was planned to be based on nuclear power and the share of domestic alternative sources of energy was low. The situation has greatly changed after the re-establishment of the Estonian independence, and now wood and peat fuels play an important role in the energy system. Energy consumption in Estonia decreased during the period 1970-1993, but this process has less influenced the consumption of domestic renewable fuels - peat and wood. It means that the share of these fuels has grown. The investment on substitution of imported fossil fuels and on conversion of boiler plants from fossil fuels to domestic fuels has reached the level of USD 100 million. The perspectives of the wood energy depend mainly on two factors; the resources and the price of wood energy compared with other fuels. The situation in wood market influences both the possible quantities and the price. It is typical that the quickly growing cost of labour power in Estonia is greatly affecting the price of energy wood. Though the price level of fuel peat and wood chips is lower than the world market price today, the conditions for using biofuels could be more favourable, if higher environmental fees were introduced. In conjunction with increasing utilisation of biofuels it is important to evaluate possible emissions or removal of greenhouse gases from Estonian forests 3 refs

  15. Utilisation of Estonian energy wood resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muiste, P.; Tullus, H.; Uri, V. [Estonian Agricultural University, Tartu (Estonia)

    1996-12-31

    In the end of the Soviet period in the 1980s, a long-term energy programme for Estonia was worked out. The energy system was planned to be based on nuclear power and the share of domestic alternative sources of energy was low. The situation has greatly changed after the re-establishment of the Estonian independence, and now wood and peat fuels play an important role in the energy system. Energy consumption in Estonia decreased during the period 1970-1993, but this process has less influenced the consumption of domestic renewable fuels - peat and wood. It means that the share of these fuels has grown. The investment on substitution of imported fossil fuels and on conversion of boiler plants from fossil fuels to domestic fuels has reached the level of USD 100 million. The perspectives of the wood energy depend mainly on two factors; the resources and the price of wood energy compared with other fuels. The situation in wood market influences both the possible quantities and the price. It is typical that the quickly growing cost of labour power in Estonia is greatly affecting the price of energy wood. Though the price level of fuel peat and wood chips is lower than the world market price today, the conditions for using biofuels could be more favourable, if higher environmental fees were introduced. In conjunction with increasing utilisation of biofuels it is important to evaluate possible emissions or removal of greenhouse gases from Estonian forests 3 refs.

  16. Solvolytic liquefaction of wood under mild conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.M.

    1982-04-01

    Conversion of wood to liquid products requires cleavage of bonds which crosslink the wood structure. This study examines a low-severity wood solubilization process utilizing a solvent medium consisting of a small amount of sulfuric acid and a potentially wood-derivable alcohol. In one half hour of reaction time at 250/sup 0/C under 15 psia starting nitrogen pressure, over 95% of the wood (maf) was rendered acetone-soluble. The product is a soft, black, bitumen-like solid at room temperature but readily softens at 140/sup 0/C. Between 25 and 50% of the original wood oxygen, depending on alcohol used, was removed as water. Approximately 2 to 17% of the alcohols were retained in the product. Gel permeation chromatography showed that the product's median molecular weight is around 300. Based on experimental and literature results, a mechanism for wood solubilization is proposed. This involves protonation of the etheric oxygen atoms, leading to subsequent bond scission to form carbonium ions which are stabilized by solvent alkoxylation. At severe conditions, polymerization and condensation reactions result in acetone-insoluble materials.

  17. Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chave, Jerome; Coomes, David; Jansen, Steven; Lewis, Simon L; Swenson, Nathan G; Zanne, Amy E

    2009-04-01

    Wood performs several essential functions in plants, including mechanically supporting aboveground tissue, storing water and other resources, and transporting sap. Woody tissues are likely to face physiological, structural and defensive trade-offs. How a plant optimizes among these competing functions can have major ecological implications, which have been under-appreciated by ecologists compared to the focus they have given to leaf function. To draw together our current understanding of wood function, we identify and collate data on the major wood functional traits, including the largest wood density database to date (8412 taxa), mechanical strength measures and anatomical features, as well as clade-specific features such as secondary chemistry. We then show how wood traits are related to one another, highlighting functional trade-offs, and to ecological and demographic plant features (growth form, growth rate, latitude, ecological setting). We suggest that, similar to the manifold that tree species leaf traits cluster around the 'leaf economics spectrum', a similar 'wood economics spectrum' may be defined. We then discuss the biogeography, evolution and biogeochemistry of the spectrum, and conclude by pointing out the major gaps in our current knowledge of wood functional traits. PMID:19243406

  18. THE DENSITY AND SHRINKAGE BEHAVIOR OF Eucalyptus grandis WOOD SUBMITTED TO DIFERENT TEMPERATURES OF THERMORETIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    José Otávio Brito; José Nivaldo Garcia; Geraldo Bortoletto Júnior; Antonio Maria das Chagas Pessoa; Paulo H. Müller da Silva

    2006-01-01

    This research deals with the evaluation of the behavior of thermorectificated wood of Eucalyptus grandis, in relation itsdensity and shrinkage. To evaluate these aspects, it was used a totally random experimental outline, with 5 treatments (A - woodthermorectificated (wt) at 120 ºC; B wt at 140 ºC; C wt at 160 ºC; D wt at 180 ºC; E - wt at 200 ºC) and 30 replications. The resultsindicated that, in statistical terms, the density of wood thermally treated is not different from that obtained fro...

  19. Residential and biological exposure assessment of chemicals from a wood treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, James; Takhar, Harpreet; Schecter, Arnold; Schmidt, Reynold; Horsak, Randy; Paepke, Olaf; Warshaw, Raphael; Lee, Alexander; Anderson-Mahoney, Pamela

    2007-04-01

    This paper evaluates the results of contamination of residents and residential homes located in close proximity to a Wood Treatment Plant. The plant has produced treated wood products continuously since 1904. The principle chemicals used to treat the wood, which is primarily used for railroad ties (oblong objects laid perpendicular to the rails to act as a base for the tracks), are creosote and pentachlorophenol. For a number of years, the plant burned treated waste wood products containing creosote and pentachlorophenol. First the plant pressure impregnates the wood with creosote and pentachlorophenol, and then the wood is stacked on open ground to allow it to air dry. Chemicals from recently treated wood ties are allowed to evaporate into the air or drip onto the ground surrounding the stacked wood. Small drainage ditches carry the liquid wastes into larger water channels where eventually the waste streams are discharged into a river adjacent to the plant. The river serves as a source of drinking water for the nearby community. Prevailing wind patterns favor a drift of air emissions from the plant's boiler stack over the nearby community and its residents. Over the past few years, the town's residents have become increasingly concerned about their health status and have voiced concerns regarding multiple health problems (including cancer), possibly associated with plant discharges. The intention of this study is to examine a representative sample of the potentially affected residents and to evaluate their residential environment for the presence of dioxin and/or its congeners. Data obtained from EPA's Toxic Release Information (TRI) database revealed the plant routinely discharged creosote, pentachlorophenol, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds into the ambient air via fugitive air emissions and surface waste waters. Sampling of household dust and water sediment within and outside of residences within a 2-mile radius of the plant revealed the presence of

  20. Evaluation in vitro of the infection times of engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus by the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema glaseri CCA strain Avaliação in vitro dos tempos de infecção de fêmeas ingurgitadas de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus pelo nematoide entomopatogênico Steinernema glaseri estirpe CCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Barbiéri de Carvalho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that ticks are susceptible to infection by entomopathogenic nematodes. These studies indicate different susceptibilities of ticks to infection by these fungi, depending on the tick species, development phase, entomopathogenic nematodes species and strains and the time the ticks are exposed to them. Usually this period ranges from 24 to 72 hours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the infection times in vitro of engorged Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus females by the entomopathogenic nematodes Steinernema glaseri CCA strain, by analysis of the ticks' biological parameters. The results show that a 2-hour exposure time was sufficient for the engorged R. microplus females to be infected by S. glaseri CCA, but that a minimum exposure time of 24 hours was necessary to generate treatment efficacy above 90%.Os carrapatos são susceptíveis à infecção por nematoides entomopatogênicos. Essa susceptibilidade diverge quanto às espécies de carrapato estudadas, à fase evolutiva, às espécies e estirpes dos nematoides e ao tempo ao qual os carrapatos ficam expostos a estes. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os tempos de infecção in vitro de fêmeas ingurgitadas de Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus pelo nematoide entomopatogênico Steinernema glaseri estirpe CCA, pela análise dos parâmetros biológicos do carrapato. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que um período de duas horas de exposição foi suficiente para que fêmeas ingurgitadas de R. microplus fossem infectadas por S. glaseri CCA e que um período de exposição mínimo de 24h foi necessário para que houvesse infecção de fêmeas ingurgitadas de R. microplus por S. glaseri estirpe CCA, capaz de gerar, in vitro, eficácia no tratamento superior a 90%.

