WorldWideScience

Sample records for cavity ringdown spectroscopy

  1. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR ) measures the transmission of the excitation source and then calculates the absorption from that measured...laser FTIR Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy HgCdTe mercury, cadmium, tellurium I absorbed light intensity I0 initial light intensity l...Infrared Spectroscopy with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer by Logan S Marcus, Ellen L Holthoff, and Paul M Pellegrino ARL-TR-7031 August

  3. [Fast and accurate extraction of ring-down time in cavity ring-down spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Ling, Liu-Yi; Duan, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Research is conducted to accurate and efficient algorithms for extracting ring-down time (r) in cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) which is used to measure NO3 radical in the atmosphere. Fast and accurate extraction of ring-down time guarantees more precise and higher speed of measurement. In this research, five kinds of commonly used algorithms are selected to extract ring-down time which respectively are fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm, discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm, linear regression of the sum (LRS) algorithm, Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm and least squares (LS) algorithm. Simulated ring-down signals with various amplitude levels of white noises are fitted by using five kinds of the above-mentioned algorithms, and comparison and analysis is conducted to the fitting results of five kinds of algorithms from four respects: the vulnerability to noises, the accuracy and precision of the fitting, the speed of the fitting and preferable fitting ring-down signal waveform length The research results show that Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and linear regression of the sum algorithm are able to provide more precise results and prove to have higher noises immunity, and by comparison, the fitting speed of Leven- berg-Marquardt algorithm turns out to be slower. In addition, by analysis of simulated ring-down signals, five to ten times of ring-down time is selected to be the best fitting waveform length because in this case, standard deviation of fitting results of five kinds of algorithms proves to be the minimum. External modulation diode laser and cavity which consists of two high reflectivity mirrors are used to construct a cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection system. According to our experimental conditions, in which the noise level is 0.2%, linear regression of the sum algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm are selected to process experimental data. The experimental results show that the accuracy and precision of linear regression of

  4. Doppler broadening thermometry based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, C -F; Sun, Y R; Tan, Y; Kang, P; Hu, S -M

    2015-01-01

    A Doppler broadening thermometry (DBT) instrument is built based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for precise determination of the Boltzmann constant. Compared with conventional direct absorption methods, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allows to reach a satisfied precision at lower sample pressures, which also reduces the influence due to collisions. By recording the spectrum of C$_2$H$_2$ at 787 nm, we demonstrate a statistical uncertainty of 6 ppm (part per million) in the determined linewidth values by several hours' measurement at a sample pressure of 1.5 Pa. The influence on the spectroscopy-determined temperatures has been investigated, including the "hidden" weak lines overlapped with the selected transition for DBT measurements. The reproducibility has also been examined to be better than 10 ppm, and it indicates that the instrument is feasible for DBT measurement toward a precision at the ppm level.

  5. Measurements of carbon-14 with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A. D.; Ognibene, T.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method for quantitation of 14C in biological samples. This technology has been used in a variety of low dose, human health related studies over the last 20 years when very high sensitivity was needed. AMS helped pioneer these scientific methods, but its expensive facilities and requirements for highly trained technical staff have limited their proliferation. Quantification of 14C by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) offers an approach that eliminates many of the shortcomings of an accelerator-based system and would supplement the use of AMS in biomedical research. Our initial prototype, using a non-ideal wavelength laser and under suboptimal experimental conditions, has a 3.5-modern, 1- σ precision for detection of milligram-sized, carbon-14-elevated samples. These results demonstrate proof of principle and provided a starting point for the development of a spectrometer capable of biologically relevant sensitivities.

  6. Use of laser diodes in cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, R.N.; Paldus, B.A.; Ma, Y.; Xie, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    We have demonstrated that cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), a highly sensitive absorption technique, is versatile enough to serve as a complete diagnostic for materials process control. In particular, we have used CRDS in the ultraviolet to determine the concentration profile of methyl radicals in a hot-filament diamond reactor; we have applied CRDS in the mid-infrared to detect 50 ppb of methane in a N{sub 2} environment; and, we have extended CRDS so that we can use continuous-wave diode laser sources. Using a laser diode at 810 nm, we were able to achieve a sensitivity of 2 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}. Thus, CRDS can be used not only as an in situ diagnostic for investigating the chemistry of diamond film deposition, but it can also be used as a gas purity diagnostic for any chemical vapor deposition system.

  7. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy of Etching Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Cunge, Gilles; Biennier, Ludovic; Romanini, Daniele; Katachanov, Alexander

    1999-10-01

    Many of the reactive species of interest in etching plasmas absorb light in the UV spectral region (200 ~ 300 nm). Measurement of these weak absorbances (10-2 ~ 10-4 for a single pass) allows their absolute concentration to be determined. Previously, low-resolution spectra have been obtained using broad-band absorption spectroscopy, using a Xe arc lamp as the light source and a small monochromator equipped with a CCD Camera. Here we report high-resolution measurements using the recently developed Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The pulsed tunable output of an excimer pumped doubled dye laser was injected into a high-Q optical cavity in which the plasma is included. The absorbance as a function of wavelength is then deduced from the lifetime of the light pulse in the cavity. This technique offers the possibility of real-time (1 second) absolute concentration measurements. Results have been obtained for the detection of CF, CF_2, AlF and SiF2 radicals in capacitively-coupled radio-frequency plasmas in fluorocarbon gases. However, the deduction of absolute concentrations from CRDS spectra is complicated by the phenomenon of non-single exponential decays when the line-width of the laser is greater then that of the transition observed.

  8. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Goeroge P. Miller; Dr. Christopher B. Winstead

    2001-12-04

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the avsorved signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time.

  9. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2002-12-31

    SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.

  10. Plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy for analytical measurement: Progress and prospectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Sida; Liu, Wei [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Analytical and Testing Center, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Xiaohe [College of Water Resources and Hydropower, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Duan, Yixiang, E-mail: yduan@scu.edu.cn [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Analytical and Testing Center, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2013-07-01

    Plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a powerful absorption technique for analytical measurement. It combines the inherent advantages of high sensitivity, absolute measurement, and relative insensitivity to light source intensity fluctuations of the cavity ringdown technique with use of plasma as an atomization/ionization source. In this review, we briefly describe the background and principles of plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy(CRDS) technology, the instrumental components, and various applications. The significant developments of the plasma sources, lasers, and cavity optics are illustrated. Analytical applications of plasma-CRDS for elemental detection and isotopic measurement in atomic spectrometry are outlined in this review. Plasma-CRDS is shown to have a promising future for various analytical applications, while some further efforts are still needed in fields such as cavity design, plasma source design, instrumental improvement and integration, as well as potential applications in radical and molecular measurements. - Highlights: • Plasma-based cavity ringdown spectroscopy • High sensitivity and high resolution • Elemental and isotopic measurements.

  11. Sensitive and ultra-fast species detection using pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) is used to develop a novel, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity diagnostic for measuring species concentrations in shock tube experiments. The diagnostic is demonstrated by monitoring trace concentrations of ethylene in the mid-IR region near 949.47 cm-1. Each ringdown measurement is completed in less than 1 μs and the time period between successive pulses is 10 μs. The high sensitivity diagnostic has a noise-equivalent detection limit of 1.08 x 10-5 cm-1 which enables detection of 15 ppm ethylene at fuel pyrolysis conditions (1845 K and 2 bar) and 294 ppb ethylene under ambient conditions (297 K and 1 bar). To our knowledge, this is the first successful application of the cavity ringdown method to the measurement of species time-histories in a shock tube. © 2015 OSA.

  12. Comb-assisted cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a buffer-gas-cooled molecular beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Luigi; Sarno, Valentina Di; Natale, Paolo De; Rosa, Maurizio De; Inguscio, Massimo; Mosca, Simona; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Maddaloni, Pasquale

    2016-06-22

    We demonstrate continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy of a partially hydrodynamic molecular beam emerging from a buffer-gas-cooling source. Specifically, the (ν1 + ν3) vibrational overtone band of acetylene (C2H2) around 1.5 μm is accessed using a narrow-linewidth diode laser stabilized against a GPS-disciplined rubidium clock via an optical frequency comb synthesizer. As an example, the absolute frequency of the R(1) component is measured with a fractional accuracy of ∼1 × 10(-9). Our approach represents the first step towards the extension of more sophisticated cavity-enhanced interrogation schemes, including saturated absorption cavity ring-down or two-photon excitation, to buffer-gas-cooled molecular beams.

  13. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    McCartt, A. Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels...

  14. Saturation dynamics and working limits of saturated absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiek, Ibrahim; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2016-08-17

    Cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) in the linear absorption regime is a well-established method for sensitive trace gas detection, but only a few studies have addressed quantitative measurements in the presence of a saturated sample. In fact, saturation is usually avoided in order to escape from the required complex modeling of the saturation process that depends on the characteristics of the absorbing species, its interaction with the surrounding gas as well as on the temporal and spectral characteristics of the cavity excitation. Conversely, the novel saturated-absorption cavity ringdown spectroscopy approach (SCAR/Sat-CRDS) takes advantage of sample saturation in order to allow one to extract both the gas absorption and the empty cavity loss rates from a single ringdown event. Using a new continuous-wave infrared CRD spectrometer equipped with a tunable narrow-bandwidth high-power OPO laser system and a 18 bit digitizer, the transient dynamics of absorption saturation and the working limits of the Sat-CRDS approach in terms of its ability to extract reliable trace gas concentrations have been experimentally studied in this work. Using a strong methane transition as a test case, the excitation power P0 and saturation power PS have been systematically varied to explore a wide range of saturation regimes. At pressures 5 μbar γc, a pronounced coupling between the two parameters has been observed. Finally, a standard error analysis was performed revealing that the Sat-CRDS approach holds its advantages over conventional CRDS implementations in particular when the attainable ultimate detection sensitivity is limited by uncertainties in the empty cavity ringdown constant.

  15. Preliminary investigation into feasibility of dissolved methane measurement using cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Nan; Ye, Wang-Quan; Luan, Xiao-Ning; Qi, Fu-Jun; Cheng, Kai; Zheng, Ronger

    2016-12-01

    For the exploration of gas hydrate resources by measuring the dissolved methane concentration in seawater, a continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) experimental setup was constructed for trace methane detection. A current-modulation method, rather than a cavity-modulation method using an optical switch and a piezoelectric transducer, was employed to realize the cavity excitation and shutoff. Such a current-modulation method enabled the improvement of the experimental setup construction and stability, and the system size and stability are critical for a sensor to be deployed underwater. Ringdown data acquisition and processing were performed, followed by an evaluation of the experimental setup stability and sensitivity. The obtained results demonstrate that great errors are introduced when a large fitting window is selected if the analog-to-digital converter has an insufficient resolution. The ringdown spectrum of methane corresponding to the 2 v 3 band R(4) branch was captured, and the methane concentration in lab air was determined to be 2.06 ppm. Further experiments for evaluating the quantitative ability of this CW-CRDS experimental setup are underway from which a high-sensitivity methane sensor that can be combined with a degassing system is expected.

  16. Note: Broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy of an intra-cavity bulk sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuner, T; Paa, W; Mühlig, C; Stafast, H

    2013-03-01

    A cavity ring-down (CRD) setup equipped with a pulsed broadband light source (480 nm ≤ λ ≤ 650 nm) and a multichannel detection system (temporal gate width Δτ = 20 ns) is used to simultaneously record the optical loss spectrum of an intra-cavity CaF2 sample and its changes upon transverse ArF laser irradiation at 193 nm. The CRD setup with mirrors of high reflectivity (R > 99.93%) allows to register loss changes of 5 × 10(-5) with a spectral resolution of 0.3 nm in less than 2 min.

  17. Novel use of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to investigate aquatic carbon cycling from microbial to ecosystem scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maher, D.T.; Santos, I.S.; Leuven, J.R.F.W.; Oakes, J.M.; Erler, D.V.; Carvalho, M.C.; Eyre, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Development of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has enabled real-time monitoring of carbon stable isotope ratios of carbon dioxide and methane in air. Here we demonstrate that CRDS can be adapted to assess aquatic carbon cycling processes from microbial to ecosystem scales. We first measured in

  18. Toward a real-time measurement of atmospheric mercury concentrations using cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Faïn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A new sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS has been developed for the measurement of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0 mass concentration with sub-ng m−3 detection limit and high temporal resolution. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy is a direct absorption technique that utilizes path lengths of up to multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell and has a significantly higher sensitivity than conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our prototype uses a frequency-doubled, tuneable dye laser emitting pulses at ~253.65 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 50 Hz. The dye laser incorporates a unique piezo element attached to its tuning grating allowing it to tune the laser on and off the Hg0 absorption line on a pulse to pulse basis to facilitate differential absorption measurements. Hg0 absorption measurements with this CRDS laboratory prototype are highly linearly related to Hg0 concentrations determined by a Tekran 2537B analyzer over a Hg0 concentration range of four orders of magnitude, from 0.2 ng m−3 to 573 ng m−3 implying excellent linearity of both instruments. The current CRDS instrument has a~sensitivity of 0.10 ng m−3 at 10 s time resolution. This tool opens new prospects for the study of Hg0 because of its high temporal resolution and reduced limited sample volume requirements (<0.5 l of sample air. Future applications may include ambient Hg0 flux measurements with eddy covariance techniques, which require measurements of Hg0 concentrations with sub-ng m−3 sensitivity and sub-second time resolution.

  19. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W

    2016-09-06

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels. Sources of inaccuracies are presented and discussed, and the capability to measure carbon-14 in biological samples is demonstrated by comparing pharmacokinetics from carbon-14 dosed guinea pigs analyzed by both CRDS and accelerator mass spectrometry. The CRDS approach presented affords easy access to powerful carbon-14 tracer techniques that can characterize complex biochemical systems.

  20. Investigation on an evanescent wave fiber-optic absorption sensor based on fiber loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Meng; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yaping; Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    An improved ring-down measurement principle for optical waveguides is presented. Fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy allows for measurement of minute optical losses in high-finesse fiber-optic cavities and immunity to the fluctuation of laser source. The evanescent wave absorption losses dependent on the absorption and the refractive index of ambient solution have been theoretically analyzed. The complex refractive index is introduced into our model and extinction coefficient can be calculated accurately through finite element analysis by setting the boundaries of the fiber and the ambient conditions. Using this method, the refractive index of environment can be taken into consideration. Our principle is validated by the highly-sensitive measurement of evanescent wave absorption loss. By chemically processing the surface of sensing segment along an extending ring-down cavity, the concentration of small volume Diethyl Sulphoxide solution where the etched fiber immersed into has been successfully measured and discussed.

  1. Note: A very simple circuit for piezo actuator pseudo-tracking for continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Földes, T

    2013-01-01

    A very simple circuit for pseudo-tracking of the piezo actuator for continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) is presented. The circuit is based on an ordinary positive-edge trigger D-type flip flop integrated circuit, has a low parts count, and can be easily assembled using only off the shelf components. The circuit can be straightforwardly incorporated into most cw-CRDS setups and, thanks to the increased ring-down event rate, higher sensitivity or lower data acquisition time can be achieved.

  2. Stable isotope analysis of saline water samples on a cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Ford, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition of water using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instruments utilizing infrared absorption spectroscopy have been comprehensively tested. However, potential limitations of infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of highly saline water have not yet been evaluated. In this study, we assessed uncertainty arising from elevated salt concentrations in water analyzed on a CRDS instrument and the necessity of a correction procedure. We prepared various solutions of mixed salts and separate solutions with individual salts (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2) using deionized water with a known stable isotope composition. Most of the individual salt and salt mixture solutions (some up to 340 g L(-1)) had δ-values within the range usual for CRDS analytical uncertainty (0.1‰ for δ (18)O and 1.0‰ for δ (2)H). Results were not compromised even when the total load of salt in the vaporizer reached ∼38.5 mg (equivalent to build up after running ∼100 ocean water samples). Therefore, highly saline mixtures can be successfully analyzed using CRDS, except highly concentrated MgCl2 solutions, without the need for an additional correction if the vaporizer is frequently cleaned and MgCl2 concentration in water is relatively low.

  3. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment.

  4. A cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time Hall thruster erosion measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B. C. [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80521 (United States); Huang, W. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 2100 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Tao, L.; Yamamoto, N.; Yalin, A. P., E-mail: ayalin@engr.colostate.edu [Mechanical Engineering Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80521 (United States); Gallimore, A. D. [Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time measurements of sputtered boron from Hall thrusters has been developed. The sensor uses a continuous-wave frequency-quadrupled diode laser at 250 nm to probe ground state atomic boron sputtered from the boron nitride insulating channel. Validation results from a controlled setup using an ion beam and target showed good agreement with a simple finite-element model. Application of the sensor for measurements of two Hall thrusters, the H6 and SPT-70, is described. The H6 was tested at power levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 kW. Peak boron densities of 10 ± 2 × 10{sup 14} m{sup −3} were measured in the thruster plume, and the estimated eroded channel volume agreed within a factor of 2 of profilometry. The SPT-70 was tested at 600 and 660 W, yielding peak boron densities of 7.2 ± 1.1 × 10{sup 14} m{sup −3}, and the estimated erosion rate agreed within ∼20% of profilometry. Technical challenges associated with operating a high-finesse cavity in the presence of energetic plasma are also discussed.

  5. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for detection of hydrogen chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Hagen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A laser-based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS sensor for measurement of hydrogen chloride (HCl has been developed and characterized. The instrument uses light from a distributed-feedback diode laser at 1742 nm coupled to a high finesse optical cavity to make sensitive and quantifiable concentration measurements of HCl based on optical absorption. The instrument has a (1σ limit of detection of < 20 pptv in 1 min and has high specificity to HCl. The measurement response time to changes in input HCl concentration is < 15 s. Validation studies with a previously calibrated permeation tube setup show an accuracy of better than 10%. The CRDS sensor was preliminarily tested in the field with two other HCl instruments (mist chamber and chemical ionization mass spectrometry, all of which were in broad agreement. The mist chamber and CRDS sensors both showed a 400 pptv plume within 50 pptv agreement. The sensor also allows simultaneous sensitive measurements of water and methane, and minimal hardware modification would allow detection of other near-infrared absorbers.

