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Sample records for cavity shaping loop

  1. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  2. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON COPPER-PLATED UTERINE CAVITY SHAPED IUD AND NON-COPPER BEARING UTERINE CAVITY SHAPED IUD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENGQing-Gu; etal

    1989-01-01

    A comparative randomized clinical trial was carried out between two uterine cavity shaped IUDs: the copper-plated uterine cavity shaped IUD(UCDCu) and non-copper bearing uterine cavity shaped IUD(UCD). The IUDs were used by 1004 and 1005 women

  3. S0 Tight Loop Studies on ICHIRO 9-Cell Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Fumio [KEK; Konomi, T. [KEK; Saito, Kenji [KEK; Bice, Damon [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony C. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    We have continued high gradient R&D of ICHIRO 9-cell cavities at KEK. ICHIRO 9-cell cavity #5 (I9#5) that has no end groups on beam tube to focus on high gradient sent to Jlab as S0 tight loop study. Surface treatments and vertical test were repeated 3 times at Jlab, and then I9#5 sent back to KEK. We also repeated surface treatments and test at KEK. Maximum gradients were 36.5MV/m at Jlab, and 33.7MV/m at KEK so far. Now we are struggling with the puzzle why the results of singles do not work well on 9-cell cavities.

  4. Feedback Loops Shape Cellular Signals in Space and Time

    OpenAIRE

    Brandman, Onn; Meyer, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Positive and negative feedback loops are common regulatory elements in biological signaling systems. We discuss core feedback motifs that have distinct roles in shaping signaling responses in space and time. We also discuss approaches to experimentally investigate feedback loops in signaling systems.

  5. Linking shape dynamics and loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2014-08-01

    Shape dynamics is a reformulation of general relativity, locally equivalent to Einstein's theory, in which the refoliation invariance of the older theory is traded for local scale invariance. Shape dynamics is here derived in a formulation related to the Ashtekar variables by beginning with a modification of the Plebanski action. The constraints of shape dynamics and their algebra are reproduced in terms of these new variables.

  6. Spatio-temporal wavefront shaping in a microwave cavity

    CERN Document Server

    del Hougne, Philipp; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-01-01

    Controlling waves in complex media has become a major topic of interest, notably through the concepts of time reversal and wavefront shaping. Recently, it was shown that spatial light modulators can counter-intuitively focus waves both in space and time through multiple scattering media when illuminated with optical pulses. In this letter we transpose the concept to a microwave cavity using flat arrays of electronically tunable resonators. We prove that maximizing the Green's function between two antennas at a chosen time yields diffraction limited spatio-temporal focusing. Then, changing the photons' dwell time inside the cavity, we modify the relative distribution of the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom (DoF), and we demonstrate that it has no impact on the field enhancement: wavefront shaping makes use of all available DoF, irrespective of their spatial or temporal nature. Our results prove that wavefront shaping using simple electronically reconfigurable arrays of reflectors is a viable approach to...

  7. Measurements of planing forces and cavity shapes on cylindrical afterbodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellum, Aren; Belden, Jesse; Beal, David; Huyer, Stephen; Henoch, Charles; Hrubes, Dana

    2015-11-01

    Supercavitation is a drag reduction technique by which an underwater body is enclosed over a significant portion of its length in a bubble of gas. Hydrodynamic forces act on the body only through contact with the nose and a planing section at the rear. Models of the planing forces typically assume that the body is placed into a cavity which is unchanged by the presence of the body, and the present study was designed to test the validity of this assumption. Measurements were taken of the planing forces for five afterbody lengths over a range of angles concurrently with photographs showing the size and shape of the cavity produced. These observations reveal that the cavity form and growth rate are significantly affected by both the length and angle of attack of the body; the length of the cavity shrinks at the same angle of attack as the body length is reduced past a critical threshold, suggesting a hydrodynamic interaction between the afterbody trailing edge and the cavity. Additionally, the planing forces demonstrate a non-monotonic dependence on attack angle that is not readily explained by existing models, specifically a ``lift crisis'' for short bodies in which the planing lift goes to zero over a range from -1 to -3 degrees.

  8. Optimum Cavity Radius Within a Bottle-Shaped Thermoacoustic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Justin; Andersen, Bonnie

    2009-10-01

    Heat energy can be used to generate acoustic energy due to thermoacoustic interactions. These engines can be used to create sound waves without any moving parts, like pistons, and could be used in space to convert solar energy into electricity. This research focused on the optimization of the geometry of bottle-shaped resonators used for thermoacoustic prime movers. These resonators have the advantage of non-harmonic overtones compared with half-wave resonators. The resonators for this research were constructed of concentric cylinders consisting of a neck piece and a cavity. The dimensions were approximately 5 cm with an ID of 2 cm for the neck and 10 cm long with IDs varying from about 2 cm to 12 cm for the cavity, producing operating frequencies ranging from approximately 1.2 to 1.5 kHz, following a theoretical model. Twelve different cavity radii were tested. The optimal cavity radius of 2.06 cm had an onset time that was 27 s faster and an onset temperature difference that was lower by 12 C than the smallest cavity (a half-wave resonator). Future research will explore the quality factor and optimum stack to surface area ratio of the engines.

  9. Study of the cavity-magnon-polariton transmission line shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Michael; Bai, LiHui; Match, Christophe; Sirker, Jesko; Hu, CanMing

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigate the microwave transmission line shape of the cavity-magnon-polariton (CMP) created by inserting a low damping magnetic insulator into a high quality 3D microwave cavity. While fixed field measurements are found to have the expected Lorentzian characteristic, at fixed frequencies the field swept line shape is in general asymmetric. Such fixed frequency measurements demonstrate that microwave transmission can be used to access magnetic characteristics of the CMP, such as the field line width Δ H. By developing an effective oscillator model of the microwave transmission we show that these line shape features are general characteristics of harmonic coupling. At the same time, at the classical level the underlying physical mechanism of the CMP is electrodynamic phase correlation and a second model based on this principle also accurately reproduces the experimental line shape features. In order to understand the microscopic origin of the effective coupled oscillator model and to allow for future studies of CMP phenomena to extend into the quantum regime, we develop a third, microscopic description, based on a Green's function formalism. Using this method we calculate the transmission spectra and find good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Shape of the human nasal cavity promotes retronasal smell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastour, Sophie; Melchionna, Simone; Mishra, Shruti; Zwicker, David; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Brenner, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Humans are exceptionally good at perceiving the flavor of food. Flavor includes sensory input from taste receptors but is dominated by olfactory (smell) receptors. To smell food while eating, odors must be transported to the nasal cavity during exhalation. Olfactory performance of this retronasal route depends, among other factors, on the position of the olfactory receptors and the shape of the nasal cavity. One biological hypothesis is that the derived configuration of the human nasal cavity has resulted in a greater capacity for retronasal smell, hence enhanced flavor perception. We here study the air flow and resulting odor deposition as a function of the nasal geometry and the parameters of exhalation. We perform computational fluid dynamics simulations in realistic geometries obtained from CT scans of humans. Using the resulting flow fields, we then study the deposition of tracer particles in the nasal cavity. Additionally, we derive scaling laws for the odor deposition rate as a function of flow parameters and geometry using boundary layer theory. These results allow us to assess which changes in the evolution of the human nose led to significant improvements of retronasal smell.

  11. Feedback Control Systems Loop Shaping Design with Practical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsakis, George

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes loop shaping control design in feedback control systems, primarily from a practical stand point that considers design specifications. Classical feedback control design theory, for linear systems where the plant transfer function is known, has been around for a long time. But it s still a challenge of how to translate the theory into practical and methodical design techniques that simultaneously satisfy a variety of performance requirements such as transient response, stability, and disturbance attenuation while taking into account the capabilities of the plant and its actuation system. This paper briefly addresses some relevant theory, first in layman s terms, so that it becomes easily understood and then it embarks into a practical and systematic design approach incorporating loop shaping design coupled with lead-lag control compensation design. The emphasis is in generating simple but rather powerful design techniques that will allow even designers with a layman s knowledge in controls to develop effective feedback control designs.

  12. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K K

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  13. Study of the effect of loop inductance on the RF transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shankar; Pant, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Coupling of RF power is an important aspect in the design and development of RF accelerating structures. RF power coupling employing coupler loops has the advantage of tunability of β, the transmission line to cavity coupling coefficient. Analytical expressions available in literature for determination of size of the coupler loop using Faraday's law of induction show reasonably good agreement with experimentally measured values of β below critical coupling (β ≤ 1) but show large deviation with experimentally measured values and predictions by simulations for higher values of β. In actual accelerator application, many RF cavities need to be over-coupled with β > 1 for reasons of beam loading compensation, reduction of cavity filling time, etc. This paper discusses a modified analytical formulation by including the effect of loop inductance in the determination of loop size for any desired coupling coefficient. The analytical formulation shows good agreement with 3D simulations and with experimentally measured values. It has been successfully qualified by the design and development of power coupler loops for two 476 MHz pre-buncher RF cavities, which have successfully been conditioned at rated power levels using these coupler loops.

  14. Spatiotemporal Wave Front Shaping in a Microwave Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hougne, Philipp; Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-09-01

    Controlling waves in complex media has become a major topic of interest, notably through the concepts of time reversal and wave front shaping. Recently, it was shown that spatial light modulators can counterintuitively focus waves both in space and time through multiple scattering media when illuminated with optical pulses. In this Letter, we transpose the concept to a microwave cavity using flat arrays of electronically tunable resonators. We prove that maximizing the Green's function between two antennas at a chosen time yields diffraction limited spatiotemporal focusing. Then, changing the photons' dwell time inside the cavity, we modify the relative distribution of the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom (DOF), and we demonstrate that it has no impact on the field enhancement: wave front shaping makes use of all available DOF, irrespective of their spatial or temporal nature. Our results prove that wave front shaping using simple electronically reconfigurable arrays of reflectors is a viable approach to the spatiotemporal control of microwaves, with potential applications in medical imaging, therapy, telecommunications, radar, or sensing. They also offer new fundamental insights regarding the coupling of spatial and temporal DOF in complex media.

  15. Epoxy composite processing in a microwave part-shaped cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shidaker, T.A.; Hawley, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    A microwave part-shaped applicator was designed to be competitive with conventional liquid composite molding processes. Three glass-reinforced diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy composites with a diaminodiphenyl sulfone curative are processed in the part-shaped cavity by microwave heating, conventional heating, and hybrid heating where both microwave and conduction heating are employed. Hybrid heating provided superior heating uniformity due to complementary heat transfer mechanisms: an outward flux of thermal energy from microwave heating combined with an inward flux of energy associated with conventional heating. Because of the penetrating nature of microwave energy, the time required to attain the cure temperature in the composite center was reduced by more than 85% using microwave and hybrid heating methods.

  16. Influence of Er:YAG laser ablation on cavity surface and cavity shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Krejsa, Otakar; Hamal, Karel; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1996-04-01

    The cavity surface and shape after Er:YAG laser ablation at different energies, number of pulses and at a different repetition rate were observed. Longitudinal sections of extracted human incisors and transverse sections of ivory tusk were cut and polished to flat and glazed surfaces. The samples thickness was from 3 to 5 mm. The Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running (long pulse) mode. The laser radiation was focused onto the tooth surface by CaF2 lens (f equals 55 mm). During the experiment, the teeth were steady and the radiation was delivered by a special mechanical arm fixed in a special holder; fine water mist was also used (water-mJ/min, a pressure of two atm, air-pressure three atm). The shapes of the prepared cavities were studied either by using a varying laser energies (from 70 mJ to 500 mJ) for a constant number of pulses, or a varying number of pulses (from one to thirty) for constant laser energy. The repetition rate was changed from 1 to 2 Hz. For evaluating the surfaces, shapes, and profiles, scanning electron microscopy and photographs from a light microscope were used. The results were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. It is seen that there is no linear relation between the radiation pulse energy and the size of the prepared holes. With increasing the incident energy the cavity depth growth is limited. There exists some saturation not only in the enamel and dentin but especially in the homogeneous ivory.

  17. Temperature control feedback loops for the linac upgrade side coupled cavities at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linac upgrade project at Fermilab will replace the last 4 drift-tube linac tanks with seven side coupled cavity strings. This will increase the beam energy from 200 to 400 MeV at injection into the Booster accelerator. The main objective of the temperature loop is to control the resonant frequency of the cavity strings. A cavity string will constant of 4 sections connected with bridge couplers driven with a 12 MW klystron at 805 MHz. Each section is a side coupled cavity chain consisting of 16 accelerating cells and 15 side coupling cells. For the linac upgrade, 7 full cavity strings will be used. A separate temperature control system is planned for each of the 28 accelerating sections, the two transition sections, and the debuncher section. The cavity strings will be tuned to resonance for full power beam loaded conditions. A separate frequency loop is planned that will sample the phase difference between a monitor placed in the end cell of each section and the rf drive. The frequency loop will control the set point for the temperature loop which will be able to maintain the resonant frequency through periods within beam or rf power. The frequency loop will need the intelligence required to determine under what conditions the phase error information is valid and the temperature set point should be adjusted. This paper will discuss some of the reason for temperature control, the implementation, and some of the problems encountered. An appendix contains some useful constants and descriptions of some of the sensor and control elements used. 13 figs

  18. Partial discharge pulse shape recognition using an inductive loop sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Tarifa, J. M.; Robles, G.; Rojas-Moreno, M. V.; Sanz-Feito, J.

    2010-10-01

    Partial discharges (PD) are a clear ageing agent on insulating materials used in high-voltage electrical machines and cables. For this reason, there is increasing interest in measuring this phenomenon in an effort to forecast unexpected failures in electrical equipment. In order to focus on harmful discharges, PD pulse shape analysis is being used as an insulation defect identification technique. In this paper, a simple, inexpensive and high-frequency inductive loop sensor will be used to detect and acquire PD pulses. Several measurements will be made on some controlled test cell geometries in order to characterize PD pulse shapes for different discharge sources. The sensor identification capability has been checked in an insulation system where two simultaneous PD sources were active.

  19. Escape of Particles from an Open Square-Shaped Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Hua; LIU Sheng; WANG Bing

    2013-01-01

    The escape of particles in an open square-shaped cavity has been examined.We consider a family of trajectories launched from the left bottom lead of the square cavity and escaped from the right boundary.For each escaping trajectories,we record the propagation time and the detector position.We find that the escape time graph exhibits a regular sawtooth structure.For a set of detector points,we search for the classical trajectories from the source point to the detector points.Then we use semiclassical theory to construct the wave function at different given points.The calculation results suggest that the escape probability density depends on the detector position and the momentum of the particle sensitively.The Fourier transform of the semiclassical wave function gives the path length spectrum.Each peak in the path length spectrum corresponds to the length of one escape trajectory of the particle.We hope that our results will be useful in understanding the escape and transport process of particles inside a microcavity.

  20. Uterine Cavity-shaped Device Used in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan CHE; Ke-juan FANG; Wei-jin ZHOU; Yong-gang DING; Yue-lian SUN; Yao-ling HAN; Olav Merick; Peter Fajans

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness, side effects, and acceptability of copper uterine cavity - shaped intrauterine devices (UCD) with and without indomethacin.Methods We used electronic search and hand search to identify relevant literatures.Included papers were systematically reviewed according to previous established guidelines.Results A total of 39 related papers were identified. Of them, 9 papers were included in this review: 4 associated with medicated or non-medicated UCD200 (containing copper 200 mm2) and 5 associated with medicated or non-medicated UCD300(containing copper 300 mm2). The contraceptive effectiveness, cumulative one-year and two-year continuation rates were similar between medicated UCD200, non-medicated UCD200 and TCu220C. The effectiveness of non-medicated UCD300 was similar to that of TCu220C and TCu200. The effectiveness of medicated UCD300 was similar to that of MLCu375 and TCu220C but lower than that of TCu380A. The cumulative one-year, three-year and five-year continuation rates were similar between medicated,non-medicated UCD300 and TCu380A or MLCu375. The problem of bleeding was less common among medicated UCD users than among non-medicated devices.Conclusions Uterine cavity-shaped devices should continue to be used in the National Family Planning Proramme. However, priority should be given to the 300 mm2 copper containing device. A large multicenter randomized comparative trial of UCD300 and TCu380A is needed.

  1. Investigations on the internal shape of Constructal cavities intruding a heat generating body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouzesh Abouzar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence that the internal shape of open ‘cavities’ exerts on the Constructal design of a heat generating body. Several shapes of cavity are studied; triangular, elliptical, trapezoidal and Y-shaped cavities intruding into a trapezoidal shaped solid with uniform heat generation. The trapezoidal solid is commonly used in round electronic devices. The geometric aspect ratios of the cavities and the solid are free to vary while the total volume occupied by the solid and the cavity are fixed. The objective is minimizing the peak (hot spot temperature with respect to the geometrical parameters of the system. Finite element method is employed to calculate the peak temperature of the solid. With respect to the Constructal thermal design, the numerical results prove that, utilizing the triangular and Y-Shaped cavities can result more reliable and effective rather than other studied cavities.

  2. Low-Profile Magnetic Loop Monopole Antenna Based on a Square Substrate-Integrated Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Kaufmann; Christophe Fumeaux

    2015-01-01

    A low-profile monopole antenna with height below λ0/16 is proposed. The antenna is based on a square substrate-integrated cavity radiating through apertures in its four side walls. This effectively creates a small square loop of magnetic currents, which radiates omnidirectionally as an electric monopole. The antenna cavity has a side length of less than λ0/3 and thus resonates in the monomode region, in a fundamental TM11 mode. This means that the structure is robust in ter...

  3. A Digital Phase Lock Loop for an External Cavity Diode Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Long; TAO Tian-Jiong; CHENG Bing; WU Bin; XU Yun-Fei; WANG Zhao-Ying; LIN Qiang

    2011-01-01

    @@ A digital optical phase lock loop (OPLL) is implemented to synchronize the frequency and phase between two external cavity diode lasers (ECDL), generating Raman pulses for atom interferometry.The setup involves alldigital phase detection and a programmable digital proportional-integral-derivative (PID) loop in locking.The lock generates a narrow beat-note linewidth below 1 Hz and low phase-noise of 0.03rad2 between the master and slave ECDLs.The lock proves to be stable and robust, and all the locking parameters can be set and optimized on a computer interface with convenience, making the lock adaptable to various setups of laser systems.

  4. A Digital Phase Lock Loop for an External Cavity Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Long; Tao, Tian-Jiong; Cheng, Bing; Wu, Bin; Xu, Yun-Fei; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Lin, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    A digital optical phase lock loop (OPLL) is implemented to synchronize the frequency and phase between two external cavity diode lasers (ECDL), generating Raman pulses for atom interferometry. The setup involves all-digital phase detection and a programmable digital proportional-integral-derivative (PID) loop in locking. The lock generates a narrow beat-note linewidth below 1 Hz and low phase-noise of 0.03rad2 between the master and slave ECDLs. The lock proves to be stable and robust, and all the locking parameters can be set and optimized on a computer interface with convenience, making the lock adaptable to various setups of laser systems.

  5. Two-loop enhancement factor for $1/Q$ corrections to event shapes in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the two-loop enhancement factors for our earlier one-loop calculations of leading ($1/Q$) power corrections to the mean values of some event shape variables in deep inelastic lepton scattering. The enhancement is found to be equal to the universal ''Milan factor'' for those shape variables considered, provided the one-loop calculation is performed in a particular way. As a result, the phenomenology of power corrections to DIS event shapes remains largely unaffected. (author)

  6. Flattop mode shaping of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser using an external-cavity aspheric mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaohui; Leger, James

    2004-11-01

    Both square-shaped and circular-shaped flattop modes were experimentally demonstrated in extended-cavity broad-area VCSELs using aspheric feedback mirrors. These refractive aspheric mirrors were fabricated by electron-beam lithography on curved substrates. Excellent single-mode operation and improved power extraction efficiency were observed. The three-mirror structure of the VCSEL and the state-of-the-art fabrication of the aspheric mirror contribute to the superior VCSEL performance. The modal loss analysis using a rigid three-mirror-cavity simulation method is discussed. PMID:19484117

  7. Deflection and focusing of charged particles by cavities of general shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, G.

    1991-04-01

    The integrated transverse momentum change of a charged particle in the rf field of a cavity can be related to the change of its voltage gain due to a virtual transverse displacement of its orbit. Formulas for the particle deflection are derived, which are a generalisation of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem to an arbitrary cavity shape and to curved orbits through the cavity. In addition, some useful formulas for the transverse and longitudinal focusing are presented.

  8. Influence of Cavity Shape on Hydrodynamic Noise by A Hybrid LES-FW-H Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu; WANG Shu-xin; LIU Yu-hong; CHEN Chao-ying

    2011-01-01

    The flow past various mechanical cavity,which is a common structure on the surface of the underwater vehicle,and generating hydrodynamic noise has attracted considerable attention in recent years.In this paper,a hybrid method is presented to investigate the hydrodynamic noise induced by mechanical cavities with various shapes.With this method,the noise sources in the near wall turbulences or in the wake are computed by the large eddy simulation (LES) and the generation and propagation of the acoustic waves are solved by the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) acoustic analogy method with acoustic source terms extracted from the time-dependent solutions of the unsteady flow.The feasibility and reliability of the current method was verified by comparing with experimental data (Wang,2009).The 2D cavity models with different cross-section shapes and 3D cavity models with different cavity mouth shapes (rectangular and circular) are developed to study the influence of cavity shape on the hydrodynamic noise.By comparing the flow mechanisms,wall pressure fluctuations,near-field and far-field sound propagation distributions,it is found that the quadrangular cavity with equal depths of leading-edge and trailing-edge is preferred for its inducing lower hydrodynamic noise than the cylindrical cavity does.

  9. Similar extrusion and mapping optimization of die cavity modeling for special-shaped products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Hong-yuan; WANG Shuang-xin; ZHU Heng-jun

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at the modeling issues in design and quick processing of extruding die for special-shaped products, with the help of Conformal Mapping theory, Conformal Mapping function is determined by the given method of numerical trigonometric interpolation. Three-dimensional forming problems are transformed into two-dimensional problems, and mathematical model of die cavity surface is established based on different kinds of vertical curve, as well as the mathematical model of plastic flow in extruding deformation of special-shaped products gets completed. By upper bound method, both vertical curves of die cavity and its parameters are optimized. Combining the optimized model with the latest NC technology, NC Program of die cavity and its CAM can be realized. Taking the similar extrusion of square-shaped products with arc radius as instance, both metal plastic similar extrusion and die cavity optimization are carried out.

  10. The application of system identification techniques to an R.F. Cavity tuning loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    System identification is the terminology used for the process of characterising a given control system. A mathematical representation of the frequency response characteristic is obtained to utilise all the known design techniques to arrange the feed-back loop to meet required control performance criterion. This is known as parametric system identification. The intention of this paper is to speed up the process of identifying the R.F. Cavity tuning system of the 800 MeV accelerator, ISIS. While achieving this goal the computer must not disturb noticeably the normal function set out by the system. This task of automatic characterisation is necessary so that a self-adapting feed-back loop can be arranged to adjust itself without human interference and meet severe R.F. tuning requirements on ISIS. In any case the results of parametric identifications are useful in designing a robust feed-back loop with appropriate gain and phase margins. The approach using a Pseudo Random Signal is currently practised in Process Industries. (author)

  11. Closed-Loop Input Shaping Control of Vibration in Flexible Structures via Adaptive Sliding Mode Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Chang Pai

    2012-01-01

    Input shaping technique is widely used in reducing or eliminating residual vibration of flexible structures. The exact elimination of the residual vibration via input shaping technique depends on the amplitudes and instants of impulse application. However, systems always have parameter uncertainties which can lead to performance degradation. In this paper, a closed-loop input shaping control scheme is developed for uncertain flexible structures. The algorithm is based on input shaping control...

  12. Studies on high order mode of bell-shaped prototype cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aluminium and copper prototype cavities were designed to study higher order modes(HOM).An automatic field mapping system was developed with LabVIEW to measure the adiofrequency(RF)charac teristics,such as resonant frequency,Q-value,shunt impedance and electromagnetic field distribution of the higher-order modes in a model RF cavity.Two kinds of the bell-shaped cavities were measured using the field mapping system,their frequencies are 1.5 GHz and 800 MHz respectively.The fields' distributions of the monopole modes and dipole modes,as well the R/Q values,were measured.

  13. Special-shaped tube drawing forming and conformal optimization of die cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Hong-yuan; ZHU Heng-jun

    2006-01-01

    Aiming at the issues in quick processing and modeling design of drawing special-shaped tube die, by Conformal Mapping Theory and the numerical trigonometry method of interpolation between odd points and even points, the conformal mapping function is obtained. As the result, three-dimension drawing forming were converted into that of two-dimension problems, and the plastic stream function was analyzed, die cavity modeling and its optimized function were set up. Combining with modern processing technology, NC program and CAM of die cavity can be realized. Taking the drawing forming of hexagon tube with arc radii r and ellipse-shaped tube as instances, the drawing die cavity optimization of special-shaped tube was achieved, as well as, the changing principle of wall thickness was analyzed.

  14. Stationary bubble formation and cavity collapse in wedge-shaped hoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagisawa, Yui; Then, Hui Zee; Okumura, Ko

    2016-01-01

    The hourglass is one of the apparatuses familiar to everyone, but reveals intriguing behaviors peculiar to granular materials, and many issues are remained to be explored. In this study, we examined the dynamics of falling sand in a special form of hourglass, i.e., a wedge-shaped hopper, when a suspended granular layer is stabilized to a certain degree. As a result, we found remarkably different dynamic regimes of bubbling and cavity. In the bubbling regime, bubbles of nearly equal size are created in the sand at a regular time interval. In the cavity regime, a cavity grows as sand beads fall before a sudden collapse of the cavity. Bubbling found here is quite visible to a level never discussed in the physics literature and the cavity regime is a novel phase, which is neither continuous, intermittent nor completely blocked phase. We elucidate the physical conditions necessary for the bubbling and cavity regimes and develop simple theories for the regimes to successfully explain the observed phenomena by considering the stability of a suspended granular layer and clogging of granular flow at the outlet of the hopper. The bubbling and cavity regimes could be useful for mixing a fluid with granular materials. PMID:27138747

  15. AN EVALUATION OF UTERINE CAVITY-SHAPED STAINLESS STEEL IUD IN 400 CHINESE WOMEN IN BEIJING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOJi-Zeng; MENLing

    1989-01-01

    Hince 1986, a uterine cavity-shaped stainless steel IUD was used by 400 women in Anshan city, north China. Among them 200 were workers and 200 peasents. 1. Follow up: women were followed at 3rd, 6th, and 12th month after insertion. 3 cases lost follow

  16. Interpolating gain-scheduled H∞ loop shaping design for high speed ball screw feed drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Tang, WenCheng; Bao, DaFei

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method to design servo controllers for flexible ball screw drives with time-varying dynamics, which are mainly due to the time-varying table position and the workpiece mass. A gain-scheduled H∞ loop shaping controller is designed to achieve high tracking performance against the dynamic variations. H∞ loop shaping design procedure incorporates open loop shaping by a set of compensators to obtain performance/robust stability tradeoffs. The interpolating gain-scheduled controller is obtained by interpolating the state space model of the linear time-invariant (LTI) controllers estimated for fixed values of the scheduling parameters and a linear least squares problem can be solved. The proposed controller has been compared with P/PI with velocity and acceleration feedforward and adaptive backstepping sliding mode control experimentally. The experimental results indicate that the tracking performance has been improved and the robustness for time-varying dynamics has been achieved with the proposed scheme.

  17. The use of shaped cavities to improve the sidewall boundary layer quality in gas dynamic lasers. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, J.S.; Cooper, J.R.; Korkegi, R.H.

    1975-03-01

    A series of cavity shapes was tested on the sidewall of a Mach 3 high Reynolds number wind tunnel to determine the effects of the cavity and its downstream lip shape on the external flow. Various mass injection rates into the cavity were provided. Holographic interferommetry, oil flow, and a fast response surface pressure transducer were used to take data. Results indicate that a rectangular cavity with a lip shaped as a short rounded overhang least disturbs the turbulent boundary layer. Low levels of mass injection were found to have little effect on boundary layer quality. (GRA)

  18. Constructal optimization on T-shaped cavity based on entransy dissipation minimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE ZhiHui; CHEN LinGen; SUN FengRui

    2009-01-01

    The entransy dissipation extremum principle provides new warranty and criterion for optimization of heat transfer. For a heat transfer model of a rectangular solid wall with an open T-shaped cavity, a di-mensionless equivalent thermal resistance based on entransy dissipation is taken as optimization ob-jective, and constructal optimization for the model is carried out when the system volume, the cavity volume and the volume of rectangle occupied by T-shaped cavity are fixed. Numerical results indicate that the optimal geometry construct of cavity can be schemed out based on entransy dissipation ex-tremum principle. The formulation of dimensionless global (maximum) thermal resistance presented in a literature is modified; some new rules which are different from those reported in the literature are obtained based on the minimization of the modified objective. Comparisons of the numerical results show that the optimal system constructs deduced respectively from the two thermal resistance objec-tives are very different. The optimization by taking equivalent thermal resistance minimization as ob-jective can more effectively reduce mean temperature difference of heat transfer than the optimization by taking maximum thermal resistance minimization as objective, so that the performance of heat transfer for the total system can be improved. The more freedom the cavity has, the better the total system performance is. The correlations of the equivalent thermal resistance and the maximum thermal resistance of the system and three geometric degrees of freedom are found by using function fitting.

  19. Stationary bubble formation and cavity collapse in wedge-shaped hoppers

    CERN Document Server

    Yagisawa, Yui; Okumura, Ko

    2016-01-01

    The hourglass is one of the apparatuses familiar to everyone, but reveals intriguing behaviors peculiar to granular materials, and many issues are remained to be explored. In this study, we examined the dynamics of falling sand in a special form of hourglass, i.e., a wedge-shaped hopper, when a suspended granular layer is stabilized to a certain degree. As a result, we found remarkably different dynamics, bubbling and cavity regimes. In the bubbling regime, bubbles of nearly equal size are created in the sand at a regular time interval. In the cavity regime, a cavity grows as sand beads fall before a sudden collapse of the cavity. Bubbling found here is quite visible to a level never discussed in the physics literature and the cavity regime is a novel phase, which is neither continuous, intermittent nor completely blocked phase. We elucidate the physical conditions necessary for the bubbling and cavity regimes and develop simple theories for the regimes to successfully explain the observed phenomena by consid...

  20. Conformal mapping modeling of metal plastic deformation and die cavity in special-shaped extrusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐红元; 朱衡君; 杜凤山; 刘才

    2002-01-01

    With the help of Complex Function Mapping studied results, the analysis function of Conformal Mapping is set up. Since the complicated three dimension's deformation problems are transferred into two dimension problems, both the stream function and strain ratio field are analyzed in the metal plastic deformation. Using the upper-bound principles, the theory of metal deformation and die cavity optimized modeling is established for random special-shaped product extrusion. As a result, this enables the realization of intelligent technique target in the die cavity of CAD/CAM integration.

  1. Pulse shaping in mode-locked fiber lasers by in-cavity spectral filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscolo, Sonia; Finot, Christophe; Karakuzu, Huseyin; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2014-02-01

    We numerically show the possibility of pulse shaping in a passively mode-locked fiber laser by inclusion of a spectral filter into the laser cavity. Depending on the amplitude transfer function of the filter, we are able to achieve various regimes of advanced temporal waveform generation, including ones featuring bright and dark parabolic-, flat-top-, triangular- and saw-tooth-profiled pulses. The results demonstrate the strong potential of an in-cavity spectral pulse shaper for controlling the dynamics of mode-locked fiber lasers.

  2. RELATIONSHIP OF FIRST STEP HEIGHT, STEP SLOPE AND CAVITY IN X-SHAPED FLARING GATE PIERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; WU Chao; HU Yao-hua; MO Zheng-yu

    2007-01-01

    The energy dissipation of X-shaped flaring gate piers ahead of a stepped spillway was adopted in the Suofengying Hydroplant. Under the circumstance that the first step is higher than others, at the step surface an aerated cavity occured behind piers. The interaction of the weir head, the elevation difference between crest and chamber outlet, the first step height, the slopes of weir end and step, and the size of cavity, was investigated, the expression was derived to characterize their relationship, and the corresponding curves were plotted. The comparison of the calculated and simulated results with the measured data was performed. When the slopes of step and weir end are equivalent, the relative height difference between the first and second steps becomes the main factor influencing the aerated cavity. These findings may be useful in practical applications.

  3. Development of PLC based control system for frequency tuning loop of 31.6 MHz RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two storage rings, Indus-1 and Indus-2 are operational at RRCAT. Both the storage rings share a common injector system consisting of a Microtron and a Booster Synchrotron. The electrons are generated and accelerated to 20 MeV in Microtron and injected through a transfer line into the Booster Synchrotron where its energy is increased to 450 MeV/550 MeV. In Booster Synchrotron, a MHz RF system is installed. This RF System includes 1 kW RF amplifier, re-entrant type RF cavity and its tuning system. The RF system works in ramp mode. In RF cavities, resonant frequency changes due to beam loading and temperature effect. Our aim is to keep the RF Cavity at fixed resonance. Frequency Tuning Loop (FTL) will keep the cavities tuned by compensating for both beam loading and temperature effects. This is realized by means of a mechanism, driven by a stepper motor, which changes the volume of RF cavity by moving the plunger in/out and therefore its frequency. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based Control system was developed to replace existing control system for FTL of RF Cavity installed in Booster Synchrotron. The main components of the control system are the phase detector, PLC with analog module, optical isolation card and touch screen interface. Control logic was developed in Step-7 MicroWin. The complete control logic, advantages over the earlier control system and scope for adaptability has been thoroughly discussed in this paper

  4. Precise force measurement method by a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangzong Xiao; Xingwu Long; Bin Zhang; Geng Li

    2011-01-01

    A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed. The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed, and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived. Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed; they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range. The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02×109 Hz/N, with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N. By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor, a force measurement resolution of 10-6i N could be expected.%A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed.The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed,and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived.Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed;they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range.The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02× 109 Hz/N,with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N.By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor,a force measurement resolution of 10 -6 N could be expected.Precise measurement of force and force-related nagnitudes,such as acceleration,pressure,and mass,is an often demanded task in modern engineering and science[1-3].In recent decades,some research efforts have been intensified to utilize optical measnrement procedures for obtaining precise force measurement.

  5. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P21 with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P21 crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-­barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-­barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family. PMID:19770509

  6. Investigating the probability of detection of typical cavity shapes through modelling and comparison of geophysical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P.

    2011-12-01

    With a growing need for housing in the U.K., the government has proposed increased development of brownfield sites. However, old mine workings and natural cavities represent a potential hazard before, during and after construction on such sites, and add further complication to subsurface parameters. Cavities are hence a limitation to certain redevelopment and their detection is an ever important consideration. The current standard technique for cavity detection is a borehole grid, which is intrusive, non-continuous, slow and expensive. A new robust investigation standard in the detection of cavities is sought and geophysical techniques offer an attractive alternative. Geophysical techniques have previously been utilised successfully in the detection of cavities in various geologies, but still has an uncertain reputation in the engineering industry. Engineers are unsure of the techniques and are inclined to rely on well known techniques than utilise new technologies. Bad experiences with geophysics are commonly due to the indiscriminate choice of particular techniques. It is imperative that a geophysical survey is designed with the specific site and target in mind at all times, and the ability and judgement to rule out some, or all, techniques. To this author's knowledge no comparative software exists to aid technique choice. Also, previous modelling software limit the shapes of bodies and hence typical cavity shapes are not represented. Here, we introduce 3D modelling software (Matlab) which computes and compares the response to various cavity targets from a range of techniques (gravity, gravity gradient, magnetic, magnetic gradient and GPR). Typical near surface cavity shapes are modelled including shafts, bellpits, various lining and capping materials, and migrating voids. The probability of cavity detection is assessed in typical subsurface and noise conditions across a range of survey parameters. Techniques can be compared and the limits of detection distance

  7. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bacteria produce acids that cause decay. Tooth pain occurs after decay reaches the inside of the tooth. Dentists can detect cavities by examining the teeth and taking x-rays periodically. Good oral hygiene and regular dental care plus a healthy diet can help prevent cavities. ...

  8. Exploration of material removal rate of srf elliptical cavities as a function of media type and cavity shape on niobium and copper using centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Li, Yongming [PEKING; Geng, Rongli [JLAB

    2013-09-01

    Centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp) for SRF application is becoming more wide spread as the technique for cavity surface preparation. CBP is now being used in some form at SRF laboratories around the world including in the US, Europe and Asia. Before the process can become as mature as wet chemistry like eletro-polishing (EP) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP) there are many questions which remain unanswered. One of these topics includes the uniformity of removal as a function of cavity shape and material type. In this presentation we show CBP removal rates for various media types on 1.3 GHz TESLA and 1.5 GHz CEBAF large/fine grain niobium cavities, and 1.3GHz low surface field copper cavity. The data will also include calculated RF frequency shift modeling non-uniform removal as a function of cavity position and comparing them with CBP results.

