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Sample records for cavity shaping loop

  1. Tuning the rf cavity by using a detuning loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.M.; Keane, J.; Batchelor, K.

    1985-09-01

    The tuning of the rf cavity with a coupling loop connected to a variable capacitor or an open or shorted coaxial line is described. Two kinds of equivalent circuits are described and some of the calculations of Δf and Q vs capacitance curves are given. At 52 MHz the maximum practical tuning range is about 100 KHz, if the parameters of tuning circuit are chosen properly so that the Q of the accelerating cavity does not decrease too much

  2. S0 Tight Loop Studies on ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Fumio [KEK; Konomi, T. [KEK; Saito, Kenji [KEK; Bice, Damon [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony C. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    We have continued high gradient R&D of ICHIRO 9-cell cavities at KEK. ICHIRO 9-cell cavity #5 (I9#5) that has no end groups on beam tube to focus on high gradient sent to Jlab as S0 tight loop study. Surface treatments and vertical test were repeated 3 times at Jlab, and then I9#5 sent back to KEK. We also repeated surface treatments and test at KEK. Maximum gradients were 36.5MV/m at Jlab, and 33.7MV/m at KEK so far. Now we are struggling with the puzzle why the results of singles do not work well on 9-cell cavities.

  3. A Digital Self Excited Loop for Accelerating Cavity Field Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curt Hovater; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; John Musson; Tomasz Plawski

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a digital process that emulates an analog oscillator and ultimately a self excited loop (SEL) for field control. The SEL, in its analog form, has been used for many years for accelerating cavity field control. In essence the SEL uses the cavity as a resonant circuit -- much like a resonant (tank) circuit is used to build an oscillator. An oscillating resonant circuit can be forced to oscillate at different, but close, frequencies to resonance by applying a phase shift in the feedback path. This allows the circuit to be phased-locked to a master reference, which is crucial for multiple cavity accelerators. For phase and amplitude control the SEL must be forced to the master reference frequency, and feedback provided for in both dimensions. The novelty of this design is in the way digital signal processing (DSP) is structured to emulate an analog system. While the digital signal processing elements are not new, to our knowledge this is the first time that the digital SEL concept has been designed and demonstrated. This paper reports on the progress of the design and implementation of the digital SEL for field control of superconducting accelerating cavities

  4. A rugby-shaped cavity for the LMJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Bastian, J.; Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Jadaud, J.P.; Lafitte, S.; Liberatore, S.; Malinie, G.; Philippe, F.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical studies show that a rugby-shaped hohlraum for indirect drive laser ignition has some advantages: it allows a better symmetry for the X-ray irradiation of the central target and it required less laser power. Rugby-shaped cavities have been tested successfully at the Omega facility. The energetic advantage is all the more important as the cavity is bigger. Simulations have shown that a rugby-shaped hohlraum plus adequate materials for the intern wall plus an optimization of the central target could open the way to an ignition with only 160 laser beams at the LMJ (Megajoule Laser) facility. (A.C.)

  5. A two-stage shape optimization process for cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Fok, Alex S L; Qualtrough, Alison

    2008-11-01

    Clinical data indicate that previously restored teeth are more likely to fracture under occlusal loads. The reason for this is attributed to the high stresses at the tooth-restoration interface, especially following debonding of the restoration from the tooth. This work aims to minimise these interfacial stresses by optimizing the cavity shape using modern shape optimisation techniques. Shape optimisation methods based on the principle of biological adaptive growth were incorporated into a finite element program and used to optimize the design of cavity preparations as previous work had successfully used one such method to minimise stresses at the internal line angles of conventional restorations with defective bonds. The overall shapes of the cavity preparations were maintained while the profiles of the internal line angles were modified. In the present study, the overall shape of the cavity preparation was also subject to modification in the optimization process. A topological optimization method which placed the restorative material according to the stress distribution was first used to obtain a draft design for the cavity shape, assuming perfect bonding at the tooth-restoration interface. The draft shape was then refined using the method employed in the previous study, to allow for deterioration in the interfacial bond strength. These optimization methods were incorporated into the commercial finite element package ABAQUS as a User Material Subroutine (UMAT) to automate the optimization process. Compared with the conventional design, the stress level at the tooth-restoration interface in the optimized design was reduced significantly, irrespective of the bonding condition. Finite-element based shape optimization methods provide a useful tool for minimizing the interfacial stresses in dental restorations. The longevity of restored teeth using the optimized designs is therefore expected to be prolonged.

  6. SRF cavity testing using a FPGA Self Excited Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Various authors have previously studied the theory and practice of cavity testing, notably an extensive treatment by Powers [1] and Padamsee [2]. The advent of the digital Low Level RF (LLRF) electronics based on Field Programmable Logic Arrays (FPGA) provides various improvements over the rather complex systems used in the past as well as enabling new measurement techniques.In this document we reintroduce a technique that seems to have fallen out of practice in recent times, that is obtaining the coupling constant β through measurements from just one port, the reflected power port, of the directional coupler placed in front of the cavity.

  7. Shape of the human nasal cavity promotes retronasal smell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastour, Sophie; Melchionna, Simone; Mishra, Shruti; Zwicker, David; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Brenner, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Humans are exceptionally good at perceiving the flavor of food. Flavor includes sensory input from taste receptors but is dominated by olfactory (smell) receptors. To smell food while eating, odors must be transported to the nasal cavity during exhalation. Olfactory performance of this retronasal route depends, among other factors, on the position of the olfactory receptors and the shape of the nasal cavity. One biological hypothesis is that the derived configuration of the human nasal cavity has resulted in a greater capacity for retronasal smell, hence enhanced flavor perception. We here study the air flow and resulting odor deposition as a function of the nasal geometry and the parameters of exhalation. We perform computational fluid dynamics simulations in realistic geometries obtained from CT scans of humans. Using the resulting flow fields, we then study the deposition of tracer particles in the nasal cavity. Additionally, we derive scaling laws for the odor deposition rate as a function of flow parameters and geometry using boundary layer theory. These results allow us to assess which changes in the evolution of the human nose led to significant improvements of retronasal smell.

  8. Temperature control feedback loops for the linac upgrade side coupled cavities at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisp, J.

    1990-01-01

    The linac upgrade project at Fermilab will replace the last 4 drift-tube linac tanks with seven side coupled cavity strings. This will increase the beam energy from 200 to 400 MeV at injection into the Booster accelerator. The main objective of the temperature loop is to control the resonant frequency of the cavity strings. A cavity string will constant of 4 sections connected with bridge couplers driven with a 12 MW klystron at 805 MHz. Each section is a side coupled cavity chain consisting of 16 accelerating cells and 15 side coupling cells. For the linac upgrade, 7 full cavity strings will be used. A separate temperature control system is planned for each of the 28 accelerating sections, the two transition sections, and the debuncher section. The cavity strings will be tuned to resonance for full power beam loaded conditions. A separate frequency loop is planned that will sample the phase difference between a monitor placed in the end cell of each section and the rf drive. The frequency loop will control the set point for the temperature loop which will be able to maintain the resonant frequency through periods within beam or rf power. The frequency loop will need the intelligence required to determine under what conditions the phase error information is valid and the temperature set point should be adjusted. This paper will discuss some of the reason for temperature control, the implementation, and some of the problems encountered. An appendix contains some useful constants and descriptions of some of the sensor and control elements used. 13 figs

  9. A digital closed loop control system for automatic phase locking of superconducting cavities of IUAC Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, R.N.; Rai, A.; Pandey, A.; Sahu, B.K.; Patra, P.; Karmakar, J.; Chaudhari, G.K.; Mathur, Y.; Ghosh, S.; Kanjilal, D.

    2013-01-01

    A closed loop digital control system has been designed and tested to automate the tuning process of superconducting resonators of LINAC at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. The mechanism controls the proportional valves of the He gas based pneumatic tuner in response to the phase and frequency errors of the cavity RF field. The main RF phase lock loop (PLL) is automatically closed once the resonant frequency is within locking range of the resonator PLL. The digital control scheme was successfully tested on few resonators of LINAC cryostat 1. A high stability of phase lock was observed. The details of the digital automation system are presented in the paper. (author)

  10. Flattop mode shaping of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser using an external-cavity aspheric mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaohui; Leger, James

    2004-11-01

    Both square-shaped and circular-shaped flattop modes were experimentally demonstrated in extended-cavity broad-area VCSELs using aspheric feedback mirrors. These refractive aspheric mirrors were fabricated by electron-beam lithography on curved substrates. Excellent single-mode operation and improved power extraction efficiency were observed. The three-mirror structure of the VCSEL and the state-of-the-art fabrication of the aspheric mirror contribute to the superior VCSEL performance. The modal loss analysis using a rigid three-mirror-cavity simulation method is discussed.

  11. Implementation of intra-cavity beam shaping technique to enhance pump efficiency

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work the author proposes an implementation of a new intra-cavity beam shaping technique to vary the intensity distribution of the fundamental mode in a resonator cavity while maintaining a constant intensity distribution at the output...

  12. Study on the 1.3 GHz low loss shape superconducting cavities at IHEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Zhanguo; Gao Jie; Gu Jun; Sun Hong; Zhao Facheng; Ge Mingqi; Xu Qingjin; Zhai Jiyuan; Yuan Hong; Chen Jinzhe; Xie Weiping; Saito, K.; Furuta, F.; Saeki, T.; Liu Liqiang; Zhang Liang

    2009-01-01

    As part of the international research program on the superconducting cavity for the International Linear Collider (ILC) R and D on the 1.3 GHz low loss superconducting cavities has been carried out at the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) since 2005. A design of 1.3 GHz low loss cavity shape was proposed and six single-cell cavities of different niobium material were successfully fabricated with standard technology. In this study our priority was on large grain (LG) cavities. The two LG cavities were treated with complete procedures of surface treatments based on chemical polishing (CP) without electro polishing (EP) at IHEP. The two LG cavities and a fine grain cavity were sent to KEK for vertical testing. All the three cavities reached accelerating gradients higher than 35 MV/m and the maximum gradient of 40.27 MV/m was achieved in the LG cavity. This paper presents the process of the vertical RF tests and the comparison of the LG and fine grain cavities's performance. (authors)

  13. The application of system identification techniques to an R.F. Cavity tuning loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.

    1989-09-01

    System identification is the terminology used for the process of characterising a given control system. A mathematical representation of the frequency response characteristic is obtained to utilise all the known design techniques to arrange the feed-back loop to meet required control performance criterion. This is known as parametric system identification. The intention of this paper is to speed up the process of identifying the R.F. Cavity tuning system of the 800 MeV accelerator, ISIS. While achieving this goal the computer must not disturb noticeably the normal function set out by the system. This task of automatic characterisation is necessary so that a self-adapting feed-back loop can be arranged to adjust itself without human interference and meet severe R.F. tuning requirements on ISIS. In any case the results of parametric identifications are useful in designing a robust feed-back loop with appropriate gain and phase margins. The approach using a Pseudo Random Signal is currently practised in Process Industries. (author)

  14. Effect of cathode shape on vertical buffered electropolishing for niobium SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, S.; Wu, A.T.; Lu, X.Y.; Rimmer, R.A.; Lin, L.; Zhao, K.; Mammosser, J.; Gao, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the research results of the effect of cathode shape during vertical buffered electropolishing (BEP) by employing a demountable single cell niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity. Several different cathode shapes such as, for instance, bar, ball, ellipsoid, and wheels of different diameters have been tested. Detailed electropolishing parameters including I–V characteristic, removal rate, surface roughness, and polishing uniformity at different locations inside the demountable cavity are measured. Similar studies are also done on conventional electropolishing (EP) for comparison. It is revealed that cathode shape has dominant effects for BEP especially on the obtaining of a suitable polishing condition and a uniform polishing rate in an Nb SRF single cell cavity. EP appears to have the same tendency. This paper demonstrates that a more homogeneous polishing result can be obtained by optimizing the electric field distribution inside the cavity through the modification of the cathode shape given the conditions that temperature and electrolyte flow are kept constant. Electric field distribution and electrolyte flow patterns inside the cavity are simulated via Poisson–Superfish and Solidworks respectively. With the optimal cathode shape, BEP shows a much faster polishing rate of ∼2.5 μm/min and is able to produce a smoother surface finish in the treatments of single cell cavities in comparison with EP.

  15. Self-determined shapes and velocities of giant near-zero drag gas cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2017-09-09

    Minimizing the retarding force on a solid moving in liquid is the canonical problem in the quest for energy saving by friction and drag reduction. For an ideal object that cannot sustain any shear stress on its surface, theory predicts that drag force will fall to zero as its speed becomes large. However, experimental verification of this prediction has been challenging. We report the construction of a class of self-determined streamlined structures with this free-slip surface, made up of a teardrop-shaped giant gas cavity that completely encloses a metal sphere. This stable gas cavity is formed around the sphere as it plunges at a sufficiently high speed into the liquid in a deep tank, provided that the sphere is either heated initially to above the Leidenfrost temperature of the liquid or rendered superhydrophobic in water at room temperature. These sphere-in-cavity structures have residual drag coefficients that are typically less than Embedded Image those of solid objects of the same dimensions, which indicates that they experienced very small drag forces. The self-determined shapes of the gas cavities are shown to be consistent with the Bernoulli equation of potential flow applied on the cavity surface. The cavity fall velocity is not arbitrary but is uniquely predicted by the sphere density and cavity volume, so larger cavities have higher characteristic velocities.

  16. Effects of shape on unstable growth of cavities interacting with surrounding small voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2008-01-01

    shape. If there is no porosity in the surrounding material, the central void in a high triaxiality stress field develops towards a near spherical shape before unstable growth occurs. However, in the presence of surrounding small-scale voids the evolution of the porosity fields has much influence......The possibility of unstable cavity growth in a ductile metal containing many voids has been studied recently. The central spherical cavity was discretely represented, whereas the surrounding small-scale voids were represented by a porous ductile material model in terms of a field quantity...

  17. Analysis of natural convection flow characteristics in a square cavity with internal elliptic shape block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Golam; Munshi, M. Jahirul Haque; Hossain, Sumon; Ali, M.

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of hydro-magnetic natural convection flow in a square cavity with internal elliptic shape cold block at the centre with Prandtl number of 0.711 has been investigated numerically. The governing equations, mass, momentum, energy and induction equations are applied to the cavity. The governing differential equations are solved by using finite element method (Galerkin weighted residual method). The top wall, left wall, right wall and elliptic obstacle are kept at cold Tc. The bottom wall is kept at heated Th. The study is performed for different Rayleigh numbers(103 ≤ Ra ≥ 106) and Hartmann numbers(0 ≤ Ha ≥ 100). A cold elliptic block is located at the centre of the cavity. The object of this study is to describe the effects of MHD on the field of buoyancy-driven and flow in presence of such cold block by visualization of graph. The obtained results showed that temperature distribution and flow pattern inside the cavity depend on both strength of the magnetic field and Rayleigh number. For all cases, two or more counter rotating eddies were formed inside the cavity. The results are illustrated with the streamlines, isotherms, velocity and temperature fields. Numerical results show good accuracy and stability of the proposal strategy.

  18. Characteristics of natural circulation flow in a bent loop with a U-shape-type cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida; Ishizuka, M.; Futamura, Y.; Akagawa, K.; Fujii, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Kutuna, H.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment on transient single phase natural circulation in a closed loop was conducted to study the core cooling behavior by natural circulation in the loop-type PWR for marine application. The system employed a loop that had two U-shaped, and three inverse U-shaped flow paths, and a small elevation difference between the heater and cooler. The experiment was conducted at atmospheric pressure with the heater input held constant (Q = 0.5 kW to 3.5 kW), and the cooling water flow rate of the cooler constant during the transient following tripping of the pump. From the experiment, a flow stability map was obtained which correlated heater input versus elevation differences. Comparison between experimental and numerical results obtained by RETRAN-02 analyses yielded general agreement

  19. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mother's bacteria from being passed to the child. Treatment of Cavities Fluoride Fillings Root canal or tooth extraction If ... to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people ...

  20. The Impact of Magnetomechanical Effects on Ferrite B-H Loop Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baguley, C. A.; Madawala, U. K.; Carsten, B.

    2012-01-01

    Under high dc bias conditions, experimental observations show B-H loops can exhibit a figure-eight shape, as energy is returned from the magnetic core back to the magnetic excitation supply during a portion of the excitation cycle. However, an explanation for this phenomenon is yet to be reported...

  1. Switching through symmetry breaking for transmission in a T-shaped photonic waveguide coupled with two identical nonlinear micro-cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakov, Evgeny; Sadreev, Almas

    2011-08-10

    Using coupled mode theory we consider transmission in a T-shaped waveguide coupled with two identical symmetrically positioned nonlinear micro-cavities with mirror symmetry. For input power injected into the central waveguide we show the existence of a symmetry breaking solution which is a result of mixing of the symmetrical input wave with an antisymmetric standing wave in the Fabry-Pérot interferometer. With growth of the input power, a feature in the form of loops arises in the solution which originates from bistability in the transmission in the output left/right waveguide coupled with the first/second nonlinear cavity. The domains of stability of the solution are found. The breaking of mirror symmetry gives rise to nonsymmetrical left and right outputs. We demonstrate that this phenomenon can be explored for all-optical switching of light transmission from the left output waveguide to the right one by application of input pulses.

  2. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne, E-mail: skerra@wzw.tum.de [Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, CIPS-M, and Lehrstuhl für Biologische Chemie, Technische Universität München, 85350 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany)

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2{sub 1} revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1} with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2{sub 1} crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family.

  3. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2 1 revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2 1 with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2 1 crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family

  4. Heat transfer augmentation of magnetohydrodynamics natural convection in L-shaped cavities utilizing nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourtiji Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of natural convection heat transfer through an alumina-water nanofluid inside L-shaped cavities in the presence of an external magnetic field is performed. The study has been carried out for a wide range of important parame­ters such as Rayleigh number, Hartmann number, aspect ratio of the cavity and solid volume fraction of the nanofluid. The influence of the nanoparticle, buoyancy force and the magnetic field on the flow and temperature fields have been plotted and discussed. The results show that after a critical Rayleigh number depending on the aspect ratio, the heat transfer in the cavity rises abruptly due to some significant changes in flow field. It is also found that the heat transfer enhances in the presence of the nanoparticles and increases with solid volume fraction of the nanofluid. In addition, the performance of the nanofluid utilization is more effective at high Ray­leigh numbers. The influence of the magnetic field has been also studied and de­duced that it has a remarkable effect on the heat transfer and flow field in the cavity that as the Hartmann number increases the overall Nusselt number is significantly decreased specially at high Rayleigh numbers.

  5. Sound absorption of a micro-perforated panel backed by an irregular-shaped cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunqi; Cheng, Li; Pan, Jie; Yu, Ganghua

    2010-01-01

    In the pursuit of more effective noise control devices, the cavity backed micro-perforated panel absorber (CBMPPA) is developed in this study. A CBMPPA differs from the conventional micro-perforated panel (MPP) absorber in that the MPP is backed by a trapezoidal cavity, which allows more effective vibroacoustic coupling between the MPP and the cavity. A two-dimensional theoretical model is established and tested both numerically and experimentally. Based on the verified theoretical model, sound absorption performance of a trapezoidal CBMPPA is investigated numerically. Results show that the shape of the backing cavity can significantly alter the sound absorption mechanisms and frequency distribution of overall sound absorption coefficient of the absorber. Further analyses show that acoustic modes that are initially decoupled from the MPP in the rectangular configuration are coupled with the air motion in the MPP, which accounts for the change in absorption pattern of the trapezoidal CBMPPA. By the same token, it also provides the flexibility for tuning the effective absorption range of the absorber. Due to the varying impedance matching conditions, the absorption performance of the trapezoidal CBMPPA exhibits obvious local characteristics over the MPP surface, which contrasts with the spatially uniform absorption in the conventional MPP absorber.

  6. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Content Medical News Cavities ˈkav-ət-ē (Dental Caries) By James T. Ubertalli, DMD, Private Practice, Hingham, ... access to dental care, and better treatment for tooth decay and periodontal disease. When teeth are lost, chewing is greatly hindered, and speaking ...

  7. Looped star polymers show conformational transition from spherical to flat toroidal shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Pascal; Fritsche, Miriam; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2011-11-01

    Inspired by the topological organization of the circular Escherichia coli chromosome, which is compacted by separate domains, we study a polymer architecture consisting of a central ring to which either looped or linear side chains are grafted. A shape change from a spherical to a toroidal organization takes place as soon as the inner ring becomes large enough for the attached arms to fit within its circumference. Building up a torus, the system flattens, depending on the effective bending rigidity of the chain induced by entropic repulsion of the attached loops and, to a lesser extent, linear arms. Our results suggest that the natural formation of a toroidal structure with a decreased amount of writhe induced by a specific underlying topology could be one driving force, among others, that nature exploits to ensure proper packaging of the genetic material within a rod-shaped, bacterial envelope.

  8. Shape control of surface-stabilized disclination loops in nematic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Kanta; Imamura, Koki; Ouchi, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies on topological defects in conventional and active nematic liquid crystals have revealed their potential as sources of advanced functionality whereby the collective behavior of the constituent molecules or cells is controlled. On the other hand, the fact that they have high energies and are metastable makes their shape control a nontrivial issue. Here, we demonstrate stabilization of arbitrary-shaped closed disclination loops with 1/2 strength floating in the bulk by designing the twist angle distribution in a liquid crystal cell. Continuous variation of the twist angle from below to above |π /2 | allows us to unambiguously position reverse twist disclinations at will. We also analyze the elastic free energy and uncover the relationship between the twist angle pattern and shrink rate of the surface-stabilized disclination loop.

  9. Microbeam dynamic shaping by closed-loop electrostatic actuation using modal control

    OpenAIRE

    Kharrat, Chady; Colinet, Eric; Voda, Alina

    2007-01-01

    International audience; A closed-loop control approach for the dynamic shaping of a microbeam by electrostatic actuation is described. Starting from a desired displacements reference vector of N small segments of the beam (representing the approximation of the continuous case), n controllers (n is the number of considered modes) output the stresses that must be distributed throughout the beam, on the N actuators. Because this reference may vary with time, the controllers are designed so that ...

  10. Coherent addition of high power broad-area laser diodes with a compact VBG V-shaped external Talbot cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Braiman, Yehuda

    2018-05-01

    We introduced a compact V-shaped external Talbot cavity for phase locking of high power broad-area laser diodes. The length of compact cavity is ∼25 mm. Near diffraction-limit coherent addition of 10 broad-area laser diodes indicated that high quality phase locking was achieved. We measured the near-field emission mode of each individual broad-area laser diode with different feedback, such as a volume Bragg grating and a high reflection mirror. We found out that the best result of phase locking broad-area laser diodes was achieved by the compact V-shaped external Talbot cavity with volume Bragg grating feedback.

  11. Single-mode quantum cascade lasers employing a candy-cane shaped monolithic coupled cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Sladek, Kamil; Wang, Xiaojun; Fan, Jen-Yu; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate single-mode quantum cascade lasers emitting at ˜4.5 μm by employing a monolithic "candy-cane" shaped coupled-cavity consisting of a straight section connecting at one end to a spiral section. The fabrication process is identical to those for simple Fabry-Perot-type ridge lasers. Continuously tunable single-mode emission across ˜8 cm-1 with side mode suppression ratio up to ˜25 dB and a single-mode operating current range of more than 70% above the threshold current is achieved when the lasers are operated in pulsed-mode from 80 K to 155 K.

  12. Interpolating gain-scheduled H∞ loop shaping design for high speed ball screw feed drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Tang, WenCheng; Bao, DaFei

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method to design servo controllers for flexible ball screw drives with time-varying dynamics, which are mainly due to the time-varying table position and the workpiece mass. A gain-scheduled H∞ loop shaping controller is designed to achieve high tracking performance against the dynamic variations. H∞ loop shaping design procedure incorporates open loop shaping by a set of compensators to obtain performance/robust stability tradeoffs. The interpolating gain-scheduled controller is obtained by interpolating the state space model of the linear time-invariant (LTI) controllers estimated for fixed values of the scheduling parameters and a linear least squares problem can be solved. The proposed controller has been compared with P/PI with velocity and acceleration feedforward and adaptive backstepping sliding mode control experimentally. The experimental results indicate that the tracking performance has been improved and the robustness for time-varying dynamics has been achieved with the proposed scheme. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. H∞ Loop Shaping Control of Input Saturated Systems with Norm-Bounded Parametric Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Lima Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a gain-scheduling control design strategy for a class of linear systems with the presence of both input saturation constraints and norm-bounded parametric uncertainty. LMI conditions are derived in order to obtain a gain-scheduled controller that ensures the robust stability and performance of the closed loop system. The main steps to obtain such a controller are given. Differently from other gain-scheduled approaches in the literature, this one focuses on the problem of H∞ loop shaping control design with input saturation nonlinearity and norm-bounded uncertainty to reduce the effect of the disturbance input on the controlled outputs. Here, the design problem has been formulated in the four-block H∞ synthesis framework, in which it is possible to describe the parametric uncertainty and the input saturation nonlinearity as perturbations to normalized coprime factors of the shaped plant. As a result, the shaped plant is represented as a linear parameter-varying (LPV system while the norm-bounded uncertainty and input saturation are incorporated. This procedure yields a linear parameter-varying structure for the controller that ensures the stability of the polytopic LPV shaped plant from the vertex property. Finally, the effectiveness of the method is illustrated through application to a physical system: a VTOL “vertical taking-off landing” helicopter.

  14. The 938 MHz resonant damping loops for the 200 MHz SPS travelling wave cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, F

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the beam stability in the SPS in 1982 - 1983 have shown a transversal instability for high intensity beams [1]. The fact that this related technical note is published nearly 30 years later, is related to the revival of interest in the frame of SPS impedance evaluation for LS1. Until now there was just a barely known paper folder available which could be consulted on request. The instability mentioned above was identified from beam measurements as raised by a deflecting mode at approximately 940 MHz in the 200 MHz travelling wave cavities of the SPS. Estimates showed that an attenuation of this particular mode by 20 dB would be desirable. In order to achieve this attenuation some vacuum ports on top of the cavities were available. For the damping devices three requirements had to be met: - sufficient damping at about 940 MHz - no serious change of cavity input VSWR at 200 MHz - no water cooling requirement for this higher order mode coupler.

  15. Fabric strain sensor integrated with looped polymeric optical fiber with large angled V-shaped notches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, D. Q.; Tao, X. M.; Zheng, W.; Wang, G. F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of a new fabric strain sensor integrated with a looped polymeric optical fiber (POF) with V-shaped notches of large angle, which is capable of measuring repeated large strain up to 21%. A theoretical model is proposed to describe the sensing behavior based on reflection from the incident sides of the V-notch on a bent fiber. The relationship between the normalized output power of the sensor and the fabric strain is derived. Verification experiments demonstrate a good agreement obtained with the numerically simulated results. Further discussions on the effects of geometric parameters of the sensors shed new light on the optimization of the sensor performance.

  16. Methodologies for Root Locus and Loop Shaping Control Design with Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes some basics for the root locus controls design method as well as for loop shaping, and establishes approaches to expedite the application of these two design methodologies to easily obtain control designs that meet requirements with superior performance. The two design approaches are compared for their ability to meet control design specifications and for ease of application using control design examples. These approaches are also compared with traditional Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) control in order to demonstrate the limitations of PID control. Robustness of these designs is covered as it pertains to these control methodologies and for the example problems.

  17. QFT Based Robust Positioning Control of the PMSM Using Automatic Loop Shaping with Teaching Learning Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish Katal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Automation of the robust control system synthesis for uncertain systems is of great practical interest. In this paper, the loop shaping step for synthesizing quantitative feedback theory (QFT based controller for a two-phase permanent magnet stepper motor (PMSM has been automated using teaching learning-based optimization (TLBO algorithm. The QFT controller design problem has been posed as an optimization problem and TLBO algorithm has been used to minimize the proposed cost function. This facilitates designing low-order fixed-structure controller, eliminates the need of manual loop shaping step on the Nichols charts, and prevents the overdesign of the controller. A performance comparison of the designed controller has been made with the classical PID tuning method of Ziegler-Nichols and QFT controller tuned using other optimization algorithms. The simulation results show that the designed QFT controller using TLBO offers robust stability, disturbance rejection, and proper reference tracking over a range of PMSM’s parametric uncertainties as compared to the classical design techniques.

  18. Noise-shaping all-digital phase-locked loops modeling, simulation, analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Brandonisio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a novel approach to the analysis and design of all-digital phase-locked loops (ADPLLs), technology widely used in wireless communication devices. The authors provide an overview of ADPLL architectures, time-to-digital converters (TDCs) and noise shaping. Realistic examples illustrate how to analyze and simulate phase noise in the presence of sigma-delta modulation and time-to-digital conversion. Readers will gain a deep understanding of ADPLLs and the central role played by noise-shaping. A range of ADPLL and TDC architectures are presented in unified manner. Analytical and simulation tools are discussed in detail. Matlab code is included that can be reused to design, simulate and analyze the ADPLL architectures that are presented in the book.   • Discusses in detail a wide range of all-digital phase-locked loops architectures; • Presents a unified framework in which to model time-to-digital converters for ADPLLs; • Explains a procedure to predict and simulate phase noise in oscil...

  19. Uniaxial Compressive Constitutive Relationship of Concrete Confined by Special-Shaped Steel Tube Coupled with Multiple Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haipeng; Cao, Wanlin; Qiao, Qiyun; Dong, Hongying

    2016-01-29

    A method is presented to predict the complete stress-strain curves of concrete subjected to triaxial stresses, which were caused by axial load and lateral force. The stress can be induced due to the confinement action inside a special-shaped steel tube having multiple cavities. The existing reinforced confined concrete formulas have been improved to determine the confinement action. The influence of cross-sectional shape, of cavity construction, of stiffening ribs and of reinforcement in cavities has been considered in the model. The parameters of the model are determined on the basis of experimental results of an axial compression test for two different kinds of special-shaped concrete filled steel tube (CFT) columns with multiple cavities. The complete load-strain curves of the special-shaped CFT columns are estimated. The predicted concrete strength and the post-peak behavior are found to show good agreement within the accepted limits, compared with the experimental results. In addition, the parameters of proposed model are taken from two kinds of totally different CFT columns, so that it can be concluded that this model is also applicable to concrete confined by other special-shaped steel tubes.

  20. Uniaxial Compressive Constitutive Relationship of Concrete Confined by Special-Shaped Steel Tube Coupled with Multiple Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haipeng Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented to predict the complete stress-strain curves of concrete subjected to triaxial stresses, which were caused by axial load and lateral force. The stress can be induced due to the confinement action inside a special-shaped steel tube having multiple cavities. The existing reinforced confined concrete formulas have been improved to determine the confinement action. The influence of cross-sectional shape, of cavity construction, of stiffening ribs and of reinforcement in cavities has been considered in the model. The parameters of the model are determined on the basis of experimental results of an axial compression test for two different kinds of special-shaped concrete filled steel tube (CFT columns with multiple cavities. The complete load-strain curves of the special-shaped CFT columns are estimated. The predicted concrete strength and the post-peak behavior are found to show good agreement within the accepted limits, compared with the experimental results. In addition, the parameters of proposed model are taken from two kinds of totally different CFT columns, so that it can be concluded that this model is also applicable to concrete confined by other special-shaped steel tubes.

  1. Design and Applications of In-Cavity Pulse Shaping by Spectral Sculpturing in Mode-Locked Fibre Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boscolo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent progress on the realisation of pulse shaping in passively-mode-locked fibre lasers by inclusion of an amplitude and/or phase spectral filter into the laser cavity. We numerically show that depending on the amplitude transfer function of the in-cavity filter, various regimes of advanced waveform generation can be achieved, including ones featuring parabolic-, flat-top- and triangular-profiled pulses. An application of this approach using a flat-top spectral filter is shown to achieve the direct generation of high-quality sinc-shaped optical Nyquist pulses with a widely tunable bandwidth from the laser oscillator. We also present the operation of an ultrafast fibre laser in which conventional soliton, dispersion-managed soliton (stretched-pulse and dissipative soliton mode-locking regimes can be selectively and reliably targeted by adaptively changing the dispersion profile and bandwidth programmed on an in-cavity programmable filter. The results demonstrate the strong potential of an in-cavity spectral pulse shaper for achieving a high degree of control over the dynamics and output of mode-locked fibre lasers.

  2. Bulk vs wedge shape layering techniques in V class cavities: marginal infiltration evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Giudice Roberto

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: Considering the limitation related to the technique used for the infiltration analysis in small V class cavities, the infiltration score is not influenced by the different stratification techniques.

  3. Regulation of flow through a T-Shaped open cavity by temperature dependent P, PI, and PID controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Sourav; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sumon

    2016-01-01

    P (proportional), PI (proportional-integral), and PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers are popular means of controlling industrial processes. Due to superior response, accuracy, and stable performance, PID controllers are mostly used in control systems. This paper presents a mathematical model and subsequent response analysis regarding regulation of flow in mixed convection through a T-shaped open cavity by temperature dependent controllers. The T-shaped cavity has cold top and hot bottom walls, while air is flowing through the inlet at surrounding temperature. The inflow is regulated by a controlled gate which operates according to the signal received from the controller. Values of proportional gain (k p ), integral gain (k i ), and derivative gain (k d ) are varied to obtain the desired system response and to ensure a stable system with fastest response. At first, only P controller is used and eventually PI and finally PID control scheme is applied for controller tuning. Tuning of different controllers (P, PI, and PID) are carried out systematically based on the reference temperature which is continuously monitored at a certain location inside the cavity. It is found that PID controller performs better than P or PI controller.

  4. Regulation of flow through a T-Shaped open cavity by temperature dependent P, PI, and PID controllers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Sourav, E-mail: ssaha09@me.buet.ac.bd; Mojumder, Satyajit, E-mail: satyajit@me.buet.ac.bd; Saha, Sumon, E-mail: sumonsaha@me.buet.ac.bd [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    P (proportional), PI (proportional-integral), and PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers are popular means of controlling industrial processes. Due to superior response, accuracy, and stable performance, PID controllers are mostly used in control systems. This paper presents a mathematical model and subsequent response analysis regarding regulation of flow in mixed convection through a T-shaped open cavity by temperature dependent controllers. The T-shaped cavity has cold top and hot bottom walls, while air is flowing through the inlet at surrounding temperature. The inflow is regulated by a controlled gate which operates according to the signal received from the controller. Values of proportional gain (k{sub p}), integral gain (k{sub i}), and derivative gain (k{sub d}) are varied to obtain the desired system response and to ensure a stable system with fastest response. At first, only P controller is used and eventually PI and finally PID control scheme is applied for controller tuning. Tuning of different controllers (P, PI, and PID) are carried out systematically based on the reference temperature which is continuously monitored at a certain location inside the cavity. It is found that PID controller performs better than P or PI controller.

  5. Regulation of flow through a T-Shaped open cavity by temperature dependent P, PI, and PID controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sourav; Mojumder, Satyajit; Saha, Sumon

    2016-07-01

    P (proportional), PI (proportional-integral), and PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers are popular means of controlling industrial processes. Due to superior response, accuracy, and stable performance, PID controllers are mostly used in control systems. This paper presents a mathematical model and subsequent response analysis regarding regulation of flow in mixed convection through a T-shaped open cavity by temperature dependent controllers. The T-shaped cavity has cold top and hot bottom walls, while air is flowing through the inlet at surrounding temperature. The inflow is regulated by a controlled gate which operates according to the signal received from the controller. Values of proportional gain (kp), integral gain (ki), and derivative gain (kd) are varied to obtain the desired system response and to ensure a stable system with fastest response. At first, only P controller is used and eventually PI and finally PID control scheme is applied for controller tuning. Tuning of different controllers (P, PI, and PID) are carried out systematically based on the reference temperature which is continuously monitored at a certain location inside the cavity. It is found that PID controller performs better than P or PI controller.

  6. Power-level regulation and simulation of nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillation using H-infinity loop shaping control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is to solve the power-level control issue of a nonlinear pressurized water reactor core with xenon oscillations. A nonlinear pressurized water reactor core is modeled using the lumped parameter method, and a linear model of the core is then obtained through the small perturbation linearization way. The H∞loop shapingcontrolis utilized to design a robust controller of the linearized core model.The calculated H∞loop shaping controller is applied to the nonlinear core model. The nonlinear core model and the H∞ loop shaping controller build the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system.Finally, the nonlinear core power-level H∞loop shaping control system is simulatedconsidering two typical load processes that are a step load maneuver and a ramp load maneuver, and simulation results show that the nonlinear control system is effective.

  7. Selection of a LGp0-shaped fundamental mode in a laser cavity: Phase versus amplitude masks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hasnaoui, A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available -plate (absorbing ring) set inside a diaphragmed laser cavity for selecting a pure LGp0 mode of radial order, p. We analyse, for each type of mask, the origin of the transverse mode selection, and contrary to what one might expect we find that it is not necessary...