  1. Mathematical modelling of wood and briquettes torrefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfli, Felix Fonseca; Luengo, Carlos Alberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Gleb Wataghin. Grupo Combustiveis Alternativos; Soler, Pedro Beaton [Universidad de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba). Fac. de Ingenieria Mecanica. Centro de Estudios de Eficiencia Energetica; Rocha, Jose Dilcio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Nucleo Interdisciplinar de Planejamento Energetico (NIPE)

    2004-07-01

    A mathematical model valid for the torrefaction of wood logs and biomass briquettes is presented. The model described both chemical and physical processes, which take place in a moist piece of wood heated at temperatures between 503 and 573 K. Calibration measurements of the temperature profile and mass loss, were performed on dry cylinders of wood samples during torrefaction in an inert atmosphere at 503, 533, and 553 K. The calculated data shows a good agreement with experiments. The model can be a useful tool to estimate projecting and operating parameters for torrefaction furnaces such as minimum time of torrefaction, energy consumption and the mass yield. (author)

  2. Coal and wood fuel for electricity production: An environmentally sound solution for waste and demolition wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninks, F.W.M. [EPON, Zwolle (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    Waste wood from primary wood processing and demolition presents both a problem and a potential. If disposed in landfills, it consumes large volumes and decays, producing CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases. As an energy source used in a coal fired power plant it reduces the consumption of fossil fuels reducing the greenhouse effect significantly. Additional advantages are a reduction of the ash volume and the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. The waste wood requires collection, storage, processing and burning. This paper describes a unique project which is carried out in the Netherlands at EPON`s Gelderland Power Plant (635 MW{sub e}) where 60 000 tonnes of waste and demolition wood will be used annually. Special emphasis is given to the processing of the powdered wood fuel. Therefore, most waste and demolition wood can be converted from an environmental liability to an environmental and economic asset. (author)

  3. Isolation of levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oil derived from wood or waste newsprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Luc

    1995-01-01

    A method is provided for preparing high purity levoglucosan from lignocellulosic pyrolysis oils derived from wood or waste newsprint. The method includes reducing wood or newsprint to fine particle sizes, treating the particles with a hot mineral acid for a predetermined period of time, and filtering off and drying resulting solid wood or newsprint material; pyrolyzing the dried solid wood or newsprint material at temperatures between about 350.degree. and 375.degree. C. to produce pyrolysis oils; treating the oils to liquid-liquid extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone to remove heavy tar materials from the oils, and to provide an aqueous fraction mixture of the oils containing primarily levoglucosan; treating the aqueous fraction mixtures with a basic metal salt in an amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of about 12 to about 12.5 and adding an amount of the salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range to remove colored materials of impurities from the oil and form a slurry, and freeze-drying the resulting slurry to produce a dry solid residue; and extracting the levoglucosan from the residue using ethyl acetate solvent to produce a purified crystalline levoglucosan.

  4. Overview of Wood-based Panel Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The production of wood-based panel was presented firstly in this paper. Some features of China’s wood-based panel industry were reviewed, including production bases, raw materials and main markets of wood-based panel. In addition, the trade flow of wood-based panel was described in the end.

  5. An Overview of the Biology of Reaction Wood Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Du; Fukuju Yamamoto

    2007-01-01

    Reaction wood possesses altered properties and performs the function of regulating a tree's form, but it is a serious defect in wood utility. Trees usually develop reaction wood in response to a gravistimulus. Reaction wood in gymnosperms is referred to as compression wood and develops on the lower side of leaning stems or branches.In arboreal, dicotyledonous angiosperms, however, it is called tension wood and is formed on the upper side of the leaning. Exploring the biology of reaction wood formation is of great value for the understanding of the wood differentiation mechanisms, cambial activity, gravitropism, and the systematics and evolution of plants. After giving an outline of the variety of wood and properties of reaction wood, this review lays emphasis on various stimuli for reaction wood induction and the extensive studies carried out so far on the roles of plant hormones in reaction wood formation. Inconsistent results have been reported for the effects of plant hormones. Both auxin and ethylene regulate the formation of compression wood in gymnosperms. However, the role of ethylene may be indirect as exogenous ethylene cannot induce compression wood formation. Tension wood formation is mainly regulated by auxin and gibberellin. Interactions among hormones and other substances may play important parts in the regulation of reaction wood formation.

  6. Finite Element Analysis Of Boron Diffusion In Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Hoffmeyer, Preben; Bechgaard, Carl;

    2002-01-01

    The coupled heat and mass transfer equations for air, water and heat transfer are supplemented with a conservation equation for an additional species representing the concentration of boron in wood. Boundary conditions for wood-air. wood-soil and wood-boron interfaces arc discussed and finally...

  7. Evaluation and optimization of the Circulating Cathodic Antigen (POC-CCA) cassette test for detecting Schistosoma mansoni infection by using image analysis in school children in Mwanza Region, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partal, Miriam Casacuberta; Kinunghi, Safari; Vennervald, Birgitte J;

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for diagnostic techniques which are sensitive, specific, rapid and easy to perform at the point-of-care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the Circulating Cathodic Antigen (POC-CCA) assay for Schistosoma mansoni in four schools along the coast...... from a urine collected in the morning and a urine taken at midday after drinking 0.5 L of water. The main study was conducted among 404 school children (aged 9-12 years) where stool and urine samples were collected for three consecutive days. For S. mansoni diagnosis, stool samples were examined...... for eggs with duplicate Kato-Katz smears, whereas urine samples were tested for presence of antigen by POC-CCA. The proportion of positive individuals for S. mansoni by one POC-CCA was higher compared to two Kato-Katz smears (66.1% vs. 28.7%; p

  8. ADHESIVE-FREE WOOD JOINTS – PART I: SESSILE OAK WOOD (Quercus petraea L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramona-Elena DUMITRAȘCU

    2015-01-01

    act: Wood as a raw material is indispensable in various human activities. Its investigation is inexhaustible and its responsible valorization, in accordance with current requirements for re-use and subsequent re-integration, is a priority at national level. Rotational friction as an alternative method of joining wood elements or wooden structures has not been addressed in Romania until now, even if it has been under investigation during the past 15 years in the wood field. T...