  9. Heat transfer augmentation of magnetohydrodynamics natural convection in L-shaped cavities utilizing nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourtiji Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of natural convection heat transfer through an alumina-water nanofluid inside L-shaped cavities in the presence of an external magnetic field is performed. The study has been carried out for a wide range of important parame­ters such as Rayleigh number, Hartmann number, aspect ratio of the cavity and solid volume fraction of the nanofluid. The influence of the nanoparticle, buoyancy force and the magnetic field on the flow and temperature fields have been plotted and discussed. The results show that after a critical Rayleigh number depending on the aspect ratio, the heat transfer in the cavity rises abruptly due to some significant changes in flow field. It is also found that the heat transfer enhances in the presence of the nanoparticles and increases with solid volume fraction of the nanofluid. In addition, the performance of the nanofluid utilization is more effective at high Ray­leigh numbers. The influence of the magnetic field has been also studied and de­duced that it has a remarkable effect on the heat transfer and flow field in the cavity that as the Hartmann number increases the overall Nusselt number is significantly decreased specially at high Rayleigh numbers.

  10. Inverse Shape Reconstruction of Inner Cavities Using Guided SH-Waves in a Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an inverse reconstruction method for inner cavities in a 2D plate using guided SH-waves. When a pure incident wave mode is sent toward the flaw area, reflected waves are observed at the far field due to mode conversion. From wave scattering theory, the reflected wave field is expressed by an integral over the unknown flaw surface concerning the total wave field. By the introduction of Born approximation and far-field expressions of Green’s function, it is found that the reflection coefficient for the mode of the same order as that of the incident mode is related to the unknown shape of the cavity by Fourier transform relations. By mathematical deduction, we show that if the basic (0th-order symmetric and the 1st-order antisymmetric modes are used as incident waves, the locations and shapes of upper and lower boundaries of the cavity can be reconstructed. Numerical examples are illustrated in the paper, and a proper condition for applying this method is discussed. The research can act as a basis of nondestructive inspection for latent flaws within more complicated structures.

  11. IMC-PID design based on model matching approach and closed-loop shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qi B; Liu, Q

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by the limitations of the conventional internal model control (IMC), this communication addresses the design of IMC-based PID in terms of the robust performance of the control system. The IMC controller form is obtained by solving an H-infinity problem based on the model matching approach, and the parameters are determined by closed-loop shaping. The shaping of the closed-loop transfer function is considered both for the set-point tracking and for the load disturbance rejection. The design procedure is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem which is solved by a specific optimization algorithm. A nice feature of this design method is that it permits a clear tradeoff between robustness and performance. Simulation examples show that the proposed method is effective and has a wide applicability.

  12. IMC-PID design based on model matching approach and closed-loop shaping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qi B; Liu, Q

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by the limitations of the conventional internal model control (IMC), this communication addresses the design of IMC-based PID in terms of the robust performance of the control system. The IMC controller form is obtained by solving an H-infinity problem based on the model matching approach, and the parameters are determined by closed-loop shaping. The shaping of the closed-loop transfer function is considered both for the set-point tracking and for the load disturbance rejection. The design procedure is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem which is solved by a specific optimization algorithm. A nice feature of this design method is that it permits a clear tradeoff between robustness and performance. Simulation examples show that the proposed method is effective and has a wide applicability. PMID:24280534

  13. Signal line shapes of Fourier transform cavity-enhanced frequency modulation spectroscopy with optical frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Alexandra C; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    We present a thorough analysis of the signal line shapes of Fourier transform-based noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS). We discuss the signal dependence on the ratio of the modulation frequency, f${_m}$, to the molecular line width, {\\Gamma}. We compare a full model of the signals and a simplified absorption-like analytical model that has high accuracy for low f${_m}$/{\\Gamma} ratios and is much faster to compute. We verify the theory experimentally by measuring and fitting NICE-OFCS spectra of CO${_2}$ at 1575 nm using a system based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser and a cavity with a finesse of ~11000.

  14. Shaping of Looped Miniaturized Chalcogenide Fiber Sensing Heads for Mid-Infrared Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Houizot

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glass fibers are promising photonic tools to develop Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS optical sensors working in the mid-infrared region. Numerous pioneering works have already been carried out showing their efficiency, especially for bio-medical applications. Nevertheless, this technology remains confined to academic studies at the laboratory scale because chalcogenide glass fibers are difficult to shape to produce reliable, sensitive and compact sensors. In this paper, a new method for designing and fabricating a compact and robust sensing head with a selenide glass fiber is described. Compact looped sensing heads with diameter equal to 2 mm were thus shaped. This represents an outstanding achievement considering the brittleness of such uncoated fibers. FEWS experiments were implemented using alcoholic solutions as target samples showing that the sensitivity is higher than with the routinely used classical fiber. It is also shown that the best compromise in term of sensitivity is to fabricate a sensing head including two full loops. From a mechanical point of view, the breaking loads of the loop shaped head are also much higher than with classical fiber. Finally, this achievement paves the way for the use of mid-infrared technology during in situ and even in vivo medical operations. Indeed, is is now possible to slide a chalcogenide glass fiber in the operating channel of a standard 2.8 mm diameter catheter.

  15. Shaping of looped miniaturized chalcogenide fiber sensing heads for mid-infrared sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houizot, Patrick; Anne, Marie-Laure; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Loréal, Olivier; Tariel, Hugues; Lucas, Jacques; Bureau, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Chalcogenide glass fibers are promising photonic tools to develop Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS) optical sensors working in the mid-infrared region. Numerous pioneering works have already been carried out showing their efficiency, especially for bio-medical applications. Nevertheless, this technology remains confined to academic studies at the laboratory scale because chalcogenide glass fibers are difficult to shape to produce reliable, sensitive and compact sensors. In this paper, a new method for designing and fabricating a compact and robust sensing head with a selenide glass fiber is described. Compact looped sensing heads with diameter equal to 2 mm were thus shaped. This represents an outstanding achievement considering the brittleness of such uncoated fibers. FEWS experiments were implemented using alcoholic solutions as target samples showing that the sensitivity is higher than with the routinely used classical fiber. It is also shown that the best compromise in term of sensitivity is to fabricate a sensing head including two full loops. From a mechanical point of view, the breaking loads of the loop shaped head are also much higher than with classical fiber. Finally, this achievement paves the way for the use of mid-infrared technology during in situ and even in vivo medical operations. Indeed, is is now possible to slide a chalcogenide glass fiber in the operating channel of a standard 2.8 mm diameter catheter. PMID:25264953

  16. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne, E-mail: skerra@wzw.tum.de [Munich Center for Integrated Protein Science, CIPS-M, and Lehrstuhl für Biologische Chemie, Technische Universität München, 85350 Freising-Weihenstephan (Germany)

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2{sub 1} revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1} with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2{sub 1} crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family.

  17. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P21 revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P21 with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P21 crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family

  18. Investigation on an evanescent wave fiber-optic absorption sensor based on fiber loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Meng; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yaping; Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    An improved ring-down measurement principle for optical waveguides is presented. Fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy allows for measurement of minute optical losses in high-finesse fiber-optic cavities and immunity to the fluctuation of laser source. The evanescent wave absorption losses dependent on the absorption and the refractive index of ambient solution have been theoretically analyzed. The complex refractive index is introduced into our model and extinction coefficient can be calculated accurately through finite element analysis by setting the boundaries of the fiber and the ambient conditions. Using this method, the refractive index of environment can be taken into consideration. Our principle is validated by the highly-sensitive measurement of evanescent wave absorption loss. By chemically processing the surface of sensing segment along an extending ring-down cavity, the concentration of small volume Diethyl Sulphoxide solution where the etched fiber immersed into has been successfully measured and discussed.

  19. Automated Droplet Manipulation Using Closed-Loop Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyle; Yang, Jinlong; Zuo, Yi Y

    2016-05-17

    Droplet manipulation plays an important role in a wide range of scientific and industrial applications, such as synthesis of thin-film materials, control of interfacial reactions, and operation of digital microfluidics. Compared to micron-sized droplets, which are commonly considered as spherical beads, millimeter-sized droplets are generally deformable by gravity, thus introducing nonlinearity into control of droplet properties. Such a nonlinear drop shape effect is especially crucial for droplet manipulation, even for small droplets, at the presence of surfactants. In this paper, we have developed a novel closed-loop axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA), integrated into a constrained drop surfactometer (CDS), for manipulating millimeter-sized droplets. The closed-loop ADSA generalizes applications of the traditional drop shape analysis from a surface tension measurement methodology to a sophisticated tool for manipulating droplets in real time. We have demonstrated the feasibility and advantages of the closed-loop ADSA in three applications, including control of drop volume by automatically compensating natural evaporation, precise control of surface area variations for high-fidelity biophysical simulations of natural pulmonary surfactant, and steady control of surface pressure for in situ Langmuir-Blodgett transfer from droplets. All these applications have demonstrated the accuracy, versatility, applicability, and automation of this new ADSA-based droplet manipulation technique. Combining with CDS, the closed-loop ADSA holds great promise for advancing droplet manipulation in a variety of material and surface science applications, such as thin-film fabrication, self-assembly, and biophysical study of pulmonary surfactant. PMID:27132978

  20. Automated Droplet Manipulation Using Closed-Loop Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyle; Yang, Jinlong; Zuo, Yi Y

    2016-05-17

    Droplet manipulation plays an important role in a wide range of scientific and industrial applications, such as synthesis of thin-film materials, control of interfacial reactions, and operation of digital microfluidics. Compared to micron-sized droplets, which are commonly considered as spherical beads, millimeter-sized droplets are generally deformable by gravity, thus introducing nonlinearity into control of droplet properties. Such a nonlinear drop shape effect is especially crucial for droplet manipulation, even for small droplets, at the presence of surfactants. In this paper, we have developed a novel closed-loop axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA), integrated into a constrained drop surfactometer (CDS), for manipulating millimeter-sized droplets. The closed-loop ADSA generalizes applications of the traditional drop shape analysis from a surface tension measurement methodology to a sophisticated tool for manipulating droplets in real time. We have demonstrated the feasibility and advantages of the closed-loop ADSA in three applications, including control of drop volume by automatically compensating natural evaporation, precise control of surface area variations for high-fidelity biophysical simulations of natural pulmonary surfactant, and steady control of surface pressure for in situ Langmuir-Blodgett transfer from droplets. All these applications have demonstrated the accuracy, versatility, applicability, and automation of this new ADSA-based droplet manipulation technique. Combining with CDS, the closed-loop ADSA holds great promise for advancing droplet manipulation in a variety of material and surface science applications, such as thin-film fabrication, self-assembly, and biophysical study of pulmonary surfactant.

  1. Fast Preisach modeling method for shape memory alloy actuators using major hysteresis loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung-Jun; Lee, Yun-Jung; Choi, Bong-Yeol

    2004-10-01

    The control accuracy of smart actuators, such as a shape memory alloy (SMA) or piezoceramic actuator, is limited due to their inherent hysteresis nonlinearities with a local memory, resulting from the influence of a previous input on subsequent behavior. In addition, the existence of minor loops in the major loop because of a local memory also makes the mathematical modeling and design of a controller difficult for SMA actuators. Therefore, to enhance the controllability of a smart actuator, the Preisach hysteresis model has emerged as an appropriate behavioral model, yet the modeling is difficult and the model equation complex. Accordingly, to resolve these difficulties, the current paper proposes a simple method based on applying the proportional relationship between the major loop and the FOD curves of an SMA actuator to the Preisach model. As such, using only data for the major hysteresis loop, the proposed method enables the FOD curves to be easily approximated and the output length rapidly computed. The efficacy of the proposed Preisach modeling method is confirmed based on comparative experiments with the classical Preisach model.

  2. Development and test of an accelerating cavity shape for a superconducting linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to use superconducting RF accelerating structures in the construction of a linear collider certain criteria must be addressed. Foremost of these criteria is the high accelerating gradient. This requirement might be more accurately expressed as the accelerating gradient per unit cost. The authors see therefore that cost/unit length is also a primary criteria. The cavity must be designed so that input power can be coupled in and higher order mode (HOM) power may be coupled out to the degree required by beam stability considerations. At this time in the development of superconducting RF accelerating cavities, the accelerating gradient is limited by two phenomena, electron field emission and thermal breakdown. The first of these makes it imperative to choose a cell shape that minimizes Epk/Eacc and the second phenomena to minimize Hpk/Eacc (the ratio of the peak surface fields to the accelerating gradient). As field emission is the dominant gradient limitation, there is considerable premium in lowering Epk/Eacc. The cell to cell coupling (K) is also effected by the shape. This is true of the coupling of the HOM's as well as the fundamental TM010 mode. Because of this, the number of coupled cells comprising an accelerating unit is limited. A larger number of cells/module helps reduce the structure cost by reducing the number of couplers as well as by improving the filling factor for the machine. An effort is made here to increase the number of cells per module to 10

  3. A rugby-shaped cavity for the LMJ; Une cavite en forme de ballon de rugby pour le LMJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Bastian, J.; Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Jadaud, J.P.; Lafitte, S.; Liberatore, S.; Malinie, G.; Philippe, F. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Numerical studies show that a rugby-shaped hohlraum for indirect drive laser ignition has some advantages: it allows a better symmetry for the X-ray irradiation of the central target and it required less laser power. Rugby-shaped cavities have been tested successfully at the Omega facility. The energetic advantage is all the more important as the cavity is bigger. Simulations have shown that a rugby-shaped hohlraum plus adequate materials for the intern wall plus an optimization of the central target could open the way to an ignition with only 160 laser beams at the LMJ (Megajoule Laser) facility. (A.C.)

  4. FREQ: A computational package for multivariable system loop-shaping procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesy, Daniel P.; Armstrong, Ernest S.

    1989-01-01

    Many approaches in the field of linear, multivariable time-invariant systems analysis and controller synthesis employ loop-sharing procedures wherein design parameters are chosen to shape frequency-response singular value plots of selected transfer matrices. A software package, FREQ, is documented for computing within on unified framework many of the most used multivariable transfer matrices for both continuous and discrete systems. The matrices are evaluated at user-selected frequency-response values, and singular values against frequency. Example computations are presented to demonstrate the use of the FREQ code.

  5. Noise-shaping all-digital phase-locked loops modeling, simulation, analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Brandonisio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a novel approach to the analysis and design of all-digital phase-locked loops (ADPLLs), technology widely used in wireless communication devices. The authors provide an overview of ADPLL architectures, time-to-digital converters (TDCs) and noise shaping. Realistic examples illustrate how to analyze and simulate phase noise in the presence of sigma-delta modulation and time-to-digital conversion. Readers will gain a deep understanding of ADPLLs and the central role played by noise-shaping. A range of ADPLL and TDC architectures are presented in unified manner. Analytical and simulation tools are discussed in detail. Matlab code is included that can be reused to design, simulate and analyze the ADPLL architectures that are presented in the book.   • Discusses in detail a wide range of all-digital phase-locked loops architectures; • Presents a unified framework in which to model time-to-digital converters for ADPLLs; • Explains a procedure to predict and simulate phase noise in oscil...

  6. Uniaxial Compressive Constitutive Relationship of Concrete Confined by Special-Shaped Steel Tube Coupled with Multiple Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haipeng Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented to predict the complete stress-strain curves of concrete subjected to triaxial stresses, which were caused by axial load and lateral force. The stress can be induced due to the confinement action inside a special-shaped steel tube having multiple cavities. The existing reinforced confined concrete formulas have been improved to determine the confinement action. The influence of cross-sectional shape, of cavity construction, of stiffening ribs and of reinforcement in cavities has been considered in the model. The parameters of the model are determined on the basis of experimental results of an axial compression test for two different kinds of special-shaped concrete filled steel tube (CFT columns with multiple cavities. The complete load-strain curves of the special-shaped CFT columns are estimated. The predicted concrete strength and the post-peak behavior are found to show good agreement within the accepted limits, compared with the experimental results. In addition, the parameters of proposed model are taken from two kinds of totally different CFT columns, so that it can be concluded that this model is also applicable to concrete confined by other special-shaped steel tubes.

  7. Radicular Pain due to Subsidence of the Nitinol Shape Memory Loop for Stabilization after Lumbar Decompressive Laminectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Byung-chul; Kim, Deog-ryeong

    2015-01-01

    A number of dynamic stabilization systems have been used to overcome the problems associated with spinal fusion with rigid fixation recently and the demand for an ideal dynamic stabilization system is greater for younger patients with multisegment disc degeneration. Nitinol, a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium, is flexible at low temperatures and regains its original shape when heated, and the Nitinol shape memory loop (SML) implant has been used as a posterior tension band mostly in ...

  8. Dissonant Modes of Bottle-shaped Thermoacoustic Prime Movers Part 1: Mode Transitions with Varying Cavity Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jacob; Andersen, Bonnie

    2012-10-01

    Dissonant overtones of closed bottle-shaped thermoacoustic prime movers are discussed. The resonator consists of two concentric cylinders with differing cross-sectional areas, closed at the outer ends. The condition for resonance results in a transcendental equation, which is solved numerically. The neck and cavity behave as coupled resonators, where the neck is a quarter-wave resonator and the cavity is a half-wave resonator. A variable cylindrical cavity with a sliding piston was constructed to study the nature of the device as the cavity length is varied. The stack is located in the neck region and the length and inner diameter of the neck are 5.39 and 1.91 cm, respectively. The inner diameter of the cavity is 4.76 cm and has a maximum length of 38 cm. The dominant mode of operation depends on the length of the cavity, favoring successively higher modes as the cavity length increases. The volume filling factor of the stack material was varied from 2 to 5% to determine whether the amount of stack material affects the transitions. These filling factors were selected to yield hydraulic radii comparable to the thermal penetration depth for the highest and lowest possible fundamental frequencies of the system. The transition to higher modes occurs roughly where the higher mode overlaps with the fundamental frequency of the neck region, and is independent of the stack filling factor. With the given dimensions, three transitions to higher modes were observed, with frequencies consistent with the model.

  9. A robust damping controller for SMES using loop-shaping technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, A.H.M.A. [King Faud Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Nowicki, E.P. [Calgary Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    A robust damping controller for a power system installed with super-conducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) has been designed using a simple graphical loop-shaping technique. The graphical method starts by selection of a nominal plant function satisfying the robust stability and performance criterion. The variations in operating conditions from the nominal values are modeled as multiplicative structured uncertainty. The generator-SMES system has been represented with a detailed dynamic model for the control design. The robust design, with generator speed variation as the controller input, was tested for a range of operating points considering various disturbances. It is observed that the fixed parameter robust controller provides very good damping for a wide range of operating conditions. (Author)

  10. Robust PID design based on static H∞ loop-shaping method for steam generator water level control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem for control of steam generator water level is complex because its complicated shrink and parameters of its model vary with operation conditions. Static H∞ loop shaping is used to design the robust PID controller for the steam generator. Simulation results show that the control efficiency of this scheme is better than that of the other three H∞ loop shaping based methods, and the derived controller has good reference tracking capability, distribution rejection ability and acceptable control performance at different operation points. (authors)

  11. Photonic multi-shape UWB pulse generation using a semiconductor optical amplifier-based nonlinear optical loop mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Bo-Wen; Dong Jian-Ji; Yu Yuan; Yang Ting; Zhang Xin-Liang

    2013-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a scheme to implement photonic multi-shape ultra-wideband (UWB) signal generation using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM).By employing the cross phase modulation (XPM) effect,cross gain modulation (XGM),or both,multi-shape UWB waveforms are generated including monocycle,doublet,triplet,and quadruplet pulses.Both the shapes and polarities of the generated pulses are flexible to adjust,which may be very useful in UWB pulse shape modulation and pulse polarity modulation.

  12. Chaotic escape from an open vase-shaped cavity. I. Numerical and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Jaison; Keeler, Matthew L.; Giefer, Joshua; Delos, John B.

    2012-01-01

    We present part I in a two-part study of an open chaotic cavity shaped as a vase. The vase possesses an unstable periodic orbit in its neck. Trajectories passing through this orbit escape without return. For our analysis, we consider a family of trajectories launched from a point on the vase boundary. We imagine a vertical array of detectors past the unstable periodic orbit and, for each escaping trajectory, record the propagation time and the vertical detector position. We find that the escape time exhibits a complicated recursive structure. This recursive structure is explored in part I of our study. We present an approximation to the Helmholtz equation for waves escaping the vase. By choosing a set of detector points, we interpolate trajectories connecting the source to the different detector points. We use these interpolated classical trajectories to construct the solution to the wave equation at a detector point. Finally, we construct a plot of the detector position versus the escape time and compare this graph to the results of an experiment using classical ultrasound waves. We find that generally the classical trajectories organize the escaping ultrasound waves.

  13. Initial study on the shape optimisation of the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Carter, R G; Dexter, A C; Jones, R M; McIntosh, P

    2008-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) requires a crab cavity to align bunches prior to collision. The bunch structure demands tight amplitude and phase tolerances of the RF fields inside the cavity, for the minimal luminosity loss. Beam loading effects require special attention as it is one potential sources of field errors in the cavity. In order to assist the amplitude and phase control, we propose a travelling wave (TW) structure with a high group velocity allowing rapid propagation of errors out of the system. Such a design makes the cavity structure significantly different from previous ones. This paper will look at the implications of this on other cavity parameters and the optimisation of the cavity geometry.

  14. Design and Applications of In-Cavity Pulse Shaping by Spectral Sculpturing in Mode-Locked Fibre Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Boscolo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We review our recent progress on the realisation of pulse shaping in passively-mode-locked fibre lasers by inclusion of an amplitude and/or phase spectral filter into the laser cavity. We numerically show that depending on the amplitude transfer function of the in-cavity filter, various regimes of advanced waveform generation can be achieved, including ones featuring parabolic-, flat-top- and triangular-profiled pulses. An application of this approach using a flat-top spectral filter is shown to achieve the direct generation of high-quality sinc-shaped optical Nyquist pulses with a widely tunable bandwidth from the laser oscillator. We also present the operation of an ultrafast fibre laser in which conventional soliton, dispersion-managed soliton (stretched-pulse and dissipative soliton mode-locking regimes can be selectively and reliably targeted by adaptively changing the dispersion profile and bandwidth programmed on an in-cavity programmable filter. The results demonstrate the strong potential of an in-cavity spectral pulse shaper for achieving a high degree of control over the dynamics and output of mode-locked fibre lasers.

  15. Shape dependence of single particle response and the one body limit of damping of multipole vibrations of a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a modification of the wall formula for one body dissipation in order to include the effect of irregularity in the shape of the one body potential on the dissipation mechanism. We arrive at a dissipation rate which is a scaled version of the wall formula developed earlier by Blocki et al. We show that the scaling factor is determined by a measure of chaos in the single particle motion. As an illustration, we obtain this measure of chaos for particles in a multipole deformed cavity with a view to use the scaled wall formula to calculate the damping widths of multipole vibrations of the cavity wall. Considering the amplitudes of the vibrations typical of the giant resonances in nuclei, it is observed that the effect of the shape dependence is to strongly suppress the damping caused by the original wall formula. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. 589-nm yellow laser generation by intra-cavity sum-frequency mixing in a T-shaped Nd:YAG laser cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuyan Chen; Xiu Li; Haolei Zhang; Haowei Chen; Jintao Bai; Zhaoyu Ren

    2009-01-01

    To obtain high power 589-nm yellow laser,a T-shaped thermal-insensitive cavity is designed.The optimal power ratio of 1064- and 1319-nm beams is considered and the fundamental spot size distribution from the output mirror to the two laser rods are calculated and simulated,respectively.As a result,a 589-nm yellow laser with the average output power of 5.7 W is obtained in the experiment when the total pumping power is 695 W.The optical-to-optical conversion efficiency from the fundamental waves to the sum frequency generation is about 15.2% and the pulse width is 150 ns at the repetition rate of 18 kHz.The instability of the yellow laser is also measured,which is less than 2% within 3 h.The beam quality factors are M2x =4.96 and M2y= 5.08.

  17. Wave-Field Shaping in Cavities: Waves Trapped in a Box with Controllable Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Matthieu; del Hougne, Philipp; Fink, Mathias; Lemoult, Fabrice; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2015-07-01

    Electromagnetic cavities are used in numerous domains of applied and fundamental physics, from microwave ovens and electromagnetic compatibility to masers, quantum electrodynamics (QED), and quantum chaos. The wave fields established in cavities are statically fixed by their geometry, which are usually modified by using mechanical parts like mode stirrers in reverberation chambers or screws in masers and QED. Nevertheless, thanks to integral theorems, tailoring the cavity boundaries theoretically permits us to design at will the wave fields they support. Here, we show in the microwave domain that it is achievable dynamically simply by using electronically tunable metasurfaces that locally modify the boundaries, switching them in real time from Dirichlet to Neumann conditions. We prove that at a high modal density, counterintuitively, it permits us to create wave patterns presenting hot spots of intense energy. We explain and model the physical mechanism underlying the concept, which allows us to find a criterion ensuring that modifying parts of a cavity's boundaries turn it into a completely different one. We finally prove that this approach even permits us, in the limiting case where the cavity supports only well-separated resonances, to choose the frequencies at which the latter occur.

  18. Intensity-only measurement of partially uncontrollable transmission matrix: demonstration with wave-field shaping in a microwave cavity

    CERN Document Server

    del Hougne, Philipp; Daudet, Laurent; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-01-01

    Transmission matrices (TMs) have become a powerful and widely used tool to describe and control wave propagation in complex media. In certain scenarios the TM is partially uncontrollable, complicating its identification and use. In standard optical wavefront shaping experiments, uncontrollable reflections or additional sources may be the cause; in reverberating cavities, uncontrollable reflections off the walls have that effect. Here we employ phase retrieval techniques to identify such a partially uncontrollable system's TM solely based on random intensity-only reference measurements. We demonstrate the feasibility of our method by focusing both on a single target as well as on multiple targets in a microwave cavity, using a phase-binary Spatial-Microwave-Modulator.

  19. Fano line-shape control and superluminal light using cavity quantum electrodynamics with a partially transmitting element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Liu, Jiuyang; Ding, Chunling; Wu, Ying

    2016-05-01

    We study the probe-field transmission in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity-QED) systems with a partially transmitting element (PTE), where the PTE is used to control and tune the amplitude of the weak probe field propagating along a single waveguide channel in the structure. We derive analytic formulas utilized to determine the transmission coefficient of the probe field within the framework of quantum optics. Using experimentally accessible parameters, it is clearly shown that the asymmetric Fano-resonance line shape can be formed and manipulated by means of the added PTE. Furthermore, we reveal that there exists superluminal light with large intensity transmission in the transport spectrum of the waveguide-coupled cavity-QED system. This superluminal-light propagation effect, which exhibits the anomalous phase shift and is characterized by the negative group delay, can be enhanced by properly choosing the system parameters. The obtained results may be used for designing switching, modulation, and sensing for nanophotonic applications and ultrafast on-chip signal processing in telecom applications.

  20. Waveguide and articulated arm for Er:YAG laser system: shape and depth of laser cavity in hard dental tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Dostalova, Tatjana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Wang, You; Shi, Yi-Wei; Dolezalova, Libuse; Hamal, Karel; Krejsa, Otakar; Kubelka, Jiri; Prochazka, Stanislav

    1998-04-01

    The aim of our study was to verify the efficiency of delivery systems for Er:YAG laser radiation which could be used in dentistry. The influence of increasing energy and number of pulses on a profile and depth of drilled holes was investigated. Er:YAG laser was operating in a free-running mode, generating a length of pulses 200 microsecond with a maximum energy of 500 mJ. The delivery systems investigated were an articulated arm and a fluorocarbon polymer-coated silver hollow glass waveguide. The prepared hard tissues were a sliced part of enamel, dentine and ivory. The laser radiation was directed on them by focusing optics (CaF2 lens) together with the cooling water to ensure that the tissues will not be burned. For the evaluation of shapes, depth and profiles of the prepared cavities the metallographic microscope, x-ray microtomograph and scanning electron microscope were used. From the results it was observed that the profile and depth of the cavities prepared by the laser radiation delivered by the various systems (waveguide or articulated arm) are not the same. The laser radiation delivered by waveguide produces a larger diameter cavity with a lower depth. The holes are smoother and without side effects.

  1. Performance scaling via passive pulse shaping in cavity-enhanced optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Aleem M; Moses, Jeffrey; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lai, Chien-Jen; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-15

    We show that an enhancement cavity seeded at the full repetition rate of the pump laser can automatically reshape small-signal gain across the interacting pulses in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for close-to-optimal operation, significantly increasing both the gain bandwidth and the conversion efficiency, in addition to boosting gain for high-repetition-rate amplification. Applied to a degenerate amplifier, the technique can provide an octave-spanning gain bandwidth.

  2. Line-Parameter Measurements and Stringent Tests of Line-Shape Models Based on Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielska, Katarzyna; Fleisher, Adam J.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Lin, Hong; Long, David A.; Reed, Zachary D.; Sironneau, Vincent; Truong, Gar-Wing; Wójtewicz, Szymon

    2014-06-01

    Laser methods that are based on cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) are well-suited for measuring molecular line parameters under conditions of low optical density, and as such they are complementary to broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTS) techniques. Attributes of CEAS include relatively low detection limits, accurate and precise detuning axes and high fidelity measurements of line shape. In many cases these performance criteria are superior to those obtained using direct laser absorption spectroscopy and FTS-based systems. In this presentation we will survey several examples of frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS)1 measurements obtained with laser spectrometers developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg Maryland. These experiments, which are motivated by atmospheric monitoring and remote-sensing applications that require high-precision and accuracy, involve nearinfrared transitions of carbon dioxide, water, oxygen and methane. We discuss spectra with signal-to-noise ratios exceeding 106, frequency axes with absolute uncertainties in the 10 kHz to 100 kHz range and linked to a Cs clock, line parameters with relative uncertainties at the 0.2 % level and isotopic ratios measured with a precision of 0.03 %. We also present FS-CRDS measurements of CO2 line intensities which are measured at atmospheric concentration levels and linked to gravimetric standards for CO2 in air, and we quantify pressure-dependent deviations between various theoretical line profiles and measured line shapes. Finally we also present recent efforts to increase data throughput and spectral coverage in CEAS experiments. We describe three new high-bandwidth CEAS techniques including frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy (FARS)2, which enables continuous-wave measurements of cavity mode linewidth and acquisition of ringdown decays with no dead time during laser frequency tuning, heterodyne

  3. Radicular Pain due to Subsidence of the Nitinol Shape Memory Loop for Stabilization after Lumbar Decompressive Laminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung-Chul; Kim, Deog-Ryeong

    2015-01-01

    A number of dynamic stabilization systems have been used to overcome the problems associated with spinal fusion with rigid fixation recently and the demand for an ideal dynamic stabilization system is greater for younger patients with multisegment disc degeneration. Nitinol, a shape memory alloy of nickel and titanium, is flexible at low temperatures and regains its original shape when heated, and the Nitinol shape memory loop (SML) implant has been used as a posterior tension band mostly in decompressive laminectomy cases because the Nitinol implant has various characteristics such as high elasticity and a tensile force, flexibility, and biological compatibility. The reported short-term outcomes of the application of SMLs as posterior column supporters in cervical and lumbar decompressive laminectomies seem to be positive, and complications are minimal except for the rare occurrence of pullout and fracture of the SML. However, there was no report of neurological complications related to neural compression in spite of the use of the loop of SML in the epidural space. The authors report a case of delayed development of radiating pain caused by subsidence of the SML resulting epidural compression. PMID:25674347

  4. The Impact of Magnetomechanical Effects on Ferrite B-H Loop Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baguley, C. A.; Madawala, U. K.; Carsten, B.;

    2012-01-01

    . In this paper, experimental evidence is presented showing a correlation between the asymmetrical nature of vibration due to magnetostriction and figure-eight B-H loops. Based on this evidence, it is proposed that mechanical energy generated during part of a magnetization cycle can be converted to magnetic...

  5. H∞ loop shaping based robust PID controller design and its application for water level control of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A robust PID controller design method was proposed, which was based on PID structured weight function optimization method with linear matrix inequality techniques. By combining static H∞ loop shaping controller synthesis, a robust systematic PID iterative optimization method was given. A PID main controller of steam generator water level control system was designed by using this method. Simulation results show that the control system designed by the given method is of good robust stability and robust performance, and its synthetic control quality is better than the method of full order weight optimization (or PID structured weight optimization mentioned by this paper) combined with normal H∞ controller synthesis. (authors)

  6. Simultaneous and continuous multiple wavelength absorption spectroscopy on nanoliter volumes based on frequency-division multiplexing fiber-loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waechter, Helen; Munzke, Dorit; Jang, Angela; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate a method for measuring optical loss simultaneously at multiple wavelengths with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRD). Phase-shift CRD spectroscopy is used to obtain the absorption of a sample from the phase lag of intensity modulated light that is entering and exiting an optical cavity. We performed dual-wavelength detection by using two different laser light sources and frequency-division multiplexing. Each wavelength is modulated at a separate frequency, and a broadband detector records the total signal. This signal is then demodulated by lock-in amplifiers at the corresponding two frequencies allowing us to obtain the phase-shift and therefore the optical loss at several wavelengths simultaneously without the use of a dispersive element. In applying this method to fiber-loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy, we achieve detection at low micromolar concentrations in a 100 nL liquid volume. Measurements at two wavelengths (405 and 810 nm) were performed simultaneously on two dyes each absorbing at mainly one of the wavelengths. The respective concentrations could be quantified independently in pure samples as well as in mixtures. No crosstalk between the two channels was observed, and a minimal detectable absorbance of 0.02 cm(-1) was achieved at 405 nm. PMID:21355542

  7. Loop Shaping Control Design for a Supersonic Propulsion System Model Using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) Specifications and Bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    This paper covers the propulsion system component modeling and controls development of an integrated mixed compression inlet and turbojet engine that will be used for an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. Using previously created nonlinear component-level propulsion system models, a linear integrated propulsion system model and loop shaping control design have been developed. The design includes both inlet normal shock position control and jet engine rotor speed control for a potential supersonic commercial transport. A preliminary investigation of the impacts of the aero-elastic effects on the incoming flow field to the propulsion system are discussed, however, the focus here is on developing a methodology for the propulsion controls design that prevents unstart in the inlet and minimizes the thrust oscillation experienced by the vehicle. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) specifications and bounds, and aspects of classical loop shaping are used in the control design process. Model uncertainty is incorporated in the design to address possible error in the system identification mapping of the nonlinear component models into the integrated linear model.

  8. Intra-cavity gain shaping of mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Yefet, Shai; Pe'er, Avi

    2015-01-01

    The gain properties of an oscillator strongly affect its behavior. When the gain is homogeneous, different modes compete for gain resources in a `winner takes all' manner, whereas with inhomogeneous gain, modes can coexist if they utilize different gain resources. We demonstrate precise control over the mode competition in a mode locked Ti:sapphire oscillator by manipulation and spectral shaping of the gain properties, thus steering the competition towards a desired, otherwise inaccessible, oscillation. Specifically, by adding a small amount of spectrally shaped inhomogeneous gain to the standard homogeneous gain oscillator, we selectively enhance a desired two-color oscillation, which is inherently unstable to mode competition and could not exist in a purely homogeneous gain oscillator. By tuning the parameters of the additional inhomogeneous gain we flexibly control the center wavelengths, relative intensities and widths of the two colors.

  9. Influence of fourfold anisotropy form on hysteresis loop shape in ferromagnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrmann, Andrea [Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Textile and Clothing Technology, 41065 Mönchengladbach (Germany); Blachowicz, Tomasz [Silesian University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Center for Science and Education, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-08-15

    The dependence of the form of different mathematical depictions of fourfold magnetic anisotropies has been examined, using a simple macro-spin model. Strong differences in longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops occur due to deviations from the usual phenomenological model, such as using absolute value functions. The proposed possible models can help understanding measurements on sophisticated magnetic nanosystems, like exchange bias layered structures employed in magnetic hard disk heads or magnetic nano-particles, and support the development of solutions with specific magnetization reversal behavior needed in novel magneto-electronic devices.

  10. Influence of fourfold anisotropy form on hysteresis loop shape in ferromagnetic nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ehrmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the form of different mathematical depictions of fourfold magnetic anisotropies has been examined, using a simple macro-spin model. Strong differences in longitudinal and transverse hysteresis loops occur due to deviations from the usual phenomenological model, such as using absolute value functions. The proposed possible models can help understanding measurements on sophisticated magnetic nanosystems, like exchange bias layered structures employed in magnetic hard disk heads or magnetic nano-particles, and support the development of solutions with specific magnetization reversal behavior needed in novel magneto-electronic devices.