  8. Hardware in the loop simulation of arbitrary magnitude shaped correlated radar clutter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, JJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a simple process for the generation of arbitrary probability distributions of complex data with correlation from sample to sample, optimized for hardware in the loop radar environment simulation. Measured radar clutter is used...

  9. Performance scaling via passive pulse shaping in cavity-enhanced optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Aleem M; Moses, Jeffrey; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lai, Chien-Jen; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-15

    We show that an enhancement cavity seeded at the full repetition rate of the pump laser can automatically reshape small-signal gain across the interacting pulses in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for close-to-optimal operation, significantly increasing both the gain bandwidth and the conversion efficiency, in addition to boosting gain for high-repetition-rate amplification. Applied to a degenerate amplifier, the technique can provide an octave-spanning gain bandwidth.

  10. Waveguide and articulated arm for Er:YAG laser system: shape and depth of laser cavity in hard dental tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Wang, You; Shi, Yi-Wei; Dolezalova, Libuse; Hamal, Karel; Krejsa, Otakar; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1998-04-01

    The aim of our study was to verify the efficiency of delivery systems for Er:YAG laser radiation which could be used in dentistry. The influence of increasing energy and number of pulses on a profile and depth of drilled holes was investigated. Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running mode, generating a length of pulses 200 microsecond with a maximum energy of 500 mJ. The delivery systems investigated were an articulated arm and a fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide. The prepared hard tissues were a sliced part of enamel, dentine and ivory. The laser radiation was directed on them by focusing optics (CaF2 lens) together with the cooling water to ensure that the tissues will not be burned. For the evaluation of shapes, depth and profiles of the prepared cavities the metallographic microscope, x-ray microtomograph and scanning electron microscope were used. From the results it was observed that the profile and depth of the cavities prepared by the laser radiation delivered by the various systems (waveguide or articulated arm) are not the same. The laser radiation delivered by waveguide produces a larger diameter cavity with a lower depth. The holes are smoother and without side effects.

  11. Eye rotation induced dynamics of a Newtonian fluid within the vitreous cavity: the effect of the chamber shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocchino, Alessandro; Repetto, Rodolfo; Cafferata, Chiara

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of the vitreous body induced by eye rotations is studied experimentally. In particular, we consider the case in which the vitreous cavity is filled by a Newtonian fluid, either because the vitreous is liquefied or because it has been replaced, after vitrectomy, by a viscous fluid. We employ a rigid Perspex container which models, in a magnified scale, the vitreous cavity of the human eye. The shape of the cavity closely resembles that of the real vitreous chamber; in particular, the anterior part of the container is concave in order to model the presence of the eye lens. The container is filled with glycerol and is mounted on the shaft of a computer-controlled motor which rotates according to a periodic time law. PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements are taken on the equatorial plane orthogonal to the axis of rotation. The experimental measurements show that the velocity field is strongly influenced by the deformed geometry of the domain. In particular, the formation of a vortex in the vicinity of the lens, which migrates in time towards the core of the domain, is invariably observed. The vortex path is tracked in time by means of a vortex identification technique and it is found that it is significantly influenced by the Womersley number of the flow. Particle trajectories are computed from the PIV measurements. Particles initially located at different positions on the equatorial horizontal plane (perpendicular to the axis of rotation) tend to concentrate in narrow regions adjacent to the lens, thus suggesting the existence, in such regions, of a vertical fluid ejection. Such a strong flow three-dimensionality, which is essentially induced by the irregular shape of the domain, may play a significant role in the mixing processes taking place inside the eye globe. The tangential stresses acting on the rigid boundary of the domain are also computed from the experimental measurements showing that regions subject to particularly intense stresses

  12. Temperature Dependence of Near-Infrared CO_2 Line Shapes Measured by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, Mélanie; Fleisher, Adam J.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2017-06-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio, mode-by-mode cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) line shape measurements of air-broadened transitions in the 30013 → 0001 band of ^{12}C^{16}O_2 located near λ = 1.6 μm. Absorption spectra were acquired from (230-290) K with a variable-temperature spectrometer developed in the framework of the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Mission to improve our understanding of carbon dioxide and oxygen line shape parameters. This system comprises a monolithic, thermally stabilized two-mirror, optical resonator exhibiting a mode stability of 200 kHz and a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 10^{-11} cm^{-1}. Observed spectra were modeled the using the recently recommended Hartmann-Tran line profile (HTP) (and several of its limiting cases) which includes the effects of Dicke narrowing, speed dependent broadening, correlation between velocity- and phase-changing collisions and first-order line mixing effects. At fixed temperature, line shape parameters were determined by constrained multispectrum fitting of spectra acquired over the pressure range (30 - 300) Torr. For each transition considered, analysis of the temperature dependence of the fitted line shape parameters yielded the pressure-broadening temperature exponent and speed dependence parameter, where the latter quantity was found to be in good agreement with theoretical values consistent with the HTP model. Tennyson, et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 86, (2014) 1931

  13. Advanced Quantitative Robust Control Engineering: New Solutions for Automatic Loop-Shaping for SISO and MIMO Systems. Part 1: SISO Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-24

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 17 September 2008 - 17-Sep-09 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Quantitative Robust Control Engineering : New...083027 Date: 1.September.2009 Page 1 Advanced Quantitative Robust Control Engineering : New Solutions for Automatic Loop-shaping for SISO...and MIMO Systems.Part 1: SISO Systems. Advanced Quantitative Robust Control Engineering : New Solutions for Automatic Loop-Shaping for SISO and

  14. Asymmetrically shaped hysteresis loop in exchange-biased FeNi/FeMn film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnatchenko, S.L.; Merenkov, D.N.; Bludov, A.N.; Pishko, V.V.; Shakhayeva, Yu.A.; Baran, M.; Szymczak, R.; Novosad, V.A.

    2006-01-01

    The magnetization reversal of the bilayer polycrystalline FeNi(50 A)/FeMn(50 A) film sputtered in a magnetic field has been studied by magnetic and magneto-optical techniques. The external magnetic fields were applied along the easy or hard magnetization axis of the ferromagnetic permalloy layer. The asymmetry of hysteresis loop has been found. Appreciable asymmetry and the exchange bias were observed only in the field applied along the easy axis. The specific features of magnetization reversal were explained within the phenomenological model that involves high-order exchange anisotropy and misalignment of the easy axes of the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic layers. It has been shown that the film can exist in one of three equilibrium magnetic states in the field applied along the easy axis. The transitions between these states occur as first-order phase transitions. The observed hysteresis loop asymmetry is related to the existence of the metastable state

  15. A spatial gradient of bacterial diversity in the human oral cavity shaped by salivary flow

    OpenAIRE

    Proctor, Diana M.; Fukuyama, Julia A.; Loomer, Peter M.; Armitage, Gary C.; Lee, Stacey A.; Davis, Nicole M.; Ryder, Mark I.; Holmes, Susan P.; Relman, David A.

    2018-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns in microbial communities provide insights into the forces that shape them, their functions and roles in health and disease. Here, we used spatial and ecological statistics to analyze the role that saliva plays in structuring bacterial communities of the human mouth using >9000 dental and mucosal samples. We show that regardless of tissue type (teeth, alveolar mucosa, keratinized gingiva, or buccal mucosa), surface-associated bacterial communities vary along an ec...

  16. Tunable multi-wavelength SOA based linear cavity dual-output port fiber laser using Lyot-Sagnac loop mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummy, M A; Madamopoulos, N; Joyo, A; Kouar, M; Dorsinville, R

    2011-02-14

    We propose and demonstrate a simple dual port tunable from the C- to the L-band multi-wavelength fiber laser based on a SOA designed for C-band operation and fiber loop mirrors. The laser incorporates a polarization maintaining fiber in one of the fiber loop mirrors and delivers multi-wavelength operation at 9 laser lines with a wavelength separation of ~2.8 nm at room temperature. We show that the number of lasing wavelengths increases with the increase of the bias current of the SOA. Wavelength tunability from the C to L-band is achieved by exploiting the gain compression of a SOA. Stable multi-wavelength operation is achieved at room temperature without temperature compensation techniques, with measured power and the wavelength stability within < ±0.5 dB and 
±0.1 nm, respectively.

  17. Loop Shaping Control Design for a Supersonic Propulsion System Model Using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) Specifications and Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    This paper covers the propulsion system component modeling and controls development of an integrated mixed compression inlet and turbojet engine that will be used for an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. Using previously created nonlinear component-level propulsion system models, a linear integrated propulsion system model and loop shaping control design have been developed. The design includes both inlet normal shock position control and jet engine rotor speed control for a potential supersonic commercial transport. A preliminary investigation of the impacts of the aero-elastic effects on the incoming flow field to the propulsion system are discussed, however, the focus here is on developing a methodology for the propulsion controls design that prevents unstart in the inlet and minimizes the thrust oscillation experienced by the vehicle. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) specifications and bounds, and aspects of classical loop shaping are used in the control design process. Model uncertainty is incorporated in the design to address possible error in the system identification mapping of the nonlinear component models into the integrated linear model.

  18. Influence of fourfold anisotropy form on hysteresis loop shape in ferromagnetic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ehrmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the form of different mathematical depictions of fourfold magnetic anisotropies has been examined, using a simple macro-spin model. Strong differences in longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops occur due to deviations from the usual phenomenological model, such as using absolute value functions. The proposed possible models can help understanding measurements on sophisticated magnetic nanosystems, like exchange bias layered structures employed in magnetic hard disk heads or magnetic nano-particles, and support the development of solutions with specific magnetization reversal behavior needed in novel magneto-electronic devices.

  19. Wind turbine inverter robust loop-shaping control subject to grid interaction effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Mikkel Peter Sidoroff; Wu, Qiuwei; Blanke, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    the grid and the number of wind turbines connected. Power converter based turbines inject harmonic currents, which are attenuated by passive filters. A robust high order active filter controller is proposed to complement the passive filtering. The H∞ design of the control loop enables desired tracking......An H∞ robust control of wind turbine inverters employing an LCL filter is proposed in this paper. The controller dynamics are designed for selective harmonic filtering in an offshore transmission network subject to parameter perturbations. Parameter uncertainty in the network originates from...

  20. Quantum input-output theory for optical cavities with arbitrary coupling strength: Application to two-photon wave-packet shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymer, M. G.; McKinstrie, C. J.

    2013-10-01

    We develop quantum-optical input-output theory for resonators with arbitrary coupling strength, and for input fields whose spectrum can be wider than the cavity free-spectral range, while ensuring that the field-operator commutator relations in space-time variables are correct. The cavity-field commutator exhibits a series of space-time “echoes,” representing causal connections of certain space-time points by light propagation. We apply the theory to two-photon wave-packet shaping by cavity reflection, which displays a remarkable illustration of dispersion cancellation. We also show that the theory is amenable to inclusion of intracavity absorbing and emitting atoms, allowing, for example, dissipative losses within the cavity to be incorporated in a quantum mechanically correct way.

  1. Electromagnetic fields backscattered from an s-shaped inlet cavity with an absorber coating on its inner walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, R. J.; Chuang, C. W.; Pathak, P. H.

    1987-01-01

    The EM backscatter from a two-dimensional S-shaped inlet cavity is analyzed using three different techniques, namely a hybrid combination of asymptotic high frequency and modal methods, an integral equation method, and the geometrical optics ray method, respectively. This inlet has a thin absorber coating on its perfectly conducting inner walls and the planar interior termination is made perfectly conducting. The effect of the absorber on the inner wall is treated via a perturbation scheme in the hybrid approach where it is assumed that the loss is sufficiently small for the method to be valid. The results are compared with the backscatter from a straight inlet cavity to evaluate the effect of offsetting the termination in the S-bend configuration such that it is not visible from the open end of the inlet. The envelope of the backscatter pattern for the straight inlet is always seen to peak around the forward axis due to the large return from the directly visible termination, and the pattern envelope tapers off away from the forward axis. Offsetting the termination causes the envelope of the backscatter pattern to flatten out, thereby reducing the return near the forward axis by several dB. The absorber coating reduces the pattern level of the straight inlet in directions away from the forward axis but has little effect on the peak near the axis; furthermore, the absorber coating is seen to consistently reduce the backscatter from the S-bend inlet for almost all incidence angles. The hybrid method gives excellent agreement with experimental data and with the integral equation solution, whereas, the geometrical optics ray tracing method is able to generally predict the average of the bachscatter pattern but not the pattern details.

  2. Design of an ammonia closed-loop storage system in a CSP power plant with a power tower cavity receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdiwe, Ramadan; Haider, Markus

    2017-06-01

    In this study the thermochemical system using ammonia as energy storage carrier is investigated and a transient mathematical model using MATLAB software was developed to predict the behavior of the ammonia closed-loop storage system including but not limited to the ammonia solar reactor and the ammonia synthesis reactor. The MATLAB model contains transient mass and energy balances as well as chemical equilibrium model for each relevant system component. For the importance of the dissociation and formation processes in the system, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation on the ammonia solar and synthesis reactors has been performed. The CFD commercial package FLUENT is used for the simulation study and all the important mechanisms for packed bed reactors are taken into account, such as momentum, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions. The FLUENT simulation reveals the profiles inside both reactors and compared them with the profiles from the MATLAB code.

  3. Ultrasensitive Mach-Zehnder Interferometric Temperature Sensor Based on Liquid-Filled D-Shaped Fiber Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A liquid-filled D-shaped fiber (DF cavity serving as an in-fiber Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated for temperature sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity. The miniature MZI is constructed by splicing a segment of DF between two single-mode fibers (SMFs to form a microcavity (MC for filling and replacement of various refractive index (RI liquids. By adjusting the effective RI difference between the DF and MC (the two interference arms, experimental and calculated results indicate that the interference spectra show different degrees of temperature dependence. As the effective RI of the liquid-filled MC approaches that of the DF, temperature sensitivity up to −84.72 nm/°C with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.9953 has been experimentally achieved for a device with the MC length of 456 μm, filled with liquid RI of 1.482. Apart from ultrahigh sensitivity, the proposed MCMZI device possesses additional advantages of its miniature size and simple configuration; these features make it promising and competitive in various temperature sensing applications, such as consumer electronics, biological treatments, and medical diagnosis.

  4. New analytical calculations of the resonance modes in lens-shaped cavities: applications to the calculations of the energy levels and electronic wavefunctions in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even, J; Loualiche, S

    2003-01-01

    The problem of the energy levels and electronic wavefunctions in quantum dots is studied in the parabolic coordinates system. A conventional effective mass Hamiltonian is written. For an infinite potential barrier, it is related to the more general problem of finding the resonance modes in a cavity. The problem is found to be separable for a biconvex-shaped cavity or quantum dot with an infinite potential barrier. This first shape of quantum dot corresponds to the intersection of two orthogonal confocal parabolas. Then plano-convex lens-shaped cavities or quantum dots are studied. This problem is no more separable in the parabolic coordinates but using symmetry properties, we show that the exact solutions of the problem are simple combinations of the previous solutions. The same approach is used for spherical coordinates and hemispherical quantum dots. It is finally shown that convex lens-shaped quantum dots give a good description of self-organized InAs quantum dots grown on InP

  5. Introducing a novel method to estimate the total heat transfer coefficient inside irregular-shape cavities utilizing thermoelectric modules; Special application in solar engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asadi, Amin; Rahbar, Nader; Rezaniakolaei, Alireza

    The main objective of the present study is to introduce a novel method to measure the total heat transfer coefficient inside irregular-shape cavities, used in solar applications, utilizing thermoelectric modules. Applying mathematical and thermodynamics modeling, the governing equations related...... to the total heat transfer coefficient between thermoelectric and glass cover as a function of ambient temperature, glass temperature, and output voltage has been derived. Investigating the accuracy of the proposed equation, an experimental case study has been performed. The experimental setup consists...... transfer coefficient inside irregular-shape cavities. The average deviation between experimental data and the output of the proposed equation is approximately 9 %, which shows the good ability of the equation in estimating the total heat transfer coefficient....

  6. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56 Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices a4 and a7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix a4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix a4) and Gln130 (helix a7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix a4. This local conformational switch of helix a4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution smallmolecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol.

  7. Abnormal Gray Matter Shape, Thickness, and Volume in the Motor Cortico-Subcortical Loop in Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder: Association with Clinical and Motor Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayel, Shady; Postuma, Ronald B; Montplaisir, Jacques; Bedetti, Christophe; Brambati, Simona; Carrier, Julie; Monchi, Oury; Bourgouin, Pierre-Alexandre; Gaubert, Malo; Gagnon, Jean-François

    2018-02-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Anatomical gray matter abnormalities in the motor cortico-subcortical loop areas remain under studied in iRBD patients. We acquired T1-weighted images and administrated quantitative motor tasks in 41 patients with polysomnography-confirmed iRBD and 41 healthy subjects. Cortical thickness and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses were performed to investigate local cortical thickness and gray matter volume changes, vertex-based shape analysis to investigate shape of subcortical structures, and structure-based volumetric analyses to investigate volumes of subcortical and brainstem structures. Cortical thickness analysis revealed thinning in iRBD patients in bilateral medial superior frontal, orbitofrontal, anterior cingulate cortices, and the right dorsolateral primary motor cortex. VBM results showed lower gray matter volume in iRBD patients in the frontal lobes, anterior cingulate gyri, and caudate nucleus. Shape analysis revealed extensive surface contraction in the external and internal segments of the left pallidum. Clinical and motor impaired features in iRBD were associated with anomalies of the motor cortico-subcortical loop. In summary, iRBD patients showed numerous gray matter structural abnormalities in the motor cortico-subcortical loop, which are associated with lower motor performance and clinical manifestations of iRBD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Quantitative analysis of a III-V tapered horn-shaped metal-clad nano-cavity as an on-chip light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukmo Koo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A horn-shaped metal-clad InGaAsP nano-cavity with sloped sidewalls is proposed as a platform for nanoscale light sources. The nano-cavity’s physical dimensions are 350 × 350 × 350 nm3, and its mode volume is 0.5 (λ0/n3. In our numerical simulations and quantitative analysis, we have shown that the sloped sidewalls reduce metallic absorption and improve resonant mode confinement; and adjusting their slope from 0 to 16° increased the Q factor from 150 to 900 and laser modulation 3dB bandwidth from 4.3 to 36 GHz. The lasing threshold current was expected to be 35 μA at 16°. In a simulated feasibility study, we demonstrate 60 Gbps modulated laser signal (5 fJ/bit, producing 20 μW output power at the 1.5 μm wavelength with injection current 100 μA, as an implementation of horn-shaped nano-cavity platform to the low power and ultra-fast on-chip nano-laser.

  9. Natural convection analysis employing entropy generation and heatline visualization in a hollow L-shaped cavity filled with nanofluid using lattice Boltzmann method- experimental thermo-physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Kasaeipoor, Abbas; Malekshah, Emad Hasani; Amiri, Ali

    2018-03-01

    The natural convection heat transfer and fluid flow is analyzed using lattice Boltzmann numerical method. The entropy generation analysis and heatline visualization are used to study the convective flow field comprehensively. The hollow L-shaped cavity is considered and filled with SiO2-TiO2/Water-EG (60:40) hybrid nanofluid. The thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of nanofluid are measured experimentally. To use the experimental data of thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity, two sets of correlations based on temperature for six different solid volume fractions of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 vol% are derived. The influences of different governing parameters such different aspect ratios, solid volume fractions of nanofluid and Rayleigh numbers on the fluid flow, temperature filed, average/local Nusselt number, total/local entropy generation and heatlines are presented.

  10. Analysis of natural convection in nanofluid-filled H-shaped cavity by entropy generation and heatline visualization using lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Sepehr, Mohammad; Lariche, Milad Janghorban; Mesbah, Mohammad; Kasaeipoor, Abbas; Malekshah, Emad Hasani

    2018-03-01

    The lattice Boltzmann simulation of natural convection in H-shaped cavity filled with nanofluid is performed. The entropy generation analysis and heatline visualization are employed to analyze the considered problem comprehensively. The produced nanofluid is SiO2-TiO2/Water-EG (60:40) hybrid nanofluid, and the thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of used nanofluid are measured experimentally. To use the experimental data of thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity, two sets of correlations based on temperature for six different solid volume fractions of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 vol% are derived. The influences of different governing parameters such different aspect ratio, solid volume fractions of nanofluid and Rayleigh numbers on the fluid flow, temperature filed, average/local Nusselt number, total/local entropy generation and heatlines are presented.

  11. Flexible performance design for the H∞ loop-shaping control based on the linear matrix inequality approach: Application to the coaxial rotor helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyan Dong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a new H ∞ loop-shaping control to decrease the complexity of the appropriate selection of the required performance for a coaxial rotor helicopter with unpredicted or unknown unstructured uncertainties. Uncertainty models are normally assumed that some knowledge of type is known. And to model a particular uncertainty as a separate model is necessary in the high-performance design of specified applications. But to model each particular uncertainty will increase the complexity of performance design for the extremely complex plant. H ∞ loop-shaping control provides a competitive and flexible choice to simultaneously represent a family of unpredicted and unconsidered unstructured uncertainty bounded by H ∞ norm. Many researches have been conducted to consider some aspects of this method, for example, the nominal stability, robustness to uncertainty, and implementation issues. However, to decrease the complexity of the appropriate selection of the required performance was not considered seriously. Therefore, a sufficient set of stable condition is derived using linear matrix inequality approach to provide the flexible performance design considering unpredicted and unknown unstructured uncertainties. Furthermore, the proposed method is applied to stabilize the attitude subsystem of a reconstructed coaxial rotor helicopter. Simulations indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method in the step response.

  12. Optimization of mixed convection in a lid-driven porous square cavity with internal elliptic shape adiabatic block and linearly heated side walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, M. Jahirul Haque; Alim, M. A.; Bhuiyan, A. H.; Ali, M.

    2017-06-01

    The physical model considered here is a lid-driven porous square cavity with internal elliptic shape adiabatic block and linearly heated side walls. The top moving wall is well cold and set with uniform velocity. The bottom moving wall heated, linearly heated side walls and inside the elliptic shape adiabatic. The relevant parameters in the present study are Darcy number Da = 10-5-10-3, Grashof number Gr = 103-105, Reynolds number Re = 1-102 and Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. The isotherms are also almost symmetric at small Re with higher Gr (Gr = 105) and Da (Da = 10-3) and natural convection is found to be dominant whereas the isotherms are compressed near the left and bottom walls at higher Re for linearly heated side walls. The solution of these governing equations is obtained numerically with the finite element approach using the Galerkin method of weighted residuals. Results are presented in the form of streamlines, isotherms, Local Nusselt number, average Nusselt number, velocity and temperature for the afore mentioned parameters. The numerical results indicate the strong influence of the mentioned parameters on the flow structure and heat transfer as well as average Nusselt number. An optimum combination of the governing parameters would result in higher heat transfer.

  13. A robust grid current controller with grid harmonic and filter resonance damping capabilities using a closed-loop admittance shaping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez, Jorge; Cóbreces, Santiago; Wang, Xiongfei

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a grid current control of a grid connected Voltage Source Converter (VSC) with an LCL filter. The control method enables to shape the input admittance of the converter in addition to track a given current reference. By specifying a low resistive admittance profile, a suitable ...

  14. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  15. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  16. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-01-01

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth

  17. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids in plaque damage the enamel covering your teeth. It also creates holes in the tooth called cavities. Cavities usually do not hurt, unless they grow very large and affect nerves or cause a tooth fracture. An untreated cavity can lead to an infection ...

  19. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients E_{acc} up to 35  MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP and up to 42  MV/m after electropolishing (EP. More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients E_{acc} of 30–35  MV/m were measured after BCP and E_{acc} up to 40  MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of E_{acc}=30–35  MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and

  20. Cavity-cavity conditional logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Gao, Yvonne Y.; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    In a superconducting circuit architecture, the highest coherence times are typically offered by 3D cavities. Moreover, these cavities offer a hardware-efficient way of redundantly encoding quantum information. While single-qubit control on a cavity has already been demonstrated, there is a need for a universal two-qubit gate between such cavities. In this talk, we demonstrate a cavity-cavity gate by parametric pumping on a fixed-frequency transmon interacting with the two cavities. Every gate application lowers the state fidelity by only 1%, while maintaining an entangling rate on-off ratio of 29dB. Additionally, we show that the gate is applicable not only to qubits consisting of single photons, but also to more complex encodings. These results illustrate the usefulness of cavities beyond the mere storage of quantum information, and pave the way towards gates between error-corrected logical qubits.

  1. Superconducting elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J K

    2011-01-01

    We give a brief overview of the history, state of the art, and future for elliptical superconducting cavities. Principles of the cell shape optimization, criteria for multi-cell structures design, HOM damping schemes and other features are discussed along with examples of superconducting structures for various applications.

  2. Cavity types

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In the field of particle accelerators the most common use of RF cavities is to increase the particle velocity of traversing particles. This feature makes them one of the core ingredients of every accelerator, and in the case of linear accelerators they are even the dominant machine component. Since there are many different types of accelerator, RF cavities have been optimized for different purposes and with different abilities, e.g., cavities with fixed or variable RF frequency, cavities for short or long pulses/CW operation, superconducting and normal-conducting cavities. This lecture starts with a brief historical introduction and an explanation on how to get from Maxwell's equations to a simple cavity. Then, cavities will be classified by the type of mode that is employed for acceleration, and an explanation is given as to why certain modes are used in particular cavity types. The lecture will close with a comparison of normal versus superconducting cavities and a few words on the actual power consumption ...

  3. Development of large grain cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DESY activities on 1.3 GHz tesla shape single cell and nine-cell large grain (LG resonators are presented; results of the past five years are covered. The R&D program explores the potential for production of elliptical superconducting cavities. The main efforts have been devoted to material investigation, development of LG disk production, cavity fabrication from this material, and a search for appropriate treatment. More than 250 LG disks are manufactured; several single cell and 11 nine-cell resonators are produced and rf tested after buffered chemical polishing and after additional electropolishing. A maximum accelerating gradient of approximately 45  MV/m for this type of cavity was achieved in two resonators. Two of the LG cavities have been installed and are currently being used in the FLASH accelerator operation. Assembly of a cryomodule, consisting of LG cavities only, is in the works. Perspectives of the LG cavity application are discussed.

  4. Coherent stacking of picosecond laser pulses in a high-Q optical cavity for accelerator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androsov, V.P.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Telegin, Yu.N.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed the harmonic analysis of the steady-state coherent pulse-stacking process in a high-Q Fabry-Perot cavity. The expression for the stacked pulse shape is obtained as a function of both the laser cavity and pulse-stacking cavity parameters. We have also estimated the pulse power gains attainable in the laser-optical system of NESTOR storage ring, which is under development at Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology. It is shown that high power gains (∼10 4 ) can be, in principle, achieved in a cavity, formed with low-absorption, high reflectivity (R ∼ 0.9999) mirrors, if the laser cavity length will differ exactly by half wavelength from the pulse-stacking cavity length. It implies development of the sophisticated frequency stabilization loop for maintaining the cavity length constant within a sub-nanometer range. At the same time, power gains of ∼10 3 can be obtained with medium reflectivity mirrors (R ∼ 0.999) at considerably lower cost

  5. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  6. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  7. Bistability of Cavity Magnon Polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Pu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Dengke; Li, Tie-Fu; Hu, C.-M.; You, J. Q.

    2018-01-01

    We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small numbers of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either a positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.

  8. Bistability of Cavity Magnon Polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Pu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Dengke; Li, Tie-Fu; Hu, C-M; You, J Q

    2018-02-02

    We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small numbers of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either a positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.

  9. Dynamic PID loop control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  10. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  11. Cavity Optomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kippenberg, T. J.; Vahala, K. J.

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical and optical degrees of freedom via radiation pressure has been a subject of early research in the context of gravitational wave detection. Recent experimental advances have allowed studying for the first time the modifications of mechanical dynamics provided by radiation pressure. This paper reviews the consequences of back-action of light confined in whispering-gallery dielectric micro-cavities, and presents a unified treatment of its two manifestations: notably th...

  12. Central safety factor and β N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary shape modification, using TRANSP for closed loop simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S.; Goumiri, I. R.; Menard, J.

    2015-04-24

    The high-performance operational goals of NSTX-U will require development of advanced feedback control algorithms, including control of ßN and the safety factor profile. In this work, a novel approach to simultaneously controlling ßN and the value of the safety factor on the magnetic axis, q0, through manipulation of the plasma boundary shape and total beam power, is proposed. Simulations of the proposed scheme show promising results and motivate future experimental implementation and eventual integration into a more complex current profile control scheme planned to include actuation of individual beam powers, density, and loop voltage. As part of this work, a flexible framework for closed loop simulations within the high-fidelity code TRANSP was developed. The framework, used here to identify control-design-oriented models and to tune and test the proposed controller, exploits many of the predictive capabilities of TRANSP and provides a means for performing control calculations based on user-supplied data (controller matrices, target waveforms, etc.). The flexible framework should enable high-fidelity testing of a variety of control algorithms, thereby reducing the amount of expensive experimental time needed to implement new control algorithms on NSTX-U and other devices.

  13. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrage, D.

    2000-01-01

    The static and dynamic structural behavior of superconducting cavities for various projects was determined by finite element structural analysis. The β = 0.61 cavity shape for the Neutron Science Project was studied in detail and found to meet all design requirements if fabricated from five millimeter thick material with a single annular stiffener. This 600 MHz cavity will have a Lorentz coefficient of minus1.8 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2 and a lowest structural resonance of more than 100 Hz. Cavities at β = 0.48, 0.61, and 0.77 were analyzed for a Neutron Science Project concept which would incorporate 7-cell cavities. The medium and high beta cavities were found to meet all criteria but it was not possible to generate a β = 0.48 cavity with a Lorentz coefficient of less than minus3 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2

  14. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  15. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  16. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  17. Design and Characterization of X-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala Devi, A. S.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Joshi, L. M.; Kumar, B.; Meena, R.

    2012-11-01

    Sheet Beam Klystron (SBK) is a device employing rectangular/elliptical cross section beam. The barbell cavity for SBK has been designed providing uniform flat electric field profile across the width of the cavity. The loop coupling arrangement has also been designed using CST Microwave studio software tool and optimized for maximum return loss. The designed barbell cavity has been re-optimized after the insertion of the loop coupling to provide flat electric field profile across the width of the cavity. The cavity has also been fabricated and initial characterization has been carried out. The simulated results and the experimental results matches closely.

  18. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner...... into the double-stranded DNA. Unzipping of the double-stranded DNA occurs in a cleft arranged by acidic and hydrophobic residues facilitating the crRNA-DNA hybrid formation. The PAM single-stranded DNA is funnelled towards the nuclease site through a mixed hydrophobic and basic cavity. In this catalytic...... conformation, the PAM-interacting domain and the helix-loop-helix motif in the REC1 domain adopt a 'rail' shape and 'flap-on' conformations, respectively, channelling the PAM strand into the cavity. A steric barrier between the RuvC-II and REC1 domains forms the 'septum', separating the displaced PAM strand...

  19. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  20. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus....

  1. The CEBAF separator cavity resonance control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wissmann; C. Hovater; A. Guerra; T. Plawski

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade will increase the maximum beam energy from 6 GeV to 12 GeV available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three halls. The resulting increase in RF separator cavity gradient and subsequent increase in RF power needed for these higher energies will require the cavities to have active resonance control. Currently, at the present 4 to 6 GeV energies, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW) which is maintained at a constant temperature of 95 Fahrenheit. This approach is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system that controls both water temperature and flow has been designed and built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to regulate water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately, closed loop control will be maintained by monitoring each cavity's reflected power. This paper describes this system

  2. Designing, Probing, and Stabilizing Exotic Fabry-Perot Cavities for Studying Strongly Correlated Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryou, Albert

    Synthetic materials made of engineered quasiparticles are a powerful platform for studying manybody physics and strongly correlated systems due to their bottom-up approach to Hamiltonian modeling. Photonic quasiparticles called polaritons are particularly appealing since they inherit fast dynamics from light and strong interaction from matter. This thesis describes the experimental demonstration of cavity Rydberg polaritons, which are composite particles arising from the hybridization of an optical cavity with Rydberg EIT, as well as the tools for probing and stabilizing the cavity. We first describe the design, construction, and testing of a four-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity, whose small waist size on the order of 10 microns is comparable to the Rydberg blockade radius. By achieving strong coupling between the cavity photon and an atomic ensemble undergoing electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we observe the emergence of the dark-state polariton and characterize its single-body properties as well as the single-quantum nonlinearity. We then describe the implementation of a holographic spatial light modulator for exciting different transverse modes of the cavity, an essential tool for studying polariton-polariton scattering. For compensating optical aberrations, we employ a digital micromirror device (DMD), combining beam shaping with adaptive optics to produce diffraction-limited light. We quantitatively measure the purity of the DMD-produced Hermite-Gauss modes and confirm up to 99.2% efficiency. One application of the technique is to create Laguerre-Gauss modes, which have been used to probe synthetic Landau levels for photons in a twisted, nonplanar cavity. Finally, we describe the implementation of an FPGA-based FIR filter for stabilizing the cavity. We digitally cancel the acoustical resonances of the feedback-controlled mechanical system, thereby demonstrating an order-of-magnitude enhancement in the feedback bandwidth from 200 Hz to more than 2 k

  3. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  4. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  5. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  6. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  7. The Model and Simulations of the LHC 400 MHz Cavity Controller

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J

    2007-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight superconducting single-cell 400.8 MHz cavities per beam, with each cavity driven by a 300 kW klystron via a circulator and waveguide. As the LHC is a high current collider (nominal 0.6 A DC), the challenge is to keep the effective impedance of the cavity at a minimum and to reduce all sources of RF noise that may degrade the beam lifetime (target value in excess of ten hours). In order to achieve this each klystron-cavity chain has a Cavity Controller implementing three Low Level loops: RF feedback, Tuner loop and Klystron loop. This note presents simulation models for the non-linear klystron, the cavity, the RF feedback, the tuner loop and the klystron loop. A model for the tuner mechanics based on measured step responses is also derived. The gains and time constants are optimized for the various loops. For the RF feedback and the tuner loop, the simulations are in excellent agreement with measurements done on a full-size test set-up including klystron and cavity. For the klystro...

  8. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  9. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  10. High bandwidth frequency lock of a rigid tunable optical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millo, Jacques; Merzougui, Mourad; Di Pace, Sibilla; Chaibi, Walid

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we present a high bandwidth frequency lock of a rigid tunable Fabry Perot cavity based on a set of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuators. The cavity spacer was specifically designed such that the frequency of the first resonance of the whole assembly under PZT excitation is above 35 kHz, thus allowing a servo-loop bandwidth of 13 kHz. It is demonstrated that no significant noise is added by the cavity to the output beam with respect to the input beam over the servo-loop bandwidth. This cavity can be used as a pre-mode cleaner in interferometric gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo.

  11. Field stabilization in superconducting cavities under pulsed operating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessier, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of Tesla linear accelerator project, superconducting cavity battery is used to accelerate electrons and positrons. These cavities require pulsed running and must reach very high accelerating gradients. Under the action of the Lorentz force, the resonance frequency shifts and leaves the band-pass width, which hinders the field from taking its maximal value inside the cavity. The setting of an auto-oscillating loop allows to bring the generator frequency under the control of the cavity frequency. A feedback system is needed to reduce the energy dispersion inside the particle packets. The effects of the mechanical vibrations that disturb the accelerating voltage phase between two impulses are also compensated by a feedback loop. This thesis describes all these phenomena and computes their effects on the energy dispersion of the beam in both cases of relativistic and non-relativistic particles. (A.C.)

  12. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-06-22

    Cpf1 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that is emerging as a powerful genome-editing tool. Here we provide insight into its DNA-targeting mechanism by determining the structure of Francisella novicida Cpf1 with the triple-stranded R-loop generated after DNA cleavage. The structure reveals the machinery involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner into the double-stranded DNA. Unzipping of the double-stranded DNA occurs in a cleft arranged by acidic and hydrophobic residues facilitating the crRNA-DNA hybrid formation. The PAM single-stranded DNA is funnelled towards the nuclease site through a mixed hydrophobic and basic cavity. In this catalytic conformation, the PAM-interacting domain and the helix-loop-helix motif in the REC1 domain adopt a 'rail' shape and 'flap-on' conformations, respectively, channelling the PAM strand into the cavity. A steric barrier between the RuvC-II and REC1 domains forms the 'septum', separating the displaced PAM strand and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1.

  13. Intra-cavity vortex beam generation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available in Fig. 3. For a Gaussian pump beam (Fig. 4(a)) we achieved a Gaussian output (Fig. 4(b)) and for a ring shaped pump beam (Fig. 4(c)) we achieved a LG01 (Fig. 4(d)) eigenmode of pure modal quality. The idea of pump shaping is employed to a plano... plano-concave laser cavity with a ring shaped pump intensity profile. The beam shaping element could be removed to revert back to the Gaussian pump scenario. Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8130 813009-4 Downloaded from SPIE Digital Library on 30 Sep 2011...