  9. LCA-based optimization of wood utilization under special consideration of a cascading use of wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglmeier, Karin; Steubing, Bernhard; Weber-Blaschke, Gabriele; Richter, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Cascading, the use of the same unit of a resource in multiple successional applications, is considered as a viable means to improve the efficiency of resource utilization and to decrease environmental impacts. Wood, as a regrowing but nevertheless limited and increasingly in demand resource, can be used in cascades, thereby increasing the potential efficiency per unit of wood. This study aims to assess the influence of cascading wood utilization on optimizing the overall environmental impact of wood utilization. By combining a material flow model of existing wood applications - both for materials provision and energy production - with an algebraic optimization tool, the effects of the use of wood in cascades can be modelled and quantified based on life cycle impact assessment results for all production processes. To identify the most efficient wood allocation, the effects of a potential substitution of non-wood products were taken into account in a part of the model runs. The considered environmental indicators were global warming potential, particulate matter formation, land occupation and an aggregated single score indicator. We found that optimizing either the overall global warming potential or the value of the single score indicator of the system leads to a simultaneous relative decrease of all other considered environmental impacts. The relative differences between the impacts of the model run with and without the possibility of a cascading use of wood were 7% for global warming potential and the single score indicator, despite cascading only influencing a small part of the overall system, namely wood panel production. Cascading led to savings of up to 14% of the annual primary wood supply of the study area. We conclude that cascading can improve the overall performance of a wood utilization system. PMID:25660355

  10. Comparative LCA of Wood from Conventional Forestry and Wood from Short Rotation Coppice

    OpenAIRE

    Kunstmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide there is an increasing demand of natural resources. In future, non renewable resources get substituted by renewable resources in the energetic sector as well as in the material sector. That implies a stronger usage of renewable resources especially - wood. In 2009 there was a usage of 77 million cubic meters of wood for material applications and a quantity of 55 million cubic meters for energetic applications in Germany alone. Furthermore, there is an increasing demand on wood for e...

  11. A geographical analysis of the Swedish wood fuel market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geographical variation in Swedish wood fuel market characteristics for the district heating sector has been studied using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and cross-sectional Tobit analysis. The results indicate that local availability and competition for wood fuels influence the wood fuel consumption at inland heating plants. The factors affecting the decision to use wood fuel at heating plants close to seaports, however, were not captured by the model, suggesting that coastal location reduces dependency on the local wood fuel market. The effects of changes in local wood fuel availability on wood fuel use by an inland heating plant are presented and discussed

  12. Micronized Copper Wood Preservatives: Efficacy of Ion, Nano, and Bulk Copper against the Brown Rot Fungus Rhodonia placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Civardi

    Full Text Available Recently introduced micronized copper (MC formulations, consisting of a nanosized fraction of basic copper (Cu carbonate (CuCO3·Cu(OH2 nanoparticles (NPs, were introduced to the market for wood protection. Cu NPs may presumably be more effective against wood-destroying fungi than bulk or ionic Cu compounds. In particular, Cu- tolerant wood-destroying fungi may not recognize NPs, which may penetrate into fungal cell walls and membranes and exert their impact. The objective of this study was to assess if MC wood preservative formulations have a superior efficacy against Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungi due to nano effects than conventional Cu biocides. After screening a range of wood-destroying fungi for their resistance to Cu, we investigated fungal growth of the Cu-tolerant fungus Rhodonia placenta in solid and liquid media and on wood treated with MC azole (MCA. In liquid cultures we evaluated the fungal response to ion, nano and bulk Cu distinguishing the ionic and particle effects by means of the Cu2+ chelator ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM and measuring fungal biomass, oxalic acid production and laccase activity of R. placenta. Our results do not support the presence of particular nano effects of MCA against R. placenta that would account for an increased antifungal efficacy, but provide evidence that attribute the main effectiveness of MCA to azoles.

  13. Micronized Copper Wood Preservatives: Efficacy of Ion, Nano, and Bulk Copper against the Brown Rot Fungus Rhodonia placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Schubert, Mark; Fey, Angelika; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2015-01-01

    Recently introduced micronized copper (MC) formulations, consisting of a nanosized fraction of basic copper (Cu) carbonate (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2) nanoparticles (NPs), were introduced to the market for wood protection. Cu NPs may presumably be more effective against wood-destroying fungi than bulk or ionic Cu compounds. In particular, Cu- tolerant wood-destroying fungi may not recognize NPs, which may penetrate into fungal cell walls and membranes and exert their impact. The objective of this study was to assess if MC wood preservative formulations have a superior efficacy against Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungi due to nano effects than conventional Cu biocides. After screening a range of wood-destroying fungi for their resistance to Cu, we investigated fungal growth of the Cu-tolerant fungus Rhodonia placenta in solid and liquid media and on wood treated with MC azole (MCA). In liquid cultures we evaluated the fungal response to ion, nano and bulk Cu distinguishing the ionic and particle effects by means of the Cu2+ chelator ammonium tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) and measuring fungal biomass, oxalic acid production and laccase activity of R. placenta. Our results do not support the presence of particular nano effects of MCA against R. placenta that would account for an increased antifungal efficacy, but provide evidence that attribute the main effectiveness of MCA to azoles. PMID:26554706

  14. Effects of Mixing Temperature and Wood Powder Size on Mechanical Properties of Wood Plastic Recycled Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Tsunehisa; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojiro, Keisuke; Kanayama, Kozo; Yamamoto, Ken

    In this study, wood (cedar) powder ranging from 53 µm to 1 mm sizes, recycled polypropylene (PP) / polyethylene (PE) and acid-modified PP as a compatibilization agent were used to produce a wood-plastic recycled composite (WPRC). For discussing the effects of the wood powder sizes on the mechanical properties of the WPRC, a mixing process of the wood powder and the plastics in a constant wood content of 50% weight was firstly performed by a mixing machine controlled temperature and rotation of mixing blade. And then, to obtain WPRC panels the wood and plastics mixtures were compressed in a mould under a constant pressure and a temperature for a certain holding time. WPRC specimens for mechanical tests were cut from the WPRC panels, and a tensile strength and a size-stability were acquired. The results show that the successful mixing process runs above 180°C, where the mixing torque required compounding keeps constant or slightly increases. The tensile strength of the WPRC increases when the smaller size of wood powder is used for wood/plastic compound under successful mixing conditions. It is shown from thickness change rate of specimens that mixing temperature of wood/plastic compound affects a size stability of the WPRC.

  15. Nitrogen immobilization by wood-chip application: Protecting water quality in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homyak, P.M.; Yanai, R.D.; Burns, Douglas A.; Briggs, R.D.; Germain, R.H.

    2008-01-01

    Forest harvesting disrupts the nitrogen cycle, which may affect stream water quality by increasing nitrate concentrations, reducing pH and acid neutralizing capacity, and mobilizing aluminum and base cations. We tested the application of wood chips derived from logging slash to increase immobilization of N after harvesting, which should reduce nitrate flux to streams. In August 2004, a stand of northern hardwoods was patch-clearcut in the Catskill Mountains, NY, and four replicates of three treatments were implemented in five 0.2-ha cut patches. Wood chips were applied to the soil surface at a rate equivalent to the amount of slash smaller than eight inches in diameter (1?? treatment). A second treatment doubled that rate (2??), and a third treatment received no chips (0??). Additionally, three uncut reference plots were established in nearby forested areas. Ion exchange resin bags and soil KCl-extractions were used to monitor nitrate availability in the upper 5-10 cm of soil approximately every seven weeks, except in winter. Resin bags indicated that the wood chips retained 30% or 42% of the nitrate pulse, while for KCl extracts, the retention rate was 78% or 100% of the difference between 0?? and uncut plots. During the fall following harvest, wood-chip treated plots had resin bag soil nitrate concentrations about 25% of those in 0?? plots (p = 0.0001). In the first growing season after the cut, nitrate concentrations in wood-chip treated plots for KCl extracts were 13% of those in 0?? treatments (p = 0.03) in May and about half those in 0?? treatments (p = 0.01) in July for resin bags. During spring snowmelt, however, nitrate concentrations were high and indistinguishable among treatments, including the uncut reference plots for resin bags and below detection limit for KCl extracts. Wood chips incubated in litterbags had an initial C:N of 125:1, which then decreased to 70:1 after one year of field incubation. These changes in C:N values indicate that the wood

  16. On the formaldehyde release of wood particles

    OpenAIRE

    Roffael, E.; Behn, C.; Dix, B.

    2012-01-01

    The emission of formaldehyde from softwood particles, as measured by the flask method (EN 717-3), depends highly on the particle size. Therefore, no definite value for the formaldehyde release from wood can be given.