  6. Radiocarbon Dioxide detection based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and a Quantum Cascade Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Genoud, Guillaume; Phillips, Hilary; Dean, Julian; Merimaa, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of radiocarbon ($^{14}$C) in carbon dioxide is demonstrated using mid-infrared spectroscopy and a quantum cascade laser. The measurement is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and a high sensitivity is achieved with a simple setup. The instrument was tested using a standardised sample containing elevated levels of radiocarbon. Radiocarbon dioxide could be detected from samples with an isotopic ratio $^{14}$C/C as low as 50 parts-per-trillion, corresponding to an activity of 5 kBq/m$^3$ in pure CO$_2$, or 2 Bq/m$^3$ in air after extraction of the CO$_2$ from an air sample. The instrument is simple, compact and robust, making it the ideal tool for on-site measurements. It is aimed for monitoring of radioactive gaseous emissions in nuclear power environment, during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Its high sensitivity also makes it the ideal tool for the detection of leaks in radioactive waste repositories.

  7. Development of a cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for boron nitride sputter erosion in Hall thrusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Lei; Gallimore, Alec D; Yalin, Azer P

    2010-01-01

    Sputter erosion of boron nitride (BN) is a critically important process in Hall thrusters from the point of view of both lifetime assessment and contamination effects. This contribution describes the development of a laser based sensor for in situ monitoring of sputtered BN from Hall thrusters. We present a continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) system and its demonstrative measurement results from BN sputtering experiments.

  8. Determination of dissolved methane in natural waters using headspace analysis with cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Hannah M; Shiller, Alan M

    2015-01-26

    Methane (CH4) is the third most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG) but is vastly understudied in comparison to carbon dioxide. Sources and sinks to the atmosphere vary considerably in estimation, including sources such as fresh and marine water systems. A new method to determine dissolved methane concentrations in discrete water samples has been evaluated. By analyzing an equilibrated headspace using laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), low nanomolar dissolved methane concentrations can be determined with high reproducibility (i.e., 0.13 nM detection limit and typical 4% RSD). While CRDS instruments cost roughly twice that of gas chromatographs (GC) usually used for methane determination, the process presented herein is substantially simpler, faster, and requires fewer materials than GC methods. Typically, 70-mL water samples are equilibrated with an equivalent amount of zero air in plastic syringes. The equilibrated headspace is transferred to a clean, dry syringe and then drawn into a Picarro G2301 CRDS analyzer via the instrument's pump. We demonstrate that this instrument holds a linear calibration into the sub-ppmv methane concentration range and holds a stable calibration for at least two years. Application of the method to shipboard dissolved methane determination in the northern Gulf of Mexico as well as river water is shown. Concentrations spanning nearly six orders of magnitude have been determined with this method.

  9. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopic System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad Bin Saud

    2015-05-14

    A system and method for cavity ring-down spectroscopy can include a pulsed quantum cascade laser, an optical ring-down cavity, a photodetector, and an oscilloscope. The system and method can produce pulse widths of less than 200 ns with bandwidths greater than 300 pm, as well as provide temporal resolution of greater than 10 .mu.s.

  10. Toward real-time measurement of atmospheric mercury concentrations using cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Faïn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS is a direct absorption technique that utilizes path lengths up to multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell and has a significantly higher sensitivity than conventional absorption spectroscopy. This tool opens new prospects for study of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0 because of its high temporal resolution and reduced sample volume requirements (<0.5 l of sample air. We developed a new sensor based on CRDS for measurement of (Hg0 mass concentration. Sensor characteristics include sub-ng m−3 detection limit and high temporal resolution using a frequency-doubled, tuneable dye laser emitting pulses at ~253.65 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 50 Hz. The dye laser incorporates a unique piezo element attached to its tuning grating allowing it to tune the laser on and off the Hg0 absorption line on a pulse-to-pulse basis to facilitate differential absorption measurements. Hg0 absorption measurements with this CRDS laboratory prototype are highly linearly related to Hg0 concentrations determined by a Tekran 2537B analyzer over an Hg0 concentration range from 0.2 ng m−3 to 573 ng m−3, implying excellent linearity of both instruments. The current CRDS instrument has a sensitivity of 0.10 ng Hg0 m−3 at 10-s time resolution. Ambient-air tests showed that background Hg0 levels can be detected at low temporal resolution (i.e., 1 s, but also highlight a need for high-frequency (i.e., pulse-to-pulse differential on/off-line tuning of the laser wavelength to account for instabilities of the CRDS system and variable background absorption interferences. Future applications may include ambient Hg0 flux measurements with eddy covariance techniques, which require measurements of Hg0 concentrations with sub-ng m−3 sensitivity and sub-second time

  11. Detection of in vitro S-Nitrosylated Compounds with Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Mary Lynn; Mezher, Monique Michele; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Lehmann, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide has been of strong biological interest for nearly 40 years due to its role in cardiovascular and nervous signaling. It has been shown that S-nitrosocompounds are the main carrier molecule for nitric oxide in biological systems. These compounds are also of interest due to their relationship to several diseases including muscular dystrophy, stroke, myocardial infarction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Understanding the role of these S-nitrosocompounds in these diseases requires concentration studies in healthy and diseased tissues as well as metabolic studies using isotopically labeled S-nitroso precursors such at 15N-arginine. The current widely used techniques for these studies include chemiluminescence, which is blind to isotopic substitution, and mass spectrometry, which is known to artificially create and break S-NO bonds in the sample preparation stages. To this end we have designed and constructed a mid-IR cavity ring-down spectrometer for the detection of nitric oxide released from the target S-nitrosocompounds. Progress toward measuring S-NO groups in biological samples using the CRDS instrument will be presented.

  12. Real-Tme Boron Nitride Erosion Measurements of the HiVHAc Thruster via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian C.; Yalin, Azer P.; Gallimore, Alec; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to make real-time erosion measurements from the NASA High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster. The optical sensor uses 250 nm light to measure absorption of atomic boron in the plume of an operating Hall thruster. Theerosion rate of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster was measured for discharge voltages ranging from 330 to 600 V and discharge powers ranging from 1 to 3 kW. Boron densities as high as 6.5 x 10(exp 15) per cubic meter were found within the channel. Using a very simple boronvelocity model, approximate volumetric erosion rates between 5.0 x 10(exp -12) and 8.2 x 10(exp -12) cubic meter per second were found.

  13. Effects of Particles on Trace-Gas Measurement Using Open-Path Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchale, L.; Shadman, S.; Yalin, A.

    2015-12-01

    Open-path Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy offers many potential advantages over traditional closed-path configurations for the measurement of atmospheric trace gasses. Removal of the vacuum pump and flow system may enable more compact instruments suitable for remote and mobile deployments as well as real time measurement of 'sticky' gases. However, open path operation introduces new challenges including exposure of high reflectivity mirrors to ambient air and aerosols, the need to measure wider (pressure broadened) spectral peaks and possible signal interferences due to optical extinction by aerosol particles in the cavity laser beam. The present submission focuses on the effects of aerosol particles on open-path CRDS using a near-infrared (1742 nm) methane gas measurement system as a test bed. A simple purge enclosure system was developed to prevent aerosol deposition on the cavity high-reflectors. The purge uses ambient air pulled in with a micro-pump through a hepa filter and maintained mirror reflectivity R>0.99996 over 100 hours of use in the presence of high aerosol loading. Optical extinction due to ambient aerosols can change the cavity loss and influence the recorded ring-down times. We observed relatively large fluctuations due to supermicron particles and a near-constant baseline shift due to smaller submicron particles. The fluctuations correspond to absorption on the order of 10-8-10-7 cm-1, comparable to the amplitude of the targeted methane absorption features, causing significant interference. Simple software filter approaches were developed to counter these fluctuations without a priori knowledge of the ambient aerosols. The filters exploit the statistical distribution of signals as well as the expected absorption lineshape. Using these filters, noise-equivalent sensitivities within a factor of ~3 of closed-path systems were obtained (4x10-10cm-1Hz-1/2). Outdoor open-path measurements were validated with side-by-side measurements with a commercial

  14. Diode laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy for in situ measurement of NO3 radical in ambient air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Hu, Renzhi; Xie, Pinhua; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Qin, Min; Ling, Liuyi; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Hao; Xing, XingBiao; Zhu, Guoliang; Wu, Jun; Duan, Jun; Lu, Xue; Shen, Lanlan

    2015-11-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument for measuring atmospheric NO3 radical developed in our laboratory is presented in detail. Light from a red laser diode (661.85 nm) is coupled on-axis into an optical cavity formed by a pair of high-reflectivity mirrors (R≥99.9985%) to achieve an effective absorption path length of approximately 20 km. The detection limit of the NO3 radical determined by Allan variance for the field observation with high particles is approximately 3.2 pptv (2σ, 10 s). The transmission efficiency of the NO3 radical in the system is calibrated, including the filter loss and surface loss. Moreover, measurable interferences from NO2, O3 and water vapor are also discussed. Considering the influence of inlet transmission efficiency and other factors, the instrument accuracy for NO3 radical measurement is approximately ±8% (1σ). The measurement of NO3 radical was performed at a suburb site in Beijing under the situation of high particles concentration (PM2.5 approximately several tens to 150 μg/m3) from October 26 to November 11, 2014. The NO3 radical concentration during the period is relatively low with the maximum value of 38 pptv. The observation results on October 29, combining NO2, O3 and NO data, are briefly analyzed. The experimental results demonstrate that this compact CRDS instrument has the potential for NO3 radical measurements in the field with high particles.

  15. CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY AND HIGH SENSITIVITY ABSORPTION MEASUREMENT%光腔衰荡技术与高灵敏吸收探测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宏太; 柳晓军; 詹明生

    2001-01-01

    腔衰荡光谱技术是一种新兴的高灵敏吸收光谱探测技术,已经被广泛地应用于原子、分子、团簇等吸收光谱的测量,且可实现10-6-10-14cm-1量级吸收的测量.文章综述了腔衰荡光谱技术的发展及在吸收光谱探测上的应用.%Cavity ring-down spectroscopy is a novel spectroscopic techniqueused for high-sensitivity measurement of absorption. It has been widely used in atomic, molecular and cluster spectroscopy, with an absorption sensitivity of 10-6-10-14cm-1. The development of the cavity ring-down technology and its application in absorption measurement are reviewed.

  16. Modification of a commercial cavity ring-down spectroscopy NO{sub 2} detector for enhanced sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, Patricia; Ehrman, Sheryl H. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Luke, Winston T.; Kelley, Paul [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory, SSMC3, Rm. 3316, 1315 East West Hwy., Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 (United States); Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Dickerson, Russell R. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) plays a central role in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, and biogeochemical cycles. Many analytical techniques have been developed to detect NO{sub 2}, but only chemiluminescence-based instruments are commonly, commercially available. There remains a need for a fast, light, and simple method to directly measure NO{sub 2}. In this work we describe the modification and characterization of a small, commercially available cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) NO{sub 2} detector suitable for surface and aircraft monitoring. A metal oxide scrubber was added to remove NO{sub 2}, and provide a chemical zero, improving the detection limit (3{sigma} of the background noise) from several parts per billion by volume (ppbv) to 0.06 ppbv, integrated over 60 s. Known interferences by water and particles were removed using Nafion tubing and a 1 {mu}m Teflon filter, respectively. A 95% response time of 18{+-}1 s was observed for a step change in concentration. The CRDS detector was run in parallel to an ozone chemiluminescence device with photolytic conversion of NO{sub 2} to NO. The two instruments measured ambient air in suburban Maryland. A least-squares fit to the comparison data resulted a slope of 0.960{+-}0.002 and R of 0.995, showing agreement within experimental uncertainty.

  17. Isotopic Seawater Analysis Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy: Method for Reducing the Effect of Salts on the Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Hak, D.; Normandeau, C.; Winkler, R.; Huang, K.; Kerrigan, L.

    2015-12-01

    High-salinity waters such as Seawater poses an operational and maintenance challenge to the measurements of water stable isotopes via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy. As liquid samples are evaporated in the vaporizer peripheral before being sent to the CRDS analyzer, salt precipitates accumulate in the vaporizer chamber. As a result, the sample-to-sample memory performance degrades over time and frequent cleaning is required to maintain the peripheral performance and integrity. To address this issue, earlier work showed that adding a metallic mesh liner into the injection port of the vaporizer could capture salt solids and protect the vaporizer chamber without affecting the sample's isotopic composition and the measurement performance. Additional long-term tests have been recently conducted with the new commercially available Salt Liner accessory to assess its efficacy. We demonstrated the longer stability of the sample-to-sample memory performance on various brine water measurements when compared to a system without the Salt Liner. We also established the guidelines in using, replacing, and cleaning the Salt Liner.

  18. Kinetics of n-butoxy and 2-pentoxy isomerization and detection of primary products by infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Matthew K; Garland, Eva R; Mollner, Andrew K; Bloss, Claire; Bean, Brian D; Weichman, Marissa L; Mertens, Laura A; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2012-06-21

    The primary products of n-butoxy and 2-pentoxy isomerization in the presence and absence of O(2) have been detected using pulsed laser photolysis-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (PLP-CRDS). Alkoxy radicals n-butoxy and 2-pentoxy were generated by photolysis of alkyl nitrite precursors (n-butyl nitrite or 2-pentyl nitrite, respectively), and the isomerization products with and without O(2) were detected by infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy 20 μs after the photolysis. We report the mid-IR OH stretch (ν(1)) absorption spectra for δ-HO-1-C(4)H(8)•, δ-HO-1-C(4)H(8)OO•, δ-HO-1-C(5)H(10)•, and δ-HO-1-C(5)H(10)OO•. The observed ν(1) bands are similar in position and shape to the related alcohols (n-butanol and 2-pentanol), although the HOROO• absorption is slightly stronger than the HOR• absorption. We determined the rate of isomerization relative to reaction with O(2) for the n-butoxy and 2-pentoxy radicals by measuring the relative ν(1) absorbance of HOROO• as a function of [O(2)]. At 295 K and 670 Torr of N(2) or N(2)/O(2), we found rate constant ratios of k(isom)/k(O(2)) = 1.7 (±0.1) × 10(19) cm(-3) for n-butoxy and k(isom)/k(O(2)) = 3.4(±0.4) × 10(19) cm(-3) for 2-pentoxy (2σ uncertainty). Using currently known rate constants k(O(2)), we estimate isomerization rates of k(isom) = 2.4 (±1.2) × 10(5) s(-1) and k(isom) ≈ 3 × 10(5) s(-1) for n-butoxy and 2-pentoxy radicals, respectively, where the uncertainties are primarily due to uncertainties in k(O(2)). Because isomerization is predicted to be in the high pressure limit at 670 Torr, these relative rates are expected to be the same at atmospheric pressure. Our results include corrections for prompt isomerization of hot nascent alkoxy radicals as well as reaction with background NO and unimolecular alkoxy decomposition. We estimate prompt isomerization yields under our conditions of 4 ± 2% and 5 ± 2% for n-butoxy and 2-pentoxy formed from photolysis of the alkyl nitrites at 351 nm. Our

  19. A cavity ring-down spectroscopy system for high time resolution measurements of gaseous elemental mercury concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Ashley M.

    The global cycling of mercury (Hg), a highly toxic environmental pollutant, currently has many unknowns. There are various sources of Hg to the atmosphere including both anthropogenic and natural sources. Processes involved in the global cycling of Hg include emissions from legacy Hg pools, deposition, re-emission, and chemical and physical transformation processes such as gas-phase oxidation and heterogeneous redox reactions. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) can represent >95% of Hg present in the atmosphere. GEM has a relatively long atmospheric lifetime, which allows it to be transported 1000s of km, effectively making it a global pollutant. Once deposited, Hg can be converted to methylmercury, a bioavailable form of Hg known to cause neurological damage in wildlife and humans. Current atmospheric Hg sensors require long analyzing periods for a single sample (minutes to hours), thus a faster-response sensor would improve characterization of surface-atmosphere exchange processes and atmospheric Hg dynamics. The goal of this thesis work was to develop a new, field-deployable sensor for high time resolution measurements of GEM in ambient air using pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). In this research, a CRDS system was developed using a pulsed laser (50 Hz pulse repetition rate) emitting wavelengths tunable between 215 and 280 nm (Hg absorbs at 253.65 nm), a high finesse 1-m-long cavity lined with two high reflectivity mirrors. Due to the long path length (˜1 km) produced inside the short cavity, sample volumes could be kept small while measurement sensitivity remained high. By optimizing the CRDS setup and reducing interferences (e.g., ozone concentration fluctuations), the current CRDS sensor was deployed in the field to measure GEM concentrations in ambient air. The sensor was also used for the first-ever GEM flux measurements by the eddy covariance flux method. Results showed that fast GEM fluctuations could be detected by the CRDS sensor and the

  20. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  1. Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide in humid air using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide (CO in humid air have been made using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique. The measurements of CO mole fractions are determined from the strength of its spectral absorption in the near infrared region (∼1.57 μm after removing interferences from adjacent carbon dioxide (CO2 and water vapor (H2O absorption lines. Water correction functions that account for the dilution and pressure-broadening effects as well as absorption line interferences from adjacent CO2 and H2O lines have been derived for CO2 mole fractions between 360–390 ppm. The line interference corrections are independent of CO mole fractions. The dependence of the line interference correction on CO2 abundance is estimated to be approximately −0.3 ppb/100 ppm CO2 for dry mole fractions of CO. Comparisons of water correction functions from different analyzers of the same type show significant differences, making it necessary to perform instrument-specific water tests for each individual analyzer. The CRDS analyzer was flown on an aircraft in Alaska from April to November in 2011, and the accuracy of the CO measurements by the CRDS analyzer has been validated against discrete NOAA/ESRL flask sample measurements made on board the same aircraft, with a mean difference between integrated in situ and flask measurements of −0.6 ppb and a standard deviation of 2.8 ppb. Preliminary testing of CRDS instrumentation that employs new spectroscopic analysis (available since the beginning of 2012 indicates a smaller water vapor dependence than the models discussed here, but more work is necessary to fully validate the performance. The CRDS technique provides an accurate and low-maintenance method of monitoring the atmospheric dry mole fractions of CO in humid air streams.