  14. Mechanical evaluation of space closure loops in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Eduardo Uggeri; Maruo, Hiroshi; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando; Camargo, Elisa Souza

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the mechanical performance of teardrop-shaped loops and teardrop-shaped loops with helix used in orthodontic space closure. Sixty retraction loops made with 0.019" x 0.025" stainless steel (SS) and beta-titanium (BT) wires were used. They were attached to a testing machine to measure the magnitudes of the sagittal force and the load-deflection ratio necessary for 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm activation. The results demonstrated that the BT alloy presented significantly smaller mean values (p < 0.01) of sagittal force and load-deflection than the SS alloy. The loop with the highest mean value of sagittal force and load-deflection was the teardrop-shaped loop (p < 0.01). Differences were observed in the mean values of sagittal force and load-deflection among activations, and the highest mean value was found in the activation of 3 mm, while the smallest mean value was evident in the activation of 1 mm (p < 0.01). It could be concluded that the metallic alloy used and the presence of a helix in configuration of the loops may have a strong influence on the sagittal force produced and on the load-deflection ratio; the teardrop-shaped loops and teardrop-shaped loops with helix in BT presented the release of lighter forces; the teardrop-shaped loop in SS generated a high load-deflection ratio, providing high magnitudes of horizontal force during its deactivation.

  15. Fundamental and Harmonic Oscillations in Neighboring Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Liu, Yu; Vai Tam, Kuan

    2017-06-01

    We present observations of multimode (fundamental and harmonic) oscillations in a loop system, which appear to be simultaneously excited by a GOES C-class flare. Analysis of the periodic oscillations reveals that (1) the primary loop with a period of P a ≈ 4 minutes and a secondary loop with two periods of P a ≈ 4 minutes and P b ≈ 2 minutes are detected simultaneously in closely spaced loop strands; (2) both oscillation components have their peak amplitudes near the loop apex, while in the second loop the low-frequency component P a dominates in a loop segment that is two times larger than the high-frequency component P b ; (3) the harmonic mode P b shows the largest deviation from a sinusoidal loop shape at the loop apex. We conclude that multiple harmonic modes with different displacement profiles can be excited simultaneously even in closely spaced strands, similar to the overtones of a violin string.

  16. Evaluation and Comparison of Biomechanical Properties of Snail Loop with that of Opus Loop and Teardrop Loop for en masse Retraction of Anterior Teeth: FEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Rajkumar Rao

    2013-01-01

    Results: Inherently the M/F ratio produced was higher and F/D rate produced was least for opus loop compared to snail loop and teardrop loop. Conclusion: With incorporation of 20°gable bends snail loop prepared in 0.017 × 0.025 inch and 0.019 × 0.025 inch TMA wire is very efficient to deliver M/F ratio required for translatory tooth movement with acceptable F/D rate. Snail loop is easy to fabricate and finer shape morphology prevents tissue impingement.

  17. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  18. Dissection of the water cavity of yeast thioredoxin 1: the effect of a hydrophobic residue in the cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Anwar; Gomes-Neto, Francisco; Myiamoto, Catarina Akiko; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fabio C L

    2015-04-21

    The water cavity of yeast thioredoxin 1 (yTrx1) is an ancestral, conserved structural element that is poorly understood. We recently demonstrated that the water cavity is involved in the complex protein dynamics that are responsible for the catalytically relevant event of coupling hydration, proton exchange, and motion at the interacting loops. Its main feature is the presence of the conserved polar residue, Asp24, which is buried in a hydrophobic cavity. Here, we evaluated the role of the solvation of Asp24 as the main element that is responsible for the formation of the water cavity in thioredoxins. We showed that the substitution of Asp24 with a hydrophobic residue (D24A) was not sufficient to completely close the cavity. The dynamics of the D24A mutant of yTrx1 at multiple time scales revealed that the D24A mutant presents motions at different time scales near the active site, interaction loops, and water cavity, revealing the existence of a smaller dissected cavity. Molecular dynamics simulation, along with experimental molecular dynamics, allowed a detailed description of the water cavity in wild-type yTrx1 and D24A. The cavity connects the interacting loops, the central β-sheet, and α-helices 2 and 4. It is formed by three contiguous lobes, which we call lobes A-C. Lobe A is hydrophilic and the most superficial. It is formed primarily by the conserved Lys54. Lobe B is the central lobe formed by the catalytically important residues Cys33 and Asp24, which are strategically positioned. Lobe C is the most hydrophobic and is formed by the conserved cis-Pro73. The central lobe B is closed upon introduction of the D24A mutation, revealing that independent forces other than solvation of Asp24 maintain lobes A and C in the open configuration. These data allow us to better understand the properties of this enzyme.

  19. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  20. Loop Transfer Matrix and Loop Quantum Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvidy, George K.

    2000-01-01

    The gonihedric model of random surfaces on a 3d Euclidean lattice has equivalent representation in terms of transfer matrix K(Q i ,Q f ), which describes the propagation of loops Q. We extend the previous construction of the loop transfer matrix to the case of nonzero self-intersection coupling constant κ. We introduce the loop generalization of Fourier transformation which allows to diagonalize transfer matrices, that depend on symmetric difference of loops only and express all eigenvalues of 3d loop transfer matrix through the correlation functions of the corresponding 2d statistical system. The loop Fourier transformation allows to carry out the analogy with quantum mechanics of point particles, to introduce conjugate loop momentum P and to define loop quantum mechanics. We also consider transfer matrix on 4d lattice which describes propagation of memebranes. This transfer matrix can also be diagonalized by using the generalized Fourier transformation, and all its eigenvalues are equal to the correlation functions of the corresponding 3d statistical system. In particular the free energy of the 4d membrane system is equal to the free energy of 3d gonihedric system of loops and is equal to the free energy of 2d Ising model. (author)

  1. Experimental analysis of surface finish in normal conducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrebini-Esfahani, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Ristic, M.; Long, K.

    2017-10-01

    A normal conducting 805 MHz test cavity with an in built button shaped sample is used to conduct a series of surface treatment experiments. The button enhances the local fields and influences the likelihood of an RF breakdown event. Because of their smaller sizes, compared to the whole cavity surface, they allow practical investigations of the effects of cavity surface preparation in relation to RF breakdown. Manufacturing techniques and steps for preparing the buttons to improve the surface quality are described in detail. It was observed that even after the final stage of the surface treatment, defects on the surface of the cavities still could be found.

  2. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  3. R.F. cavity design for the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Galayda, J.; Hawrylak, R.

    1981-01-01

    The r.f cavity design for the Booster, vuv ring and x-ray ring of the NSLS is described together with the mechanical design of tuners, coupling and monitoring loops and the temperature control systems. The results of higher order mode measurements as compared with Superfish calculations are also presented

  4. Review of new shapes for higher gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    High-gradient superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed for energy frontier superconducting accelerators. Progress has been made over the past decades and the accelerating gradient E acc has been increased from a few MV/m to ∼42 MV/m in SRF niobium cavities. The corresponding peak RF magnetic field H pk on the niobium cavity surface is approaching the intrinsic RF critical magnetic field H crit,RF , a hard physical limit at which superconductivity breaks down. Pushing the gradient envelope further by adopting new cavity shapes with a lower ratio of H pk /E acc has been recently proposed. For a reduced H pk /E acc , a higher ultimate E acc is sustained when H pk finally strikes H crit,RF . The new cavity geometry include the re-entrant shape conceived at Cornell University and the so-called 'Low-loss' shape proposed by a DESY/JLAB/KEK collaboration. Experimental work is being pursued at Cornell, KEK and JLAB. Results of single-cell cavities are encouraging. A record gradient of 47 MV/m was first demonstrated in a 1.3 GHz re-entrant niobium cavity at Cornell University. At the time of writing, a new record of 52 MV/m has been realized with another 1.3 GHz re-entrant cavity, designed and built at Cornell and processed and tested at KEK. Single-cell low-loss cavities have reached equally high gradients in the range of 45-51 MV/m at KEK and JLAB. Owing to their higher gradient potential and the encouraging single-cell cavity results, the new cavity shapes are becoming attractive for their possible use in the international linear collider (ILC). Experimental work on multi-cell niobium cavities of new shapes is currently under active exploration

  5. Millimeter-long fiber Fabry-Perot cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Konstantin; Garcia, Sebastien; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-05-02

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5 mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem.

  6. Nanoscale dislocation shear loops at static equilibrium and finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Khanh; Capolungo, Laurent; Spearot, Douglas E.

    2017-12-01

    Atomistic simulations are used to determine the resolved shear stress necessary for equilibrium and the resulting geometry of nanoscale dislocation shear loops in Al. Dislocation loops with different sizes and shapes are created via superposition of elemental triangular dislocation displacement fields in the presence of an externally imposed shear stress. First, a bisection algorithm is developed to determine systematically the resolved shear stress necessary for equilibrium at 0 K. This approach allows for the identification of dislocation core structure and a correlation between dislocation loop size, shape and the computed shear stress for equilibrium. It is found, in agreement with predictions made by Scattergood and Bacon, that the equilibrium shape of a dislocation loop becomes more circular with increasing loop size. Second, the bisection algorithm is extended to study the influence of temperature on the resolved shear stress necessary for stability. An approach is presented to compute the effective lattice friction stress, including temperature dependence, for dislocation loops in Al. The temperature dependence of the effective lattice friction stress can be reliably computed for dislocation loops larger than 16.2 nm. However, for dislocation loops smaller than this threshold, the effective lattice friction stress shows a dislocation loop size dependence caused by significant overlap of the stress fields on the interior of the dislocation loops. Combined, static and finite temperature atomistic simulations provide essential data to parameterize discrete dislocation dynamics simulations.

  7. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  8. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  9. Tip cells act as dynamic cellular anchors in the morphogenesis of looped renal tubules in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weavers, Helen; Skaer, Helen

    2013-11-11

    Tissue morphogenesis involves both the sculpting of tissue shape and the positioning of tissues relative to one another in the body. Using the renal tubules of Drosophila, we show that a specific distal tubule cell regulates both tissue architecture and position in the body cavity. Focusing on the anterior tubules, we demonstrate that tip cells make transient contacts with alary muscles at abdominal segment boundaries, moving progressively forward as convergent extension movements lengthen the tubule. Tip cell anchorage antagonizes forward-directed, TGF-β-guided tubule elongation, thereby ensuring the looped morphology characteristic of renal tubules from worms to humans. Distinctive tip cell exploratory behavior, adhesion, and basement membrane clearing underlie target recognition and dynamic interactions. Defects in these features obliterate tip cell anchorage, producing misshapen and misplaced tubules with impaired physiological function. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aune

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of E_{acc}≥25 MV/m at a quality factor Q_{0}≥5×10^{9}. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF linac was set to the more moderate value of E_{acc}≥15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} was measured to be 20.1±6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} amounts to 25.0±3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  11. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Donald J.; Gibson, S.; Luna, M.; Karpen, J.; Innes, D.

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system; the cavity is under-dense because it it evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolutin of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model and diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prminence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 A badpass near he prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset between emission enhancements in the other EUV bandpasses. While these predictions match well a subset of the horn observations, the range of variations in the observed structures is not captured by the model. We discuss the implications of one-dimensional loop simulations for the three-dimensional time-averaged equilibrium in the prominence and the cavity. Evidence suggests that horns are likely caused by condensing prominence plasma, but the larger question of whether this process produces a density-depleted cavity requires a more tightly constrained model of heating and better knowledge of the associated magnetic structure.

  12. Multicolor cavity soliton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rui; Liang, Hanxiao; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-25

    We show a new class of complex solitary wave that exists in a nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The cavity soliton consists of multiple soliton-like spectro-temporal components that exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, formed together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor cavity soliton shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which would be very useful for versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy.

  13. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  14. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  15. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  16. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  17. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  18. Automatic Phase Calibration for RF Cavities using Beam-Loading Signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Chase, B. E. [Fermilab

    2017-10-01

    Precise calibration of the cavity phase signals is necessary for the operation of any particle accelerator. For many systems this requires human in the loop adjustments based on measurements of the beam parameters downstream. Some recent work has developed a scheme for the calibration of the cavity phase using beam measurements and beam-loading however this scheme is still a multi-step process that requires heavy automation or human in the loop. In this paper we analyze a new scheme that uses only RF signals reacting to beam-loading to calculate the phase of the beam relative to the cavity. This technique could be used in slow control loops to provide real-time adjustment of the cavity phase calibration without human intervention thereby increasing the stability and reliability of the accelerator.

  19. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  20. Experimental Demonstration on Air Cavity Mode of Violin Using Holed Sheets of Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental air cavity mode (A0) of a violin was investigated from the viewpoint of its dependence on the opening area and shape by using holed sheets of paper. The dependences of the frequency response of the A0 cavity mode on the shape, opening area, and orientation of the openings were observed. It was also demonstrated that the change of…

  1. Renormalization of loop functions for all loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.A.; Neri, F.; Sato, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the vacuum expectation values W(C 1 ,xxx, C/sub n/) of products of the traces of the path-ordered phase factors P exp[igcontour-integral/sub C/iA/sub μ/(x)dx/sup μ/] are multiplicatively renormalizable in all orders of perturbation theory. Here A/sub μ/(x) are the vector gauge field matrices in the non-Abelian gauge theory with gauge group U(N) or SU(N), and C/sub i/ are loops (closed paths). When the loops are smooth (i.e., differentiable) and simple (i.e., non-self-intersecting), it has been shown that the generally divergent loop functions W become finite functions W when expressed in terms of the renormalized coupling constant and multiplied by the factors e/sup -K/L(C/sub i/), where K is linearly divergent and L(C/sub i/) is the length of C/sub i/. It is proved here that the loop functions remain multiplicatively renormalizable even if the curves have any finite number of cusps (points of nondifferentiability) or cross points (points of self-intersection). If C/sub γ/ is a loop which is smooth and simple except for a single cusp of angle γ, then W/sub R/(C/sub γ/) = Z(γ)W(C/sub γ/) is finite for a suitable renormalization factor Z(γ) which depends on γ but on no other characteristic of C/sub γ/. This statement is made precise by introducing a regularization, or via a loop-integrand subtraction scheme specified by a normalization condition W/sub R/(C-bar/sub γ/) = 1 for an arbitrary but fixed loop C-bar/sub γ/. Next, if C/sub β/ is a loop which is smooth and simple except for a cross point of angles β, then W(C/sub β/) must be renormalized together with the loop functions of associated sets S/sup i//sub β/ = ]C/sup i/ 1 ,xxx, C/sup i//sub p/i] (i = 2,xxx,I) of loops C/sup i//sub q/ which coincide with certain parts of C/sub β/equivalentC 1 1 . Then W/sub R/(S/sup i//sub β/) = Z/sup i/j(β)W(S/sup j//sub β/) is finite for a suitable matrix Z/sup i/j

  2. Abnormal duodenal loop demonstrated by X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thommesen, P.; Funch-Jensen, P.

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspeptic symptoms has previously been correlated with the shape of the duodenal loop in patients with X-ray-negative dyspepsia. An abnormal duodenal loop was associated with a significantly higher incidence of symtoms provoked by meals, vomiting, regurgitations, heartburn, and the irritable bowel syndrome. 89% of these patients (26 patients with a normal duodenal loop and 39 patients with abnormal duodenal loop) were available for a 5-year follow-up study of symptomatic outcome. The incidence of symptoms provoked by meals was still significantly higher in patients with an abnormal duodenal loop, and there was also a significant difference concerning symptomatic outcome. Approximately 75% of the patients with a normal duodenal loop had improved, and 25% had unchanged clinical conditions. Approximately 50% of the patients with an abnormal duodenal loop had improved, and 50% had an unchanged or even deteriorated clinical condition

  3. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, K.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N. [Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi (India)

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed.

  4. Niobium coaxial quarter-wave cavities for the New Delhi booster linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.; Roy, A.; Potukuchi, P.N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the design and construction status of a prototype superconducting niobium accelerating structure consisting of a pair of quarter-wave coaxial-line cavities which are strongly coupled with a superconducting loop. Quarter-wave resonators are two-gap accelerating structures and are relatively short, so that a large number of independently-phased cavities is required for a linac. Strongly coupling several cavities can reduce the number of independently-phased elements, but at the cost of reducing the range of useful velocity acceptance for each element. Coupling two cavities splits the accelerating rf eigenmode into two resonant modes each of which covers a portion of the full velocity acceptance range of the original single cavity mode. Using both of these resonant modes makes feasible the use of coupled cavity pairs for a linac with little loss m velocity acceptance. Design details for the niobium cavity pair and the results of preliminary tests of multipacting behavior are discussed

  5. [Usefulness of mini loop retractor in video-assisted thoracic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Y; Tamura, M; Umezu, H; Karube, Y; Seki, N; Kobayashi, S; Nagai, S; Miyoshi, S

    2003-03-01

    We have developed a technique using a Mini Loop Retractor II and successfully performed video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) in 32 patients. It is inserted into the pleural cavity through a skin puncture and a loop at its distal end is easily, and is freely adjustable in dimensions so that it can act as a retractor or holding forceps. Mini Loop Retractor II was very useful instruments in VATS.

  6. 80  nJ ultrafast dissipative soliton generation in dumbbell-shaped mode-locked fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2016-09-15

    A novel all-fiberized dumbbell-shaped mode-locked fiber laser was developed to directly generate 80 nJ dissipative solitons, which can be linearly compressed from 85 to 1.2 ps externally with a diffraction grating pair. The pulse peak power reached 42 kW after compression. With the most available pump power, stable dissipative soliton bundles with up to 628 nJ bundle energy were obtained. The corresponding average output power reached 2.2 W. The employment of dual-nonlinear-optical-loop mirrors and large-mode-area fibers in the cavity played an essential role in improving structural compactness and producing high-energy ultrafast pulses. To the best of our knowledge, these are the most energetic compressible dissipative solitons generated from a strictly all-fiber cavity.

  7. High gain proportional rf control stability at TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar Vogel

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fast proportional rf control is used as the basis for rf field regulation in actual linear accelerator projects like the international linear collider (ILC and the European x-ray free electron laser (XFEL based on TESLA technology. Additional control loops improve the field regulation by treating repetitive effects and compensating the beam loading. Nevertheless, the ability for high gain operation of the fast loops is desirable for the strong suppression of nonpredictive and nonrepetitive disturbances. TESLA cavities host nine fundamental modes (FMs where only one is used for beam acceleration. The unwanted FMs have a significant influence on the proportional rf control loop stability at high gains. Within this paper, the stability of proportional rf control loops taking the FMs and digitalization effects into account will be discussed in detail together with measures enabling a significant increase of the gain values.

  8. Mechanical evaluation of space closure loops in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Uggeri Rodrigues

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the mechanical performance of teardrop-shaped loops and teardrop-shaped loops with helix used in orthodontic space closure. Sixty retraction loops made with 0.019" x 0.025" stainless steel (SS and beta-titanium (BT wires were used. They were attached to a testing machine to measure the magnitudes of the sagittal force and the load-deflection ratio necessary for 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm activation. The results demonstrated that the BT alloy presented significantly smaller mean values (p < 0.01 of sagittal force and load-deflection than the SS alloy. The loop with the highest mean value of sagittal force and load-deflection was the teardrop-shaped loop (p < 0.01. Differences were observed in the mean values of sagittal force and load-deflection among activations, and the highest mean value was found in the activation of 3 mm, while the smallest mean value was evident in the activation of 1 mm (p < 0.01. It could be concluded that the metallic alloy used and the presence of a helix in configuration of the loops may have a strong influence on the sagittal force produced and on the load-deflection ratio; the teardrop-shaped loops and teardrop-shaped loops with helix in BT presented the release of lighter forces; the teardrop-shaped loop in SS generated a high load-deflection ratio, providing high magnitudes of horizontal force during its deactivation.

  9. On loop extensions and cohomology of loops

    OpenAIRE

    Benítez, Rolando Jiménez; Meléndez, Quitzeh Morales

    2015-01-01

    In this paper are defined cohomology-like groups that classify loop extensions satisfying a given identity in three variables for association identities, and in two variables for the case of commutativity. It is considered a large amount of identities. This groups generalize those defined in works of Nishigori [2] and of Jhonson and Leedham-Green [4]. It is computed the number of metacyclic extensions for trivial action of the quotient on the kernel in one particular case for left Bol loops a...

  10. Neutron transport in irradiation loops (IRENE loop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarsam, Maher.

    1980-09-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts with different aspects. Part one is a technical description of the loop and its main ancillary facilities as well as of the safety and operational regulations. The measurement methods on the model of the ISIS reactor and on the loop in the OSIRIS reactor are described. Part two deals with the possibility of calculating the powers dissipated by each rod of the fuel cluster, using appropriate computer codes, not only in the reflector but also in the core and to suggest a method of calculation [fr

  11. Simulations of gyrosynchrotron microwave emission from an oscillating magnetic loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Reznikova, Veronika; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Antolin, Patrick

    Radio observations of solar flares often reveal various periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations. Most likely, these oscillations are caused by MHD oscillations of flaring loops which modulate the radio emission via variations of the magnetic field and electron concentration. We perform numerical simulations of gyrosynchrotron radiation from a toroidal-shaped magnetic loop containing sausage-mode MHD oscillations. Different parameters of the loop and MHD oscillations and different loop orientations are considered. The simulation results are compared with the observations of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph.

  12. Point-defect migration into an infinitesimal dislocation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.H.

    1981-11-01

    Point-defect migration into an infinitesimal dislocation loop in an isotropic linear elastic medium is described. Particular care has been taken to include the effects of the saddle-point shape anisotropy of the point defect. Expressions for the reaction radii and the bias are derived, both in the presence and absence of an external applied stress. These are found to depend on intrinsic parameters, such as the loop strength, the loop nature (vacancy or interstitial), the relaxation volume, the saddle-point shape, and extrinsic parameters, such as the magnitude and direction of the external stress, and the temperature. The implications of the results are discussed

  13. Mechanical evaluation of space closure loops in Orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Eduardo Uggeri; Maruo, Hiroshi; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Tanaka, Orlando; Camargo, Elisa Souza

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the mechanical performance of teardrop-shaped loops and teardrop-shaped loops with helix used in orthodontic space closure. Sixty retraction loops made with 0.019" x 0.025" stainless steel (SS) and beta-titanium (BT) wires were used. They were attached to a testing machine to measure the magnitudes of the sagittal force and the load-deflection ratio necessary for 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm activation. The results demonstrated that the BT alloy presented significantly smaller mea...

  14. Materials for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal material for superconducting cavities should exhibit a high critical temperature, a high critical field, and, above all, a low surface resistance. Unfortunately, these requirements can be conflicting and a compromise has to be found. To date, most superconducting cavities for accelerators are made of niobium. The reasons for this choice are discussed. Thin films of other materials such as NbN, Nb 3 Sn, or even YBCO compounds can also be envisaged and are presently investigated in various laboratories. It is shown that their success will depend critically on the crystalline perfection of these films. (author)

  15. Glucocorticoid-Induced Changes in the Geometry of Osteoclast Resorption Cavities Affect Trabecular Bone Stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanderoost, Jef; Søe, Kent; Merrild, Ditte Marie Horslev

    2012-01-01

    Bone fracture risk can increase through bone microstructural changes observed in bone pathologies, such as glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. Resorption cavities present one of these microstructural aspects. We recently found that glucocorticoids (GCs) affect the shape of the resorption cavities...... differently compared to round cavities. To test this hypothesis, we cultured OCs on bone slices in the presence and absence of GC and quantified their dimensions. These data were used to model the effects of OC resorption cavities on bone mechanical properties using a validated beam-shell finite element model...... is closely related to the shape of the cavities, highly determines the stiffness effect. The lumbar spine was the anatomic site most affected by the GC-induced changes on the shape of the cavities. These findings might explain the clinical observation that the prevalence of vertebral fractures during GC...

  16. Coupling to fast MHD eigenmodes in a toroidal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paoloni, F.J.

    1975-05-01

    The coupling to fast MHD waves in toroidal-like geometry is calculated when eigenmodes exist in the plasma. The torus is considered to be a resonant cavity into which energy is coupled by a half turn loop. The cavity Q is calculated for the minority heating process, for cyclotron harmonic damping, electron transit-time magnetic pumping, wall loading, and Coulomb collisional damping. The problem of sustaining the eigenmode as the plasma conditions change with time is also discussed. One method that seems to be practical is a feedback scheme that varies the plasma major radius by a small amount as the conditions change. (U.S.)

  17. MATLAB: For While Loops

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    sim tut Simulation Tutorial Interactive Media Element This interactive tutorial on MATLAB covers the For Loop and the While Loop functions. Examples are provided with step-by-step animated explanations. The interactions involve entering MATLAB instructions and observing the outcomes. Self-check questions are provided to help learners determine their level of understanding of the content presented. EC1010 Introduction to MATLAB

  18. Water loop for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.V.

    1983-02-01

    The procedures used to operate the water loop of the Institute of Nuclear Enginering (IEN) in Brazil are presented. The aim is to help future operators of the training water loop in the operation technique and in a better comprehension of the phenomena occured during the execution of an experience. (E.G.) [pt

  19. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  20. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  1. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  2. What's a Cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a ... made up mostly of the germs that cause tooth decay. The bacteria in your mouth make acids and when plaque clings to your teeth, the acids can eat away at the outermost ...

  3. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  4. The Design of the Orthogonal Box Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Alfred; /Fermilab

    2010-09-15

    The muon collider and/or the neutrino factory require large accelerating electric field gradients immersed in large (3 to 6 T) solenoidal magnetic fields for ionization cooling of muon beams. Our original vacuum breakdown study demonstrated a loss of achievable peak accelerating gradient in solenoidal magnetic fields by a factor 2 or greater. The Muon Collaboration has developed a theory of a method to suppress high electric field breakdown in vacuum cavities needed for a Muon collider or neutrino factory. It has been shown in our studies and by others that high gradient electric field emitted electrons (dark current) are the primary cause of breakdown. A DC magnetic field orthogonal to the RF electric accelerating field prevents dark current high field emitted electrons from traveling across the accelerating gap and then will prevent breakdown. We have decided to test this theory by building a special cavity in the shape of vacuum box. Figure 1 is a simplified view of the cavity design. The design is based on an 805 MHz WR975 waveguide cavity resonating in the TE{sub 101} mode. For the TE{sub 101} mode the resonant frequency f{sub 0} is given by the relationship f{sub 0} = c[(I/a){sup 2} + (m/b){sup 2} + (n/d){sup 2}]{sup 0.5}/2 where a and d are the lengths of the base sides and b is the height of the box in MKS units and c is the velocity of light.

  5. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  6. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  7. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka?a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20?30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having p...

  8. Single-cavity SLED device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, B.A.

    1984-09-01

    The conventional SLED device used at SLAC requires two cavities. However, the same effect can be obtained with a single cavity; the theory and operation of the device is the same, only the hardware is changed. The single-cavity device is described here

  9. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  10. Blind Loop Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of tissue that protrude through the intestinal wall (diverticulosis) Certain medical conditions, including Crohn's disease, radiation enteritis, ... History of radiation therapy to the abdomen Diabetes Diverticulosis of the small intestine Complications A blind loop ...

  11. Diffusion of Wilson loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, A.M.; Lenz, F.; Thies, M.; Negele, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the distribution of Wilson loops in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is presented in which Wilson loop distributions are described as the result of a diffusion process on the group manifold. It is shown that, in the absence of forces, diffusion implies Casimir scaling and, conversely, exact Casimir scaling implies free diffusion. Screening processes occur if diffusion takes place in a potential. The crucial distinction between screening of fundamental and adjoint loops is formulated as a symmetry property related to the center symmetry of the underlying gauge theory. The results are expressed in terms of an effective Wilson loop action and compared with various limits of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory

  12. Mashup the OODA Loop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heier, Jeffrey E

    2008-01-01

    ...) processes via the Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act (OODA) Loop concept. As defined by Wikipedia, a mashup is a Website or application that combines the content from more than one source into an integrated presentation...

  13. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  14. Dechanneling by dislocation loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalant, Gerard.

    1976-09-01

    Ion implantation always induces the creation of dislocation loops. When the damage profile is determined by a backscattering technique, the dechanneling by these loops is implicitely at the origin of these measurements. The dechanneling of alpha particles by dislocation loops produced by the coalescence of quenched-in vacancies in aluminium is studied. The dechanneling and the concentration of loops were determined simultaneously. The dechanneling width around dislocation was found equal to lambda=6A, both for perfect and imperfect loops having a mean diameter d=250A. In the latter case, a dechanneling probability chi=0.34 was determined for the stacking fault, in good agreement with previous determination in gold. A general formula is proposed which takes into account the variation of lambda with the curvature (or the diameter d) of the loops. Finally, by a series of isothermal anneals, the self-diffusion energy ΔH of aluminium was measured. The value obtained ΔH=1.32+-0.10eV is in good agreement with the values obtained by other methods [fr

  15. The generation of a lower threshold multiwavelength fiber laser in the L-band region assisted by a Sagnac loop mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Siti Narimah; Arsad, Norhana; Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif Abu; Elias, Sayidatul Nadia; Menon, P Sushita; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2015-01-01

    A low threshold multiwavelength laser generated with the assistance of a Sagnac loop mirror is proposed. Two simple ring cavity designs are studied, namely a standard design ring cavity (design A) and a ring cavity with a Sagnac loop mirror (design B). Design B, which integrates a Sagnac loop mirror together with a polarization controller, exhibits the most optimum performance, generating seven lasing modes. Using only a 40 mW pump power from the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), design B is the preferred ring cavity design, as it successfully produces seven lasing modes simultaneously within a 0.42 nm channel spacing in the L-band region. The ring cavity is characterized by investigating the lasing threshold through the tuning output power of the EDFA, the percentages of extracted power and cavity loss. (paper)

  16. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured

  17. Looping in OLSRv2 in Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks, Loop Suppression and Loop Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, Lee; Owada, Yasunori; Mase, Kenichi

    Transient routing loops have been observed to form in Mobile Ad-hoc Networks running the OLSRv2 proactive link-state routing protocol. The packets falling into loops impact the surrounding network thus degrading throughput even though only a small proportion of the traffic may enter these loops and only for a short time. This becomes significantly more evident when Link Layer Notification is used to catch broken links, inadvertently leading to an increase in the number of loops. Two methods of Loop Detection are introduced and are used to trigger either Loop Suppression by selectively and preemptively discarding the looping packets that are unlikely to reach their destination, or Loop Correction by the notification of the routing protocol to cut the link over which the packet is looping. The newly introduced Loop Suppression and Loop Correction techniques used with Link Layer Notification are shown to significantly increase network performance over plain OLSRv2 and OLSRv2 with Link Layer Notification.

  18. Morphology of a Hot Coronal Cavity Core as Observed by Hinode/XRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Hudson, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    We follow a coronal cavity that was observed by Hinode/XRT during the summer of 2008. This cavity has a persistent area of relatively bright X-ray emission in its center. We use multifilter data from XRT to study the thermal emission from this cavity, and find that the bright center is hotter than the surrounding cavity plasma with temperatures of about 1.6 MK. We follow the morphology of this hot feature as the cavity structure rotates over the limb during the several days between July 19 - 23 2008. We find that the hot structure at first looks fairly circular, then appears to expand and elongate, and then shrinks again to a compact circular shape. We interpret this apparent change in shape as being due to the morphology of the filament channel associated with the cavity, and the change in viewing angle as the structure rotates over the limb of the Sun.

  19. Morphology Of A Hot Prominence Cavity Observed with Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mark A.; Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    Prominence cavities appear as circularly shaped voids in coronal emission over polarity inversion lines where a prominence channel is straddling the solar limb. The presence of chromospheric material suspended at coronal altitudes is a common but not necessary feature within these cavities. These voids are observed to change shape as a prominence feature rotates around the limb. We use a morphological model projected in cross-sections to fit the cavity emission in Hinode/XRT passbands, and then apply temperature diagnostics to XRT and SDO/AIA data to investigate the thermal structure. We find significant evidence that the prominence cavity is hotter than the corona immediately outside the cavity boundary. This investigation follows upon "Thermal Properties of A Solar Coronal Cavity Observed with the X-ray Telescope on Hinode" by Reeves et al., 2012, ApJ, in press.

  20. Optimizing SRF Gun Cavity Profiles in a Genetic Algorithm Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofler, Alicia; Evtushenko, Pavel; Marhauser, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Automation of DC photoinjector designs using a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization is an accepted practice in accelerator physics. Allowing the gun cavity field profile shape to be varied can extend the utility of this optimization methodology to superconducting and normal conducting radio frequency (SRF/RF) gun based injectors. Finding optimal field and cavity geometry configurations can provide guidance for cavity design choices and verify existing designs. We have considered two approaches for varying the electric field profile. The first is to determine the optimal field profile shape that should be used independent of the cavity geometry, and the other is to vary the geometry of the gun cavity structure to produce an optimal field profile. The first method can provide a theoretical optimal and can illuminate where possible gains can be made in field shaping. The second method can produce more realistically achievable designs that can be compared to existing designs. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation for these two methods for generating field profiles for SRF/RF guns in a GA based injector optimization scheme and provide preliminary results.

  1. Three dimensional density cavities in guide field collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A.; Goldman, M.; Newman, D.; Andersson, L.

    2012-03-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide field reveal for the first time the three dimensional features of the low density regions along the magnetic reconnection separatrices, the so-called cavities. It is found that structures with further lower density develop within the cavities. Because their appearance is similar to the rib shape, these formations are here called low density ribs. Their location remains approximately fixed in time and their density progressively decreases, as electron currents along the cavities evacuate them. They develop along the magnetic field lines and are supported by a strong perpendicular electric field that oscillates in space. In addition, bipolar parallel electric field structures form as isolated spheres between the cavities and the outflow plasma, along the direction of the low density ribs and of magnetic field lines.

  2. Design and Optimization of Thermophotovoltaic System Cavity with Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermophotovoltaic (TPV systems can convert radiant energy into electrical power. Here we explore the design of the TPV system cavity, which houses the emitter and the photovoltaic (PV cells. Mirrors are utilized in the cavity to modify the spatial and spectral distribution within. After discussing the basic concentric tubular design, two novel cavity configurations are put forward and parametrically studied. The investigated variables include the shape, number, and placement of the mirrors. The optimization objectives are the optimized efficiency and the extended range of application of the TPV system. Through numerical simulations, the relationship between the design parameters and the objectives are revealed. The results show that careful design of the cavity configuration can markedly enhance the performance of the TPV system.

  3. Recent Developments in SRF Cavity Science and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ciovati

    2006-08-10

    The performances of SRF cavities made of high purity bulk niobium have been improving in the last few years and surface magnetic fields (Bp) close to the thermodynamic critical field of niobium have been achieved in a few cases. The recommendation made in 2004 in favor of SRF as the technology of choice for the International Linear Collider (ILC), requires improving the reliability of multi-cell cavities operating at accelerating gradients (Eacc) of the order of 35 MV/m. Additionally, a better understanding of the present limitations to cavity performance, such as the high-field Q-drop is needed. This contribution presents some recent developments in SRF cavity science and performance. Among the most significant advances of the last few years, new cavity shapes with lower ratio Bp/Eacc were designed and tested. Cavities made of large-grain niobium became available, promising lower cost at comparable performance to standard fine-grain ones and several tests on single-cell cavities were done to gain a better understanding of high-field losses. In addition, studies to improve the reliability of electropolishing are being carried out by several research groups.

  4. Inductive Loops for Sensing Position as Signature Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larbani, Sofiane; Malik, Noreha Abdul; Nordin, Anis Norashikin; Khan, Sheroz; Shobaki, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an inductive sensing technique made of a special shaped inductive loop is proposed. The inductive loop has an inner turn fitted within an outer turn, making a total inductance value 100μH. This loop is made to be shown with balanced response using three capacitance values of 0.068μF each when a sinusoidal voltage source of 5V peak-to-peak is applied. The variation of the relative permeability of the inductance of the inductive loop (AL) results in a variation of the overall inductance value (L+AL), that causes the output signal to change in term of shape and amplitude for variation of total inductance sweep over a given period of time. As a result of change in inductance value (lμH) there is a correspondence increase of 300mV. Theoretical derivations have showed in close agreement with the simulation plots obtained using Multisim software

  5. Inductive Loops for Sensing Position as Signature Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbani, Sofiane; Malik, Noreha Abdul; Norashikin Nordin, Anis; Khan, Sheroz; Shobaki, Mohammad

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an inductive sensing technique made of a special shaped inductive loop is proposed. The inductive loop has an inner turn fitted within an outer turn, making a total inductance value 100μH. This loop is made to be shown with balanced response using three capacitance values of 0.068μF each when a sinusoidal voltage source of 5V peak-to-peak is applied. The variation of the relative permeability of the inductance of the inductive loop (AL) results in a variation of the overall inductance value (L+AL), that causes the output signal to change in term of shape and amplitude for variation of total inductance sweep over a given period of time. As a result of change in inductance value (lμH) there is a correspondence increase of 300mV. Theoretical derivations have showed in close agreement with the simulation plots obtained using Multisim software.