  11. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  12. Surface quality of extruding metal special-shape products and frictional behavior in optimized die cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Hong-yuan; ZHU Heng-jun

    2004-01-01

    With the help of Complex Function Mapping theory, the complicated three-dimensional deformation problems are transferred into two-dimensional problems, and the function of strain ratio field is analyzed in the metal plastic extruding deformation. Taking the strain-hardening effect of metal deformation into account, the relationship between friction behavior and optimized mathematical model is analyzed by the numerical analysis friction energy dissipation function. As a result, the method of lowering the material hardening and decreasing the reduction ratio over multi-procedures can be used to improve the surface quality of metal special-shape extrusion products.

  13. Messenger RNA Fluctuations and Regulatory RNAs Shape the Dynamics of Negative Feedback Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, María Rodríguez; Tlusty, Tsvi; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Furman, Itay; 10.1103/PhysRevE.81.031924

    2010-01-01

    Single cell experiments of simple regulatory networks can markedly differ from cell population experiments. Such differences arise from stochastic events in individual cells that are averaged out in cell populations. For instance, while individual cells may show sustained oscillations in the concentrations of some proteins, such oscillations may appear damped in the population average. In this paper we investigate the role of RNA stochastic fluctuations as a leading force to produce a sustained excitatory behavior at the single cell level. Opposed to some previous models, we build a fully stochastic model of a negative feedback loop that explicitly takes into account the RNA stochastic dynamics. We find that messenger RNA random fluctuations can be amplified during translation and produce sustained pulses of protein expression. Motivated by the recent appreciation of the importance of non--coding regulatory RNAs in post--transcription regulation, we also consider the possibility that a regulatory RNA transcri...

  14. Shaping of Looped Miniaturized Chalcogenide Fiber Sensing Heads for Mid-Infrared Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Houizot; Marie-Laure Anne; Catherine Boussard-Plédel; Olivier Loréal; Hugues Tariel; Jacques Lucas; Bruno Bureau

    2014-01-01

    Chalcogenide glass fibers are promising photonic tools to develop Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS) optical sensors working in the mid-infrared region. Numerous pioneering works have already been carried out showing their efficiency, especially for bio-medical applications. Nevertheless, this technology remains confined to academic studies at the laboratory scale because chalcogenide glass fibers are difficult to shape to produce reliable, sensitive and compact sensors. In this paper,...

  15. QUANTITATIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF STRESS-STRAIN HYSTERESIS LOOPS OF Cu-Zn-Al SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.F. Guo; Y.Z. Huo; G.T. Zeng; X.T. Zu

    2001-01-01

    A six-parameter mathematical model was introduced to simulate the stress-strain hysteresis and the inner hysteresis of polycrystalline shape memory alloys (SMAs). By comparing with experiments of Cu-Zn-Al SMA, it was shown that the model could be used to calculate the stress-strain relations with rather good accuracy. Moreover,it was found that the six parameters introduced in this paper represented the characteristics of the stress-strain hysteresis of polycrystalline SMA and can be used to characterize the hysteresis quantitatively.

  16. Graded index profiles and loss-induced single-mode characteristics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with petal-shape holey structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu An-Jin; Qu Hong-Wei; Chen Wei; Jiang Bin; Zhou Wen-Jun; Xing Ming-Xin; Zheng Wan-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The 850-nm oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with petal-shape holey structures are presented. An area-weighted average refractive index model is given to analyse their effective index profiles, and the graded index distribution in the holey region is demonstrated. The index step between the optical aperture and the holey region is obtained which is related merely to the etching depth. Four types of holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with different parameters are fabricated as well as the conventional oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. Compared with the conventional oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser without etched holes, the holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser possesses an improved beam quality due to its graded index distribution, but has a lower output power, higher threshold current and lower slope efficiency. With the hole number increased, the holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser can realize the single-mode operation throughout the entire current range, and reduces the beam divergence further. The loss mechanism is used to explain the single-mode characteristic, and the reduced beam divergence is attributed to the shallow etching. High coupling efficiency of 86% to a multi-mode fibre is achieved for the single-mode device in the experiment.

  17. Characteristics of entropy generation and heat transfer in a microchannel with fan-shaped reentrant cavities and internal ribs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA; GuoDong; ZHAI; YuLing; CUI; ZhenZhen

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional laminar fluid flow and heat transfer in a micro heat sink with cavities and internal ribs are investigated us-ing numerical methods. Moreover, according to the second law of thermodynamics, the model of entropy generation is also established for variable cross section of the microchannel. The simulation encompasses Reynolds number of 198-600, relative cavity height e1/Dhvalues of 0-0.65, relative rib height e2/Dhrange of 0-0.2167. The results show that the effect of relative rib height on entropy generation is significant, while the relative cavity height has little effect on it. The combined effect of cavities and ribs in the microchannel has better performance of heat transfer than the smooth microchannel under similar conditions. Extensive simulations are conducted to collect data on the characteristics of heat transfer and fluid flow in a micro heat sink with cavities and internal ribs. Using these data, correlations for Nusselt number and friction factor in terms of Reynolds number and the geometry of cavity and rib have been developed.

  18. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  19. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56 Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices a4 and a7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix a4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix a4) and Gln130 (helix a7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix a4. This local conformational switch of helix a4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution smallmolecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol.

  20. 电解加工异形型腔的试验研究%Experimental Investigation of NC Electrochemical Machining for the Special-shaped Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许越; 干为民

    2013-01-01

    通过数控电解加工的方法,进行了异形型腔的电解加工试验。根据型腔形状设计了专用的加工阴极,讨论了阴极流场分布。通过正交试验获得了最优的加工参数,对加工结果的分析表明:电解加工可获得较好的表面质量,工件表面最大误差仅为0.18 mm,且最大加工速度可达2 mm/min,加工效率比电火花加工快了10倍。%Through the method of NC electrochemical machining technology, we have carried on the machining experiment on the special-shaped cavity. According to the specific-shape of the cavity, the appropriative machining-cathode is designed and the distribution flow field is discussed. Through the orthogonal experiment, the optimal level of machining factors are obtained. The analysis of process-ing results show that NC electrochemical machining technology can get better surface quality, the maxi-mum error in workpiece is only 0.18 mm, and its maximum processing speed can get 2 mm/min. It ’s processing efficiency is ten times faster than the EDM.

  1. Magnetic field effect on natural convection and entropy generation in a half-moon shaped cavity with semi-circular bottom heater having different ferrofluid inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojumder, Satyajit; Rabbi, Khan Md.; Saha, Sourav; Hasan, MN; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-06-01

    In this study magneto-hydrodynamic convection in a half-moon shaped cavity filled with ferrofluid has been analyzed numerically. The cavity has two semi-circular bottom heaters and effect of the distance between these two heaters (λ = 0.1 , 0.4) has been thoroughly investigated. Numerical simulation has been carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh number (Ra =103 ∼107), Hartmann number (Ha = 0 ∼ 100) and inclination angle of magnetic field (γ = 0 ° ∼ 90 °) to understand the flow field, thermal field and entropy generation respectively. Cobalt-kerosene and Fe3 O4 -water ferrofluids are used for the present investigation and considered as a single phase fluid. Galerkin weighted residual method of finite element analysis has been used for numerical solution. The code validation and grid independency test have been carried out to justify the numerical accuracy. It has been observed that increment of magnetic field reduces the heat transfer rate, whereas increment of heater distance augments the heat transfer rate significantly. Results are discussed on the basis of Nusselt number (Nu), Bejan number (Be) and shown by contours and 3D plots. It has also been found that λ = 0.4 always shows better heat transfer rate and entropy optimization.

  2. 5.5 W continuous-wave TEM00-mode Nd:YAG solar laser by a light-guide/2V-shaped pump cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, J.; Liang, D.; Vistas, C. R.; Bouadjemine, R.; Guillot, E.

    2015-12-01

    A significant progress in TEM00-mode solar laser power and efficiency with heliostat-parabolic mirror system is reported here. A double-stage light-guide/2V-shaped pump cavity is used to efficiently couple and redistribute the concentrated pump light from a 2-m-diameter parabolic mirror to a 4-mm-diameter, 30-mm-length, 1.1 at.% Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. The light guide with large rectangular cross section enables a stable uniform pumping profile along the laser rod, resulting also in an enhanced tracking error compensation capacity. 5.5 W cw TEM00-mode solar laser power was measured at the output of a thermally near unstable asymmetric resonator. 150 and 157 % improvement in TEM00-mode solar laser collection efficiency and slope efficiency were obtained, respectively.

  3. Preliminary Characterization of Loop-Shaped Defect in the AlPdMn Icosahedral Quasicrystal by Conventional X-Ray Topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仁卉; 王建波; J. GASTALDI

    2001-01-01

    Loop-shaped contrasts were observed in the as-grown Al70.3Pd2o.6Mn9. 1 icosahedral quasicrystal (IQC) by means of x-ray diffraction topography (Lang's method). One possible direction of the apparent Burger vectors of loopshaped defects (LSDs) was determined to be B = [110101] by the invisibility criterion, whose physical component is parallel to the two-fold axis 1/τ1/0, 1/1, 0/1 of the IQC. Apart from the relaxation of strain fields around the faceted dodecahedral holes and lamellar precipitates, LSDs may well originate from the growth of the quasicrystal, which shows that these defects could be a kind of intrinsic defect in the quasicrystals.

  4. Central safety factor and βN control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary shape modification, using TRANSP for closed loop simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S.; Goumiri, I. R.; Menard, J.

    2015-05-01

    The high-performance operational goals of NSTX-U will require development of advanced feedback control algorithms, including control of βN and the safety factor profile. In this work, a novel approach to simultaneously controlling βN and the value of the safety factor on the magnetic axis, q0, through manipulation of the plasma boundary shape and total beam power, is proposed. Simulations of the proposed scheme show promising results and motivate future experimental implementation and eventual integration into a more complex current profile control scheme planned to include actuation of individual beam powers, density, and loop voltage. As part of this work, a flexible framework for closed loop simulations within the high-fidelity code TRANSP was developed. The framework, used here to identify control-design-oriented models and to tune and test the proposed controller, exploits many of the predictive capabilities of TRANSP and provides a means for performing control calculations based on user-supplied data (controller matrices, target waveforms, etc). The flexible framework should enable high-fidelity testing of a variety of control algorithms, thereby reducing the amount of expensive experimental time needed to implement new control algorithms on NSTX-U and other devices.

  5. The kissing-loop T-shaped structure translational enhancer of Pea enation mosaic virus can bind simultaneously to ribosomes and a 5' proximal hairpin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Gulay, Suna P; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Dinman, Jonathan D; Shapiro, Bruce A; Simon, Anne E

    2013-11-01

    The Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) 3' translational enhancer, known as the kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS), binds to 40S subunits, 60S subunits, and 80S ribosomes, whereas the Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) TSS binds only to 60S subunits and 80S ribosomes. Using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA)-based competition assays, the kl-TSS was found to occupy a different site in the ribosome than the P-site-binding TCV TSS, suggesting that these two TSS employ different mechanisms for enhancing translation. The kl-TSS also engages in a stable, long-distance RNA-RNA kissing-loop interaction with a 12-bp 5'-coding-region hairpin that does not alter the structure of the kl-TSS as revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of the kl-TSS in trans to a luciferase reporter construct containing either wild-type or mutant 5' and 3' PEMV sequences suppressed translation, suggesting that the kl-TSS is required in cis to function, and both ribosome-binding and RNA interaction activities of the kl-TSS contributed to translational inhibition. Addition of the kl-TSS was more detrimental for translation than an adjacent eIF4E-binding 3' translational enhancer known as the PTE, suggesting that the PTE may support the ribosome-binding function of the kl-TSS. Results of in-line RNA structure probing, ribosome filter binding, and high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (hSHAPE) of rRNAs within bound ribosomes suggest that kl-TSS binding to ribosomes and binding to the 5' hairpin are compatible activities. These results suggest a model whereby posttermination ribosomes/ribosomal subunits bind to the kl-TSS and are delivered to the 5' end of the genome via the associated RNA-RNA interaction, which enhances the rate of translation reinitiation. PMID:23986599

  6. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  7. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P21 revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family.

  8. The Kissing-Loop T-Shaped Structure Translational Enhancer of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Can Bind Simultaneously to Ribosomes and a 5′ Proximal Hairpin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Gulay, Suna P.; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    The Pea Enation Mosaic Virus (PEMV) 3′ translational enhancer, known as the kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS), binds to 40S subunits, 60S subunits, and 80S ribosomes, whereas the Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) TSS binds only to 60S subunits and 80S ribosomes. Using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA)-based competition assays, the kl-TSS was found to occupy a different site in the ribosome than the P-site-binding TCV TSS, suggesting that these two TSS employ different mechanisms for enhancing translation. The kl-TSS also engages in a stable, long-distance RNA-RNA kissing-loop interaction with a 12-bp 5′-coding-region hairpin that does not alter the structure of the kl-TSS as revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of the kl-TSS in trans to a luciferase reporter construct containing either wild-type or mutant 5′ and 3′ PEMV sequences suppressed translation, suggesting that the kl-TSS is required in cis to function, and both ribosome-binding and RNA interaction activities of the kl-TSS contributed to translational inhibition. Addition of the kl-TSS was more detrimental for translation than an adjacent eIF4E-binding 3′ translational enhancer known as the PTE, suggesting that the PTE may support the ribosome-binding function of the kl-TSS. Results of in-line RNA structure probing, ribosome filter binding, and high-throughput selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (hSHAPE) of rRNAs within bound ribosomes suggest that kl-TSS binding to ribosomes and binding to the 5′ hairpin are compatible activities. These results suggest a model whereby posttermination ribosomes/ribosomal subunits bind to the kl-TSS and are delivered to the 5′ end of the genome via the associated RNA-RNA interaction, which enhances the rate of translation reinitiation. PMID:23986599

  9. RESONANCE CONTROL FOR THE COUPLED CAVITY LINAC AND DRIFT TUBE LINAC STRUCTURES OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE LINAC USING A CLOSED-LOOP WATER COOLING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardin, J. D. (John D.); Brown, R. L. (Richard L.); Brown, S. K. (Stanley K.); Bustos, G. R. (Gerald R.); Crow, M.L. (Martin L.); Gregory, W. S.; Hood, M. E. (Michael E.); Jurney, J. D. (James D.); Medalen, I. (Ivan); Owen, A. C. (Albert C.); Weiss, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a facility being designed for scientific and industrial research and development. SNS will generate and use neutrons as a diagnostic tool for medical purposes, material science, etc. The neutrons will be produced by bombarding a heavy metal target with a high-energy beam of protons, generated and accelerated with a linear particle accelerator, or linac. The low energy end of the linac consists of two room temperature copper structures, the drift tube linac (DTL), and the coupled cavity linac (CCL). Both of these accelerating structures use large amounts of electrical energy to accelerate the protons to an energy of 185 MeV. Approximately 60-80% of the electrical energy is dissipated in the copper structure and must be removed. This is done using specifically designed water cooling passages within the linac's copper structure. Cooling water is supplied to these cooling passages by specially designed resonance control and water cooling systems.

  10. Recent Progress on High-Current SRF Cavities at Jlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Rimmer, William Clemens, James Henry, Peter Kneisel, Kurt Macha, Frank Marhauser, Larry Turlington, Haipeng Wang, Daniel Forehand

    2010-05-01

    JLab has designed and fabricated several prototype SRF cavities with cell shapes optimized for high current beams and with strong damping of unwanted higher order modes. We report on the latest test results of these cavities and on developments of concepts for new variants optimized for particular applications such as light sources and high-power proton accelerators, including betas less than one. We also report on progress towards a first beam test of this design in the recirculation loop of the JLab ERL based FEL. With growing interest worldwide in applications of SRF for high-average power electron and hadron machines, a practical test of these concepts is highly desirable. We plan to package two prototype cavities in a de-mountable cryomodule for temporary installation into the JLab FEL for testing with RF and beam. This will allow verification of all critical design and operational parameters paving the way to a full-scale prototype cryomodule.

  11. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Hydroforming of Elliptical Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    W. Singer; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area ...

  13. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  14. Surface Plasma Waveguide Filter Based on T-shape Cavity Structure%基于T型腔结构的表面等离子体波导滤波器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Optical fields can be bound at sub-wavelength level by surface plasma polaritons (SPPs) and dif⁃fraction limit can be broken through. SPP is regarded as one of the most hopeful carrier to implement integrated optical devices in nanometer level. A surface plasma waveguide filter with T-shape cavity structure is designed. And its filtering characteristics are analyzed by finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The results show that the center wavelength of transmission spectrum can be changed by the changing of length and width of T-shape cavity. Q values of cavities can be adjusted by changing the distances between cavities and coupling waveguide.%  表面等离子体激元(surface plasmon polaritons, SPPs)能将光场束缚在亚波长量级,可以突破衍射极限,被认为是有希望实现纳米集成光学器件的载体之一。设计了一种T型腔结构的表面等离子体波导滤波器,并且利用时域有限差分(FDTD)法对其滤波特性进行了分析。结果表明,改变T型腔的长度和宽度可以改变透射谱的中心波长,而改变腔与耦合波导之间的间距,则可以调节腔的Q值。

  15. 连续搅拌反应釜过程的闭环增益成形PID控制器设计%PID controller design of closed-loop gain shaping in CSTR process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李述清; 张胜修; 张煜东; 胡波

    2011-01-01

    针对连续搅拌反应釜(CSTR)系统控制问题,设计了一种基于闭环增益成形算法的PID控制器,以提高PID控制器设计的简洁性和鲁棒性.首先假设期望闭环回路传递函数有一阶形式,同时将受控对象的一阶传递函数和PID控制器构成实际闭环回路传递函数.然后,比较期望闭环回路传递函数和实际闭环回路传递函数,即可确定PJD参数.最后,以某CSTR系统为例,利用该方法设计了PID控制器,并通过仿真结果比较,检验了该方法所得PID控制器的良好鲁棒稳定性和动态品质.%To solve the control problem of Continuous-Stirred-Tank-Reactor (CSTR), a straightforward PID design based on closed-loop gain shaping algorithm was proposed in this paper to enhance the simplicity and robustness of PID controller.Firstly, the transfer function of the anticipant closed-loop control system was assumed as a 1st order system, and the actual closed-loop transfer function was consisted of the 1 st order transfer function and PID controller.Then, the anticipated closedloop transfer function was compared with that of the actual closed-loop, thus the PID controller coefficients could be calculated.Finally, the robust PID controller was designed in a CSTR system.The simulation results demonstrate that the PID controller has better robust stability and dynamic performance.

  16. Cavity magnomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  17. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to cavities. Treatment may involve: Fillings Crowns Root canals Dentists fill teeth by removing the decayed tooth ... gold, porcelain, or porcelain attached to metal. A root canal is recommended if the nerve in a tooth ...

  18. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  19. Access cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  20. Compound parabolic concentrator with cavity for tubular absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland

    1983-01-01

    A compond parabolic concentrator with a V-shaped cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity redirects all energy entering between the receiver and the cavity structure onto the receiver, if the optical receiver is emplaced a distance from the cavity not greater than 0.27 r (where r is the radius of the receiver).

  1. Dynamic PID loop control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  2. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  3. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  4. Evaluation of sentinel lymph node size and shape as a predictor of occult metastasis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhans, Linnea; Bilde, Anders; Charabi, Birgitte;

    2013-01-01

    node axis lengths were compared with the histopathological results. Data were analysed using Microsoft Excel 2008 for Mac, version 12.0. A total of 167 sentinel nodes was excised with a median of 3.3 per patient. Following SNB 18% of the patients was upstaged at the subsequent histopathological......The aim of the study was to evaluate sentinel lymph node size as a predictor of metastasis in N0 patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma treated by individual sentinel node biopsy (SNB) guided neck dissection. In addition, to evaluate lymph node shape as an indicator of malignancy....... A retrospective study based on data from 50 patients with clinically N0 neck and oral squamous cell carcinoma stage T1-2N0M0, SNB and consecutive neck dissection was performed. Excised sentinel nodes were measured in three axes by the surgeons before undergoing histopathological examination. Measured sentinel...

  5. Central safety factor and β N control on NSTX-U via beam power and plasma boundary shape modification, using TRANSP for closed loop simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, M. D.; Andre, R.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S.; Goumiri, I. R.; Menard, J.

    2015-04-24

    The high-performance operational goals of NSTX-U will require development of advanced feedback control algorithms, including control of ßN and the safety factor profile. In this work, a novel approach to simultaneously controlling ßN and the value of the safety factor on the magnetic axis, q0, through manipulation of the plasma boundary shape and total beam power, is proposed. Simulations of the proposed scheme show promising results and motivate future experimental implementation and eventual integration into a more complex current profile control scheme planned to include actuation of individual beam powers, density, and loop voltage. As part of this work, a flexible framework for closed loop simulations within the high-fidelity code TRANSP was developed. The framework, used here to identify control-design-oriented models and to tune and test the proposed controller, exploits many of the predictive capabilities of TRANSP and provides a means for performing control calculations based on user-supplied data (controller matrices, target waveforms, etc.). The flexible framework should enable high-fidelity testing of a variety of control algorithms, thereby reducing the amount of expensive experimental time needed to implement new control algorithms on NSTX-U and other devices.

  6. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy of Hydrogen in the 784-852 NM Region and Corresponding Line Shape Implementation Into HITRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yan; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Cunfeng; Liu, An-Wen; Hu, Shui-Ming; Wcislo, Piotr; Kochanov, Roman V.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogen molecule as the most abundant neutral molecule in the universe is an important object of studies in different areas of science, especially astrophysics. The precision spectroscopy of the hydrogen molecule is particularly useful to verify the quantum electrodynamics theory (QED) in a molecular system. The electric quadrupole transitions of the second overtone of H_2 have been recorded with a high precision cavity ring-down spectrometer. A total of eight lines including the extremely weak S3(5) line in the 784-852 nm range have been observed. The line positions have been determined to an accuracy of 3 × 10-4 cm-1 and the line intensities were determined with a relative accuracy of about 1%. The deviations between the experimental and theoretical frequencies are less than 5 × 10-4 cm-1, which is much smaller than the claimed theoretical uncertainty of 0.0025cm-1. The data from this experiment along with other high-quality H_2 spectra have also been analyzed by the Hartmann-Tran profile as a test case for incorporating parametrization of this profile in the HITRAN database. It was incorporated in the new relational structure of the HITRAN database (www.hitran.org) and into the HITRAN Application Programming Interface (HAPI) for the case of H_2 spectra. Tan Y, Wang J, Cheng C-F, Zhao X-Q, Liu A-W, Hu S-M, J Mol Spectrosc 2014;300:60-4; Tran H, Ngo NH, Hartmann J-M, J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;129:199-203; Wcislo P, Gordon IE, Tran H, Tan Y, Hu S-M, Campargue A, et al., Accepted J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015 Rothman LS, Gordon IE, Babikov Y, Barbe A, Chris Benner D, Bernath PF, et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;130:4-50; Kochanov RV, Gordon IE, Rothman LS, Wcislo P, Hill C, Wilzewski JS, Submitted to J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015.

  7. Geometry-Invariant Resonant Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modeling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of its geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected in order to operate at a specific frequency. Here, we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, i.e., resonators whose eigenfrequency is invariant with respect to geometrical deformations. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, which enable decoupling of the time and spatial field variations. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  8. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  9. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological ...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus.......Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...

  10. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  11. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  12. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  13. 湍流脉动压力下椭球声呐腔水动力自噪声分析%Self Noise of Hydrodynamic Component for Ellipsoid-Shaped Sonar Cavity Induced by Turbulent Fluctuating Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭华康; 李天匀; 朱翔

    2011-01-01

    运用统计能量法建立水下椭球壳形状的声呐腔模型.利用计算流体动力学软件计算不同航速下声呐罩表面湍流边界层的分离点,考虑了湍流脉动压力空间分布的不均匀性.分析航速以及不同吸声和阻尼处理方案对声呐腔水动力自噪声的影响.理论评估吸声处理的结果和数值计算的结果比较吻合.研究表明:航速越大,自噪声越大;透声窗面积所占总表面积的比例越小,吸声和阻尼处理的降噪效果越明显;吸声和阻尼处理在中高频段降噪效果更好.研究结果为水下声呐腔水动力自噪声预报和控制提供了参考.%An underwater ellipsoid-shaped sonar cavity model was created by SEA method. The separation position of turbulent boundary layer was calculated with different flow speeds by CFD software, and the spatial distribution of non-uniform for turbulent fluctuating pressure was considered. This paper analyzed the influence of flow speeds and different absorption and damping coatings on the sonar flow-induced self noise. The results of theoretical evaluation for absorption coating agreed with the numerical results. It shows that the greater flow speed is, the greater sonar self noise is. And the smaller percentage the acoustic window area accounts for, the better performance noise reduction for absorption and damping coating will. The results could support the prediction and control of flow-induced noise for underwater sonar cavity.

  14. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  15. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  16. The effect of a cavity on airfoil tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Karn L.; Doolan, Con J.; Kelso, Richard M.

    2014-03-01

    The presence of a cavity in the pressure surface of an airfoil has been found via experiment to play a role in the production of airfoil tones, which was attributed to the presence of an acoustic feedback loop. The cavity length was sufficiently small that cavity oscillation modes did not occur for most of the investigated chord-based Reynolds number range of 70,000-320,000. The airfoil tonal noise frequencies varied as the position of the cavity was moved along a parallel section at the airfoil's maximum thickness: specifically, for a given velocity, the frequency spacing of the tones was inversely proportional to the geometric distance between the cavity and the trailing edge. The boundary layer instability waves considered responsible for the airfoil tones were only detected downstream of the cavity. This may be the first experimental verification of these aspects of the feedback loop model for airfoil tonal noise.

  17. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology.

  18. Circuit model for cavity with a port

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These notes present, by way of an example, the calculation of lumped circuit elements to model a cavity that is connected to a transmission line through a coupling loop. This example is featured in a well-known text. It is adopted here to illustrate the concept and the procedures involved in the calculation of equivalent circuit elements. Its generalization is indicated. (author)

  19. Empirical potential simulations of interstitial dislocation loops in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Prioux, Arno; Fossati, Paul; Maillard, Serge; Jourdan, Thomas; Maugis, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Stoichiometric circular shaped interstitial dislocation loop energies are calculated in stoichiometric UO2 by empirical potential simulation. The Burgers vector directions studied are and . The main structural properties of each type of interstitial dislocation loop are determined, including stacking fault energy. Defect energies are compared and a maximum size for stable dislocation loops before transition to dislocation loops is given. A model of dislocation loop energy based on elasticity theory is then fitted on the basis of these simulation results.

  20. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; Molendijk, John; Timko, Helga; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently configured for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power and lead to saturation. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test a new algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the cavity phase modulation that would minimize klystron forward power.

  1. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  2. H_∞回路成形半挂汽车列车鲁棒控制器设计%H_∞ loop shaping robust controller design for tractor-semitrailer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常胜; 许洪国; 刘宏飞

    2011-01-01

    在路面参考坐标系下建立了半挂汽车列车模型,分析了牵引车侧向位移响应特性。将鲁棒控制理论和算法应用于半挂汽车列车干扰控制的研究。针对开环不稳情况,运用标称受控对象前后加权、规范化左互质因式分解等方法设计了H∞回路成形控制器。该控制器具有良好的鲁棒稳定性,能够稳定有干扰情况下的车辆系统,满足道路条件要求,使侧向偏移量保持在较小数值下。%A model was built for the tractor-semitrailer in the road reference frame to analyze the response of the tractor-semitrailer to the tractor lateral displacement.The robust control theory and algorithm were used to study the disturbance control of the tractor-semitrailer.A H∞ loop-shaping controller was designed by techniques such as the pre-and/or post-weighting of the nominal controlled object and the normalized left coprime faetorization.The designed controller appears to be characterized by a good trade-off between the driving performance and the robust stability,ensuring the driving performance of the tractor-semitrailer under the lateral force disturbance with little lateral track shift.

  3. Efficient Tiled Loop Generation: D-Tiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daegon; Rajopadhye, Sanjay

    Tiling is an important loop optimization for exposing coarse-grained parallelism and enhancing data locality. Tiled loop generation from an arbitrarily shaped polyhedron is a well studied problem. Except for the special case of a rectangular iteration space, the tiled loop generation problem has been long believed to require heavy machinery such as Fourier-Motzkin elimination and projection, and hence to have an exponential complexity. In this paper we propose a simple and efficient tiled loop generation technique similar to that for a rectangular iteration space. In our technique, each loop bound is adjusted only once, syntactically and independently. Therefore, our algorithm runs linearly with the number of loop bounds. Despite its simplicity, we retain several advantages of recent tiled code generation schemes - unified generation for fixed, parameterized and hybrid tiled loops, scalability for multi-level tiled loop generation with the ability to separate full tiles at any levels, and compact code. We also explore various schemes for multi-level tiled loop generation. We formally prove the correctness of our scheme and experimentally validate that the efficiency of our technique is comparable to existing parameterized tiled loop generation approaches. Our experimental results also show that multi-level tiled loop generation schemes have an impact on performance of generated code. The fact that our scheme can be implemented without sophisticated machinery makes it well suited for autotuners and production compilers.

  4. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  5. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  6. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  7. Gravitational back reaction on piecewise linear cosmic string loops

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the metric and affine connection due to a piecewise linear cosmic string loop, and the effect of gravitational back reaction for the Garfinkle-Vachaspati loop with four straight segments. As expected, back reaction reduces the size of the loop, in accord with the energy going into gravitational waves. The "square" loop whose generators lie at right angles evaporates without changing shape, but in all other cases, the kinks become less sharp and segments between kinks become curved. If the loop is close to the square case, the loop will evaporate before its kinks are significantly changed; if it is far from square, the opening out of the kinks is much faster than evaporation of the loop. In more realistic loops, the curvature of the straight segments due to gravitational back reaction may lead to cusps which did not exist in the original shape with the bending of the string concentrated at kinks.

  8. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  9. RF Cavity Design

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2014-01-01

    After a short overview of a general approach to cavity design, we sketch the derivation of waveguide modes from plane waves and of cavity fields from waveguide modes. The characteristic parameters describing cavities and their performance are defined and explained. An equivalent circuit is introduced and extended to explain beam loading and higher order modes. Finally travelling- and standing-wave multi-gap cavities are introduced using the Brillouin diagram.

  10. Dawn of Cavity Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Can-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Merging the progress of spintronics with the advancement in cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity polaritons, a new field of Cavity Spintronics is forming, which connects some of the most exciting modern physics, such as quantum information and quantum optics, with one of the oldest science on the earth, the magnetism.

  11. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  12. Cavities and atomic packing in protein structures and interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrihari Sonavane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of cavities enclosed in a tertiary structure of proteins and interfaces formed by the interaction of two protein subunits in obligate and non-obligate categories (represented by homodimeric molecules and heterocomplexes, respectively is presented. The total volume of cavities increases with the size of the protein (or the interface, though the exact relationship may vary in different cases. Likewise, for individual cavities also there is quantitative dependence of the volume on the number of atoms (or residues lining the cavity. The larger cavities tend to be less spherical, solvated, and the interfaces are enriched in these. On average 15 A(3 of cavity volume is found to accommodate single water, with another 40-45 A(3 needed for each additional solvent molecule. Polar atoms/residues have a higher propensity to line solvated cavities. Relative to the frequency of occurrence in the whole structure (or interface, residues in beta-strands are found more often lining the cavities, and those in turn and loop the least. Any depression in one chain not complemented by a protrusion in the other results in a cavity in the protein-protein interface. Through the use of the Voronoi volume, the packing of residues involved in protein-protein interaction has been compared to that in the protein interior. For a comparable number of atoms the interface has about twice the number of cavities relative to the tertiary structure.

  13. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  14. Blasting practices in a quarry with karstic cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The blasting practices in a limestone quarry with karstic cavities have been presented. The existence of karstic cavities in the quarry has reduced blasting efficiency significantly. In order to improve blasting efficiency different blasting strategies (loading holes with ANFO in plastic bag, recording cavity location along the holes and charging the holes according to this information, and modifying blasting pattern according to karstic cavities) had been implemented and the results were evaluated on per ton cost basis. It was concluded that efficient blasting in such aquarries requires determining the size and shape of karstic cavities and based on this information, to modify the blast pattern and charge the holes. The suggested method is to record the cavity along the drill hole and to generate 3D model of cavities. By doing this, the production cost in the limestone quarry has decreased from 0.407 $/t to 0.354 $/t.

  15. Present status of superconducting cavity developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-11-01

    An R and D work of a superconducting (SC) cavity for the high intensity proton linac has begun at JAERI in collaboration with KEK. The RF field calculation and the structural analysis have been made to determine the cavity shape in the proton energy range between 100 and 1500 MeV. The results indicate the feasibility of a SC proton linac. A vertical test stand with clean room, water rinsing system, cavity evacuation pumping system, cryostat and data acquisition system has been installed to demonstrate the cavity performance. A single cell cavity of {beta}=0.5 has been fabricated and tested at the test stand to obtain the Q-value and the maximum surface electric field strength. The measured Q-values have been found to be high enough for our requirement while the field strength was limited to about 75% of the specification by the multipacting. We describe the preliminary design of the SC cavity, the overview of the vertical test stand and experimental results of the single cell cavity. (author)

  16. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  17. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Butterworth, A; Molendijk, J; Tuckmantel, J

    2012-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently setup for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading eects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would push the klystrons to saturation. For beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will be not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test an iterative algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the optimal phase modulation for klystron forward power considerations.

  18. A Shape-Persistent Cryptand for Capturing Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Feng; Hu, Wen-Jing; Liu, Yahu A; Zhao, Xiao-Li; Li, Jiu-Sheng; Jiang, Biao; Wen, Ke

    2016-07-01

    A shape-persistent cryptand 1, containing two face-to-face oriented electron-deficient 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine units separated by approximately 7 Å, and bridged by two rigid 1,8-naphthyridine linkers and a pentaethylene oxide loop, is created for capturing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Cryptand 1 formed 1:1 complexes with PAH guest molecules, such as phenanthrene (6), anthracene (7), pyrene (8), triphenylene (9), and tetraphene (10). The single-crystal structure of complex 6⊂1 revealed that 6 was included in the cavity of 1 via face-to-face π···π stacking interactions. Soaking crystalline 1 in a toluene solution of anthracene resulted in anthracene from the toluene solution being picked up by the crystalline solid of 1. PMID:27258531

  19. Gravitational smoothing of kinks on cosmic string loops

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effect of gravitational back reaction on cosmic string loops with kinks, which is an important determinant of the shape, and thus the potential observability, of string loops which may exist in the universe today. Kinks are not rounded off, but may be straightened out. In some loops, symmetries prevent even this process, so that the loop evaporates in a self-similar fashion and the kinks are unchanged. As an example, we give results for the rectangular Garfinkle-Vachaspati loop.

  20. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  1. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  2. Stability for the Electromagnetic Scattering from Large Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Gang; Yun, KiHyun

    2016-06-01

    Consider the scattering of electromagnetic waves from a large rectangular cavity embedded in the infinite ground plane. There are two fundamental polarizations for the scattering problem in two dimensions: TM (transverse magnetic) and TE (transverse electric). In this paper, new stability results for the cavity problems are established for large rectangular shape cavities in both polarizations. For the TM cavity problem, an asymptotic property of the solution and a stability estimate with an improved dependence on the high wavenumber are derived. In the TE case, the first stability result is established with an explicit dependence on the wave number.

  3. Retention proposal in complex cavities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alvarez Rodríguez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental Operatory is the main structure in which Odontology lies. It is not an easy discipline that gives enjoyable results with little effort due to the difficulties that a correct reconstruction of a destroyed dental element offers.The frequency with which pulpar injury occurs while anchoring additional retainers in complex cavities, the technical difficulties the lack of these devices cause and the need to simplify dental procedures lead this study to show the advantages to substitute additional retainers for a retainer surcus. Method: An observational descriptive study was applied to 53 patients(42% of the universe , sample which was selected by means of a simple randomized sample . From a proximal-occlusal cavity, the preparations were extended in a box-like shape towards the bucal or lingual region and the additional retainers were substituted for a surcus which was performed in the gingival wall of the preparation. Calcium Hydroxide of rapid dryness was used as a cavity cover and Policarboxilate cement as a base; then the amalgam restoration was performed. The number of restorations were studied taking into account the patient´s age and the failures due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were assessed taking into consideration the patient´s age and a one- year follow up. Results: Most of the amalgam restorations were performed in patients aged from 35 to 59 years and the relative frequencies due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were very low. Conclusion: The substitution of additional retainers for a retainer surcus in complex cavities of vital molars showed to be advantageous because it guarantees a less degree of pulpar damage and less pulpar damage.