  17. Wood recognition using image texture features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-jun Wang

    Full Text Available Inspired by theories of higher local order autocorrelation (HLAC, this paper presents a simple, novel, yet very powerful approach for wood recognition. The method is suitable for wood database applications, which are of great importance in wood related industries and administrations. At the feature extraction stage, a set of features is extracted from Mask Matching Image (MMI. The MMI features preserve the mask matching information gathered from the HLAC methods. The texture information in the image can then be accurately extracted from the statistical and geometrical features. In particular, richer information and enhanced discriminative power is achieved through the length histogram, a new histogram that embodies the width and height histograms. The performance of the proposed approach is compared to the state-of-the-art HLAC approaches using the wood stereogram dataset ZAFU WS 24. By conducting extensive experiments on ZAFU WS 24, we show that our approach significantly improves the classification accuracy.

  18. Moisture-driven fracture in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur; Olesen, John Forbes

    2011-01-01

    Moisture-induced fractures in solid timber create considerable problems for both building industries and sawmills. Cracks caused by kiln-drying of solid timber are extremely difficult to predict. This paper reports on experiments concerned with methods of reducing cracks in wood and with the crac......Moisture-induced fractures in solid timber create considerable problems for both building industries and sawmills. Cracks caused by kiln-drying of solid timber are extremely difficult to predict. This paper reports on experiments concerned with methods of reducing cracks in wood...... process, suggesting that sealing the ends of timber logs while in the green moisture state could considerably reduce the development of end-cracks. The initial moisture content and the shrinkage properties of the wood varied markedly from pith to bark. The importance of taking material inhomogeneities...... into account when modelling crack propagation in solid wood is emphasized. © 2011 Taylor & Francis....

  19. Wood ethanol and synthetic natural gas pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provided details of updates to the wood ethanol pathway recently added to the GHGenius model, an analytical tool used to analyze emissions from conventional and alternative fuel combustion processes. The pathway contains data developed by the United States Department of Energy. A number of co-products were added to the wood and agricultural residue pathways, including furfural, xylitol, lignin, and glycerol. New chemical inputs included nitrogen gas, ammonia, enzymes and yeast. Biological ethanol pathways were reviewed, and separate inputs for wood, agricultural residues, corn ethanol, and wheat ethanol were added. The model was updated to reflect current research conducted on the gasification of wood and the upgrading of the gas to produce pipeline quality natural gas. New process developments in producing pipeline quality gas from coal were also added. The ability to model enzyme consumption was added to all ethanol pathways. 25 refs., 41 tabs., 8 figs

  20. Supply of Rubber Wood Log in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Noraida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Issue on shortage of raw material for wood processing solved by discovery of rubber wood log as one of the substitutes the natural log. This paper examines the supply of rubber wood log in Malaysia. We employ ARDL Bound Approach Test and time series data from 1980 to 2010 which represented the whole Malaysia are used to achieve the established objectives. The result shown, in the long run harvested area and wages have 1% and 10% significant level respectively. While in the short run, there was only harvested area having an impact with 1% significant level. This result indicates that, the harvested area become the most impact towards supply of rubber wood log either in short run or in the long run. While wages as input cost gave less impact in another word it become unburden to the producers.

  1. Wood ethanol and synthetic natural gas pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-11-30

    This report provided details of updates to the wood ethanol pathway recently added to the GHGenius model, an analytical tool used to analyze emissions from conventional and alternative fuel combustion processes. The pathway contains data developed by the United States Department of Energy. A number of co-products were added to the wood and agricultural residue pathways, including furfural, xylitol, lignin, and glycerol. New chemical inputs included nitrogen gas, ammonia, enzymes and yeast. Biological ethanol pathways were reviewed, and separate inputs for wood, agricultural residues, corn ethanol, and wheat ethanol were added. The model was updated to reflect current research conducted on the gasification of wood and the upgrading of the gas to produce pipeline quality natural gas. New process developments in producing pipeline quality gas from coal were also added. The ability to model enzyme consumption was added to all ethanol pathways. 25 refs., 41 tabs., 8 figs.

  2. Overview of established and emerging treatment technologies for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at wood preserving facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contamination of soil and groundwater by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is common to wood preserving facilities and manufactured gas plants. Since the inception of RCRA and CERCLA, much attention has been focused upon the remediation of both active and defunct wood preserving facilities. The experiences gleaned from the use of proven technologies, and more importantly, the lessons being learned in the trials of emerging technologies on creosote-derived PAH clean-ups at wood preserving sites, should have direct bearing on the clean-up of similar contaminants at MGP sites. In this paper, a review of several remedial actions using waste removal/disposal, on-site incineration, and bioremediation will be presented. Additionally, emerging technologies for the treatment of PAH-contaminated soil and water will be reviewed. Lastly, recent information on risk assessment results for creosote sites and treated PAH waste will be discussed

  3. The effects of heat treatment on some technological properties of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Süleyman; Akgül, Mehmet; Dündar, Turker

    2008-04-01

    Heat treatment is often applied to wood species to improve their dimensional stability. This study examined the effect of heat treatment on certain mechanical properties of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), which has industrially high usage potential and large plantations in Turkey. Wood specimens obtained from Bolu, Turkey, were subjected to heat treatment under atmospheric pressure at varying temperatures (120, 150 and 180 degrees C) for varying durations (2, 6 and 10h). The test results of heat-treated Scots pine and control samples showed that technological properties including compression strength, bending strength, modulus of elasticity in bending, janka-hardness, impact bending strength and tension strength perpendicular to grain suffered with heat treatment, and increase in temperature and duration further diminished technological strength values of the wood specimens.

  4. Monitoring of hydroxyl groups in wood during heat treatment using NIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Katsuya; Inagaki, Tetsuya; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of thermally treated wood by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. In the NIR second derivative spectrum, the absorption band at 6913 cm(-1) appeared with the procession of heat treatment, which conclusively assigned to the phenolic hydroxyl groups due to the lignin in comparison with the spectrum of acetylated spruce wood. As a result of the changes in the ratio of the areal integral calculated from spectral separation in the region of hydroxyl groups (7200-6100 cm(-1)) by the Gauss-Newton method, it was clear that the degradation of hydroxyl group in the cellulose started predominantly from the amorphous region and followed to semicrystalline and crystalline region. There was an obvious correlation between the weight decrement of wood and the decrement of hydroxyl groups in the cellulose by heat treatment.

  5. China s Wood Industry after Joining WTO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    After reviewing the present status and prospects of wood industry in the world, the author suggests that in response to the new situation of economic globalization and China's entry into the WTO, the Chinese wood industry should further develop IT application, optimize and upgrade industrial structure and raise quality of labor force, blazing a new trail to industrialization featuring high scientific and technological content, good economic return, low resources consumption, little environmental polluti...

  6. Waste-Wood-Derived Fillers for Plastics

    OpenAIRE

    English, Brent; Clemons, Craig M.; Stark, Nicole; Schneider, James P.

    1996-01-01

    Filled thermoplastic composites are stiffer, stronger, and more dimensionally stable than their unfilled counterparts. Such thermoplastics are usually provided to the end-user as a precompounded, pelletized feedstock. Typical reinforcing fillers are inorganic materials like talc or fiberglass, but materials derived from waste wood, such as wood flour and recycled paper fiber, are also effective as fillers. The goal of this project was to generate commercial interest in using waste-wood–paper-...

  7. Adsorption of coper-ethanolamine preservatives in wood

    OpenAIRE

    Humar, Miha

    2008-01-01

    Copper-ethanolamine based preservatives are one of the most important wood preservatives for protection of wood in third and fourth use class. Despite the fact that they are commercially used for several years, complete mechanismof fixation in wood has been not resolved to date. It is clear that copper-ethanolamine system reacts with wood faster than copper-chromium based wood preservatives. It is not known, however, which parameters control this process of fixation and when it is finished. I...