  6. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  7. Slot-coupled CW standing wave accelerating cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-05-16

    A slot-coupled CW standing wave multi-cell accelerating cavity. To achieve high efficiency graded beta acceleration, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include different cell lengths. Alternatively, to achieve high efficiency with acceleration for particles with beta equal to 1, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include the same cell design. Coupling between the cells is achieved with a plurality of axially aligned kidney-shaped slots on the wall between cells. The slot-coupling method makes the design very compact. The shape of the cell, including the slots and the cone, are optimized to maximize the power efficiency and minimize the peak power density on the surface. The slots are non-resonant, thereby enabling shorter slots and less power loss.

  8. Husimi functions at gradient index cavities designed by conformal transformation optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inbo; Cho, Jinhang; Kim, Yushin; Min, Bumki; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Rim, Sunghwan; Choi, Muhan

    2018-03-19

    Dielectric cavity systems, which have been studied extensively so far, have uniform refractive indices of their cavities, and Husimi functions, the most widely used phase space representation of optical modes formed in the cavities, accordingly were derived only for these homogeneous index cavities. For the case of the recently proposed gradient index dielectric cavities (called as transformation cavities) designed by optical conformal mapping, we show that the phase space structure of resonant modes can be revealed through the conventional Husimi functions by constructing a reciprocal virtual space. As examples, the Husimi plots were obtained for an anisotropic whispering gallery mode (WGM) and a short-lived mode supported in a limaçon-shaped transformation cavity. The phase space description of the corresponding modes in the reciprocal virtual space is compatible with the far-field directionality of the resonant modes in the physical space.

  9. Energetics analysis of interstitial loops in single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Xin; Niu, Liang-Liang; Wang, Shaoqing

    2018-04-01

    Systematic energetics analysis on the shape preference, relative stability and radiation-induced segregation of interstitial loops in nickel-containing single-phase concentrated solid-solution alloys have been conducted using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the perfect loops prefer rhombus shape for its low potential energy, while the Frank faulted loops favor ellipse for its low potential energy and the possible large configurational entropy. The decrease of stacking fault energy with increasing compositional complexity provides the energetic driving force for the formation of faulted loops, which, in conjunction with the kinetic factors, explains the experimental observation that the fraction of faulted loops rises with increasing compositional complexity. Notably, the kinetics is primarily responsible for the absence of faulted loops in nickel-cobalt with a very low stacking fault energy. We further demonstrate that the simultaneous nickel enrichment and iron/chromium depletion on interstitial loops can be fully accounted for by their energetics.

  10. 3D Reconstruction of Coronal Loops by the Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Verwichte

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowing the three dimensional structure of plasma filaments in the uppermost part of the solar atmosphere, known as coronal loops, and especially their length, is an important parameter in the wave-based diagnostics of this part of the Sun. The combination of observations of the Sun from different points of observations in space, thanks to the most recent missions, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO, allows us to infer information about the geometrical shape of coronal loops in 3D space. Here, we propose a new method to reconstruct the loop shape starting from stereoscopically determined 3D points, which sample the loop length, by principal component analysis. This method is shown to retrieve in an easy way the main parameters that define the loop, e.g., the minor and major axes, the loop plane, the azimuthal and inclination angles, for the special case of a coplanar loop.

  11. Optimal Performance Design Guideline of Hybrid Reference Frame-based Dual Loop Control Strategy for Stand-Alone Single-Phase Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yang; Jiang, Ai-Ting; Coelho, Ernane A. A.

    2018-01-01

    The dual-loop control strategies in hybrid reference frame (HRF) for single-phase voltage source inverters (VSIs) in islanded operation mode is studied, which applies a capacitor voltage shaping loop in the synchronous reference frame (SRF) and a capacitor current shaping loop in the stationary r...

  12. Abdominal cavity balloon for preventing a patient's bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, E.E.H.; Rutten, H.J.T.; Jakimowicz, J.J.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Moes, C.C.M.; Buzink, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to an abdominal cavity balloon for preventing a haemorrhage in a patient's pelvic region, comprising an inflatable balloon, wherein the balloon is pro vided with a smooth surface and with a strip that is flex- urally stiff and formed to follow the balloon's shape for po

  13. V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

    2012-12-25

    A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

  14. Closing global material loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosman, Ernst-Jan; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Liotta, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Replacing virgin materials with waste materials, a practice known as Industrial Symbiosis (IS), has been identified as a key strategy for closing material loops. This article adopts a critical view on geographic proximity and external coordinators – two key enablers of IS. By ‘uncovering’ a case ...... for geographic proximity and external coordinators. In doing so, our insights into firm-level challenges of long-distance IS exchanges contribute to closing global material loops by increasing the number of potential circular pathways....

  15. Closed Loop Subspace Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir W. Nilsen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A new three step closed loop subspace identifications algorithm based on an already existing algorithm and the Kalman filter properties is presented. The Kalman filter contains noise free states which implies that the states and innovation are uneorre lated. The idea is that a Kalman filter found by a good subspace identification algorithm will give an output which is sufficiently uncorrelated with the noise on the output of the actual process. Using feedback from the output of the estimated Kalman filter in the closed loop system a subspace identification algorithm can be used to estimate an unbiased model.

  16. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  17. Quantum dot SOA/silicon external cavity multi-wavelength laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Shuyu; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Li, Qi; Guan, Hang; Magill, Peter; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Thomas; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-02-23

    We report a hybrid integrated external cavity, multi-wavelength laser for high-capacity data transmission operating near 1310 nm. This is the first demonstration of a single cavity multi-wavelength laser in silicon to our knowledge. The device consists of a quantum dot reflective semiconductor optical amplifier and a silicon-on-insulator chip with a Sagnac loop mirror and microring wavelength filter. We show four major lasing peaks from a single cavity with less than 3 dB power non-uniformity and demonstrate error-free 4 × 10 Gb/s data transmission.

  18. Quasilinear infiltration from an elliptical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Warrick, Arthur W.

    2008-08-01

    We develop analytic solutions to the linearized steady-state Richards equation for head and total flowrate due to an elliptic cylinder cavity with a specified pressure head boundary condition. They are generalizations of the circular cylinder cavity solutions of Philip [Philip JR. Steady infiltration from circular cylindrical cavities. Soil Sci Soc Am J 1984;48:270-8]. The circular and strip sources are limiting cases of the elliptical cylinder solution, derived for both horizontally- and vertically-aligned ellipses. We give approximate rational polynomial expressions for total flowrate from an elliptical cylinder over a range of sizes and shapes. The exact elliptical solution is in terms of Mathieu functions, which themselves are generalizations of and computed from trigonometric and Bessel functions. The required Mathieu functions are computed from a matrix eigenvector problem, a modern approach that is straightforward to implement using available linear algebra libraries. Although less efficient and potentially less accurate than the iterative continued fraction approach, the matrix approach is simpler to understand and implement and is valid over a wider parameter range.

  19. The quest for high-gradient superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavities excel in applications requiring continuous waves or long pulse voltages. Since power losses in the walls of the cavity increase as the square of the accelerating voltage, copper cavities become uneconomical as demand for high continuous wave voltage grows with particle energy. For these reasons, RF superconductivity has become an important technology for high energy and high luminosity accelerators. The state of art in performance of sheet metal niobium cavities is best represented by the statistics of more than 300 5-cell, 1.5-GHz cavities built for CEBAF. Key aspects responsible for the outstanding performance of the CEBAF cavities set are the anti-multipactor, elliptical cell shape, good fabrication and welding techniques, high thermal conductivity niobium, and clean surface preparation. On average, field emission starts at the electric field of 8.7 MV/m, but there is a large spread, even though the cavities received nominally the same surface treatment and assembly procedures. In some cavities, field emission was detected as low as 3 MV/m. In others, it was found to be as high as 19 MV/m. As we will discuss, the reason for the large spread in the gradients is the large spread in emitter characteristics and the random occurrence of emitters on the surface. One important phenomenon that limits the achievable RF magnetic field is thermal breakdown of superconductivity, originating at sub-millimeter-size regions of high RF loss, called defects. Simulation reveal that if the defect is a normal conducting region of 200 mm radius, it will break down at 5 MV/m. Producing high gradients and high Q in superconducting cavities demands excellent control of material properties and surface cleanliness. The spread in gradients that arises from the random occurrence of defects and emitters must be reduced. It will be important to improve installation procedures to preserve the excellent gradients now obtained in laboratory test in vertical cryostats

  20. Experimental observations of effects of inert gas on cavity formation during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K.

    1980-04-01

    Cavity (void) formation and swelling in non-fissile materials during neutron irradiation and charged particle bombardments are reviewed. Helium is the most important inert gas and is primarily active as a cavity nucleant. It also enhances formation of dislocation structure. Preimplantation of helium overstimulates cavity nucleation and gives a different temperature response of swelling than when helium is coimplanted during the damage process. Helium affects, and is affected by, radiation-induced phase instability. Many of these effects are explainable in terms of cavity nucleation on submicroscopic critical size gas bubbles, and on the influence of the neutral sink strength of such bubbles. Titanium and zirconium resist cavity formation when vacancy loops are present.

  1. Gain-assisted broadband ring cavity enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Mahmoud A.; Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-02-01

    Incoherent broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy can significantly increase the effective path length of light-matter interaction to detect weak absorption lines over broad spectral range, for instance to detect gases in confined environments. Broadband cavity enhancement can be based on the decay time or the intensity drop technique. Decay time measurement is based on using tunable laser source that is expensive and suffers from long scan time. Intensity dependent measurement is usually reported based on broadband source using Fabry-Perot cavity, enabling short measurement time but suffers from the alignment tolerance of the cavity and the cavity insertion loss. In this work we overcome these challenges by using an alignment-free ring cavity made of an optical fiber loop and a directional coupler, while having a gain medium pumped below the lasing threshold to improve the finesse and reduce the insertion loss. Acetylene (C2H2) gas absorption is measured around 1535 nm wavelength using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) gain medium. The system is analyzed for different ring resonator forward coupling coefficient and loses, including the 3-cm long gas cell insertion loss and fiber connector losses used in the experimental verification. The experimental results are obtained for a coupler ratio of 90/10 and a fiber length of 4 m. The broadband source is the amplified spontaneous emission of another SOA and the output is measured using a 70pm-resolution optical spectrum analyzer. The absorption depth and the effective interaction length are improved about an order of magnitude compared to the direct absorption of the gas cell. The presented technique provides an engineering method to improve the finesse and, consequently the effective length, while relaxing the technological constraints on the high reflectivity mirrors and free-space cavity alignment.

  2. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  3. Justification by Infinite Loops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peijnenburg, A.J.M.; Atkinson, David

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier paper we have shown that a proposition can have a well-defined probability value, even if its justification consists of an infinite linear chain. In the present paper we demonstrate that the same holds if the justification takes the form of a closed loop. Moreover, in the limit that

  4. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve th...

  5. Holographic calculations of Euclidean Wilson loop correlator in Euclidean anti-de Sitter space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziama, Sannah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky,505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States)

    2015-04-07

    The correlation functions of two or more Euclidean Wilson loops of various shapes in Euclidean anti-de Sitter space are computed by considering the minimal area surfaces connecting the loops. The surfaces are parametrized by Riemann theta functions associated with genus three hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces. In the case of two loops, the distance L by which they are separated can be adjusted by continuously varying a specific branch point of the auxiliary Riemann surface. When L is much larger than the characteristic size of the loops, then the loops are approximately regarded as local operators and their correlator as the correlator of two local operators. Similarly, when a loop is very small compared to the size of another loop, the small loop is considered as a local operator corresponding to a light supergravity mode.

  6. MEDICI reactor cavity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Trebilcock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MEDICI reactor cavity model is currently under development with the goal of providing a flexible, relatively realistic treatment of ex-vessel severe accident phenomena suitable for large-system codes like CONTAIN and MELCOR. The code is being developed with an emphasis on top-down design, to facilitate adaptability and multiple applications. A brief description of the overall code structure is provided. One of the key new models is then described in more detail. This is a dynamic quench model for debris beds. An example calculation using this model is presented. The question of whether it is necessary to consider the simultaneous motion of the quench front and ablation of the concrete is addressed with some scoping models

  7. Development of an advanced electropolishing setup for multicell high gradient niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éozénou, F.; Chel, S.; Gasser, Y.; Servouin, C.; Visentin, B.; Charrier, J.-P.; Wang, Z.

    2012-08-01

    Reproducible operation at high performances of superconducting cavities is required for linear accelerators. High beta elliptical cavities are thus of concern and, to achieve required performances for such resonators, surface preparation including electropolishing is recommended. We have designed and operate a setup for electropolishing in the vertical position of multicell cavities in order to: (i) obtain high yield with large elliptical cavities for Superconducting Linac (SPL) or European Spallation Source projects; (ii) develop a reference installation demonstrating that this process is appropriate for the large scale treatment of cavities in industry. The setup described here is the first one able to electropolish vertically multicell cavities with circulating acid and high safety standards. This equipment makes it possible to use a wide range of parameters such as voltage, acid flow rate, temperature, and nitrogen injection with an R&D purpose in mind. Optimization is studied using modeling with COMSOL software for different cavities. As examples, we present some results for the 704 MHz high-beta SPL cavity and the 1300 MHz International Linear Collider cavity and show the influence of cathode shape on both acid flow and electric field distribution during the process. Importance of the size of the cavity and first results achieved on single-cell and nine-cell cavities will be discussed.

  8. Development of an advanced electropolishing setup for multicell high gradient niobium cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Éozénou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproducible operation at high performances of superconducting cavities is required for linear accelerators. High beta elliptical cavities are thus of concern and, to achieve required performances for such resonators, surface preparation including electropolishing is recommended. We have designed and operate a setup for electropolishing in the vertical position of multicell cavities in order to: (i obtain high yield with large elliptical cavities for Superconducting Linac (SPL or European Spallation Source projects; (ii develop a reference installation demonstrating that this process is appropriate for the large scale treatment of cavities in industry. The setup described here is the first one able to electropolish vertically multicell cavities with circulating acid and high safety standards. This equipment makes it possible to use a wide range of parameters such as voltage, acid flow rate, temperature, and nitrogen injection with an R&D purpose in mind. Optimization is studied using modeling with COMSOL software for different cavities. As examples, we present some results for the 704 MHz high-beta SPL cavity and the 1300 MHz International Linear Collider cavity and show the influence of cathode shape on both acid flow and electric field distribution during the process. Importance of the size of the cavity and first results achieved on single-cell and nine-cell cavities will be discussed.

  9. Impact of Trapped Flux and Thermal Gradients on the SRF Cavity Quality Factor

    CERN Document Server

    Kugeler, O; Knobloch, J; Aull, S

    2012-01-01

    The obtained Q0 value of a superconducting niobium cavity is known to depend on various factors like the RRR of the Niobium material, crystallinity, chemical treatment history, the high-pressure rinsing process, or effectiveness of the magnetic shielding. We have observed that spatial thermal gradients over the cavity length during cool-down appear to contribute to a degradation of Q0. Measurements were performed in the Horizontal Bi-Cavity Test Facility (HoBiCaT) at HZB on TESLA type cavities as well as on disc- and rod-shaped niobium samples equipped with thermal, electrical and magnetic diagnostics. Possible explanations for the effect are discussed.

  10. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  11. Self-injection locking of the DFB laser through an external ring fiber cavity: Polarization behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Bueno Escobedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study stability of self-injection locking realized with DFB laser coupled with an external fiber optic ring cavity. Polarization behavior of the radiation circulating in the feedback loop is reported. Two regimes of mode hopping have been observed; one of them is accompanied by polarization bistability involving two orthogonal polarization states.

  12. Energy Transfer of a Shaped Charge.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milinazzo, Jared Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    A cylinder of explosive with a hollow cavity on one and a detonator at the other is considered a hollow charge. When the explosive is detonated the detonation products form a localized intense force. If the hollow charge is placed near or in contact with a steel plate then the damage to the plate is greater than a solid cylinder of explosive even though there is a greater amount of explosive in the latter charge. The hollow cavity can take almost any geometrical shape with differing amounts of damage associated with each shape. This phenomenon is known in the United States as the Munroe effect.

  13. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  15. A Study on the Flow Characterization in the Reactor Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Ko, Kwang Jeok; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Min Gyu; Cho, Yeon Ho; Kim, Hyun Min [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, the flow characterization of the cooling air in reactor cavity nearby RCPSA has been analyzed by using a 3 dimensional model and the ANSYS CFX software in order to predict the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient (CHTC) of the RCPSA. The Reactor Cavity is the annular space by the concrete structure, the Reactor Cavity Pool Seal Assembly (RCPSA), which consists of the welded steel and is designed to be installed between the RV and the refueling pool floor, and the Reactor Vessel (RV). For such reason, the RCPSA should be designed to provide the cooling air passage for ventilation to circulate high temperature air passing by the RV during the reactor operation. It means that the RCPSA is influenced by the convection of cooling air and the thermal expansion of the RV. Therefore, the flow characterization at the reactor cavity is one of the factors of the RCPSA design during the reactor operation. The flow distribution of the cooling air in reactor cavity nearby RCPSA has been analyzed using ANSYS CFX software to obtain the CHTC at surface of the RCPSA. 1) The temperature from the RV and the insulation is one of the critical factors for the thermal gradient of the cooling air and the CHTC in the reactor cavity. 2) The rapid change of the CHTC in inner region nearby inner and outer flexure is related to the geometry shape of the RCPSA and velocity of cooling air.

  16. Electromagnetic excitation of a generic cavity with a variable e-beam pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, R.; Kerris, K.; Merkel, G.; Roberts, H.; Smith, M.

    1987-01-01

    Relativistic electron-beam nose-erosion techniques have been employed to produce an electron beam with variable pulse shape and bremsstrahlung capability (''dial a pulse''). This capability has been employed to excite a large number of electromagnetic fields inside a canonical cavity. Electron-beam and bremsstrahlung pulse-shape parameters have been varied to produce changes in the electromagnetic cavity response. For example, generic cavity test parameters such as displacement currents or conduction currents can be emphasized or de-emphasized. A theoretical interpretation of these electromagnetic excitations is presented

  17. Changeability of oral cavity environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka A, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. 24 healthy individuals aged 20-30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O'Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca(2+), Pi, Na(+), Cl(-), total protein, albumins, F(-) and Sr(2+) were determined. The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca(2+) (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K(+) (P<.04), Sr(2+) (P<.03), Na(+) (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters.

  18. Schapiro Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Emily

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a lesson on Schapiro Shapes. Schapiro Shapes is based on the art of Miriam Schapiro, who created a number of works of figures in action. Using the basic concepts of this project, students learn to create their own figures and styles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  19. The gluon beam function at two loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2014-08-01

    The virtuality-dependent beam function is a universal ingredient in the resummation for observables probing the virtuality of incoming partons, including N -jettiness and beam thrust. We compute the gluon beam function at two-loop order. Together with our previous results for the two-loop quark beam function, this completes the full set of virtuality-dependent beam functions at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). Our results are required to account for all collinear initial-state radiation effects on the N -jettiness event shape through N3LL order. We present numerical results for both the quark and gluon beam functions up to NNLO and N3LL order. Numerically, the NNLO matching corrections are important. They reduce the residual matching scale dependence in the resummed beam function by about a factor of two.

  20. The gluon beam function at two loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2014-05-15

    The virtuality-dependent beam function is a universal ingredient in the resummation for observables probing the virtuality of incoming partons, including N-jettiness and beam thrust. We compute the gluon beam function at two-loop order. Together with our previous results for the two-loop quark beam function, this completes the full set of virtuality-dependent beam functions at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). Our results are required to account for all collinear ISR effects to the N-jettiness event shape through N{sup 3}LL order. We present numerical results for both the quark and gluon beam functions up to NNLO and N{sup 3}LL order. Numerically, the NNLO matching corrections are important. They reduce the residual matching scale dependence in the resummed beam function by about a factor of two.

  1. Status of the seamless L-band cavity fabrication at KEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Takeo; Inoue, Hitoshi; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki; Kako, Eiji; Shishido, Toshio; Kubota, Akira; Koide, Shigeyuki

    1996-01-01

    For the future superconducting RF cavity project like TESLA, reduction of the fabrication cost is a great concern. Elimination of electron beam welding in the present fabrication process is one way to do so. Spinning, explosive forming or hydro-bulge forming is a candidate to fabricate such a seamless cavity. As a feasibility study, explosive forming was tried for the L-band three cell copper structures and could successfully expand copper tubes by 60% of the final cell shape. The study of hydro-bulge forming has also started to get enough thickness at the equator section of cavities. Both method need intermediate annealing to form the final cell shape. If one applies these methods to the Nb/Cu clad cavities, large merits are expected on not material cost reduction but also cavity performance. (author)

  2. Ototoxicity of loop diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, L P

    1993-10-01

    The loop diuretics are drugs that increase the excretion of water and electrolytes in the urine by their action on the cells in the loop of Henle. Clinical reports of ototoxicity of these agents are reviewed, and the results of a number of studies in experimental animals are discussed. These drugs can cause either a temporary, or in some cases, a permanent loss of hearing in patients. Animal experiments show that these drugs act on the stria vascularis, producing edema of these tissues and a temporary loss of function, resulting in a decrease of the endocochlear potential. This can result in secondary effects on sound-evoked measures of hearing. As new information unfolds about protective agents, it may be possible to preserve hearing and maintain the desired therapeutic effect.

  3. Development of large Grain/Single Crystal Niobium Cavity Technology at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel; J. Sekutowicz; T. Carneiro; G. Ciovati

    2006-10-31

    Approximately two years ago we started to develop high performance niobium accelerating cavities based on large grain or single crystal high purity niobium. We have fabricated and tested 15 single cell cavities of various shapes and frequencies between 1300 MHz and 2300 MHz using material from a total of 9 different very large grain niobium ingots from four niobium suppliers. The materials differed not only in grain sizes, but also in RRR ? value and in the amount of Ta contained in the material. In one ingot supplied by CBMM the central grain exceeded 7 inches in diameter and this was used to fabricate two 2.2 GHz cavities. A single crystal 1300 MHz mono-cell cavity was also produced at DESY by rolling out a single crystal to the size required for this cavity. It was sent to Jlab for surface treatment and testing. In addition, we have fabricated three 7-cell cavities: two of the Jlab high gradient (HG) shape and one of the ILC Low Loss shape. Two 9-cell TESLA shape cavities are presently in fabrication at Jlab and are close to completion.

  4. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  5. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2008-4.

  6. Closing the loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2010-02-01

    The dream of closing the loop is actually the dream of creating an artificial pancreas and freeing the patients from being involved with the care of their own diabetes. Insulin-dependent diabetes (type 1) is a chronic incurable disease which requires constant therapy without the possibility of any 'holidays' or insulin-free days. It means that patients have to inject insulin every day of their life, several times per day, and in order to do it safely they also have to measure their blood glucose levels several times per day. Patients need to plan their meals, their physical activities and their insulin regime - there is only very small room for spontaneous activities. This is why the desire for an artificial pancreas is so strong despite the fact that it will not cure the diabetic patients. Attempts to develop a closed-loop system started in the 1960s but never got to a clinical practical stage of development. In recent years the availability of continuous glucose sensors revived those efforts and stimulated the clinician and researchers to believe that closing the loop might be possible nowadays. Many papers have been published over the years describing several different ideas on how to close the loop. Most of the suggested systems have a sensing arm that measures the blood glucose repeatedly or continuously, an insulin delivery arm that injects insulin upon command and a computer that makes the decisions of when and how much insulin to deliver. The differences between the various published systems in the literature are mainly in their control algorithms. However, there are also differences related to the method and site of glucose measurement and insulin delivery. SC glucose measurements and insulin delivery are the most studied option but other combinations of insulin measurements and glucose delivery including intravascular and intraperitoneal (IP) are explored. We tried to select recent publications that we believe had influenced and inspired people interested

  7. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  8. Optimal choice of cell geometry for a multicell superconducting cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Shemelin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for optimization of the multicell cavity cells is proposed. Inner cells are optimized for minimal losses or minimal magnetic field, when the aperture diameter, E_{pk}/E_{acc}—the ratio of peak electric field to the accelerating field, and the wall slope angle are given. Optimization of the end cells is done for minimal losses or maximal acceleration in them. Two shapes of the end cells—with and without the end irises—are analyzed. This approach facilitates further optimization for higher order modes extraction because it permits keeping the achieved optimal values nearly the same while changing some dimensions of the cells. Comparison of the proposed cavity geometry with the TESLA cavity geometry illustrates the traits of the presented approach. It is also shown that lower values of the wall slope angle, which lead to the reentrant shape for the inner cells, are also beneficial for the end cells. For the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac most dangerous are dipole modes causing the beam breakup (BBU. Minimization of power of higher order modes (HOMs in a multicell cavity was done using derivatives of the BBU parameter with respect to geometric parameters of the cavity cells. As a starting point of optimization, the shape with minimal losses at the fundamental mode was taken. Further changing the shape for better propagation of HOMs was done with degradation of the fundamental mode loss parameter G·R_{sh}/Q within 1% while decrease of the BBU parameter was nearly 3 orders of magnitude. The BBU threshold current tends to be inversely proportional to this parameter.

  9. GPR Experiments of the Simulated Cavity Detection in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changryol; Kang, Woong; Son, Jeongsul; Jeong, Soocheol

    2017-04-01

    Recent years, the deteriorated underground facilities such as sewage or water supply pipes have increased significantly with growing urban development in Korea. The soils surrounding old damaged pipes were washed away beneath the roadbed, causing underground cavities and eventual ground cave-ins in the urban areas. The detection of the roadbed cavities is, therefore, required to prevent property damage and loss of human lives for precautionary measures. In general, GPR is well known as a suitable geophysical technique for shallow underground cavity detection. 3-D GPR technique was applied to conduct the full-scale experiment for roadbed cavity detection. The physical experiment has employed the testing ground with soil characteristics of silty sand soils. The experimental test ground consists of physically simulated cavities with dome-shaped structure, and of hume concrete and cast-iron pipes to simulate underground facilities. The pipes were installed more than one meter below the land surface and simulated cavities nearby were also installed at regular intervals in spatial distribution. The land surface of the site was not paved with asphalt concrete at the current stage of the experiments. The GPR data was obtained to investigate GPR responses due to different antenna orientations (HH and VV antenna orientations) over the testing ground. The results of the experiment show that the reflection patterns from the simulated cavities are hyperbolic returns typical to the point source in 2-D perspective. The different antenna orientations have shown the different areal extents of the hyperbolic reflections patterns from the cavities, and have shown the different characteristics over the pipes on the data. A closer inspection of 3-D GPR volume data has yielded more clear interpretation than 2-D GPR data regarding where the cavities are situated and what kind of shape the cavities show in space. This study is an ongoing project of KIGAM at a second stage of the physical

  10. Convoluted dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation in reduced-activation martensitic steel and their impact on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wen, Yongming [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Helium irradiation induced dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa at 350 °C. Unexpectedly, very large dislocation loops were found, significantly larger than that induced by other types of irradiations under the same dose. Moreover, the large loops were convoluted and formed interesting flower-like shape. The large loops were determined as interstitial type. Loops with the Burgers vectors of b=〈100〉 were only observed. Furthermore, irradiation induced hardening caused by these large loops was observed using the nano-indentation technique.

  11. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  12. Wind turbine model and loop shaping controller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilev, Bogdan

    2017-12-01

    A model of a wind turbine is evaluated, consisting of: wind speed model, mechanical and electrical model of generator and tower oscillation model. Model of the whole system is linearized around of a nominal point. By using the linear model with uncertainties is synthesized a uncertain model. By using the uncertain model is developed a H∞ controller, which provide mode of stabilizing the rotor frequency and damping the tower oscillations. Finally is simulated work of nonlinear system and H∞ controller.

  13. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  15. Design of 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell SRF cavity and development of single cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Bhattacharyya, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    In India, DAE laboratories and other institutes are now actively involved in research and development activities on SRF cavities and associated technologies for the proposed high current, high energy proton linear accelerators like ISNS/IADS and also for the FERMILAB PIP-II program under Indian institutions-Fermilab collaboration (IIFC). As part of the above activities, VECC, Kolkata, has been involved in the design, analysis and development of a 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity. RF design involves optimization of the geometry to get acceptable values of field enhancement factors (magnetic and electric), R/Q , Geometric factor, coupling factor and field flatness. This paper describes the RF design using 2-D superfish and 3-D CST Microwave studio and multipacting analysis using 2-D Multipac2.1 and 3-D CST Particle Studio. A prototype 1-cell aluminum cavity and a prototype 5-cell copper cavity have been fabricated using die-punch assembly designed for fabrication of elliptical half-cells to check the procedures for forming and to make sure the desired frequency and field flatness could be obtained. RF characterization has been carried out for both the prototypes using Vector Network Analyzer and Bead pull measurement set up.The fabrication of a single-cell niobium cavity has been carried out indigenously and with the help of Electron Beam Welding (EBW) facility at IUAC, New Delhi. CMM measurement and RF characterization of the niobium half cells and full cell cavities have been carried out. This paper describes the development and measurement of prototype cavities and single cell niobium cavity. (author)

  16. Call for Papers: Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, W.; Gerard, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    Cavity QED interactions of light and matter have been investigated in a wide range of systems covering the spectrum from microwaves to optical frequencies, using media as diverse as single atoms and semiconductors. Impressive progress has been achieved technologically as well as conceptually. This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is intended to provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of cavity QED by uniting contributions from researchers active across this field. As Guest Editors of this topical issue, we invite manuscripts on current theoretical and experimental work on any aspects of cavity QED. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletCavity QED in optical microcavities bulletSemiconductor cavity QED bulletQuantum dot cavity QED bulletRydberg atoms in microwave cavities bulletPhotonic crystal cavity QED bulletMicrosphere resonators bulletMicrolasers and micromasers bulletMicrodroplets bulletDielectric cavity QED bulletCavity QED-based quantum information processing bulletQuantum state engineering in cavities The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the

  17. Effect of cold cap boundary conditions on Joule-heating flow in the sloping bottom cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jiaju; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tsuzuki, Nobuyoshi; Kikura, Hiroshige

    2015-01-01

    Flow behavior in a sloping bottom cavity is observed to study the effect of cavity shape on flow behavior for Joule-heating flow. In the former study, a simple cubic cavity is applied to study the chaotic flow behavior of Joule-heating convection due to simplification as the real melter case is complicated. In this study, a sloping bottom cavity of the dimension one-fifth of the actual melter is applied to study the detail flow behavior. Carbon electrodes and top cooling surface are placed to make Joule-heating and the chaotic flow behavior. The working fluid is 80%wt Glycerol-water solution with LiCl as electrolyte. To observe the chaotic flow behavior spatio-temporally, Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler (UVP) is applied in this experiment to obtain the one-dimensional continuous velocity profiles in the center line of cavity. Particle Image Velocity (PIV) method is also applied to observe the two-dimensional flow behavior and to examine the cross-check between UVP and PIV for the chaotic flow behavior with temperature distribution. The flow profiles of the former cubic cavity and the sloping bottom cavity are compared changing voltage magnitude and cooling temperature of the electrodes side to analyze the effect of cavity shape under Joule-heating condition. The flow behavior in the upper part of the sloping bottom cavity is similar to that in the cubic cavity in the experiment in whole cavity, the range down-flow achieved is larger than the cubic cavity. (author)

  18. X-ray and gamma ray waveguide, cavity and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vali, V.; Krogstad, R.S.; Willard, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    An x-ray and gamma ray waveguide, cavity, and method for directing electromagnetic radiation of the x-ray, gamma ray, and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths are described. A hollow fiber is used as the waveguide and is manufactured from a material having an index of refraction less than unity for these wavelengths. The internal diameter of the hollow fiber waveguide and the radius of curvature for the waveguide are selectively predetermined in light of the wavelength of the transmitted radiation to minimize losses. The electromagnetic radiation is obtained from any suitable source ad upon introduction into the waveguide is transmitted along a curvilinear path. The waveguide may be formed as a closed loop to create a cavity or may be used to direct the electromagnetic radiation to a utilization site

  19. Digital Measurement System for the HIE-Isolde Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, Michal

    Extensive R&D efforts are being invested at CERN into the fundamental science of the RF superconductivity, cavity design, niobium sputtering, coating and RF properties of superconducting cavities. Fast and precise characterization and measurements of RF parameters of the newly produced cavities is essential for advances with the cavity production. The currently deployed analogue measurement system based on an analogue phase discriminators and tracking RF generators is not optimal for efficient work at the SM18 superconducting cavity test stand. If exact properties of the cavity under test are not known a traditional feedback loop will not be able to find resonant frequency in a reasonable time or even at all. This is mainly due to a very high Q factor. The resonance peak is very narrow (fraction of a Hz at 100 MHz). If the resonant frequency is off by several bandwidths, small changes of the cavity field during the tuning will not be measureable. Also cavity field will react only very slowly to any change...

  20. A Culture-Behavior-Brain Loop Model of Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shihui; Ma, Yina

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cultural influences on brain activity are associated with multiple cognitive and affective processes. These findings prompt an integrative framework to account for dynamic interactions between culture, behavior, and the brain. We put forward a culture-behavior-brain (CBB) loop model of human development that proposes that culture shapes the brain by contextualizing behavior, and the brain fits and modifies culture via behavioral influences. Genes provide a fundamental basis for, and interact with, the CBB loop at both individual and population levels. The CBB loop model advances our understanding of the dynamic relationships between culture, behavior, and the brain, which are crucial for human phylogeny and ontogeny. Future brain changes due to cultural influences are discussed based on the CBB loop model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. On some properties of conjugacy closed loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeniran, John Olusola

    2002-07-01

    It is shown that central loops are not conjugacy closed loops but instead are loops of units in their loop algebras that are conjugacy closed. It is also shown that certain inner mappings of a conjugacy closed loop are nuclear. Some invariants of left conjugacy closed loops are obtained. (author)

  2. The Role of Entropic Effects on DNA Loop Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Tkachenko, Alexei; Lillian, Todd; Perkins, Noel; Meiners, Jens Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of protein mediated DNA loops often regulates gene expression. Typically, a protein is simultaneously bound to two DNA operator sites. An example is the lactose repressor which binds to the Lac operon of E. coli. We characterize the mechanics of this system by calculating the free energy cost of loop formation. We construct a Hamiltonian that describes the change in DNA bending energy due to linear perturbations about the looped and open states, starting from a non-linear mechanical rod model that determines the shape and bending energy of the inter-operator DNA loop while capturing the intrinsic curvature and sequence-dependent elasticity of the DNA. The crystal structure of the LacI protein provides the boundary conditions for the DNA. We then calculate normal modes of the open and closed loops to account for the thermal fluctuations. The ratio of determinants of the two Hamiltonians yields the partition function, and the enthalphic and entropic cost of looping. This calculation goes beyond standard elastic energy models because it fully accounts for the substantial entropic differences between the two states. It also includes effects of sequence dependent curvature and stiffness and allows anisotropic variations in persistence length. From the free energy we then calculate the J-factor and ratio of loop lifetimes.

  3. Afferent loop syndrome: Role of sonography and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Lim, Jae Hoon; Ko, Young Tae [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-03-15

    Afferent loop syndrome(ALS) is caused by obstruction of the afferent loop after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth II gastrojejunostomy. Prompt diagnosis of ALS is important as perforation of the loop occurs. The aim of study is to ascertain the sonography and CT to diagnose ALS. We describe the radiologic findings in ten patients with ALS. The cause of ALS, established at surgery, included cancer recurrence (n=4), internal hernia (n=4), marginal ulcer (n=1), and development of cancer at the anastomosis site (n=1). Abdominal X-ray and sonography were performed in all cases, upper GI series in five cases and computed tomography in two cases. The dilated afferent loop was detected in only two cases out often patients in retrospective review of abdominal X-ray. ALS with recurrence of cancer was diagnosed in three cases by upper GI series. Of the cases that had sonography, the afferent loop was seen in the upper abdomen crossing transversely over the midline in all ten patients. The cause of ALS were predicated on the basis of the sonograms in three of the five patients. In two cases of computed tomography, the dilated afferent loop and recurrent cancer at the remnant stomach were seen.Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of afferent syndrome can be made on the basis of the typical anatomic location and shape of the dilated bowel loop in both sonography and computed tomography.

  4. Sound Radiation of Aerodynamically Excited Flat Plates into Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Osterziel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibrations and the sound radiation of flexible plate structures of different thickness mounted in a rigid plate are experimentally investigated. Therefore, flow properties and turbulent boundary layer parameters are determined through measurements with a hot-wire anemometer in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel. Furthermore, the excitation of the vibrating plate is examined by laser scanning vibrometry. To describe the sound radiation and the sound transmission of the flexible aluminium plates into cavities, a cuboid-shaped room with adjustable volume and 34 flush-mounted microphones is installed at the non flow-excited side of the aluminium plates. Results showed that the sound field inside the cavity is on the one hand dependent on the flow parameters and the plate thickness and on the other hand on the cavity volume which indirectly influences the level and the distribution of the sound pressure behind the flexible plate through different excited modes.