  2. Ultra-Sensitive Elemental and Isotope Measurements with Compact Plasma Source Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CPS-CRDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yixiang; Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2005-06-01

    The proposed research is to develop a new class of instruments for actinide isotopes and hazardous element analysis through coupling highly sensitive cavity ring-down spectroscopy to a compact microwave plasma source. The research work will combine advantages of CRDS measurement with a low power, low flow rate, tubing-type microwave plasma source to reach breakthrough sensitivity for elemental analysis and unique capability of isotope measurement. The project has several primary goals: (1) Explore the feasibility of marrying CRDS with a new microwave plasma source; (2) Provide quantitative evaluation of CMP-CRDS for ultratrace elemental and actinide isotope analysis; (3) Approach a breakthrough detection limit of ca. 10{sup -13} g/ml or so, which are orders of magnitude better than currently available best values; (4) Demonstrate the capability of CMP-CRDS technology for isobaric measurements, such as {sup 238}U and {sup 238}Pu isotopes. (5) Design and assemble the first compact, field portable CMP-CRDS instrument with a high-resolution diode laser for DOE/EM on-site demonstration. With all these unique capabilities and sensitivities, we expect CMP-CRDS will bring a revolutionary change in instrument design and development, and will have great impact and play critical roles in supporting DOE's missions in environmental remediation, environmental emission control, waste management and characterization, and decontamination and decommissioning. The ultimate goals of the proposed project are to contribute to environmental management activities that would decrease risk for the public and workers, increase worker productivity with on-site analysis, and tremendously reduce DOE/EM operating costs.

  3. A gas chromatograph for quantification of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides calibrated by thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. W. Tokarek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs, molecular formula RC(OO2NO2 can readily be observed by gas chromatography coupled to electron capture detection (PAN-GC. Calibration of a PAN-GC remains a challenge because the response factors (RF's differ for each of the PANs and because their synthesis in sufficiently high purity is non-trivial, in particular for PANs containing unsaturated side chains. In this manuscript, a PAN-GC and its calibration using diffusion standards, whose output was quantified by blue diode laser thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS, are described. The PAN-GC peak areas correlated linearly with total peroxy nitrate (ΣPN mixing ratios measured by TD-CRDS (r > 0.96. Accurate determination of RF's required the concentrations of PAN impurities in the synthetic standards to be subtracted from ΣPN. The PAN-GC and its TD-CRDS calibration method were deployed during ambient air measurement campaigns in Abbotsford, BC, from 20 July to 5 August, 2012, and during the Fort McMurray Oil Sands Strategic Investigation of Local Sources (FOSSILS campaign at the AMS13 ground site in Fort McKay, AB, from 10 August to 5 September 2013. For the Abbotsford data set, the PAN-GC mixing ratios were compared and agreed with those determined in parallel by thermal dissociation chemical ionization mass spectrometry (TD-CIMS. Advantages and disadvantages of the PAN measurement techniques used in this work and the utility of TD-CRDS as a PAN-GC calibration method are discussed.

  4. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  5. Near Infrared Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Isotopic Analyses of CH4 on Future Martian Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Mahaffy P.; Holmes, V.; Burris, J.; Morey, P.; Lehmann, K.K.; Lollar, B. Sherwood; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Onstott, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A compact Near Infrared Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (near-IR-cw-CRDS) was developed as a candidate for future planetary surface missions. The optical cavity was made of titanium with rugged quartz windows to protect the delicate super cavity from the harsh environmental changes that it would experience during space flight and a Martian surface mission. This design assured the long-term stability of the system. The system applied three distributed feedback laser diodes (DFB-LD), two of which were tuned to the absorption line peaks of (sup 12)CH4 and (sup 13)CH4 at 6046.954 inverse centimeters and 6049.121 inverse centimeters, respectively. The third laser was tuned to a spectral-lines-free region for measuring the baseline cavity loss. The multiple laser design compensated for typical baseline drift of a CRDS system and, thus, improved the overall precision. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was used instead of an Acousto-Optic Module (AOM) to initiate the cavity ring-down events. It maintained high acquisition rates such as AOM, but consumed less power. High data acquisition rates combined with improved long-term stability yielded precise isotopic measurements in this near-IR region even though the strongest CH4 absorption line in this region is 140 times weaker than that of the strongest mid-IR absorption band. The current system has a detection limit of 1.4 times 10( sup –12) inverse centimeters for (sup 13)CH4. This limit corresponds to approximately 7 parts per trillion volume of CH4 at 100 Torrs. With no further improvements the detection limit of our current near IR-cw-CRDS at an ambient Martian pressure of approximately 6 Torrs (8 millibars) would be 0.25 parts per billion volume for one 3.3 minute long analysis.

  6. Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide in humid air using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Chen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide (CO in humid air have been made using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique. The measurements of CO mole fractions are determined from the strength of its spectral absorption in the near-infrared region (~1.57 μm after removing interferences from adjacent carbon dioxide (CO2 and water vapor (H2O absorption lines. Water correction functions that account for the dilution and pressure-broadening effects as well as absorption line interferences from adjacent CO2 and H2O lines have been derived for CO2 mole fractions between 360–390 ppm and for reported H2O mole fractions between 0–4%. The line interference corrections are independent of CO mole fractions. The dependence of the line interference correction on CO2 abundance is estimated to be approximately −0.3 ppb/100 ppm CO2 for dry mole fractions of CO. Comparisons of water correction functions from different analyzers of the same type show significant differences, making it necessary to perform instrument-specific water tests for each individual analyzer. The CRDS analyzer was flown on an aircraft in Alaska from April to November in 2011, and the accuracy of the CO measurements by the CRDS analyzer has been validated against discrete NOAA/ESRL flask sample measurements made on board the same aircraft, with a mean difference between integrated in situ and flask measurements of −0.6 ppb and a standard deviation of 2.8 ppb. Preliminary testing of CRDS instrumentation that employs improved spectroscopic model functions for CO2, H2O, and CO to fit the raw spectral data (available since the beginning of 2012 indicates a smaller water vapor dependence than the models discussed here, but more work is necessary to fully validate the performance. The CRDS technique provides an accurate and low-maintenance method of monitoring the atmospheric dry mole fractions of CO in humid air streams.

  7. Continuous Flow - Cavity RingDown Spectroscopy Using a Novel Universal Interface for High-Precision Bulk 13C Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Nabil; Richman, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    We have developed the world's first optical spectroscopy-based system for bulk stable isotope analysis of 13C. The system is based on a novel universal interface, named LIAISON, capable of coupling to almost any CO2-generating sample preparation front-end ranging from an elemental analyzer to any dissolved carbon analysis module, which are of significant use in geochemical, ecological and food authentication studies. In one specific application, we have coupled LIAISON to an elemental analyzer (EA) and to a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) for 13C isotopic analysis of adulterated honey samples. Another application was developed to analyze dissolved inorganic carbon in water samples. LIAISON is suited for handling a high-throughput sample analysis process by running three different gas handling operations in parallel: Admitting combustion gas from the EA into a first gas bellows, analyzing the previous sample collected into a second gas bellows with CRDS, and flushing and purging a third gas bellows in preparation for the upcoming sample collection operation. The sample-to-sample analysis time is 10 minutes and the operation is completely automated for the whole front-end auto-sampler tray capacity, requiring no operator intervention. The CRDS data are collected, tabulated and saved into an output text file. The memory effect between the USGS L-Glutamic acid standard at natural abundance and the moderately enriched USGS L-Glutamic acid standard is excluded by the selection of the adequate number and duration of flush and purge cycles of the gas sample bags. The system's proven accuracy was cross-checked with EA-IRMS and its achieved precision was typically less than 0.2 permil, including the 13C-enriched tested samples. The LIAISON-CRDS system presented here provides a fully automated solution for 13C bulk stable isotope analysis with unprecedented ease-of-use and possible field portability and application with the availability of a compact front-end. In

  8. Amplified Fiber-Loop Ringdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litman, Jessica; Barnes, Jack; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2009-06-01

    Many commercial liquid chemical analysis systems, such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or capillary electrophoresis consist of a separation followed by optical detection. Besides small volumes and low detection limits, the system should also allow the detection of a large variety of analytes. Existing absorption and fluorescence detectors are often not very sensitive or require labelling. Here, an absorption detector is presented based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) where the optical cavity is made from fibre optic waveguides and the light source is a continuous wave (cw) diode laser. The purpose of this project is to increase the detection of analytes through their overtone absorption in the telecom region at 1300 to 1500 nm. This is done by increasing the ratio of desired loss (extinction caused by the sample), to undesirable loss (due to the waveguides or solvents) through amplification of the ringdown signal using a gain-clamped erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA). The amplified cavity has a round-trip time of 750 ns and we achieved a detection limit of at most 250 ppm when measuring acetylene at 1532.83 nm. The application of our method to detection of dissolved analytes or particles in liquids will be discussed.

  9. A free-flowing soap film combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy as a detection system for liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsang, Markus; Welsch, Thomas; Jones, Harold

    2010-05-07

    We have shown that a free-flowing soap film has sufficiently high-quality optical properties to allow it to be used in the cavity of a ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). The flow rates required to maintain a stable soap film were similar to those used in liquid chromatography and thus allowed interfacing with an HPLC system for use as an optical detector. We have investigated the properties of the system in a relevant analytical application. The soap film/CRDS combination was used at 355 nm as a detector for the separation of a mixture of nitroarenes. These compounds play a role in the residue analysis of areas contaminated with explosives and their decomposition products. In spite of the short absorption path length (9 microm) obtained by the soap film, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allowed a limit of detection of 4 x 10(-6) in absorption units (AU) or less than 17 fmol in the detection volume to be achieved.

  10. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Xueref-Rémy, I.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-09-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  11. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  12. An Ultrahigh Precision, High-Frequency Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Analyzer Based on Dual Isotope Dilution and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan; Cassar, Nicolas; Jonsson, Bror; Cai, Wei-jun; Bender, Michael L

    2015-07-21

    We present a novel method for continuous and automated shipboard measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon concentration ([DIC]) in surface water. The method is based on dual isotope dilution and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (DID-CRDS). In this method, seawater is continuously sampled and mixed with a flow of NaH(13)CO3 solution that is also enriched in deuterated water (the spike). The isotopic composition of CO2 (δ(13)C(spiked_sample)) derived from the DIC in the mixture, and the D/H ratio of the mixed water (δD(spiked_sample)), are measured by CRDS analyzers. The D/H of the water in the mixture allows accurate estimates of the mixing ratio of the sample and the spike. [DIC] of the sample is then calculated from the mixing ratio, [DI(13)C] of the spike, and δ(13)C(spiked_sample). In the laboratory, the precision of the method is test was conducted in the Delaware Bay and Estuary. For 2 min average [DIC], a precision of <0.03% was achieved. Measurements from the DID-CRDS showed good agreement with independent measurements of discrete samples using the well-established coulometric method (mean difference = -1.14 ± 1.68 μmol kg(-1)), and the nondispersive infrared(NDIR)-based methods (mean difference = -0.9 ± 4.73 μmol kg(-1)).

  13. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  14. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  15. Cavity ring-down study of the visible absorption spectrum of the phenyl radical and kinetics of its reactions with Cl, Br, Cl-2, and O-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonokura, K; Norikane, Y; Koshi, M;

    2002-01-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser photolysis was used to study the visible absorption spectrum (490-535 nm, B-2(1)......Cavity ring-down spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser photolysis was used to study the visible absorption spectrum (490-535 nm, B-2(1)...

  16. High-frequency isotopic analysis of liquid water samples in the field - initial results from continuous water sampling and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Freyberg, Jana; Studer, Bjørn; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Studying rapidly changing hydrochemical signals in catchments can help to improve our mechanistic understanding of their water flow pathways and travel times. For these purposes, stable water isotopes (18O and 2H) are commonly used as natural tracers. However, high-frequency isotopic analyses of liquid water samples are challenging. One must capture highly dynamic behavior with high precision and accuracy, but the lab workload (and sample storage artifacts) involved in collecting and analyzing thousands of bottled samples should also be avoided. Therefore, we have tested Picarro, Inc.'s newly developed Continuous Water Sampler Module (CoWS), which is coupled to their L2130-i Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to enable real-time on-line measurements of 18O and 2H in liquid water samples. We coupled this isotope analysis system to a dual-channel ion chomatograph (Metrohm AG, Herisau, Switzerland) for analysis of major cations and anions, as well as a UV-Vis spectroscopy system (s::can Messtechnik GmbH, Vienna, Austria) and electrochemical probes for characterization of basic water quality parameters. The system was run unattended for up to a week at a time in the laboratory and at a small catchment. At the field site, stream-water and precipitation samples were analyzed, alternating at sub-hourly intervals. We observed that measured isotope ratios were highly sensitive to the liquid water flow rate in the CoWS, and thus to the hydraulic head difference between the CoWS and the samples from which water was drawn. We used a programmable high-precision dosing pump to control the injection flow rate and eliminate this flow-rate artifact. Our experiments showed that the precision of the CoWS-L2130-i-system for 2-minute average values was typically better than 0.06‰ for δ18O and 0.16‰ for δ2H. Carryover effects were 1% or less between isotopically contrasting water samples for 30-minute sampling intervals. Instrument drift could be minimized through periodic analysis of

  17. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy of Hydrogen in the 784-852 NM Region and Corresponding Line Shape Implementation Into HITRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yan; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Cunfeng; Liu, An-Wen; Hu, Shui-Ming; Wcislo, Piotr; Kochanov, Roman V.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogen molecule as the most abundant neutral molecule in the universe is an important object of studies in different areas of science, especially astrophysics. The precision spectroscopy of the hydrogen molecule is particularly useful to verify the quantum electrodynamics theory (QED) in a molecular system. The electric quadrupole transitions of the second overtone of H_2 have been recorded with a high precision cavity ring-down spectrometer. A total of eight lines including the extremely weak S3(5) line in the 784-852 nm range have been observed. The line positions have been determined to an accuracy of 3 × 10-4 cm-1 and the line intensities were determined with a relative accuracy of about 1%. The deviations between the experimental and theoretical frequencies are less than 5 × 10-4 cm-1, which is much smaller than the claimed theoretical uncertainty of 0.0025cm-1. The data from this experiment along with other high-quality H_2 spectra have also been analyzed by the Hartmann-Tran profile as a test case for incorporating parametrization of this profile in the HITRAN database. It was incorporated in the new relational structure of the HITRAN database (www.hitran.org) and into the HITRAN Application Programming Interface (HAPI) for the case of H_2 spectra. Tan Y, Wang J, Cheng C-F, Zhao X-Q, Liu A-W, Hu S-M, J Mol Spectrosc 2014;300:60-4; Tran H, Ngo NH, Hartmann J-M, J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;129:199-203; Wcislo P, Gordon IE, Tran H, Tan Y, Hu S-M, Campargue A, et al., Accepted J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015 Rothman LS, Gordon IE, Babikov Y, Barbe A, Chris Benner D, Bernath PF, et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;130:4-50; Kochanov RV, Gordon IE, Rothman LS, Wcislo P, Hill C, Wilzewski JS, Submitted to J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015.

  18. High Resolution Infrared Spectra of Plasma Jet-Cooled - and Triacetylene in the C-H Stretch Region by CW Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D.; Guss, J.; Walsh, A.; Doney, K.; Linnartz, H.

    2013-06-01

    Polyacetylenes form an important series of unsaturated hydrocarbons that are of astrophysical interest. Small polyacetylenes have been detected from infrared observations in dense atmosphere of Titan and in a protoplanetary nebula CRL 618. We present here high-resolution mid-infrared spectra of diacetylene (HC_{4}H) and triacetylene (HC_{6}H) that are recorded in a supersonically expanded pulsed planar plasma using an ultra-sensitive detection technique. This method uses an all fiber-laser-based optical parametric oscillator (OPO), in combination with continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) as a direct absorption detection tool. A hardware-based multi-trigger concept is developed to apply cw-CRDS to pulsed plasmas. Vibrationally hot but rotationally cold HC_{4}H and HC_{6}H are produced by discharging a C_{2}H_{2}/He/Ar gas mixture which is supersonically expanded into a vacuum chamber through a slit discharge nozzle. Experimental spectra are recorded at a resolution of ˜100 MHz in the 3305-3340 cm^{-1} region, which is characteristic of the C-H stretch vibrations of HC_{4}H and HC_{6}H. Jet-cooling in our experiment reduces the rotational temperature of both HC_{4}H and HC_{6}H to <20 K. In total, ˜2000 lines are measured. More than fourteen (vibrationally hot) bands for HC_{4}H and four bands for HC_{6}H are assigned based on Loomis-Wood diagrams, and nearly half of these bands are analyzed for the first time. For both molecules improved and new molecular constants of a series of vibrational levels are presented. The accurate molecular data reported here, particularly those for low-lying (bending) vibrational levels may be used to interpret the ro-vibrational transitions in the FIR and submillimeter/THz region. D. Zhao, J. Guss, A. Walsh, H. Linnartz Chem. Phys. Lett., {dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cplett.2013.02.025}, in press, 2013.

  19. Carbon isotope analysis of dissolved organic carbon in fresh and saline (NaCl) water via continuous flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy following wet chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher H; Thomas, Burt; Saad, Nabil; Thordsen, James J; Kharaka, Yousif K

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the performance and limitations of a wet chemical oxidation carbon analyser interfaced with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (WCO-CRDS) in a continuous flow (CF) configuration for measuring δ(13)C of dissolved organic carbon (δ(13)C-DOC) in natural water samples. Low-chloride matrix (oxidation despite using high-concentration oxidant, extended reaction time, or post-wet chemical oxidation gas-phase combustion. However, through a combination of dilution, chloride removal, and increasing the oxidant:sample ratio, high-salinity samples with sufficient DOC (>22.5 µg C/aliquot) may be analysed. The WCO-CRDS approach requires more total carbon (µg C/aliquot) than conventional CF-isotope ratio mass spectrometer, but is nonetheless applicable to a wide range of DOC concentration and water types, including brackish water, produced water, and basinal brines.