  4. Unidirectional superscattering by multilayered cavities of effective radial anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Shi, Jianhua; Hu, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    We achieve unidirectional forward superscattering by multilayered spherical cavities which are effectively radially anisotropic. It is demonstrated that, relying on the large effective anisotropy, the electric and magnetic dipoles can be tuned to spectrally overlap in such cavities, which satisfies the Kerker's condition of simultaneous backward scattering suppression and forward scattering enhancement. We show such scattering pattern shaping can be obtained in both all-dielectric and plasmonic multilayered cavities, and believe that the mechanism we have revealed provides extra freedom for scattering shaping, which may play a significant role in many scattering related applications and also in optoelectronic devices made up of intrinsically anisotropic two dimensional materials.

  5. Millimeter-long fiber Fabry-Perot cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Konstantin; Garcia, Sebastien; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5 mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem.

  6. Millimeter-long Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Konstantin; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem.

  7. Study of Cavity Imperfection Impact on RF-Parameters and Multipole Components in a Superconducting RF-Dipole Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Olave, R G; Delayen, Jean Roger; De Silva, S U; Li, Z

    2014-01-01

    The ODU/SLAC superconducting rf-dipole cavity is under consideration for the crab-crossing system in the upcoming LHC luminosity upgrade. While the proposed cavity complies well within the rf-parameters and multipolar component restrictions for the LHC system, cavity imperfections arising from cavity fabrication, welding and frequency tuning may have a significant effect in these parameters. We report on an initial study of the impact of deviation from the ideal shape on the cavity’s performance in terms of rf-parameters and multipolar components.

  8. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  9. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  10. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  11. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  12. Superconducting RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    It was 20 years ago when the research and development programme for LEP superconducting cavities was initiated. It lasted about 10 years. Today, my aim is not to tell you in great detail about the many innovations made thanks to our research, but I would like to point out some milestones in the development of superconducting cavities where Emilio's influence was particularly important.

  13. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  14. Ferrite loaded rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of a ferrite-loaded rf cavity is explained from the point of view of its operation. Then, an analysis of the automatic cavity-tuning system is presented using the transfer function; and a systematic analysis of a beam-feedback system using transfer functions is also presented. (author)

  15. K-loops: Loop Transformations for Reconfigurable Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragomir, O.S.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is on kernel loops (K-loops), which are loop nests that contain hardware mapped kernels in the loop body. In this thesis, we propose methods for improving the performance of such K-loops, by using standard loop transformations for exposing and exploiting the coarse gr

  16. Passivated niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  17. Loop functions in thermal QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Vairo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We discuss divergences of loop functions in thermal QCD and compute perturbatively the Polyakov loop, the Polyakov loop correlator and the cyclic Wilson loop. We show how these functions get mixed under renormalization.

  18. Loop functions in thermal QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss divergences of loop functions in thermal QCD and compute perturbatively the Polyakov loop, the Polyakov loop correlator and the cyclic Wilson loop. We show how these functions get mixed under renormalization.

  19. Investigation of vortical flow over bluff bodies with base cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Cheng Pan; Jin-Sheng Cai

    2012-01-01

    Based on our previous research about drag reduction in term of the base cavity length using two dimensional simulations,this paper describes a numerical study of a bluff body of which the number of base cavities is successively increased and the cavity geometries are also modified to assume different shapes.Here we attempt to find an effective configuration to reduce the drag by increasing the number of base cavities.The numerical simulations examining varied number of base cavities reveal the presence of different strength of vortices in the wake zone which is the reason why the drag coefficients are distinctly different for different cases.In the case with double and triple rectangular cavities,we use the pressure contours snapshots at successive time instants to describe the wake evolution.We further investigate the effect of variable base cavity shapes for a constant cavity length at an identical time instant.A total of two different geometries of base cavities are discussed here:the rectangular and the sinusoidal cavities with sharp and rounded trailing edges,respectively.The numerical results reveal that the former is an effective drag reduction configuration which can produce a significant base pressure recovery corresponding to the strength of the vortices shown in the pressure contour figures.While the latter shows no obvious reduction in drag coefficient and a similar intensity of vortex in the wake zone compared with the unmodified case.Reductions in drag are observed for all the investigated cavity configurations,and additionally it is found that the magnitude of the reduction bears a direct relationship with the number of the cavities up to a certain minimum value.

  20. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  1. Fermilab linac upgrade side coupled cavity temperature control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Each cavity section has a temperature control system which maintains the resonant frequency by exploiting the 17.8 ppm/degree C frequency sensitivity of the copper cavities. Each accelerating cell has a cooling tube brazed azimuthally to the outside surface. Alternate supply and return connection to the water manifolds reduce temperature gradients and maintain physical alignment of the cavity string. Special tubing with spiral inner fins and large flow rate are used to reduce the film coefficient. Temperature is controlled by mixing chilled water with the water circulating between the cavity and the cooling skid located outside the radiation enclosure. Chilled water flow is regulated with a valve controlled by a local microcomputer. The temperature loop set point will be obtained from a slower loop which corrects the phase error between the cavity section and the rf drive during normal beam loaded conditions. Time constants associated with thermal gradients induced in the cavity with the rf power require programming it to the nominal 7.1 MW level over a 1 minute interval to limit the reverse power. 4 refs., 4 figs

  2. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  3. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  4. Quantum Dynamics of Nonlinear Cavity Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nation, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of three different configurations of nonlinear cavity systems. To begin, we carry out a quantum analysis of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) mechanical displacement detector comprised of a SQUID with a mechanically compliant loop segment. The SQUID is approximated by a nonlinear current-dependent inductor, inducing a flux tunable nonlinear Duffing term in the cavity equation of motion. Expressions are derived for the detector signal and noise response where it is found that a soft-spring Duffing self-interaction enables a closer approach to the displacement detection standard quantum limit, as well as cooling closer to the ground state. Next, we make use of a superconducting transmission line formed from an array of dc-SQUIDs for investigating analogue Hawking radiation. Biasing the array with a space-time varying flux modifies the propagation velocity of the transmission line, leading to an effective metric with a horizon. This setup allows for quan...

  5. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  6. Loops and trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron-Huot, S.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate relations between loop and tree amplitudes in quantum field theory that involve putting on-shell some loop propagators. This generalizes the so-called Feynman tree theorem which is satisfied at 1-loop. Exploiting retarded boundary conditions, we give a generalization to ℓ-loop expressing the loops as integrals over the on-shell phase space of exactly ℓ particles. We argue that the corresponding integrand for ℓ > 2 does not involve the forward limit of any physical tree amplitude, except in planar gauge theories. In that case we explicitly construct the relevant physical amplitude. Beyond the planar limit, abandoning direct integral representations, we propose that loops continue to be determined implicitly by the forward limit of physical connected trees, and we formulate a precise conjecture along this line. Finally, we set up technology to compute forward amplitudes in supersymmetric theories, in which specific simplifications occur.

  7. Diffusion of Wilson Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Brzoska, A. M.; Lenz, F.; Negele, J. W.; Thies, M.

    2004-01-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the distribution of Wilson loops in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is presented in which Wilson loop distributions are described as the result of a diffusion process on the group manifold. It is shown that, in the absence of forces, diffusion implies Casimir scaling and, conversely, exact Casimir scaling implies free diffusion. Screening processes occur if diffusion takes place in a potential. The crucial distinction between screening of fundamental and adjoint loops i...

  8. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8202397: View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  9. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  10. Moving Detectors in Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Obadia, N

    2007-01-01

    We consider two-level detectors, coupled to a quantum scalar field, moving inside cavities. We highlight some pathological resonant effects due to abrupt boundaries, and decide to describe the cavity by switching smoothly the interaction by a time-dependent gate-like function. Considering uniformly accelerated trajectories, we show that some specific choices of non-adiabatic switching have led to hazardous interpretations about the enhancement of the Unruh effect in cavities. More specifically, we show that the emission/absorption ratio takes arbitrary high values according to the emitted quanta properties and to the transients undergone at the entrance and the exit of the cavity, {\\it independently of the acceleration}. An explicit example is provided where we show that inertial and uniformly accelerated world-lines can even lead to the same ``pseudo-temperature''.

  11. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  12. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  13. The Test of LLRF control system on superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhenglong; Wen, Lianghua; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Ruifeng; Gao, Zheng; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    The first generation Low-Level radio frequency(LLRF) control system independently developed by IMPCAS, the operating frequency is 162.5MHz for China ADS, which consists of superconducting cavity amplitude stability control, phase stability control and the cavity resonance frequency control. The LLRF control system is based on four samples IQ quadrature demodulation technique consisting an all-digital closed-loop feedback control. This paper completed the first generation of ADS LLRF control system in the low-temperature superconducting cavities LLRF stability and performance online tests. Through testing, to verify the performance of LLRF control system, to analysis on emerging issues, and in accordance with the experimental data, to summarize LLRF control system performance to accumulate experience for the future control of superconducting cavities.

  14. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  15. Spindle cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D DeLacure

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Spindle cell carcinoma (SpCC is a unique variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. SpCC confined to the nasal cavity is extremely rare, with only one case having been previously reported. We present a case report of nasal cavity SpCC and review the literature on this rare entity. A 29-year-old male presented with intermittent epistaxis from the left nasal cavity. On physical examination, the patient had an ulcerated mass in the left nasal vestibule and a biopsy showed a proliferation of spindle and epitheliod cells. The patient underwent wide local excision of the mass via a lateral alotomy approach and reconstruction with a composite conchal bowl skin and cartilage graft. Histologically, the mass had dyplastic squamous epithelium and spindle-shaped cells admixed with epitheliod cells. Immunohistochemistry was only positive for pancytokeratin AE1/AE3 and vimentin. Six months after surgery, the patient continues to have no evidence of disease. On literature review, only one previous case of SpCC confined to the nasal cavity was identified. We present a rare case of nasal cavity SpCC. No definite treatment protocol exists for this unique entity, but we believe that this tumor should primarily be treated with aggressive, wide local excision. Adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy have also been used anecdotally.

  16. Neutron transport in irradiation loops (IRENE loop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is composed of two parts with different aspects. Part one is a technical description of the loop and its main ancillary facilities as well as of the safety and operational regulations. The measurement methods on the model of the ISIS reactor and on the loop in the OSIRIS reactor are described. Part two deals with the possibility of calculating the powers dissipated by each rod of the fuel cluster, using appropriate computer codes, not only in the reflector but also in the core and to suggest a method of calculation

  17. Loop Quantum Cosmology from Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We show how Loop Quantum Cosmology can be derived as an effective semiclassical description of Loop Quantum Gravity. Using the tools of QRLG, a gauge fixed version of LQG, we take the coherent states of the fundamental microscopic theory suitable to describe a Bianchi I Universe and we find a mapping between the expectation value of the Hamiltonian and the dynamics of LQC. Our results are in agreement with a lattice refinement framework for LQC, thus the so called ``old'' and ``improved-dynam...

  18. Robust PID Design Based on Static H∞ Loop-Shaping Method for Steam Generator Water Level Control%基于静态H∞-回路成形方法的蒸汽发生器水位鲁棒PID设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周世梁; 刘玉燕; 段锋

    2012-01-01

    The problem for control of steam generator water level is complex because its complicated shrink and parameters of its model vary with operation conditions. Static H∞loop shaping is used to design the robust PID controller for the steam generator. Simulation results show that the control efficiency of this scheme is better than that of the other three H∞loop shaping based methods, and the derived controller has good reference tracking capability, distribution rejection ability and acceptable control performance at different operation points.%核电厂蒸汽发生器(SG)水位存在“收缩”与“膨胀”的逆动力学效应、随运行功率而变化的动力学特性,对其水位控制系统在各种工况下的调节品质要求较高.本研究基于静态H∞-回路成形方法设计SG水位的鲁棒比例积分微分( PID)控制器.仿真结果证实该方法所设计的鲁棒PID控制器的有效性优于其他3种基于H∞-回路成形方法设计的控制器,所得的鲁棒PID控制器具有良好的给定值跟踪、抗干扰性能,并能在负荷变化的情况下保持较好的控制能力.

  19. RF design and characterisation of Indus-1 RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new capacitive loaded torrespherical RF cavity at 31.613 MHz was designed, developed and tested for INDUS-1 storage ring. The torrespherical shape is chosen because of its compactness and simplicity in fabrication. The new cavity is made of Stainless Steel and its internal surface is plated with copper to reduce the power loss. The cavity is capable of handling 30 kV gap voltage with calculated 0.635 MΩ shunt impedance. This cavity is equipped with three tuners for the frequency tuning during operation with measured tuning range of ±45 kHz with each tuner. Low power RF characterization and cavity tuning was carried out for this RF cavity. New INDUS-1 RF cavity had been tested up to 1.6 kW RF power during high power RF testing. The new RF cavity in INDUS-1 storage ring has been successfully commissioned and beam current up to 150 mA has been stored at 450 MeV. This paper describes the design feature, low power RF characterisation and high power testing of the new INDUS-1 RF cavity. (author)

  20. Mode-locked pulse oscillation of a self-resonating enhancement optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hosaka, Yuji; Kosuge, Atsushi; Omori, Tsunehiko; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Tohru; Uesugi, Yuuki; Urakawa, Junji; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A power enhancement optical cavity is a compelling means of realizing a pulsed laser with a high peak power and a high repetition frequency, which is not feasible by using a simple amplifier scheme. However, a precise feedback system is necessary for maintaining the narrow resonance condition of the optical cavity, and has become a major technical issue in developing such cavities. We developed a new approach that does not require any active feedback system, by placing the cavity in the outer loop of a laser amplifier. We report on the first demonstration of a mode-locked pulse oscillation using the new system.

  1. Water loop for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedures used to operate the water loop of the Institute of Nuclear Enginering (IEN) in Brazil are presented. The aim is to help future operators of the training water loop in the operation technique and in a better comprehension of the phenomena occured during the execution of an experience. (E.G.)

  2. What Controls DNA Looping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Perez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The looping of DNA provides a means of communication between sequentially distant genomic sites that operate in tandem to express, copy, and repair the information encoded in the DNA base sequence. The short loops implicated in the expression of bacterial genes suggest that molecular factors other than the naturally stiff double helix are involved in bringing the interacting sites into close spatial proximity. New computational techniques that take direct account of the three-dimensional structures and fluctuations of protein and DNA allow us to examine the likely means of enhancing such communication. Here, we describe the application of these approaches to the looping of a 92 base-pair DNA segment between the headpieces of the tetrameric Escherichia coli Lac repressor protein. The distortions of the double helix induced by a second protein—the nonspecific nucleoid protein HU—increase the computed likelihood of looping by several orders of magnitude over that of DNA alone. Large-scale deformations of the repressor, sequence-dependent features in the DNA loop, and deformability of the DNA operators also enhance looping, although to lesser degrees. The correspondence between the predicted looping propensities and the ease of looping derived from gene-expression and single-molecule measurements lends credence to the derived structural picture.

  3. RESEARCH ON THE FLOW PROPERTY IN THREE DIMENSIONAL CAVITY OF MICRO-CHANNEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The vortical property in a three dimensional cavity of micro-channel flow, which is very important, was investigated numerically. The results show that the rotation direction of vortex in the cavity depends on the dimension and shape of the cavity as well as the viscosity of the fluid. With the dimension and shape of the cavity fixed, there exists a critical inlet velocity. When the inlet velocity is less than the critical value, the rotation direction of vortex in the cavity will change. The critical velocity is directly proportional to the viscosity of the fluid, and inversely proportional to square of the thickness, length and depth of cavity. For the ratio of length and depth of cavity equals to one, there is a critical dimensionless parameter Re(cr), when R(e) is less than Re(cr), the rotation direction of vortex will change too. Re(cr) is equal to 11.8 approximately.

  4. Design of ERL Spoke Cavity For Non-Destructive Assay Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, M.; Nagai, R.; Nishimori, N.; Hajima, R.

    2015-10-01

    We are proposing non-destructive assay system of nuclear materials with laser Compton scattering combined with an energy-recovery linac (ERL) and a laser. Since constructing accelerator system for nuclear safe guard and security requires small cavities, spoke cavities have many advantages such as shortening the distance between cavities, small frequency detune due to micro-phonics and easy adjustment of field distribution for strong cell coupling. Calculations of optimized cavity shape and HOM coupler shape have been performed and rf properties with aluminum spoke cavity model have been also measured. Considering refrigerator system required for superconducting accelerator, we are planning to develop 325MHz spoke cavity which can be practically operated with 4K liquid helium. We have started to fabricate the niobium one-spoke cavity.

  5. Experiment and Results on Plasma Etching of SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Janardan [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Im, Do [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Peshl, J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Vuskovic, Leposova [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Popovic, Svetozar [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Valente, Anne-Marie [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Phillips, H. Lawrence [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The inner surfaces of SRF cavities are currently chemically treated (etched or electropolished) to achieve the state of the art RF performance. We designed an apparatus and developed a method for plasma etching of the inner surface for SRF cavities. The process parameters (pressure, power, gas concentration, diameter and shape of the inner electrode, temperature and positive dc bias at inner electrode) are optimized for cylindrical geometry. The etch rate non-uniformity has been overcome by simultaneous translation of the gas point-of-entry and the inner electrode during the processing. A single cell SRF cavity has been centrifugally barrel polished, chemically etched and RF tested to establish a baseline performance. This cavity is plasma etched and RF tested afterwards. The effect of plasma etching on the RF performance of this cavity will be presented and discussed.

  6. Apparatus and method for plasma processing of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Peshl, J; Bašović, M; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vuškovića, L

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for plasma etching of the inner surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Accelerator SRF cavities are formed into a variable-diameter cylindrical structure made of bulk niobium, for resonant generation of the particle accelerating field. The etch rate non-uniformity due to depletion of the radicals has been overcome by the simultaneous movement of the gas flow inlet and the inner electrode. An effective shape of the inner electrode to reduce the plasma asymmetry for the coaxial cylindrical rf plasma reactor is determined and implemented in the cavity processing method. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise way to establish segmented plasma columns. The test structure was a pillbox cavity made of steel of similar dimension to the standard SRF cavity. This was adopted to experimentally verify the plasma surface reaction on cylindrical structures with variable diameter using the segment...

  7. 天津高银117大厦异形多腔体巨型钢柱施工分段研究%Construction Phase Segmentation Research of Special-shaped Multi-cavity Giant Steel Columns of Tianjin Gaoyin 117 Mansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏; 戴立先; 朱邵辉; 宫健; 吕黄兵; 胡宜婷

    2012-01-01

    天津高银117大厦地下室巨型钢柱平面尺寸和用钢量特别大.地下室阶段单根钢柱高度19.25m,质量约1 800t,平面最大尺寸24m×22.5m,最大截面积180m2,分为26个腔体单元.单根巨型钢柱的体量及尺寸在国内钢结构施工领域均前所未有,钢柱的施工分段及现场拼装焊接的难度非常大.阐述在施工中所采用的巨型钢柱施工方法及依据,指出此类异形多腔体巨型钢构件的施工分段需综合考虑多方面因素,寻求最平衡方案.%The basement giant steel column of Tianjin Gaoyin 117 Mansion building, whose plan size and the steel use of volume are particularly huge. The basement' s single steel column height is 19. 25 meters, weight is 1 800 tons,the largest plan size is 24 meters by 22. 5 meters,the biggest cross sectional area is 180 square meters, which is divided into 26 cavity units. The volume and size of single steel column both are unprecedented in the domestic steel structure construction field, the scene of assembling segmented sub-section and assembly welding are very difficult. The authors describe the method of giant column assembling segmented sub-section. It is pointed out that comprehensive factors should be considered for this special-shaped multi-cavity giant steel columns to find the most balance scheme.

  8. A STUDY OF MORPHOLOGY OF THE GLENOID CAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gursharan Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: A morphometric study of the glenoid cavity of 80 adult dry human scapulae in North Indian Population was done to evaluate the various parameters of the glenoid cavity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was done on 80 dry, unpaired adult human scapulae (41 right & 39 left of unknown sex belonging to the North Indian population. Maximum superior-inferior diameter and Maximum anterior-posterior diameter of the glenoid cavity were measured and Glenoid cavity index was calculated. The shape of the glenoid cavity was classified as inverted comma shaped, pear shaped and oval shaped depending upon the presence or absence of a notch on the glenoid rim. RESULTS: The average superior-inferior diameter on right and the left sides were 34.13±3.16 mm and 34.11± 2.57 mm respectively. The average anterior-posterior diameter of the right glenoid was 24.05± 2.86 mm and that of the left was 23.36 ± 2.22 mm. The average glenoid cavity index on the right was 70.37 ± 4.08 and that of left was 68.59 ± 4.36. All values were compared with series of other workers to draw the conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: All the parameters showed a greater value for the right side. The difference seen between the values of present study and that of other workers could be explained on the basis of ethnic and racial variations. This fact may be taken into consideration while performing shoulder arthroplasty and designing glenoid prostheses in North Indian population. The current study recorded 80% of glenoid cavities having the glenoid notch, which could be useful while diagnosing different pathologies of the shoulder joint. Thus a sound knowledge of various parameters of the glenoid cavity is important for the anatomists, anthropologists, orthopaedicians and prosthetists

  9. Polymer indentation: Numerical analysis and comparison with a spherical cavity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Needleman, A.

    2011-01-01

    found to be smaller for sharper indenters. The calculated values of both the nominal and true hardness do not differ significantly for the two indenter shapes. An expanding spherical cavity model is also considered and the predictions of this model are compared with the finite element results for...... various indenter shapes and indentation rates. The spherical cavity model is found to give fairly good agreement with the predictions of the finite element analyses for the nominal polymer hardness for both indenter shapes....

  10. Direct numerical simulation of flow past cactus--shaped cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Pradeep; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2006-11-01

    The Saguaro cacti are tall, have short root systems and can withstand high wind velocities (Bulk 1984, Talley et al. 2002). Their trunks are essentially cylindrical with V--shaped longitudinal cavities. The size and number of cavities on the Saguaro cacti vary so that they have a near--constant fraction cavity depth (l/D ratio of about 0.07, Geller & Nobel 1984). Direct numerical simulations is used to assess the aerodynamic effect of the grooves on the cactus. DNS is performed for cactus shaped cylinders with l/d ratio's of 0.07 and 0.105, and smooth cylinders (l/d=0) at the same Reynolds number. Presence of the V--shaped cavities is found to decrease the drag on the cylindrical trunk as well as affect the fluctuating lift forces. The talk will quantify these differences, and discuss the physical mechanisms by which V--shaped cavities on the surface influence the flow.

  11. A method based on potential theory for calculating air cavity formation of an air cavity resistance reduction ship

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun-bo; WU Xiao-yu; MA Yong; WANG Jin-guang

    2008-01-01

    This research is intended to provide academic reference and design guidance for further studies to determine the most effective means to reduce a ship's resistance through an air-cavity.On the basis of potential theory and on the assumption of an ideal and irrotational fluid,this paper drives a method for calculating air cavity formation using slender ship theory then points out the parameters directly related to the formation of air cavities and their interrelationships.Simulations showed that the formation of an air cavity is affected by cavitation number,velocity,groove geometry and groove size.When the ship's velocity and groove structure are given,the cavitation number must be within range to form a steady air cavity.The interface between air and water forms a wave shape and could be adjustedby an air injection system.

  12. Torsion of elliptical composite bars containing neutral coated cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using complex variable methods and conformal mapping techniques, we establish the existence of coated cavities of various shapes that do not disturb the warping function in a host elliptical bar. These cavities are known as ‘partly neutral cavities’. Our results show that the two axes corresponding to the neutral elliptical coating are parallel to those of the host elliptical bar and that the centre of the elliptical coating can be located arbitrarily on the major axis of the host bar. Examples of neutral coated non-elliptical cavities are provided.

  13. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  14. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  15. Heat Transfer with Flow and Phase Change in an Evaporator of Miniature Flat Plate Capillary Pumped Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongmin WAN; Wei LIU; Zhaoqing ZHENG; A. Nakayama

    2007-01-01

    An overall two-dimensional numerical model of the miniature flat plate capillary pumped loop (CPL) evaporator is developed to describe the liquid and vapor flow, heat transfer and phase change in the porous wick structure,liquid flow and heat transfer in the compensation cavity and heat transfer in the vapor grooves and metallic wall.The entire evaporator is solved with SIMPLE algorithm as a conjugate problem. The effect of heat conduction of metallic side wall on the performance of miniature flat plate CPL evaporator is analyzed, and side wall effect heat transfer limit is introduced to estimate the performance of evaporator. The shape and location of vapor-liquid interface inside the wick are calculated and the influences of applied heat flux, liquid subcooling, wick material and metallic wall material on the evaporator performance are investigated in detail. The numerical results obtained are useful for the miniature flat plate evaporator performance optimization and design of CPL.

  16. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Schlessinger

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested

  17. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-07-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  18. Decreased vibrational susceptibility of Fabry-Perot cavities via designs of geometry and structural support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Tao; Li Wen-Bo; Zang Er-Jun; Chen Li-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-stable optical cavities are widely used for laser frequency stabilization. In these experiments the laser performance relies on the length stability of the Fabry-Perot cavities. Vibration-induced deformation is one of the dominant factors that affect the stability of ultra-stable optical cavities. We have quantitatively analysed the elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities with various shapes and mounting configurations. Our numerical result facilitates a novel approach for the design of ultra-stable cavities that are insensitive to vibrational perturbations. This approach can be applied to many experiments such as laser frequency stabilization, high-precision laser spectroscopy, and optical frequency standards.

  19. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  20. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  1. Blind loop syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  2. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  3. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  4. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  5. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8302397: View from the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138. Giacomo Primadei stands on the left.

  6. Statistical electromagnetics: Complex cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2008-01-01

    A selection of the literature on the statistical description of electromagnetic fields and complex cavities is concisely reviewed. Some essential concepts, for example, the application of the central limit theorem and the maximum entropy principle, are scrutinized. Implicit assumptions, biased choic

  7. Laser cavity modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Damakoa, I.; Audounet, J.; Bouyssou, G.; Vassilieff, G.

    1993-01-01

    Two approachs of modelling nonhomogeneous cavity laser are presented. They are based on the beam propagation method which allows the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT). The resulting procedures provide selfconsistent solutions to the Maxwell and diffusion equations. Results are given to illustrate the two methods.


  8. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  9. What Controls DNA Looping?

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Pamela J.; Nicolas Clauvelin; Grosner, Michael A.; Colasanti, Andrew V.; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-01-01

    The looping of DNA provides a means of communication between sequentially distant genomic sites that operate in tandem to express, copy, and repair the information encoded in the DNA base sequence. The short loops implicated in the expression of bacterial genes suggest that molecular factors other than the naturally stiff double helix are involved in bringing the interacting sites into close spatial proximity. New computational techniques that take direct account of the three-dimensional stru...

  10. Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Rovelli Carlo

    1997-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (...

  11. Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Reduced Loop Gravity provides a promising framework for a consistent characterization of the early Universe dynamics. Inspired by BKL conjecture, a flat Universe is described as a collection of Bianchi I homogeneous patches. The resulting quantum dynamics is described by the scalar constraint operator, whose matrix elements can be analytically computed. The effective semiclassical dynamics is discussed, and the differences with Loop Quantum Cosmology are emphasized.

  12. Reactor loops at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes broadly the nine in-reactor loops, and their components, located in and around the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River. First an introduction and general description is given of the loops and their function, supplemented with a table outlining some loop specifications and nine simplified flow sheets, one for each individual loop. The report then proceeds to classify each loop into two categories, the 'main loop circuit' and the 'auxiliary circuit', and descriptions are given of each circuit's components in turn. These components, in part, are comprised of the main loop pumps, the test section, loop heaters, loop coolers, delayed-neutron monitors, surge tank, Dowtherm coolers, loop piping. Here again photographs, drawings and tables are included to provide a clearer understanding of the descriptive literature and to include, in tables, some specifications of the more important components in each loop. (author)

  13. Loops under Strategies ... Continued

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Thiemann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available While there are many approaches for automatically proving termination of term rewrite systems, up to now there exist only few techniques to disprove their termination automatically. Almost all of these techniques try to find loops, where the existence of a loop implies non-termination of the rewrite system. However, most programming languages use specific evaluation strategies, whereas loop detection techniques usually do not take strategies into account. So even if a rewrite system has a loop, it may still be terminating under certain strategies. Therefore, our goal is to develop decision procedures which can determine whether a given loop is also a loop under the respective evaluation strategy. In earlier work, such procedures were presented for the strategies of innermost, outermost, and context-sensitive evaluation. In the current paper, we build upon this work and develop such decision procedures for important strategies like leftmost-innermost, leftmost-outermost, (max-parallel-innermost, (max-parallel-outermost, and forbidden patterns (which generalize innermost, outermost, and context-sensitive strategies. In this way, we obtain the first approach to disprove termination under these strategies automatically.

  14. Choking loops on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying

    2013-08-01

    We present a method for computing "choking" loops--a set of surface loops that describe the narrowing of the volumes inside/outside of the surface and extend the notion of surface homology and homotopy loops. The intuition behind their definition is that a choking loop represents the region where an offset of the original surface would get pinched. Our generalized loops naturally include the usual 2g handles/tunnels computed based on the topology of the genus-g surface, but also include loops that identify chokepoints or bottlenecks, i.e., boundaries of small membranes separating the inside or outside volume of the surface into disconnected regions. Our definition is based on persistent homology theory, which gives a measure to topological structures, thus providing resilience to noise and a well-defined way to determine topological feature size. More precisely, the persistence computed here is based on the lower star filtration of the interior or exterior 3D domain with the distance field to the surface being the associated 3D Morse function. PMID:23744260

  15. Implosion of the small cavity and large cavity cannonball targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results of cannonball target implosion research are briefly reviewed with theoretical predictions for GEKKO XII experiments. The cannonball targets are classified into two types according to the cavity size ; small cavity and large cavity. The compression mechanisms of the two types are discussed. (author)

  16. Teleportation of Cavity Field States via Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss two schemes of teleportation of cavity field states. In the first scheme we consider cavities prepared in a coherent state and in the second scheme we consider cavities prepared in a superposition of zero and one Fock states.

  17. V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

    2012-12-25

    A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

  18. Seamless/bonded niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2006-07-01

    Technological aspects and performance of seamless cavities produced by hydroforming are presented. Problems related to the fabrication of seamless cavities from bulk niobium are mainly solved thanks to the progress of the last years. The highest achieved accelerating gradients are comparable for both seamless and welded versions (ca. 40 MV/m) Nevertheless further development of seamless cavities is desirable in order to avoid the careful preparation of parts for welding and get reliable statistic. Fabrication of NbCu clad cavities from bimetallic tubes is an interesting option that gives new opportunity to the seamless technique. On the one hand it allows reducing the niobium costs contribution; on the other hand it increases the thermal stability of the cavity. The highest accelerating gradient achieved on seamless NbCu clad single cell cavities (ca. 40 MV/m) is comparable to the one reached on bulk Nb cavities. Fabrication of multi-cell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was recently proven.

  19. Probability safety assessment of LOOP accident to molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Loss of offsite power (LOOP) is a possible accident to any type of reactor, and this accident can reflect the main idea of reactor safety design. Therefore, it is very important to conduct a study on probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of the molten salt reactor that is under LOOP circumstance. Purpose: The aim is to calculate the release frequency of molten salt radioactive material to the core caused by LOOP, and find out the biggest contributor to causing the radioactive release frequency. Methods: We carried out the PSA analysis of the LOOP using the PSA process risk spectrum, and assumed that the primary circuit had no valve and equipment reliability data based on the existing mature power plant equipment reliability data. Results: Through the PSA analysis, we got the accident sequences of the release of radioactive material to the core caused by LOOP and its frequency. The results show that the release frequency of molten salt radioactive material to the core caused by LOOP is about 2×10-11/(reactor ·year), which is far below that of the AP1000 LOOP. In addition, through the quantitative analysis, we obtained the point estimation and interval estimation of uncertainty analysis, and found that the biggest contributor to cause the release frequency of radioactive material to the core is the reactor cavity cooling function failure. Conclusion: This study provides effective help for the design and improvement of the following molten salt reactor system. (authors)

  20. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka³a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20–30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having p...

  1. Classical Physics and Quantum Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry R. Holstein; John F. Donoghue

    2004-05-01

    The standard picture of the loop expansion associates a factor of h-bar with each loop, suggesting that the tree diagrams are to be associated with classical physics, while loop effects are quantum mechanical in nature. We discuss examples wherein classical effects arise from loop contributions and display the relationship between the classical terms and the long range effects of massless particles.

  2. Bootstrapping Null Polygon Wilson Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Gaiotto, Davide; Maldacena, Juan; Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    We derive the two loop expressions for polygonal Wilson loops by starting from the one loop expressions and applying an operator product expansion. We do this for polygonal Wilson loops in R^{1,1} and find a result in agreement with previous computations. We also discuss the spectrum of excitations around flux tube that connects two null Wilson lines.

  3. Direct construction of code loops

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Gabor P.

    2004-01-01

    Code loops were introduced by R. L. Griess. R.L. Griess and T. Hsu gave methods to construct the corresponding code loop from any given doubly even binary code; both these methods used some kind of induction. In this paper, we present a global construction of the loop, where we apply the correspondance between the concepts of Moufang loops and groups with triality.

  4. Widely tunable linear-cavity multiwavelength fiber laser with distributed Brillouin scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ajiya; M. H. Al-Mansoori; M. A. Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a multiple wavelength Brillouin/erbium fiber laser in a linear cavity configuration. The laser cavity is made up of a fiber loop mirror on one end of the resonator and a virtual mirror generated from the distributed stimulated Brillouin scattering effect on the other end. Due to the weak reflectivity provided by the virtual mirror, self-lasing cavity modes are completely suppressed from the laser cavity. At Brillouin pump and 1480-nm pump powers of 2 and 130 mW, respectively, 11 channels of the demonstrated laser with an average total power of 7.13 dBm can freely be tuned over a span of 37-nm wavelength from 1530 to 1567 nm.%@@ We demonstrate a multiple wavelength Brillouin/erbium fiber laser in a linear cavity configuration.The laser cavity is made up of a fiber loop mirror on one end of the resonator and a virtual mirror generated from the distributed stimulated Brillouin scattering effect on the other end.Due to the weak reflectivity provided by the virtual mirror, self-lasing cavity modes are completely suppressed from the laser cavity.At Brillouin pump and 1480-nm pump powers of 2 and 130 mW, respectively, 11 channels of the demonstrated laser with an average total power of 7.13 dBm can freely be tuned over a span of 37-nm wavelength from 1530 to 1567 nm.

  5. Morphology Of A Hot Prominence Cavity Observed with Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mark A.; Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    Prominence cavities appear as circularly shaped voids in coronal emission over polarity inversion lines where a prominence channel is straddling the solar limb. The presence of chromospheric material suspended at coronal altitudes is a common but not necessary feature within these cavities. These voids are observed to change shape as a prominence feature rotates around the limb. We use a morphological model projected in cross-sections to fit the cavity emission in Hinode/XRT passbands, and then apply temperature diagnostics to XRT and SDO/AIA data to investigate the thermal structure. We find significant evidence that the prominence cavity is hotter than the corona immediately outside the cavity boundary. This investigation follows upon "Thermal Properties of A Solar Coronal Cavity Observed with the X-ray Telescope on Hinode" by Reeves et al., 2012, ApJ, in press.

  6. Morphology of a Hot Coronal Cavity Core as Observed by Hinode/XRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Hudson, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    We follow a coronal cavity that was observed by Hinode/XRT during the summer of 2008. This cavity has a persistent area of relatively bright X-ray emission in its center. We use multifilter data from XRT to study the thermal emission from this cavity, and find that the bright center is hotter than the surrounding cavity plasma with temperatures of about 1.6 MK. We follow the morphology of this hot feature as the cavity structure rotates over the limb during the several days between July 19 - 23 2008. We find that the hot structure at first looks fairly circular, then appears to expand and elongate, and then shrinks again to a compact circular shape. We interpret this apparent change in shape as being due to the morphology of the filament channel associated with the cavity, and the change in viewing angle as the structure rotates over the limb of the Sun.

  7. Genetic Programming with Simple Loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Yuesheng; WANG Baozhong; KANG Lishan

    1999-01-01

    A kind of loop function LoopN inGenetic Programming (GP) is proposed.Different from other forms of loopfunction, such as While-Do and Repeat-Until, LoopNtakes only oneargument as its loop body and makes its loop body simply run N times,soinfinite loops will never happen. The problem of how to avoid too manylayers ofloops in Genetic Programming is also solved. The advantage ofLoopN in GP is shown bythe computational results in solving the mowerproblem.