  5. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  6. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  7. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  8. A Moral Experience Feedback Loop: Modeling a System of Moral Self-Cultivation in Everyday Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherblom, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    This "systems thinking" model illustrates a common feedback loop by which people engage the moral world and continually reshape their moral sensibility. The model highlights seven processes that collectively form this feedback loop: beginning with (1) one's current moral sensibility which shapes processes of (2) perception, (3)…

  9. Abnormal duodenal loop demonstrated by X-ray. Correlation to symptoms and prognosis of dyspepsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thommesen, P.; Funch-Jensen, P.

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspeptic symptoms has previously been correlated with the shape of the duodenal loop in patients with X-ray-negative dyspepsia. An abnormal duodenal loop was associated with a significantly higher incidence of symtoms provoked by meals, vomiting, regurgitations, heartburn, and the irritable bowel syndrome. 89% of these patients (26 patients with a normal duodenal loop and 39 patients with abnormal duodenal loop) were available for a 5-year follow-up study of symptomatic outcome. The incidence of symptoms provoked by meals was still significantly higher in patients with an abnormal duodenal loop, and there was also a significant difference concerning symptomatic outcome. Approximately 75% of the patients with a normal duodenal loop had improved, and 25% had unchanged clinical conditions. Approximately 50% of the patients with an abnormal duodenal loop had improved, and 50% had an unchanged or even deteriorated clinical condition.

  10. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective open study the sterility of the uterine cavity was evaluated in 99 women admitted for hysterectomy. The indications for hysterectomy were in most cases persistent irregular vaginal bleeding and fibromyomas of the uterus. Samples for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, Chlamydia ...... which may play a causative role in endometritis. The results indicate that inflammation of the uterine cavity should be evaluated by hysteroscopic examination before hysterectomy is undertaken in patients with persistent irregular vaginal bleeding. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Mar...

  11. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  12. Integral force feedback control with input shaping: Application to piezo-based scanning systems in ECDLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Zhigang; Zhu, Yu; Bu, Mingfan; Hong, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a hybrid control system is developed by integrating the closed-loop force feedback and input shaping method to overcome the problem of the hysteresis and dynamic behavior in piezo-based scanning systems and increase the scanning speed of tunable external cavity diode lasers. The flexible hinge and piezoelectric actuators are analyzed, and a dynamic model of the scanning systems is established. A force sensor and an integral controller are utilized in integral force feedback (IFF) to directly augment the damping of the piezoelectric scanning systems. Hysteresis has been effectively eliminated, but the mechanical resonance is still evident. Noticeable residual vibration occurred after the inflection points and then gradually disappeared. For the further control of mechanical resonance, based on the theory of minimum-acceleration trajectory planning, the time-domain input shaping method was developed. The turning sections of a scanning trajectory are replaced by smooth curves, while the linear sections are retained. The IFF method is combined with the input shaping method to control the non-linearity and mechanical resonance in high-speed piezo-based scanning systems. Experiments are conducted, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  13. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  14. Development of Ultra High Gradient and High Q0 Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the recent progress at Jefferson Lab in developing ultra high gradient and high Q 0 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for future SRF based machines. A new 1300 MHz 9-cell prototype cavity is being fabricated. This cavity has an optimized shape in terms of the ratio of the peak surface field (both magnetic and electric) to the acceleration gradient, hence the name low surface field (LSF) shape. The goal of the effort is to demonstrate an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q 0 of 10 10 at 2 K in a 9-cell SRF cavity. Fine-grain niobium material is used. Conventional forming, machining and electron beam welding method are used for cavity fabrication. New techniques are adopted to ensure repeatable, accurate and inexpensive fabrication of components and the full assembly. The completed cavity is to be first mechanically polished to a mirror-finish, a newly acquired in-house capability at JLab, followed by the proven ILC-style processing recipe established already at JLab. In parallel, new single-cell cavities made from large-grain niobium material are made to further advance the cavity treatment and processing procedures, aiming for the demonstration of an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q 0 of 2пїЅ10 10 at 2K

  15. Simulation of Multipacting in SC Low Beta Cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, Gennady [Fermilab; Berrutti, Paolo [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, Timergali [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan-II at Fermilab is a plan for improvements to the accelerator complex aimed at providing a beam power capability of at least 1 MW on target at the initiation of LBNE (Long Base Neutrino Experiment) operations. The central element of the PIP-II is a new 800 MeV superconducting linac, injecting into the existing Booster. Multipacting affects superconducting RF cavities in the entire range from high energy elliptical cavities to coaxial resonators for low-beta applications. This work is focused on multipacting study in the low-beta 325 MHz spoke cavities; namely SSR1 and SSR2, which are especially susceptible to the phenomena. The extensive simulations of multipacting in the cavities with updated material properties and comparison of the results with experimental data helped us to improve overall reliability and accuracy of these simulations. Our practical approach to the simulations is described in details. For SSR2, which has a high multipacting barrier right at the operating power level, some changes of the cavity shape to mitigate this harmful phenomenon are proposed.

  16. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a device that consists of a compound intended to coat a prepared cavity of a tooth before insertion of...

  17. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  18. Engineering interactions between long-lived cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yvonne; Rosenblum, Serge; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    The availability of large Hilbert dimensions and outstanding coherence properties make superconducting cavities promising systems for storing quantum information. Recent experiments in cQED has demonstrated that redundantly encoding logical qubits in such cavities is a hardware-efficient approach toward error-correctable quantum memories. In order to tap into the power of these protected memories for quantum information processing, robust inter-cavity operations are required. A simple way to realise such operations between two cavities is using the non-linearity of the Josephson junction. To do so, we adopt a multi-cavity architecture where a fixed-frequency, single junction transmon simultaneously couples to two highly coherent 3D cavities. Using only external RF drives, we demonstrate transmon-cavity as well as cavity-cavity SWAP operations and show that such interactions are essential building blocks for implementing multi-cavity conditional logics.

  19. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry

  20. Closed loop reflux system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Witt, R.; Jepson, B.E.; Schwind, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO 3 ). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO 3 , and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO 4 ) and SO 2 gas, which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO 2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO 4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ), which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H 2 SO 4 components, which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials. (U.S.)

  1. Thermal conditions within tree cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests: potential implications for cavity users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierling, Kerri T.; Lorenz, Teresa J.; Cunningham, Patrick; Potterf, Kelsi

    2017-11-01

    Tree cavities provide critical roosting and breeding sites for multiple species, and thermal environments in these cavities are important to understand. Our objectives were to (1) describe thermal characteristics in cavities between June 3 and August 9, 2014, and (2) investigate the environmental factors that influence cavity temperatures. We placed iButtons in 84 different cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in central Washington, and took hourly measurements for at least 8 days in each cavity. Temperatures above 40 °C are generally lethal to developing avian embryos, and 18% of the cavities had internal temperatures of ≥ 40 °C for at least 1 h of each day. We modeled daily maximum cavity temperature, the amplitude of daily cavity temperatures, and the difference between the mean internal cavity and mean ambient temperatures as a function of several environmental variables. These variables included canopy cover, tree diameter at cavity height, cavity volume, entrance area, the hardness of the cavity body, the hardness of the cavity sill (which is the wood below the cavity entrance which forms the barrier between the cavity and the external environment), and sill width. Ambient temperature had the largest effect size for maximum cavity temperature and amplitude. Larger trees with harder sills may provide more thermally stable cavity environments, and decayed sills were positively associated with maximum cavity temperatures. Summer temperatures are projected to increase in this region, and additional research is needed to determine how the thermal environments of cavities will influence species occupancy, breeding, and survival.

  2. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  3. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime , is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n -point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  4. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO 2 ), uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ), and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 )] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF 6 product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study was sponsored by

  5. African baobabs with false inner cavities: the radiocarbon investigation of the Lebombo Eco Trail baobab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Patrut

    Full Text Available The article reports the radiocarbon investigation results of the Lebombo Eco Trail tree, a representative African baobab from Mozambique. Several wood samples collected from the large inner cavity and from the outer part of the tree were investigated by AMS radiocarbon dating. According to dating results, the age values of all samples increase from the sampling point with the distance into the wood. For samples collected from the cavity walls, the increase of age values with the distance into the wood (up to a point of maximum age represents a major anomaly. The only realistic explanation for this anomaly is that such inner cavities are, in fact, natural empty spaces between several fused stems disposed in a ring-shaped structure. We named them false cavities. Several important differences between normal cavities and false cavities are presented. Eventually, we dated other African baobabs with false inner cavities. We found that this new architecture enables baobabs to reach large sizes and old ages. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 1425 ± 24 BP, which corresponds to a calibrated age of 1355 ± 15 yr. The dating results also show that the Lebombo baobab consists of five fused stems, with ages between 900 and 1400 years; these five stems build the complete ring. The ring and the false cavity closed 800-900 years ago. The results also indicate that the stems stopped growing toward the false cavity over the past 500 years.

  6. Compact 400-Mhz Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for the LHC Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zenghai

    2010-01-01

    Crab cavities are proposed for the LHC upgrade to improve the luminosity. There are two possible crab cavity installations for the LHC upgrade: the global scheme at Interaction Region (IR) 4 where the beam-beam separation is about 420-mm, and the local scheme at the IR5 where the beam-beam separation is only 194-mm. One of the design requirements as the result of a recent LHC-Crab cavity workshop is to develop a 400-MHz cavity design that can be utilized for either the global or local schemes at IR4 or IR5. Such a design would offer more flexibility for the final upgrade installation, as the final crabbing scheme is yet to be determined, and save R and D cost. The cavity size of such a design, however, is limited by the beam-beam separation at IR5 which can only accommodate a cavity with a horizontal size of about 145-mm, which is a design challenge for a 400-MHz cavity. To meet the new design requirements, we have developed a compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) crab cavity that can fit into the tight spaces available at either IR4 or IR5. In this paper, we present the optimization of the HWSR cavity shape and the design of HOM, LOM, and SOM couplers for wakefield damping.

  7. Empirical potential and elasticity theory modelling of interstitial dislocation loops in UO2 for cluster dynamics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Prioux, Arno

    2017-01-01

    During irradiation in reactor, the microstructure of UO 2 changes and deteriorates, causing modifications of its physical and mechanical properties. The kinetic models used to describe these changes such as cluster dynamics (CRESCENDO calculation code) consider the main microstructural elements that are cavities and interstitial dislocation loops, and provide a rather rough description of the loop thermodynamics. In order to tackle this issue, this work has led to the development of a thermodynamic model of interstitial dislocation loops based on empirical potential calculations. The model considers two types of interstitial dislocation loops on two different size domains: Type 1: Dislocation loops similar to Frank partials in F.C.C. materials which are stable in the smaller size domain. Type 2: Perfect dislocation loops of Burgers vector (a/2)(110) stable in the larger size domain. The analytical formula used to compute the interstitial dislocation loop formation energies is the one for circular loops which has been modified in order to take into account the effects of the dislocation core, which are significant at smaller sizes. The parameters have been determined by empirical potential calculations of the formation energies of prismatic pure edge dislocation loops. The effect of the habit plane reorientation on the formation energies of perfect dislocation loops has been taken into account by a simple interpolation method. All the different types of loops seen during TEM observations are thus accounted for by the model. (author) [fr

  8. Frequency-feedback tuning for single-cell cavity under rf heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.D.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    A tuning system is described that is being used to match the source frequency of a high-power klystron on the resonant frequency of the prototype single-cell cavity for the 7-GeV Advance Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Typically a water-cooled piston tuner is required to adjust the reactive component of the cavity's impedance to minimize reflected power back to the RF drive source. As the cavity watts expand due to RF heating, the resonant frequency decreases. Adjusting the source frequency to follow the cavity resonant frequency is a convenient method used to condition the cavity (for vacuum) at high power levels, in this case, 1 MV gap voltage at 100 kW power level. The tuning system consists of two coupling ports, a phase detector, a digitizing I/O system, and a DC coupled FM-modulated RF source. Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) loop parameters for the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) software are calculated, and data is presented showing the damped response to peturbations on the loop. The timing system presented here does not need water-cooling, has no moving parts to wear out, and has an inherently faster response time. Its one limitation is the digitizing sampling rate. The only limitation in tuning range is the bandwidth of the RF source

  9. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  10. Self-cavity lasing in optically pumped single crystals of p-sexiphenyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Hisao, E-mail: yanagi@ms.naist.jp; Tamura, Kenji [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Sasaki, Fumio [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Organic single-crystal self-cavities are prepared by solution growth of p-sexiphenyl (p-6P). Based on Fabry-Pérot feedback inside a quasi-lozenge-shaped platelet crystal, edge-emitting laser is obtained under optical pumping. The multimode lasing band appears at the 0-1 or 0-2 vibronic progressions depending on the excitation conditions which affect the self-absorption effect. Cavity-size dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is investigated with laser-etched single crystals of p-6P. As the cavity length of square-shaped crystal is reduced from 100 to 10 μm, ASE threshold fluence is decreased probably due to size-dependent light confinement in the crystal cavity.

  11. Loop quantum cosmology: Recent progress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aspects of the full theory of loop quantum gravity can be studied in a simpler context by reducing to symmetric models like cosmological ones. This leads to several applications where loop effects play a significant role when one is sensitive to the quantum regime. As a consequence, the structure of and the approach to ...

  12. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-08

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  14. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n + 1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n + 1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n + 1 dimensional model and the 3 + 1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology. (orig.)

  15. Effects of various thermal boundary conditions on natural convection in porous cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, H. T.; Sivasankaran, S.; Bhuvaneswari, M.; Siri, Z.

    2015-10-01

    The present work analyzes numerically the effects of various thermal boundary conditions and the geometry of the cavity on natural convection in cavities with fluid-saturated porous medium. Cavity of square, right-angled trapezium and right-angled triangle shapes are considered. The different temperature profiles are imposed on the left wall of the cavity and the right wall is maintained at a lower constant temperature. The top and bottom walls are adiabatic. The Darcy model is adopted for the porous medium. The finite difference method is used to solve the governing equations and boundary conditions over a range of Darcy-Rayleigh numbers. Streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt numbers are used for presenting the results. The heat transfer of the square cavity is more enhanced at high Darcy-Rayleigh number for all the thermal boundary conditions considered.

  16. Coeliac cavity ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, O.; Suwaki, T.

    1983-07-05

    A coeliac cavity ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus is disclosed which includes an ultrasonic transducer or scanner portion adapted to be inserted into a coeliac cavity to effect a sector scan of an ultrasonic beam to produce an ultrasonic image of internal tissues and in which the ultrasonic oscillator on the one hand and an ultrasonic reflecting mirror and rotary disc on the other hand are relatively rotated so as to effect the sector scan of the ultrasonic beam and the rotary angle of the rotary disc is detected so as to obtain a deflecting angle of the ultrasonic beam and a display on a cathode ray tube of a precise ultrasonic picture image.

  17. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heremans K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  18. Magnesium Diboride thin Films, multilayers, and coatings for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities currently use low-temperature superconductor niobium, and the Nb SRF cavities have approached the performance levels predicted theoretically. Compared to Nb, MgB2 becomes superconducting at a much higher temperature and promises a better RF performance in terms of higher quality factor Q and higher acceleration capability. An MgB2 SRF technology can significantly reduce the operating costs of particle accelerators when these potentials are realized. This project aimed to advance the development of an MgB2 SRF technology. It had two main objectives: (1) materials issues of MgB2 thin films and multilayers related to their applications in SRF cavities; and (2) coating single-cell cavities for testing at RF frequencies. The key technical thrust of the project is the deposition of high quality clean MgB2 films and coatings by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique, which was developed in my group. We have achieved technical progress in each of the two areas. For the first objective, we have confirmed that MgB2 thin film coatings can be used to effectively enhance the vortex penetration field of an SRF cavity. A vortex is a normal region in the shape of spaghetti that threads through a superconductor. Its existence is due to an applied magnetic field that is greater than a so-called lower critical field, Hc1. Once a vortex enters the superconductor, its movement leads to loss. This has been shown to be the reason for an SRF cavity to break down. Thus, enhancing the magnetic field for a vortex to enter the superconductor that forms the SRF cavity has be a goal of intense research. To this end, Gurevich proposed that a coating of thin superconductor layer can impede the vortex entrance. In this project, we have done two important experiment to test this concept. One, we showed that the enhancement of Hc1 can be

  19. Theoretical analysis of laser-locked spectroscopy employing a confocal Fabry-Perot cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Linfeng; Ma, Weiguang; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of laser-locked enhanced absorption spectroscopy employing a confocal Fary-Perot cavity (CFPC) is presented. The signal-to-noise ratio and the minimum detectable absorbance, which are limited by either the shot noise or the amplitude noise due to the loose laser lock loop, are also discussed in detail. The results show that the effective absorption path length of a CFPC configuration is the same as that of the conventional nonconfocal Fary-Perot cavity configuration, with the CFPC configuration being more convenient to align without deliberate mode matching. Thus, the CFPC configuration should greatly simplify the complications of conventional laser-locked spectroscopy.

  20. Gross morphology of rhea oropharyngeal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio N. Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The rhea (Rhea americana americana is an american bird belonging to Ratite's family. Studies related to its morphology are still scarce. This study aims to describe the macroscopic structures of the oropharyngeal cavity. Five heads (2 to 6 months old formalin preserved were anatomically dissected to expose the oropharynx. The oropharynx of the rhea was "bell-shaped" composed by the maxillary and mandibular rhamphotheca. The roof and floor presented two distinct regions different in colour of the mucosa. The rostral region was pale pink contrasting to grey coloured caudal region. The median longitudinal ridge extended rostrally from the apex of the choana to the tip of the beak in the roof and it is clearly more prominent and rigid than the homolog in the floor that appeared thin and stretched merely along the rostral portion of the regio interramalis. The floor was formed by the interramal region, (regio interramalis tongue and laryngeal mound containing glove-shaped glottis. This study confirmed the basic morphology of the oropharinx of the rhea. However, important morphological information not previously described is highlighted and contradictory information present in the literature is clarified.

  1. The Shaped Charge Concept. Part 2. The History of Shaped Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    the hollow cavity effect and the lined shaped charge effect, Also, M. Neumann (1911) and E. Neumann (1914) (who ame often confused in the literature ...large Gennan holov charge called the " MISTERIE ?" (This is undoubtedl) the MISTEL which evo ved fhom the Beethoven charge discussed earlier). From the...references, with informative abstracts, to all pertinent literature found in books, periodicals, and reports on the subject of shaped charges, particularly

  2. Analysis of the impacts of mechanical errors on the RF performance of a single spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhongyuan; Lu Xiangyang; Zhang Baocheng; Quan Shengwen; He Feisi; Zhao Kui

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical errors can not be avoided in fabrication. They will cause geometry errors and have impacts on the cavity performance. This paper systematically analyzes the impacts of mechanical errors on the RF performance of Peking University single spoke cavity. The various kinds of shape and size errors are considered, the influences on the resonation frequency and field flatness are studied by numerical simulation and the theoretical models are analyzed. The results show that the single spoke cavity is robust with respect to the mechanical tolerance. It also indicates the most essential factors for fabrication. (authors)

  3. Higher Order Modes HOM's in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinton, I.R.R.

    2012-01-01

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  4. Higher Order Modes HOM___s in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinton, I.R.R.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Jones, R.M.; /Manchester U. /DESY; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /DESY

    2012-09-14

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  5. Higher order modes HOMs in coupled cavities of the FLASH module ACC39

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I R R; Li, Z; Zhang, P

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM’s) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  6. Investigation on the fabrication of the 3rd harmonic superconducting cavity for the SSRF storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhenyu; Ma Guangming; Yu Haibo; Mao Dongqing; Feng Ziqiang; Hou Hongtao; Liu Jianfei

    2009-01-01

    A third harmonic superconducting niobium cavity has been proposed for installation in the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring to improve the Touschek lifetime. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting cavity fabrication indigenously and the possibility to master the fabrication techniques, cavities were fabricated from copper and niobium sheets by deep drawing and electron-beam welding, and a series of measurements, such as resonant frequency, shape dimensions and wall thickness, were carried out during this process. After analysis of various problems existing in the fabrication process, technique improvements were proposed, and finally the precise shape as designed and resonant frequency within 1.2 MHz were achieved for the new completed cavities. In addition, full annealing was finally proved to be a good cure for niobium sheets' tearing up during deep drawing. By fabricating niobium cavities successfully, some problems to the next step were cleared. This paper introduces the process of cavity fabrication and its technique improvements towards forming, and the initial vertical test result of niobium cavity is also presented. (authors)

  7. Conduction cooling systems for linear accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Robert

    2017-05-02

    A conduction cooling system for linear accelerator cavities. The system conducts heat from the cavities to a refrigeration unit using at least one cavity cooler interconnected with a cooling connector. The cavity cooler and cooling connector are both made from solid material having a very high thermal conductivity of approximately 1.times.10.sup.4 W m.sup.-1 K.sup.-1 at temperatures of approximately 4 degrees K. This allows for very simple and effective conduction of waste heat from the linear accelerator cavities to the cavity cooler, along the cooling connector, and thence to the refrigeration unit.

  8. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide ...

  9. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  10. On the collapse of cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N. K.

    The collapse of a single cavity, or a cloud of bubbles has several physical consequences when in proximity to a structure or resident within a material during deformation. The earliest recognized of these was cavitation erosion of the propellers of steam ships. However, other processes include the rapid collapse of cavities leading to hot spots in explosives from which reaction ensues, or the more recent phenomenon of light generation by oscillating single bubbles or clouds. In the collapse of a cavity, the least considered but the most important mechanism is asymmetric closure. One of the consequences of this is the formation of jets leading to local high pressures and shears that result in the damage or reaction mechanisms observed. The challenge for the future remains in understanding the effects of cloud cavitation since it is likely that only one bubble in perhaps millions in a cloud catalyses an event. The review follows the author's work in the understanding of shock-induced cavity collapse and highlights several results which indicate the importance of this problem in a variety of fields.

  11. A 200 MHz prebunching cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This cavity was installed in the PS ring and proved very efficient in providing a modulation on the PS beam before it is injected into the SPS machine. Moreover it allowed longitudinal instabilities studies at high intensities. Roberto Cappi stands on the left.

  12. Improving cooling of cavity blackbodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Catherine; Chauvel, Gildas

    2013-10-01

    A cavity blackbody is the appropriate IR reference source for IR sensors which require high radiance levels. It combines high emissivity independent from wavelength and high speed warm up and high stability thanks to its light trap structure. However, the inconvenient of this structure is that it leads to a prohibitive cooling time. HGH developed a method to speed up the cooling time.

  13. Seismic resonances of acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. M.; Esterhazy, S.; Perugia, I.; Bokelmann, G.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to clarify at a possible testsite whether a member state of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)has violated its rules by conducting a underground nuclear test. Compared toatmospheric and underwater tests underground nuclear explosions are the mostdifficult to detect.One primary structural target for the field team during an OSI is the detectionof an underground cavity, created by underground nuclear explosions. Theapplication of seismic-resonances of the cavity for its detection has beenproposed in the CTBT by mentioning "resonance seismometry" as possibletechnique during OSIs. We modeled the interaction of a seismic wave-field withan underground cavity by a sphere filled with an acoustic medium surrounded byan elastic full space. For this setting the solution of the seismic wave-fieldcan be computed analytically. Using this approach the appearance of acousticresonances can be predicted in the theoretical calculations. Resonance peaksappear in the spectrum derived for the elastic domain surrounding the acousticcavity, which scale in width with the density of the acoustic medium. For lowdensities in the acoustic medium as for an gas-filled cavity, the spectralpeaks become very narrow and therefore hard to resolve. The resonancefrequencies, however can be correlated to the discrete set of eigenmodes of theacoustic cavity and can thus be predicted if the dimension of the cavity isknown. Origin of the resonance peaks are internal reverberations of wavescoupling in the acoustic domain and causing an echoing signal that couples outto the elastic domain again. In the gas-filled case the amplitudes in timedomain are very low.Beside theoretical considerations we seek to find real data examples fromsimilar settings. As example we analyze a 3D active seismic data set fromFelsőpetény, Hungary that has been conducted between 2012 and 2014 on behalf ofthe CTBTO. In the subsurface of this area a former clay mine is

  14. Control Loops for the J-PARC RCS Digital Low-Level RF Control

    CERN Document Server

    Schnase, Alexander; Ezura, Eizi; Hara, Keigo; Nomura, Masahiro; Ohmori, Chihiro; Takagi, Akira; Tamura, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    2005-01-01

    The low-level radiofrequency control for the Rapic Cycling Synchrotron of J-PARC is based on digital signal processing. This system controls the acceleration voltages of 12 magnetic alloy loaded cavities. To achive a short overall delay, mandatory for stable loop operation, the data-processing is based on distributed arithmetics in FPGA. Due to the broadband characteristic of the acceleration cavities, no tuning loop is needed. To handle the large beam current, the RF system operates simultaneously with dual harmonics (h=2) and (h=4). The stability of the amplitude loops is limited by the delay of the FIR filters used after downconversion. The phase loop offers several operation modes to define the phase relation of (h=2) and (h=4) between the longitudinal beam signal and the vector-sum of the cavity voltages. Besides the FIR filters, we provide cascaded CIC filters with smoothly varying coefficients. Such a filter tracks the revolution frequency and has a substantially shorter delay, thereby increasing the s...

  15. BMN correlators by loop equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynard, Bertrand; Kristjansen, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    In the BMN approach to N=4 SYM a large class of correlators of interest are expressible in terms of expectation values of traces of words in a zero-dimensional gaussian complex matrix model. We develop a loop-equation based, analytic strategy for evaluating such expectation values to any order in the genus expansion. We reproduce the expectation values which were needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus one correction to the anomalous dimension of BMN-operators and which were earlier obtained by combinatorial means. Furthermore, we present the expectation values needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus two correction. (author)

  16. A preliminary quadrupole asymmetry study of a β=0.12 superconducting single spoke cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Qin; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Xing; Zhou, Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen

    2014-10-01

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been launched in China for nuclear waste transmutation. For the application of high intensity proton beam acceleration, the quadrupole asymmetry effect needs to be carefully evaluated for cavities. Single spoke cavities are the main accelerating structures in the low energy front-end. The single spoke cavity has small transverse electromagnetic field asymmetry, which may lead to transverse RF defocusing asymmetry and beam envelope asymmetry. A superconducting single spoke resonator (PKU-2 Spoke) of β=0.12 and f=325 MHz with a racetrack-shaped inner conductor has been designed at Peking university. The study of its RF field quadrupole asymmetry and its effect on transverse momentum change has been performed. The quadrupole asymmetry study has also been performed on a β=0.12 and f=325 MHz ring-shaped single spoke cavity. Our results show that the quadrupole asymmetry is very small for both the racetrack-shaped and the ring-shaped single spoke cavity.

  17. Optical loop framing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalibjian, R.; Chong, Y.P.; Prono, D.S.; Cavagnolo, H.R.

    1984-06-01

    The ATA provides an electron beam pulse of 70-ns duration at a 1-Hz rate. Our present optical diagnostics technique involve the imaging of the visible light generated by the beam incident onto the plant of a thin sheet of material. It has already been demonstrated that the light generated has a sufficiently fast temporal reponse in performing beam diagnostics. Notwithstanding possible beam emittance degradation due to scattering in the thin sheet, the observation of beam spatial profiles with relatively high efficiencies has provided data complementary to that obtained from beam wall current monitors and from various x-ray probes and other electrical probes. The optical image sensor consists of a gated, intensified television system. The gate pulse of the image intensifier can be appropriately delayed to give frames that are time-positioned from the head to the tail of the beam with a minimum gate time of 5-ns. The spatial correlation of the time frames from pulse to pulse is very good for a stable electron beam; however, when instabilities do occur, it is difficult to properly assess the spatial composition of the head and the tail of the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Multiple gating within a pulse duration becomes desirable but cannot be performed because the recycle time (20-ms) of the TV system is much longer than the beam pulse. For this reason we have developed an optical-loop framing technique that will allow the recording of two frames within one pulse duration with our present gated/intensified TV system

  18. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-01-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q 0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons

  19. Thermal Properties of A Solar Coronal Cavity Observed with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Katherine K.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Theresa A.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kano, Ryouhei

    2011-01-01

    Coronal cavities are voids in coronal emission often observed above high latitude filament channels. Sometimes, these cavities have areas of bright X-ray emission in their centers. In this study, we use data from the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Hinode satellite to examine the thermal emission properties of a cavity observed during July 2008 that contains bright X-ray emission in its center. Using ratios of XRT filters, we find evidence for elevated temperatures in the cavity center. The area of elevated temperature evolves from a ring-shaped structure at the beginning of the observation, to an elongated structure two days later, finally appearing as a compact round source four days after the initial observation. We use a morphological model to fit the cavity emission, and find that a uniform structure running through the cavity does not fit the observations well. Instead, the observations are reproduced by modeling several short cylindrical cavity "cores" with different parameters on different days. These changing core parameters may be due to some observed activity heating different parts of the cavity core at different times. We find that core temperatures of 1.75 MK, 1.7 MK and 2.0 MK (for July 19, July 21 and July 23, respectively) in the model lead to structures that are consistent with the data, and that line-of-sight effects serve to lower the effective temperature derived from the filter ratio.

  20. Middle ear cavity morphology is consistent with an aquatic origin for testudines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Willis

    Full Text Available The position of testudines in vertebrate phylogeny is being re-evaluated. At present, testudine morphological and molecular data conflict when reconstructing phylogenetic relationships. Complicating matters, the ecological niche of stem testudines is ambiguous. To understand how turtles have evolved to hear in different environments, we examined middle ear morphology and scaling in most extant families, as well as some extinct species, using 3-dimensional reconstructions from micro magnetic resonance (MR and submillimeter computed tomography (CT scans. All families of testudines exhibited a similar shape of the bony structure of the middle ear cavity, with the tympanic disk located on the rostrolateral edge of the cavity. Sea Turtles have additional soft tissue that fills the middle ear cavity to varying degrees. When the middle ear cavity is modeled as an air-filled sphere of the same volume resonating in an underwater sound field, the calculated resonances for the volumes of the middle ear cavities largely fell within testudine hearing ranges. Although there were some differences in morphology, there were no statistically significant differences in the scaling of the volume of the bony middle ear cavity with head size among groups when categorized by phylogeny and ecology. Because the cavity is predicted to resonate underwater within the testudine hearing range, the data support the hypothesis of an aquatic origin for testudines, and function of the middle ear cavity in underwater sound detection.

  1. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  2. Loop quantum cosmology: Recent progress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . These techniques and their implications can be illustrated and tested in simple sit- uations by introducing symmetries, which is the origin of loop quantum cosmology. The symmetry reduction can be done in such a way that the characteristic ...

  3. An economical wireless cavity-nest viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel P. Huebner; Sarah R. Hurteau

    2007-01-01

    Inspection of cavity nests and nest boxes is often required during studies of cavity-nesting birds, and fiberscopes and pole-mounted video cameras are sometimes used for such inspection. However, the cost of these systems may be prohibitive for some potential users. We describe a user-built, wireless cavity viewer that can be used to access cavities as high as 15 m and...

  4. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  5. RF Feedback Analysis for 4 cavities per klystron in PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.; Tighe, R.

    1994-06-01

    Lattice changes in the PEP-II high energy ring have made the concept of driving four cavities with a single klystron an attractive option. This paper examines the topology from a RF feedback point of view. Sources of error are identified and their magnitudes are estimated. The effect on the performance of the longitudinal impedance reducing feedback loops is calculated using control theory and Mathematica

  6. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  7. Closed Loop Fluid Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    loop fluid delivery system (CLFDS) will integrate a vital signs monitor ( VSM ) and high speed infusion pump (Pump) to respond quickly to drops in...Interface (GUI) shows VSM data, allows the user to select from several injury types (head, uncontrolled hemorrhage, controlled hemorrhage, and three total...the bedrock for future Closed Loop Fluid System Pre-Market Approval application(s) to FDA. 6. Major Issues Clinical study testing revealed a

  8. Study of additive manufactured microwave cavities for pulsed optically pumped atomic clock applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolderbach, C.; Moreno, W.; Ivanov, A. E.; Debogovic, T.; Pellaton, M.; Skrivervik, A. K.; de Rijk, E.; Mileti, G.

    2018-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of passive microwave components is of high interest for the cost-effective and rapid prototyping or manufacture of devices with complex geometries. Here, we present an experimental study on the properties of recently demonstrated microwave resonator cavities manufactured by AM, in view of their applications to high-performance compact atomic clocks. The microwave cavities employ a loop-gap geometry using six electrodes. The critical electrode structures were manufactured monolithically using two different approaches: Stereolithography (SLA) of a polymer followed by metal coating and Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of aluminum. The tested microwave cavities show the desired TE011-like resonant mode at the Rb clock frequency of ≈6.835 GHz, with a microwave magnetic field highly parallel to the quantization axis across the vapor cell. When operated in an atomic clock setup, the measured atomic Rabi oscillations are comparable to those observed for conventionally manufactured cavities and indicate a good uniformity of the field amplitude across the vapor cell. Employing a time-domain Ramsey scheme on one of the SLA cavities, high-contrast (34%) Ramsey fringes are observed for the Rb clock transition, along with a narrow (166 Hz linewidth) central fringe. The measured clock stability of 2.2 × 10-13 τ-1/2 up to the integration time of 30 s is comparable to the current state-of-the-art stabilities of compact vapor-cell clocks based on conventional microwave cavities and thus demonstrates the feasibility of the approach.

  9. Response of the primary piping loop to an HCDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.W.; Moneim, M.T.A.; Wang, C.Y.; Gvildys, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a method for analyzing the response of the primary piping loop that consists of straight pipes, elbows, and other components connected in series and subject to hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) loads at both ends of the loop. The complete hydrodynamic equations in two-dimensions, that include both the nonlinear convective and viscous dissipation terms are used for the fluid dynamics together with the implicit ICE technique. The external walls of the pipes and components are treated as thin shells in which the analysis accounts for the membrane and bending strength of the wall, elastic-plastic material behavior, as well as large deformation under the effect of transient loading conditions. In the straight pipes, the flow is assumed to be axisymmetric; in the elbow regions, the two dimensions considered are the r and theta directions. The flow in the other components is also assumed to be axisymmetric; the components are modeled as a circular cylinder, in which the radius of the cylinder can be varied to conform with the outside shape of the component and the flow area inside can be changed independently from the outside shape. However, they must remain axially symmetric. The method is applied to a piping loop which consists of six elastic-plastic pipes and five rigid elbows connected in series and subjected to pressure pulses at both ends of the loop

  10. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  11. Habitat-mediated variation in the importance of ecosystem engineers for secondary cavity nesters in a nest web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Hugo; Martin, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Through physical state changes in biotic or abiotic materials, ecosystem engineers modulate resource availability to other organisms and are major drivers of evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Understanding whether and how ecosystem engineers are interchangeable for resource users in different habitats is a largely neglected topic in ecosystem engineering research that can improve our understanding of the structure of communities. We addressed this issue in a cavity-nest web (1999-2011). In aspen groves, the presence of mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides) and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolour) nests was positively related to the density of cavities supplied by northern flickers (Colaptes auratus), which provided the most abundant cavities (1.61 cavities/ha). Flickers in aspen groves provided numerous nesting cavities to bluebirds (66%) and swallows (46%), despite previous research showing that flicker cavities are avoided by swallows. In continuous mixed forests, however, the presence of nesting swallows was mainly related to cavity density of red-naped sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis), which provided the most abundant cavities (0.52 cavities/ha), and to cavity density of hairy woodpeckers (Picoides villosus), which provided few (0.14 cavities/ha) but high-quality cavities. Overall, sapsuckers and hairy woodpeckers provided 86% of nesting cavities to swallows in continuous forests. In contrast, the presence of nesting bluebirds in continuous forests was associated with the density of cavities supplied by all the ecosystem engineers. These results suggest that (i) habitat type may mediate the associations between ecosystem engineers and resource users, and (ii) different ecosystem engineers may be interchangeable for resource users depending on the quantity and quality of resources that each engineer supplies in each habitat type. We, therefore, urge the incorporation of the variation in the quantity and quality of resources provided by ecosystem engineers

  12. Assessing catchment connectivity using hysteretic loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jason; Masselink, Rens; Goni, Mikel; Gimenez, Rafael; Casali, Javier; Seeger, Manuel; Keesstra, Saskia

    2017-04-01

    Storm events mobilize large proportions of sediments in catchment systems. Therefore understanding catchment sediment dynamics throughout the continuity of storms and how initial catchment states act as controls on the transport of sediment to catchment outlets is important for effective catchment management. Sediment connectivity is a concept which can explain the origin, pathways and sinks of sediments within catchments (Baartman et al., 2013; Parsons et al., 2015; Masselink et al., 2016a,b; Mekonnen et al., 2016). However, sediment connectivity alone does not provide a practicable mechanism by which the catchment's initial state - and thus the location of entrained sediment in the sediment transport cascade - can be characterized. Studying the dynamic relationship between water discharge (Q) and suspended sediment (SS) at the catchment outlet can provide a valuable research tool to infer the likely source areas and flow pathways contributing to sediment transport because the relationship can be characterized by predictable hysteresis patterns. Hysteresis is observed when the sediment concentration associated with a certain flow rate is different depending on the direction in which the analysis is performed - towards the increase or towards the diminution of the flow. However, the complexity of the phenomena and factors which determine the hysteresis make its interpretation ambiguous. Previous work has described various types of hysteretic loops as well as the cause for the shape of the loop, mainly pointing to the origin of the sediments. The data set for this study comes from four experimental watersheds in Navarre (Spain), owned and maintained by the Government of Navarre. These experimental watersheds have been monitored and studied since 1996 (La Tejería and Latxaga) and 2001 (Oskotz principal and Oskotz woodland). La Tejería and Latxaga watersheds are similar to each other regarding size (approximately 200 ha), geology (marls and sandstones), soils (fine

  13. Evaluation of tensile strength of different configurations of orthodontic retraction loops for obtaining optimized forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Miceli Beck Guimaraes; Westphalen, Graziela Henriques; Guimaraes, Magali Beck; Hirakata, Luciana Mayumi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the mechanical behavior of different orthodontic retraction loops. Two designs of orthodontic loops for closing space were analyzed: teardrop-shaped (T) and circle-shaped loop (C), of two different heights (6 and 8 mm), and two types of orthodontic wires (stainless steel - 0.19' x 0.25'; TMA - titanium molybdenum alloy - 0.016' x 0.016'). The sample consisted of 80 loops, divided into 8 groups determined by the combination shape/height/type of wire, which were submitted to tensile testing at a speed of 2 mm/min., to measure the quantity of force generated when activated in the interval of 0.75 mm and 2.25 mm. The results were submitted to the ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests to compare the groups, and the Student's-t test to compare the means of two groups. Statistically higher values were observed for the size 6 mm, circle shape and stainless steel composition. The group "teardrop-8 mm-TMA" together with the group "circle-8 mm-TMA" presented the lowest mean value, differing statistically from all of the other groups. It was concluded that the alloy of the wire and the height of the loop would be more important than the loop design.