  20. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  1. 光腔衰荡光谱研究PH2自由基在465-555nm的光谱%Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy of PH2 Radical in 465-555 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵东锋; 秦成兵; 张群; 陈旸

    2011-01-01

    Absorption spectra of jet-cooled PH2 radicals were recorded in the wavelength range of 465-555 nm using cavity ringdown spectroscopy. The PH2 radicals were produced in a supersonic jet by pulsed direct current discharge of a mixture of PH3 and SF6 in argon. Seven vibronic bands with fine rotational structures have been observed and assigned as 000 , 2n0, and 2n1 (n=1-3) bands of the (A)2A1-(X)2B1 electronic transition. Rotational assignments and rotational term values for each band were re-identified, and the molecular parameters including rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and spin-rotation interaction constants were also improved with reasonably high precision. In addition, large perturbations observed in each quantum number of total angular momentum of the a axis level of the excited vibronic states were briefly discussed.

  2. First Continuous High Frequency in Situ Measurements of CO2 and CH4 in Rwanda Using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasore, J.; DeWitt, L. H.; Prinn, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Recent IPCC reports emphasize the lack of ground measurements of greenhouse gases on the African continent, despite Africa's significant emissions from agriculture and biomass burning as well as ongoing land use changes. We have established a greenhouse gas monitoring station in northern Rwanda that will be part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), a global network of high frequency long-term remote atmospheric measurement stations. Using a Picarro G2401 cavity ring-down analyzer, continuous measurements of CO2, CH4, and CO at a frequency of five seconds are being captured at this equatorial East African site. The measurement site is located near the Virunga mountains, a volcanic range in North-West Rwanda, on the summit of Mt. Mugogo (2507 m above sea level). Mt. Mugogo is located in a rural area 70km away from Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, and about 13km from the nearest town. From HYSPLIT 7-day back-trajectory calculations, we have determined that the station measures air masses originating from East and Central Africa, the Indian Ocean and occasionally from Southern Asia. Depending on the wind direction and local boundary layer height, measurements taken at Mt Mugogo are occasionally influenced by local sources, including emissions from the nearby city and wood fires from small rural settlements around the station. Here we present the first greenhouse gas measurement data from this unique and understudied location in Africa. Using the lagrangian transport and dispersion model FLEXPART, we derive the relationship between the observed mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 and our current knowledge of their sources and sinks, across this large African footprint.

  3. Influence of ring-down cavity parameters on intensity transmission property in trace gas concentration measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-quan; YAN Ju-bing; SUN Yu-chao; LI Wen-chao

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we describe the basic principles and system design of continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CWCRDS).We also particularly study the nature and the behavior of a novel method to detune a laser and apply it to a cavity ring-down spectroscopy experiment.Both simulations and experiments are completed on the relation between the transmission characteristic and different reflectivities,as well as scanning speed.Output electric field equation is deduced.It has been investigated that how photons are coupled to the cavity and how to accumulate the intensity and leak out of the cavity as a function of time.It is noted that both accumulation of intensity and decay times decrease,and the oscillation amplitude increases as the reflectivity increases.Relative intensity increases with decreasing scanning velocity.Additionally,the simulations show that a non-detuned cavity displays the transmitted signals which are highly dependent on the mirror reflectivity and piezoelectric translator (PZT) modulation speed.Simulations also display that the laser switching off is different from detuning.

  4. Lowest triplet (n, π*) electronic state of acrolein: Determination of structural parameters by cavity ringdown spectroscopy and quantum-chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, Nikolaus C.; McAnally, Michael O.; Drucker, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    The cavity ringdown absorption spectrum of acrolein (propenal, CH2=CH—CH=O) was recorded near 412 nm, under bulk-gas conditions at room temperature and in a free-jet expansion. The measured spectral region includes the 0^0_0 band of the T1(n, π*) ← S0 system. We analyzed the 0^0_0 rotational contour by using the STROTA computer program [R. H. Judge et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 5343 (1995)], 10.1063/1.470569, which incorporates an asymmetric rotor Hamiltonian for simulating and fitting singlet-triplet spectra. We used the program to fit T1(n, π*) inertial constants to the room-temperature contour. The determined values (cm-1), with 2σ confidence intervals, are A = 1.662 ± 0.003, B = 0.1485 ± 0.0006, C = 0.1363 ± 0.0004. Linewidth analysis of the jet-cooled spectrum yielded a value of 14 ± 2 ps for the lifetime of isolated acrolein molecules in the T1(n, π*), v = 0 state. We discuss the observed lifetime in the context of previous computational work on acrolein photochemistry. The spectroscopically derived inertial constants for the T1(n, π*) state were used to benchmark a variety of computational methods. One focus was on complete active space methods, such as complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and second-order perturbation theory with a CASSCF reference function (CASPT2), which are applicable to excited states. We also examined the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster and time-dependent density function theory excited-state methods, and finally unrestricted ground-state techniques, including unrestricted density functional theory and unrestricted coupled-cluster theory with single and double and perturbative triple excitations. For each of the above methods, we or others [O. S. Bokareva et al., Int. J. Quantum Chem. 108, 2719 (2008)], 10.1002/qua.21803 used a triple zeta-quality basis set to optimize the T1(n, π*) geometry of acrolein. We find that the multiconfigurational methods provide the best agreement with fitted inertial

  5. A broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer for in-situ measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bitter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer and its deployment during the 2002 North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer Experiment (NAMBLEX to measure ambient concentrations of NO3, N2O5, I2 and OIO at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, Co. Galway, Ireland. The effective absorption path lengths accessible with the spectrometer generally exceeded 10 km, enabling sensitive localised ``point' measurements of atmospheric absorbers to be made adjacent to the other instruments monitoring chemically related species at the same site. For the majority of observations, the spectrometer was used in an open path configuration thereby avoiding surface losses of reactive species. A subset of observations targeted the N2O5 molecule by detecting the additional NO3 formed by the thermal dissociation of N2O5. In all cases the concentrations of the atmospheric absorbers were retrieved by fitting the differential structure in the broadband cavity ringdown spectra using a methodology adapted from long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy. The uncertainty of the retrieval depends crucially on the correct treatment and fitting of the absorption bands due to water vapour, a topic that is discussed in the context of analysing broadband cavity ringdown spectra. The quality of the measurements and the retrieval method are illustrated with representative spectra acquired during NAMBLEX in spectral regions around 660 nm (NO3 and N2O5 and 570 nm (I2 and OIO. Typical detection limits were 1 pptv for NO3 in an integration time of 100 s, 4 pptv for OIO and 20 pptv for I2 in an integration time of 10 min. Additionally, the concentrations of atmospheric water vapour and the aerosol optical extinction were retrieved in both spectral regions. A companion paper in this issue presents the time series of the measurements and discusses their significance for understanding the variability of short lived nitrogen and iodine compounds in the marine

  6. Determination of inlet transmission and conversion efficiencies for in situ measurements of the nocturnal nitrogen oxides, NO3, N2O5 and NO2, via pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Dubé, William P; Ciciora, Steven J; Brown, Steven S

    2008-08-01

    Pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method for direct absorption spectroscopy that has been applied to in situ detection of NO3, N2O5 and NO2 in the atmosphere from a variety of platforms, including ships, aircraft, and towers. In this paper, we report the development of schemes to significantly improve the accuracy of these measurements. This includes the following: (1) an overall improvement in the inlet transmission efficiencies (92 +/- 2% for NO3 and 97 +/- 1% for N2O5) achieved primarily through a reduction in the inlet residence time; and (2) the development of a calibration procedure that allows regular determination of these efficiencies in the field by addition of NO3 or N2O5 to the inlet from a portable source followed by conversion of NO3 to NO2. In addition, the dependence of the instrument's sensitivity and accuracy to a variety of conditions encountered in the field, including variations in relative humidity, aerosol loading, and VOC levels, was systematically investigated. The rate of degradation of N2O5 transmission efficiency on the inlet and filter system due to the accumulation of inorganic aerosol was determined, such that the frequency of filter changes required for accurate measurements could be defined. In the absence of aerosol, the presence of varying levels of relative humidity and reactive VOC were found to be unimportant factors in the instrument's performance. The 1 sigma accuracy of the NO3, N2O5, and NO2 measured with this instrument are -9/+12, -8/+11, +/- 6%, respectively, where the -/+ signs indicate that the actual value is low/high relative to the measurement. The largest contribution to the overall uncertainty is now due to the NO3 absorption cross section rather than the inlet transmission efficiency.

  7. Measurement of size-dependent single scattering albedo of fresh biomass burning aerosols using the extinction-minus-scattering technique with a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and nephelometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sujeeta; Fiddler, Marc N.; Bililign, Solomon

    2016-11-01

    Biomass burning (BB) aerosols have a significant effect on regional climate, and represent a significant uncertainty in our understanding of climate change. Using a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and integrating nephelometry, the single scattering albedo (SSA) and Ångstrom absorption exponent (AAE) were measured for several North American biomass fuels. This was done for several particle diameters for the smoldering and flaming stage of white pine, red oak, and cedar combustion. Measurements were done over a wider wavelength range than any previous direct measurement of BB particles. While the offline sampling system used in this work shows promise, some changes in particle size distribution were observed, and a thorough evaluation of this method is required. The uncertainty of SSA was 6 %, with the truncation angle correction of the nephelometer being the largest contributor to error. While scattering and extinction did show wavelength dependence, SSA did not. SSA values ranged from 0.46 to 0.74, and were not uniformly greater for the smoldering stage than the flaming stage. SSA values changed with particle size, and not systematically so, suggesting the proportion of tar balls to fractal black carbon change with fuel type/state and particle size. SSA differences of 0.15-0.4 or greater can be attributed to fuel type or fuel state for fresh soot. AAE values were quite high (1.59-5.57), despite SSA being lower than is typically observed in wildfires. The SSA and AAE values in this work do not fit well with current schemes that relate these factors to the modified combustion efficiency of a burn. Combustion stage, particle size, fuel type, and fuel condition were found to have the most significant effects on the intrinsic optical properties of fresh soot, though additional factors influence aged soot.

  8. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high reflectivity mirrors with high accuracy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sridhar; Sandeep K Agarwalla; Sunita Singh; L M Gantayet

    2010-12-01

    A simple, accurate and reliable method for measuring the reflectivity of laser-grade mirrors ( > 99.5 %) based on cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has been success-fully demonstrated in our laboratory using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A fast photomultiplier tube with an oscilloscope was used to detect and analyse the CRD signal. The cavity decay times were measured for three cavities formed by a combination of three mirror pairs. The absolute reflectivities 1, 2, 3 were determined to be 99.94%, 99.63%, 99.52% at normal incidence. The reflectivity of mirrors is measured to an accuracy of 0.01%.

  9. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T. Peter

    2014-10-01

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 105 cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >103) to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high-finesse cavity

  10. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2014-10-02

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 10(5) cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >10(3)); to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high

  11. The application of a cavity ring-down spectrometer to measurements of ambient ammonia using traceable primary standard gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas A.; Ferracci, Valerio; Cassidy, Nathan; Hoffnagle, John A.

    2016-08-01

    A correction for the undesirable effects of direct and indirect cross-interference from water vapour on ammonia (NH3) measurements was developed using an optical laser sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This correction relied on new measurements of the collisional broadening due to water vapour of two NH3 spectral lines in the near infra-red (6548.6 and 6548.8 cm-1), and on the development of novel stable primary standard gas mixtures (PSMs) of ammonia prepared by gravimetry in passivated gas cylinders at 100 μmol mol-1. The PSMs were diluted dynamically to provide calibration mixtures of dry and humidified ammonia atmospheres of known composition in the nmol mol-1 range and were employed as part of establishing a metrological traceability chain to improve the reliability and accuracy of ambient ammonia measurements. The successful implementation of this correction will allow the extension of this rapid on-line spectroscopic technique to exposure chamber validation tests under controlled conditions and ambient monitoring in the field.

  12. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, J. Brian, E-mail: b.leen@lgrinc.com; O’Keefe, Anthony [Los Gatos Research, 67 E. Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  13. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  14. Measurement of carbon dioxide concentration by fiber-loop ring-down spectroscopy for continuous remote measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiromasa; Noriyasu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    We report on the continuous remote measurement of CO2 concentration using a fiber-loop ring-down spectroscopy system at a wavelength of 1572.334 nm. In fiber-loop ring-down spectroscopy, the effective propagation distance through the CO2 atmosphere determines the minimum detectable CO2 concentration. The effective propagation distance is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio in the fiber loop, including the gain of an Er-doped optical fiber amplifier (EDFA), and the loss in the single-mode fiber, coupling losses, and losses in optical devices. We examined the influence of noise due to the EDFA in the system. A noise figure for the EDFA was measured, and the maximum effective propagation distance through the CO2 atmosphere was 350 m. Using the obtained EDFA gain and the optical loss in the system, we simulated the ring-down time for a CO2 concentration range of 0 to 0.5%. We set up the fiber-loop ring-down spectroscopy system and measured the ring-down waveforms with a CO2 concentration range of 0 to 0.5%. In this CO2 concentration range, the measurement resolution was 0.05%, showing good agreement with the calculated results.

  15. Research and data pro cessing of double lo cked cavity ringdown absorption sp ectroscopy%双重频率锁定的腔衰荡吸收光谱技术及信号处理∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾梦源; 肖连团; 贾锁堂; 赵刚; 侯佳佳; 谭巍; 邱晓东; 马维光; 张雷; 董磊; 尹王保

    2016-01-01

    A continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy based on a double-locking loop is proposed to improve the short-coming of low acquisition rate of concentration in traditional scheme. A small portion of laser is separated to pass through a C2H2 reference cell, used to lock the laser frequency to the ν1+ν3 band P(9)e absorption line of C2H2 at 6534.3634 cm−1 by the 1st harmonic demodulation of the frequency modulation spectroscopy. The remaining portion is incident on a high finesses cavity to observe the ringdown events. Meanwhile, the reflected light of cavity is used to extract the error signal to lock the laser based on the PDH frequency locking technique. As a consequence, the frequency drift of the laser and the jitter of the cavity length are improved, therefore a more relatively accuracy result is expected. The laser light is dual frequency modulated by a fiber coupled electro optic modulator (FEOM)in the above system. In order to optimize, to some extent, the asymmetry of the error signal caused by the residual amplitude modulation due to the inconsistency of the laser polarization direction with the extraordinary axis of the FEOM, the demodulation phase is adjusted carefully until the error signal is smoothed up and close to symmetry. Then, the effect of locking loop is examined. The frequency of laser, based on the measurement by a wavelength meter, is more stable and the relative frequency discrimination between the laser and the longitudinal mode of cavity is about 9.8 kHz. In addition, the PDH locking, ensuring the efficient coupling of the laser with the cavity, can gain a high acquisition rate of the concentration information. In order to obtain a complete ringdown event, the frequency of square wave to the fiber coupled acoustic optical modulator (FAOM) is limited to 30 kHz with the duty cycle of 85%, which is determined by the ringdown time and re-lock time. However, there exists a relatively large random noise in a series of ringdown time

  16. An optic fiber sensor for multiple gases based on fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy and microring resonator arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Jian, Jia-wen; Zheng, Yan-gong; Jin, Han; Zou, Jie

    2016-07-01

    A high-sensitivity sensor for multiple gases based on microring array filter and fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy system is proposed and demonstrated. The parameters of the resonators are designed so that the filtered signal from a broadband light source can be tuned with an absorption spectral line of gas. Therefore, through adding microring resonators horizontally and vertically, the number of target gases and filter range are increased. In this research, in the broad spectral range of about 0.9 μm, only the absorption spectral lines of target gases are filtered. The simulation results show that three target gases, CH4, CO2 and HF, can be simultaneously detected by the sensing system. Owing to the fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy, the whole system is optimized in mini-size and sensitivity, and we can choose different sensing methods to enhance the measurement accuracy for high and low concentration conditions.

  17. Determination of δ2H and δ18O in mineral water based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonietto, G.; Godoy, J.; Godoy, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotopes of water are proven indicators, tracers and recorders of processes that affect the hydrologic cycle. Measurements of the stable isotope ratios (δ2H, δ18O and δ17O) of both liquid water and water vapor are widely used in hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and biogeochemistry to determine the migration of water through an ecosystem. Application of the method to Brazilian bottled mineral water has shown that it is possible to trace the origin of the water to at least the state level within Brazilian geographical regions. National and regional meteoric water lines were constructed with substantial differences between geographical regions, in particular for the central region of the country, with a slope coefficient of approximately seven and no deuterium excess. The repeatability, reproducibility and accuracy of the direct measurement of δ2H and δ18O isotopes in water samples were evaluated using Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometry, and values comparable with the Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry were obtained. Memory effect correction was negligible after five successive injections, and the time for each sample analysis was approximately 7 minutes. The new high throughput method measures isotopologues of water with a typical precision of better than 0.15‰ for δ18O and better than 0.6‰ for δ2H.

  18. H2S interference on CO2 isotopic measurements using a Picarro G1101-i cavity ring-down spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Malowany

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cavity ring-down spectrometers (CRDS have the capacity to make isotopic measurements of CO2 where concentrations range from atmospheric (~ 400 ppm to 6000 ppm. Following field trials, it has come to light that the spectrographic lines used for CO2 have an interference with elevated (higher than ambient amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S, which causes significant depletions in the δ13C measurement by the CRDS. In order to deploy this instrument in environments with elevated H2S concentrations (i.e., active volcanoes, we require a robust method for eliminating this interference. Controlled experiments using a Picarro G1101-i optical spectrometer were done to characterize the H2S interference at varying CO2 and H2S concentrations. The addition of H2S to a CO2 standard gas reveals an increase in the 12CO2 concentration and a more significant decrease in the 13CO2 concentration, resulting in a depleted δ13C value. Reacting gas samples containing H2S with copper prior to analysis can eliminate this effect. However, experiments also revealed that the addition of H2S to CO2 results in the formation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS and carbon disulfide (CS2, causing a decrease in the overall CO2 concentration without affecting the δ13C value. It is important for future work with CRDS, particularly in volcanic regions where H2S is abundant, to be aware of the H2S interference on the CO2 spectroscopic lines and to remove all H2S prior to analysis. We suggest employing a scrub composed of copper to remove H2S from all gas samples that have concentrations in excess of 1 ppb.