  8. Models for the Infrared Cavity of HH 46/47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raga, A. C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Gonzalez, R. F.; Velazquez, P. F.

    2004-01-01

    We have modeled the limb-brightened cavity seen in the new Spitzer Space Telescope IR images of the southwest lobe of HH 46/47 as the bow shock driven by an outflow from a young, low-mass star. We present models in which the outflow is a perfectly collimated, straight jet, models in which the jet precesses, and finally a model in which the outflow takes the form of a latitude-dependent wind. We study cases in which the outflow moves into a constant-density cloud and into a stratified cloud. We find that the best agreement with the observed cavity is obtained for the precessing jet in a stratified cloud. However, the straight jet (traveling in a stratified cloud) also gives cavity shapes close to the observed one. The latitude-dependent wind model that we have computed gives cavity shapes that are substantially wider than the observed cavity. We therefore conclude that the cavity seen in the Spitzer observations of the southwest lobe of the HH 46/47 outflow do not seem to imply the presence of a latitude-dependent wind, as it can be modeled successfully with a perfectly collimated jet model.

  9. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  10. Developmental Defects of Uterine Cavity: Presentation of Seven Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Shahrzad

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of intrauterine conditions that may cause infertility is generally made by hysterosalpingography (HSG. Herein, we are presenting seven hysterosalpingo¬graphically-proven patients of Developmental Uterine Cavity Defects. We believed that some of developmental defects of these uterine cavity have not been addressed in preceding medical texts. Accurate diagnosis and reports of such cases are important not only for the benefit of treatment, but also to reflect the true incidence of these anomalies and to consolidate embryologic concept."nThe presented anomalies included "flying bird" uterus, "wine-glass-shaped" uterus, "buffalo head" uterus, "heart-shaped" uterus, "phantom-shaped" uterus, "candle light" uterus, and "jackal-shaped" uterus."nThe presented cases belonged to many years before, thus they were not evaluated by recently-developed advanced diagnostic modalities.

  11. RF superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Y

    1980-01-01

    The history and present activity in research on RF superconducting cavities in various countries are reviewed. The program of the July 1980 Karlsruhe workshop is reproduced and research activity in this field at Stanford HEPL and SLAC, Cornell, Oregon, Brookhaven, KEK (Japan), Weismann (Israel), Genoa, CERN and Karlsruhe (KfK) listed. The theoretical basis of surface resistance and intracavity magnetic field, multipacing and non-resonant electron loading are outlined. (20 refs).

  12. 3D Reconstruction of Coronal Loops by the Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Verwichte

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowing the three dimensional structure of plasma filaments in the uppermost part of the solar atmosphere, known as coronal loops, and especially their length, is an important parameter in the wave-based diagnostics of this part of the Sun. The combination of observations of the Sun from different points of observations in space, thanks to the most recent missions, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO and the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO, allows us to infer information about the geometrical shape of coronal loops in 3D space. Here, we propose a new method to reconstruct the loop shape starting from stereoscopically determined 3D points, which sample the loop length, by principal component analysis. This method is shown to retrieve in an easy way the main parameters that define the loop, e.g., the minor and major axes, the loop plane, the azimuthal and inclination angles, for the special case of a coplanar loop.

  13. A geometric approach to identify cavities in particle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyiatzis, Evangelos; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of a geometric algorithm to identify cavities in particle systems in an open-source python program is presented. The algorithm makes use of the Delaunay space tessellation. The present python software is based on platform-independent tools, leading to a portable program. Its successful execution provides information concerning the accessible volume fraction of the system, the size and shape of the cavities and the group of atoms forming each of them. The program can be easily incorporated into the LAMMPS software. An advantage of the present algorithm is that no a priori assumption on the cavity shape has to be made. As an example, the cavity size and shape distributions in a polyethylene melt system are presented for three spherical probe particles. This paper serves also as an introductory manual to the script. It summarizes the algorithm, its implementation, the required user-defined parameters as well as the format of the input and output files. Additionally, we demonstrate possible applications of our approach and compare its capability with the ones of well documented cavity size estimators.

  14. Conformal optimal design and processing of extruding die cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐红元; 陈科山; 杜凤山

    2008-01-01

    Aimed at the optimal analysis and processing technology of die cavity of special-shaped products extrusion, by numerical analysis of trigonometric interpolation and Conformal Mapping theory, on the non-circle cross-section of special-shaped products, the conformal mapping function can be set up to translate the cross-section region into unit dish region, over numerical finite interpolation points between even and odd. Products extrusion forming can be turned into two-dimension problem, and plastic stream function can be deduced, as well as the mathematical model of the die cavity surface is established based on deferent kinds of vertical curve. By applying Upper-bound Principle, the vertical curves and related parameters of die cavity are optimized. Combining with electrical discharge machining (EDM) process and numerical control (NC) milling machine technology, the optimal processing of die cavity can be realized. Taking ellipse-shaped products as an instance, the optimal analysis and processing of die cavity including extruding experiment are carried out.

  15. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  16. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  17. Waveguide-coupled cavities for energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Nguyen, D. C.; Young, L. M.

    2004-08-01

    A novel scheme for energy recovery linacs used as FEL drivers is proposed. It consists of two parallel beam lines, one for electron beam acceleration and the other for the used beam that is bent after passing through a wiggler. The used beam is decelerated by the structure and feeds the cavity fields. The main feature of the scheme is that RF cavities are coupled with waveguides between these two linacs. The waveguide cut through the two beam pipes provides an efficient mechanism for energy transfer. The superconducting RF cavities in the two accelerators can be shaped differently, with an operating mode at the same frequency. This provides HOM detuning and therefore reduces the beam break-up effects. Another advantage of the proposed two-beam scheme is easy tuning of the cavity coupling by changing the waveguide length.

  18. Design and Optimization of Thermophotovoltaic System Cavity with Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermophotovoltaic (TPV systems can convert radiant energy into electrical power. Here we explore the design of the TPV system cavity, which houses the emitter and the photovoltaic (PV cells. Mirrors are utilized in the cavity to modify the spatial and spectral distribution within. After discussing the basic concentric tubular design, two novel cavity configurations are put forward and parametrically studied. The investigated variables include the shape, number, and placement of the mirrors. The optimization objectives are the optimized efficiency and the extended range of application of the TPV system. Through numerical simulations, the relationship between the design parameters and the objectives are revealed. The results show that careful design of the cavity configuration can markedly enhance the performance of the TPV system.

  19. Grid Window Tests on an 805-MHz Pillbox Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torun, Y. [IIT, Chicago; Moretti, A. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Muon ionization cooling channel designs use pillbox shaped RF cavities for improved power efficiency and fine control over phasing of individual cavities. For minimum scattering of the muon beam, the ends should be made out of a small thickness of high radiation length material. Good electrical and thermal conductivity are required to reduce power dissipation and remove the heat efficiently. Thin curved beryllium windows with TiN coating have been used successfully in the past. We have built an alternative win- dow set consisting of grids of tubes and tested these on a pillbox cavity previously used with both thin Be and thick Cu windows. The cavity was operated with a pair of grids as well as a single grid against a flat endplate.

  20. Micro-cavity lasers with large device size for directional emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chang-ling; Li, Peng; Shi, Jian-wei; Feng, Yuan; Hao, Yong-qin; Zhu, Dongda

    2014-10-01

    Optical micro-cavity structures, which can confine light in a small mode volume with high quality factors, have become an important platform not only for optoelectronic applications with densely integrated optical components, but also for fundamental studies such as cavity quantum electrodynamics and nonlinear optical processes. Micro-cavity lasers with directional emission feature are becoming a promising resonator for the compact laser application. In this paper, we presented the limason-shaped cavity laser with large device size, and fabricated this type of micro-cavity laser with quantum cascade laser material. The micro-cavity laser with large device size was fabricated by using InP based InGaAs/InAlAs quantum cascade lasers material at about 10um emitting wavelength, and the micro-cavity lasers with the large device size were manufactured and characterized with light output power, threshold current, and the far-field pattern.

  1. Impact of ghost loops on dynamical gluon mass generation

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, Arlene C

    2011-01-01

    Exploiting the gauge-invariant properties of the PT-BFM truncation scheme for the gluon Schwinger-Dyson equation, we estimate the individual non-perturbative contribution of the "one-loop dressed" ghost loop to the gluon propagator. Using the available quenched lattice data for the gluon and the ghost propagators in d=4 and d=3, we determine how the overall shape of the gluon propagator is affected by the removal of the ghost loop, and what are the consequences on the phenomenon of gluon mass generation.

  2. Closed Loop Subspace Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir W. Nilsen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A new three step closed loop subspace identifications algorithm based on an already existing algorithm and the Kalman filter properties is presented. The Kalman filter contains noise free states which implies that the states and innovation are uneorre lated. The idea is that a Kalman filter found by a good subspace identification algorithm will give an output which is sufficiently uncorrelated with the noise on the output of the actual process. Using feedback from the output of the estimated Kalman filter in the closed loop system a subspace identification algorithm can be used to estimate an unbiased model.

  3. Wilson-loop instantons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    Wilson-loop symmetry breaking is considered on a space-time of the form M4 x K, where M4 is a four-dimensional space-time and K is an internal space with nontrivial and finite fundamental group. It is shown in a simple model that the different vacua obtained by breaking a non-Abelian gauge group by Wilson loops are separated in the space of gauge potentials by a finite energy barrier. An interpolating gauge configuration is then constructed between these vacua and shown to have minimum energy. Finally some implications of this construction are discussed.

  4. Loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) — a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the paper, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  5. On loop states in loop-quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dass, N D Hari [Hayama Center for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Mathur, Manu [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Calcutta 700 091 (India)

    2007-05-07

    We explicitly construct and characterize all possible independent loop states in (3 + 1)-dimensional loop-quantum gravity by regulating it on a 3D regular lattice in the Hamiltonian formalism. These loop states, characterized by the (dual) angular momentum quantum numbers, describe SU(2) rigid rotators on the links of the lattice. The loop states are constructed using the Schwinger bosons which are harmonic oscillators in the fundamental (spin half) representation of SU(2). Using the generalized Wigner-Eckart theorem, we compute the matrix elements of the volume operator in the loop basis. Some simple loop eigenstates of the volume operator are explicitly constructed.

  6. Development of non-contact 3D measurement system for parts of accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We strive to develop a 3D coordinate measuring machine, which can measure the shape of parts of accelerator cavity with without contact and rapidly. Currently, the ILC (International Linear Collider) project is progressing through international collaboration. The major goal of ILC is to produce and investigate Higgs bosons. ILC consists of two linear accelerators facing each other, and will hurl some 10 billion electrons and positrons toward each other at nearly the speed of light. The cavity is an important component to accelerate particles to near light speed. A cavity's inner 3D shape influences the accelerating performance. Therefore, it is important to measure the shape of the parts of a cavity. We are developing a highly accurate and non-contact shape measuring machine using triangulation method. (author)

  7. Loops: Twisting and Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    Loop-like structures are the fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar atmosphere. Recent space-based EUV and X-ray satellite observations (from Yohkoh SOHO and TRACE) have challenged the view that these features are simply static gravitationally stratified plasma pipes. Rather it is now surmised that each loop may consist of a bundle of fine plasma threads that are twisted around one another and can brighten independently. This invited review will outline the latest developments in ""untangling"" the topology of these features through three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic modelling and how their properties are being deduced through spectroscopic observations coupled to theoretical scaling laws. In particular recent interest has centred on how the observed thermal profile along loops can be employed as a tool to diagnose any localised energy input to the structure and hence constrain the presence of a particular coronal heating mechanism. The dynamic nature of loops will be highlighted and the implications of superior resolution plasma thread observations (whether spatial temporal or spectral) from future space missions (SolarB STEREO SDO and Solar Orbiter) will be discussed.

  8. Loop quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loop quantum gravity is one of the approaches that are being studied to apply the rules of quantum mechanics to the gravitational field described by the theory of General Relativity . We present an introductory summary of the main ideas and recent results. (Author)

  9. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  10. Application of Fractal Theory in Simulation of Ferromagnetic Elements' Hysteresis Loop in Transformer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕军; 付梦印; 张宇河

    2003-01-01

    The simulation of the transformer transient is one of the indispensable qualifications for improving the performance of transformer protection, the key technique of the transformer's transient simulation is the treatment of ferromagnetic elements' loop. Thus the shapes of the primary hysteresis loop and each internal secondary hysteresis loop in the identical magnetism conducting are analyzed, and then it is proposed that there are some fractal characteristics in the relation between them. The fractal phenomenon of the ferromagnetic elements' hysteresis loop in the transformer's transient simulation is first brought forward, the mutuality between the ferromagnetic elements' primary hysteresis loop and its secondary hysteresis loops is revealed in mechanism by using the fractal theory. According to the iterated function system of fractal theory, the secondary hysteresis loops can be generated by the iterative calculation of the primary loop. The simulation results show the validity of this idea.

  11. High-power RF cavity R ampersand D for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the development of a high-power test model of the 476 MHz RF cavity for the PEP-II B Factory. This cavity is designed to demonstrate the feasibility of a high-power design with higher-order mode (HOM) damping waveguides and the fabrication technologies involved, and it can also be used to evaluate aperture or loop couplers and various RF windows. Changes to the RF design to reduce peak surface heating are discussed and results of finite-element analyses of temperature and stress are presented. Fabrication methods for the prototype and subsequent production cavities are discussed

  12. Quantum dot SOA/silicon external cavity multi-wavelength laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Shuyu; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Li, Qi; Guan, Hang; Magill, Peter; Bergman, Keren; Baehr-Jones, Thomas; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-02-23

    We report a hybrid integrated external cavity, multi-wavelength laser for high-capacity data transmission operating near 1310 nm. This is the first demonstration of a single cavity multi-wavelength laser in silicon to our knowledge. The device consists of a quantum dot reflective semiconductor optical amplifier and a silicon-on-insulator chip with a Sagnac loop mirror and microring wavelength filter. We show four major lasing peaks from a single cavity with less than 3 dB power non-uniformity and demonstrate error-free 4 × 10 Gb/s data transmission. PMID:25836504

  13. An all-optical buffer based on temporal cavity solitons operating at 10 Gb/s

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Jae K; Schröder, Jochen; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Murdoch, Stuart G; Coen, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the operation of an all-optical buffer based on temporal cavity solitons stored in a nonlinear passive fiber ring resonator. Unwanted acoustic interactions between neighboring solitons are suppressed by modulating the phase of the external laser driving the cavity. A new locking scheme is presented that allows the buffer to operate with an arbitrarily large number of cavity solitons in the loop. Experimentally, we are able to demonstrate the storage of 4536 bits of data, written all-optically into the fiber ring at 10 Gb/s, for 1 minute.

  14. Single photon delayed feedback: a way to stabilize intrinsic quantum cavity electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmele, Alexander; Kabuss, Julia; Schulze, Franz; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Knorr, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We propose a scheme to control cavity quantum electrodynamics in the single photon limit by delayed feedback. In our approach a single emitter-cavity system, operating in the weak coupling limit, can be driven into the strong coupling-type regime by an external mirror: The external loop produces Rabi oscillations directly connected to the electron-photon coupling strength. As an expansion of typical cavity quantum electrodynamics, we treat the quantum correlation of external and internal light modes dynamically and demonstrate a possible way to implement a fully quantum mechanical time-delayed feedback. Our theoretical approach proposes a way to experimentally feedback control quantum correlations in the single photon limit.

  15. Computer-aided studies of the ALS 500 MHz storage ring cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the ALS storage ring 500 MHz cavity has been modeled with Mafia and Urmel codes. The effects of the holes cut for the drive port, the higher order mode damping port, the probe port and tuner plunger were modeled with the Mafia codes. The frequency dependence on the shape and spacing of the nose cones and the general shape of the cavity were modeled with Urmel codes. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  16. Uniqueness and local stability for the inverse scattering problem of determining the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; Lixin; MA; Fuming

    2005-01-01

    Considering a time-harmonic electromagnetic plane wave incident on an arbitrarily shaped open cavity embedded in infinite ground plane, the physical process is modelled by Maxwell's equations. We investigate the inverse problem of determining the shape of the open cavity from the information of the measured scattered field. Results on the uniqueness and the local stability of the inverse problem in the 2-dimensional TM (transverse magnetic) polarization are proved in this paper.

  17. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  18. Kink Oscillations of a Curved, Gravitationally Stratified Coronal Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Hindman, Bradley W

    2012-01-01

    Loops of magnetic field in the corona are observed to oscillate and these oscillations have been posited to be the superposition of resonant kink waves. To date, most analyses of these oscillations have concentrated on calculating the frequency shifts that result from spatial variation in the kink wave speed. Further, most have ignored gravity and treated the loop as a straight tube. Here we ignore spatial variation in the wave speed, but self-consistently include the effects of gravity and loop curvature in both the equilibrium loop model and in the wave equation. We model a coronal loop as an isolated, thin, magnetic fibril that is anchored at two points in the photosphere. The equilibrium shape of the loop is determined by a balance between magnetic buoyancy and magnetic tension, which is characterized by a Magnetic Bond Number \\epsilon, that is typically small |\\epsilon| << 1. This balance produces a loop that has a variable radius of curvature. The resonant kink waves of such a loop come in two pol...

  19. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xiang, Yongyuan, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn [Fuxian Solar Observatory, Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  20. A Comprehensive study of Cavities on the Sun: Structure, Formation, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Nishu; Zhang, Jie; Pesnell, William D.

    2016-05-01

    Coronal cavities are large-scale structures in the Sun's corona that are closely related with the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in the photosphere as well as associated with the energetic solar activity such as prominence eruptions and coronal mass ejections. They are observed as circular or elliptical-shaped relatively low-density dark regions above the solar limb in EUV, X-ray, and white-light coronal images. We used SDO/AIA limb synoptic maps, constructed from annuli above the solar limb, to systematically identify cavities. We observed 429 coronal prominence cavities between May 20, 2010 and Feb 1, 2015. We examined correlations between height, width, and length of the cavities. Based on the fitting of the shape of the cross section, we classified cavities in three types: prolate (38%), oblate (27%) and circular (35%). We found that the cavities of all shapes are common in shorter length while circular and oblate cavities are more common in the longer length. In general, we found that the overall 3-D topology of long stable cavities can be characterized as a long tube with an elliptical cross-section. Next, we investigated the pattern of cavity location and found that cavity systematically drifts towards the pole. We found that cavities form a belt by making a plot using SDO/HMI surface magnetogram similar to classical buttery diagram of sunspots, we call that the cavity belt. Our analysis showed that the cavity belts migrated towards higher latitude with time and the cavity belts disappeared after the polar magnetic field reversal. This result shows that cavity evolution provides new insight into the solar cycle. Moreover, we studied the underlying magnetic field of a circumpolar crown cavity (Mar 21, 2013- Oct 25, 2013) that was observed for several Carrington Rotations. Our results showed that the underlying polarity inversion line of cavities is formed between the trailing part of decayed active regions and the unipolar magnetic field in the

  1. Assessment of Flow Control Devices for Transonic Cavity Flows Using DES and LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakos, G. N.; Lawson, S. J.; Steijl, R.; Nayyar, P.

    Since the implementation of internal carriage of stores on military aircraft, transonic flows in cavities were put forward as a model problem for validation of CFD methods before design studies of weapon bays can be undertaken. Depending on the free-stream Mach number and the cavity dimensions, the flow inside the cavity can become very unsteady. Below a critical length-to-depth ratio (L/D), the flow has enough energy to span across the cavity opening and a shear layer develops. When the shear layer impacts the downstream cavity corner, acoustical disturbances are generated and propagated upstream, which in turn causes further instabilities at the cavity front and a feedback loop is maintained. The acoustic environment in the cavity is so harsh in these circumstances that the noise level at the cavity rear has been found to approach 170 dB and frequencies near 1 kHz are created. The effect of this unsteady environment on the structural integrity of the contents of the cavity (e.g. stores, avionics, etc.) can be serious. Above the critical L/D ratio, the shear layer no longer has enough energy to span across the cavity and dips into it. Although this does not produce as high noise levels and frequencies as shorter cavities, the differential pressure along the cavity produces large pitching moments making store release difficult. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cavity flows, based on the Reynolds-Averaged Navier—Stokes equations was only able to capture some of the flow physics present. On the other hand, results obtained with Large-Eddy Simulation or Detached-Eddy Simulation methods fared much better and for the cases computed, quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data has been obtained.

  2. Mode-locking external-cavity laser-diode sensor for displacement measurements of technical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarske, Jürgen; Möbius, Jasper; Moldenhauer, Karsten

    2005-09-01

    A novel laser sensor for position measurements of technical solid-state surfaces is proposed. An external Fabry-Perot laser cavity is assembled by use of an antireflection-coated laser diode together with the technical surface. Mode locking results from pumping the laser diode synchronously to the mode spacing of the cavity. The laser cavity length, i.e., the distance to the measurement object, is determined by evaluation of the modulation transfer function of the cavity by means of a phase-locked loop. The mode-locking external-cavity laser sensor incorporates a resonance effect that results in highly resolving position and displacement measurements. More than a factor-of-10 higher resolution than with conventional nonresonant sensing principles is achieved. Results of the displacement measurements of various technical surfaces are reported. Experimental and theoretical investigations are in good agreement.

  3. Simulation analysis of analog IQ based LLRF control of RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the simulation work and results in Matlab Simulink for the analogue Inphase-Quadrature (IQ) based Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) control of RF cavity voltage. The RF cavity chosen here is the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) cavity in our RIB project. All the subsystems in the IQ based RF control were modelled using the Simulink blocks/components. The envelope simulation was carried out using the IQ model of RF cavity. The PI controller was properly tuned to achieve good control performance in time. The simulation graphs showing the time evolution of the RF cavity voltage with a step change of the input reference signal is presented. The simulation graphs showing the control response time needed to correct a disturbance is presented. The simulation results showing Nichols plots of the control loop and the gain and phase margin values obtained from them are presented, which are good enough for stability considerations. (author)

  4. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  5. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  6. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  7. Surface state photonic bandgap cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Rahachou, A. I.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2005-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new type of a resonant high-Q cavity for lasing, sensing or filtering applications, which is based on a surface states of a finite photonic crystal. We demonstrate that such the cavity can have a Q factor comparable with that one of conventional photonic band-gap defect mode cavities. At the same time, the distinguished feature of the surface mode cavity is that it is situated directly at the surface of the photonic crystal. This might open up new possibilities for de...

  8. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  9. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  10. Principal Component Analysis reveals correlation of cavities evolution and functional motions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desdouits, Nathan; Nilges, Michael; Blondel, Arnaud

    2015-02-01

    Protein conformation has been recognized as the key feature determining biological function, as it determines the position of the essential groups specifically interacting with substrates. Hence, the shape of the cavities or grooves at the protein surface appears to drive those functions. However, only a few studies describe the geometrical evolution of protein cavities during molecular dynamics simulations (MD), usually with a crude representation. To unveil the dynamics of cavity geometry evolution, we developed an approach combining cavity detection and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This approach was applied to four systems subjected to MD (lysozyme, sperm whale myoglobin, Dengue envelope protein and EF-CaM complex). PCA on cavities allows us to perform efficient analysis and classification of the geometry diversity explored by a cavity. Additionally, it reveals correlations between the evolutions of the cavities and structures, and can even suggest how to modify the protein conformation to induce a given cavity geometry. It also helps to perform fast and consensual clustering of conformations according to cavity geometry. Finally, using this approach, we show that both carbon monoxide (CO) location and transfer among the different xenon sites of myoglobin are correlated with few cavity evolution modes of high amplitude. This correlation illustrates the link between ligand diffusion and the dynamic network of internal cavities.

  11. Loop Subdivision Surface Based Progressive Interpolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Hua (Frank) Cheng; Feng-Tao Fan; Shu-Hua Lai; Cong-Lin Huang; Jia-Xi Wang; Jun-Hai Yong

    2009-01-01

    A new method for constructing interpolating Loop subdivision surfaces is presented. The new method is an extension of the progressive interpolation technique for B-splines. Given a triangular mesh M, the idea is to iteratively upgrade the vertices of M to generate a new control mesh M such that limit surface of M would interpolate M. It can be shown that the iterative process is convergent for Loop subdivision surfaces. Hence, the method is well-defined. The new method has the advantages of both a local method and a global method, i.e., it can handle meshes of any size and any topology while generating smooth interpolating subdivision surfaces that faithfully resemble the shape of the given meshes. The meshes considered here can be open or closed.

  12. The Gluon Beam Function at Two Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Gaunt, Jonathan; Tackmann, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    The virtuality-dependent beam function is a universal ingredient in the resummation for observables probing the virtuality of incoming partons, including N-jettiness and beam thrust. We compute the gluon beam function at two-loop order. Together with our previous results for the two-loop quark beam function, this completes the full set of virtuality-dependent beam functions at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). Our results are required to account for all collinear ISR effects to the N-jettiness event shape through N^3LL order. We present numerical results for both the quark and gluon beam functions up to NNLO and N^3LL order. Numerically, the NNLO matching corrections are important. They reduce the residual matching scale dependence in the resummed beam function by about a factor of two.

  13. Impact of Trapped Flux and Thermal Gradients on the SRF Cavity Quality Factor

    CERN Document Server

    Kugeler, O; Knobloch, J; Aull, S

    2012-01-01

    The obtained Q0 value of a superconducting niobium cavity is known to depend on various factors like the RRR of the Niobium material, crystallinity, chemical treatment history, the high-pressure rinsing process, or effectiveness of the magnetic shielding. We have observed that spatial thermal gradients over the cavity length during cool-down appear to contribute to a degradation of Q0. Measurements were performed in the Horizontal Bi-Cavity Test Facility (HoBiCaT) at HZB on TESLA type cavities as well as on disc- and rod-shaped niobium samples equipped with thermal, electrical and magnetic diagnostics. Possible explanations for the effect are discussed.

  14. Analytical approach for resolving stress states around elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of stress states around cavities in the stressed elastic body, regardless of cavity shapes, that may be spherical, cylindrical elliptical etc. in its analytical approach has to be based on selection of a stress function that will satisfy biharmonic equation, under given boundary conditions. This paper is concerned with formulation and solution of the cited differential equation using elliptical coordinates in conformity with the cavity shape of oblong ellipsoid [1]. It is therefore considered that the formulation of the stress tensor will be done in conformity to the cited coordinates. The paper describes basic statements and definitions in connection to harmonic functions used for determination of stress states around cavities formed in the stressed homogeneous space. The particular attention has been paid to the use of Legendre`s functions, with definitions and derivation of recurrent formulas, that have been used for determination of stress states around an oblong ellipsoidal cavity, [1]. The paper also includes the description of procedures used in forming series based on Legendre`s functions of the first order.

  15. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  16. Deflecting cavity for a temporal response measurement of a photocathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies for the next generation light sources based on energy-recovery linac (ERL) are under development in our group. Photocathode related technology is a key technology for the ERL based light sources. Temporal shape control of the photocathode gun generated electron beam is indispensable to generate ultra-small emittance electron beam. A 1300 MHz deflecting cavity has been developed for a temporal shape measurement of an electron beam from a 250-kV DC photocathode electron gun. The cavity is a rectangle shaped TM120 mode with the unloaded quality factor Q0=17660. The deflecting angle is ±9.5 mrad for the electron bunch with ±50 ps with 134.7 W input RF power. (author)

  17. On the extended loop calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Griego, J R

    1995-01-01

    Some features of extended loops are considered. In particular, the behaviour under diffeomorphism transformations of the wavefunctions with support on the extended loop space are studied. The basis of a method to obtain analytical expressions of diffeomorphism invariants via extended loops are settled. Applications to knot theory and quantum gravity are considered.

  18. Convoluted dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation in reduced-activation martensitic steel and their impact on mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Fengfeng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yao, Z. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Suo, Jinping [State Key Laboratory of Mould Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wen, Yongming [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Helium irradiation induced dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa at 350 °C. Unexpectedly, very large dislocation loops were found, significantly larger than that induced by other types of irradiations under the same dose. Moreover, the large loops were convoluted and formed interesting flower-like shape. The large loops were determined as interstitial type. Loops with the Burgers vectors of b=〈100〉 were only observed. Furthermore, irradiation induced hardening caused by these large loops was observed using the nano-indentation technique.

  19. Convoluted dislocation loops induced by helium irradiation in reduced-activation martensitic steel and their impact on mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helium irradiation induced dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steels were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated with 100 keV helium ions to 0.8 dpa at 350 °C. Unexpectedly, very large dislocation loops were found, significantly larger than that induced by other types of irradiations under the same dose. Moreover, the large loops were convoluted and formed interesting flower-like shape. The large loops were determined as interstitial type. Loops with the Burgers vectors of b=〈100〉 were only observed. Furthermore, irradiation induced hardening caused by these large loops was observed using the nano-indentation technique

  20. Determinants of RNA hairpin loop-loop complex stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorian, R S; Crothers, D M

    1995-05-19

    Complexes formed by RNA hairpin loops with complementary loop sequences derived from Escherichia coli RNA I and RNA II, which are involved in the control of DNA replication of plasmid ColE1, have been analyzed to determine the sequence and structural elements required to achieve full affinity. Of particular interest is the origin of the enhanced stability of the complex formed by hairpin loops whose loop sequences have been inverted 5' to 3' with respect to wild-type sequences. Full complementarity of the two interacting loops is required to achieve full or enhanced affinity, while the stems of the two hairpins can differ. The major determinant of enhanced affinity lies in the base-pairs formed at positions 1 and 7 of the loops, together with the two base-pairs of each stem which are closest to the loop. Sequence variation in the middle of the loops, or further down the stem away from the loops, exerts only a modest influence on complex stability. We incorporate these results into a model for the loop-loop interaction which accounts for the importance of positions one and seven and the first two nucleotides of the stem, while providing potentially unique structures for recognition by the RNA one modulator protein. PMID:7539081

  1. Phase locked loop

    OpenAIRE

    Beek, van, P.; Klumperink, Eric Antonius Maria; Nauta, Bram; Vaucher, Cicero Silveira

    2007-01-01

    A phase locked loop comprising a phase detector ( 100 ) for determining a phase difference between a reference signal (Ref) and mutually phase shifted signals (I, Q) to generate frequency control signals (U, D), the phase detector ( 100 ) comprising: means ( 10 ) for obtaining a first one of said frequency control signals (U, D) by binary multiplication of the reference signal (Ref) and one of the relative phase shifted signals (I, Q); and means ( 20 ) for obtaining a second one of said frequ...

  2. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  3. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  4. Loop structure of renormalizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymptotics in the internal momenta p and q is obtained for renormalized Feynman amplitudes recurrently to a number of loops. The asymptotics has the form of a polynomial in powers of these momenta. The renormalization method implies the exclusion of UV-''bad'' asymptotics which provides the p and q convergence of the integral (UV - ultraviolet divergences). It is pointed out the regularization of the integral performed here may be convenient for combined analysis of UV and infrared problem

  5. Lattice Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Aastrup, Johannes; Grimstrup, Jesper M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a separable version of Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) based on an inductive system of cubic lattices. We construct semi-classical states for which the LQG operators -- the flux, the area and the volume operators -- have the right classical limits. Also, we present the Hamilton and diffeomorphism constraints as operator constraints and show that they have the right classical limit. Finally, we speculate whether the continuum limit, which these semi-classical states probe, can be defined...

  6. RF Cavities For The Muon and Neutrino Factory Collaboration Study

    CERN Document Server

    Moretti, A; Jurgens, T G; Qian, Z; Wu, V

    2000-01-01

    A multi-laboratory collaboration is studying the feasibility of building a muon collider, the first phase of which maybe a neutrino factory. The phase space occupied by the muons is very large and needs to be cooled several orders of magnitude for either machine, 100,000 to 1 million for the collider and ten to 100 for the factory. Ionization cooling is the base line method for muon cooling. This scheme uses hydrogen absorbers and rf re-acceleration in a long series of magnetic focusing channels to cool the muons. At Fermilab two rf cavity types are under study to provide the required cooling rf re-acceleration, a 805 MHz high gradient cavity for the collider and a 201 MHz high gradient cavity for the neutrino factory. The 805 MHz cavity currently under going cold testing is a non-periodic pi-mode cavity with the iris openings shaped to follow the contour of the beam. The 201 MHz cavity uses hollow thin metal tubes over the beam aperture to terminate the field in a pill-box type mode to increase its shunt imp...

  7. Polymer translocation into and out of an ellipsoidal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, James M

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to study the translocation of a polymer into and out of an ellipsoidal cavity through a narrow pore. We measure the polymer free energy F as a function of a translocation coordinate, s, defined to be the number of bonds that have entered the cavity. To study polymer insertion, we consider the case of a driving force acting on monomers inside the pore, as well as monomer attraction to the cavity wall. We examine the changes to F(s) upon variation in the shape anisometry and volume of the cavity, the polymer length, and the strength of the interactions driving the insertion. For athermal systems, the free energy functions are analyzed using a scaling approach, where we treat the confined portion of the polymer to be in the semi-dilute regime. The free energy functions are used with the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation to calculate mean translocation times, as well as translocation time distributions. We find that both polymer ejection and insertion are faster for ellipsoidal cavities than for spherical cavities. The results are in qualitative agreement with those of a Langevin dynamics study in the case of ejection but not for insertion. The discrepancy is likely due to out-of-equilibrium conformational behaviour that is not accounted for in the FP approach. PMID:25956116

  8. A Scanning Cavity Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Mader, Matthias; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1700-fold signal enhancement compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity below 1 nm2, we show a method to improve spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for opt...

  9. Frequency Tuning for a DQW Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Leuxe, Raphael; Skaritka, John; Wu, Qiong; Xiao, Binping; Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The nominal operating frequency for the HL-LHC crab cavities is 400.79 MHz within a bandwidth of ±60kHz. Attaining the required cavity tune implies a good understanding of all the processes that influence the cavity frequency from the moment when the cavity parts are being fabricated until the cavity is installed and under operation. Different tuning options will be available for the DQW crab cavity of LHC. This paper details the different steps in the cavity fabrication and preparation that may introduce a shift in the cavity frequency and introduces the different tuning methods foreseen to bring the cavity frequency to meet the specifications.

  10. The 340-cavity in neuraminidase provides new opportunities for influenza drug development: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nanyu; Mu, Yuguang; Miao, Huabiao; Yang, Yunjuan; Wu, Qian; Li, Junjun; Ding, Junmei; Xu, Bo; Huang, Zunxi

    2016-01-29

    Influenza neuraminidase (NA) is a pivotal target for viral infection control. However, the accumulating of mutations compromise the efficacy of NA inhibitors. Thus, it is critical to design new drugs targeted to different motifs of NA. Recently, a new motif called 340-cavity was discovered in NA subtypes close to the calcium binding site. The presence of calcium is known to influence NA activity and thermostability. Therefore, the 340-cavity is a putative ligand-binding site for affecting the normal function of NA. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of different NA subtypes to explore the mechanism of 340-loop formation. Ligand-binding site prediction and fragment library screening were also carried out to provide evidence for the 340-cavity as a druggable pocket. We found that residues G342 and P/R344 in the 340-loop determine the size of the 340-cavity, and the calcium ion plays an important role in maintaining the conformation of the 340-loop through contacts with G345 and Q347. In addition, the 340-cavity is predicted to be a ligand-binding site by metaPocket, and a sequence analysis method is proposed to predict the existence of the 340-cavity. Our study shows that the 340-cavity is not an occasional or atypical domain in NA subtypes, and it has potential to function as a new hotspot for influenza drug binding. PMID:26768362

  11. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  13. Fiber cavities for atom chips

    OpenAIRE

    Klappauf, B.G.; Horak, P.; Kazansky, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    We present experimental realizations of several micro-cavities, constructed from standard fiber optic components, which meet the theoretical criteria for single atom detection from laser-cooled samples. We discuss integration of these cavities into state-of-the-art 'atom chips'.