  14. Gastrophysics of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-01-01

    Gastrophysics is the science that pertains to the physical and physico-chemical description of the empirical world of gastronomy, with focus on sensory perception in the oral cavity and how it is related to the materials properties of food and cooking processes. Flavor (taste and smell), mouthfeel, chemesthesis, and astringency are all related to the chemical properties and the texture of the food and how the food is transformed in the oral cavity. The present topical review will primarily focus attention on the somatosensory perception of food (mouthfeel or texture) and how it interacts with basic tastes (sour, bitter, sweet, salty, and umami) and chemesthetic action. Issues regarding diet, nutrition, and health will be put into an evolutionary perspective, and some mention will be made of umami and its importance for (oral) health.

  15. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  16. Chromospheric counterparts of solar transition region unresolved fine structure loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2018-04-01

    Low-lying loops have been discovered at the solar limb in transition region temperatures by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). They do not appear to reach coronal temperatures, and it has been suggested that they are the long-predicted unresolved fine structures (UFS). These loops are dynamic and believed to be visible during both heating and cooling phases. Making use of coordinated observations between IRIS and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, we study how these loops impact the solar chromosphere. We show for the first time that there is indeed a chromospheric signal of these loops, seen mostly in the form of strong Doppler shifts and a conspicuous lack of chromospheric heating. In addition, we find that several instances have a inverse Y-shaped jet just above the loop, suggesting that magnetic reconnection is driving these events. Our observations add several puzzling details to the current knowledge of these newly discovered structures; this new information must be considered in theoretical models. Two movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  17. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also...... described, and their implications for microdroplet resonator technology are discussed. Optofluidic implementations of microdroplet resonators are reviewed with emphasis on the basic optomechanical properties....

  18. Planar and non-planar Wilson loops in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagan, E.; Latorre, J.I.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1988-01-01

    A general QCD sum rule calculation of vacuum expectation values of Wilson loops is presented and particularized to several specific planar and non-planar contours. The string tension obtained is √σ = 0.50(5) GeV. Within the errors of the approach, this result is shape-independent. We comment on the possibility that corrections to the area and perimeter laws could be parametrized by a geodesic curvature term. (orig.)

  19. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  20. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El-Jallal, Said [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Physique du Rayonnement et de l’Interaction Laser Matière, Faculté des sciences, Université de Moulay Ismail, Meknès (Morocco)

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  1. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-03

    Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a ferroelectric tuner concept that could be used for controlling external coupling to RF cavities for the superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the electron cooler of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner configuration utilizes several small donut-shaped ferroelectric assemblies, which allow the design to be simpler and more flexible, as compared to previous designs. Design parameters for 704 and 1300 MHz versions of the tuner are given. Simulation results point to efficient performance that could reduce by a factor-of-ten the RF power levels required for driving superconducting cavities in the BNL ERL.

  2. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a ferroelectric tuner concept that could be used for controlling external coupling to RF cavities for the superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the electron cooler of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner configuration utilizes several small donut-shaped ferroelectric assemblies, which allow the design to be simpler and more flexible, as compared to previous designs. Design parameters for 704 and 1300 MHz versions of the tuner are given. Simulation results point to efficient performance that could reduce by a factor-of-ten the RF power levels required for driving superconducting cavities in the BNL ERL.

  3. Preparation and handling of surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloess, D.

    1988-01-01

    Fortunately, surface treatment for s.c. cavities knows only one simple rule. If one observes this rule strictly one will be successful, if not, one will fail! The rule is CLEANLINESS. This means: clean material (high purity niobium without inclusions), clean (analytical grade) polishing chemicals and solvents, ultraclean (semiconductor grade) rinsing water, ultraclean (class 100) assembly environment. In general, if one applies the same working practice as the semiconductor industry, one will produce surfaces that are less clean than silicon wafers, due to the shape of the cavity (an inner surface is much more difficult to clean than a flat wafer); due to its size and due to the material (niobium is hydrophilic which makes the water with all the dirt in it stick to the surface). 9 references

  4. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  5. Feedback control of the hyperfine ground states of neutral atoms in an optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Kampschulte, Tobias; Reimann, Rene; Meschede, Dieter [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Widera, Artur [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, TU Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Str., 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Detection and manipulation of atomic spin states is essential for many experimental realizations of quantum gates. Feedback schemes to stabilize the states and their superpositions can counteract perturbations caused by the environment. In our experiment we deduce the atomic spin state of one or two Caesium atoms by measuring the transmission of a probe laser through a high-finesse cavity. Depending on the number of atoms in the hyperfine state that strongly couples to the cavity, the resonance of the cavity is shifted and the probe laser transmission is decreased. We employ a Bayesian update formalism to obtain time-dependent probabilities for the atomic states of one and two atoms. I present an experimental implementation using a digital signal processor which allows us to determine the atomic spin state in real-time. First experimental results of an extension to a feedback loop for the preparation and stabilization of atomic states are shown.

  6. The flow distribution in the parallel tubes of the cavity receiver under variable heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Yun; Wang, Yueshe; Hu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An experimental loop is built to find the flow distribution in the parallel tubes. • With the concentration of heat flux, two-phase flow makes distribution more uneven. • The total flow rate is chosen appropriately for a wider heat flux distribution. • A suitable system pressure is essential for the optimization of flow distribution. - Abstract: As an optical component of tower solar thermal power station, the heliostat mirror reflects sunlight to one point of the heated surface in the solar cavity receiver, called as one-point focusing system. The radiation heat flux concentrated in the cavity receiver is always non-uniform temporally and spatially, which may lead to extremely local over-heat on the receiver evaporation panels. In this paper, an electrical heated evaporating experimental loop, including five parallel vertical tubes, is set up to evaluate the hydrodynamic characteristics of evaporation panels in a solar cavity receiver under various non-uniform heat flux. The influence of the heat flux concentration ratio, total flow rate, and system pressure on the flow distribution of parallel tubes is discussed. It is found that the flow distribution becomes significantly worse with the increase of heat flux and concentration ratio; and as the system pressure decreased, the flow distribution is improved. It is extremely important to obtain these interesting findings for the safe and stable operation of solar cavity receiver, and can also provide valuable references for the design and optimization of operating parameters solar tower power station system.

  7. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  8. Temperature measurement of accelerator cell solenoid loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Fan; Dong Pan; Dai Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the research on temperature measurement of solenoid loop. The measuring temperature fiber is layered in solenoid loop for the accelerator cell. When the solenoid loop is supplied with high current form a constant current source, its temperature increases rapidly. The temperature fiber can measure the temperature of the solenoid loop and get temperature measurement rule. Experiment and simulation show temperature of interior solenoid loop the highest and it decreases from the interior to the exterior of solenoid loop. To control temperature of solenoid loop under 60 degree C, simulation displays load interval of constant current source with 80 A current should be at least is 17.5 minutes. (authors)

  9. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  10. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  11. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Burt, G. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Lingwood, C. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Rimmer, Robert [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  12. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for ‘open’ surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a ‘unity’ of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and

  13. Modeling of Reduced-Beta Half-Reentrant Cavities: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popielarksi, J.T.; Hartung, W.; Johnson, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    The linear accelerator for the Spallation Neutron Source uses multi-cell elliptical superconducting cavities to provide much of the accelerating voltage. Similar technology is being considered for other projects, including a proposed superconducting proton linac at Fermilab and the European Spallation Source. A new type of accelerating structure, a 'half-reentrant' elliptical cavity has been studied at Michigan State University. A half-reentrant cavity can potentially improve upon existing elliptical cavity designs by reducing the cryogenic load by as much as 40% for the same accelerating gradient. Alternatively, with the same peak surface magnetic field as traditional elliptical cavities, it is anticipated that half-reentrant designs could operate at up to 25% higher accelerating gradient. With a half-reentrant shape, liquids can drain easily during chemical etching and high pressure rinsing, which allows standard multi-cell processing techniques to be used. Electromagnetic designs have been developed for three half-reentrant cell shapes suitable for an ion or proton linac (β = 0.47, 0.61 and 0.81). The mechanical designs have been done for prototypes at 805 MHz. The design and optimization of the reduced-β half-reentrant cavities are summarized in this report.

  14. Steady and perturbed motion of a point vortex along a boundary with a circular cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhov, E.A.; Koshel, K.V.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a point vortex moving along a straight boundary with a circular cavity subjected to a background flow is investigated. Given the constant background flow, this configuration produces regular phase portraits of the vortex motion. These phase portraits are discriminated depending on the cavity's circular shape, and then the transition to chaos of the vortex motion is investigated given an oscillating perturbation superimposed on the background flow. Based on the steady-state vortex rotation, the forcing parameters that lead to effective destabilization of vortex trajectories are distinguished. We show that, provided the cavity aperture is relatively narrow, the periodic forcing superimposed on the background flow destabilizes the vortex trajectories very slightly. On the other hand, if the cavity aperture is relatively wide, the forcing can significantly destabilize vortex trajectories causing the majority of the trajectories, which would be closed without the forcing, to move towards infinity. - Highlights: • The dynamics of a point vortex moving along a straight boundary with a circular cavity is addressed. • Three phase portrait structures depending on the cavity's circular shape are singled out. • Forcing parameters that lead to effective destabilization of vortex trajectories are found.

  15. Comparison of hysteresis loop area scaling behavior of Co/Pt multilayers: Discrete and continuous field sweeping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handoko, Djati; Lee, Sang-Hyuk [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Min Lee, Kyung; Jeong, Jong-Ryul [Department of Material Science and Engineering and Graduate School of Green Energy Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Hyun, E-mail: donghyun@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    We have investigated the hysteresis loop shape changes with discrete and continuous magnetic field sweeping for Co/Pt multilayers with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The hysteresis loop shape was observed by measuring a polar magneto-optical Kerr effect. The loop area has been found to increase rapidly with an increase of the field step size as well as the sweeping frequency until the area reaches a maximum. The increase of the loop area has been analyzed based on the Steinmetz law, where a loop area scaling exponent determined from discrete field sweeping is compared to a scaling exponent from continuous field sweeping. The dynamic coercivity behavior with respect to discrete and continuous field sweeping is analyzed together with the loop area scaling behavior, suggesting that details of magnetic configuration disorders do not modify the loop area scaling exponent. - Highlights: • Co/Pt thin film multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have been prepared. • Discrete and continuous field sweeping is applied for MOKE measurement. • Loop area scaling exponent is observed. • The dynamic coercivity behavior is analyzed together with the loop area scaling behavior. • Disorder details of magnetic configuration do not modify the loop area scaling exponent.

  16. Tritium Management Loop Design Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Jordan D. [ORNL; Felde, David K. [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Greenwood, Michael Scott [ORNL; Qualls, A L. [ORNL; Calderoni, Pattrick [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2017-12-01

    This report summarizes physical, chemical, and engineering analyses that have been done to support the development of a test loop to study tritium migration in 2LiF-BeF2 salts. The loop will operate under turbulent flow and a schematic of the apparatus has been used to develop a model in Mathcad to suggest flow parameters that should be targeted in loop operation. The introduction of tritium into the loop has been discussed as well as various means to capture or divert the tritium from egress through a test assembly. Permeation was calculated starting with a Modelica model for a transport through a nickel window into a vacuum, and modifying it for a FLiBe system with an argon sweep gas on the downstream side of the permeation interface. Results suggest that tritium removal with a simple tubular permeation device will occur readily. Although this system is idealized, it suggests that rapid measurement capability in the loop may be necessary to study and understand tritium removal from the system.

  17. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  18. Diagnostics and treatment of 1.3 GHz Nb cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamashevich, Yegor

    2017-01-01

    increase the accuracy of the measurements. A new program code for quench localisation calculating the path of the second-sound wave was developed. This allows the signals from all sensors to be used, regardless of their position relative to the quench site. The new approach was validated using additional techniques such as a temperature mapping and an optical inspection of the inner cavity surface. Furthermore, a new multi-sensor for second-sound wave detection in the helium vessel of a cavity was developed and successfully tested on a serial-production XFEL cavity. The determined quench site location was confirmed by subsequent optical inspection. The algorithm localises the quench without mode measurements i.e. there is no need to dismount HOM-antennas which requires special procedures and must be performed in a clean-room. The mathematical approach described in this paper can be applied for second-sound tests of superconductive cavities of various shapes and dimensions.

  19. Frequency control of RF booster cavity in TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Laverty, M.

    1993-01-01

    A booster is used in the TRIUMF cyclotron to increase the energy gain per turn for beam orbits corresponding to energies greater than 370 MeV. It operates at 92.24 MHz, the 4 th harmonic of the cyclotron main rf, and at a nominal voltage of 150 kV. Excitation is provided by a 90 kW rf system that is phase locked to the main rf. When the main rf is interrupted due to sparking or other causes, a controller built into the low frequency source of the booster rf system disables the phase-locked loop, and reconfigures the source as a temperature stabilized oscillator operating at the last locked frequency. When the cyclotron rf is restored it usually will be at different frequency. The oscillator tunes automatically to this new frequency. The acquisition time is extended by the controller to match the response time of the mechanical tuner in the cavity

  20. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD blocks 3 and 4

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Butterworth, A; Molendijk, J; Tuckmantel, J

    2013-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently setup for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would push the klystrons to saturation. For beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam (transient beam loading) will not be corrected, but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for RF loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point should be adapted for each bunch. The goal of these MDs was to test thefirmware version of an iterative algorithm that adjusts the voltage set point to achieve the optimal phase modulation for klystron forward power considerations.

  1. Statistical wave scattering: from the atomic nucleus to mesoscopic systems to microwave cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, P.A. [IFUNAM, 01000 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2007-12-15

    Universal statistical aspects of wave scattering by a variety of physical systems ranging from atomic nuclei to mesoscopic systems and microwave cavities are described. A statistical model for the scattering matrix is employed to address the problem of quantum chaotic scattering. The model, introduced in the past in the context of nuclear physics, discusses the problem in terms of a prompt and an equilibrated component: it incorporates the average value of the scattering matrix to account for the prompt processes and satisfies the requirements of flux conservation, causality and ergodicity. The main application of the model is the analysis of electronic transport through ballistic mesoscopic cavities whose classical dynamics is chaotic, although it can be applied to the propagation of microwaves through cavities of a similar shape. The model describes well the results from the numerical solutions of the Schrodinger equation for two-dimensional cavities. (Author)

  2. DESIGN, PROTOTYPE AND MEASUREMENT OF A SINGLE-CELL DEFLECTING CAVITY FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haipeng Wang, Guangfeng Cheng, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Larry Turlington, Alireza Nassiri, Geoff Waldschmidt

    2009-05-01

    After the design optimization of a squashed elliptical shape, single-cell, superconducting (SC) deflecting cavity at 2.815 GHz, a copper prototype has been bench measured to determine its rf properties and the effectiveness of waveguide damping of parasitic modes [1]. RF cold tests were also performed at 2K on niobium single-cell and two-cell prototype cavities. Details of impedance calculation using wakefiled analysis of the single-cell cavity are shown to meet the strict 200 mA beam stability requirement of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab where a total of 16 single-cell cavities will be divided into two cryomodule. The design of higher-order mode (HOM) waveguide damping, the simulations of the Lorenz force detuning, and the prototype of on-cell damping are presented.

  3. Higher Order Modes in Third Harmonic Cavities for XFEL/FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinton, I.R.R.; /Manchester U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Baboi, N.; /DESY; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab; Flisgen, T.; Glock, H.W.; /Rostock U.; Jones, R.M.; Juntong, N.; /Manchester U. /DESY; Khabiboulline, T.N.; /Fermilab; van Rienen, U; /Rostock U.; Zhang, P.; /Manchester U. /DESY /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2010-06-01

    We analyse higher order modes in the 3.9 GHz bunch shaping cavities recently installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. We report on recent experimental results on the frequency spectrum from probe based measurements made at CMTB at DESY. These are compared to those predicted by finite difference and finite element computer codes. This study is focused mainly on the dipole component of the multi-pole expansion of the wakefield. The modes are readily identifiable as single-cavity modes provided the frequencies of these modes are below the cut-off of the inter-connecting beam pipes. The modes above cut-off are coupled to the 4 cavities and are distinct from single cavity modes.

  4. Influence of tests results on serial production of EXFEL superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostin, D. V.; Sulimov, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The European XFEL (EXFEL) 1.3 GHz cavities were produced without any final cold RF performance guarantee for characteristics like accelerating gradient, quality factor or field emission. In the case of low-performance, DESY provided all re-treatment procedures in order to improve these characteristics getting closer to specification levels. But EXFEL cavities have very tight tolerances for the parameters like cavity length, cells eccentricity, fundamental mode frequency and field distribution on the operational mode. Usage of modern infrastructure, analytical methods and powerful tools of the database analysis allows us not only keeping these characteristics in specified ranges, but also investigate the cavity shape uncertainties and improve the damping of the higher order modes.

  5. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binping Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity’s electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  6. Cavity polaritons in one-dimensional photonic crystals containing dye molecule-titanate nanosheet hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenta; Suzuki, Makoto; Chen, Changdong; Feng, Qi; Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Tsurumachi, Noriaki

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the optical properties of one dimensional photonic crystal (1D-PC) microcavity with a wedge-shaped cavity layer containing fluorescent pseudoisocyanine (PIC)-gelatin and nonfluorescent PIC-H1.07Ti1.73O4•nH2O (HTO) nanohybrids. In the case of the PIC-gelatin, the formation of cavity polaritons with a Rabi splitting energy of 49.2 meV was clearly observed. Contrary to our expectations, the formation of cavity polaritons in the case of the PIC-HTO nanohybrids was also observed, even though their splitting energy of 5.8 meV was small. Although different possible explanations were considered, at present, there is insufficient information to completely explain the phenomena. The formation of cavity polaritons with nonfluorescent excitons is indeed very rare and therefore interesting.

  7. Thermodynamics in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.F.; Zhu, J.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is very powerful to deal with the behavior of early universe. Moreover, the effective loop quantum cosmology gives a successful description of the universe in the semiclassical region. We consider the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe as a thermodynamical system and investigate the thermodynamics of LQC in the semiclassical region. The effective density and effective pressure in the modified Friedmann equation from LQC not only determine the evolution of the universe in LQC scenario but also are actually found to be the thermodynamic quantities. This result comes from the energy definition in cosmology (the Misner-Sharp gravitational energy) and is consistent with thermodynamic laws. We prove that within the framework of loop quantum cosmology, the elementary equation of equilibrium thermodynamics is still valid.

  8. Understanding cavity QED effects from cavity classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddei, M.M.; Kort-Kamp, W.J.M.; Farina, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Our work intends to show how cavity classical electrodynamics can be used for achieving results with direct quantum analogues. It is shown how the classical interaction between a real radiating electric dipole and a perfectly-conducting surface can be used to obtain information about some cavity quantum electrodynamics effects related to radiative properties of atomic systems. Based on the case of an oscillating electric dipole (a classical representation of an excited atom) in front of a perfectly-conducting sphere, two main physical quantities can be computed, the classical dipole frequency shift and the change in the rate of energy loss from radiation reaction, both due to the presence of the sphere. The link from classical to quantum can be made via interpreting, for example, the dipole frequency as the atom's dominant transition frequency. The frequency shift due to the sphere can be related through E = (h/2π) to the energy shift of the system, i.e., the dispersive interaction between the atom and the sphere; while the change in energy loss can be related to the alteration of the atom's spontaneous emission due to the sphere. The amazing result is that this classical method, once corresponded classical quantities to quantum ones such as exemplified above with frequency, can predict the two above-mentioned quantum effects analytically with the correct functional dependencies on all geometric and atomic parameters, being off only by a constant pre factor. (author)

  9. Spin Interference in Rectangle Loop Based on Rashba and Dresselhaus Spin-Orbit Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia-Ting, Ni; Bin, Chen; Xiao-Wan, Liang; Koga, T.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the amplitude and spin polarization of AAS oscillation changing with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and Dresselhaus SOI. The amplitude and spin polarization of AB oscillation changing with Rashba SOI and Dresselhaus SOI are demonstrated as well. The ideal quasi-one-dimensional square loop does not exist in reality, therefore to match the experiment better we should consider the shape of the rectangle loop in theory

  10. Transfer behavior of quantum states between atoms in photonic crystal coupled cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke; Li Zhiyuan

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the one-excitation dynamics of a quantum system consisting of two two-level atoms each interacting with one of two coupled single-mode cavities via spontaneous emission. When the atoms and cavities are tuned into resonance, a wide variety of time-evolution behaviors can be realized by modulating the atom-cavity coupling strength g and the cavity-cavity hopping strength λ. The dynamics is solved rigorously via the eigenproblem of an ordinary coupled linear system and simple analytical solutions are derived at several extreme situations of g and λ. In the large hopping limit where g >λ, the time-evolution behavior of the system is characterized by the usual slowly varying carrier envelope superimposed upon a fast and violent oscillation. At a certain instant, the energy is fully transferred from the one quantum subsystem to the other. When the two interaction strengths are comparable in magnitude, the dynamics acts as a continuous pulse having irregular frequency and line shape of peaks and valleys, and the complicated time-evolution behaviors are ascribed to the violent competition between all the one-excitation quantum states. The coupled quantum system of atoms and cavities makes a good model to study cavity quantum electrodynamics with great freedoms of many-body interaction.

  11. Linear shaped charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David; Stofleth, Jerome H.; Saul, Venner W.

    2017-07-11

    Linear shaped charges are described herein. In a general embodiment, the linear shaped charge has an explosive with an elongated arrowhead-shaped profile. The linear shaped charge also has and an elongated v-shaped liner that is inset into a recess of the explosive. Another linear shaped charge includes an explosive that is shaped as a star-shaped prism. Liners are inset into crevices of the explosive, where the explosive acts as a tamper.

  12. High pressure experimental water loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenon, M.

    1958-01-01

    A high pressure experimental water loop has been made for studying the detection and evolution of cladding failure in a pressurized reactor. The loop has been designed for a maximum temperature of 360 deg. C, a maximum of 160 kg/cm 2 and flow rates up to 5 m 3 /h. The entire loop consists of several parts: a main circuit with a canned rotor circulation pump, steam pressurizer, heating tubes, two hydro-cyclones (one de-gasser and one decanter) and one tubular heat exchanger; a continuous purification loop, connected in parallel, comprising pressure reducing valves and resin pots which also allow studies of the stability of resins under pressure, temperature and radiation; following the gas separator is a gas loop for studying the recombination of the radiolytic gases in the steam phase. The preceding circuits, as well as others, return to a low pressure storage circuit. The cold water of the low pressure storage flask is continuously reintroduced into the high pressure main circuit by means of a return pump at a maximum head of 160 kg /cm 2 , and adjusted to the pressurizer level. This loop is also a testing bench for the tight high pressure apparatus. The circulating pump and the connecting flanges (Oak Ridge type) are water-tight. The feed pump and the pressure reducing valves are not; the un-tight ones have a system of leak recovery. To permanently check the tightness the circuit has been fitted with a leak detection system (similar to the HRT one). (author) [fr

  13. Temperature Structure of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    we analyze the temperature structure of a coronal cavity observed in Aug. 2007. coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and x-rays. when these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs. It is important to establish the temperature structure of cavities in order to understand the thermodynamics of cavities in relation to their three-dimensional magnetic structure. To analyze the temperature we compare temperature ratios of a series of iron lines observed by the Hinode/EUv Imaging spectrometer (EIS). We also use those lines to constrain a forward model of the emission from the cavity and streamer. The model assumes a coronal streamer with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel lenth. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. The general cavity morphology and the cavity and streamer density have already been modeled using data from STEREO's SECCHI/EUVI and Hinode/EIS (Gibson et al 2010 and Schmit & Gibson 2011).

  14. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulse properties of external cavity mode locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Kroh, Marcel; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an external-cavity mode-locked semiconductor laser is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The optimization analysis focuses on the regimes of stable mode locking and the generation of sub-picosecond optical pulses. We demonstrate stable output pulses down to one...... picosecond duration with more than 30 dB trailing pulse suppression. The limiting factors to the device performance are investigated on the basis of a fully-distributed time-domain model.We find that ultrafast gain dynamics effectively reduce the pulse-shaping strength and inhibit the generation...

  16. LISA Pathfinder: OPD loop characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Michael; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The optical metrology system (OMS) of the LISA Pathfinder mission is measuring the distance between two free-floating test masses with unprecedented precision. One of the four OMS heterodyne interferometers reads out the phase difference between the reference and the measurement laser beam. This phase from the reference interferometer is common to all other longitudinal interferometer read outs and therefore subtracted. In addition, the phase is fed back via the digital optical pathlength difference (OPD) control loop to keep it close to zero. Here, we analyse the loop parameters and compare them to on-ground measurement results.

  17. Fermions and loops on graphs: I. Loop calculus for determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Chertkov, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series devoted to evaluation of the partition function in statistical models on graphs with loops in terms of the Berezin/fermion integrals. The paper focuses on a representation of the determinant of a square matrix in terms of a finite series, where each term corresponds to a loop on the graph. The representation is based on a fermion version of the loop calculus, previously introduced by the authors for graphical models with finite alphabets. Our construction contains two levels. First, we represent the determinant in terms of an integral over anti-commuting Grassmann variables, with some reparametrization/gauge freedom hidden in the formulation. Second, we show that a special choice of the gauge, called the BP (Bethe–Peierls or belief propagation) gauge, yields the desired loop representation. The set of gauge fixing BP conditions is equivalent to the Gaussian BP equations, discussed in the past as efficient (linear scaling) heuristics for estimating the covariance of a sparse positive matrix

  18. Shape language - How people describe shapes and shape operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegers, T.; Langeveld, L.H.; Vergeest, J.S.M.

    2001-01-01

    Many designers do not use CAD tools for shape ideation. They consider CAD systems not appropriate for the ideation phase. This research investigates how designers ideate shape, in particular which terms they use to exteriorize shape. The goal is to be able to propose digital tools that are useful

  19. Comparison of 3 methods on fabricating micro- /nano- structured surface on 3D mold cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bissacco, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    limited to flat or simple shaped geometries. In this paper, 3 approaches for fabricating micro and nano- structured surfaces on a mold cavity for injection moulding are investigated and compared. The first approach is to use pre-fabricated plate with micro-structured surface as an insert for the mold...

  20. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, E. [Fermilab; Arkan, T. [Fermilab; Borissov, E. [Fermilab; Dhanaraj, N. [Fermilab; Hocker, A. [Fermilab; Orlov, Y. [Fermilab; Peterson, T. [Fermilab; Premo, K. [Fermilab

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  1. Cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Srinivasulu Raju; M Umapathy; G Uma

    2015-01-01

    Energy harvesting employing piezoelectric materials in mechanical structures such as cantilever beams, plates, diaphragms, etc, has been an emerging area of research in recent years. The research in this area is also focused on structural tailoring to improve the harvested power from the energy harvesters. Towards this aim, this paper presents a method for improving the harvested power from a cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester by introducing multiple rectangular cavities. A generalized model for a piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple rectangular cavities at a single section and two sections is developed. A method is suggested to optimize the thickness of the cavities and the number of cavities required to generate a higher output voltage for a given cantilever beam structure. The performance of the optimized energy harvesters is evaluated analytically and through experimentation. The simulation and experimental results show that the performance of the energy harvester can be increased with multiple cavities compared to the harvester with a single cavity. (paper)

  2. Unique space saving accelerator cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.; Fugitt, J.; Crosby, F.; Johnson, R.

    1981-03-01

    A cavity with 3 series gaps was designed and modeled to operate at 70 MHz as a SuperHILAC post acceleration buncher (8.5 MeV/A). Because of a cross-coupling scheme, the 3 cells operate in the 1/2 β lambda mode instead of the β lambda mode of an Alvarez cavity. This coupling results in a cavity with diameter reduced from 3 to less than one meter and a length half that of an Alvarez cavity for the same energy gain. The 3 gaps are electrically in parallel but mechanically in series. The cavity has high Q and shunt impedance. This type of cavity appears to be useful for low velocity beams with β less than or equal to 0.2

  3. Feedback - closing the loop digitally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagel, J.; Chase, B.

    1992-01-01

    Many feedback and feedforward systems are now using microprocessors within the loop. We describe the wide range of possibilities and problems that arise. We also propose some ideas for analysis and testing, including examples of motion control in the Flying Wire systems in Main Ring and Tevatron and Low Level RF control now being built for the Fermilab Linac upgrade. (author)

  4. Closing the Loop with Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altizer, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Conducting exercises provides a critical bridge between the theory of an Emergency Action Plan and its effective implementation. When conducted properly, exercises can fill the gap between training and after-action review to close the preparedness loop--before an actual emergency occurs. Often exercises are planned and conducted on campus based on…

  5. Two loops in eleven dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Michael B.; Vanhove, Pierre; Green, Michael B.; Kwon, Hwang-h.; Vanhove, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    The two-loop Feynman diagram contribution to the four-graviton amplitude of eleven-dimensional supergravity compactified on a two-torus, T^2, is analyzed in detail. The Schwinger parameter integrations are re-expressed as integration over the moduli space of a second torus, \\hat T^2, which enables the leading low-momentum contribution to be evaluated in terms of maps of \\hat T^2 into T^2. The ultraviolet divergences associated with boundaries of moduli space are regularized in a manner that is consistent with the expected duality symmetries of string theory. This leads to an exact expression for terms of order contraction of four Weyl tensors), thereby extending earlier results for the R^4 term that were based on the one-loop eleven-dimensional amplitude. Precise agreement is found with terms in type IIA and IIB superstring theory that arise from the low energy expansion of the tree-level and one-loop string amplitudes and predictions are made for the coefficients of certain two-loop string theory terms as we...

  6. Loop quantum cosmology and singularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyve, Ward

    2017-08-15

    Loop quantum gravity is believed to eliminate singularities such as the big bang and big crunch singularity. This belief is based on studies of so-called loop quantum cosmology which concerns symmetry-reduced models of quantum gravity. In this paper, the problem of singularities is analysed in the context of the Bohmian formulation of loop quantum cosmology. In this formulation there is an actual metric in addition to the wave function, which evolves stochastically (rather than deterministically as the case of the particle evolution in non-relativistic Bohmian mechanics). Thus a singularity occurs whenever this actual metric is singular. It is shown that in the loop quantum cosmology for a homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-time with arbitrary constant spatial curvature and cosmological constant, coupled to a massless homogeneous scalar field, a big bang or big crunch singularity is never obtained. This should be contrasted with the fact that in the Bohmian formulation of the Wheeler-DeWitt theory singularities may exist.

  7. PONDEROMOTIVE ACCELERATION IN CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Obenschain, K. [LCP and FD, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Laming, J. M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Taylor, B. D. [AFRL Eglin AFB, Pensacola, FL 32542 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3–4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  8. Morbidity of temporary loop ileostomies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Bemelman, W. A.; Veldink, G. J.; Slors, J. F. M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: A temporary loop ileostomy is constructed to protect a distal colonic anastomosis. Closure is usually performed not earlier than 8 - 12 weeks after the primary operation. During this period, stoma-related complications can occur and enhance the adverse effect on quality of life. The

  9. Design of 325 MHz spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Peng; Huang Hong; Dai Jianping; Zu Guoquan; Li Han

    2012-01-01

    Spoke cavity can be used in the low-energy section of the proton accelerator. It has many significant advantages: compact structure, high value of R/Q, etc. The ADS (Accelerator Driven System) project will adopt many spoke cavities with different β values. Therefore, IHEP has began the research of β=0.14, 325 MHz spoke cavity. In this pa per, the dimensions, RF performances and mechanical properties of it are studied. (authors)

  10. Induced Cavities for Photonic Quantum Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahad, Ohr; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-09-01

    Effective cavities can be optically induced in atomic media and employed to strengthen optical nonlinearities. Here we study the integration of induced cavities with a photonic quantum gate based on Rydberg blockade. Accounting for loss in the atomic medium, we calculate the corresponding finesse and gate infidelity. Our analysis shows that the conventional limits imposed by the blockade optical depth are mitigated by the induced cavity in long media, thus establishing the total optical depth of the medium as a complementary resource.

  11. Approach to rapid plasma shape diagnostics in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.K.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1980-07-01

    A deterministic approach to estimating the plasma boundary shape and location, based only on the signals of small B vector pickup loops in the vicinity of the plasma, is studied. The pickup loops provide information on par. delta B/sub R//par. delta t and B/sub Z//par. delta t, which can be processed to provide data on B/sub R/, B/sub Z/, psi, and psi/par. delta n (normal derivative), thus leading to a Cauchy boundary condition for solving Δ*psi = 0 between the loop locations and the plasma boundary flux surface. Numerical equilibria calculated for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) with different shapes are used to simulate pickup loop signals. Random errors are added to the signals to test the efficacy of two different approaches: global fitting and local fitting. Reasonably accurate results are obtained by the method of global fitting of the boundary values, which is based on the expansion of psi in terms of eigenfunctions of Δ*psi = 0 in a toroidal ring coordinate system. This approach is shown to permit a random error of nearly 100% in poloidal B vector field values at the loops and still reproduce the plasma shape and location within a few percent. This method appears to have the potential of rapidly displaying the plasma shape and location

  12. Study of an accelerating superconducting module and its feedback loop systems for the MYRRHA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouly, F.

    2011-11-01

    The MYRRHA ( Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications ) project aims at constructing an accelerator driven system (ADS) demonstrator (50 a 100 MWth) to explore the feasibility of nuclear waste transmutation. Such a subcritical reactor requires an extremely reliable accelerator which delivers a CW high power protons beam (600 MeV, 4 mA). The reference solution for this machine is a superconducting linear accelerator. This thesis presents the work - undertaken at IPN Orsay in October 2008 - on the study of a prototypical superconducting module and the feedback control systems of its cavity for the high energy part of the MYRRHA linac. First, the optimization and the design of 5-cell elliptical cavities (β=0,65), operating at 704.4 MHz, are presented. Then, the experimental work focuses on a reliability oriented study of the 'cryo-module' which hold a prototypical 5-cell cavity (β=0,47). In this study, the dynamic behavior of the fast tuning system of the cavity was measured and qualified. The 'field flatness' issue in 'low beta' multi-cell cavity was also brought to light. Finally, a fault-tolerance analysis of the linac was carried out. Toward this goal, a model of the cavity, its RF feedback loop system and its tuning system feedback loop was developed. This study enabled to determine the RF power needs, the tuning system requirements and as well as to demonstrate the feasibility of fast fault-recovery scenarios to minimize the number of beam interruptions in the MYRRHA linac. (author)

  13. Regularized quasinormal modes for plasmonic resonators and open cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamandar Dezfouli, Mohsen; Hughes, Stephen

    2018-03-01

    Optical mode theory and analysis of open cavities and plasmonic particles is an essential component of optical resonator physics, offering considerable insight and efficiency for connecting to classical and quantum optical properties such as the Purcell effect. However, obtaining the dissipative modes in normalized form for arbitrarily shaped open-cavity systems is notoriously difficult, often involving complex spatial integrations, even after performing the necessary full space solutions to Maxwell's equations. The formal solutions are termed quasinormal modes, which are known to diverge in space, and additional techniques are frequently required to obtain more accurate field representations in the far field. In this work, we introduce a finite-difference time-domain technique that can be used to obtain normalized quasinormal modes using a simple dipole-excitation source, and an inverse Green function technique, in real frequency space, without having to perform any spatial integrations. Moreover, we show how these modes are naturally regularized to ensure the correct field decay behavior in the far field, and thus can be used at any position within and outside the resonator. We term these modes "regularized quasinormal modes" and show the reliability and generality of the theory by studying the generalized Purcell factor of dipole emitters near metallic nanoresonators, hybrid devices with metal nanoparticles coupled to dielectric waveguides, as well as coupled cavity-waveguides in photonic crystals slabs. We also directly compare our results with full-dipole simulations of Maxwell's equations without any approximations, and show excellent agreement.