  19. Variable pathlength cavity spectroscopy development of an automated prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Ryan Andrew

    Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) with matter to probe the chemical and physical properties of atoms and molecules. The primary types of analytical spectroscopy are absorption, emission, and scattering methods. Absorption spectroscopy can quantitatively determine the chemical concentration of a given species in a sample by the relationship described by Beer's Law. Upon inspection of Beer's Law, it becomes apparent that for a given analyte concentration, the only experimental variable is the pathlength. Over the past ˜75 years, several approaches to physically increasing the pathlength have been reported in the literature. These have included not only larger cuvettes and novel techniques such as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy, but also numerous designs that are based upon the creation of an optical cavity in which multiple reflections through the sample are made possible. The cavity-based designs range from the White Cell (1942) to Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (O'Keefe and Deacon, 1998). In the White Cell approach, the incident beam is directed off-axis to repeatedly reflect concave mirror surfaces. Numerous variations of the White Cell design have been reported, and it has found wide application in infrared absorption spectroscopy in what have become to be known as "light pipes". In the CRDS design, on the other hand, highly reflective dielectric mirrors situated for on-axis reflections result in the measurement of the exponential decay of trapped light that passes through the exit mirror. CRDS has proven over the past two decades to be a powerful technique for ultra-trace analysis (thesis, a novel approach to ultra-trace analysis by absorption spectroscopy is described. In this approach known as Variable Pathlength Cavity Spectroscopy (VPCS), a high finesse optical cavity is created by two flat, parallel, dielectric mirrors -- one of which is rotating. Source light from a pulsed dye laser (488 nm

  20. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy and sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Loock, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The book reviews the dramatic recent advances in the use of optical resonators for high sensitivity and high resolution molecular spectroscopy as well as for chemical, mechanical and physical sensing.  It encompasses a variety of cavities including those made of two or more mirrors, optical fiber loops, fiber gratings and spherical cavities. The book focuses on novel techniques and their applications. Each chapter is written by an expert and/or pioneer in the field. These experts also provide the theoretical background in optics and molecular physics where needed. Examples of recent breakthroughs include the use of frequency combs (Nobel prize 2005) for cavity enhanced sensing and spectroscopy, the use of novel cavity materials and geometries, the development of optical heterodyne detection techniques combined to active frequency-locking schemes. These methods allow the use and interrogation of optical resonators with a variety of coherent light sources for trace gas detection and sensing of strain, temperat...

  1. Bulk Stable Isotope Analysis of Carbon from Solids and Liquids using an Elemental Analyzer Coupled to a Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, N.; Rella, C.; van Pelt, A.

    2009-04-01

    We report here on the novel employment of a small footprint Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) interfaced to an elemental analyzer for the measurement of the bulk isotopic carbon signature in plants and food products. The current system provides an inexpensive alternative with unparalleled ease-of-use as compared to standard methods using the more complex analytical instrumentation of isotope ratio mass spectrometry. A precision of carbon isotopic ratio measurements of less than 1 permil was achieved in minutes of measurement time. Such precision readily distinguishes the isotopic carbon signatures of a variety of environmental and agricultural products from different origins, providing information about food authenticity and climate changes effect on plant physiology.

  2. Conversion of a Continuous Flow Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to Measure 13C in CO2 Using Static Analyses of Small Volume Grab Samples (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, T.; Jordanova, K.; Berryman, E.; van Pelt, A. D.; Marshall, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Laser-based analyses of concentration and isotopic content allow unprecedented temporal resolution for a number of important atmospheric constituents. Perhaps overlooked is the potential for these tools to also provide analyses in a more traditional "mass spectrometric" mode that is readily deployable in a field setting. Certain sampling regimes (e.g. soil profiles) are not appropriate for continuous sampling due to their slow change and disturbance of gradients caused by frequent/continuous sampling. We have modified the inlet and plumbing system of a commercial continuous flow cavity ring-down spectrometer in a manner that allows for 13C analyses of CO2 from syringe samples at volumes as small as 25 ml of air with ambient concentrations of CO2. The method employs an external high vacuum pump and a series of programmable micro-valves that allow for evacuation of the long-pass ring-down cell followed by controlled filling, via syringe, of the cavity to optimal sampling pressure and subsequent static analysis of CO2 concentration and 13C /13C ratios. The set-up is field deployable with modest power requirements and allows for near real time analysis in a variety of sampling environments and on-the-fly determination of sampling protocol. In its current configuration, the system provides precision of 1% for CO2 concentration and 0.3 permil for δ13C in replicate analyses of reference air. We have deployed the system to a field laboratory in central New Mexico near a controlled tree mortality research site where post-mortality ecosystem CO2 evolution is being studied. Results from the first field season will be presented and discussed.

  3. Development of a New N2O/CO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer for sub-ppb Ambient Gas Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, G. A.; Saad, N.; Zhou, J.; Hoffnagle, J.; Fleck, D.

    2015-12-01

    With a global warming potential of nearly 300, N2O is a critically important greenhouse gas, contributing about 5% of the US total GHG emissions. Agriculture soil management practices are the dominant source of anthropogenic N2O emissions, contributing nearly 3/4ths of US N2O emissions. In urban areas, vehicle tailpipe emissions and waste water treatment plants are significant sources of N2O. We report here a new mid-infrared laser-based cavity ring-down spectrometer that was recently developed to measure sub-ppb ambient concentrations of two key greenhouse gas species, N2O and CO, simultaneously. It combines a quantum cascade laser with a proprietary 3-mirror optical cavity. The new optical analyzer was set up to monitor nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide, along with CO2 and CH4, in ambient air obtained from a 10m tower in Santa Clara, California. In the data collected, the contribution from traffic and a nearby sewage treatment facility was evident.

  4. Cavity-enhanced dual-comb spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhardt, Birgitta; Jacquet, Patrick; Jacquey, Marion; Kobayashi, Yohei; Udem, Thomas; Holzwarth, Ronald; Guelachvili, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular fingerprinting is dramatically improved when placing the absorbing sample in a high-finesse optical cavity, thanks to the large increase of the effective path-length. As demonstrated recently, when the equidistant lines from a laser frequency comb are simultaneously injected into the cavity over a large spectral range, multiple trace-gases may be identified within a few milliseconds. Analyzing efficiently the light transmitted through the cavity however still remains challenging. Here, a novel approach, cavity-enhanced frequency comb Fourier transform spectroscopy, fully overcomes this difficulty and measures ultrasensitive, broad-bandwidth, high-resolution spectra within a few tens of $\\mu$s. It could be implemented from the Terahertz to the ultraviolet regions without any need for detector arrays. We recorded, within 18 $\\mu$s, spectra of the 1.0 $\\mu$m overtone bands of ammonia spanning 20 nm with 4.5 GHz resolution and a noise-equivalent-absorption at one-second-averaging per ...

  5. Real-time monitoring of ethane in human breath using mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahnke, H.; Kleine, D.; Hering, P.; Mürtz, M.

    2001-06-01

    We report on spectroscopic real-time analysis of ethane traces in exhaled human breath. Ethane is considered the most important volatile marker of free-radical induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the human body. Our measurements were carried out by means of mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy in the 3 μm region, a cw variant of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The spectrometer is based on a CO overtone laser with tunable microwave sidebands. The resulting system proved to be an unique tool with high sensitivity and selectivity for rapid and precise breath testing. With a 5 s integration time, we achieved a detection limit on the order of 100 parts per trillion ethane in human breath. Thus, sample preconcentration is unnecessary. Time-resolved monitoring of the decaying ethane fraction in breath after smoking a cigarette is demonstrated.

  6. Applications of broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy for measurements of trace gases and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.; Dube, W. P.; Flores, J. M.; Langford, A. O.; Min, K. E.; Rudich, Y.; Stutz, J.; Wagner, N.; Young, C.; Zarzana, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy (BBCES) uses a broadband light source, optical cavity, and multichannel detector to measure light extinction with high sensitivity. This method differs from cavity ringdown spectroscopy, because it uses an inexpensive, incoherent light source and allows optical extinction to be determined simultaneously across a broad wavelength region.Spectral fitting methods can be used to retrieve multiple absorbers across the observed wavelength region. We have successfully used this method to measure glyoxal (CHOCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from ground-based and aircraft-based sampling platforms. The detection limit (2-sigma) in 5 s for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 is 32, 250 and 80 parts per trillion (pptv).Alternatively, gas-phase absorbers can be chemically removed to allow the accurate determination of aerosol extinction. In the laboratory, we have used the aerosol extinction measurements to determine scattering and absorption as a function of wavelength. We have deployed a ground-based field instrument to measure aerosol extinction, with a detection limit of approximately 0.2 Mm-1 in 1 min.BBCES methods are most widely used in the near-ultraviolet and visible spectral region. Recently, we have demonstrated measurements at 315-350 nm for formaldehyde (CH2O) and NO2. Extending the technique further into the ultraviolet spectral region will allow important additional measurements of trace gas species and aerosol extinction.

  7. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Reber, Melanie A R; Allison, Thomas K

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique using a frequency comb laser and optical cavities for performing ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with improved sensitivity. Resonantly enhancing the probe pulses, we demonstrate a sensitivity of $\\Delta$OD $ = 1 \\times 10^{-9}/\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$ for averaging times as long as 30 s per delay point ($\\Delta$OD$_{min} = 2 \\times 10^{-10}$). Resonantly enhancing the pump pulses allows us to produce a high excitation fraction at high repetition-rate, so that signals can be recorded from samples with optical densities as low as OD $\\approx 10^{-8}$, or column densities $< 10^{10}$ molecules/cm$^2$. This high sensitivity enables new directions for ultrafast spectroscopy.

  8. Differential cavity mode spectroscopy: A new cavity enhanced technique for the detection of weak transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Glenn de [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)], E-mail: glenn.devine@jpl.nasa.gov; McClelland, David E.; Gray, Malcolm B. [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2008-06-16

    We present a new cavity enhanced, continuous wave spectroscopic technique for the detection of weak atomic and molecular transitions. Differential Cavity Mode Spectroscopy (DCMS) measures the difference in absorption between two adjacent cavity longitudinal modes to yield a highly sensitive, yet relatively simple, cavity enhanced spectroscopic technique. In addition this relative absorption measurement is, to first order, independent of both laser frequency noise and cavity acoustic noise. Here we present both a theoretical description of this new technique and an initial experimental demonstration.

  9. Optical Trapping-Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy System for Single Aerosol Particle Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Final Report REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR...focused 532 nm laser ( Bermuda grass smut spores, horizontal illumination at power of 4.5 mW, focus length = 10 mm, UV quartz cuvette is from Starna...Cells, Inc.) (b) Single bioaerosol particles trapped using a focused 405 nm laser ( Bermuda grass smut spores, upward illumination at power of 2.0

  10. Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties by Integrating Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and Nephelometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    sources. isoprenes and terpenes are examples of organic compounds emitted to the atmosphere by plants. Although initially volatile these molecules can be...have a cooling and worming effect in the atmosphere depending on their tendency to absorb and make the atmosphere warmer or scatter the energy back...the relationship between the particle size and the wavelength of the incident light. Absorbing aerosol types include urban pollution, biomass

  11. A new cavity ring-down instrument for airborne monitoring of N2O5, NO3, NO2 and O3 in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Albert A.; Brown, Steven S.; Dinesan, Hemanth; Dubé, William P.; Goulette, Marc; Hübler, Gerhard; Orphal, Johannes; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The chemistry of NO3 and N2O5 is important to the regulation of both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone. In situ detection of NO3 and N2O5 in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS) represents a new scientific direction as the only previous measurements of these species in this region of the atmosphere has been via remote sensing techniques. Because both the sources and the sinks for NO3 and N2O5 are potentially stratified spatially, their mixing ratios, and their influence on nitrogen oxide and ozone transport and loss at night can show large variability as a function of altitude. Aircraft-based measurements of heterogeneous N2O5 uptake in the lower troposphere have uncovered a surprising degree of variability in the uptake coefficient [1], but there are no corresponding high altitude measurements.The UTLS is routinely sampled by the IAGOS-CARIBIC program (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmospheric.com), a European infrastructural program with the aim of studying the chemistry and transport across this part of the atmosphere. An airfreight container with 15 different automated instruments from 8 European research partners is utilized on board a commercial Lufthansa airbus 340-600 to monitor ~ 100 atmospheric species (trace gases and aerosol parameters) in the UTLS. The instrumentation in the CARIBIC container is now to be supplemented by a new cavity ring-down device for monitoring nitrogen oxides, jointly developed by researchers from Cork (Ireland), Boulder (USA) and Karlsruhe (Germany). The compact and light-weight instrument is designed to monitor not only NO3 and N2O5, but also NO2 and O3. The detection is based on 4 high-finesse optical cavities (cavity length ~ 44 cm). Two cavities are operated at 662 nm (maximum absorption of NO3), the other two at 405 nm (maximum absorption of NO2). The inlet to one of the (662)-cavities is heated in order to thermally decompose N2O5

  12. Characterisation and first application of a cavity ring-down instrument for measurements of NO3 and N2O5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrade, Stephanie; Bachner, Mathias; Kubik, Kamil; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    A new instrument was built for atmospheric measurements using the cavity ringdown technique for a simultaneous measurement of nitrate radicals (NO3) and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) using a red laser diode at 662 nm. The instrument consists of two channels: The inlet and the cavity of the first one is heated up to 120 °C to force the thermal equlibrium of N2O5 and NO3 to the side of NO3, so that this channel measures the sum NO3 and N2O5. The other channel stays at ambient temperature to measure NO3 only. To prevent aerosol extinction, a filter is installed upstream of the cavities. The detection limit is within the range of a few ppt at 1 s time resolution. Measurements have an accuracy of 15 %. Instrument losses were characterized by a titration method using the conversion of NO3 to NO2 by adding NO. Two addition points where chosen, right before and after the NO3 intrument.The NO2 concentration was measured downstream of the instrument with another CRDS intrument using a blue laser diode at 405 nm. Estimated losses are within the range of 40 % due two a high point loss on the used filter housing. First application took place at the SAPHIR simulation chamber at Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH. Experiments were made by injecting known concentrations of NO2 and ozone into the dark chamber filled with pure synthetic air to analyse the behavior of NO3 and N2O5 in the clean chamber. Possible losses were estimated from the steady-state lifetime of NO3, which can be calculated from measured NO3, NO2 and ozone concentrations. Estimated lifetimes of NO3 and N2O5 were within the range of 19 min and 44 min, respetively. During futher experiments organic compounds (isoprene, β-pinene, limonene) were additionally injected, in order to test the applicability of chamber experiments for the invertigation of oxidation processes by NO3.

  13. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  14. Diode laser-based cavity ring-down instrument for NO3, N2O5, NO, NO2 and O3 from aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Ryerson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a diode laser based, cavity ring-down spectrometer for simultaneous in situ measurements of four nitrogen oxide species, NO3, N2O5, NO, NO2, as well as O3, designed for deployment on aircraft. The instrument measures NO3 and NO2 by optical extinction at 662 nm and 405 nm, respectively; N2O5 is measured by thermal conversion to NO3, while NO and O3 are measured by chemical conversion to NO2. The instrument has several advantages over previous instruments developed by our group for measurement of NO2, NO3 and N2O5 alone, based on a pulsed Nd:YAG and dye laser. First, the use of continuous wave diode lasers reduces the requirements for power and weight and eliminates hazardous materials. Second, detection of NO2 at 405 nm is more sensitive than our previously reported 532 nm instrument, and does not have a measurable interference from O3. Third, the instrument includes chemical conversion of NO and O3 to NO2 to provide measurements of total NOx (= NO + NO2 and Ox (= NO2 + O3 on two separate channels; mixing ratios of NO and O3 are determined by subtraction of NO2. Finally, all five species are calibrated against a single standard based on 254 nm O3 absorption to provide high accuracy. Disadvantages include an increased sensitivity to water vapor on the 662 nm NO3 and N2O5 channels and a modest reduction in sensitivity for these species compared to the pulsed laser instrument. The measurement precision for both NO3 and N2O5 is below 1 pptv (2σ, 1 s and for NO, NO2 and O3 is 170, 46, and 56 pptv (2σ, 1 s respectively. The NO and NO2 measurements are less precise than research-grade chemiluminescence instruments. However, the combination of these five species in a single instrument, calibrated to a single analytical standard, provides a complete and accurate picture of nighttime nitrogen oxide chemistry. The instrument performance is demonstrated using data acquired during a recent field campaign in California.