  8. Treating Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Treating meningitis Steven Karceski, MD WHAT DID THE AUTHORS STUDY? ... study, “ Dexamethasone and long-term survival in bacterial meningitis, ” Dr. Fritz and his colleagues carefully evaluated 2 ...

  9. Effect of Wood Particle Size on the Properties of Wood/Polypropylene Composites Ⅰ:Mechanical Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The mechanical properties of wood powder/polypropy!ene composites with different wood particle sizes and wood species have been studied. All of the wood particie sizes increased the E-modulus of the composites. Tensile tests showed that wood partide sizes had a negative effect on the elongation at break and the tensile strength of the composites has been improved when wood particle sizes were be(ow 150 μm (below 100 mesh). For the impact tests, the wood partide sizes had a negative effect, but the MDF f...

  10. Wood zone plate fishnet metalens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazbayev Bakhtiyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresnel-zone plate lenses provide focusing performance while having low profile. Unfortunately, they usually display higher reflection losses than conventional dielectric lenses. Here, we demonstrate a low-profile Wood zone plate metalens based on the fishnet metamaterial working in a near-zero regime with an equivalent refractive index less than unity (nf = 0.51. The metalens is made of alternating dielectric and fishnet metamaterial concentric rings. The use of fishnet metamaterial allows reducing the reflections from the lens, while maintaining low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. The lens is designed to work at the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a focal length FL = 22.8 mm (7.5 λ0 aiming at antenna or radar system applications. The focusing performance of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2.5 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret metalens.

  11. Short rotation Wood Crops Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, L.L.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.

    1990-08-01

    This report synthesizes the technical progress of research projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program for the year ending September 30, 1989. The primary goal of this research program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, is the development of a viable technology for producing renewable feedstocks for conversion to biofuels. One of the more significant accomplishments was the documentation that short-rotation woody crops total delivered costs could be $40/Mg or less under optimistic but attainable conditions. By taking advantage of federal subsidies such as those offered under the Conservation Reserve Program, wood energy feedstock costs could be lower. Genetic improvement studies are broadening species performance within geographic regions and under less-than-optimum site conditions. Advances in physiological research are identifying key characteristics of species productivity and response to nutrient applications. Recent developments utilizing biotechnology have achieved success in cell and tissue culture, somaclonal variation, and gene-insertion studies. Productivity gains have been realized with advanced cultural studies of spacing, coppice, and mixed-species trials. 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  12. The effects of heat treatment on technological properties in Red-bud maple (Acer trautvetteri Medw.) wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Süleyman; Kök, M Samil; Korkut, Derya Sevim; Gürleyen, Tuğba

    2008-04-01

    Heat treatment is often used to improve the dimensional stability of wood. In this study, the effects of heat treatment on technological properties of Red-bud maple (Acer trautvetteri Medw.) wood were examined. Samples obtained from Düzce Forest Enterprises, Turkey, were subjected to heat treatment at varying temperatures (120 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 180 degrees C) and for varying durations (2h, 6h and 10h). The technological properties of heat-treated wood samples and control samples were tested. Compression strength parallel to grain, bending strength, modulus of elasticity in bending, janka-hardness, impact bending strength, and tension strength perpendicular to grain were determined. The results showed that technological strength values decreased with increasing treatment temperature and treatment times. Red-bud maple wood could be utilized by using proper heat treatment techniques with minimal losses in strength values in areas where working, and stability such as in window frames, are important factors.

  13. Effect of Heat Treatment Upon the Compression Strength of Black Pine and Spruce – A Comparison Between Wood Originating From Mature Trees Vs. Thinnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina OLARESCU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of anexperimental study performed with black pine (Pinusnigra L. and spruce (Picea abies L. wood, originatingfrom mature trees and thinnings cut from the sameparcel from the Stroesti-Arges region in Romania.After air drying and conditioning, the defect-freetest boards were cut into standard 20x20x60mmsamples for the compression test. The compressionstrength was measured and the rupture mode incompression was analyzed.Therefore, the sampleswere first dried to oven-dry state, then heat-treated athigh temperatures (180 and 200ºC for 1, 2, 3 and 4hours. Sets of 10 samples from each wood species,wood assortment and treating regime were tested.The obtained results were comparativelyanalyzed for the two species (pine vs. spruce and forthe two wood assortments (mature wood vs, thinwood. Then they were also expressed relatively tothe mass loss, considered to be the main indiactor ofthe degradation suffered by wood during the heattreatment.A graph was drawn for each species andassortment in order to establish the optimum treatingregime, considering the correlated influence of theheat treatment conditions upon all three analyzedproperties (mass loss, dimensional stability andcompression strength.The results of the present research are to bevalorized at the manufacturing of solid wood panelsmade from heat-treated lamellas.

  14. Removal of muscle artifact from EEG data: comparison between stochastic (ICA and CCA) and deterministic (EMD and wavelet-based) approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, Doha; Kachenoura, Amar; Albera, Laurent; Birot, Gwénaël; Karfoul, Ahmad; Pasnicu, Anca; Biraben, Arnaud; Wendling, Fabrice; Senhadji, Lotfi; Merlet, Isabelle

    2012-12-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings are often contaminated with muscle artifacts. This disturbing myogenic activity not only strongly affects the visual analysis of EEG, but also most surely impairs the results of EEG signal processing tools such as source localization. This article focuses on the particular context of the contamination epileptic signals (interictal spikes) by muscle artifact, as EEG is a key diagnosis tool for this pathology. In this context, our aim was to compare the ability of two stochastic approaches of blind source separation, namely independent component analysis (ICA) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA), and of two deterministic approaches namely empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and wavelet transform (WT) to remove muscle artifacts from EEG signals. To quantitatively compare the performance of these four algorithms, epileptic spike-like EEG signals were simulated from two different source configurations and artificially contaminated with different levels of real EEG-recorded myogenic activity. The efficiency of CCA, ICA, EMD, and WT to correct the muscular artifact was evaluated both by calculating the normalized mean-squared error between denoised and original signals and by comparing the results of source localization obtained from artifact-free as well as noisy signals, before and after artifact correction. Tests on real data recorded in an epileptic patient are also presented. The results obtained in the context of simulations and real data show that EMD outperformed the three other algorithms for the denoising of data highly contaminated by muscular activity. For less noisy data, and when spikes arose from a single cortical source, the myogenic artifact was best corrected with CCA and ICA. Otherwise when spikes originated from two distinct sources, either EMD or ICA offered the most reliable denoising result for highly noisy data, while WT offered the better denoising result for less noisy data. These results suggest that

  15. Plasma-chemical surface engineering of wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sokołowska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Wood infiltrated with nano-silica hydrosol forms a “weak”, irregular composite of components bound with hydrogen bonds only. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of low-energy ions bombardment on the structure and properties of the surface of this composite. The aim of these investigations was to produce a shallow “buried” layer of a dense wood-ceramic composite on a wood surface .Design/methodology/approach: D.c. glow-discharge in N2/H2 (9:11 atmosphere under a pressure of 4hPa was the source of ions. A beech plate was placed on the cathode. The temperature of wood was 200°C. The material collected from the wood-silica composite surface was investigated with FTIR spectroscopy and SEM observations. The surface energy was determined with the use of contact angle measurements.Findings: The ions influenced silica only. The nano-particles underwent sintering changing its medium size twice and a small I.R. peak of N2 trapped in SiO2 suggest the possibility of silica nitriding. A buried, continual surface layer of sintered silica did not form. The surface energy of the “wood-silica” plate was slightly decreased after plasma treatment.Research limitations/implications: The results proved the possibility of plasma treatment of wood even in a d.c. glow-discharge under low pressure. Silica sintering, a difficult process which in a thermal way has to be carried out at a temperature of 1000°C, taking place in a plasma at a temperature of 200°C showed the very special nature of an influence of ions.Originality/value: The plasma surface treatment of wood in the d.c. glow-discharge (GD under reduced pressure has not been investigated. There are only publications about glow-dielectric-barrier-discharge (GDBD at atmospheric pressure applications for wood surface modification. The energy of ions in GDBD is much smaller than that of ions in GD and therefore the application of glow discharge under reduced pressure to