  14. Novel Geometries for the LHC CRAB Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme b...

  15. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  16. Superconducting niobium cavity with cooling fins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, Shigeru.

    1978-04-01

    Cooling efficiency of a superconducting cavity is shown to be improved by applying a fin structure. Internal heating can be suppressed in a certain degree and the higher rf field is expected to be reached on surfaces of the cavity which is immersed in superfluid He 4 liquid. The rf measurements were made on a C-band niobium cavity with cylindrical and circular fins around the wall. Fields of 39 mT and 25 MV/m were attained for TM 010 mode cavity after surface treatments including high temperature annealing in a UHV furnace. (auth.)

  17. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    CERN Document Server

    Cantergiani, E.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A.T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulicforming (EHF). InEHF, half-cells areobtainedthrough ultrahigh-speed deformation ofblank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHFon high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half- cells produced by EHFand by spinning have been compared in terms of damage...

  18. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  19. Development of Vertical Buffered Electropolishing for Its Post-Treatment Technology on 1.5 GHz Niobium SRF Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Song; Lu Xiang-Yang; Lin Lin; Zhao Kui; Wu, A. T.; Rimmer, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the latest research development of vertical buffered electropolishing on its post-treatment procedure as well as the effects of several major post-treatment techniques for buffered electropolishing (BEP) processed 1.5 GHz niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. With the established post-treatment procedure, an accelerating gradient of 28.4 MV/m is obtained on a single cell cavity of the cebaf shape. This is the best result in the history of BEP development. The cavity is limited by quench with a high quality factor over 1.2 × 10 10 at the quench point. Analyses from optical inspection and temperature-mapping show that the quench should be originated from the pits that were already present on the cavity before this BEP treatment. All of these factors indicate that this procedure will have a great potential to produce better results if cavities without intrinsic performance limiting imperfections are used. (nuclear physics)

  20. Improvement of RF performance for AlGaN/GaN HEMT by using a cavity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Yu, Xinxin; Zhou, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Cen; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuechan; Li, Zhonghui; Chen, Tangsheng

    2016-12-01

    A novel method of improving RF performance for AlGaN/GaN HEMT by introducing a cavity structure under the gate-head of the T-shaped gate is proposed, which can effectively reduce the parasitic gate capacitance. The device with cavity structure presents quite similar DC characteristics with the conventional device without cavity, including a maximum drain current density of 1.16 A/mm, a peak transconductance of 424 mS/mm and a slightly degraded two-terminal breakdown voltage of 29 V. However, in comparison with the device without cavity, the device with cavity presents the significant improvements in small signal characteristics, with the fT increasing from 60 GHz to 84 GHz and the fmax increasing from 93 GHz to 104 GHz.

  1. A loop-based neural architecture for structured behavior encoding and decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisiger, Thomas; Boukadoum, Mounir

    2018-02-01

    We present a new type of artificial neural network that generalizes on anatomical and dynamical aspects of the mammal brain. Its main novelty lies in its topological structure which is built as an array of interacting elementary motifs shaped like loops. These loops come in various types and can implement functions such as gating, inhibitory or executive control, or encoding of task elements to name a few. Each loop features two sets of neurons and a control region, linked together by non-recurrent projections. The two neural sets do the bulk of the loop's computations while the control unit specifies the timing and the conditions under which the computations implemented by the loop are to be performed. By functionally linking many such loops together, a neural network is obtained that may perform complex cognitive computations. To demonstrate the potential offered by such a system, we present two neural network simulations. The first illustrates the structure and dynamics of a single loop implementing a simple gating mechanism. The second simulation shows how connecting four loops in series can produce neural activity patterns that are sufficient to pass a simplified delayed-response task. We also show that this network reproduces electrophysiological measurements gathered in various regions of the brain of monkeys performing similar tasks. We also demonstrate connections between this type of neural network and recurrent or long short-term memory network models, and suggest ways to generalize them for future artificial intelligence research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Topological crystalline superconductivity and second-order topological superconductivity in nodal-loop materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapourian, Hassan; Wang, Yuxuan; Ryu, Shinsei

    2018-03-01

    We study the intrinsic fully gapped odd-parity superconducting order in doped nodal-loop materials with a torus-shaped Fermi surface. We show that the mirror symmetry, which protects the nodal loop in the normal state, also protects the superconducting state as a topological crystalline superconductor. As a result, the surfaces preserving the mirror symmetry host gapless Majorana cones. Moreover, for a Weyl-loop system (twofold degenerate at the nodal loop), the surfaces that break the mirror symmetry (those parallel to the bulk nodal loop) contribute a Chern (winding) number to the quasi-two-dimensional system in a slab geometry, which leads to a quantized thermal Hall effect and a single Majorana zero mode bound at a vortex line penetrating the system. This Chern number can be viewed as a higher-order topological invariant, which supports hinge modes in a cubic sample when mirror symmetry is broken. For a Dirac-loop system (fourfold degenerate at the nodal loop), the fully gapped odd-parity state can be either time-reversal symmetry-breaking or symmetric, similar to the A and B phases of 3He. In a slab geometry, the A phase has a Chern number two, while the B phase carries a nontrivial Z2 invariant. We discuss the experimental relevance of our results to nodal-loop materials such as CaAgAs.

  3. Primary leiomyosarcoma of peritoneal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Naresh Bharti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcomas of soft tissue are the rare tumors and the retroperitoneum is the most common site involved. We report a case of primary leiomyosarcoma of the peritoneal cavity which clinically presented with suprapubic, freely mobile, nontender mass which measured 10×10 cm in size. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed well defined heterogenous hypodense solid cystic mass. The mass was surgically excised out in its entirety. The histopathological examination revealed spindle cells arranged in alternating fascicles having pleomorphic nuclei, indistinct margin and eosinophilic cytoplasm with foci of haemorrhage, necrosis and 5-6 mitosis/HPF. The spindle cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, desmin and negative for S-100, CD-34 and c-kit. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were helpful in making the final confirmatory diagnosis. Leiomyosarcomas are aggressive tumors, with poor prognosis and often difficult to treat. The survival rates are lowest among all soft tissue sarcomas.

  4. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Shirani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering.

  5. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren H.; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...... pattern. The antenna is designed for the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band. Applications of the antenna are many. One is for on-body applications since it is ideal for launching a creeping waves due to the polarization.......A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...

  6. Deterministic quantum state transfer between remote qubits in cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogell, B.; Vermersch, B.; Northup, T. E.; Lanyon, B. P.; Muschik, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Performing a faithful transfer of an unknown quantum state is a key challenge for enabling quantum networks. The realization of networks with a small number of quantum links is now actively pursued, which calls for an assessment of different state transfer methods to guide future design decisions. Here, we theoretically investigate quantum state transfer between two distant qubits, each in a cavity, connected by a waveguide, e.g., an optical fiber. We evaluate the achievable success probabilities of state transfer for two different protocols: standard wave packet shaping and adiabatic passage. The main loss sources are transmission losses in the waveguide and absorption losses in the cavities. While special cases studied in the literature indicate that adiabatic passages may be beneficial in this context, it remained an open question under which conditions this is the case and whether their use will be advantageous in practice. We answer these questions by providing a full analysis, showing that state transfer by adiabatic passage—in contrast to wave packet shaping—can mitigate the effects of undesired cavity losses, far beyond the regime of coupling to a single waveguide mode and the regime of lossless waveguides, as was proposed so far. Furthermore, we show that the photon arrival probability is in fact bounded in a trade-off between losses due to non-adiabaticity and due to coupling to off-resonant waveguide modes. We clarify that neither protocol can avoid transmission losses and discuss how the cavity parameters should be chosen to achieve an optimal state transfer.

  7. Effect of ramp-cavity on hydrogen fueled scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.V.S. Moorthy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained combustion and optimization of combustor are the two challenges being faced by combustion scientists working in the area of supersonic combustion. Thorough mixing, lower stagnation pressure losses, positive thrust and sustained combustion are the key issues in the field of supersonic combustion. Special fluid mechanism is required to achieve good mixing. To induce such mechanisms in supersonic inflows, the fuel injectors should be critically shaped incurring less flow losses. Present investigations are focused on the effect of fuel injection scheme on a model scramjet combustor performance. Ramps at supersonic flow generate axial vortices that help in macro-mixing of fuel with air. Interaction of shocks generated by ramps with the fuel stream generates boro-clinic torque at the air & liquid fuel interface, enhancing micro-mixing. Recirculation zones present in cavities increase the residence time of the combustible mixture. Making use of the advantageous features of both, a ramp-cavity combustor is designed. The combustor has two sections. First, constant height section consists of a backward facing step followed by ramps and cavities on both the top and bottom walls. The ramps are located alternately on top and bottom walls. The complete combustor width is utilized for the cavities. The second section of the combustor is diverging area section. This is provided to avoid thermal choking. In the present work gaseous hydrogen is considered as fuel. This study was mainly focused on the mixing characteristics of four different fuel injection locations. It was found that injecting fuel upstream of the ramp was beneficial from fuel spread point of view.

  8. Localization of wave fields in lower hybrid cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tjulin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate lower hybrid wave trapping in cylindrically symmetric density depletions in the electrostatic approximation. Our investigation is inspired by previous observations of such trapping by spacecraft in the auroral region at altitudes up to about 2000km, and the recent discovery of this phenomenon at altitudes above 20000km in the inner magnetosphere. No particular shape is assumed for the density depletion, which need not be strictly zero outside some value of the radial coordinate r. Important previously known properties concerning parabolic density depletions extending to finite r are shown to hold also for arbitrary shapes and infinite extent: for a given parallel wave number kz, modes below the ambient lower hybrid frequency fLH are trapped in the density depletion (in the sense that they are evanescent outside the cavity, have a discrete spectrum and rotate in a left-handed sense, while there is a continuous spectrum of freely propagating right-handed rotating modes above fLH. New results are such that even though the density depletion may go to zero slowly with increasing r, and thus be essentially infinite in extent, there is a maximum distance within which a trapped mode with given kz and azimuthal mode number m may propagate. Furthermore, we find that for any monotonic density cavity and given kz, there is a local relation between plasma density gradient and the lowest possible frequency that can be trapped. We combine our theoretical results with spacecraft observations to find an upper bound on kz. Our examples indicate that the length of the cavities is larger than the width by a factor of at least 100.

  9. Estimation of complex permittivity using loop antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna.......A method for estimating the complex permittivity of materials in the vicinity of a loop antenna is proposed. The method is based on comparing measured and numerically calculated input admittances for the loop antenna....

  10. Verifying parallel loops with separation logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Stefan; Darabi, Saeed; Huisman, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a technique to specify and verify whether a loop can be parallelised. Our approach can be used as an additional step in a parallelising compiler to verify user annotations about loop dependences. Essentially, our technique requires each loop iteration to be specified with the

  11. In, On, or Out of the Loop?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John; Kristoffersen, Jens Wenzel

    being the degree of sophist ication of weapon responses to external stimuli. Such weapons can be controlled directly with a “man-in-the-loop,” managed by a “man-on-the-loop,” or supervised by a “man-out-of-the-loop.” Although all uses of force by Western militaries take place within an institution...

  12. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    demonstrate a PhC cavity with a quality factor of Q15 000 that exhibits a temperature-independent resonance. Temperature-stable cavities constitute a major building block in the development of a large suite of applications from high-sensitivity sensor systems for chemical and biomedical applications...

  13. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities...

  14. Superconducting rf cavities for accelerator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proch, D.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a review of superconducting cavities for accelerator application (β = 1). The layout of a typical accelerating unit is described and important parameters are discussed. Recent cavity measurements and storage ring beam tests are reported and the present state of the art is summarized

  15. Telescopic Examination of the mastoid Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Anita; Sharma, Man Prakash; Bapna, A. S.

    1998-01-01

    Otoendoscopy enables viewing of different angles of the tympanomastoid area and approach to them for better prognosis. A comparative study of post-operative mastoid cavities has been done using the Hopkin’s rod telescope, Otoscope and microscope. Various procedures have also been done successfully on the mastoid cavity using the telescope on an outdoor basis.

  16. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  17. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  18. The gastro-oesophageal common cavity revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    The manometric common cavity phenomenon has been used as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux of liquid or gaseous substances. Using combined pH and impedance recording as reference standard the value of a common cavity as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux was tested. Ten healthy male

  19. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  20. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...

  1. Inertial confinement fusion reactor cavity phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Hafer, J.F.; Devaney, J.J.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Cavity phenomena in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are created by the interaction of energy released by the fuel pellet microexplosion with the medium inside the reactor cavity. The ambient state of the medium in ICF reactor cavities is restricted primarily by its effects on laser beam propagation and on the fuel pellet trajectory. Therefore, a relatively wide choice of ambient conditions can be exploited to gain first-wall protection and advantages in energy extraction. Depending on the choice of ambient cavity conditions and on fuel pellet design, a variety of physical phenomena may develop and dominate the ICF reactor cavity design. Because of the cavity phenomena, the forms of energy released by the fuel-pellet microexplosion are modified before reaching the first wall, thus giving rise to different cavity design problems. The types of cavity phenomena encountered in the conceptual design of ICF reactors are examined, the approaches available for their modeling and analysis are discussed, and some results are presented. Most phenomena are sufficiently well understood to permit valid engineering assessments of the proposed ICF reactor concepts

  2. Transverse-mode-selectable microlens vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Debernardi, Pierluigi; Lee, Yong Tak

    2010-01-01

    of the mode selection properties of the new structure is rigorously analyzed and compared to other structures reported in the literature. The possibility of engineering the emission shape while retaining strong single mode operation is highly desirable for low-cost mid-range optical interconnects applications......A new vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structure employing a thin microlens is suggested and numerically investigated. The laser can be made to emit in either a high-power Gaussian-shaped single-fundamental mode or a high-power doughnut-shaped higher-order mode. The physical origin...

  3. Modeling of cavity swelling-induced embrittlement in irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, X.

    2012-01-01

    During long-time neutron irradiation occurred in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), significant changes of the mechanical behavior of materials used in reactor core internals (made of 300 series austenitic stainless steels) are observed, including irradiation induced hardening and softening, loss of ductility and toughness. So far, much effect has been made to identify radiation effects on material microstructure evolution (dislocations, Frank loops, cavities, segregation, etc.). The irradiation-induced cavity swelling, considered as a potential factor limiting the reactor lifetime, could change the mechanical properties of materials (plasticity, toughness, etc.), even lead to a structure distortion because of the dimensional modifications between different components. The principal aim of the present PhD work is to study qualitatively the influence of cavity swelling on the mechanical behaviors of irradiated materials. A micromechanical constitutive model based on dislocation and irradiation defect (Frank loops) density evolution has been developed and implemented into ZeBuLoN and Cast3M finite element codes to adapt the large deformation framework. 3D FE analysis is performed to compute the mechanical properties of a polycrystalline aggregate. Furthermore, homogenization technique is applied to develop a Gurson-type model. Unit cell simulations are used to study the mechanical behavior of porous single crystals, by accounting for various effects of stress triaxiality, of void volume fraction and of crystallographic orientation, in order to study void effect on the irradiated material plasticity and roughness at polycrystalline scale. (author) [fr

  4. Theory of K-loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kiechle, Hubert

    2002-01-01

    The book contains the first systematic exposition of the current known theory of K-loops, as well as some new material. In particular, big classes of examples are constructed. The theory for sharply 2-transitive groups is generalized to the theory of Frobenius groups with many involutions. A detailed discussion of the relativistic velocity addition based on the author's construction of K-loops from classical groups is also included. The first chapters of the book can be used as a text, the later chapters are research notes, and only partially suitable for the classroom. The style is concise, but complete proofs are given. The prerequisites are a basic knowledge of algebra such as groups, fields, and vector spaces with forms.

  5. Loop connectors in dentogenic diastema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a missing tooth along with diastema have limited treatment options to restore the edentulous space. The use of a conventional fixed partial denture (FPD to replace the missing tooth may result in too wide anterior teeth leading to poor esthetics. Loss of anterior teeth with existing diastema may result in excess space available for pontic. This condition presents great esthetic challenge for prosthodontist. If implant supported prosthesis is not possible because of inadequate bone support, FPD along with loop connector may be a treatment option to maintain the diastema and provide optimal esthetic restoration. Here, we report a clinical case where FPD along with loop connector was used to achieve esthetic rehabilitation in maxillary anterior region in which midline diastema has been maintained.

  6. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities......) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using...... a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (alpha= 0.05). 1/4-inlay cavities had higher percent mean mass loss (9.71%) than composite resin cavities with the same width (7.07%). 1/3-inlay preparations also produced higher percent mean...

  7. Fiber cavities with integrated mode matching optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Keller, Matthias

    2017-07-17

    In fiber based Fabry-Pérot Cavities (FFPCs), limited spatial mode matching between the cavity mode and input/output modes has been the main hindrance for many applications. We have demonstrated a versatile mode matching method for FFPCs. Our novel design employs an assembly of a graded-index and large core multimode fiber directly spliced to a single mode fiber. This all-fiber assembly transforms the propagating mode of the single mode fiber to match with the mode of a FFPC. As a result, we have measured a mode matching of 90% for a cavity length of ~400 μm. This is a significant improvement compared to conventional FFPCs coupled with just a single mode fiber, especially at long cavity lengths. Adjusting the parameters of the assembly, the fundamental cavity mode can be matched with the mode of almost any single mode fiber, making this approach highly versatile and integrable.

  8. Statistics of magnetoconductance in ballistic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Ishio, H.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    1995-01-01

    The statistical properties of magnetoconductance in ballistic microcavities are investigated numerically. The distribution of conductance for chaotic cavities is found to follow the renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution suggested by random-matrix theory for the Gaussian ensemble while the conductance distribution of regular cavities in magnetic fields is nonuniversal and shifted towards the maximum value for a given number of open channels. The renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution implies a universal dependence of fluctuation amplitude on the mean conductance for chaotic cavities in the absence of time-reversal symmetry. The fluctuation amplitude for regular cavities is found to be larger than the saturation value of the fluctuation amplitude of chaotic cavities predicted by random-matrix theory. The change of the mean conductance as a function of the external magnetic field is consistent with semiclassical predictions

  9. New achievements in RF cavity manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, G.; Pimiskern, K.; Kaiser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Dornier has been engaged in development, manufacturing and testing of Cu-, Cu/Nb- and Nb-cavities for many years. Recently, several different types of RF cavities were manufactured. A prototype superconducting (s.c.) B-Factory accelerating cavity (1-cell, 500 MHz) was delivered to Cornell University, Laboratory of Nuclear Studies. A second lot of 6 s.c. cavities (20-cell, 3000 MHz) was fabricated on contract from Technical University of Darmstadt for the S-DALINAC facility. Finally, the first copper RF structures (9-cell, 1300 MHz) for TESLA were finished and delivered to DESY, two s.c. niobium structures of the same design are in production. Highlights from the manufacturing processes of these cavities are described and first performance results will be reported

  10. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence C Stewart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is evenmore difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the outputfrom the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects thehardware’s future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses ofneuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loopbenchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of minimalsimulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, whilestill maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the samebenchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchersto explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardwareexcels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motorcontrol for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we showthat an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across arandomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interactingjoints to be controlled.

  11. Microwave power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity for accelerator application and its testing procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianjian [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Superconducting cavity resonators offer the advantage of high field intensity for a given input power, making them an attractive contender for particle accelerator applications. Power coupling into a superconducting cavity employed in a particle accelerator requires unique provisions to maintain high vacuum and cryogenic temperature on the cavity side, while operating with ambient conditions on the source side. Components introduced to fulfill mechanical requirements must show negligible obstruction of the propagation of the microwave with absence of critical locations that may give rise to electron multipaction, leading to a multiple section design, instead of an aperture, a probe, or a loop structure as found in conventional cavities. A coaxial power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity at 3.9 GHz has been developed. The cavity is intended to be employed as an accelerator to provide enhanced electron beam quality in a free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) user facility. The design of the coupler called for two windows to sustain high vacuum in the cavity and two bellows to accommodate mechanical dimensional changes resulting from cryogenics. Suppression of multipacting was accomplished by the choice of conductor dimensions and materials with low second yield coefficients. Prior to integration with the cavity, the coupler was tested for intrinsic properties in a back-to-back configuration and conditioned for high-power operation with increasing power input. Maximum incident power was measured to be 61 kW. When integrated with the superconducting cavity, a loaded quality factor of 9 x 10 5 was measured by transient method. Coupler return loss and insertion loss were estimated to be around -21 dB and -0.2 dB, respectively.

  12. Luminescent photonic crystal cavities for fiber-optic sensors, coupled dissimilar cavities and optofluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mehmet A.; Wang, Bowen; Siahaan, Timothy; Voorbraak, Joost A. M.; Speijcken, Noud W. L.; Nötzel, Richard; van der Hoek, Marinus J.; He, Sailing; Fiore, Andrea; Van der Heijden, Rob W.

    2012-06-01

    Photonic crystal (PhC) cavities made in broadband luminescent material offer attractive possibilities for flexible active devices. The luminescence enables the cavity to operate as an autonomous entity. New applications of this property are demonstrated for cavities made in the InGaAsP underetched semiconductor membrane with embedded InAs Quantum Dots that emit in the range of 1400-1600 nm. Planar photonic crystal membrane nanocavities were released from the parent chip by mechanical nanomanipulation. The released cavity particle could be bonded on an arbitrary surface, which was exploited to make a novel fiber-optic tip sensor with a PhC cavity attached to the tip. A single mode from a short cavity is shown to couple simultaneously to at least three cavity modes of a long cavity, as concluded from level anticrossing data when the small cavity was photothermally tuned. Reconfigurable and movable cavities were created by locally varying the infiltration status by liquid oil near a PhC waveguide or defect cavity. Liquid was displaced locally on a micron scale using capillary force effects or laser-induced evaporation and condensation phenomena.

  13. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyreff, G. [Optique Nonlineaire Theorique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), CP 231 (Belgium); Gelens, L. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  14. Modular invariance and covariant loop calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, J.L.; Roland, K.O.; Sidenius, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The covariant loop calculus provides an efficient technique for computing explicit expressions for the density on moduli space corresponding to arbitrary (bosonic string) loop diagrams. Since modular invariance is not manifest, however, we carry out a detailed comparison with known explicit two- and three-loop results derived using analytic geometry (one loop is known to be okay). We establish identity to 'high' order in some moduli and exactly in others. Agreement is found as a result of various nontrivial cancellations, in part related to number theory. We feel our results provide very strong support for the correctness of the covariant loop calculus approach. (orig.)

  15. Modular invariance and covariant loop calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, J.L.; Roland, K.O.; Sidenius, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The covariant loop calculus provides and efficient technique for computing explicit expressions for the density on moduli space corresponding to arbitrary (bosonic string) loop diagrams. Since modular invariance is not manifest, however, we carry out a detailed comparison with known explicit 2- and 3- loop results derived using analytic geometry (1 loop is known to be ok). We establish identity to 'high' order in some moduli and exactly in others. Agreement is found as a result of various non-trivial cancellations, in part related to number theory. We feel our results provide very strong support for the correctness of the covariant loop calculus approach. (orig.)

  16. Thermal Properties and Evolution of a Coronal Cavity as Observed by the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Hudson, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    Coronal cavities are voids in coronal emission often observed above high latitude filament channels. sometimes, these cavities have areas of bright x-ray emission in their centers (i.e. Hudson et al 1999). In this study, we use data from the x-ray Telescope (XRT) on Hinode to examine the thermal emission properties of a cavity observed during July 2008 that contains bright x-ray emission in its center. using ratios of XRT filters, we find evidence for elevated temperatures in the cavity center. The area of elevated temperature evolves from a ring-shaped structure at the beinning of the observation, to an elongated structure two days later, finally appearing as a compact round source four days after the initial observation. We use a morphological model to fit the cavity emission, and find that a uniform structure running through the cavity does not fit the observations well. Instead, the observations are reproduced by modeling several short cavity "cores" with different parameters on different days. These changing core parameters may be due to some observed activity heating different parts of the cavity core at different times. We also find that core temperatures of 1.75 MK, 1.7 MK and 2.25 MK (for 19 July, 21 July and 23 July, respectively) in the model lead to structures that are consistent with the data, and that line-of-sight effects serve to lower the effective temperature derived from the filter ratio. page

  17. Basic Comparison of the Properties of the Loop and Frotte Yarns, Woven and Knitted Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Grabowska Katarzyna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both loop fancy yarns and frotte fancy yarns belong to the group of yarns with continuous effects. The difference between frotte and loop yarn relies on the fact that the loop yarn is constructed with two core yarns and the frotte yarn is constructed with only one core yarn. The differences are evident in the shape of these two types of fancy yarns. These shape differences are the functions of the tensions of component yarns during the twisting process. The shape and construction of the fancy yarn influence its properties. The properties of loop and frotte fancy yarns, woven and knitted fabrics are compared in this article in order to find out the optimal yarn’s and fabric’s production condition to satisfy the final user and maintain low production costs. In terms of economy aspects only, the frotte fancy yarns are believed to be cheaper in production due to lower quantity of components utilize for their production to compare with loop fancy yarns, under conditions of the same settings of ring twisting frame.

  18. Loop technique for mitral valve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Toshihiko

    2014-02-01

    A new artificial chordal reconstruction technique has been developed using several expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) loops. This technique differs from conventional artificial chordal reconstruction in the use of premeasured ePTFE loops. The loop technique involves several steps: (1) assessment of the corresponding papillary muscle; (2) measurement of the required ePTFE loop length; (3) making a loop set of the premeasured length; (4) anchoring the loop set to the papillary muscle; (5) fixing the ePTFE loops to the prolapsing leaflet; (6) adjusting the loop length if necessary; and (7) ring implantation. Favorable early and mid-term results of this loop technique have been reported in patients undergoing mitral valve repair through mini-thoracotomy and via median sternotomy, with 3-year survival and re-operation-free rates of 94.8 and 97.4 %, respectively. The loop technique using ePTFE chordal reconstruction with premeasured loops thus appears to be a safe, reliable, and reproducible technique for mitral valve repair. In addition, it is suitable for both minimally invasive and conventional sternotomy approaches, and represents a useful technique for treating posterior, anterior, and especially bi-leaflet prolapses.

  19. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  20. Results from the first single cell Nb3Sn cavity coatings at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Nb3Sn is a promising superconducting material for SRF applications and has the potential to exceed the limitations of niobium. We have used the recently commissioned Nb3Sn coating system to investigate Nb3Sn coatings on several single cell cavities by applying the same coating procedure on several different single cells with different history and pre-coating surface preparation. We report on our findings with four 1.5 GHz CEBAF-shape single cell and one 1.3 GHz ILC-shape single cavities that were coated, inspected, and tested.

  1. Cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity are curable. When early tumor (T1 and T2) is diagnosed and treated, cure rates by surgery or irradiation are high. The choice of therapeutic modalities for these lesions is complex and depends on the site of origin and size of the tumor, the presence or absence of nodal metastases, and the age, physical, medical, and socioeconomic status of the patient. Other factors include the willingness of the patient to return for a protracted course of radiation therapy, the skill of the physician, and the relative morbidity and cosmesis of the two forms of treatment. In general, surgery may be considered for early (T1) lesions if the deformity resulting from surgery is minimal. If resection involves major morbidity, such as a deformity that alters cosmesis or the function of the speech and swallowing mechanisms, then radiation therapy is preferred. For medium-sized (T2) tumors, superficial radiation therapy is the treatment of choice, for it controls the disease and preserves normal function and anatomy. Surgery is reserved for radiation failures. Extensive disease (T3 and T4) often associated with bone and muscle involvement and cervical lymph node metastases is rarely curable by radiation therapy or surgery alone; a combined approach using radiation therapy and surgery is therefore the procedure of choice

  2. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson was a critical test of...

  3. The MEDICI reactor cavity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Trebikock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MEDICI reactor cavity model is currently under development with the goal of providing a flexible, relatively realistic treatment of ex-vessel severe accident phenomena suitable for large system codes like CONTAIN and MELCOR. The code is being developed with an emphasis on top-down design, to facilitate adaptability and multiple applications. A brief description of the overall code structure is provided. One of the key new models is then described in more detail. This is a dynamic quench model for debris beds. An example calculation using this model is presented. The question of whether it is necessary to consider the simultaneous motion of the quench front and ablation of the concrete is addressed with some scoping models. It is found that for realistic parameters and coolable beds, concrete ablation is too slow a process to be important on the quenching time scale. Remelt in the dry zone, however, is found to be potentially important on this time scale, so quench and remelt are considered simultaneously

  4. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, W.; Kaiser, H.; Singer, X.; Gonin, I.; Zhelezov, I.; Khabibullin, T.; Kneisel, P.; Saito, K.

    2000-01-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10 10 at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n(Omega) after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 (micro)m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E acc ∼ 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 (micro)m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E acc (ge) 42 MV/m

  5. Preparation and handling of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takaaki

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines the recent preparation methods for superconducting cavities used in various laboratories and universities, and reports the problems of the cavity fabrication at KEK as an example of mass production. Preparation and handling are first addressed, focusing on material, fabrication, surface treatment, rinsing, clean environment, and heat treatment. Cavity production at KEK is then described, centering on defects on the surface and clean environments. Field gradients of more than 20 MV/m have been obtained by 1.5-3 GHz single cavities, for multi-cell cavities Eacc of 10 MV/m are available at any frequency range. The successful construction of thirty-two cavities for TRISTAN at KEK is due to the careful checking of the surface and quality control of all processes against the surface defects and contaminations. Eacc of 5 MV/m has been achieved by 94 % of the TRISTAN cavities at the first cold test, but 6 % of them had to be reworked because of the surface defects. These defects could not be detected by an X-ray photograph or visual inspections during the fabrication processes. (N.K.)

  6. Passive control of supersonic cavity flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokani, N.; Kim, I.

    1991-01-01

    A computational investigation has been conducted to study the effect and mechanisms of the passive control of a supersonic flow over a rectangular two-dimensional cavity. The passive control was included through the use of a porous surface over a vent chamber in the floor of the cavity. The passive control effectively suppressed the low-frequency pressure oscillations for the open type cavity, (length-to-depth ratio = 6.0). The mechanism for the suppression was observed to be the stabilization of the motion of the free shear layer. For the closed type cavity flow, (length-to-depth ratio = 17.5), the passive control modified the flowfield to nearly that of an open type cavity flow; further the cavity drag was reduced by a factor of four. The computational results of both cases showed good agreement with the available experimental data and the predictions of a semiempirical formula. This study demonstrates that the passive control concept can be used to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of open and closed cavity flowfields.

  7. Forward Modeling of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a forward model of emission from a coronal cavity in an effort to determine the temperature and density distribution in the cavity. Coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and X-rays. When these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs The model consists of a coronal streamer model with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. We apply this model to a cavity observed in Aug. 2007 by a wide array of instruments including Hinode/EIS, STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/EIT. Studies such as these will ultimately help us understand the the original structures which erupt to become CMEs and ICMES, one of the prime Solar Orbiter objectives.

  8. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland); Simrock, S.; Brand, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Chase, B.; Carcagno, R.; Cancelo, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Koeth, T.W. [Rutgers - the State Univ. of New Jersey, NJ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The digital control of several superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity and ACC1 module of the VU-FEL TTF in DESY-Hamburg have both been driven by a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based system. Additionally, a single 9-cell TESLA Superconducting cavity of the FNPL Photo Injector at FERMILAB has been remotely controlled from WUT-ISE laboratory with the support of the DESY team using the same FPGA control system. These experiments focused attention on the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. An electrical model of the resonator was taken as a starting point. Calibration of the signal path is considered key in preparation for the efficient driving of a cavity. Identification of the resonator parameters has been proven to be a successful approach in achieving required performance; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time while requiring reasonable levels of power consumption. Feed-forward and feedback modes were successfully applied in operating the cavities. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  9. Interaction energy of interface dislocation loops in piezoelectric bi-crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Interface dislocations may dramatically change the electric properties, such as polarization, of the piezoelectric crystals. In this paper, we study the linear interactions of two interface dislocation loops with arbitrary shape in generally anisotropic piezoelectric bi-crystals. A simple formula for calculating the interaction energy of the interface dislocation loops is derived and given by a double line integral along two closed dislocation curves. Particularly, interactions between two straight segments of the interface dislocations are solved analytically, which can be applied to approximate any curved loop so that an analytical solution can be also achieved. Numerical results show the influence of the bi-crystal interface as well as the material orientation on the interaction of interface dislocation loops.

  10. Effect of sub-loops in SMA ear system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Andrzej; Rusinek, Rafał

    2018-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is modelling the hysteresis effect in shape memory alloys. The stress versus strain relation is approximated by idealized curves. The adopted characteristics is modelled using the piecewise linear model. Transmission between individual line segments is dependent on the proposed conditions if(…). Performed numerical research allows to evaluate the possibilities of hysteresis sub-loops modelling. Finally, this model is used in a specific system - the biomechanical model of the middle ear to find the reconstructed ear response.

  11. Design of the Advanced LIGO recycling cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Muzammil A; Mueller, Guido

    2008-07-07

    The current LIGO detectors will undergo an upgrade which is expected to improve their sensitivity and bandwidth significantly. These advanced gravitational-wave detectors will employ stable recycling cavities to better confine their spatial eigenmodes instead of the currently installed marginally stable power recycling cavity. In this letter we describe the general layout of the recycling cavities and give specific values for a first possible design. We also address the issue of mode mismatch due to manufacturing tolerance of optical elements and present a passive compensation scheme based upon optimizing the distances between optical elements.

  12. Interaction of IREB with a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, R.; Mishra, Mamta; Purkayastha, A.D.; Rambabu, P.; Maheshwari, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    The propagation of an intense pulsed relativistic electron beam (IREB) through a cavity resonator is considered. The cavity gets shock excited. The electromagnetic fields so generated interact with the beam in such a way that the energy is transferred from the front of the beam to the back. As a result the beams gets energized but shortened in time. Analysis for the chosen dominant mode of the cavity viz. TMsub(010) is carried out. The induced electric field excited is calculated and the accelerating potential is estimated. The results are compared with the recent-experiments. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig

  13. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  14. Indirect coupling of magnons by cavity photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Rameshti, Babak; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between two magnetic spheres in microwave cavities is studied by Mie scattering theory beyond the magnetostatic and rotating wave approximations. We demonstrate that two spatially separated dielectric and magnetic spheres can be strongly coupled over a long distance by the electric field component of standing microwave cavity modes. The interactions split acoustical (dark) and optical (bright) modes in a way that can be mapped on a molecular orbital theory of the hydrogen molecule. Breaking the symmetry by assigning different radii to the two spheres introduces "ionic" character to the magnonic bonds. These results illustrate the coherent and controlled energy exchange between objects in microwave cavities.

  15. Analysis of dual coupler nested coupled cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, George A; Sabry, Yasser M; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-12-01

    Coupled ring resonators are now forming the basic building blocks in several optical systems serving different applications. In many of these applications, a small full width at half maximum is required, along with a large free spectral range. In this work, a configuration of passive coupled cavities constituting dual coupler nested cavities is proposed. A theoretical study of the configuration is presented allowing us to obtain analytical expressions of its different spectral characteristics. The transfer function of the configuration is also used to generate design curves while comparing these results with analytical expressions. Finally, the configuration is compared with other coupled cavity configurations.

  16. Cavity Pressure Behaviour in Micro Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C.A.; Dimov, S.S.; Scholz, S.

    2010-01-01

    Process monitoring of micro injection moulding (µIM) is of crusial importance to analyse the effect of different parameter settings on the process and to assess its quality. Quality factors related to cavity pressure can provide useful information directly connected with the dyanmics of the process...... as well as with the filling of the cavity by the polymer melt. In this paper, two parameters derived from cavity pressure over time (i.e. pressure work). The influence of four µIM parameters (melt temperature, mould temperature, injection speed, aand packing pressure) on the two pressure-related outputs...