  15. Diode laser-based cavity ring-down instrument for NO3, N2O5, NO, NO2 and O3 from aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Ryerson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a diode laser-based, cavity ring-down spectrometer for simultaneous in situ measurements of four nitrogen oxide species, NO3, N2O5, NO, NO2, as well as O3, designed for deployment on aircraft. The instrument measures NO3 and NO2 by optical extinction at 662 nm and 405 nm, respectively; N2O5 is measured by thermal conversion to NO3, while NO and O3 are measured by chemical conversion to NO2. The instrument has several advantages over previous instruments developed by our group for measurement of NO2, NO3 and N2O5 alone, based on a pulsed Nd:YAG and dye laser. First, the use of continuous wave diode lasers reduces the requirements for power and weight and eliminates hazardous materials. Second, detection of NO2 at 405 nm is more sensitive than our previously reported 532 nm instrument, and does not have a measurable interference from O3. Third, the instrument includes chemical conversion of NO and O3 to NO2 to provide measurements of total NOx (= NO + NO2 and Ox (= NO2 + O3 on two separate channels; mixing ratios of NO and O3 are determined by subtraction of NO2. Finally, all five species are calibrated against a single standard based on 254 nm O3 absorption to provide high accuracy. Disadvantages include an increased sensitivity to water vapor on the 662 nm NO3 and N2O5 channels and a modest reduction in sensitivity for these species compared to the pulsed laser instrument. The in-flight detection limit for both NO3 and N2O5 is 3 pptv (2 σ, 1 s and for NO, NO2 and O3 is 140, 90, and 120 pptv (2 σ, 1 s respectively. Demonstrated performance of the instrument in a laboratory/ground based environment is better by approximately a factor of 2–3. The NO and NO2 measurements are less precise than research-grade chemiluminescence instruments. However, the combination of these five species in a single instrument, calibrated to a single analytical standard, provides a complete and accurate picture of nighttime nitrogen oxide

  16. Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectrum of the T_1(n,π*) ← S_0 Transition of Acrolein: Analysis of the 0^0_0 Band Rotational Contour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, Nikolaus C.; McAnally, Michael O.; Drucker, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Acrolein (propenal, CH_2=CH---CH=O) is the simplest conjugated enal molecule and serves as a prototype for investigating the photochemical properties of larger enals and enones. Acrolein has a coplanar arrangement of heavy atoms in its ground electronic state. Much of the photochemistry is mediated by the T_1(π,π*) state, which has a CH_2--twisted equilibrium structure. In solution, the T_1(π,π*) state is typically accessed via intersystem crossing from an intially prepared planar S_1(n,π*) state. An intermediate in this photophysical transformation is the lowest ^3 (n,π*) state, a planar species with adiabatic excitation energy below S_1 and above T_1(π,π*). The present work focuses on this ^3 (n,π*) intermediate state; it is designated T_1(n,π*) as the lowest-energy triplet state of acrolein having a planar equilibrium structure. The T_1(n,π*) ← S_0 band system, with origin near 412 nm, was first recorded in the 1970s at medium (0.5 cm-1) resolution using a long-path absorption cell. Here we report the cavity ringdown spectrum of the 0^0_0 band, recorded using a pulsed dye laser with 0.1 cm-1 spectral bandwidth. The spectrum was measured under both bulk-gas (room-temperature) and jet-cooled conditions. The band contour in each spectrum was analyzed by using a computer program developed for simulating and fitting the rotational structure of singlet-triplet transitions. The assignment of several resolved sub-band heads in the room-temperature spectrum permitted approximate fitting of the inertial constants for the T_1(n,π*) state. The determined values (cm-1) are A=1.662, B=0.1485, C=0.1363. For the parameters A and (B+C)/2, estimated uncertainties of ± 0.003 cm-1 and ± 0.0004 cm-1, respectively, correspond to a range of values that produce qualitatively satisfactory global agreement with the observed room-temperature contour. The fitted inertial constants were used to simulate the rotational contour of the 0^0_0 band under jet-cooled conditions

  17. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsälä, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-06-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν 1 + ν 2 + ν 3 + ν4 1 + ν5 - 1 in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm-1, the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm-1, and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10-6 cm-1, where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  18. Measurement of aerosol optical properties by cw cavity enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Guo; Ye, Shan-Shan; Yang, Xiao; Han, Ye-Xing; Tang, Huai-Wu; Yu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The CAPS (Cavity Attenuated Phase shift Spectroscopy) system, which detects the extinction coefficients within a 10 nm bandpass centered at 532 nm, comprises a green LED with center wavelength in 532nm, a resonant optical cavity (36 cm length), a Photo Multiplier Tube detector, and a lock in amplifier. The square wave modulated light from the LED passes through the optical cavity and is detected as a distorted waveform which is characterized by a phase shift with respect to the initial modulation. Extinction coefficients are determined from changes in the phase shift of the distorted waveform of the square wave modulated LED light that is transmitted through the optical cavity. The performance of the CAPS system was evaluated by using measurements of the stability and response of the system. The minima ( 0.1 Mm-1) in the Allan plots show the optimum average time ( 100s) for optimum detection performance of the CAPS system. In the paper, it illustrates that extinction coefficient was correlated with PM2.5 mass (0.91). These figures indicate that this method has the potential to become one of the most sensitive on-line analytical techniques for extinction coefficient detection. This work aims to provide an initial validation of the CAPS extinction monitor in laboratory and field environments. Our initial results presented in this paper show that the CAPS extinction monitor is capable of providing state-of-the-art performance while dramatically reducing the complexity of optical instrumentation for directly measuring the extinction coefficients.

  19. Cavity-enhanced ultrafast two-dimensional spectroscopy using higher order modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Thomas K.

    2017-02-01

    We describe methods using frequency combs and optical resonators for recording two-dimensional (2D) ultrafast spectroscopy signals with high sensitivity. By coupling multiple frequency combs to higher-order modes of one or more optical cavities, background-free, cavity-enhanced 2D spectroscopy signals are naturally generated via phase cycling. As in cavity-enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, the signal to noise is enhanced by a factor proportional to the cavity finesse squared, so even using cavities of modest finesse, a very high sensitivity is expected, enabling ultrafast 2D spectroscopy experiments in dilute molecular beams.

  20. Cavity-enhanced ultrafast two-dimensional spectroscopy using higher-order modes

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    We describe methods using frequency combs and optical resonators for recording two-dimensional (2D) ultrafast spectroscopy signals with high sensitivity. By coupling multiple frequency combs to higher-order modes of one or more optical cavities, background-free, cavity-enhanced 2D spectroscopy signals are naturally generated via phase cycling. As in cavity-enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy (CE-TAS), the signal to noise is enhanced by a factor proportional to the cavity finesse squared, so even using cavities of modest finesse, a very high sensitivity is expected, enabling ultrafast 2D spectroscopy experiments in dilute molecular beams.

  1. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Lite: A Low Power Analyzer for measuring Carbon Dioxide, Methane and Water Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagle, John; Tan, Sze; He, Yonggang

    2016-04-01

    Greenhouse gas accumulation has contributed to the changes in environments across the globe. Monitoring these fluctuations on global and local scales will allow scientists to better understand contributions that are made from nature and humans. This has led to the deployment of analytical instrumentation of all types to the most remote areas as well as the most densely populated areas. This however requires instruments to be precise, versatile, robust, and most importantly have power requirements that are as not limited by location, i.e. low enough power consumption to run off of batteries or even solar array. Here we present a full greenhouse gas analyzer that utilizes a new method of CRDS to measure carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor that consumes only 25W and still maintains long term stability to allow for averaging time of over 3 hours. Measurements have a 1-σ precision of 30 ppb for CO2 and 300 ppt of CH4 with 5 minutes of averaging; and with measurements of 3 hour averages reaching precisions down to 40ppt of methane. Additionally this new flavor of CRDS has allowed for an overall increase in measurement dynamic range from traditional CW-CRDS measuring methane up to 1000ppm and carbon dioxide up to several percent. We will present supplemental data acquired using this tower measurements from Santa Clara, CA.

  2. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR

  3. Coherent cavity-enhanced dual-comb spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fleisher, Adam J; Reed, Zachary D; Hodges, Joseph T; Plusquellic, David F

    2016-01-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopy allows for the rapid, multiplexed acquisition of high-resolution spectra without the need for moving parts or low-resolution dispersive optics. This method of broadband spectroscopy is most often accomplished via tight phase locking of two mode-locked lasers, or via sophisticated signal processing algorithms, and therefore long integration times are difficult to achieve. Here we demonstrate an alternative approach to dual-comb spectroscopy using two phase modulator combs originating from a single continuous-wave laser capable of > 2 hours of coherent real-time averaging. The combs of > 250 teeth and 203 MHz spacing were generated by driving the phase modulators with step-recovery diodes, passive devices that provided low-phase-noise harmonics for efficient coupling into an enhancement cavity at picowatt optical powers. With this approach, we demonstrate the sensitivity to simultaneously monitor ambient levels of CO$_2$, CO, HDO, and H$_2$O at a maximum acquisition rate of 150 kHz. Robus...

  4. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Spectroscopy: Ultrafast Meets Ultrasensitive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Thomas K.; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Chen, Yuning

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods, such as transient absorption spectroscopy and 2D-spectroscopy, are widely used across many disciplines. However, these techniques are typically restricted to optically thick samples, such as solids and liquid solutions. Using a frequency comb laser and optical cavities, we present a new technique for performing ultrafast optical spectroscopy with high sensitivity, enabling work in dilute gas-phase molecular beams. Resonantly enhancing the probe pulses, we demonstrate transient absorption measurements with a detection limit of ΔOD = 2 × 10-10 (1 × 10-9/√{Hz}). Resonantly enhancing the pump pulses allows us to produce a high excitation fraction at high repetition-rate, so that signals can be recorded from samples with optical densities as low as OD ≈ 10-8, or column densities oise performance of CE-TAS. (a), Transient absorption measurements taken with reduced gas flow and perpendicular polarizations. The red dots represent the average of 60 consecutive scans taken over a 1 hour period. Black curves are every 10th scan from the data set. Inset: Zoom-in around 0.8 ps delay. Error bars represent the uncertainty in the mean. (b), The green squares show the average of the Allan deviations obtained independently for each delay point. Error bars here are the standard deviation (not the uncertainty in the mean) of this ensemble, to represent the spread in the data. The blue diamond is the average of the error bars of (a), along with their standard deviation. The grey line has a slope of -1/2 on the log-log plot, the expected slope for white noise performance

  5. Absolute absorption and fluorescence measurements over a dynamic range of 10$^6$ with cavity-enhanced laser-induced fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Scott E; Nahler, N Hendrik; Wrede, Eckart

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental setup that combines the advantages of both laser-induced fluorescence and cavity ring-down techniques. The simultaneous measurement of the ring-down and fluorescence signals from the same sample in a single laser beam delivers the calibration of the fluorescence measurement to gain absolute quantities: absorption cross section, sample density and fluorescence quantum yield. At the same time, the fluorescence measurement extends the dynamic range of a stand-alone cavity ring-down setup from typically three to at least six orders of magnitude. The methodology of this combined cavity-enhanced laser-induced fluorescence (CELIF) technique is developed and rigorously tested against the spectroscopy of 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene in a molecular beam and density measurements in a cell.

  6. Temporal ringdown of silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karle, T J; Raineri, F; Roppo, V; Bordas, F; Monnier, P; Ali, S; Sivan, I; Raj, R

    2013-07-01

    Ring-down temporal measurements of silicon-on-insulator wire racetrack resonators are performed with 150 fs input pulses using a parametric process in a nonlinear crystal to gate and amplify the weak output pulses. We measure the cavity round trip time and the quality factor of these all-pass filters and find excellent agreement with continuous wave spectroscopic measurements as well as with an analytic model built using numerical solutions for the fully vectorial waveguide modes.

  7. Continuous Vernier filtering of an optical frequency comb for broadband cavity-enhanced molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rutkowski, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    We have recently introduced the Vernier-based Direct Frequency Comb Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy technique and we present the corresponding formalism for quantitative broadband spectroscopy. We achieve high sensitivity and broadband performance by acquiring spectra covering more than 2000 cm$^{-1}$ around 12600 cm$^{-1}$ (800 nm), resolving the 3$\

  8. A new calibration system for lightweight, compact and mobile Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielcke, Johannes; Horbanski, Martin; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Absorption Spectroscopy has been employed for several decades now to study the earth's atmosphere. While the focus has been on remote sensing for a long time, lately there has been a renewed interest in in-situ methods, as point measurements allow an easier interpretation for highly inhomogeneous distributions of gases of interest compared to the integration approach of most remote sensing methods. One comparatively new method offering both advantages of in-situ measurements as well as being contactless is open-path Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS). Broadband open-path CE-DOAS instruments have been used for ten years now, and in the meantime allow the measurement of numerous atmospheric trace gases (e.g. NO2, NO3, IO, CHOCHO, HCHO). While those instruments were bulky and not very mobile at first, recent developments resulted in relatively lightweight (< 30 kg) instruments with a relatively low power consumption allowing mobile open-path measurements at remote field locations. An important operational issue has been the path length calibration in the field, necessary for the determination of the concentration of measured gases. Until now, often calibration gases were used with different scattering properties than air or known concentrations. However this methods has several major shortcomings, being rather inconvenient and cumbersome in the field with the need for compressed gas cylinders, as well as time consuming, preventing a quick check of the state of the instrument in the field after changing measurement locations. Here we present a new wavelength-resolved method for broadband CE-DOAS path length calibration. A small, custom made ring-down system is employed with a pulsed LED as light source. The wavelength is then resolved by tilting a narrow band interference filter. The system not only allows quick, automated path length calibrations without physical interaction on the instrument, but also saves weight, space and the

  9. Cavity ring down spectroscopy with a free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engeln, R.; van den Berg, E.; Meijer, G.; Lin, L.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    1997-01-01

    A cavity ring down (CRD) absorption experiment is performed with a free-electron laser (FEL) operating in the 10-11 mu m region. A short infrared pulse of approximately 20 ns, sliced from the much longer FEL pulse, is used to measure CRD spectra of ethylene in two different ways. First, ''

  10. Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Numerical Method for Integrated Photonic Cavity Based Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonnegative matrix factorization numerical method has been used to improve the spectral resolution of integrated photonic cavity based spectroscopy. Based on the experimental results for integrated photonic cavity device on Optics Letters 32, 632 (2007, the theoretical results show that the spectral resolution can be improved more than 3 times from 5.5 nm to 1.8 nm. It is a promising way to release the difficulty of fabricating high-resolution devices.

  11. Effect of cylindrical cavity height on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with spatial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng, Shao; Tingfeng, Wang; Jin, Guo; Anmin, Chen; Mingxing, Jin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present a study on the spatial confinement effect of laser-induced plasma with a cylindrical cavity in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The emission intensity with the spatial confinement is dependent on the height of the confinement cavity. It is found that, by selecting the appropriate height of cylindrical cavity, the signal enhancement can be significantly increased. At the cylindrical cavity (diameter = 2 mm) with a height of 6 mm, the enhancement ratio has the maximum value (approximately 8.3), and the value of the relative standard deviation (RSD) (7.6%) is at a minimum, the repeatability of LIBS signal is best. The results indicate that the height of confinement cavity is very important for LIBS technique to reduce the limit of detection and improve the precision.

  12. Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2010-10-01

    The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

  13. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  14. Cavity-ring-down spectroscopy on water vapor in the range 555-604 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Levelt, P.F.; Polyansky, O.L.; Zobov, N.F.; Tennyson, J.

    2001-01-01

    The method of pulsed cavity-ring-down spectroscopy was employed to record the water vapor absorption spectrum in the wavelength range 555-604 nm. The spectrum consists of 1830 lines, calibrated against the iodine standard with an accuracy of 0.01 cm(-1); 800 of these lines are not obtained in the HI

  15. A novel multiple species ringdown spectrometer for in situ measurements of methane, carbon dioxide, and carbon isotope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Srivastava, N.; Jones, B. A.; Reese, R. B.

    2008-08-01

    We have developed a standalone, user-friendly, multi-species ringdown spectrometer for in situ measurements of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and a carbon dioxide isotope (13CO2). The instrument is based on near-infrared continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (NIR cw-CRDS) and engineered to be of approximately 16 kg with dimensions of 50 cm × 40 cm × 15 cm. The instrument design, optical configuration, electronic control, and performance are described. CH4, CO2, and 13CO2 are measured at different wavelengths that are obtained through multiplexing two distributed feedback laser diodes with central wavelengths at 1597 and 1650 nm. The spectrometer has low power consumption and runs for 4-6 h when powered by a standard car battery. The instrument is operated either locally by interacting with a 7-inch touch screen or remotely via an Internet connection. The 1-σ detection limits for CH4 and CO2 are 0.2 and 120 ppmv, respectively. The measurement uncertainty is better than ±4% of full-scale reading for CH4 and CO2 and ±1.5‰ for δ13C (part per thousand relative to the Pee Dee Belemnite scale). Measurement of each species is near real-time; switching from measuring one species to another takes less than one minute. This work demonstrates a novel multiple-species CRDS-instrumentation platform, which can be adopted for development of an array of ringdown spectrometers for portable, user-friendly, field analysis of a variety of gases in environmental and industrial applications. Discussion of a future version of the spectrometer with better detection sensitivity, higher accuracy, and a smaller geometry is also presented.

  16. [Near infrared Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy study of NO2O].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-wei; Dong, Yan-ting; Zhou, Wei-dong

    2014-08-01

    Using a tunable near infrared external cavity diode laser and a 650 mm long high finesse optical cavity consisting of two highly reflective (R=99.97% at 6561.39 cm(-1)) plan-concave mirrors of curvature radius approximately 1000 mm, a cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) system was made. The absorption spectra centered at 6561.39 cm(-1) of pure N2O gas and gas mixtures of N2O and N2 were recorded. According to the absorption of N2O at 6561.39 cm(-1) in the cavity, the measured effective absorption path was about 1460 km. The spectra line intensity and line-width of N2O centered at 6561.39 cm(-1) were carefully studied. The relationship between the line-width of absorption spectra and the gas pressure was derived. The pressure broadening parameter of N2 gas for NO2O line centered at 6 561. 39 cm(-1) was deduced and given a value of approximately (0.114 +/- 0.004) cm(-1) x atm(-1). The possibility to detect trace N2O gas in mixture using this CEAS system was investigated. By recording the ab- sorption spectra of N2O gas mixtures at different concentration, the relationship between the line intensity and gas concentration was derived. The minimum detectable absorption was found to be 2.34 x 10(-7) cm(-1) using this cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy system. And te measurement precision in terms of relative standard deviation (RSD) for N2O is approximately 1.73%, indicating the possibility of using the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy system for micro gas N2O analysis in the future.

  17. a New Broadband Cavity Enhanced Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique Using GHz Vernier Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morville, Jérôme; Rutkowski, Lucile; Dobrev, Georgi; Crozet, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We present a new approach to Cavity Enhanced - Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy where the full emission bandwidth of a Titanium:Sapphire laser is exploited at GHz resolution. The technique is based on a low-resolution Vernier filtering obtained with an appreciable -actively stabilized- mismatch between the cavity Free Spectral Range and the laser repetition rate, using a diffraction grating and a split-photodiode. This particular approach provides an immunity to frequency-amplitude noise conversion, reaching an absorption baseline noise in the 10-9 cm-1 range with a cavity finesse of only 3000. Spectra covering 1800 cm-1 (˜ 55 THz) are acquired in recording times of about 1 second, providing an absorption figure of merit of a few 10-11 cm-1/√{Hz}. Initially tested with ambient air, we report progress in using the Vernier frequency comb method with a discharge source of small radicals. Rutkowski et al, Opt. Lett., 39(23)2014

  18. Actively controlled tuning of an external cavity diode laser by polarization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Führer, Thorsten; Stang, Denise; Walther, Thomas

    2009-03-30

    We report on an universal method to achieve and sustain a large mode-hop free tuning range of an external cavity diode laser. By locking one of the resonators using a closed loop control based on polarization spectroscopy while tuning the laser we achieved mode-hop free tuning of up to 130 GHz with a non AR-coated, off-the-shelf laser diode.