  16. Climate effects of wood used for bioenergy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ros, Jan P.M.; Van Minnen, Jelle G. [Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency PBL, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Arets, Eric J.M.M. [Alterra, Wageningen University WUR, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    Wood growth and natural decay both take time, and this is an important aspect of sustainability assessments of wood used for energy. Wood taken from forests is a carbon-neutral energy source in the long term, but there are many examples of potential sources of wood used for bioenergy for which net emission reductions are not achieved in 10 to 40 years - the time frame for most climate policy mitigation targets. This is caused by two factors. The first factor relates to the fact that the carbon cycles of wood have a long time span. After final felling, CO2 fixation rates are initially relatively low, but increase again as forests regrow. This regrowth takes many years, sometimes more than a century. Wood residues can either be used or left in the forest. By using them, the emissions from the otherwise decaying residues (taking 2 to 30 years) would be avoided. The second factor concerns the fact that, if the wood is used for bioenergy, then fossil energy emissions are being avoided. However, the direct emission levels from bioenergy are higher than those related to the fossil energy it replaces. These additional emissions also have to be compensated. The carbon debt caused by both factors has to be paid back first, before actual emission reductions can be realised. For wood residues (from harvesting or thinning) that are used to replace coal or oil products, these payback times are relatively short, of the order of 5 to 25 years, mainly depending on location and type of residue (longer if they replace gas). This is also the case when using wood from salvage logging. In most cases, when using wood from final felling directly for energy production, payback times could be many decades to more than a century, with substantial increases in net CO2 emissions, in the meantime. This is especially the case for many forests in Europe, because they are currently an effective carbon sink. Additional felling reduces average growth rates in these forests and thus the sequestration

  17. Exposure to wood dust and endotoxin in small-scale wood industries in Tanzania.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongo, L.M.B.; Msamanga, G.I.; Burstyn, I.; Barten, F.J.M.H.; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Heederik, D.

    2004-01-01

    Workers in small-scale wood industries (SSWI) have increased risks of developing asthma and other respiratory diseases. Wood dust and microbial agents have both been suggested to play a role, but few studies have measured endotoxin exposure in SSWI in Africa. We assessed inhalable dust levels in 281

  18. Service Life Prediction of Wood Claddings by in-situ Measurement of Wood Moisture Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Lindegaard, Berit; Morsing, Niels

    2009-01-01

    of wood moisture are done by in-situ resistance moisture meters (Lindegaard and Morsing 2006). The aim is that the test should form the basis of evaluation of the maintenance requirements and the prediction of service life of the surface treatment and the wood/construction. At the moment 60 test racks...

  19. Differential Analysis and Functional Marker Development of Photoperiod Regulation Factor CCA1 from Two Chinese Cabbage Inbred Lines%大白菜光周期调控因子 CCA1的差异分析及功能标记开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志刚; 刘辰; 刘栓桃; 李巧云; 王晓; 王立华; 赵智中; 王淑芬; 徐文玲; 刘贤娴

    2016-01-01

    By the trend of photoperiod in spring and autumn,the sensibilities of two Chinese cabbage in-bred lines,06 -247 and He102,to photoperiod were identified.The 06 -247 was sensitive to long day, while He102 was opposite.The full -length cDNA sequence of photoperiod regulation factor CCA1 (Circadian clock associated 1 )from two lines were compared by homology -based cloning.It was revealed that there were two 6 -bp InDels and 14 non -synonymous SNPs between the CCA1 coding regions of 06 -247 and He102.The coding product had 552 and 556 amino acid residues respectively.The non -synonymous SNPs caused the exchange of amino acids with different property.The amino acid differences were mainly located in middle protein -protein interaction domain and C -terminal phosphorylation domain.The codominant molec-ular markers to distinguish the two 6 -bp InDels were developed and validated.The results provided founda-tion for further elucidating the molecular mechanism of photoperiodic response of CCA1 in Chinese cabbage.%本研究利用春季和秋季条件下光周期的变化趋势,对两个大白菜自交系06-247与 He102的光周期敏感性进行了鉴定,结果是06-247对长日照敏感,而 He102对长日照不敏感。采用同源克隆技术,比较分析两材料光周期响应关键调控因子 CCA1的全长 cDNA 序列,发现二者编码区存在两处6 bp 插入/缺失和14处非同义 SNPs 差异;二者编码产物分别包含552、556个氨基酸残基;其非同义 SNPs 造成不同氨基酸的替换;二者间氨基酸序列差异主要位于 CCA1蛋白中间区域的蛋白-蛋白相互作用结构域和 C 端的磷酸化修饰结构域。本研究开发出区分两处6 bp 插入/缺失的共显性分子标记。该结果为深入研究 CCA1在大白菜光周期响应调节过程中的功能奠定了基础。

  20. ALKALINE PEROXIDE MECHANICAL PULPING OF FAST GROWTH PAULOWNIA WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Jahan Latibari,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline peroxide mechanical pulping of paulownia wood harvested from exotic tree plantations in northern Iran was investigated. The fiber length, width, and cell wall thickness of this wood were measured as 0.82 mm, 40.3 μm, and 7.1 μm, respectively. The chemical composition including cellulose, lignin, and extractives soluble in ethanol-acetone, 1% NaOH, hot and cold water was determined as 49.5%, 25%, 12.1%, 26.9%, 11.4%, and 8.1% respectively. The ash content of this wood was 0.45%. Pre-washed chips were chemically treated at 70°C for 120 minutes with different combinations of three dosages (1.5, 3, and 4.5% of hydrogen peroxide and three dosages (1.5, 3, and 4.5% of sodium hydroxide prior to defibration. Other chemicals including DTPA, sodium silicate, and MgSO4 were constant at 0.5%, 3%, and 0.5%, respectively. The results showed that using a 1.5% hydrogen peroxide and 4.5% sodium hydroxide charge, the brightness of APMP pulp reached 68.7% ISO and higher chemical dosages did not improve the brightness; however, to produce APMP pulp with higher strength, a sodium hydroxide charge of 4.5% was needed. The tensile strength, tear strength, burst strength indices, and bulk density of the APMP pulp produced from 1.5% hydrogen peroxide and 4.5% sodium hydroxide were measured as 15.5Nm/g, 6.54mN.m2/g, 0.56kPa.m2/g, and 3.47cm3/g, respectively. The resulting pulp was bulky and is suitable for use in the middle layer of boxboard to provide the desired stiffness with a lower basis weight.

  1. Listening to Chinese Immigrant Restaurant Workers in the Midwest: Application of the Culture-Centered Approach (CCA) to Explore Perceptions of Health and Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haijuan; Dutta, Mohan; Okoror, Titilayo

    2016-01-01

    This study engages with the culture-centered approach (CCA) to explore Chinese immigrant restaurant workers' perception of the U.S. health care system and their interactions with the health care system in interpreting meanings of health. Chinese restaurant workers are marginalized because of their struggles on the job, their immigrant identity, and their negotiations with the structural contexts of occupation, migration status, and culture. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 Chinese immigrant restaurant workers that lasted an average of 1.5 hours each, and were audiotaped. Interviews with participants highlighted critical issues in access to health care and the struggles experienced by restaurant workers in securing access to health, understood in the context of work. Critical to the workers' discourse is the acknowledgment of structural constraints such as lack of insurance coverage, immigration status, and lack of understanding of how the U.S. health care system works. PMID:26575110

  2. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers’ exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  3. Tricky Treats

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-04

    The Eagle Books are a series of four books that are brought to life by wise animal characters - Mr. Eagle, Miss Rabbit, and Coyote - who engage Rain That Dances and his young friends in the joy of physical activity, eating healthy foods, and learning from their elders about health and diabetes prevention. Tricky Treats shows children the difference between healthy snacks and sweet treats.  Created: 8/4/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/5/2008.