  14. DNA Brushing Shoulders: Targeted Looping and Scanning of Large DNA Strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Zubair; Roushan, Maedeh; Riehn, Robert

    2015-08-12

    We present a nanofluidic device for targeted manipulations in the quarternary structure of single DNA molecules. We demonstrate the folding and unfolding of hairpin-shaped regions, similar to chromatin loops. These loops are stable for minutes at nanochannel junctions. We demonstrate continuous scanning of two DNA segments that occupy a common nanovolume. We present a model governing the stability of loop folds and discuss how the system achieves specific DNA configurations without operator intervention. PMID:26156085

  15. Demountable damped cavity for HOM-damping in ILC superconducting accelerating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konomi, T.; Yasuda, F.; Furuta, F.; Saito, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed a new higher-order-mode (HOM) damper called a demountable damped cavity (DDC) as part of the R&D efforts for the superconducting cavity of the International Linear Collider (ILC). The DDC has two design concepts. The first is an axially symmetrical layout to obtain high damping efficiency. The DDC has a coaxial structure along the beam axis to realize strong coupling with HOMs. HOMs are damped by an RF absorber at the end of the coaxial waveguide and the accelerating mode is reflected by a choke filter mounted at the entrance of the coaxial waveguide. The second design concept is a demountable structure to facilitate cleaning, in order to suppress the Q-slope problem in a high field. A single-cell cavity with the DDC was fabricated to test four performance parameters. The first was frequency matching between the accelerating cavity and the choke filter. Since the bandwidth of the resonance frequency in a superconducting cavity is very narrow, there is a possibility that the accelerating field will leak to the RF absorber because of thermal shrinkage. The design bandwidth of the choke filter is 25 kHz. It was demonstrated that frequency matching adjusted at room temperature could be successfully maintained at 2 K. The second parameter was the performance of the demountable structure. At the joint, the magnetic field is 1/6 of the maximum field in the accelerating cavity. Ultimately, the accelerating field reached 19 MV/m and Q0 was 1.5×1010 with a knife-edge shape. The third parameter was field emission and multipacting. Although the choke structure has numerous parallel surfaces that are susceptible to the multipacting problem, it was found that neither field emission nor multipacting presented problems in both an experiment and simulation. The final parameter was the Q values of the HOM. The RF absorber adopted in the system is a Ni-Zn ferrite type. The RF absorber shape was designed based on the measurement data of permittivity and permeability

  16. Technical tasks in superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kenji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The feature of superconducting rf cavities is an extremely small surface resistance on the wall. It brings a large energy saving in the operation, even those are cooled with liquid helium. That also makes possible to operate themselves in a higher field gradient comparing to normal conducting cavities, and brings to make accelerators compact. These merits are very important for the future accelerator engineering which is planed at JAERI for the neutron material science and nuclear waste transmutation. This machine is a high intensity proton linac and uses sc cavities in the medium and high {beta} sections. In this paper, starting R and D of proton superconducting cavities, several important technical points which come from the small surface resistance of sc cavities, are present to succeed it and also differences between the medium and high - {beta} structures are discussed. (author)

  17. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  18. Nonradiating and radiating modes excited by quantum emitters in open epsilon-near-zero cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Liberal, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the emission and interaction properties of quantum emitters (QEs) embedded within an optical cavity is a key technique in engineering light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, as well as in the development of quantum information processing. State-of-the-art optical cavities are based on high Q photonics crystals and dielectric resonators. However, wealthier responses might be attainable with cavities carved in more exotic materials. Here, we theoretically investigate the emission and interaction properties of QEs embedded in open epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) cavities. Using analytical methods and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that open ENZ cavities present the unique property of supporting nonradiating modes independently of the geometry of the external boundary of the cavity (shape, size, topology...). Moreover, the possibility of switching between radiating and nonradiating modes enables a dynamic control of both the emission by, and the interaction between, QEs. These phenomena provide...

  19. Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

  20. Preparation and Testing of the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilly, A. V.; Bass, T.; Burrill, A.; Davis, G. K.; Marhauser, F.; Reece, C. E.; Stirbet, M.

    2011-07-01

    Eighty new 7-cell, low-loss cell-shaped cavities are required for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade project. In addition to ten pre-production units fabricated at JLab, the full set of commercially-produced cavities have been delivered. An efficient processing routine, which includes a controlled 30 micron electropolish, has been established to transform these cavities into qualified 8-cavity strings. This work began in 2010 and will run through the end of 2011. The realized cavity performance consistently exceeds project requirements and also the maximum useful gradient in CEBAF: 25 MV/m. We will describe the cavity processing and preparation protocols and summarize test results obtained to date.

  1. High Finesse Fiber Fabry-Perot Cavities: Stabilization and Mode Matching Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gallego, Jose; Alavi, Seyed Khalil; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter; Ratschbacher, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background ph...

  2. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  3. A Culture-Behavior-Brain Loop Model of Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shihui; Ma, Yina

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cultural influences on brain activity are associated with multiple cognitive and affective processes. These findings prompt an integrative framework to account for dynamic interactions between culture, behavior, and the brain. We put forward a culture-behavior-brain (CBB) loop model of human development that proposes that culture shapes the brain by contextualizing behavior, and the brain fits and modifies culture via behavioral influences. Genes provide a fundamental basis for, and interact with, the CBB loop at both individual and population levels. The CBB loop model advances our understanding of the dynamic relationships between culture, behavior, and the brain, which are crucial for human phylogeny and ontogeny. Future brain changes due to cultural influences are discussed based on the CBB loop model.

  4. Non-linear optimization of track layouts in loop-sorting-systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Emil; Hansen, Michael R.; Ebbesen, Morten K.;

    2013-01-01

    shape optimization problemswith collision avoidance constraints by which a collision detection algorithmis presented. The presentedmethod is tested against the commercial loop-sorting-system used for sorting of medium sized items. The objective is to minimize price and footprint of the system...... whilemaintaining its functionality. Contact constraints are in this context important to include as various obstacles may surround the loop-sorting-system....

  5. Abnormal duodenal loop demonstrated by X-ray. Correlation to symptoms and prognosis of dyspepsia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thommesen, P.; Funch-Jensen, P.

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of dyspeptic symptoms has previously been correlated with the shape of the duodenal loop in patients with X-ray-negative dyspepsia. An abnormal duodenal loop was associated with a significantly higher incidence of symtoms provoked by meals, vomiting, regurgitations, heartburn, and the irritable bowel syndrome. 89% of these patients (26 patients with a normal duodenal loop and 39 patients with abnormal duodenal loop) were available for a 5-year follow-up study of symptomatic outcome. The incidence of symptoms provoked by meals was still significantly higher in patients with an abnormal duodenal loop, and there was also a significant difference concerning symptomatic outcome. Approximately 75% of the patients with a normal duodenal loop had improved, and 25% had unchanged clinical conditions. Approximately 50% of the patients with an abnormal duodenal loop had improved, and 50% had an unchanged or even deteriorated clinical condition.

  6. Design of 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell SRF cavity and development of single cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In India, DAE laboratories and other institutes are now actively involved in research and development activities on SRF cavities and associated technologies for the proposed high current, high energy proton linear accelerators like ISNS/IADS and also for the FERMILAB PIP-II program under Indian institutions-Fermilab collaboration (IIFC). As part of the above activities, VECC, Kolkata, has been involved in the design, analysis and development of a 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity. RF design involves optimization of the geometry to get acceptable values of field enhancement factors (magnetic and electric), R/Q , Geometric factor, coupling factor and field flatness. This paper describes the RF design using 2-D superfish and 3-D CST Microwave studio and multipacting analysis using 2-D Multipac2.1 and 3-D CST Particle Studio. A prototype 1-cell aluminum cavity and a prototype 5-cell copper cavity have been fabricated using die-punch assembly designed for fabrication of elliptical half-cells to check the procedures for forming and to make sure the desired frequency and field flatness could be obtained. RF characterization has been carried out for both the prototypes using Vector Network Analyzer and Bead pull measurement set up.The fabrication of a single-cell niobium cavity has been carried out indigenously and with the help of Electron Beam Welding (EBW) facility at IUAC, New Delhi. CMM measurement and RF characterization of the niobium half cells and full cell cavities have been carried out. This paper describes the development and measurement of prototype cavities and single cell niobium cavity. (author)

  7. A study of resonant-cavity and fiberglass-filled parallel baffles as duct silencers. [for wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, P. T.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustical performance and pressure drop were measured for two types of splitters designed to attenuate sound propagating in ducts - resonant-cavity baffles and fiberglass-filled baffles. Arrays of four baffles were evaluated in the 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel number 1 at Ames Research Center at flow speeds from 0 to 41 m/sec. The baffles were 2.1 m high, 305 to 406 mm thick, and 3.1 to 4.4 m long. Emphasis was on measurements of silencer insertion loss as affected by variations of such parameters as baffle length, baffle thickness, perforated skin geometry, cavity size and shape, cavity damping, wind speed, and acoustic field directivity. An analytical method for predicting silencer performance is described and compared with measurements. With the addition of cavity damping in the form of 25-mm foam linings, the insertion loss above 250 Hz of the resonant-cavity baffles was improved 2 to 7 db compared with the undamped baffles; the loss became equal to or greater than the insertion loss of comparable size fiberglass baffles at frequencies above 250 Hz. Variations of cavity size and shape showed that a series of cavities with triangular cross-sections (i.e., variable depth) were superior to cavities with rectangular cross sections (i.e., constant depth). In wind, the undamped, resonant-cavity baffles generated loud cavity-resonance tones; the tones could be eliminated by cavity damping.

  8. Digital Measurement System for the HIE-Isolde Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, Michal

    Extensive R&D efforts are being invested at CERN into the fundamental science of the RF superconductivity, cavity design, niobium sputtering, coating and RF properties of superconducting cavities. Fast and precise characterization and measurements of RF parameters of the newly produced cavities is essential for advances with the cavity production. The currently deployed analogue measurement system based on an analogue phase discriminators and tracking RF generators is not optimal for efficient work at the SM18 superconducting cavity test stand. If exact properties of the cavity under test are not known a traditional feedback loop will not be able to find resonant frequency in a reasonable time or even at all. This is mainly due to a very high Q factor. The resonance peak is very narrow (fraction of a Hz at 100 MHz). If the resonant frequency is off by several bandwidths, small changes of the cavity field during the tuning will not be measureable. Also cavity field will react only very slowly to any change...

  9. Field stabilization in superconducting cavities under pulsed operating; Stabilisation de champ dans des cavites supraconductrices en regime pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessier, J.M

    1996-12-17

    Within the framework of Tesla linear accelerator project, superconducting cavity battery is used to accelerate electrons and positrons. These cavities require pulsed running and must reach very high accelerating gradients. Under the action of the Lorentz force, the resonance frequency shifts and leaves the band-pass width, which hinders the field from taking its maximal value inside the cavity. The setting of an auto-oscillating loop allows to bring the generator frequency under the control of the cavity frequency. A feedback system is needed to reduce the energy dispersion inside the particle packets. The effects of the mechanical vibrations that disturb the accelerating voltage phase between two impulses are also compensated by a feedback loop. This thesis describes all these phenomena and computes their effects on the energy dispersion of the beam in both cases of relativistic and non-relativistic particles. (A.C.) 44 refs.

  10. Dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback is studied experimentally. Different dynamics are observed when different lateral modes are selected. When the feedback mirror is aligned perfectly and high-order modes are selected, in most....... When the feedback mirror is aligned non-perfectly, pulse-package oscillation is observed, for the first time to our knowledge, in a diode laser with long-cavity feedback....... of the cases, the output of the laser shows a periodic oscillation corresponding to a single roundtrip external-cavity loop, but the dynamic behavior disappears in some case; when the zero-order lateral-mode is selected, periodic oscillation corresponding to a double roundtrip external-cavity loop is observed...

  11. Cooling and control of a cavity opto-electromechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kwan H; Harris, Glen I; Knittel, Joachim; Bowen, Warwick P

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical oscillators provide a quintessential example of the profound difference between quantum and classical behaviour. However, the quantum regime is yet to be observed. Rapid progress is underway in cavity optomechanical systems (COMS) and nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). COMS have superior mechanical transduction sensitivity, able to resolve mechanical zero-point fluctuations. However, the electrical actuation of NEMS provides far greater scope for quantum control. By combining electrical gradient forces from NEMS with the ultrasensitive transduction from COMS, we implement a cavity optoelectromechanical system (COEMS), demonstrating both control and feedback cooling capabilities. Out-of-loop mechanical transduction provides, for the first time, independent temperature verification even when opto-mechanical correlations exist due to strong interactions such as measurement backaction. This technology has significance in fundamental science, improving our capacity to engineer mechanical quantum syst...

  12. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  13. Loop expansion and the bosonic representation of loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Hackl, Lucas; Yokomizo, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new loop expansion that provides a resolution of the identity in the Hilbert space of loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph. We work in the bosonic representation obtained by the canonical quantization of the spinorial formalism. The resolution of the identity gives a tool for implementing the projection of states in the full bosonic representation onto the space of solutions to the Gauss and area matching constraints of loop quantum gravity. This procedure is particularly efficient in the semiclassical regime, leading to explicit expressions for the loop expansions of coherent, heat kernel and squeezed states.

  14. Plasma Processing of Large Curved Surfaces for SRF Cavity Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The development of the technology based on Cl2/Ar plasma etching has to address several crucial parameters which influence the etching rate and surface roughness, and eventually, determine cavity performance. This includes dependence of the process on the frequency of the RF generator, gas pressure, power level, the driven (inner) electrode configuration, and the chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To demonstrate surface layer removal in the asymmetric non-planar geometry, we are using a simple cylindrical cavity with 8 ports symmetrically distributed over the cylinder. The ports are used for diagnosing the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (RF) circuit elements, chlorine concentration in the Cl2/Ar gas mixtures, residence...

  15. Fano resonance engineering in slanted cavities with hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaianella, Fabio; Maes, Bjorn

    2016-09-01

    We present the possibility to engineer Fano resonances using multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials. The proposed cavity designs are composed of multilayers with a central slanted part. The highly tunable resonances originate from the interference between a propagating and an evanescent mode inside the slanted section. The propagating mode can reach an extremely high effective index, making the realization of deeply subwavelength cavities possible, as small as 5 nm. The evanescent mode is rarely analyzed but plays an important role here, as its contribution determines the particular shape of the cavity characteristic. Moreover, these phenomena cannot be described using effective medium theory, and we provide a more rigorous analysis. The reported resonances are very sensitive to any structural changes and could be used for sensing applications.

  16. Transverse-mode-selectable microlens vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Debernardi, Pierluigi; Lee, Yong Tak;

    2010-01-01

    A new vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structure employing a thin microlens is suggested and numerically investigated. The laser can be made to emit in either a high-power Gaussian-shaped single-fundamental mode or a high-power doughnut-shaped higher-order mode. The physical origin...

  17. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  18. Beam - cavity interaction beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a beam with a cavity and a generator in cyclic accelerators or storage rings is investigated. Application of Maxwell's equations together with the nonuniform boundary condition allows one to get an equivalent circuit for a beam-loaded cavity. The general equation for beam loading is obtained on the basis of the equivalent circuit, and the beam admittance is calculated. Formulas for power consumption by a beam-loaded cavity are derived, and the optimal tuning and coupling factor are analyzed. (author)

  19. The design and HOM studies of INDUS-1 cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synchrotron radiation facility consisting of two storage rings INDUS-1 (450 MeV) and INDUS-2 (2.0 GeV) is under construction at the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. In the first phase, a 20 MeV injector microtron, a 700 MeV booster synchrotron and the storage ring INDUS-1 will be built. This paper describes the design and Higher Order Mode (HOM) studies for the booster and INDUS-1 cavity. The input coupler and sensing loops are also described. (author). 2 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Wilson Loop diagrams and Positroids

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwala, Susama; Amat, Eloi Marin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study a new application of the positive Grassmanian to Wilson loop diagrams (or MHV diagrams) for scattering amplitudes in N=4 Super Yang-Mill theory ($N=4$ SYM). There has been much interest in studying this theory via the positive Grassmanians using BCFW recursion. This is the first attempt to study MHV diagrams for planar Wilson loop calculations (or planar amplitudes) in terms of positive Grassmannians. We codify Wilson loop diagrams completely in terms of matroids. This...

  1. Wilson Loop Renormalization Group Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Polchinski, Joseph; Sully, James

    2011-01-01

    The locally BPS Wilson loop and the pure gauge Wilson loop map under AdS/CFT duality to string world-sheet boundaries with standard and alternate quantizations of the world-sheet fields. This implies an RG flow between the two operators, which we verify at weak coupling. Many additional loop operators exist at strong coupling, with a rich pattern of RG flows.

  2. Combinatorial aspects of code loops

    OpenAIRE

    Vojtěchovský, Petr

    2007-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness (up to equivalence) of code loops was first established by R. Griess. Nevertheless, the explicit construction of code loops remained open until T. Hsu introduced the notion of symplectic cubic spaces and their Frattini extensions, and pointed out how the construction of code loops followed from the (purely combinatorial) result of O. Chein and E. Goodaire. Within this paper, we focus on their combinatorial construction and prove a more general result using the lan...

  3. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  4. Fine Extruding Deformation and Modeling Optimization of Die Cavityin Special-Shaped Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Hongyuan; Zhu Hengjun

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of Conformal Mapping theory, using approaches of numerical trigonometric interpolation and vector normal convergence, region function of three-dimension deforming, surface function of die cavity, and mapping function between the plastic flow model and the axis-symmetry model were set up respectively for fine extruding special-shaped products with different arc radius ri. Then the stream function and both fields of velocity and strain ratio are inferred for special-shaped plastic deformation; meanwhile, with the help of Upper-Bound principle, the parameter of die cavity gets optimized. Taking square-shaped and hexagon-shaped products with different arc radius ri as examples,the velocity field gets analyzed, the parameter of die cavity is optimized and the die cavity gets depicted as well. Consequently, above study provides theoretical support for achieving the technical goal of CAD/CAM integration in die cavity of fine extrusion.

  5. Vibration insensitive optical ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Jin; Jiang Yan-Yi; Fang Su; Bi Zhi-Yi; Ma Long-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The mounting configuration of an optical ring cavity is optimized for vibration insensitivity by finite element analysis. A minimum response to vertical accelerations is found by simulations made for different supporting positions.

  6. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-01-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  7. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  8. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  9. Wilson Loop-Loop Correlators in AdS/QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Nian, J.; Pirner, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the expectation value of one circular Wilson loop and the correlator of two concentric circular Wilson loops in AdS/QCD using the modified AdS_5-metric given in Ref.[1]. The confinement properties of this metric in AdS/QCD are analyzed and compared with QCD and Nambu-Goto theory in four dimensions.

  10. Simulation of Multipacting in SC Low Beta Cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, Gennady [Fermilab; Berrutti, Paolo [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, Timergali [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan-II at Fermilab is a plan for improvements to the accelerator complex aimed at providing a beam power capability of at least 1 MW on target at the initiation of LBNE (Long Base Neutrino Experiment) operations. The central element of the PIP-II is a new 800 MeV superconducting linac, injecting into the existing Booster. Multipacting affects superconducting RF cavities in the entire range from high energy elliptical cavities to coaxial resonators for low-beta applications. This work is focused on multipacting study in the low-beta 325 MHz spoke cavities; namely SSR1 and SSR2, which are especially susceptible to the phenomena. The extensive simulations of multipacting in the cavities with updated material properties and comparison of the results with experimental data helped us to improve overall reliability and accuracy of these simulations. Our practical approach to the simulations is described in details. For SSR2, which has a high multipacting barrier right at the operating power level, some changes of the cavity shape to mitigate this harmful phenomenon are proposed.

  11. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; /DESY; Kneisel, P.; /Jefferson Lab; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  12. Inductance loop and partial

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Clayton R

    2010-01-01

    "Inductance is an unprecedented text, thoroughly discussing "loop" inductance as well as the increasingly important "partial" inductance. These concepts and their proper calculation are crucial in designing modern high-speed digital systems. World-renowned leader in electromagnetics Clayton Paul provides the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and calculate inductance." "With the present and increasing emphasis on high-speed digital systems and high-frequency analog systems, it is imperative that system designers develop an intimate understanding of the concepts and methods in this book. Inductance is a much-needed textbook designed for senior and graduate-level engineering students, as well as a hands-on guide for working engineers and professionals engaged in the design of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog systems."--Jacket.

  13. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  14. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  15. The Loop Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd

    1998-03-01

    Exciting new investigations have recently become possible for strongly correlated systems of spins, bosons, and fermions, through Quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the Loop Algorithm (H.G. Evertz, G. Lana, and M. Marcu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 875 (1993).) (For a recent review see: H.G. Evertz, xxx.lanl.gov/abs/cond-mat/9707221>cond- mat/9707221.) and its generalizations. A review of this new method, its generalizations and its applications is given, including some new results. The Loop Algorithm is based on a formulation of physical models in an extended ensemble of worldlines and graphs, and is related to Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms. It performs nonlocal changes of worldline configurations, determined by local stochastic decisions. It overcomes many of the difficulties of traditional worldline simulations. Computer time requirements are reduced by orders of magnitude, through a corresponding reduction in autocorrelations. The grand-canonical ensemble (e.g. varying winding numbers) is naturally simulated. The continuous time limit can be taken directly. Improved Estimators exist which further reduce the errors of measured quantities. The algorithm applies unchanged in any dimension and for varying bond-strengths. It becomes less efficient in the presence of strong site disorder or strong magnetic fields. It applies directly to locally XYZ-like spin, fermion, and hard-core boson models. It has been extended to the Hubbard and the tJ model and generalized to higher spin representations. There have already been several large scale applications, especially for Heisenberg-like models, including a high statistics continuous time calculation of quantum critical exponents on a regularly depleted two-dimensional lattice of up to 20000 spatial sites at temperatures down to T=0.01 J.

  16. Inversion of arbitrary segmented loop source TEM data over a layered earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai; Xue, Guo-qiang; Zhao, pan; Zhou, Nan-nan; Zhong, Hua-sen

    2016-05-01

    The loop source TEM method has been widely used in the detection of a mined out area in China. In the cases that the laying of traditional rectangle or square transmitting loop is limited due to the presence of obstacle on the path of the loop, the changing of the shape of the transmitting loop to bypass the obstacle is a labor saving solution. A numeric integration scheme is proposed to calculate the response and Jacobian of the segmented loop source from that of an electric dipole source. The comparison of forward response between the segmented loop and square loop shows the effect of loop geometry on the decay curves. In order to interpret the data from an irregular source loop, this paper presents an inversion scheme that incorporate the effect of loop geometry. The proposed inversion scheme is validated on the synthetic data, and then applied to the field data. The result reveals that the developed inversion scheme is capable of interpreting the segmented loop source TEM field data.

  17. 基于CFD的内构件强化内循环流化床流场结构分析%Computational fluid dynamics simulation of hydrodynamics in an internal-loop fluidized bed reactor with a funnel-shaped internal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱家亮; 陈祥佳; 张涛; 冯春华; 韦朝海

    2011-01-01

    The development of fluidized bed reactors suffers from drawbacks including a poor understanding of the complexity of internal fluid flow and the lack of an efficient theory for scale-up of the design. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation using the Eulerian-Eulerian double-phase model was used for predicting the complex two-phase flow in a reactor which was enhanced by implanting an funnel-shaped internal in the internal-loop fiuidized bed reactor. The role of the conical baffle in improving the gas-liquid mixing was explored by investigating the flow field, the gas holdup distribution and the liquid velocity distribution. The simulation results demonstrate that the Eulerian-Eulerian model reasonably predicts the two-phase flow in the fiuidized bed. The cone-shaped baffle is favorable for improving gas-liquid mass transfer by increasing the flow conductivity of both gas and liquid and extending the bubble retention time. The presence of the conical baffle results in an increase in the gas holdup by 10%~25% in the rising area and by a maximum of ten times in the downcomer area, but also a noticeable decrease in the liquid circulation velocity. Non-uniform distribution of bubbles is also observed in the downcomer area, and specifically the gas holdup in some areas is found to approach 1. The simulation results imply that the appropriate range of gas velocity and type of the implanted baffle should be rationalized to achieve the optimal liquid circulation velocity and gas holdup, thus leading to the optimization of reactor function and system design.%针对流化床内部流体结构的复杂性和缺乏有效放大设计理论的问题,以漏斗型导流内构件强化的内循环流化床的气液运动为研究对象,利用欧拉-欧拉双流体模型构建了能描述其复杂流动的CFD数学模型,通过宏观流场、气含率分布、液体速度分布解析内构件对气液混合传质的作用原理.数值模拟结果表明:双流体模型

  18. Plasma Treatment of Bulk Niobium Surface for SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marija Raskovic; H. Phillips; Anne-Marie Valente

    2006-08-16

    Pulsed electric discharges were used to demonstrate the validity of plasma surface treatment of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. The experiments were performed on disc-shaped Nb samples and compared with identical samples treated with buffer chemical polishing techniques. The results of several standard surface analytical techniques indicate that plasma-treated samples have comparable or superior properties regarding the surface roughness and composition.

  19. Further studies of the seismic characteristics of Russian explosions in cavities: Implications for cavity decoupling of underground nuclear explosions. Final report, August 1993-November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.R.; Kitov, I.O.; Rimer, N.; Sultanov, D.D.; Barker, B.W.

    1996-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the results of a joint research program under which an attempt is made to develop a better understanding of the effects of cavity decoupling on the seismic signals produced by underground nuclear explosions. Investigations conducted under this program have focused on analyses of seismic data recorded from a series of HE cavity decoupling experiments conducted by the Russians in Kirghizia in 1960, and from a sequence of nuclear tests conducted in a water-filled cavity at the Soviet Azgir test site during the period 1975-1979. The Kirghizia series included tests designed to assess the influence of cavity geometry on decoupling effectiveness, and comparisons of near-field seismic data recorded from these tests indicate that the low frequency decoupling factor is independent of cavity shape for elongated cavities with length to width ratios of 6 or more, in agreement with previous theoretical simulation results. Broadband seismic data recorded from the Azgir water-filled cavity tests are analyzed to estimate cavity/tamped source spectral ratios, and the results are compared with theoretical finite difference simulations of these tests.

  20. Hinode and IRIS Observations of a Prominence-Cavity System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibben, Patricia R.; Reeves, Kathy; Su, Yingna

    2016-05-01

    Long-lived solar prominences often have a coronal cavity enclosing the prominence. Within the cavity, hot X-ray emission can persist above the prominence and in the central regions of the cavity. We present the results of an Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Hinode coordinated Observation Program (IHOP 264) study of a prominence-cavity system. The X-ray Telescope (XRT) observes an inflow of bright X-ray emission that strikes and envelops the prominence-cavity system causing an eruption of chromospheric plasma near the base of the prominence. During and after the eruption, an increase in X-ray emission forms within the cavity and above the prominence. IRIS and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observe strong blue shifts in both chromosphere and coronal lines during the eruption. The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) Ca II H-line data show bright emission along the eruption path with complex turbulent plasma motions. The IRIS Si IV 1394 Angstrom spectra along the on-disk portion of the prominence show a region of decreased emission near the base of the prominence, suggesting a magnetic field bald-patch topology along the Polarity Inversion Line (PIL). Combined, these observations imply a cylindrical flux rope best represents the prominence-cavity system. A model of the magnetic structure of the prominence-cavity system comprised of a weakly twisted flux rope can explain the observed loops in the X-ray and EUV data. Observations from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) are compared to predicted models and are inconclusive. We find that more sensitive measurements of the magnetic field strength along the line-of-sight are needed to verify this configuration.Patricia Jibben and Kathy Reeves are supported by under contract 80111112705 from Lockheed-Martin to SAO, contract NNM07AB07C from NASA to SAO, grant number NNX12AI30G from NASA to SAO, and contract Z15-12504 from HAO to SAO under a grant from AFOSR. Yingna Su is supported by the Youth Fund of

  1. Multipacting Analysis for the Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    A compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) superconducting crab cavity is being developed for the LHC upgrade. The cavity shape and the LOM/HOM couplers for such a design have been optimized to meet the space and beam dynamics requirements, and satisfactory RF parameters have been obtained. As it is known that multipacting is an issue of concern in a superconducting cavity which may limit the achievable gradient. Thus it is important in the cavity RF design to eliminate the potential MP conditions to save time and cost of cavity development. In this paper, we present the multipacting analysis for the HWSR crab cavity using the Track3P code developed at SLAC, and to discuss means to mitigate potential multipacting barriers. Track3P was used to analyze potential MP in the cavity and the LOM, HOM and FPC couplers. No resonances were found in the LOM couplers and the coaxial beam pipe. Resonant trajectories were identified on various locations in cavity, HOM and FPC couplers. Most of the resonances are not at the peak SEY of Nb. Run-away resonances were identified in broader areas on the cavity end plate and in the HOM coupler. The enhancement counter for run-away resonances does not show significant MP. HOM coupler geometry will be optimized to minimize the high SEY resonance.

  2. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  3. Loop groups and noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Carpi, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    We describe the representation theory of loop groups in terms of K-theory and noncommutative geometry. This is done by constructing suitable spectral triples associated with the level l projective unitary positive-energy representations of any given loop group LG. The construction is based on certain supersymmetric conformal field theory models associated with LG.

  4. Analytical description of brittle-to-ductile transition in bcc metals. Nucleation of dislocation loop at the crack tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleation of dislocation loop at the crack tip in a material subjected to uniaxial loading is investigated. Analytical expression for the total energy of rectangular dislocation loop at the crack tip is found. Dependence of the nucleation energy barrier on dislocation loop shape and stress intensity factor at the crack tip is determined. It is established that the energetic barrier for nucleation of dislocation loop strongly depends on the stress intensity factor. Nucleation of dislocation loop is very sensitive to stress field modifiers (forest dislocations, precipitates, clusters of point defects, etc) in the crack tip vicinity. (orig.)

  5. Wilson Loop Diagrams and Positroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwala, Susama; Marin-Amat, Eloi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a new application of the positive Grassmannian to Wilson loop diagrams (or MHV diagrams) for scattering amplitudes in N= 4 Super Yang-Mill theory (N = 4 SYM). There has been much interest in studying this theory via the positive Grassmannians using BCFW recursion. This is the first attempt to study MHV diagrams for planar Wilson loop calculations (or planar amplitudes) in terms of positive Grassmannians. We codify Wilson loop diagrams completely in terms of matroids. This allows us to apply the combinatorial tools in matroid theory used to identify positroids (non-negative Grassmannians) to Wilson loop diagrams. In doing so, we find that certain non-planar Wilson loop diagrams define positive Grassmannians. While non-planar diagrams do not have physical meaning, this finding suggests that they may have value as an algebraic tool, and deserve further investigation.

  6. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The start-up transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe start-up behaviors. Topics include the four start-up scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the start-up scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power start-up, and methods to enhance the start-up success. Also addressed are the thermodynamic constraint between the evaporator and reservoir in the loop heat pipe operation, the superheat requirement for nucleate boiling, pressure spike and pressure surge during the start-up transient, and repeated cycles of loop start-up andshutdown under certain conditions.

  7. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  8. 3D cavity detection technique and its application based on cavity auto scanning laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ling; LI Xi-bing; LI Fa-ben; ZHAO Guo-yan; QIN Yu-hui

    2008-01-01

    Ground constructions and mines are severely threatened by underground cavities especially those unsafe or inaccessible ones. Safe and precise cavity detection is vital for reasonable cavity evaluation and disposal. The conventional cavity detection methods and their limitation were analyzed. Those methods cannot form 3D model of underground cavity which is used for instructing the cavity disposal; and their precisions in detection are always greatly affected by the geological circumstance. The importance of 3D cavity detection in metal mine for safe exploitation was pointed out; and the 3D cavity laser detection method and its principle were introduced. A cavity auto scanning laser system was recommended to actualize the cavity 3D detection after comparing with the other laser detection systems. Four boreholes were chosen to verify the validity of the cavity auto scanning laser system. The results show that the cavity auto scanning laser system is very suitable for underground 3D cavity detection, especially for those inaccessible ones.

  9. Self-cavity lasing in optically pumped single crystals of p-sexiphenyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Hisao; Tamura, Kenji; Sasaki, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    Organic single-crystal self-cavities are prepared by solution growth of p-sexiphenyl (p-6P). Based on Fabry-Pérot feedback inside a quasi-lozenge-shaped platelet crystal, edge-emitting laser is obtained under optical pumping. The multimode lasing band appears at the 0-1 or 0-2 vibronic progressions depending on the excitation conditions which affect the self-absorption effect. Cavity-size dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is investigated with laser-etched single crystals of p-6P. As the cavity length of square-shaped crystal is reduced from 100 to 10 μm, ASE threshold fluence is decreased probably due to size-dependent light confinement in the crystal cavity.

  10. Self-cavity lasing in optically pumped single crystals of p-sexiphenyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Yanagi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Organic single-crystal self-cavities are prepared by solution growth of p-sexiphenyl (p-6P. Based on Fabry-Pérot feedback inside a quasi-lozenge-shaped platelet crystal, edge-emitting laser is obtained under optical pumping. The multimode lasing band appears at the 0-1 or 0-2 vibronic progressions depending on the excitation conditions which affect the self-absorption effect. Cavity-size dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE is investigated with laser-etched single crystals of p-6P. As the cavity length of square-shaped crystal is reduced from 100 to 10 μm, ASE threshold fluence is decreased probably due to size-dependent light confinement in the crystal cavity.

  11. A practical guide to endodontic access cavity preparation in molar teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Rhodes, J

    2007-08-11

    The main objective of access cavity preparation is to identify the root canal entrances for subsequent preparation and obturation of the root canal system. Access cavity preparation can be one of the most challenging and frustrating aspects of endodontic treatment, but it is the key to successful treatment. Inadequate access cavity preparation may result in difficulty locating or negotiating the root canals. This may result in inadequate cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canal system. It may also contribute to instrument separation and aberrations of canal shape. These factors may ultimately lead to failure of treatment. Good access cavity design and preparation is therefore imperative for quality endodontic treatment, prevention of iatrogenic problems, and prevention of endodontic failure.

  12. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  13. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion

  14. The Positions and Number of Flux Loops and Magnetic Probes for the HT-7U Superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈飙; 罗家融; 万宝年; 王华中

    2003-01-01

    The plasma shape and other paremeters such as βp, li is important for the tokamakdeveice where the plasma has a non-circular cross-section of sufficient elongation. The measueredsignals of magnetic probes and flux loops are used to reconstruct the plasma shape and thecurrent profile in device operation and plasma shape feed back control system. So the numberand positions of magnetic probes and flux loops provides the basis of the plasma reconstruction.This paper instroduce how to use EFIT code (equilibrium fitting code) to determine the numberand positions of the magnetic probes and flux loops. The simulation result is given also.

  15. On the electrostatic equilibrium of charges and cavities in a conductor

    CERN Document Server

    Pathak, Aritro

    2016-01-01

    We consider a charged conductor of arbitrary shape, in electrostatic equilibrium, with one or more cavities inside it, and with fixed charges placed outside the conductors and inside the cavities. The field inside a particular cavity is then only due to charges within that cavity itself and to the surface charge induced on the surface of the same cavity. A similar statement holds for the exterior of the conductor. Although this is an elementary property of conductors, it is not a trivial statement, as explained in this article. Undergraduate texts in electrodynamics do not discuss at length or provide a complete argument for an important problem such as this. Two simple and complete proofs are provided in this note with the help of the standard electrostatic uniqueness theorems.

  16. Effectiveness of Er:YAG laser in cavity preparation for retrograde filling--in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlović, Zoran; Grgurević, Lovro; Verzak, Zeljko; Modrić, Vesna-Erika; Sorić, Pjetra; Grgurević, Josko

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sealing quality of Super EBA cement in laser prepared root-end cavities in comparison with root-end cavities classically prepared with steel burrs. Two groups of three millimeter root sections were prepared. The first group was prepared with the Er:YAG laser and the second group with a steel burr mounted on a surgical handpiece. The sections were filled with Super EBA cement and tested for leakage with fluid transport techniques. The sealing quality of Super EBA cement in the classically prepared root-end cavities was better, but there was no statistically significant difference between the two preparation techniques. The possible reason for greater leakage in the laser prepared root-end cavities was probably the irregular shape of the root-end cavity.

  17. Middle ear cavity morphology is consistent with an aquatic origin for testudines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Katie L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Ketten, Darlene R;

    2013-01-01

    evolved to hear in different environments, we examined middle ear morphology and scaling in most extant families, as well as some extinct species, using 3-dimensional reconstructions from micro magnetic resonance (MR) and submillimeter computed tomography (CT) scans. All families of testudines exhibited...... a similar shape of the bony structure of the middle ear cavity, with the tympanic disk located on the rostrolateral edge of the cavity. Sea Turtles have additional soft tissue that fills the middle ear cavity to varying degrees. When the middle ear cavity is modeled as an air-filled sphere of the same...... volume resonating in an underwater sound field, the calculated resonances for the volumes of the middle ear cavities largely fell within testudine hearing ranges. Although there were some differences in morphology, there were no statistically significant differences in the scaling of the volume...

  18. Polyakov loop correlators and cyclic Wilson loop from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, Alexei; Weber, Johannes Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    We discuss color screening in 2+1 flavor QCD in terms of free energies of a static quark-antiquark pair. Thermal modifications of long distance correlations in quark-antiquark systems are studied in terms of static meson correlators. We calculate the Polyakov loop correlator, the color-singlet Wilson line correlator in Coulomb gauge and the cyclic Wilson loop on lattices using the HISQ/Tree action and almost physical quark mases with $N_\\tau= 4, 6, 8, 10, 12$. We present results in the continuum limit for temperatures up to $T \\lesssim 650$ MeV and discuss the linear divergence of the cyclic Wilson loop.