  17. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  18. Mismatch-shaping switching for two-capacitor DAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensgaard-Madsen, Jesper; Moon, U.; Temes, G.C.

    1998-01-01

    A mismatch-shaping scheme is proposed for a two-capacitor digital-to-analogue converter (DAC). It uses a delta-sigma loop for finding the optimal switching sequence for each input word. Simulations indicate that the scheme can be used for the realisation of DACs with 16 bit linearity and SNR...

  19. Spectrum reshaping of micro-ring resonator via an integrated Fabry-Perot cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiayang; Moein, Tania; Xu, Xingyuan; Ren, Guanghui; Mitchell, Arnan; Moss, David J.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the enhancement in the filtering quality (Q) factor of an integrated micro-ring resonator (MRR) by embedding it in an integrated Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity formed by cascaded Sagnac loop reflectors (SLRs). By using coherent interference within the FP cavity to reshape the transmission spectrum of the MRR, both the Q factor and the extinction ratio (ER) can be greatly improved. The device is theoretically analyzed, and practically fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. Experimental results show that up to 11-times improvement in Q factor and an 8-dB increase in ER can be achieved via our proposed method. The impact of varying structural parameters on the device performance is also investigated and verified.

  20. SQUID based cryogenic current comparator for measurements of the dark current of superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodel, W.; Nietzsche, S.; Neubert, R.; Nawrodt, R. [Friedrich Schiller Univ. Jena (Germany); Peters, A. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Knaack, K.; Wendt, M.; Wittenburg, K. [DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The linear accelerator technology, based on super-conducting L-band (1.3 GHz) is currently under study at DESY (Hamburg, Germany). The two 10 km long main Linacs will be equipped with a total of nearly 20.000 cavities. The dark current due to the emission of electrons in these high gradient field super-conducting cavities is an unwanted particle source. A newly high performance SQUID based measurement system for detecting dark currents is proposed. It makes use of the Cryogenic Current Comparator principle and senses dark currents in the pA range with a measurement bandwidth of up to 70 kHz. The use of a cryogenic current comparator as dark current sensor has some important advantages: -) the measurement of the absolute value of the dark current, -) the non-dependence on the electron trajectories, -) the accurate absolute calibration with an additional wire loop, and -) extremely high resolution.

  1. Frequency tracking and stabilization of a tunable dual-wavelength external-cavity diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, L.; Chi, L. C.; Wang, S. C.; Pan, Ci-Ling

    1999-09-01

    We show a unique dual-wavelength external-cavity laser diode with frequency tracking capability and obtain a stable beat frequency between the dual-wavelength output. By using a Fabry-Perot interferometer as the frequency discriminator and the time-gating technique in a servo loop, the peak-to-peak frequency fluctuations were stabilized, with respect to the Fabry-Perot cavity, to 86 kHz in the dual-wavelength output at 802.5 and 804.5 nm, and to 17 kHz in their 0.9 THz beat signal. Similar performance was achieved for tuning of the dual wavelength separation ranging from 0.2 to 4 nm.

  2. Shape memory polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  3. Perturbation calculations with Wilson loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto Junior, L.B.

    1984-01-01

    We present perturbative calculations with the Wilson loop (WL). The dimensional regularization method is used with a special attention concerning to the problem of divergences in the WL expansion in second and fourth orders, in three and four dimensions. We show that the residue in the pole, in 4d, of the fourth order graphs contribution sum is important for the charge renormalization. We compute up to second order the exact expression of the WL, in three-dimensional gauge theories with topological mass as well as its assimptotic behaviour for small and large distances. the author [pt

  4. TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS OF SYSTEMS OF CORONAL LOOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.

    2009-01-01

    We study the collective kinklike normal modes of a system of several cylindrical loops using the T-matrix theory. Loops that have similar kink frequencies oscillate collectively with a frequency which is slightly different from that of the individual kink mode. On the other hand, if the kink frequency of a loop is different from that of the others, it oscillates individually with its own frequency. Since the individual kink frequency depends on the loop density but not on its radius for typical 1 MK coronal loops, a coupling between kink oscillations of neighboring loops takes place when they have similar densities. The relevance of these results in the interpretation of the oscillations studied by Schrijver and Brown in 2000 and Verwichte et al. in 2004, in which transverse collective loop oscillations seem to be detected, is discussed. In the first case, two loops oscillating in antiphase are observed; interpreting this motion as a collective kink mode suggests that their densities are roughly equal. In the second case, there are almost three groups of tubes that oscillate with similar periods, and therefore their dynamics can be collective, which again seems to indicate that the loops of each group share a similar density. All the other loops seem to oscillate individually and their densities can be different from the rest.

  5. Gauge theory loop operators and Liouville theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drukker, Nadav [Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Gomis, Jaume; Okuda, Takuda [Perimeter Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Teschner, Joerg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    We propose a correspondence between loop operators in a family of four dimensional N=2 gauge theories on S{sup 4} - including Wilson, 't Hooft and dyonic operators - and Liouville theory loop operators on a Riemann surface. This extends the beautiful relation between the partition function of these N=2 gauge theories and Liouville correlators found by Alday, Gaiotto and Tachikawa. We show that the computation of these Liouville correlators with the insertion of a Liouville loop operator reproduces Pestun's formula capturing the expectation value of a Wilson loop operator in the corresponding gauge theory. We prove that our definition of Liouville loop operators is invariant under modular transformations, which given our correspondence, implies the conjectured action of S-duality on the gauge theory loop operators. Our computations in Liouville theory make an explicit prediction for the exact expectation value of 't Hooft and dyonic loop operators in these N=2 gauge theories. The Liouville loop operators are also found to admit a simple geometric interpretation within quantum Teichmueller theory as the quantum operators representing the length of geodesics. We study the algebra of Liouville loop operators and show that it gives evidence for our proposal as well as providing definite predictions for the operator product expansion of loop operators in gauge theory. (orig.)

  6. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jae Won

    1993-01-01

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60 Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  7. Optomechanically induced transparency with Bose–Einstein condensate in double-cavity optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Wei; Gengzang, Duo-Jie; An, Xiu-Jia; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2018-03-01

    We propose a novel technique of generating multiple optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) of a weak probe field in hybrid optomechanical system. This system consists of a cigar-shaped Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside each high finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity. In the resolved sideband regime, the analytic solutions of the absorption and the dispersion spectrum are given. The tunneling strength of the two resonators and the coupling parameters of the each BEC in combination with the cavity field have the appearance of three distinct OMIT windows in the absorption spectrum. Furthermore, whether there is BEC in each cavity is a key factor in the number of OMIT windows determination. The technique presented may have potential applications in quantum engineering and quantum information networks. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11564034, 11105062, and 21663026) and the Scientific Research Funds of College of Electrical Engineering, Northwest University, China (Grant No. xbmuyjrc201115).

  8. 3 GHz Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) RF pulse compressor for CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A prototype 3 GHz RF pulse compressor, based on a single 'Barrel shaped Open Cavity' (BOC), was designed, manufactured and successfully high power tested into a RF load. It is now planned to install five such devices in the CTF3 drive beam linac currently being built at CERN. A specific feature of the BOC is the so-called "whispering gallery" mode which has a high internal Q-factor. Contrary to other cavity-based pulse compressors, such as SLED or LIPS, with this mode one can operate in a resonant rotating wave regime. Consequently, when used as an RF pulse compressor a single BOC is sufficient, whereas the LIPS and SLED schemes require two cavities and a 3-dB hybrid. A short description of the BOC and the results of high power operation specific to the CTF3 drive beam linac are presented.

  9. FPGA-based implementation of a cavity field controller for FLASH and X-FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafara, Przemyslaw; Jalmuzna, Wojciech; Koprek, Waldemar; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Szewinski, Jaroslaw; Cichalewski, Wojciech

    2007-08-01

    The subject of this paper is the design and construction of a new generation of superconducting cavity accelerator measurement and control system. The old system is based on a single digital signal processor (DSP). The new system uses a large programmable array circuit (FPGA) instead, with a multi-gigabit optical link. Both systems now work in parallel in the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). The differences between the systems are shown, based on the measurement results of the working machine. The major advantage of the new system is a bigger area of stability of the machine control loop.

  10. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Potter, J.M.; Earley, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity

  11. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  12. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  13. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  14. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  15. Cavity-Enhanced Transport of Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmüller, David; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Schütz, Stefan; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate charge transport through electronic bands of a mesoscopic one-dimensional system, where interband transitions are coupled to a confined cavity mode, initially prepared close to its vacuum. This coupling leads to light-matter hybridization where the dressed fermionic bands interact via absorption and emission of dressed cavity photons. Using a self-consistent nonequilibrium Green's function method, we compute electronic transmissions and cavity photon spectra and demonstrate how light-matter coupling can lead to an enhancement of charge conductivity in the steady state. We find that depending on cavity loss rate, electronic bandwidth, and coupling strength, the dynamics involves either an individual or a collective response of Bloch states, and we explain how this affects the current enhancement. We show that the charge conductivity enhancement can reach orders of magnitudes under experimentally relevant conditions.

  16. Cavity squeezing by a quantum conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Udson C; Mora, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid architectures integrating mesoscopic electronic conductors with resonant microwave cavities have a great potential for investigating unexplored regimes of electron–photon coupling. In this context, producing nonclassical squeezed light is a key step towards quantum communication with scalable solid-state devices. Here we show that parametric driving of the electronic conductor induces a squeezed steady state in the cavity. We find that squeezing properties of the cavity are essentially determined by the electronic noise correlators of the quantum conductor. In the case of a tunnel junction, we predict that squeezing is optimized by applying a time-periodic series of quantized δ—peaks in the bias voltage. For an asymmetric quantum dot, we show that a sharp Leviton pulse is able to achieve perfect cavity squeezing. (paper)

  17. Design of an optical cavity for gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billion Reyes, M. S.; Lopez-Vazquez, A.; Pimenta, W. M.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Franco-Villafane, J. A.; Gomez, E.

    2017-04-01

    Atomic interferometry is a widely used method to perform precision measurements of accelerations. We enhance the interferometric signal by adding an optical cavity around the free-falling atoms inside of a vacuum chamber. We use a bow-tie configuration to support a traveling wave and avoid spatial fluctuations in the light shift. To induce collective behavior (entangled state), we design the optical cavity with a cooperativity factor higher than one. We present the characterization of an optical cavity with a maximized beam waist to reach homogeneous illumination of the atomic cloud. The mirrors have high reflectivity (R =99.999%) at 780 nm, in a non-confocal arrangement so that we can excite transverse modes independently or simultaneously. We describe our progress to achieve a transverse mode closer to a flat-top and a cavity design that fits our geometrical restrictions. Funding from CONACYT.

  18. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  19. Piecewise linear loop quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, Jonathan [MPI fuer Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-02-07

    We define a modification of loop quantum gravity (LQG) in which graphs are required to consist of piecewise linear edges, which we call piecewise linear LQG (plLQG). At the diffeomorphism-invariant level, we prove that plLQG is equivalent to standard LQG, as long as one chooses the class of diffeomorphisms appropriately. That is, we exhibit a unitary map between the diffeomorphism-invariant Hilbert spaces that maps physically equivalent operators into each other. In addition, using the same ideas as in standard LQG, one can define a Hamiltonian and master constraint in plLQG, and the unitary map between plLQG and LQG then provides an exact isomorphism of dynamics in the two frameworks. Furthermore, loop quantum cosmology (LQC) can be exactly embedded into plLQG. This allows a prior program of the author to embed LQC into LQG at the dynamical level to proceed. In particular, this allows a formal expression for a physically motivated embedding of LQC into LQG at the diffeomorphism-invariant level to be given.

  20. HOM power in FCC-ee cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, Ivan; Chapochnikova, Elena

    2018-01-01

    This Note summarizes the results of the power loss calculations for FCC-ee machines with 400.79 MHz cavity options. The requirements for the single-cell cavity design and for the operation with beam are obtained from the results for the high-current FCC-ee machine (Z). For other machines the power loss is sufficiently low and can be absorbed and extracted by foreseen HOM couplers.

  1. Cavity-Assisted Quantum Bath Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, K. W.; Vool, U.; Zhou, D.; Weber, S. J.; Girvin, S. M.; Siddiqi, I.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate quantum bath engineering for a superconducting artificial atom coupled to a microwave cavity. By tailoring the spectrum of microwave photon shot noise in the cavity, we create a dissipative environment that autonomously relaxes the atom to an arbitrarily specified coherent superposition of the ground and excited states. In the presence of background thermal excitations, this mechanism increases state purity and effectively cools the dressed atom state to a low temperature.

  2. Performance experience with the CEBAF SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Mammosser, J.; Preble, J.

    1995-12-31

    The full complement of 169 pairs of niobium superconducting cavities has been installed in the CEBAF accelerator. This paper surveys the performance characteristics of these cavities in vertical tests, commissioning in the tunnel, and operational experience to date. Although installed performance exceeds specifications, and 3.2 GeV beam has been delivered on target, present systems do not consistently preserve the high performance obtained in vertical dewar tests as operational capability. Principal sources of these limitations are discussed.

  3. Ultrasensitive and broadband magnetometry with cavity optomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bei-Bei; Bulla, Douglas; Bilek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    We achieved sensitivity of 30 pT/Hz1/2 and working bandwidth larger than 100 MHz, using cavity optomechanical magnetometry, and also demonstrated quantum light enhanced sensitivity in such a magnetometer.......We achieved sensitivity of 30 pT/Hz1/2 and working bandwidth larger than 100 MHz, using cavity optomechanical magnetometry, and also demonstrated quantum light enhanced sensitivity in such a magnetometer....

  4. Quantum cavities with alternating boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Ligabò, Marilena

    2018-03-01

    We consider the quantum dynamics of a free nonrelativistic particle moving in a cavity and we analyze the effect of a rapid switching between two different boundary conditions. We show that this procedure induces, in the limit of infinitely frequent switchings, a new effective dynamics in the cavity related to a novel boundary condition. We obtain a dynamical composition law for boundary conditions which gives the emerging boundary condition in terms of the two initial ones.

  5. Early 500 MHz prototype LEP RF Cavity with superposed storage cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The principle of transferring the RF power back and forth between the accelerating cavity and a side-coupled storage cavity was demonstrated with this 500 MHz prototype. In LEP, the accelerating frequency was 352.2 MHz, and accelerating and storage cavities were consequently larger. See also 8002294, 8006061, 8407619X, and Annual Reports 1980, p.115; 1981, p.95; 1985, vol.I, p.13.

  6. A True Open-Loop Synchronization Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Vidal, Ana; Yepes, Alejandro G.

    2016-01-01

    in a parallel manner. In the presence of the frequency feedback loop, nevertheless, the OLS technique may not be truly open-loop, which makes a deep study of stability necessary. Using the secondary frequency detector, on the other hand, increases the computational effort and implementation complexity. Another......Synchronization techniques can be broadly classified into two major categories: Closed-loop and open-loop methods. The open-loop synchronization (OLS) techniques, contrary to the closed-loop ones, are unconditionally stable and benefit from a fast dynamic response. Their performance, however, tends...... to worsen in the presence of frequency drifts. To deal with this problem, two approaches are often recommended in the literature: Adapting OLS techniques to grid frequency variations by feeding back the frequency estimated by them or using the frequency estimated by a secondary frequency detector...

  7. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayu; Li Peng; Liu Yong; Xie Qingchun

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238 U 72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  8. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cantergiani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting rf (SRF cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF. In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  9. Niobium superconducting rf cavity fabrication by electrohydraulic forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantergiani, E.; Atieh, S.; Léaux, F.; Perez Fontenla, A. T.; Prunet, S.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Bertinelli, F.; Capatina, O.; Favre, G.; Gerigk, F.; Jeanson, A. C.; Fuzeau, J.; Avrillaud, G.; Alleman, D.; Bonafe, J.; Marty, P.

    2016-11-01

    Superconducting rf (SRF) cavities are traditionally fabricated from superconducting material sheets or made of copper coated with superconducting material, followed by trim machining and electron-beam welding. An alternative technique to traditional shaping methods, such as deep-drawing and spinning, is electrohydraulic forming (EHF). In EHF, half-cells are obtained through ultrahigh-speed deformation of blank sheets, using shockwaves induced in water by a pulsed electrical discharge. With respect to traditional methods, such a highly dynamic process can yield interesting results in terms of effectiveness, repeatability, final shape precision, higher formability, and reduced springback. In this paper, the first results of EHF on high purity niobium are presented and discussed. The simulations performed in order to master the multiphysics phenomena of EHF and to adjust its process parameters are presented. The microstructures of niobium half-cells produced by EHF and by spinning have been compared in terms of damage created in the material during the forming operation. The damage was assessed through hardness measurements, residual resistivity ratio (RRR) measurements, and electron backscattered diffraction analyses. It was found that EHF does not worsen the damage of the material during forming and instead, some areas of the half-cell have shown lower damage compared to spinning. Moreover, EHF is particularly advantageous to reduce the forming time, preserve roughness, and to meet the final required shape accuracy.

  10. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation

  11. Loop quantization as a continuum limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, Elisa; Oeckl, Robert; Weber, Axel; Zapata, Jose A

    2006-01-01

    We present an implementation of Wilson's renormalization group and a continuum limit tailored for loop quantization. The dynamics of loop-quantized theories is constructed as a continuum limit of the dynamics of effective theories. After presenting the general formalism we show as a first explicit example the 2D Ising field theory, an interacting relativistic quantum field theory with local degrees of freedom quantized by loop quantization techniques

  12. Advanced Hybrid Spacesuit Concept Featuring Integrated Open Loop and Closed Loop Ventilation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Brian A.; Fitzpatrick, Garret R.; Gohmert, Dustin M.; Ybarra, Rick M.; Dub, Mark O.

    2013-01-01

    A document discusses the design and prototype of an advanced spacesuit concept that integrates the capability to function seamlessly with multiple ventilation system approaches. Traditionally, spacesuits are designed to operate both dependently and independently of a host vehicle environment control and life support system (ECLSS). Spacesuits that operate independent of vehicle-provided ECLSS services must do so with equipment selfcontained within or on the spacesuit. Suits that are dependent on vehicle-provided consumables must remain physically connected to and integrated with the vehicle to operate properly. This innovation is the design and prototype of a hybrid spacesuit approach that configures the spacesuit to seamlessly interface and integrate with either type of vehicular systems, while still maintaining the ability to function completely independent of the vehicle. An existing Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) was utilized as the platform from which to develop the innovation. The ACES was retrofitted with selected components and one-off items to achieve the objective. The ventilation system concept was developed and prototyped/retrofitted to an existing ACES. Components were selected to provide suit connectors, hoses/umbilicals, internal breathing system ducting/ conduits, etc. The concept utilizes a lowpressure- drop, high-flow ventilation system that serves as a conduit from the vehicle supply into the suit, up through a neck seal, into the breathing helmet cavity, back down through the neck seal, out of the suit, and returned to the vehicle. The concept also utilizes a modified demand-based breathing system configured to function seamlessly with the low-pressure-drop closed-loop ventilation system.

  13. Soft Neutrosophic Loops and Their Generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soft set theory is a general mathematical tool for dealing with uncertain, fuzzy, not clearly defined objects. In this paper we introduced soft neutrosophic loop,soft neutosophic biloop, soft neutrosophic N -loop with the discuission of some of their characteristics. We also introduced a new type of soft neutrophic loop, the so called soft strong neutrosophic loop which is of pure neutrosophic character. This notion also found in all the other corresponding notions of soft neutrosophic thoery. We also given some of their properties of this newly born soft structure related to the strong part of neutrosophic theory.

  14. Loop statistics in polymers in crowded environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydukivska, K.; Blavatska, V.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the probability to find a single loop in a long flexible polymer chain in disordered environment in d dimensions. The structural defects are considered to be correlated on large distances r according to a power law ˜r-a. Working within the frames of continuous chain model and applying the direct polymer renormalization scheme, we obtain the values of critical exponents governing the scaling of probabilities to find the loops of various positions along the chain as function of loops' length. Our results quantitatively reveal that the presence of structural defects in environment decreases the probability of loop formation in polymer macromolecules.

  15. Numerical Contour Integration for Loop Integrals

    OpenAIRE

    Kurihara, Y.; Kaneko, T.

    2005-01-01

    A fully numerical method to calculate loop integrals, a numerical contour-integration method, is proposed. Loop integrals can be interpreted as a contour integral in a complex plane for an integrand with multi-poles in the plane. Stable and efficient numerical integrations an along appropriate contour can be performed for tensor integrals as well as for scalar ones appearing in loop calculations of the standard model. Examples of 3- and 4-point diagrams in 1-loop integrals and 2- and 3-point ...

  16. Quantum chromodynamics as dynamics of loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makeenko, Yu.; Migdal, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of a possibility of reformulating quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in terms of colourless composite fields instead of coloured quarks and gluons is considered. The role of such fields is played by the gauge invariant loop functionals. The Shwinger equations of motion is derived in the loop space which completely describe dynamics of the loop fields. New manifestly gauge invariant diagram technique in the loop space is developed. These diagrams reproduce asymptotic freedom in the ultraviolet range and are consistent with the confinement law in the infrared range

  17. Vertically Polarized Omnidirectional Printed Slot Loop Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, Nikolaj Peter Iversen; Kvist, Søren H.; Thaysen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    A novel vertically polarized omnidirectional printed slot loop antenna has been designed, simulated, fabricated and measured. The slot loop works as a magnetic loop. The loop is loaded with inductors to insure uniform and in-phase fields in the slot in order to obtain an omnidirectional radiation...... pattern. The antenna is designed for the 2.45 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band. Applications of the antenna are many. One is for on-body applications since it is ideal for launching a creeping waves due to the polarization....

  18. Negative differential resistance in Josephson junctions coupled to a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, N.F. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Filatrella, G., E-mail: filatrella@unisannio.it [Department of Science and Technology, University of Sannio (Italy); Pierro, V. [Department of Engineering, University of Sannio (Italy); Sørensen, M.P. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • A simple model for the negative differential resistance observed in JJ arrays. • The N- and S-shape differential resistances are included in JJ models. • A single junction model mimics the behavior of stacks of Josephson junctions. • A peak in the power is linked to the negative differential resistance. • Relevant to model emission in millimeter wave device, e.g. circuits and antennas. - Abstract: Regions with negative differential resistance can arise in the IV curve of Josephson junctions and this phenomenon plays an essential role for applications, in particular for THz radiation emission. For the measurement of high frequency radiation from Josephson junctions, a cavity – either internal or external – is often used. A cavity may also induce a negative differential resistance region at the lower side of the resonance frequency. We investigate the dynamics of Josephson junctions with a negative differential resistance in the quasi particle tunnel current, i.e. in the McCumber curve. We find that very complicated and unexpected interactions take place. This may be useful for the interpretation of experimental measurements of THz radiation from intrinsic Josephson junctions.

  19. Third harmonic cavity design and RF measurements for the Frascati DAΦNE collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alesini

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Third harmonic passive RF cavities have been proposed for installation in both rings of the DAΦNE factory collider to improve the Touschek lifetime and to increase the Landau damping. This paper illustrates the design of the harmonic cavities. The main requirements were to obtain a relatively low R/Q factor and a quality factor Q as high as possible to satisfy beam dynamics requirements and to damp all the higher order mode (HOM to a harmless level in order to avoid multibunch instabilities. A spherical shape of the cavity central body has been chosen as an optimum compromise between a high Q resonator and a low R/Q factor. HOM suppression has been provided by a ferrite ring damper designed for the superconducting cavities of the high energy ring of the KEK-B factory. The design and electromagnetic properties of the resonant modes have been studied with MAFIA and HFSS codes. Cavities have been made of aluminum and the RF measurements have been performed to characterize them. The measurements are in a good agreement with numerical simulations results, demonstrating a satisfactory HOM damping.

  20. Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC is a rare variant of squamous cell carcinoma which is characterized by a dysplastic epithelial component and a stromal element with invasive fusiform or spindle-shaped cells. The clinical and histopathologic characteristics make it very difficult to distinguish SC from epithelioid sarcoma (ES. We present a case of a 51-year-old man with a soft tissue mass in the oral cavity diagnosed as proximal variant of epithelioid sarcoma on incisional biopsy. A thorough radiologic examination was conducted to rule out the possibility of a primary elsewhere in the body. Supraomohyoid neck dissection, mandibular resection, and reconstruction with recon plates were carried out. Histopathologic examination was suggestive of epithelioid variant of SC which was contrary to the incisional biopsy report. The dilemma in diagnosis was resolved by observing the presence of invading atypical epithelial cells into the stroma confirming the epithelial origin of the tumor.

  1. Estimating tree cavity distributions from historical FIA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Nelson; Charlotte. Roy

    2012-01-01

    Tree cavities provide important habitat features for a variety of wildlife species. We describe an approach for using historical FIA data to estimate the number of trees containing cavities during the 1990s in seven states of the Upper Midwest. We estimated a total of 280 million cavity-containing trees. Iowa and Missouri had the highest percentages of cavity-...

  2. Soliton laser: A computational two-cavity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, P.; If, F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1987-01-01

    An improved computational two-cavity model of the soliton laser proposed and designed by Mollenauer and Stolen [Opt. Lett. 9, 13 (1984)] is obtained through refinements of (i) the laser cavity model, (ii) the pulse propagation in the fiber cavity, and (iii) the coupling between the two cavities...

  3. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  4. [Morbidity of lateral loop ileostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Y; Griot, J B; Molter, A; Gilly, F N; Carry, P Y; Sayag, A; Vignal, J

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the morbidity of twisted loop ileostomy (TLI). Between 1985 and 1994, 83 TLI were performed in 79 patients. Before TLI closure, 13 patients (16%) presented complications, requiring surgery in 5 cases. Small bowel obstruction (7 cases: 8%) and high stoma output (4 cases: 5%) were the commonest complications. After stoma closure (performed in 76 cases), 8 patients (10.5%) presented complications, requiring surgery in 3 cases. The most commonest complication was enteric fistula (4 cases: 5.3%) requiring reoperation in 2 cases. This procedure adds a separate set of postoperative complications, which tend to be minor in nature without any permanent sequelae and which can be minimized by a meticulous surgical technique. This technique remains a safe and effective procedure for fecal diversion.

  5. Lose Your Loops with Numpy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developing in python is fast. Computation, however, can often be another story. Or at least that is how it may seem. When working with arrays and numerical datasets one can subvert many of python’s computational limitations by utilizing numpy. Numpy is python’s standard matrix computation library. Many python users only use numpy to store and generate arrays, failing to utilize one of python’s most powerful computational tools. By leveraging numpy’s ufuncs, aggregation, broadcasting and slicing/masking/indexing functionality one can cut back on slow python loops and increase the speed of their programs by as much as 100x. This talk aims at teaching attendees how to use these tools through toy examples.

  6. Comparing the thermal performance of horizontal slinky-loop and vertical slinky-loop heat exchangers

    OpenAIRE

    C.S.A. Chong; G. Gan; A. Verhoef; R.G. Garcia

    2014-01-01

    The heat pump market in the UK has grown rapidly over the last few years. Performance analyses of vertical ground-loop heat exchanger configurations have been widely carried out using both numerical modelling and experiments. However, research findings and design recommendations on horizontal slinky-loop and vertical slinky-loop heat exchangers are far fewer compared with those for vertical ground-loop heat exchanger configurations, especially where the long-term operation of the systems is c...

  7. Calcium and chemical looping technology for power generation and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture solid oxygen- and CO2-carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Fennell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Calcium and Chemical Looping Technology for Power Generation and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture reviews the fundamental principles, systems, oxygen carriers, and carbon dioxide carriers relevant to chemical looping and combustion. Chapters review the market development, economics, and deployment of these systems, also providing detailed information on the variety of materials and processes that will help to shape the future of CO2 capture ready power plants. Reviews the fundamental principles, systems, oxygen carriers, and carbon dioxide carriers relevant to calcium and chemical loopingProvi

  8. Shape-changing interfaces:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegård; Pedersen, Esben Warming; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2015-01-01

    Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address these shortc......Shape change is increasingly used in physical user interfaces, both as input and output. Yet, the progress made and the key research questions for shape-changing interfaces are rarely analyzed systematically. We review a sample of existing work on shape-changing interfaces to address...... shape-changing interfaces be used for, (b) which parts of the design space are not well understood, and (c) why studying user experience with shape-changing interfaces is important....

  9. Self-erecting shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Matthew W.

    2017-07-04

    Technologies for making self-erecting structures are described herein. An exemplary self-erecting structure comprises a plurality of shape-memory members that connect two or more hub components. When forces are applied to the self-erecting structure, the shape-memory members can deform, and when the forces are removed the shape-memory members can return to their original pre-deformation shape, allowing the self-erecting structure to return to its own original shape under its own power. A shape of the self-erecting structure depends on a spatial orientation of the hub components, and a relative orientation of the shape-memory members, which in turn depends on an orientation of joining of the shape-memory members with the hub components.

  10. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  11. The Hue of Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco; Malfatti, Michela; Vescovi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an experimental study on the naturally biased association between shape and color. For each basic geometric shape studied, participants were asked to indicate the color perceived as most closely related to it, choosing from the Natural Color System Hue Circle. Results show that the choices of color for each shape were not…

  12. Building with shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Mooney, Carla

    2014-01-01

    There are shapes everywhere you look. You can put shapes together or build with them. What can you build with three circles? In this title, students will explore and understand that certain attributes define what a shape is called. This title will allow students to identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

  13. Effect of DNA hairpin loops on the twist of planar DNA origami tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Wang, Lei; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2012-01-31

    The development of scaffolded DNA origami, a technique in which a long single-stranded viral genome is folded into arbitrary shapes by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides, represents an important milestone in DNA nanotechnology. Recent findings have revealed that two-dimensional (2D) DNA origami structures based on the original design parameters adopt a global twist with respect to the tile plane, which may be because the conformation of the constituent DNA (10.67 bp/turn) deviates from the natural B-type helical twist (10.4 bp/turn). Here we aim to characterize the effects of DNA hairpin loops on the overall curvature of the tile and explore their ability to control, and ultimately eliminate any unwanted curvature. A series of dumbbell-shaped DNA loops were selectively displayed on the surface of DNA origami tiles with the expectation that repulsive interactions among the neighboring dumbbell loops and between the loops and the DNA origami tile would influence the structural features of the underlying tiles. A systematic, atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of how the number and position of the DNA loops influenced the global twist of the structure was performed, and several structural models to explain the results were proposed. The observations unambiguously revealed that the first generation of rectangular shaped origami tiles adopt a conformation in which the upper right (corner 2) and bottom left (corner 4) corners bend upward out of the plane, causing linear superstructures attached by these corners to form twisted ribbons. Our experimental observations are consistent with the twist model predicted by the DNA mechanical property simulation software CanDo. Through the systematic design and organization of various numbers of dumbbell loops on both surfaces of the tile, a nearly planar rectangular origami tile was achieved. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. On-chip low-profile nano-horn metal-clad optical cavity with much improved performance

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zheng; Choo, Hyuck

    2014-01-01

    We propose an on-chip nano-horm-shaped metal-clad cavity. The proposed device is 0.8 µm in height-half the size of the previously reported devices— and achieves the quality factor of 1000 and effective volume of 0.31(λ/n)^3.

  15. Wear of Shaped Surfaces of PVD Coated Dies for Clinching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Džupon

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A clinching method that uses a simple toolset consisting of a punch and a die, is utilized for joining lightweight materials. This paper is aimed at investigating the wear of the die cavity of a clinching tool. A clinching tool with a specially shaped cavity was used for joining thin hot-dip galvanized steel sheets. Various types of physical vapour deposition (PVD coatings such as ZrN, CrN and TiCN were deposited on the shaped surface of the die using Lateral Rotating Arc-Cathodes technology. Hot-dip galvanized steel sheets were used for testing the clinching tool. The material properties of PVD coatings that were deposited on the shaped part of the clinching die were evaluated. Finite Element Analysis was used to localize the area of the shaped part of the die and the part of surface area of the cylindrical die cavity of ϕ 5.0 mm, in which high contact pressure values were predicted. The prediction of the start of the wear cycle was verified experimentally by the clinching of 300 samples of hot-dip galvanized steel sheets. Unlike the CrN and ZrN coatings, the TiCN coating remained intact on the entire surface of the die.

  16. Natural cavity characteristics and cavity bird abundance on West Virginia forested islands of the Ohio River

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Anderson; Karen A. Riesz

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife habitats connected with forested islands and their back channels (areas where commercial traffic is prohibited) on the Ohio River are valuable to diverse species. However, quantitative data on the importance of these areas to cavity-nesting birds are lacking. We compared cavity-nesting bird use and habitat between back and navigational channel sides of islands...

  17. Preparation of porous lead from shape-controlled PbO bulk by in situ electrochemical reduction in ChCl-EG deep eutectic solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Juanjian; Hua, Yixin; Xu, Cunying; Li, Jian; Li, Yan; Wang, Ding; Zhou, Zhongren; Gong, Kai

    2015-12-01

    Porous lead with different shapes was firstly prepared from controlled geometries of solid PbO bulk by in situ electrochemical reduction in choline chloride-ethylene glycol deep eutectic solvents at cell voltage 2.5 V and 353 K. The electrochemical behavior of PbO powders on cavity microelectrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It is indicated that solid PbO can be directly reduced to metal in the solvent and a nucleation loop is apparent. Constant voltage electrolysis demonstrates that PbO pellet can be completely converted to metal for 13 h, and the current efficiency and specific energy consumption are about 87.79% and 736.82 kWh t-1, respectively. With the electro-deoxidation progress on the pellet surface, the reduction rate reaches the fastest and decreases along the distance from surface to inner center. The morphologies of metallic products are porous and mainly consisted of uniform particles which connect with each other by finer strip-shaped grains to remain the geometry and macro size constant perfectly. In addition, an empirical model of the electro-deoxidation process from spherical PbO bulk to porous lead is also proposed. These findings provide a novel and simple route for the preparation of porous metals from oxide precursors in deep eutectic solvents at room temperature.

  18. Roles for ordered and bulk solvent in ligand recognition and docking in two related cavities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Barelier

    Full Text Available A key challenge in structure-based discovery is accounting for modulation of protein-ligand interactions by ordered and bulk solvent. To investigate this, we compared ligand binding to a buried cavity in Cytochrome c Peroxidase (CcP, where affinity is dominated by a single ionic interaction, versus a cavity variant partly opened to solvent by loop deletion. This opening had unexpected effects on ligand orientation, affinity, and ordered water structure. Some ligands lost over ten-fold in affinity and reoriented in the cavity, while others retained their geometries, formed new interactions with water networks, and improved affinity. To test our ability to discover new ligands against this opened site prospectively, a 534,000 fragment library was docked against the open cavity using two models of ligand solvation. Using an older solvation model that prioritized many neutral molecules, three such uncharged docking hits were tested, none of which was observed to bind; these molecules were not highly ranked by the new, context-dependent solvation score. Using this new method, another 15 highly-ranked molecules were tested for binding. In contrast to the previous result, 14 of these bound detectably, with affinities ranging from 8 µM to 2 mM. In crystal structures, four of these new ligands superposed well with the docking predictions but two did not, reflecting unanticipated interactions with newly ordered waters molecules. Comparing recognition between this open cavity and its buried analog begins to isolate the roles of ordered solvent in a system that lends itself readily to prospective testing and that may be broadly useful to the community.

  19. Estimation of Time Dependent Properties from Surface Pressure in Open Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    static pressure of the cavity. The stagnation and static pressures are measured separately with Druck Model DPI 145 pressure transducers (with a quoted...interacting with the ZNMF actuator jets, the 2D shape of the vortical structures transform to a 3D shape with spanwise vortical structures. These...Therefore, the pressure gradient in the d direction is dd ° 3d Substituting Equation (5.3) into Equation (5.5) results in ^l = PJk(e^-Re^)/c^ (5.6

  20. Dispersive optomechanics: a membrane inside a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayich, A M; Sankey, J C; Zwickl, B M; Yang, C; Thompson, J D; Girvin, S M; Harris, J G E [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Clerk, A A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Marquardt, F [Department of Physics, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: jack.harris@yale.edu

    2008-09-15

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies of dispersively coupled (or 'membrane in the middle') optomechanical systems. We calculate the linear optical properties of a high finesse cavity containing a thin dielectric membrane. We focus on the cavity's transmission, reflection and finesse as a function of the membrane's position along the cavity axis and as a function of its optical loss. We compare these calculations with measurements and find excellent agreement in cavities with empty-cavity finesses in the range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5}. The imaginary part of the membrane's index of refraction is found to be {approx}10{sup -4}. We calculate the laser cooling performance of this system, with a particular focus on the less-intuitive regime in which photons 'tunnel' through the membrane on a timescale comparable to the membrane's period of oscillation. Lastly, we present calculations of quantum non-demolition measurements of the membrane's phonon number in the low signal-to-noise regime where the phonon lifetime is comparable to the QND readout time.