  4. Changes of wood cell walls in response to hygro-mechanical steam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Juan; Song, Kunlin; Salmén, Lennart; Yin, Yafang

    2015-01-22

    The effects of compression combined with steam treatment (CS-treatment), i.e. a hygro-mechanical steam treatment on Spruce wood were studied on a cell-structure level to understand the chemical and physical changes of the secondary cell wall occurring under such conditions. Specially, imaging FT-IR microscopy, nanoindentation and dynamic vapour absorption were used to track changes in the chemical structure, in micromechanical and hygroscopic properties. It was shown that CS-treatment resulted in different changes in morphological, chemical and physical properties of the cell wall, in comparison with those under pure steam treatment. After CS-treatment, the cellular structure displayed significant deformations, and the biopolymer components, e.g. hemicellulose and lignin, were degraded, resulting in decreased hygroscopicity and increased mechanical properties of the wood compared to both untreated and steam treated wood. Moreover, CS-treatment resulted in a higher degree of degradation especially in earlywood compared to a more uniform behaviour of wood treated only by steam.

  5. Thick-target PIXE analysis of chromium, copper and arsenic impregnated lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, K.-E.; Harju, L.; Lill, J.-O.; Rajander, J.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    1999-04-01

    Chromium, copper and arsenic (CCA) have for decades been used for wood preservation. Of these elements especially arsenic is very toxic. As CCA impregnated wood is still today used for many construction purposes, a monitoring of these metal ions is of great environmental importance. Thick-target PIXE is a powerful method for the determination of trace metals in wood. The TTPIXE method enabled study of variations of the elemental concentrations in lumber treated with CCA impregnation solution. Distribution patterns were obtained for both naturally occurring elements and elements introduced in the treatment process. During the impregnation process a desorption of e.g. alkali metal ions takes place from the wood. The sensitivity of the method is improved by dry ashing of the samples prior to PIXE analysis. The TTPIXE method was calibrated and validated using international certified reference materials (CRM) based on wood material.

  6. ECONOMICAL VIABILITY OF PRESERVATIVE TREATMENT OF Prosopis juliflora (SW D.C. WOOD SUBMITTED TO SAP DISPLACEMENT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmoulis Wanderley de Farias Sobrinho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the economical viability of preservative treatment of Prosopis juliflora (Sw D.C. roundpieces treated with Osmose CCB commercial preservative applied by sap displacement method in rural property and to comparetheir costs with Mimosa caesalpiniifolia, Mimosa tenuiflora and Prosopis juliflora non-treated pieces costs. The treatment of Prosopisjuliflora wood demonstrated to be economically viable when compared to alternatives using the Equivalent Annual Costs (EACs, fordiscount rates of 12; 15; and 18% and expected useful life varying from 16 to 30 years, in these situations treated Prosopis juliflorawood presented smaller EAC than Mimosa caesalpiniifolia, Mimosa tenuiflora and Prosopis juliflora non-treated woods for theanalyzed situations, that justifies the employment of the Prosopis juliflora treated logs as fence posts and other similar uses.

  7. Water soluble carbon nano-onions from wood wool as growth promoters for gram plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkar, Sumit Kumar; Roy, Manas; Babar, Dipak Gorakh; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2012-11-01

    Water-soluble carbon nano-onions (wsCNOs) isolated from wood wool--a wood-based pyrolysis waste product of wood, can enhance the overall growth rate of gram (Cicer arietinum) plants. Treatment of plants with upto 30 μg mL-1 of wsCNOs for an initial 10 day period in laboratory conditions led to an increase in the overall growth of the plant biomass. In order to examine the growth stimulating effects of wsCNOs under natural conditions, 10 day-old plants treated with and without wsCNOs were transplanted into soil of standard carbon and nitrogen composition. We observed an enhanced growth rate of the wsCNOs pre-treated plants in soil, which finally led to an increased productivity of plants in terms of a larger number of grams. On analyzing the carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN) content for the shoot and fruit sections of the plants treated with and without wsCNOs, only a minor difference in the composition was noticed. However, a slight increase in the percentage of carbon and hydrogen in shoots reflects the synthesis of more organic biomass in the case of treated plants. This work shows that wsCNOs are non-toxic to plant cells and can act as efficient growth stimulants which can be used as benign growth promoters.

  8. General Regularities of Wood Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGOSS, Endre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface roughness of wood products is depending on many factors related both towood properties and wood working operational parameters. Probably this is the reason why there areno generally valid correlation determining surface roughness parameters as a function of influencingfactors. In particular, the account of wood structure in the surface roughness interpretation proved tobe difficult.In the last years an important progress was made in recognizing the role of the anatomicalstructure of wood species in the attainable surface roughness. The introduction of a structure numbermade it possible to express and characterize the different wood species numerically.The aim of these studies was the separation of roughness components due to the anatomicalstructure and the woodworking operation. Using a special finishing technique, the roughnesscomponent due to woodworking operations was not significant and could be separated. The samespecimens were also subjected to different woodworking operations using cutting velocities between10 and 50 m/s. The processing of experimental data resulted in a chart showing the minimumroughness component due to different woodworking operations. Special experimental investigationwas conducted to clear the influence of edge dullness on the surface roughness, especially on itsAbbott-parameters. The measurements showed that the Rk-parameter is a good indicator to predictedge dullness.

  9. Thermal and Tensile Properties of Treated and Untreated Red Balau (Shorea Dipterocarpaceae Filled LDPE Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Anayimi Lafia-Araga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Red balau saw dust was heat-treated at 180°C and 200°C for one hour, extrusion compounded with Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE at 20%, 40% and 60% volume fraction loadings and injection moulded. Thermal and tensile properties of the resultant composites were investigated as a function of filler loadings and treatment temperature. Increase in tensile moduli and decrease in tensile stress and strain were observed as filler loading and treatment temperature increased. Thermogravimetric analysis revealed an increase in degradation peak temperature of the composites from heat treated compared to the untreated wood composites. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed a decreasing trend in the degree of crystallinity (Xc of the matrix when heat treated wood was used as filler. However, untreated wood showed an increase in Xc with increasing wood content.

  10. Bamboo and Wood in Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, Ulrike G. K.

    2008-08-01

    Over centuries and millennia, our ancestors worldwide found the most appropriate materials for increasingly complex acoustical applications. In the temperate climate of Europe, where the instruments of the Western symphony orchestra were developed and perfected, instrument makers still primarily take advantage of the unique property combination and the aesthetic appeal of wood. In all other continents, one material dominates and is frequently chosen for the manufacture of wind, string, and percussion instruments: the grass bamboo. Here, we review from a materials science perspective bamboo's and wood's unique and highly optimized structure and properties. Using material property charts plotting acoustic properties such as the speed of sound, the characteristic impedance, the sound radiation coefficient, and the loss coefficient against one another, we analyze and explain why bamboo and specific wood species are ideally suited for the manufacture of xylophone bars and chimes, flutes and organs, violins and zithers, violin bows, and even strings.