  19. Control Loops for the J-PARC RCS Digital Low-Level RF Control

    CERN Document Server

    Schnase, Alexander; Ezura, Eizi; Hara, Keigo; Nomura, Masahiro; Ohmori, Chihiro; Takagi, Akira; Tamura, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    2005-01-01

    The low-level radiofrequency control for the Rapic Cycling Synchrotron of J-PARC is based on digital signal processing. This system controls the acceleration voltages of 12 magnetic alloy loaded cavities. To achive a short overall delay, mandatory for stable loop operation, the data-processing is based on distributed arithmetics in FPGA. Due to the broadband characteristic of the acceleration cavities, no tuning loop is needed. To handle the large beam current, the RF system operates simultaneously with dual harmonics (h=2) and (h=4). The stability of the amplitude loops is limited by the delay of the FIR filters used after downconversion. The phase loop offers several operation modes to define the phase relation of (h=2) and (h=4) between the longitudinal beam signal and the vector-sum of the cavity voltages. Besides the FIR filters, we provide cascaded CIC filters with smoothly varying coefficients. Such a filter tracks the revolution frequency and has a substantially shorter delay, thereby increasing the s...

  20. Higher Order Modes in Coupled Cavities of the Flash Module ACC39

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I R R; Li, Z; Zhang, P

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM's) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  1. Higher order modes HOMs in coupled cavities of the FLASH module ACC39

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I R R; Li, Z; Zhang, P

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the higher order modes (HOM’s) in the 3.9GHz bunch shaping cavities installed in the FLASH facility at DESY. A suite of finite element computer codes (including HFSS and ACE3P) and globalised scattering matrix calculations (GSM) are used to investigate the modes in these cavities. This study is primarily focused on the dipole component of the multiband expansion of the wakefield, with the emphasis being on the development of a HOM-based BPM system for ACC39. Coupled inter-cavity modes are simulated together with a limited band of trapped modes.

  2. Conditioning effects of cavities prepared with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser and an air-turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Chikage; Taira, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Masaya; Shinkai, Koichi; Katoh, Yoshiroh

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, morphologically and histochemically, five types of conditioning effects on cavities prepared with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser and an air-turbine. Cavities were prepared using a Waterlase(®) MD turbo handpiece (W) and an air-turbine (AT) on human extracted molars. The cavity conditionings used were non-conditioned (G1), K-etchant Gel (G2), K-etchant Gel + AD Gel (G3), Clearfil SE Bond primer (G4) and Clearfil S(3) Bond (G5). On naked eye observations, enamel of G1, G2 and G3 in the W cavities and etched enamel of G2 and G3 in the AT cavities were observed as rough and dull in appearance. G4 and G5 in W and AT cavities were observed as shiny surfaces. On SEM observations, no smeared layer was observed in W cavities, while a smeared layer and bur-scratches were observed in AT cavities. In W cavities, rough surfaces were observed on enamel. That is, cracks and minute rough surfaces were observed. In contrast, equally etched scale-shaped enamel rods were observed in AT cavities. Widely opened dentinal tubules and protruding peritubular matrices of dentin were observed in W cavities. A few remaining smeared plugs could be observed at the AT cavities. On LM observations, 13-16 μm layers of the dentin in G1, G2, G4 and G5 of W cavities were stained red in color by the Azan staining method, while redness was not observed in G3. No groups were stained red in AT cavities. It was considered that layers stained red in color were thermal degeneration layers of dentin induced by W. Namely 30 s etching of 40% phosphoric acid gel followed by 90 s treatment of 10% NaClO gel should be recommended for use when combined with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser for cavity preparation.

  3. Investigation on the fabrication of the 3rd harmonic superconducting cavity for the SSRF storage ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhen-Yu; MA Guang-Ming; YU Hai-Bo; MAO Dong-Qing; FENG Zi-Qiang; HOU Hong-Tao; LIU Jian-Fei

    2009-01-01

    A third harmonic superconducting niobium cavity has been proposed for installation in the Shang-hai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) storage ring to improve the Touschek lifetime. In order to investigate the feasibility of the superconducting cavity fabrication indigenously and the possibility to master the fabrica-tion techniques, cavities were fabricated from copper and niobium sheets by deep drawing and electron-beam welding, and a series of measurements, such as resonant frequency, shape dimensions and wall thickness, were carried out during this process. After analysis of various problems existing in the fabrication process, tech-nique improvements were proposed, and finally the precise shape as designed and resonant frequency within 1.2 MHz were achieved for the new completed cavities. In addition, full annealing was finally proved to be a good cure for niobium sheets' tearing up during deep drawing. By fabricating niobium cavities successfully, some problems to the next step were cleared. This paper introduces the process of cavity fabrication and its technique improvements towards forming, and the initial vertical test result of niobium cavity is also presented.

  4. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  5. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  6. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, D E; Gorhskov, A V; Kimble, H J

    2012-01-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated "impurity" atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a "strong coupling" regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a cavity photon. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  7. Renormalization of Loop Functions in QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Berwein, Matthias; Brambilla, Nora; Vairo, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We give a short overview of the renormalization properties of rectangular Wilson loops, the Polyakov loop correlator and the cyclic Wilson loop. We then discuss how to renormalize loops with more than one intersection, using the simplest non-trivial case as an illustrative example. Our findings expand on previous treatments. The generalized exponentiation theorem is applied to the Polyakov loop correlator and used to renormalize linear divergences in the cyclic Wilson loop.

  8. Oscillation of Newly Formed Loops After Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Shuhong

    2016-01-01

    With the high spatial and temporal resolution H$\\alpha$ images from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope, we focus on two groups of loops with a X-shaped configuration in the dynamic chromosphere. We find that the anti-directed loops approach each other and reconnect continually. The connectivity of the loops is changed and new loops are formed and stack together. The stacked loops are sharply bent, implying that they are greatly impacted by the magnetic tension force. When another more reconnection process takes place, one new loop is formed and stacks with the previously formed ones. Meanwhile, the stacked loops retract suddenly and move toward the balance position, performing an overshoot movement, which led to an oscillation with an average period of about 45 s. The oscillation of newly formed loops after magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere is observed for the first time. We suggest that the stability of the stacked loops is destroyed due to the join of the last new loop and then suddenly retract under th...

  9. Radial propagators and Wilson loops

    CERN Document Server

    Leupold, S; Leupold, Stefan; Weigert, Heribert

    1996-01-01

    We present a relation which connects the propagator in the radial (Fock-Schwinger) gauge with a gauge invariant Wilson loop. It is closely related to the well-known field strength formula and can be used to calculate the radial gauge propagator. The result is shown to diverge in four-dimensional space even for free fields, its singular nature is however naturally explained using the renormalization properties of Wilson loops with cusps and self-intersections. Using this observation we provide a consistent regularization scheme to facilitate loop calculations. Finally we compare our results with previous approaches to derive a propagator in Fock-Schwinger gauge.

  10. BMN correlators by loop equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the BMN approach to N=4 SYM a large class of correlators of interest are expressible in terms of expectation values of traces of words in a zero-dimensional gaussian complex matrix model. We develop a loop-equation based, analytic strategy for evaluating such expectation values to any order in the genus expansion. We reproduce the expectation values which were needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus one correction to the anomalous dimension of BMN-operators and which were earlier obtained by combinatorial means. Furthermore, we present the expectation values needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus two correction. (author)

  11. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Medium-Beta 650 MHz SRF Cavity Prototypes for Project-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Marhauser, W.A. Clemens, J. Henry, P. Kneisel, R. Martin, R.A. Rimmer, G. Slack, L. Turlington, R.S. Williams

    2011-09-01

    A new type of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity shape with a shallow equator dome to reduce electron impact energies for suppressing multipacting barriers has been proposed. The shape is in consideration for the first time in the framework of Project-X to design a potential multi-cell cavity candidate for the medium-beta section of the SRF proton CW linac operating at 650 MHz. Rationales covering the design of the multi-cell cavity, the manufacture, post-processing and high power testing of two single-cell prototypes are presented.

  12. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Medium-Beta 650 MHz SRF Cavity Prototypes for Project-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity shape with a shallow equator dome to reduce electron impact energies for suppressing multipacting barriers has been proposed. The shape is in consideration for the first time in the framework of Project-X to design a potential multi-cell cavity candidate for the medium-beta section of the SRF proton CW linac operating at 650 MHz. Rationales covering the design of the multi-cell cavity, the manufacture, post-processing and high power testing of two single-cell prototypes are presented.

  13. Gross morphology of rhea oropharyngeal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio N. Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The rhea (Rhea americana americana is an american bird belonging to Ratite's family. Studies related to its morphology are still scarce. This study aims to describe the macroscopic structures of the oropharyngeal cavity. Five heads (2 to 6 months old formalin preserved were anatomically dissected to expose the oropharynx. The oropharynx of the rhea was "bell-shaped" composed by the maxillary and mandibular rhamphotheca. The roof and floor presented two distinct regions different in colour of the mucosa. The rostral region was pale pink contrasting to grey coloured caudal region. The median longitudinal ridge extended rostrally from the apex of the choana to the tip of the beak in the roof and it is clearly more prominent and rigid than the homolog in the floor that appeared thin and stretched merely along the rostral portion of the regio interramalis. The floor was formed by the interramal region, (regio interramalis tongue and laryngeal mound containing glove-shaped glottis. This study confirmed the basic morphology of the oropharinx of the rhea. However, important morphological information not previously described is highlighted and contradictory information present in the literature is clarified.

  14. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul;

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective open study the sterility of the uterine cavity was evaluated in 99 women admitted for hysterectomy. The indications for hysterectomy were in most cases persistent irregular vaginal bleeding and fibromyomas of the uterus. Samples for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, Chlamydia...... trachomatis, yeasts and viruses were taken preoperatively from the apex of the vagina and cervical os. Immediately after hysterectomy the uterus was opened under sterile conditions and samples obtained from the isthmus and fundus of the uterine cavity for microbiological examination. Wet smears were taken...

  15. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heremans K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  16. Nanobeam Cavities for Reconfigurable Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Deotare, Parag

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, with theoretical quality factors of \\(1.4 × 10^7\\) in silicon, operating at ~1550 nm. By detecting the cross-polarized resonantly scattered light from a normally incident laser beam, we measure a quality factor of nearly \\(7.5 × 10^5\\). We show on-chip integration of the cavities using waveguides and an inverse taper geometry based mode size converters, and also...

  17. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction. PMID:25871175

  18. Cavity Solitons in VCSEL Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barbay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We review advances on the experimental study of cavity solitons in VCSELs in the past decade. We emphasize on the design and fabrication of electrically or optically pumped broad-area VCSELs used for CSs formation and review different experimental configurations. Potential applications of CSs in the field of photonics are discussed, in particular the use of CSs for all-optical processing of information and for VCSELs characterization. Prospects on self-localization studies based on vertical cavity devices involving new physical mechanisms are also given.

  19. Entanglement swapping between atom and cavity and generation of entangled state of cavity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ai-Xi; Deng Li

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme where entanglement swapping between atom and cavity can be realized. A-type three-level atoms interacting resonantly with cavity field are considered. By detecting atom and cavity field, it realizes entanglement swapping between atom and cavity. It uses the technique of entanglement swapping to generate an entangled state of two cavity fields by measuring on atoms. It discusses the experimental feasibility of the proposed scheme and application of entangled state of cavity fields.

  20. Optical loop framing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATA provides an electron beam pulse of 70-ns duration at a 1-Hz rate. Our present optical diagnostics technique involve the imaging of the visible light generated by the beam incident onto the plant of a thin sheet of material. It has already been demonstrated that the light generated has a sufficiently fast temporal reponse in performing beam diagnostics. Notwithstanding possible beam emittance degradation due to scattering in the thin sheet, the observation of beam spatial profiles with relatively high efficiencies has provided data complementary to that obtained from beam wall current monitors and from various x-ray probes and other electrical probes. The optical image sensor consists of a gated, intensified television system. The gate pulse of the image intensifier can be appropriately delayed to give frames that are time-positioned from the head to the tail of the beam with a minimum gate time of 5-ns. The spatial correlation of the time frames from pulse to pulse is very good for a stable electron beam; however, when instabilities do occur, it is difficult to properly assess the spatial composition of the head and the tail of the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Multiple gating within a pulse duration becomes desirable but cannot be performed because the recycle time (20-ms) of the TV system is much longer than the beam pulse. For this reason we have developed an optical-loop framing technique that will allow the recording of two frames within one pulse duration with our present gated/intensified TV system

  1. Application of Shape Lock-on Method in Plate Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xian-lei; WANG Jun; WANG Zhao-dong; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2004-01-01

    AGC system can improve the plate gauge precision, and damage the plate shape if the shape control loop is left quite open. This damage will cause wave during rolling wide-thin plate. A control strategy named shape lock-on method is afforded for plate shape control. This method requires APC instead of AGC at last one or two passes during rolling wide-thin plate. Approved by theory and on-line application, this method is good for the plate shape and crown control with small effect on gauge control.

  2. A preliminary quadrupole asymmetry study of a β=0.12 superconducting single spoke cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zi-Qin; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Xing; Zhou, Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen

    2014-10-01

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been launched in China for nuclear waste transmutation. For the application of high intensity proton beam acceleration, the quadrupole asymmetry effect needs to be carefully evaluated for cavities. Single spoke cavities are the main accelerating structures in the low energy front-end. The single spoke cavity has small transverse electromagnetic field asymmetry, which may lead to transverse RF defocusing asymmetry and beam envelope asymmetry. A superconducting single spoke resonator (PKU-2 Spoke) of β=0.12 and f=325 MHz with a racetrack-shaped inner conductor has been designed at Peking university. The study of its RF field quadrupole asymmetry and its effect on transverse momentum change has been performed. The quadrupole asymmetry study has also been performed on a β=0.12 and f=325 MHz ring-shaped single spoke cavity. Our results show that the quadrupole asymmetry is very small for both the racetrack-shaped and the ring-shaped single spoke cavity.

  3. Deep drawing experiences of niobium disk for PEFP SRF cavity prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Sung; An, Sun; Zhang, Liping; Tang, Yazhe; Li, Ying Min; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a geometrical beta of 0.42 has been designed to accelerate a proton beam after 100 MeV for an extension of Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP). The designed cavity shape is an elliptical and the resonant frequency is 700 MHz. In order to confirm the RF and mechanical properties of the cavity, two prototypes of copper cavities have been fabricated and tested. Based on the experiences gained with the copper prototypes, two niobium prototypes have been designed. One is two-cell cavity and the other is five cell cavity. The two-cell cavity is for finalizing the niobium cavity production procedure and testing the cavity RF properties at a low temperature and moderate power level. The five-cell cavity is for checking the production quality and testing vertical test system in the future. Both of them are under fabrication. Through the fabrication of the niobium prototype, several issues such as deep drawing, electron beam welding and surface treatment will be addressed. The drawing of the PEPF SRF low beta cavity is shown in Fig. 1. Major parameters for the cavity are like following. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 per cavity - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m - Field flatness: 1.56 % - Cell to cell coupling: 1.41 % - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Lorentz force detuning: 0.4 Hz/(MV/m)2 - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m - External Q of FPC: 8.0E5 {+-}20 % - HOM load: less than 2 W - HOM Qext requirement: less than 3.0E5 At present, all the niobium disk and plates for cavity and NbTi flanges for beam pipe flange are prepared.

  4. Gauge theories in loop space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure Yang-Mills theory is reformulated in terms of gauge-independent loop variables whose intrinsic redundancy is removed using a newly derived nonabelian generalisation of the Poincare lemma. (author)

  5. Product Integrals and Wilson loops

    OpenAIRE

    Karp, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Using product integrals we review the unambiguous mathematical representation of Wilson line and Wilson loop operators, including their behavior under gauge transformations and the non-abelian Stokes theorem. Interesting consistency conditions among Wilson lines are also presented.

  6. Loop Quantum Cosmology Gravitational Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Odintsov, S D

    2016-01-01

    Loop Quantum Cosmology is an appealing quantum completion of classical cosmology, which brings along various theoretical features which in many cases offer remedy or modify various classical cosmology aspects. In this paper we address the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism in the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology. As we demonstrate, when Loop Quantum Cosmology effects are taken into account in the resulting Friedmann equations for a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe, then even for a radiation dominated Universe, the predicted baryon-to-entropy ratio from the gravitational baryogenesis mechanism is non-zero, in contrast to the Einstein-Hilbert case, in which case the baryon-to-entropy ratio is zero. We also discuss various other cases apart from the radiation domination case, and we discuss how the baryon-to-entropy ratio is affected from the parameters of the quantum theory. In addition, we use illustrative exact solutions of Loop Quantum Cosmology and we investigate under which circumstances the bar...

  7. Matter in Loop Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Date, Ghanashyam

    2011-01-01

    Loop quantum Gravity, a non-perturbative and manifestly background free, quantum theory of gravity implies that at the kinematical level the spatial geometry is discrete in a specific sense. The spirit of background independence also requires a non-standard quantum representation of matter. While loop quantization of standard model fields has been proposed, detail study of its implications is not yet available. This review aims to survey the various efforts and results.

  8. Matter in Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanashyam Date

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Loop quantum gravity, a non-perturbative and manifestly background free, quantum theory of gravity implies that at the kinematical level the spatial geometry is discrete in a specific sense. The spirit of background independence also requires a non-standard quantum representation of matter. While loop quantization of standard model fields has been proposed, detail study of its implications is not yet available. This review aims to survey the various efforts and results.

  9. Mainz two-loop methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruecher, L.; Franzkowski, J.; Frink, A.; Kreimer, D. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    In the recent past procedures for the calculation of two-loop Feynman diagrams were developed at the University of Mainz. They solve self-energy and vertex diagrams involving arbitrary massive particles. The procedures are bound to a program package called XLOOPS which is designed to treat Feynman diagrams up to the two-loop level in a completely automatic way. (author) 14 refs, 3 figs

  10. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  11. Introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Mercuri, Simone

    2012-01-01

    The questions I have been asked during the 5th International School on Field Theory and Gravitation, have compelled me to give an account of the premises that I consider important for a beginner's approach to Loop Quantum Gravity. After a description of some general arguments and an introduction to the canonical theory of gravity, I review the background independent approach to quantum gravity, giving only a brief survey of Loop Quantum Gravity.

  12. Middle ear cavity morphology is consistent with an aquatic origin for testudines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Willis

    Full Text Available The position of testudines in vertebrate phylogeny is being re-evaluated. At present, testudine morphological and molecular data conflict when reconstructing phylogenetic relationships. Complicating matters, the ecological niche of stem testudines is ambiguous. To understand how turtles have evolved to hear in different environments, we examined middle ear morphology and scaling in most extant families, as well as some extinct species, using 3-dimensional reconstructions from micro magnetic resonance (MR and submillimeter computed tomography (CT scans. All families of testudines exhibited a similar shape of the bony structure of the middle ear cavity, with the tympanic disk located on the rostrolateral edge of the cavity. Sea Turtles have additional soft tissue that fills the middle ear cavity to varying degrees. When the middle ear cavity is modeled as an air-filled sphere of the same volume resonating in an underwater sound field, the calculated resonances for the volumes of the middle ear cavities largely fell within testudine hearing ranges. Although there were some differences in morphology, there were no statistically significant differences in the scaling of the volume of the bony middle ear cavity with head size among groups when categorized by phylogeny and ecology. Because the cavity is predicted to resonate underwater within the testudine hearing range, the data support the hypothesis of an aquatic origin for testudines, and function of the middle ear cavity in underwater sound detection.

  13. RF properties of 700 MHz, = 0.42 elliptical cavity for high current proton acceleration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amitava Roy; J Mondal; K C Mittal

    2008-12-01

    BARC is developing a technology for the accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and development of superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the accelerator-driven subcritical system project. We have studied RF properties of 700 MHz, = 0.42 single cell elliptical cavity for possible use in high current proton acceleration. The cavity shape optimization studies have been done using SUPERFISH code. A calculation has been done to find out the velocity range over which this cavity can accelerate protons efficiently and to select the number of cells/cavity. The cavity's peak electric and magnetic fields, power dissipation c, quality factor and effective shunt impedance 2 were calculated for various cavity dimensions using these codes. Based on these analyses a list of design parameters for the inner cell of the cavity has been suggested for possible use in high current proton accelerator.

  14. Helicoids, wrinkles, and loops in twisted ribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Julien; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2013-10-25

    We investigate the instabilities of a flat elastic ribbon subject to twist under tension and develop an integrated phase diagram of the observed shapes and transitions. We find that the primary buckling mode switches from being localized longitudinally along the length of the ribbon to transverse above a triple point characterized by a crossover tension that scales with ribbon elasticity and aspect ratio. Far from threshold, the longitudinally buckled ribbon evolves continuously into a self-creased helicoid with focusing of the curvature along the triangular edges. Further twist causes an anomalous transition to loops compared with rods due to the self-rigidity induced by the creases. When the ribbon is twisted under high tension, transverse wrinkles are observed due to the development of compressive stresses with higher harmonics for greater width-to-length ratios. Our results can be used to develop functional structures using a wide range of elastic materials and length scales.

  15. Simple device for treating prolapsing loop colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Yu; Liu, Chinsu; Ho, Shin-Huei; Wung, Shin-Huev; Chin, Taiwai; Wei, Choufu

    2006-03-01

    Stoma prolapse is a common complication of intestinal stoma. Although various surgical methods yield satisfactory results, nonsurgical treatment may be better for a temporary stoma. We report a case of a patient with a distal limb prolapse of a right transverse colostomy who received nonsurgical treatment with satisfactory results. For the treatment of a temporary transverse loop colostomy with distal limb prolapse, we designed a simple device consisting of a pediatric plastic medicine cup, which was rolled into a towel to shape the bottom of the cup into a compressor. The towel was put on the stoma outside of the colostomy bag with the compressor above the prolapsing limb of the colostomy. An abdominal binder was applied to fix the towel. PMID:16599021

  16. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  17. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianHua; RUAN ShiPing

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavitation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator, which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emergence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects, of both model and prototype, on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length below aerators was suggested, which considers overall effects of the above mentioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  18. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavi-tation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator,which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emer-gence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects,of both model and prototype,on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length be-low aerators was suggested,which considers overall effects of the above men-tioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  19. Large-mode enhancement cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Henning; Holzberger, Simon; Kaster, Jan; Weitenberg, Johannes; Pervak, Volodymyr; Apolonski, Alexander; Fill, Ernst; Krausz, Ferenc; Pupeza, Ioachim

    2013-05-01

    In passive enhancement cavities the achievable power level is limited by mirror damage. Here, we address the design of robust optical resonators with large spot sizes on all mirrors, a measure that promises to mitigate this limitation by decreasing both the intensity and the thermal gradient on the mirror surfaces. We introduce a misalignment sensitivity metric to evaluate the robustness of resonator designs. We identify the standard bow-tie resonator operated close to the inner stability edge as the most robust large-mode cavity and implement this cavity with two spherical mirrors with 600 mm radius of curvature, two plane mirrors and a round trip length of 1.2 m, demonstrating a stable power enhancement of near-infrared laser light by a factor of 2000. Beam radii of 5.7 mm × 2.6 mm (sagittal × tangential 1/e(2) intensity radius) on all mirrors are obtained. We propose a simple all-reflective ellipticity compensation scheme. This will enable a significant increase of the attainable power and intensity levels in enhancement cavities. PMID:23670017

  20. Field emission in RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1996-01-01

    Electron field emission limits the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities. It is shown how and why it is an important problem. The phenomenology of field emission is then described, both in DC and RF regimes. Merits of a few plausible `remedies` to field emission are discussed. (author). 20 refs.

  1. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...

  2. A 200 MHz prebunching cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This cavity was installed in the PS ring and proved very efficient in providing a modulation on the PS beam before it is injected into the SPS machine. Moreover it allowed longitudinal instabilities studies at high intensities. Roberto Cappi stands on the left.

  3. Black hole entropy, loop gravity, and polymer physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Eugenio, E-mail: bianchi@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Centre de Physique Theorique de Luminy , case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2011-06-07

    Loop gravity provides a microscopic derivation of black hole entropy. In this paper, I show that the microstates counted admit a semiclassical description in terms of shapes of a tessellated horizon. The counting of microstates and the computation of the entropy can be done via a mapping to an equivalent statistical mechanical problem: the counting of conformations of a closed polymer chain. This correspondence suggests a number of intriguing relations between the thermodynamics of black holes and the physics of polymers.

  4. Nanobeam cavities for Reconfigurable Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deotare, Parag B.

    We investigate the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, with theoretical quality factors of 1.4 x 107 in silicon, operating at ˜ 1550 nm. By detecting the cross-polarized resonantly scattered light from a normally incident laser beam, we measure a quality factor of nearly 7.5 x 105. We show on-chip integration of the cavities using waveguides and an inverse taper geometry based mode size converters, and also demonstrate tuning of the optical resonance using thermo-optic effect. We also study coupled cavities and show that the single nanobeam cavity modes are coupled into even and odd superposition modes. Using electrostatic force and taking advantage of the highly dispersive nature of the even mode to the nanobeam separation, we demonstrate dynamically reconfigurable optical filters tunable continuously and reversibly over a 9.5 nm wavelength range. The electrostatic force, obtained by applying bias voltages directly to the nanobeams, is used to control the spacing between the nanobeams, which in turn results in tuning of the cavity resonance. The observed tuning trends were confirmed through simulations that modeled the electrostatic actuation as well as the optical resonances in our reconfigurable geometries. Finally we demonstrate reconfiguration of coupled cavities by using optical gradient force induced mechanical actuation. Propagating waveguide modes that exist over wide wavelength range are used to actuate the structures and in that way control the resonance of a localized cavity mode. Using this all-optical approach, more than 18 linewidths of tuning range is demonstrated. Using an on-chip temperature self-referencing method that we developed, we determined that 20% of the total tuning was due to optomechanical reconfiguration and the rest due to thermo-optic effects. By operating the device at frequencies higher than the thermal cut-off, we show high speed operation dominated by

  5. An update on the study of high-gradient elliptical SRF cavities at 805 MHz for proton and other applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krawczyk, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Madrid, Mike [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roybal, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simakov, Evgenya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clemens, Bob [TJNAF; Macha, Jurt [TJNAF; Manus, Bob [TJNAF; Rimmer, Bob [TJNAF; Rimmer, Bob [TJNAF; Turlington, Larry [TJNAF

    2010-09-09

    An update on the study of 805 MHz elliptical SRF cavities that have been optimized for high gradient will be presented. An optimized cell shape, which is still appropriate for easy high pressure water rinsing, has been designed with the ratios of peak magnetic and electric fields to accelerating gradient being 3.75 mT/(MV/m) and 1.82, respectively. A total of 3 single-cell cavities have been fabricated. Two of the 3 cavities have been tested so far. The second cavity achieved an E{sub acc} of {approx}50 MV/m at Q{sub 0} of 1.4 x 10{sup 10}. This result demonstrates that 805 MHz cavities can, in principle, achieve as high as, or could even be better than, 1.3 GHz high-gradient cavities.

  6. LIGHT SOURCE: RF deflecting cavity for bunch length measurement in Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jia-Ru; Chen, Huai-Bi; Tang, Chuan-Xiang; Huang, Wen-Hui; Du, Ying-Chao; Zheng, Shu-Xin; Ren, Li

    2009-06-01

    An RF deflecting cavity used for bunch length measurement has been designed and fabricated at Tsinghua University for the Thomson Scattering X-Ray Source. The cavity is a 2856 MHz, π-mode, 3-cell standing-wave cavity, to diagnose the 3.5 MeV beam produced by photocathode electron gun. With a larger power source, the same cavity will again be used to measure the accelerated beam with energy of 50 MeV before colliding with the laser pulse. The RF design using MAFIA for both the cavity shape and the power coupler is reviewed, followed by presenting the fabrication procedure and bench measurement results of two cavities.

  7. Vertical cavity lasing from melt-grown crystals of cyano-substituted thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Yanagi, Hisao, E-mail: yanagi@ms.naist.jp [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Goto, Kaname; Yamashita, Kenichi; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, Fumio [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2015-10-19

    Vertical-cavity organic lasers are fabricated with melt-grown crystals of a cyano-substituted thiophene-phenylene co-oligomer. Due to lying molecular orientation, surface-emitting lasing is achieved even in the half-cavity crystal grown on a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) under optical pumping at room temperature. Anticrossing splits in angle-resolved photoluminescence spectra suggest the formation of exciton-polaritons between the cavity photons and the confined Frenkel excitons. By constructing the full-cavity structure sandwiched between the top and bottom DBRs, the lasing threshold is reduced to one order, which is as low as that of the half cavity. Around the threshold, the time profile of the full-cavity emission is collapsed to a pulsed shape accompanied by a finite turn-on delay. We discuss these observed characteristics in terms of a polariton contribution to the conventional photon lasing.

  8. Stereoscopic Observation of Slipping Reconnection in A Double Candle-Flame-Shaped Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Gou, Tingyu; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Zhuang, Bin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 January 28 M1.4 flare exhibits two side-by-side candle-flame-shaped flare loop systems underneath a larger cusp-shaped structure during the decay phase, as observed at the northwestern solar limb by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The northern loop system brightens following the initiation of the flare within the southern loop system, but all three cusp-shaped structures are characterized by ~ 10 MK temperatures, hotter than the arch-shaped loops underneath. The "Ahead" satellite of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) provides a top view, in which the post-flare loops brighten sequentially, with one end fixed while the other apparently slipping eastward. By performing stereoscopic reconstruction of the post-flare loops in EUV and mapping out magnetic connectivities, we found that the footpoints of the post-flare loops are slipping along the footprint of a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) separating the two loop systems, and that the reconstructed loops share similarity with the magne...

  9. Habitat-mediated variation in the importance of ecosystem engineers for secondary cavity nesters in a nest web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Robles

    Full Text Available Through physical state changes in biotic or abiotic materials, ecosystem engineers modulate resource availability to other organisms and are major drivers of evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Understanding whether and how ecosystem engineers are interchangeable for resource users in different habitats is a largely neglected topic in ecosystem engineering research that can improve our understanding of the structure of communities. We addressed this issue in a cavity-nest web (1999-2011. In aspen groves, the presence of mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolour nests was positively related to the density of cavities supplied by northern flickers (Colaptes auratus, which provided the most abundant cavities (1.61 cavities/ha. Flickers in aspen groves provided numerous nesting cavities to bluebirds (66% and swallows (46%, despite previous research showing that flicker cavities are avoided by swallows. In continuous mixed forests, however, the presence of nesting swallows was mainly related to cavity density of red-naped sapsuckers (Sphyrapicus nuchalis, which provided the most abundant cavities (0.52 cavities/ha, and to cavity density of hairy woodpeckers (Picoides villosus, which provided few (0.14 cavities/ha but high-quality cavities. Overall, sapsuckers and hairy woodpeckers provided 86% of nesting cavities to swallows in continuous forests. In contrast, the presence of nesting bluebirds in continuous forests was associated with the density of cavities supplied by all the ecosystem engineers. These results suggest that (i habitat type may mediate the associations between ecosystem engineers and resource users, and (ii different ecosystem engineers may be interchangeable for resource users depending on the quantity and quality of resources that each engineer supplies in each habitat type. We, therefore, urge the incorporation of the variation in the quantity and quality of resources provided by ecosystem

  10. Sink strength calculations of dislocations and loops using OKMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •The sink strength for dislocations and loops are calculated using OKMC. •The master curves for the 1D to 3D defect migration transition are well reproduced. •We find that OKMC and theory are in good agreement for low volume fractions. -- Abstract: We calculate the sink strength of dislocations and toroidal absorbers using Object Kinetic Monte Carlo and compare with the theoretical expressions. We get good agreement for dislocations and loop-shaped absorbers of 3D migrating defects, provided that the volume fraction is low, and fair agreements for dislocations with 1D migrating defects. The master curve for the 3D to 1D transition is well reproduced with loop-shaped absorbers and fairly well with dislocations. We conclude that, on the one hand, the master curve is correct for a wide range of sinks and that, on the other, OKMC techniques inherently take correctly into account the strengths of sinks of any shape, provided that an effective way of appropriately inserting the sinks to be studied can be found

  11. Loop Quantum Gravity Phenomenology: Linking Loops to Observational Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Girelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research during the last decade demonstrates that effects originating on the Planck scale are currently being tested in multiple observational contexts. In this review we discuss quantum gravity phenomenological models and their possible links to loop quantum gravity. Particle frameworks, including kinematic models, broken and deformed Poincaré symmetry, non-commutative geometry, relative locality and generalized uncertainty principle, and field theory frameworks, including Lorentz violating operators in effective field theory and non-commutative field theory, are discussed. The arguments relating loop quantum gravity to models with modified dispersion relations are reviewed, as well as, arguments supporting the preservation of local Lorentz invariance. The phenomenology related to loop quantum cosmology is briefly reviewed, with a focus on possible effects that might be tested in the near future. As the discussion makes clear, there remains much interesting work to do in establishing the connection between the fundamental theory of loop quantum gravity and these specific phenomenological models, in determining observational consequences of the characteristic aspects of loop quantum gravity, and in further refining current observations. Open problems related to these developments are highlighted.

  12. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common treatment for all stages of lip and oral cavity cancer. Surgery may include the following: Wide local excision : Removal ... cancer may have spread from the lip and oral cavity. Plastic surgery : An operation that restores or improves the appearance ...

  13. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer » Detailed Guide » What are ... how cancers start and spread, see What Is Cancer? Oral cavity cancer, or just oral cancer, is cancer ...

  14. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  15. Cavity-water interface is polar

    OpenAIRE

    Friesen, Allan D.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations of the electrostatics and dynamics of water hydration shells surrounding Kihara cavities given by a Lennard-Jones (LJ) layer at the surface of a hard-sphere cavity. The local dielectric response of the hydration layer substantially exceeds that of bulk water, with the magnitude of the dielectric constant peak in the shell increasing with the growing cavity size. The polar shell propagates into bulk water to approximately the cavity radius. The s...

  16. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  17. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. Ian Wilso seems to hold it in his hands. The storage cavities had 4 portholes, 1 each for: RF feed; tuning; connection to the accelerating cavity; vacuum pump. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the lower LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. See also 8002294, 8006510X, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  18. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan;

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  19. Shape anisotropy in zero-magnetostrictive rapidly solidified amorphous nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotărescu, C.; Atitoaie, A.; Stoleriu, L.; Óvári, T.-A.; Lupu, N.; Chiriac, H.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic behavior of zero-magnetostrictive rapidly solidified amorphous nanowires has been investigated in order to understand their magnetic bistability. The study has been performed both experimentally - based on inductive hysteresis loop measurements - and theoretically, by means of micromagnetic simulations. Experimental hysteresis loops have shown that the amorphous nanowires display an axial magnetic bistability, characterized by a single-step magnetization reversal when the applied field reaches a critical value called switching field. The simulated loops allowed us to understand the effect of shape anisotropy on coercivity. The results are key for understanding and controlling the magnetization processes in these novel nanowires, with important application possibilities in new miniaturized sensing devices.

  20. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-12-12

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves-the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for 'open' surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a 'unity' of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced

  1. BPS Wilson Loops on S^2 at Higher Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Donovan

    2008-01-01

    We consider supersymmetric Wilson loops of the variety constructed by Drukker, Giombi, Ricci, and Trancanelli, whose spatial contours lie on a two-sphere. Working to second order in the 't Hooft coupling in planar N=4 Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory (SYM), we compute the vacuum expectation value of a wavy-latitude and of a loop composed of two longitudes. We evaluate the resulting integrals numerically and find that the results are consistent with the zero-instanton sector calculation of Wilson loops in 2-d Yang-Mills on S^2 performed by Bassetto and Griguolo. We also consider the connected correlator of two distinct latitudes to third order in the 't Hooft coupling in planar N=4 SYM. We compare the result in the limit where the latitudes become coincident to a perturbative calculation in 2-d Yang-Mills on S^2 using a light-cone Wu-Mandelstam-Leibbrandt prescription. The two calculations produce differing results.

  2. Study of the Open Loop and Closed Loop Oscillator Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imel, George R. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Baker, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riley, Tony [Knolls Atomic Power Lab. (KAPL), Schenectady, NY (United States); Langbehn, Adam [Puget Sound Naval Base, Bremerton, WA (United States); Aryal, Harishchandra [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Benzerga, M. Lamine [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2015-04-11

    This report presents the progress and completion of a five-year study undertaken at Idaho State University of the measurement of very small worth reactivity samples comparing open and closed loop oscillator techniques.The study conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of the two techniques with regard to uncertainties in reactivity values, i.e., limited by reactor noise. As those results are thoroughly documented in recent publications, in this report we will concentrate on the support work that was necessary. For example, we describe in some detail the construction and calibration of a pilot rod for the closed loop system. We discuss the campaign to measure the required reactor parameters necessary for inverse-kinetics. Finally, we briefly discuss the transfer of the open loop technique to other reactor systems.