  19. Shock-Tube Measurement of Acetone Dissociation Using Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-07-16

    A direct measurement for the rate constant of the acetone dissociation reaction (CH3COCH3 = CH3CO + CH3) was conducted behind reflected shock wave, utilizing a sub-ppm sensitivity CO diagnostic achieved by cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). The current experiment eliminated the influence from secondary reactions and temperature change by investigating the clean pyrolysis of shock-tube kinetics studies.

  20. Experimental studies on perturbed acoustic resonant spectroscopy by a small rock sample in a cylindrical cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dehua; WANG Xiuming; CONG Jiansheng; XU Delong; SONG Yanjie; MA Shuilong

    2006-01-01

    A measurement system for acoustic resonant spectroscopy (ARS) is established,and the effects of resonant cavity geometry,inner perturbation samples and environmental temperature on the ARS are investigated.The ARSs of the small samples with various sizes and acoustic properties are measured.The results show that at the normal pressure,the resonant frequency decreases gradually with the increase of liquid temperature in the cylindrical cavity,while the resonant amplitude increases.At certain pressure and temperature,both the resonant frequency and the amplitude decrease greatly when there exist air bubbles inside the cavity fluid.The ARS is apparently affected by the sample porosity and the sample location in the resonant cavity.At the middle of the cavity,the resonant frequencies reach their maximum values for all of the measurement samples.The resonant frequencies of the porous rock samples are smaller than those of the compacted samples if other acoustic parameters are the same.As the sample is moved from the top to the middle of the cavity along its axis,the resonant amplitude increases gradually for the compacted rocks while decreases for the unconsolidated rocks.Furthermore,the resonant amplitude increases firstly and then decreases if the porosity of the rock sample is relatively small.In addition,through the comparisons between the experimental and theoretical results,it is found that the effects of the acoustic parameters and sizes of the samples and the size of the cylindrical cavity on the laboratory results agree well with the theoretical ones qualitatively.These results may provide basic reference for the experiment study of rock acoustic properties in a low frequency using ARS.

  1. Quantification of total pigments in citrus essential oils by thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Gerardo A; Antonio-Pérez, Aurora; Díaz-Reyes, J

    2015-05-01

    A general theory of thermal wave resonant cavity photopyroelectric spectroscopy (TWRC-PPE) was recently proposed by Balderas-López (2012) for the thermo-optical characterisation of substances in a condensed phase. This theory is used to quantify the total carotenoids and chlorophylls in several folded and un-folded citrus essential oils to demonstrate the viability of using this technique as an alternative analytical method for the quantification of total pigments in citrus oils. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) reveals significant differences (p spectroscopy can be used to quantify concentrations up to five times higher of total carotenoids and chlorophylls in citrus oils than UV-Vis spectroscopy without sample preparation or dilution. The optical limits of this technique and possible interference are also described.

  2. Ancillary qubit spectroscopy of vacua in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, Jared; Baksic, Alexandre; Nagy, David; Manucharyan, Vladimir E; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2015-05-01

    We investigate theoretically how the spectroscopy of an ancillary qubit can probe cavity (circuit) QED ground states containing photons. We consider three classes of systems (Dicke, Tavis-Cummings, and Hopfield-like models), where nontrivial vacua are the result of ultrastrong coupling between N two-level systems and a single-mode bosonic field. An ancillary qubit detuned with respect to the boson frequency is shown to reveal distinct spectral signatures depending on the type of vacua. In particular, the Lamb shift of the ancilla is sensitive to both ground state photon population and correlations. Backaction of the ancilla on the cavity ground state is investigated, taking into account the dissipation via a consistent master equation for the ultrastrong coupling regime. The conditions for high-fidelity measurements are determined.

  3. Signal line shapes of Fourier transform cavity-enhanced frequency modulation spectroscopy with optical frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Alexandra C; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    We present a thorough analysis of the signal line shapes of Fourier transform-based noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS). We discuss the signal dependence on the ratio of the modulation frequency, f${_m}$, to the molecular line width, {\\Gamma}. We compare a full model of the signals and a simplified absorption-like analytical model that has high accuracy for low f${_m}$/{\\Gamma} ratios and is much faster to compute. We verify the theory experimentally by measuring and fitting NICE-OFCS spectra of CO${_2}$ at 1575 nm using a system based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser and a cavity with a finesse of ~11000.

  4. Gas trace detection with cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy: a review of its process in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siqi; Luo, Zhifu; Tan, Zhongqi; Long, Xingwu

    2016-11-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) is a technology in which the intracavity absorption is deduced from the intensity of light transmitted by the high finesse optical cavity. Then the samples' parameters, such as their species, concentration and absorption cross section, would be detection. It was first proposed and demonstrated by Engeln R. [1] and O'Keefe[2] in 1998. This technology has extraordinary detection sensitivity, high resolution and good practicability, so it is used in many fields , such as clinical medicine, gas detection and basic physics research. In this paper, we focus on the use of gas trace detection, including the advance of CEAS over the past twenty years, the newest research progresses, and the prediction of this technology's development direction in the future.

  5. Sensitive and rapid laser diagnostic for shock tube kinetics studies using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-04-21

    We report the first application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a coherent light source for sensitive and rapid gaseous species time-history measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 83 with a measurement time resolution of 20 µs was demonstrated for C2H2 detection using a near-infrared transition near 1537 nm, corresponding to a noise-equivalent detection limit of 20 ppm at 296 K and 76 ppm at 906 K at 50 kHz. This substantial gain in signal, relative to conventional single-pass absorption, will enable ultra-sensitive species detection in shock tube kinetics studies, particularly useful for measurements of minor species and for studies of dilute reactive systems.

  6. An XUV source using a femtosecond enhancement cavity for photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Arthur K.; Zhdanovich, Sergey; Sheyerman, Alex; Levy, Giorgo; Damascelli, Andrea; Jones, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Recent development of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources based on high harmonic generation (HHG) in femtosecond enhancement cavities (fsEC) has enabled generation of high photon ux ( ̴ 1013-1014 photons/sec) in the XUV, at high repetition rates (> 50 MHz) and spanning the spectral region from 40 nm - 120 nm. Here we demonstrate the potential offered by this approach for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy by measuring the photoemission spectrum of Au using 8.3 and 25 eV photons with excellent resolution at rapid data rates.

  7. External cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for protein analysis in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Julia; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta Raquel; Quintás, Guillermo; Mayer, Helmut; Vento, Máximo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-04-22

    The analytical determination of bovine milk proteins is important in food and non-food industrial applications and yet, rather labour-intensive wet-chemical, low-throughput methods have been employed since decades. This work proposes the use of external cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for the simultaneous quantification of the most abundant bovine milk proteins and the total protein content based on the chemical information contained in mid-infrared (IR) spectral features of the amide I band. Mid-IR spectra of protein standard mixtures were used for building partial least squares (PLS) regression models. Protein concentrations in commercial bovine milk samples were calculated after chemometric compensation of the matrix contribution employing science-based calibration (SBC) without sample pre-processing. The use of EC-QCL spectroscopy together with advanced multivariate data analysis allowed the determination of casein, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and total protein content within several minutes.

  8. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy for ultrafast sensing with optical microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenblum, Serge; Arazi, Lior; Vollmer, Frank; Dayan, Barak

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy of whispering-gallery mode (WGM) microresonators has become a powerful scientific tool, enabling detection of single viruses, nanoparticles, and even single molecules. Yet the demonstrated timescale of these schemes has been limited so far to milliseconds or more. Here we introduce a novel scheme that is orders of magnitude faster, capable of capturing complete spectral snapshots of WGM resonances at nanosecond timescales: cavity ring-up spectroscopy (CRUS). Based on sharply-rising detuned probe pulses, CRUS combines the sensitivity of heterodyne measurements with the highest possible, transform-limited acquisition rate. As a demonstration we capture spectra of microtoroid resonators at time intervals as short as 16 ns, directly monitoring sub-microsecond dynamics of their optomechanical vibrations, thermorefractive response and Kerr nonlinearity. CRUS holds promise for the study of fast biological processes such as enzyme kinetics, protein folding and light harvesting, with applications in other...

  9. Broadband spectroscopy with external cavity quantum cascade lasers beyond conventional absorption measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Armin; Pfeifer, Marcel; Konz, Werner; Herbst, Johannes; Axtmann, Felix

    2014-05-07

    Laser spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing small molecules, i.e. in the gas phase. In the mid-infrared spectral region quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been established as the most frequently used laser radiation source. Spectroscopy of larger molecules in the gas phase, of complex mixtures, and analysis in the liquid phase requires a broader tuning range and is thus still the domain of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. However, the development of tunable external cavity (EC) QCLs is starting to change this situation. The main advantage of QCLs is their high spectral emission power that is enhanced by a factor of 10(4) compared with thermal light sources. Obviously, transmission measurements with EC-QCLs in strongly absorbing samples are feasible, which can hardly be measured by FTIR due to detector noise limitations. We show that the high power of EC-QCLs facilitates spectroscopy beyond simple absorption measurements. Starting from QCL experiments with liquid samples, we show results of fiber evanescent field analysis (FEFA) to detect pesticides in drinking water. FEFA is a special case of attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable fast vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy of chiral molecules in the liquid phase - a technique which is very time consuming with standard FTIR equipment. We present results obtained for the chiral compound 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL). Finally, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable the application of laser photothermal emission spectroscopy (LPTES). We demonstrate this for a narrowband and broadband absorber in the gas phase. All three techniques have great potential for MIR process analytical applications.

  10. Continuous Vernier filtering of an optical frequency comb for broadband cavity-enhanced molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Morville, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    We have recently introduced the Vernier-based Direct Frequency Comb Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy technique which allows us to record broadband spectra at high sensitivity and GHz resolution (Rutkowski and Morville, 2014) [1]. We discuss here the effect of Vernier filtering on the observed lineshapes in the 3 ν + δ band of water vapor and the entire A-band of oxygen around 800 nm in ambient air. We derive expressions for the absorption profiles resulting from the continuous Vernier filtering method, testing them on spectra covering more than 2000 cm-1 around 12,500 cm-1. With 31,300 independent spectral elements acquired at the second time scale, an absorption baseline noise of 2 ×10-8cm-1 is obtained, providing a figure of merit of 1.1×10-10 cm-1/√{ Hz } per spectral element with a cavity finesse of 3000 and a cavity round-trip length around 3.3 m.

  11. Shock-tube measurements of excited oxygen atoms using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marcel; Wang, Shengkai; Goldenstein, Christopher S; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-10-10

    We report the use of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using two distributed feedback diode lasers near 777.2 and 844.6 nm for sensitive, time-resolved, in situ measurements of excited-state populations of atomic oxygen in a shock tube. Here, a 1% O2/Ar mixture was shock-heated to 5400-8000 K behind reflected shock waves. The combined use of a low-finesse cavity, fast wavelength scanning of the lasers, and an off-axis alignment enabled measurements with 10 μs time response and low cavity noise. The CEAS absorption gain factors of 104 and 142 for the P35←S520 (777.2 nm) and P0,1,23←S310 (844.6 nm) atomic oxygen transitions, respectively, significantly improved the detection sensitivity over conventional single-pass measurements. This work demonstrates the potential of using CEAS to improve shock-tube studies of nonequilibrium electronic-excitation processes at high temperatures.

  12. Near-field imaging and spectroscopy of plasmonic cavities (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbane, Deirdre

    2016-09-01

    Photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) is an attractive and advantageous technique in the field of plasmonics. Whilst surface plasmons are excited at the metal dielectric interface by light, it is the near-field photoelectron distribution that is imaged, with optical diffraction limit is overcome. Additionally parallel acquisitioning makes time-resolved (TR) PEEM1 possible. PEEM therefore allows us to investigate light-matter interactions in localized, propagating and hybridized surface plasmons leading to advances in fundamental research and technological applications. In addition to near-field imaging it is also possible to perform near-field spectroscopy. A tunable short pulse optical parametric oscillator (OPO) light source can be combined with PEEM. We demonstrate this technique with arrays of whispering gallery mode (WGM) cavities2 fabricated with focused ion beam milling (FIB) on gold surfaces. Characteristic spectral peaks and near-field mode distributions result from the coherent excitation of different plasmon resonances. This near-field interference of modes allows us to control the emission from these WGM cavities3. Additionally recent advances in ultrafast near-field microscopy and spectroscopy will be discussed. [1] M. Bauer, C. Wiemann, J. Lange, D. Bayer, M. Rohmer and M. Aeschlimann, Appl. Phys. A 88 473 (2007) [2] E. J. Vesseur, F. J. García de Abajo and A. Polman Nano Letters 9 3147 (2009) [3] P. Melchior, D. Kilbane, E. J. Vesseur, A. Polman and M. Aeschlimann Optics Express 23, 31619 (2015)

  13. Time-Resolved Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy behind Shock Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2016-04-07

    A fast and sensitive broadband absorption technique for measurements of high-temperature chemical kinetics and spectroscopy has been developed by applying broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) in a shock tube. The developed method has effective absorption path lengths of 60-200 cm, or cavity enhancement factors of 12-40, over a wavelength range of 280-420 nm, and is capable of simultaneously recording absorption time profiles over an ∼32 nm spectral bandpass in a single experiment with temporal and spectral resolutions of 5 μs and 2 nm, respectively. The accuracy of the kinetic and spectroscopic measurements was examined by investigating high-temperature reactions and absorption spectra of formaldehyde behind reflected shock waves using 1,3,5-trioxane as a precursor. The rate constants obtained for the thermal decomposition reactions of 1,3,5-trioxane (to three formaldehyde molecules) and formaldehyde (to HCO + H) agreed well with the literature data. High-temperature absorption cross sections of formaldehyde between 280 and 410 nm have been determined at the post-reflected-shock temperatures of 955, 1265, and 1708 K. The results demonstrate the applicability of the BBCEAS technique to time- and wavelength-resolved sensitive absorption measurements at high temperatures.

  14. Fiber cavity ring down and gain amplification effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana; Magalhães, Regina; Pérez-Herrera, Rosa Ana; Lopez-Amo, Manuel; Marques, M. B.; Frazão, O.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) placed inside the fiber ring of a cavity ring down (CRD) configuration is studied. The limitations and advantages of this configuration are discussed, and the study of the ring-down time as a function of the current applied and gain to the EDFA is also presented. In this case, the power fluctuations in the output signal are strongly dependent on the cavity ring-down time with the EDFA gain.

  15. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy for dissipative and dispersive sensing in a whispering gallery mode resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yong; Kasumie, Sho; Ward, Jonathan M; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-01-01

    In whispering gallery mode resonator sensing applications, the conventional way to detect a change in the parameter to be measured is by observing the steady state transmission spectrum through the coupling waveguide. Alternatively, cavity ring-up spectroscopy (CRUS) sensing can be achieved transiently. In this work, we investigate CRUS using coupled mode equations and find analytical solutions with a large spectral broadening approximation of the input pulse. The relationships between the frequency detuning, coupling gap and ring-up peak height are determined and experimentally verified using an ultrahigh \\textit{Q}-factor silica microsphere. This work shows that distinctive dispersive and dissipative transient sensing can be realised by simply measuring the peak height of the CRUS signal, which might improve the data collection rate.

  16. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  17. Insights on diagnosis of oral cavity pathologies by infrared spectroscopy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, Elisabetta; Balercia, Paolo; Conti, Carla; Ferraris, Paolo; Sabbatini, Simona; Rubini, Corrado; Tosi, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared microspectroscopy, a largely used spectroscopic technique in basic and industrial researches, offers the possibility to analyze the vibrational features of molecular groups within a variety of environments. In the bioclinical field, and, in particular, in the study of cells, tissues and biofluids, it could be considered a supporting objective technique able to characterize the biochemical processes involved in relevant pathologies, such as tumoral diseases, highlighting specific spectral markers associable with the principal biocomponents (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates). In this article, we review the applications of infrared spectroscopy to the study of tumoral diseases of oral cavity compartments with the aim to improve understanding of biological processes involved during the onset of these lesions and to afford to an early diagnosis. Spectral studies on mouth, salivary glands and oral cystic lesions, objectively discriminate normal from dysplastic and cancer states characterizing also the grading.

  18. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karhu, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, $\

  19. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Verhoeven

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers.

  20. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, W; van Rens, J F M; van Ninhuijs, M A W; Toonen, W F; Kieft, E R; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers.

  1. Time-of-flight electron energy loss spectroscopy using TM110 deflection cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, W.; van Rens, J. F. M.; van Ninhuijs, M. A. W.; Toonen, W. F.; Kieft, E. R.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; Luiten, O. J.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of two TM110 resonant cavities to generate ultrashort electron pulses and subsequently measure electron energy losses in a time-of-flight type of setup. The method utilizes two synchronized microwave cavities separated by a drift space of 1.45 m. The setup has an energy resolution of 12 ± 2 eV FWHM at 30 keV, with an upper limit for the temporal resolution of 2.7 ± 0.4 ps. Both the time and energy resolution are currently limited by the brightness of the tungsten filament electron gun used. Through simulations, it is shown that an energy resolution of 0.95 eV and a temporal resolution of 110 fs can be achieved using an electron gun with a higher brightness. With this, a new method is provided for time-resolved electron spectroscopy without the need for elaborate laser setups or expensive magnetic spectrometers. PMID:27704035

  2. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy: A sensitive technique for high-resolution broadband molecular detection

    CERN Document Server

    Khodabakhsh, Amir; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS) is a recently developed technique that utilizes phase modulation to obtain immunity to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity modes and yields high absorption sensitivity over a broad spectral range. We describe the principles of the technique and discuss possible comb-cavity matching solutions. We present a theoretical description of NICE-OFCS signals detected with a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), and validate the model by comparing it to experimental CO2 spectra around 1575 nm. Our system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency equal to a multiple of the cavity free spectral range (FSR). The NICE-OFCS signal is detected by a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We demonstrate a simple method of passive locking of the modulation frequency to the cavity FSR that significantly improves the long term stability of the system, a...