  11. Brazilian Market Structure of Wood Briquettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentil, L.V. (Univ. of Brasilia, Forest Dept, Brasilia (Brazil)). E-mail: gentil22@unb.br; Vieira, A.M.C. (Univ. of Brasilia, Dept. of Statistics, Brasilia (Brazil))

    2008-10-15

    The bioenergy market and wood briquette market grew starting from the oil crisis in 1973, when it began the fossil fuels replacement. Lignocellulosic wastes have larger specific calorific power and quality than agricultural, peat and sugar cane bagasse. Knowledge of the briquette market with larger efficient scientific tools and smaller costs, is as important in this work as using improved SWOT Analysis of research market with a Multiple Mode and a Correspondence Analysis Mode. The results of this research show that the supply strengths are the quality and amount of energy from wood briquette. The supply weaknesses are expensive freight and briquette vulnerability to the moisture. The demand opportunities are the many uses of wood briquette in several market segments. The demand threats are the absence of a good distribution and expensive freight for the delivery

  12. Wood flow problems in the Swedish forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Dick [Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden); Roennqvist, M. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Mathematics

    1998-12-31

    In this paper we give an overview of the wood-flow in Sweden including a description of organization and planning. Based on that, we will describe a number of applications or problem areas in the wood-flow chain that are currently considered by the Swedish forest companies to be important and potential in order to improve overall operations. We have focused on applications which are short term planning or operative planning. We do not give any final results as much of the development is currently ongoing or is still in a planning phase. Instead we describe what kind of models and decision support systems that could be applied in order to improve co-operation within and integration of the wood-flow chain 13 refs, 20 figs, 1 tab

  13. Research advance in wood composites in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Wood composites can generally be classified in three parts: laminated composites, mixed composites and penetrated composites. Every part has its own characteristic and can be further divided. This paper introduces the history and the state of development of wood composites in China. The research about glue-laminated timber is rare and the industry hardly comes to being. A great of achievements have been obtained in mixed composites and it is well industrialized. Many studies on scrimber have been done and the Chinese researchers are looking for a feasible way to develop the scrimber industry in China. Chinese researchers also spent so much energy in studying wood plastic composites (WPC), but it has not been industrialized due to the high cost.

  14. Properties of Wood/Montmorillonite Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Wenhua; ZHAO Guangjie

    2006-01-01

    With montmorillonite (MMT) organically modified as organophilic-MMT (OMMT) and water-soluble phenol formaldehyde resin (PF) as intermediate, the nanocomposites of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) wood and MMT, i.e. WMNC, were prepared via nano intercalation compounding, some properties of WMNC were analyzed. Results show that, compared with Chinese fir wood and its PF-impreg, WMNC has lower humidity and water absorption, better dimension stability, higher longitudinal compressive strength, abrasive resistance, fire-resistance, and water-leaching resistance with a very low mass ratio about 3% of MMT. The nano intercalation compounding of wood and exfoliated MMT nanolamellae is very promising. More studies should be carried out to fully reveal the nanosize effects and the special properties of WMNC.

  15. How to quantify conduits in wood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Alexander; Klepsch, Matthias; Karimi, Zohreh; Jansen, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Vessels and tracheids represent the most important xylem cells with respect to long distance water transport in plants. Wood anatomical studies frequently provide several quantitative details of these cells, such as vessel diameter, vessel density, vessel element length, and tracheid length, while important information on the three dimensional structure of the hydraulic network is not considered. This paper aims to provide an overview of various techniques, although there is no standard protocol to quantify conduits due to high anatomical variation and a wide range of techniques available. Despite recent progress in image analysis programs and automated methods for measuring cell dimensions, density, and spatial distribution, various characters remain time-consuming and tedious. Quantification of vessels and tracheids is not only important to better understand functional adaptations of tracheary elements to environment parameters, but will also be essential for linking wood anatomy with other fields such as wood development, xylem physiology, palaeobotany, and dendrochronology.

  16. How to quantify conduits in wood?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eScholz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vessels and tracheids represent the most important xylem cells with respect to long distance water transport in plants. Wood anatomical studies frequently provide several quantitative details of these cells, such as vessel diameter, vessel density, vessel element length, and tracheid length, while important information on the three dimensional structure of the hydraulic network is not considered. This paper aims to provide an overview of various techniques, although there is no standard protocol to quantify conduits due to high anatomical variation and a wide range of techniques available. Despite recent progress in image analysis programs and automated methods for measuring cell dimensions, density, and spatial distribution, various characters remain time-consuming and tedious. Quantification of vessels and tracheids is not only important to better understand functional adaptations of tracheary elements to environment parameters, but will also be essential for linking wood anatomy with other fields such as wood development, xylem physiology, palaeobotany, and dendrochronology.

  17. Thermal Diffusion in Masson Pine Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xian-jun; Zhang Bi-guang; Li Wen-jun

    2005-01-01

    In order to analyze the effects of the temperature gradient on moisture movement during the highly intensive microwave-vacuum drying, thermal diffusion of Masson pine wood was studied. Internal distribution of temperature and moisture in Masson pine samples sealed by epoxy resin and aluminum foil was measured, the magnitude of thermal diffusion was calculated and the influencing factors of thermal diffusion were discussed. Results showed that with the transfer of moisture toward the low temperature in wood, opposite temperature and moisture gradient occurred. The initial moisture content (MC), temperature and time are important factors affecting this process; the thermal diffusion is in proportion to wood temperature, its initial moisture and time. The temperature and distance from hot surface is strongly linearly correlated, and the relationship between MCs at different locations and distance from the hot end surface changes from logarithmically form to exponentially form with the increase in experimental time.

  18. Genetic improvement of trees for wood production, with particular refeference to wood traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nocetti M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of selected propagation material from tree improvement programs is expected to lead to a more homogenous product, generally appreciated by industry. So far, breeding strategy have been mainly targeted to maximize acclimation/adaptation to specific environment conditions, tree growth and disease resistance, but it is not obvious that such strategy might lead to improvement of wood characteristics at the same time. Therefore, it seems important to introduce wood traits improvement as specific target of the selection process in tree breeding programs, and/or to assess heritability of wood technological properties of trees previously selected based on different criteria. Investigations reported so far have revealed that several wood traits are under a medium to high genetic control. The main goal of this work is to discuss the suitability of wood traits improvement as main target of specific breeding programs, with particular attention to wood technological characteristics to be considered in the tree selection process. Finally, we focused on noble hardwoods, that have been the target species for many improvement programs developed in Italy, and particularly on wild cherry, where studies on the genetic control of wood traits are rare.

  19. Temperature Evolution in Poplar (Populus nigra Tension Wood and Normal Wood during a Conventional Drying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar TARMIAN

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, temperature evolution through tension wood and normal wood in poplar (Populus nigra under a convective drying condition was investigated. Flat-sawn boards with green dimensions 80�40�25 mm were dried at constant dry-bulb temperature of 60�C and relative humidity (RH of 50% to a final moisture content of about 8%. They were coated on four surfaces using aluminum foil bonded with polyurethane (PU glue to confine moisture movement along the board thickness. The measurement of board temperature was carried out at 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 12.5 mm along the board thickness every 20 minutes by means of 1 mm-thermocouples. The pattern of temperature profile was observed to be almost similar for both tension wood and normal wood. However, a slightly steeper temperature gradient occurred in the normal wood compared to the tension wood. In both types of woods, the surface temperature rose progressively from the initial value to the dry-bulb temperature but the core temperature remained at an almost constant value as the wet-bulb temperature even at the end of drying.

  20. Lung function: occupational exposure to wood dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Occupational exposure to wood dust has been shown to cause several respiratory disorders, such as allergic rhinitis, chronic bronchitis, asthma, sino-nasal adenocarcinoma, and impairment of lung function. The aim of the study was to estimate lung function (in the woodworking industry among workers employed by wood processing, who run the risk of being expose to wood dust. Methods The study concerns a group of 70 workers aged 24-55. All the workers underwent general and laryngological examination. A group of 20 workers, working at the positions where dustiness exceeded TLV (threshold limit value took X-ray of the chest and spirometry. The following parameters were measured: VC, IC, ERV, TV, BF, FEV1, FVC, PEF, MEF25-75, FEV1%FVC, FEV1%VC. The data are presented as means ± SD and the authors applied references values according to ERS guidelines. Results The results show that there was no decline in FEV1 (3.7 ± 0.7 and FVC (4.5 ± 0.8. Normal lung function was defined as FEV1/VC ratio ≥0.7. None of the tested workers had obstructive pattern in spirometry. The mean FEV1%VC was 77.1 ± 10.2. These results suggest that wood dust exposure might not lead to significant pulmonary damage. Conclusions These data do not corroborate that wood dust plays significant role in lung function impairment. Future studies of respiratory health among workers exposed to wood dust are needed.