  3. Fréchet derivative for light-like Wilson loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Cherednikov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We address the equations of motion for the light-like QCD Wilson exponentials defined in the generalized loop space. We attribute an important class of the infinitesimal shape variations of the rectangular light-like Wilson loops to the Fréchet derivative associated to a diffeomorphism in loop space what enables the derivation of the law of the classically conformal-invariant shape variations. We show explicitly that the Fréchet derivative coincides (at least in the leading perturbative order with the area differential operator introduced in the previous works. We discuss interesting implications of this result which will allow one to relate the rapidity evolution and ultra-violet evolution of phenomenologically important quantum correlation functions (such as 3-dimensional parton distribution functions and geometrical properties of the light-like cusped Wilson loops.

  4. SUB-DOMAIN MOM FORMULATION FOR CIRCULAR AND NON-CIRCULAR LOOP ANTENNA ARRAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMÁŠ PÁLENÍK

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The method of moments (MoM analysis of thin-wire loop antenna arrays with multiple elements is presented in this paper. The proposed formulation provides simple algorithmic implementation that canbe applied to circular loop arrays as well as more generally shaped arrays using the Pocklington’s integral equation with simplified kernel for arbitrary shaped wires in combination with a superquadriccurve representation. This analysis leads to knowledge of the current distribution, input impedance and other electromagnetic properties of both uniform and non-uniform loop arrays. Numerical results areincluded to exhibit good agreement with various relevant references and simulation software. The data for large square and rectangular loop arrays are presented for the first time in literature.

  5. Nanometer cavities studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positronium (Ps) is trapped in cavities in insulating solids, and the lifetime of ortho Ps is determined by the size of the cavity. The information on the properties of the cavities obtained by use of the standard slow positron beam and the 'normal' positron annihilation techniques is compared for several selected cases. (author)

  6. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  7. Three-dimensional shape optimization using boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Koetsu; Sakamoto, Jiro; Kitano, Masami

    1993-04-01

    A practical design sensitivity calculation technique of displacements and stresses for three-dimensional bodies based on the direct differentiation method of discrete boundary integral equations is formulated in detail. Then, the sensitivity calculation technique is applied to determine optimum shapes of minimum weight subjected to stress constraints, where an approximated subproblem is constructed repeatedly and solved sequentially by the mathematical programming method. The shape optimization technique suggested here is applied to determine optimum shapes of a cavity shape in a cube and a connecting rod.

  8. Radiation by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Sliva, Randy

    1994-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays are popular antennas for aircraft, spacecraft and land vehicle platforms due to their inherent low weight, cost and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to radiation by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. The formulation is used to investigate the effect of cavity size on the radiation pattern for typical circumferentially and axially polarized patch antennas. Curvature effect on the gain, pattern shape, and input impedance is also studied. Finally, the accuracy of the FE-BI approach for a microstrip patch array is demonstrated.

  9. Preparation and handling of surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunately, surface treatment for s.c. cavities knows only one simple rule. If one observes this rule strictly one will be successful, if not, one will fail! The rule is CLEANLINESS. This means: clean material (high purity niobium without inclusions), clean (analytical grade) polishing chemicals and solvents, ultraclean (semiconductor grade) rinsing water, ultraclean (class 100) assembly environment. In general, if one applies the same working practice as the semiconductor industry, one will produce surfaces that are less clean than silicon wafers, due to the shape of the cavity (an inner surface is much more difficult to clean than a flat wafer); due to its size and due to the material (niobium is hydrophilic which makes the water with all the dirt in it stick to the surface). 9 references

  10. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-03

    Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a ferroelectric tuner concept that could be used for controlling external coupling to RF cavities for the superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the electron cooler of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner configuration utilizes several small donut-shaped ferroelectric assemblies, which allow the design to be simpler and more flexible, as compared to previous designs. Design parameters for 704 and 1300 MHz versions of the tuner are given. Simulation results point to efficient performance that could reduce by a factor-of-ten the RF power levels required for driving superconducting cavities in the BNL ERL.

  11. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfenning, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.Pfenning@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas [Technische Physik, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Würzburg and Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen Research Center for Complex Material Systems, Am Hubland, D-97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  12. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×104 A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found

  13. Development of high purity niobium used in SRF accelerating cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Niobium is widely used in SRF(Superconducting Radio Frequency)cavities due to its excellent superconductivity and workability.With the continuous development of technology,higher demands of material are raised.One of the key issues is that RRR(Residual Resistance Ratio)of the Nb material should be more than 300.which requires that the Nb ingot have even higher RRR.This article introduces the development and the experimental results of high purity niobium in OTIC in Ningxia(Ningxia Orient Tantalum Industry Co.Ltd.),and the test results of the single cell TESLA(Tera Electron volt energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator)shaped cavity manufactured by Peking University using Nb material from OTIC.

  14. Prototype development and design overview of low level RF control for DTL and RFQ cavities of High Current Injector facility at IUAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Current Injector (HCI) facility at IUAC consists of one RFQ cavity operating at 48.5 MHz and six IH-DTL cavities operating at 97 MHz. Maintaining the RF cavity field amplitude, phase and operating frequency at the desired level is the function of the Low Level RF (LLRF) control system. To ensure a successful implementation of LLRF control for the HCI RF cavities, the complete LLRF control system has been outlined considering the maximum possible operating conditions and the controllability. Control system requirements have been divided into different modules. Amplitude and phase control is based on Generator Driven Resonator (GDR) scheme and is fully analog. Proportional control has been planned to drive a mechanical tuner to control the cavity's operating frequency. The control system will also include safety interlocks, functionalities as per operating modes (tuning and steady state), RF measurements and diagnostic, temperature control. Initially a prototype Amplitude and Phase Control Loop based on fully analog GDR scheme has been developed. The amplitude and phase of the cavity field are controlled independently using PI type feedback control loops. The control circuits have successfully tuned the cavity and stabilized the amplitude and phase of the DTL cavity within 0.01 dB. The performances of the prototype controller with measured results and an overview of the techniques proposed to meet the control requirements will be presented in the paper. (author)

  15. Development of Vertical Buffered Electropolishing for Its Post-Treatment Technology on 1.5 GHz Niobium SRF Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Song; A. T. Wu; LU Xiang-Yang; R. A. Rimmer; LIN Lin; ZHAO Kui

    2011-01-01

    We report the latest research development of vertical buffered electropolishing on its post-treatment procedure as well as the effects of several major post-treatment techniques for buffered electropolishing (BEP) processed 1.5 GHz niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.With the established post-treatment procedure,an accelerating gradient of 28.4MV/m is obtained on a single cell cavity of the cebaf shape.This is the best result in the history of BEP development.The cavity is limited by quench with a high quality factor over 1.2 × 1010 at the quench point.Analyses from optical inspection and temperature-mapping show that the quench should be originated from the pits that were already present on the cavity before this BEP treatment.All of these factors indicate that this procedure will have a great potential to produce better results if cavities without intrinsic performance limiting imperfections are used.Surface condition plays a critical role in the performance of a superconducting radio frequency (SRF)cavity.[1] Since the development of SRF niobium (Nb)cavities,research on the technique of surface treatments for SRF cavities has not stopped.As the technique of surface treatments on Nb SRF cavities evolved from buffered chemical polishing (BCP) to electropolishing (EP),the performance of SRF cavities improved greatly.[2-5] However,the yield of the nine-cell cavities is still not high enough to surpass the required 35MV/m for the International Linear Collider (ILC).[6] The variability of cavity performance has emerged as a major challenge.[7]%We report the latest research development of vertical buffered electropolishing on its post-treatment procedure as well as the effects of several major post-treatment techniques for buffered electropolishing (BEP) processed 1.5 GHz niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. With the established post-treatment procedure, an accelerating gradient of 28.4MV/m is obtained on a single cell

  16. Temporal tweezing of light: trapping and manipulation of temporal cavity solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Jae K; Coen, Stephane; Murdoch, Stuart G

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers use laser light to trap and move microscopic particles in space. Here we demonstrate a similar control over ultrashort light pulses, but in time. Our experiment involves temporal cavity solitons that are stored in a passive loop of optical fiber pumped by a continuous-wave "holding" laser beam. The cavity solitons are trapped into specific time slots through a phase-modulation of the holding beam, and moved around in time by manipulating the phase profile. We report both continuous and discrete manipulations of the temporal positions of picosecond light pulses, with the ability to simultaneously and independently control several pulses within a train. We also study the transient drifting dynamics and show complete agreement with theoretical predictions. Our study demonstrates how the unique particle-like characteristics of cavity solitons can be leveraged to achieve unprecedented control over light. These results could have significant ramifications for optical information processing.

  17. Relaxation oscillations, stability, and cavity feedback in a superradiant Raman laser

    CERN Document Server

    Bohnet, Justin G; Weiner, Joshua M; Cox, Kevin C; Thompson, James K

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the relaxation oscillations and amplitude stability properties of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime using a laser-cooled $^{87}$Rb Raman laser. By combining measurements of the laser light field with non-demolition measurements of the atomic populations, we infer the response of the the gain medium represented by a collective atomic Bloch vector. The results are qualitatively explained with a simple model. Measurements and theory are extended to include the effect of intermediate repumping states on the closed-loop stability of the oscillator and the role of cavity-feedback on stabilizing or enhancing relaxation oscillations. This experimental study of the stability of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime will guide future development of superradiant lasers with ultranarrow linewidths.

  18. Relaxation oscillations, stability, and cavity feedback in a superradiant Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet, Justin G; Chen, Zilong; Weiner, Joshua M; Cox, Kevin C; Thompson, James K

    2012-12-21

    We experimentally study the relaxation oscillations and amplitude stability properties of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime using a laser-cooled ^{87}Rb Raman laser. By combining measurements of the laser light field with nondemolition measurements of the atomic populations, we infer the response of the gain medium represented by a collective atomic Bloch vector. The results are qualitatively explained with a simple model. Measurements and theory are extended to include the effect of intermediate repumping states on the closed-loop stability of the oscillator and the role of cavity feedback on stabilizing or enhancing relaxation oscillations. This experimental study of the stability of an optical laser operating deep into the bad-cavity regime will guide future development of superradiant lasers with ultranarrow linewidths.

  19. Polyakov loop correlators and cyclic Wilson loop from lattice QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Bazavov, Alexei; Petreczky, Peter; Weber, Johannes Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    We discuss color screening in 2+1 flavor QCD in terms of free energies of a static quark-antiquark pair. Thermal modifications of long distance correlations in quark-antiquark systems are studied in terms of static meson correlators. We calculate the Polyakov loop correlator, the color-singlet Wilson line correlator in Coulomb gauge and the cyclic Wilson loop on lattices using the HISQ/Tree action and almost physical quark mases with $N_\\tau= 4, 6, 8, 10, 12$. We present results in the contin...

  20. Generalized loop space and TMDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertens Tom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Standard Model describes the three (of four basic interactions known in Nature in terms of the quantum fields which are constituted by representations of special unitary gauge groups of symmetry. However, the physical observables do not always coincide with the fundamental degrees of freedom of the Standard Model. Therefore it can be useful to switch to the loop space representation of the gauge theory, where the variables are inherently gauge invariant but the degrees of freedom are absorbed in the path/loop dependence. Over-completeness of this space requires the introduction of an equivalence relation which is provided by Wilson loop functionals operating on piecewise regular paths. It is well known that certain Wilson loops show the same singularity structure as some Transverse Momentum Dependent PDFs (TMDs, which are not renormalizable by the common methods due to exactly this singularity structure. By introducing geometrical operators, like the area-derivative, we were able to derive an evolution equation for these Wilson loops and we hope to apply this method in the future to find some renormalization schemes for TMDs.

  1. Gluing hexagons at three loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Benjamin; Goncalves, Vasco; Komatsu, Shota; Vieira, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    We perform extensive three-loop tests of the hexagon bootstrap approach for structure constants in planar N = 4 SYM theory. We focus on correlators involving two BPS operators and one non-BPS operator in the so-called SL (2) sector. At three loops, such correlators receive wrapping corrections from mirror excitations flowing in either the adjacent or the opposing channel. Amusingly, we find that the first type of correction coincides exactly with the leading wrapping correction for the spectrum (divided by the one-loop anomalous dimension). We develop an efficient method for computing the second type of correction for operators with any spin. The results are in perfect agreement with the recently obtained three-loop perturbative data by Chicherin, Drummond, Heslop, Sokatchev [2] and by Eden [3]. We also derive the integrand for general multi-particle wrapping corrections, which turns out to take a remarkably simple form. As an application we estimate the loop order at which various new physical effects are expected to kick-in.

  2. Universality of large N phase transitions in Wilson loop operators in two and three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, R.; Neuberger, H.

    2007-01-01

    The eigenvalue distribution of a Wilson loop operator of fixed shape undergoes a transition under scaling at infinite N. We derive a large N scaling function in a double scaling limit of the average characteristic polynomial associated with the Wilson loop operator in two dimensional QCD. We hypothesize that the transition in three and four dimensional large N QCD are also in the same universality class and provide a numerical test for our hypothesis in three dimensions.

  3. Spin Interference in Rectangle Loop Based on Rashba and Dresselhaus Spin-Orbit Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Jia-Ting; LIANG Xiao-Wan; CHEN Bin; T.Koga

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the amplitude and spin polarization of AAS oscillation changing with Rashba spin-orbit interaction(SOI)and Dresselhaus SOI.The amplitude and spin polarization of AB oscillation changing with Rashba SOI and Dresselhaus SOI are demonstrated as well.The ideal quasi-one-dimensional square loop does not exist in reality,therefore to match the experiment better we should consider the shape of the rectangle loop in theory.

  4. Influence of the power level of an ultra-sonic system on dental cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josgrilberg, Erika Botelho; Guimarães, Murilo de Sousa; Pansani, Cyneu Aguiar; Cordeiro, Rita de Cássia Loiola

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shape of dental cavities made with the CVDentus system using different ultrasound power levels. One standard cavity was made on the buccal aspect of 15 bovine incisors with a CVDentus cylindrical bur (82142). The sample was divided into three groups: G1-ultrasound with power II; G2-ultrasound with power III; and G3-ultrasound with power IV. A standardizing device was used to obtain standardized preparations and ultrasound was applied during one minute in each dental preparation. The cavities were sectioned in the middle, allowing observation of the cavity's profile with a magnifying glass, and width and depth measurement using the Leica Qwin program. The Kruskal-Wallis (p<0.05) and Dunn statistical analyses demonstrated differences between the dental cavity shapes when powers III and IV were used. However, the cavities that were made with power III presented dimensions similar to those of the bur used for preparation. We concluded that the power recommended by the manufacturer (III) is the most adequate for use with the CVDentus system.

  5. Non-reacting flow visualization of supersonic combustor based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Liang, Jianhan; Zhao, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Nano-particle planer laser scattering and particle image velocimetry technology are employed to observe the flow field of scramjet combustors based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder. Density field and velocity distribution inside combustors are obtained. Mainstream fluid enters into cavity nearby side wall in experimental observation because side wall shock waves interact with bottom wall boundary layer. Cavity fluid is entrained into mainstream in the middle of combustor meanwhile. Flow past cavity displays obvious three dimensional characteristics in both combustors. But cavity-strut combustor displays asymmetrical flow field because of strut configuration. Mass exchange between mainstream and cavity fluid is evaluated by statistic mass flow rate into cavity. Mass flow rate near side wall is raised to 6.62 times of the value in the middle of cavity combustor while it is 5.1 times in cavity-strut combustor. Further study is needed to injection strategies and realistic flow characteristics on condition of combustion.

  6. RF cavity vacuum interlock system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.; Crawford, K.; Bundy, R.; Dylla, H. F.; Heckman, J.; Marshall, J.; Nichols, R.; Osullivan, S.; Preble, J.; Robb, J.

    1992-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a continuous wave (CW) 4 GeV Electron Accelerator is undergoing construction in Newport News, Virginia. When completed in 1994, the accelerator will be the largest installation of radio-frequency superconductivity. Production of cryomodules, the fundamental building block of the machine, has started. A cryomodule consists of four sets of pairs of 1497 MHz, 5 cell niobium cavities contained in separate helium vessels and mounted in a cryostat with appropriate end caps for helium supply and return. Beam vacuum of the cavities, the connecting beam piping, the waveguides, and the cryostat insulating vacuum are crucial to the performance of the machine. The design and initial experience of the vacuum systems for the first 2 1/4 cryomodules that makeup the 45 MEV injector are discussed.

  7. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Paris (France); Van Brackel, Emmanuel [Département de Physique, ENS, Paris (France); Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier [Département Mesures Physiques, ONERA, Châtillon (France); Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele [Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés, IN2P3-CNRS, Lyon (France)

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  8. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  9. Collapses of underground cavities and soil-structure interactions: influences of the position of the structure relative to the cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Caudron, Matthieu; Emeriault, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    This paper is focused on soil subsidence of small extend and amplitude caused by tunnel boring or the collapse of underground cavities, whether natural or man-made. The impact of the movements of the ground on existing structures is generally dramatic. It is therefore necessary to accurately predict these movements (settlements and horizontal extension or compression displacements). Even though it is obvious that the overall stiffness and weight of the structure influences the size and shape of the soil movement, the main features of this soil-structure interaction phenomenon are not well established. Caudron et al. (2006) developed an original small-scale physical model to take the soil-structure interaction into account. It is based on the use of the frictional Schneebeli material (assembly of small diameter rods) and a modified version including cohesion in order to reproduce a cohesive layer above a cavity. The displacements of the soil are obtained from digital images processing by particle image velocim...

  10. LHC crab cavity final report

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G et al

    2013-01-01

    A compact 400 MHz SRF crab cavity is designed for LHC. The design has low surface fields, has no hard multipactor barriers and fits within the transverse space available on the HL-LHC. The structure has been designed to have a constant deflecting voltage across the beam-pipe aperture and this has been verified on an aluminium model. The structure includes designs for the input and lower order mode couplers.

  11. Retention proposal in complex cavities.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Alvarez Rodríguez; Eduardo M. Curbeira Hernández; Eduardo Duarte Marrero; Yisell Peláez Rivas; Aracelis Navarro Sánchez

    2003-01-01

    Background: Dental Operatory is the main structure in which Odontology lies. It is not an easy discipline that gives enjoyable results with little effort due to the difficulties that a correct reconstruction of a destroyed dental element offers.The frequency with which pulpar injury occurs while anchoring additional retainers in complex cavities, the technical difficulties the lack of these devices cause and the need to simplify dental procedures lead this study to show the advantages to subs...

  12. Bending of the looping heart: differential growth revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfei; Yao, Jiang; Xu, Gang; Taber, Larry A

    2014-08-01

    In the early embryo, the primitive heart tube (HT) undergoes the morphogenetic process of c-looping as it bends and twists into a c-shaped tube. Despite intensive study for nearly a century, the physical forces that drive looping remain poorly understood. This is especially true for the bending component, which is the focus of this paper. For decades, experimental measurements of mitotic rates had seemingly eliminated differential growth as the cause of HT bending, as it has commonly been thought that the heart grows almost exclusively via hyperplasia before birth and hypertrophy after birth. Recently published data, however, suggests that hypertrophic growth may play a role in looping. To test this idea, we developed finite-element models that include regionally measured changes in myocardial volume over the HT. First, models based on idealized cylindrical geometry were used to simulate the bending process in isolated hearts, which bend without the complicating effects of external loads. With the number of free parameters in the model reduced to the extent possible, stress and strain distributions were compared to those measured in embryonic chick hearts that were isolated and cultured for 24 h. The results show that differential growth alone yields results that agree reasonably well with the trends in our data, but adding active changes in myocardial cell shape provides closer quantitative agreement with stress measurements. Next, the estimated parameters were extrapolated to a model based on realistic 3D geometry reconstructed from images of an actual chick heart. This model yields similar results and captures quite well the basic morphology of the looped heart. Overall, our study suggests that differential hypertrophic growth in the myocardium (MY) is the primary cause of the bending component of c-looping, with other mechanisms possibly playing lesser roles.

  13. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Z. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hao, Z. K. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Liu, K. X. [Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Zhao, H. Y. [OTIC, Ningxia (China); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  14. The Duel Strings versus Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Vaas, R

    2004-01-01

    Physicists in search of the foundation of the world: how tiny objects can create matter, energy and even space and time - and possibly countless other universes. -- This article is meant as an introduction into quantum geometry (loop quantum gravity) and string theory, written for the general audience. Partly, this article is also a conference report and review, based on the "Strings Meet Loops" conference at the Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Golm/Germany, in October 2003. -- Keywords: quantum geometry, loop quantum gravity, string theory, string cosmology, spin networks, spin foams, anthropic principle, theory of everything, Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Bojowald, Michael Douglas, Jerzy Lewandowski, Hermann Nicolai, Robert Oeckl, Fernando Quevedo, Carlo Rovelli, Amitabha Sen, Lee Smolin, Leonard Susskind.

  15. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing 'Air Crescent' sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma. PMID:27625451

  16. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  17. All digital pulsewidth control loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hong-Yi; Jan, Shiun-Dian; Pu, Ruei-Iun

    2013-03-01

    This work presents an all-digital pulsewidth control loop (ADPWCL). The proposed system accepts a wide range of input duty cycles and performs a fast correction to the target output pulsewidth. An all-digital delay-locked loop (DLL) with fast locking time using a simplified time to digital converter and a new differential two-step delay element is proposed. The area of the delay element is much smaller than that in conventional designs, while having the same delay range. A test chip is verified in a 0.18-µm CMOS process. The measured duty cycle ranges from 4% to 98% with 7-bit resolution.

  18. Loop Quantum Geometry: A primer

    CERN Document Server

    Corichi, A

    2005-01-01

    This is the written version of a lecture given at the ``VI Mexican School of Gravitation and Mathematical Physics" (Nov 21-27, 2004, Playa del Carmen, Mexico), introducing the basics of Loop Quantum Geometry. The purpose of the written contribution is to provide a Primer version, that is, a first entry into Loop Quantum Gravity and to present at the same time a friendly guide to the existing pedagogical literature on the subject. This account is geared towards graduate students and non-experts interested in learning the basics of the subject.

  19. Loop quantum cosmology: Recent progress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Martin Bojowald

    2004-10-01

    Aspects of the full theory of loop quantum gravity can be studied in a simpler context by reducing to symmetric models like cosmological ones. This leads to several applications where loop effects play a significant role when one is sensitive to the quantum regime. As a consequence, the structure of and the approach to classical singularities are very different from general relativity. The quantum theory is free of singularities, and there are new phenomenological scenarios for the evolution of the very early universe such as inflation. We give an overview of the main effects, focussing on recent results obtained by different groups.

  20. Twisted Automorphisms of Right Loops

    OpenAIRE

    R. Lal; Yadav, A. C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we make an attempt to study right loops $(S, o)$ in which, for each $y\\in S$, the map $\\sigma_y$ from the inner mapping group $G_S$ of $(S, o)$ to itself given by $\\sigma_y (h)(x) o\\ h(y)= h(xoy)$, $x\\in S, h\\in G_S$ is a homomorphism. The concept of twisted automorphisms of a right loop and also the concept of twisted right gyrogroup appears naturally and it turns out that the study is almost equivalent to the study of twisted automorphisms and a twisted right gyrogroup. A repr...

  1. A progress report on the ultrasonic detection of cavities in metal castings

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    This project is concerned with an important inverse problem- the use of ultrasound to determine the shape of inclusions (or cavities or flaws) in metal castings. This problem is severely ill-posed both analytically and computationally because it is non-linear and because it is an inverse problem in which the shape of the inclusion need not depend continuously on the available far-field data. ¶The author has been collaborating with the CSIRO Division of Applied Physics on ...

  2. CHECHIA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland). ELHEP Laboratory, ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). TESLA

    2005-07-01

    The initial control of the superconductive cavity has recently been performed by applying the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system in DESY Hamburg. This first experiment turned attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the cavity is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The cavity parameters identification is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  3. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Möhle, Katharina; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-01-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1 x 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (> 1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  4. Solution of Cavity Resonance and Waveguide Scattering Problems Using the Eigenmode Projection Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nasr, Mamdouh H; Eshrah, Islam A; Abuelfadl, Tamer M

    2016-01-01

    An eigenmode projection technique (EPT) is developed and employed to solve problems of electromagnetic resonance in closed cavities and scattering from discontinuities in guided-wave structures. The EPT invokes the eigenmodes of a canonical predefined cavity in the solution procedure and uses the expansion of these eigenmodes to solve Maxwell's equations, in conjunction with a convenient choice of port boundary conditions. For closed cavities, resonance frequencies of arbitrary-shaped cavities are accurately determined with a robust and efficient separation method of spurious modes. For waveguide scattering problems, the EPT is combined with the generalized scattering matrix approach to solve problems involving waveguide discontinuities with arbitrary dielectric profiles. Convergence studies show stable solutions for a relatively small number of expansion modes, and the proposed method shows great robustness over conventional solvers in analyzing electromagnetic problems with inhomogeneous materials.

  5. Analyses of the seismic characteristics of US and Russian cavity decoupled explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.R.; Kitov, I.O.; Stevens, J.L.; Sultanov, D.D.; Barker, B.W.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents a summary of the initial results of an on-going joint research program in which S-CUBED scientists are working with Russian scientists from the Institute for Dynamics of the Geospheres in an attempt to develop a better understanding of the effects of cavity decoupling on the seismic signals produced by underground nuclear explosions. This program includes analyses of seismic data recorded from a series of 10 tamped and 12 decoupled HE tests which were conducted in cavities of different sizes and shapes in Kirghizia in 1960, a theoretical evaluation of the influence of radiation diffusion effects on nuclear cavity decoupling efficiency and an analysis of data recorded from six small (0.01 to 0.50 kt) Russian nuclear tests conducted in a 32 % radius, water-filled cavity in salt at the Azgir test site.

  6. Light trapping in an ensemble of pointlike impurity centers in a Fabry-Perot cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraptsev, A. S.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of quantum microscopic theory of quasiresonant dipole-dipole interaction in the ensembles of impurity atoms imbedded into transparent dielectric and located in a Fabry-Perot cavity. On the basis of the general approach we study the simultaneous influence of the cavity and resonant dipole-dipole interaction on the shape of the line of atomic transition as well as on light trapping in dense impurity ensembles. We analyze this influence depending on the size of the ensemble, its density, as well as on rms deviation of the transition frequency shifts caused by the symmetry disturbance of the internal fields of the dielectric medium. Obtained results are compared with the case when the cavity is absent. We show that the cavity can essentially modify cooperative polyatomic effects.

  7. Light trapping in an ensemble of point-like impurity centers in Fabry-Perot cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraptsev, A S

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of quantum microscopic theory of quasi-resonant dipole-dipole interaction in the ensembles of impurity atoms imbedded into transparent dielectric and located into Fabry-Perot cavity. On the basis of the general approach we study the simultaneous influence of the cavity and resonant dipole-dipole interaction on the shape of the line of atomic transition as well as on light trapping in dense impurity ensembles. We analyze this influence depending on the size of the ensemble, its density, as well as on r.m.s. deviation of the transition frequency shifts caused by the symmetry disturbance of the internal fields of the dielectric medium. Obtained results are compared with the case when the cavity is absent. We show that the cavity can essentially modify cooperative polyatomic effects.

  8. High finesse optical fiber cavities: optimal alignment and robust stabilization (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Gallego, Jose; Ghosh, Sutapa; Alavi, Seyed; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications. Some of the most promising areas of application of these optical micro-resonators with high finesse and small mode volume are in the field of quantum communication and information. The resonator-enhanced light-matter interaction, for instance, provide basis for the realization of efficient optical interfaces between stationary matter-based quantum nodes and flying single-photon qubits. To date fiber Fabry-Perot cavities have been successfully applied in experiments interfacing single photons with a wide range of quantum systems, including cold atoms, ions and solid state emitters as well as quantum optomechanical experiments. Here we address some important practical questions that arise during the experimental implementation of high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: How can optimal fiber cavity alignment be achieved and how can the efficiency of coupling light from the optical fibers to the cavity mode and vice versa be characterized? How should optical fiber cavities be constructed and stabilized to fulfill their potential for miniaturization and integration into robust scientific and technological devices that can operate outside of dedicated laboratory environments in the future? The first two questions we answer with an analytic mode matching calculation that relates the alignment dependent fiber-to-cavity mode-matching efficiency to the easily measurable dip in the reflected light power at the cavity resonance. Our general analysis provides a simple recipe for the optimal alignment of fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and moreover for the first time explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes. The latter question we explore by investigating a novel, intrinsically rigid fiber cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal

  9. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M.; Boehm, Tobias K.; Pride, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  10. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Anna; Santiago-Rodriguez, Tasha M; Boehm, Tobias K; Pride, David T

    2015-01-01

    The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts. PMID:25861745

  11. Bacteriophage and their potential roles in the human oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Edlund

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The human oral cavity provides the perfect portal of entry for viruses and bacteria in the environment to access new hosts. Hence, the oral cavity is one of the most densely populated habitats of the human body containing some 6 billion bacteria and potentially 35 times that many viruses. The role of these viral communities remains unclear; however, many are bacteriophage that may have active roles in shaping the ecology of oral bacterial communities. Other implications for the presence of such vast oral phage communities include accelerating the molecular diversity of their bacterial hosts as both host and phage mutate to gain evolutionary advantages. Additional roles include the acquisitions of new gene functions through lysogenic conversions that may provide selective advantages to host bacteria in response to antibiotics or other types of disturbances, and protection of the human host from invading pathogens by binding to and preventing pathogens from crossing oral mucosal barriers. Recent evidence suggests that phage may be more involved in periodontal diseases than were previously thought, as their compositions in the subgingival crevice in moderate to severe periodontitis are known to be significantly altered. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to dysbiosis or the transition of the microbial community into a state promoting oral disease. Bacteriophage communities are distinct in saliva compared to sub- and supragingival areas, suggesting that different oral biogeographic niches have unique phage ecology shaping their bacterial biota. In this review, we summarize what is known about phage communities in the oral cavity, the possible contributions of phage in shaping oral bacterial ecology, and the risks to public health oral phage may pose through their potential to spread antibiotic resistance gene functions to close contacts.

  12. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  13. High-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: stabilization and mode matching analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Alavi, S. K.; Alt, W.; Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Meschede, D.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background photons. We expect that our results contribute toward the integration of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities into compact and robust quantum-enabled devices in the future.

  14. A small-size transfer blackbody cavity for calibration of infrared ear thermometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small-size transfer blackbody cavity for calibration of infrared ear thermometers (IRETs) was developed and characterized at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. This blackbody cavity consists of a reflector exposed to the air and a radiator with three-step curves immersed in a water-bath, and has an angularly uniform emissivity of higher than 0.9993. The radiance temperature of the blackbody cavity was measured with an IRET. We also calculated the effective emissivity by using the software STEEP322, considering the influence of the shape and temperature of the probe-tip of the IRET on the effective emissivity of the blackbody cavity. The measured and calculated radiance temperatures of the blackbody cavity were compared to those of the ASTM-type blackbody cavity and are in good agreement. Uncertainties (k = 1) of the blackbody cavity are estimated to be less than 44 mK in the temperature range 35–42 °C. (paper)

  15. A Computational Study of Transient Couette Flow Over an Embedded Cavity Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Lang, Amy; Schreiber, Will; Leibenguth, Chase; Palmore, John

    2011-11-01

    Insect flight has become a topic of increased study due to bio-inspired applications for Micro-Air-Vehicles (MAVs). The complex yet efficient flight mechanism of butterflies relies upon flexible, micro-geometrically surface patterned, scaled wings. Effective vortex control, when flapping as well as low-drag gliding, may result from the wing's texture. This hypothesis was tested by focusing on the formation of embedded vortices between the rows of scales on butterfly wings. To calculate the total surface drag induced on the moving cavity surface a computational fluid dynamics study using FLUENT simulated the flow inside and above the embedded cavities under transient Couette flow conditions with Reynolds numbers varied from 0.01 to 100. The computational model consisted of a single embedded cavity with a periodic boundary condition. Based on SEM pictures of Monarch (Danaus plexippus) butterfly scales, various cavity geometries were tested to deduce drag reduction. Results showed that the embedded vortex size and shape generated within the cavity depended on which surface moved (top, flat wall or bottom, cavity wall) as well as aspect ratio. Surface drag reduction was confirmed over the cavity surfaces when compared to that of a flat plate, and increased with aspect ratio. Funded by REU SITE EEC - 1062611.

  16. Influence of the Vapor Cavity Depth on Liquid Flow through a Microchannel Exhibiting Superhydrophobic Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Daniel; Jeffs, Kevin; Woolford, Brady; Webb, Brent

    2007-11-01

    We report results of an analytical and experimental investigation of laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel with superhydrophobic walls. The walls are fabricated with hydrophobically coated micro-ribs and cavities that are oriented parallel to the flow direction and are modeled in an idealized fashion, with the shape of the liquid-vapor meniscus approximated as flat. An analytical model of the flow in the vapor cavity is employed and coupled with a numerical model of the liquid flow. The numerical predictions show that the effective slip length and the reduction in the classical friction factor-Reynolds number product increase with increasing relative cavity width and depth, and decreasing relative micro-rib/cavity module length. Comparisons are also made between the zero shear interface model and the liquid-vapor cavity coupled model. The results illustrate that the zero shear interface model under-predicts the overall flow resistance. Further, the deviation between the two models was found to be significantly larger for increasing values of both the relative rib/cavity module width and the cavity fraction. The trends in the frictional pressure drop predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements made at similar conditions and a generalized expression for predicting the friction factor is proposed.

  17. Gain enhanced Fano resonance in a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qian, Chenjiang; Qiu, Kangsheng; Tang, Jing; Sun, Yue; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2016-01-01

    Systems with coupled cavities and waveguides have been demonstrated as optical switches and optical sensors. To optimize the functionalities of these optical devices, Fano resonance with asymmetric and steep spectral line shape has been used. We theoretically propose a coupled photonic crystal cavity-waveguide structure to achieve Fano resonance by placing partially reflecting elements in waveguide. To enhance Fano resonance, optical gain material is introduced into the cavity. As the gain increases, the transmission line shape becomes steepened and the transmissivity can be six times enhanced, giving a large contrast by a small frequency shift. It is prospected that the gain enhanced Fano resonance is very useful for optical switches and optical sensors. PMID:27640809

  18. Effects of convective motion in n-octane pool fires in an ice cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farahani, Harried Farmahini; Jomaas, Grunde; Rangwala, Ali S.

    2015-01-01

    performed by burning n-octane in cylindrically shaped ice cavities of 5.7 cm diameter. The first set of experiments was intended to provide a clear understanding of the geometry change of the cavity and displacement of the fuel layer. The results of these experiments showed that the rate of melting...... of the ice walls were higher in areas where the fuel layer was in contact with ice than in places where the flame was present. Due to the melting of the ice walls, a ring-shaped void was formed around the perimeter of the cavity. In the second set of experiments, the change in the temperature of the fuel...... two major convective phases; in the first half of the burning time, the buoyancy driven flows (Rayleigh) were dominant, while Marangoni convection was dominant in the second half of the burning time. The role of these mechanisms in affecting the flow and melting the ice is discussed. (C) 2015...

  19. Escape Kinetics of Self-Propelled Janus Particles from a Cavity: Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigate the escape kinetics of elliptic Janus particles from narrow two-dimensional cavities with reflecting walls. The self-propulsion velocity of the Janus particle is directed along either their major (prolate) or minor axis (oblate). We show that the mean exit time is very sensitive to the cavity geometry, particle shape and self-propulsion strength. The mean exit time is found to be a minimum when the self-propulsion length is equal to the cavity size. We also find the optimum mean escape time as a function of the self-propulsion velocity, translational diffusion, and particle shape. Thus, effective transport control mechanisms for Janus particles in a channel can be implemented.

  20. Comparison of energy spreads induced by a wakefield in a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy spread of a beam bunch induced in a linear accelerator can be reduced to a minimum if the amplitude and the phase of the RF voltage are optimized. The energy spread is induced by the longitudinal wakefield and by the sinusoidal profile of the accelerating voltage acting on the beam. The cavity shape, the bunch profile, and the charge in the bunch determine the wake function. Aiming to have an approximately constant net voltage acting across the beam bunch, we optimize the amplitude and the phase of the RF voltage. The minimum energy spread, the required RF voltage, and the required RF phase are calculated as a function of the net charge and the length of the bunch. To find out the effect of cavity shape on the minimum energy spread, the optimization was performed for several types of cavities. 4 refs., 8 figs