  3. Measurements of Iodine Monoxide Levels During the CAST Campaign Using Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N. R. P.; Popoola, O. A.; McLeod, M.; Ouyang, B.; Jones, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Iodine monoxide (IO) has been regarded as an important radical involved in the ozone destruction in the remote marine boundary layer. Here we presented the first in situ aircraft measurements of IO using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with 1s -sensitivity of ~1.5 ppt Hz-1/2 on the surface level during the Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) campaign between January - February 2014. IO was retrieved from analysis of absorption spectrum recorded between 415 nm - 452.5 nm. Instrument baseline corresponding to the "zero" signal of IO was obtained by injection of ~20 ppb of nitric oxide (NO) into the sample air at chosen frequency and period. No clear absorption feature was observable from the spectra by eye with up to 100 seconds averaging, pointing to very low mixing ratios (<~0.5 ppt) of IO over the sampled area. A small positive bias (~0.3 ppt) of IO (against the baseline signal during NO titration) was obtained in the statistical histogram of retrieved IO from average of each straight and level run, but little altitude dependence was noted. In summary, our observation appears to support the existence of IO in the remote marine boundary above the Pacific Ocean at sub ppt levels, but the limited sensitivity precludes us from quantifying spatial gradients more accurately.

  4. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish [Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041-1518 (United States); Liebson, Lindsay [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O measurement errors ({Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m{sub BB}, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m{sub NB}. These metrics are used to correct for {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m{sub NB}. Using the isotope error versus m{sub NB} and m{sub BB} curves, {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 per mille and 0.25 per mille respectively, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 per mille and 0.22 per mille . Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the

  5. High-sensitivity time-resolved intracavity laser Fourier transform spectroscopy with vertical cavity surface emitting multiple quantum well lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Picqué, N; Kachanov, A A; Picqu\\'e, Nathalie; Guelachvili, Guy; Kachanov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Spectra comprised of hundreds of time-components for absorption path lengths up to 130 km have been recorded around 1050 nm by combining two recent techniques, intracavity laser spectroscopy with vertical external cavity surface emitting multiple-quantum-well lasers and time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy. A sensitivity of 1 10^{-10} cm^{-1}.Hz^{-1/2} is achieved, for simultaneously acquired 10^4 spectral elements, three orders of magnitude better than the sensitivity obtained in previous similar experiments. Specific advantages of the method, especially for frequency and intensity metrology of weak absorption transitions, are discussed.

  6. Two-dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy of vibrational polaritons of molecules in an optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Saurabh, Prasoon

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of molecular vibrations to an infrared cavity mode affects their nature by creating dressed polariton states. We show how the single and double vibrational polariton manifolds may be controlled by varying the cavity coupling strength, and probed by a time domain 2DIR technique, Double Quantum Coherence (DQC). Applications are made to the amide-I ($CO$) and amide-II ($CN$) bond vibrations of $N-methylacetamide$ (NMA).

  7. Ultra-Stable Rubidium-Stabilized External-Cavity Diode Laser Based on the Modulation Transfer Spectroscopy Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiang-Hui; CHEN Wen-Lan; YI Lin; ZHOU Da-Wei; ZHOU Tong; XIAO Qin; DUAN Jun; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; CHEN Xu-Zong

    2009-01-01

    @@ We construct an ultra-stable external-cavity diode laser via modulation transfer spectroscopy referencing on a hyperfine component of the 87Rb D2 lines at 780 hm. The Doppler-free dispersion-like modulation transfer signal is obtained with high signal-to-noise-ratio. The instability of the laser frequency is measured by beating with an optical frequency comb which is phase-locked to an ultra-stable oven controlled crystal oscillator. The Allan deviation is 3.9×10-13 at 1s averaging time and 9.8×10-14 at 90s averaging time.

  8. Comparison of a Gas Chromatograph and a Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer for Flux Quantification of Nitrous Oxide, Carbon Dioxide and Methane in Closed Soil Chambers Derek Fleck1, Yonggang He1, Donald Herman2, Serena Moseman-Valtierra3, Gloria Jacobson1 1 Picarro Inc, 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 2 College of Natural Resource, UC Berkeley, 130 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-3114 3 University of Rhode Island, CBLS 489, Kingston, RI 02881

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, D.; He, Y.; Herman, D.; Moseman-valtierra, S.; Jacobson, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    The study of the three predominant greenhouse gasses effecting global climate change, CO2, CH4 and N2O, has become increasingly important in ecological and agricultural soil research. It is essential for current and future atmospheric greenhouse gas budgets to reduce the uncertainty of greenhouse gas soil fluxes in a variety of environments and climates. Traditional soil flux experiments using the closed chamber and discrete sampling for Gas Chromatograph ('GC') analysis cannot sufficiently capture the large temporal variation in soil gas fluxes, which can lead to large errors in ecosystem flux models. Real-time, simultaneous measurement of these gases should provide easier and more comprehensive and precise chamber flux measurements. We provide a comparison of the GC sampling method to a closed loop, continuous flow system coupled with a Picarro G2508 Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer to quantify the flux of CO2, CH4 and N2O. The Picarro analyzer has a data rate of approximately 6 seconds for all three gases, which gives a much higher temporal resolution than discrete sampling (performed every 8-15 minutes). This work will compare GC and Picarro G2508 soil flux measurement results from two independent researchers and will cover fluxes for three different soil environments. Details on the system configuration and sampling methodology effects on flux errors will also be discussed. We will show that by reducing the systematic error due to sample preparation for the GC, the continuous flow measurement of the Picarro G2508 field deployable analyzer can significantly increase the measurement precision of respiration rates of N2O, CH4 and CO2. It is noteworthy that the Picarro analyzer also simultaneously measures the concentration of ammonia (NH3) and water, and these results will also be discussed.

  9. Technical note: Coupling infrared gas analysis and cavity ring down spectroscopy for autonomous, high-temporal-resolution measurements of DIC and δ13C-DIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Mitchell; Schulz, Kai G.; Carvalho, Matheus C.; Santos, Isaac R.; Maher, Damien T.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach to autonomously determine concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its carbon stable isotope ratio (δ13C-DIC) at high temporal resolution is presented. The simple method requires no customised design. Instead it uses two commercially available instruments currently used in aquatic carbon research. An inorganic carbon analyser utilising non-dispersive infrared detection (NDIR) is coupled to a Cavity Ring-down Spectrometer (CRDS) to determine DIC and δ13C-DIC based on the liberated CO2 from acidified aliquots of water. Using a small sample volume of 2 mL, the precision and accuracy of the new method was comparable to standard isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) methods. The system achieved a sampling resolution of 16 min, with a DIC precision of ±1.5 to 2 µmol kg-1 and δ13C-DIC precision of ±0.14 ‰ for concentrations spanning 1000 to 3600 µmol kg-1. Accuracy of 0.1 ± 0.06 ‰ for δ13C-DIC based on DIC concentrations ranging from 2000 to 2230 µmol kg-1 was achieved during a laboratory-based algal bloom experiment. The high precision data that can be autonomously obtained by the system should enable complex carbonate system questions to be explored in aquatic sciences using high-temporal-resolution observations.

  10. Near-infrared broad-band cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy using a superluminescent light emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzer, W; Hamilton, M L; Hancock, G; Islam, M; Langley, C E; Peverall, R; Ritchie, G A D

    2009-11-01

    A fibre coupled near-infrared superluminescent light emitting diode that emits approximately 10 mW of radiation between 1.62 and 1.7 microm is employed in combination with a broad-band cavity enhanced spectrometer consisting of a linear optical cavity with mirrors of reflectivity approximately 99.98% and either a dispersive near-infrared spectrometer or a Fourier transform interferometer. Results are presented on the absorption of 1,3-butadiene, and sensitivities are achieved of 6.1 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the dispersive spectrometer in combination with phase-sensitive detection, and 1.5 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the Fourier transform interferometer (expressed as a minimum detectable absorption coefficient) over several minutes of acquisition time.

  11. Diagnosis of Multiple Gases Separated from Transformer Oil Using Cavity-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Yun; XIA Yu-Xing; HUANG Ju-Ming; ZHAN Li

    2008-01-01

    The Raman signal of gas molecules is very weak due to its small scattering cross section. Here, a near-confocal cavity-enhanced Raman detection system is demonstrated. In the cavity, a high power light of 9 W is achieved by using a cw 200mW 532nm laser, which greatly enhances the detection sensitivity of gas species. A photomultiplier tube connected to a spectrometer is used as the detection system. The Raman spectra of the mixed gases separated from transformer oil has been observed. The relationship of absolute Raman intensity and gas pressure is also obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first Raman system to detect the gases separated from transformer oil.

  12. Compact near-IR and mid-IR cavity ring down spectroscopy device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Houston (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    This invention relates to a compact cavity ring down spectrometer for detection and measurement of trace species in a sample gas using a tunable solid-state continuous-wave mid-infrared PPLN OPO laser or a tunable low-power solid-state continuous wave near-infrared diode laser with an algorithm for reducing the periodic noise in the voltage decay signal which subjects the data to cluster analysis or by averaging of the interquartile range of the data.

  13. Microwave spectral taxonomy: A semi-automated combination of chirped-pulse and cavity Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Kyle N.; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Brown, Gordon G.; Gaster, Sydney A.; Hall, Taylor M.; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Because of its structural specificity, rotational spectroscopy has great potential as an analytical tool for characterizing the chemical composition of complex gas mixtures. However, disentangling the individual molecular constituents of a rotational spectrum, especially if many of the lines are entirely new or unknown, remains challenging. In this paper, we describe an empirical approach that combines the complementary strengths of two techniques, broadband chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and narrowband cavity Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy, to characterize and assign lines. This procedure, called microwave spectral taxonomy, involves acquiring a broadband rotational spectrum of a rich mixture, categorizing individual lines based on their relative intensities under series of assays, and finally, linking rotational transitions of individual chemical compounds within each category using double resonance techniques. The power of this procedure is demonstrated for two test cases: a stable molecule with a rich spectrum, 3,4-difluorobenzaldehyde, and products formed in an electrical discharge through a dilute mixture of C2H2 and CS2, in which spectral taxonomy has enabled the identification of propynethial, HC(S)CCH.

  14. Pump-probe differencing technique for cavity-enhanced, noise-canceling saturation laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    De Vine, G; Close, J D; Gray, M B; Vine, Glenn de; Clelland, David E. Mc; Close, John D.; Gray, Malcolm B.

    2004-01-01

    We present an experimental technique enabling mechanical-noise free, cavity-enhanced frequency measurements of an atomic transition and its hyperfine structure. We employ the 532nm frequency doubled output from a Nd:YAG laser and an iodine vapour cell. The cell is placed in a traveling-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) with counter-propagating pump and probe beams. The FPI is locked using the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique. Mechanical noise is rejected by differencing pump and probe signals. In addition, this differenced error signal gives a sensitive measure of differential non-linearity within the FPI.

  15. On-chip spectroscopy with thermally tuned high-Q photonic crystal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liapis, Andreas C., E-mail: andreas.liapis@gmail.com; Gao, Boshen; Siddiqui, Mahmudur R. [The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Shi, Zhimin [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Boyd, Robert W. [The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physics and School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-11

    Spectroscopic methods are a sensitive way to determine the chemical composition of potentially hazardous materials. Here, we demonstrate that thermally tuned high-Q photonic crystal cavities can be used as a compact high-resolution on-chip spectrometer. We have used such a chip-scale spectrometer to measure the absorption spectra of both acetylene and hydrogen cyanide in the 1550 nm spectral band and show that we can discriminate between the two chemical species even though the two materials have spectral features in the same spectral region. Our results pave the way for the development of chip-size chemical sensors that can detect toxic substances.

  16. On-chip spectroscopy with thermally-tuned high-Q photonic crystal cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Liapis, Andreas C; Siddiqui, Mahmudur R; Shi, Zhimin; Boyd, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopic methods are a sensitive way to determine the chemical composition of potentially hazardous materials. Here, we demonstrate that thermally-tuned high-Q photonic crystal cavities can be used as a compact high-resolution on-chip spectrometer. We have used such a chip-scale spectrometer to measure the absorption spectra of both acetylene and hydrogen cyanide in the 1550 nm spectral band, and show that we can discriminate between the two chemical species even though the two materials have spectral features in the same spectral region. Our results pave the way for the development of chip-size chemical sensors that can detect toxic substances.

  17. Noise-cancelled, cavity-enhanced saturation laser spectroscopy for laser frequency stabilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Glenn de; McClelland, David E; Gray, Malcolm B [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2006-03-02

    We employ a relatively simple experimental technique enabling mechanical-noise free, cavityenhanced spectroscopic measurements of an atomic transition and its hyperfine structure. We demonstrate this technique with the 532 nm frequency doubled output from a Nd:YAG laser and an iodine vapour cell. The resulting cavity-enhanced, noise-cancelled, iodine hyperfine error signal is used as a frequency reference with which we stabilise the frequency of the 1064nm Nd:YAG laser. Preliminary frequency stabilisation results are then presented.

  18. Precise and accurate d13C analysis of rock samples using Flash Combustion–Cavity Ring Down Laser Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev-Clausen, David Morten; Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Saad, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of 13C to 12C in marine sedimentary rocks holds important clues to the evolution of the carbon cycle through Earth history. Isotopic analyses are traditionally carried out using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), but this technique is both labor-intensive, expensive and requires...... expert know-how. Here, we measure 13C/12C in natural sedimentary samples using Combustion Module - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CM-CRDS) with average precision and standard reproducibility of 0.05‰ and 0.2‰ (1 s.d., n = 17), respectively. The accuracy of the technique was determined from certified...... reference compounds to be mass spectrometry. We report data from a Cambrian succession of organic-rich shales straddling a positive d13Corg excursion of 2‰. We conclude that, optical determination of bulk organic d13C provides a high...

  19. Widely tunable, narrow linewidth external-cavity gain chip laser for spectroscopy between 1.0 - 1.1 um

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Dong K; Khakimov, Roman I; Ross, Jacob A; Dedman, Colin J; Hodgman, Sean S; Baldwin, Kenneth G H; Truscott, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    We have developed and characterised a stable, narrow linewidth external-cavity laser (ECL) tunable over 100 nm around 1080 nm, using a single-angled-facet gain chip. We propose the ECL as a low-cost, high-performance alternative to fibre and diode lasers in this wavelength range and demonstrate its capability through the spectroscopy of metastable helium. Within the coarse tuning range, the wavelength can be continuously tuned over 30 pm (7.8 GHz) without mode-hopping and modulated with bandwidths up to 3 kHz (piezo) and 37(3) kHz (current). The spectral linewidth of the free-running ECL was measured to be 22(2) kHz (Gaussian) and 4.2(3) kHz (Lorentzian) over 22.5 ms, while a long-term frequency stability better than 40(20) kHz over 11 hours was observed when locked to an atomic reference.

  20. Detection of HO2 in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet using optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Michele; Reuter, Stephan; Lawry Aguila, Ana; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; van Helden, Jean-Pierre H.

    2016-11-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets are increasingly applied in material processing and plasma medicine. However, their small dimensions make diagnosing the fluxes of generated species a challenge. Here we report on the detection of the hydroperoxyl radical, HO2, in the effluent of a plasma jet by the use of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a minimum detectable absorption coefficient {α }\\min of 2.25× {10}-10 cm-1 with a 100 second acquisition, equivalent to 5.5× {10}12 {{cm}}-3 of HO2 (under ideal conditions). Concentrations in the range of (3.1-7.8) × 1013 cm-3 were inferred in the 4 mm wide effluent of the plasma jet.

  1. Measurement of glyoxal using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Washenfelder

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe an instrument for simultaneous measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The output of a Xenon arc lamp is coupled into a 1 m optical cavity, and the spectrum of light exiting the cavity is recorded by a grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD array detector. The mirror reflectivity and effective path lengths are determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and dry zero air (N2+O2. Least-squares fitting, using published reference spectra, allow the simultaneous retrieval of CHOCHO, NO2, O4, and H2O in the 441 to 469 nm spectral range. For a 1-min sampling time, the precision (±1σ on signal for measurements of CHOCHO and NO2 is 29 pptv and 20 pptv, respectively. We directly compare measurements made with the incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer with those from cavity ringdown instruments detecting CHOCHO and NO2 at 404 and 532 nm, respectively, and find linear agreement over a wide range of concentrations. The instrument has been tested in the laboratory with both synthetic and real air samples, and the demonstrated sensitivity and specificity suggest a strong potential for field measurements of both CHOCHO and NO2.

  2. Design and application of robust rf pulses for toroid cavity NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, Thomas E; Woelk, Klaus; Gershenzon, Naum I; Glaser, Steffen J

    2010-01-01

    We present robust radio frequency (rf) pulses that tolerate a factor of six inhomogeneity in the B1 field, significantly enhancing the potential of toroid cavity resonators for NMR spectroscopic applications. Both point-to-point (PP) and unitary rotation (UR) pulses were optimized for excitation, inversion, and refocusing using the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm based on optimal control theory. In addition, the optimized parameterization (OP) algorithm applied to the adiabatic BIR-4 UR pulse scheme enabled ultra-short (50 microsec) pulses with acceptable performance compared to standard implementations. OP also discovered a new class of non-adiabatic pulse shapes with improved performance within the BIR-4 framework. However, none of the OP-BIR4 pulses are competitive with the more generally optimized UR pulses. The advantages of the new pulses are demonstrated in simulations and experiments. In particular, the DQF COSY result presented here represents the first implementation of 2D NMR sp...

  3. Backaction-limited cavity-sideband spectroscopy of quantum collective motion

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, Nathan; Schreppler, Sydney; Brooks, Daniel W C; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2011-01-01

    The motion of sub-atomic particles is characteristically quantum mechanical in nature. In contrast, quantum aspects of the motion of massive, many-atom objects are typically obscured by high phonon occupation and thermal noise. This contrast is now diminishing, owing to research efforts to bring the control and measurement of macroscopic motion fully into the quantum regime, using objects with masses from attograms to kilograms. This achievement will be critical for constructing force detectors sensitive to gravitational waves, verifying the correspondence principle at macroscopic scales, and realizing protocols that mechanically store and exchange quantum information. Here, we directly observe the quantization of the collective motion of an ultracold atomic ensemble by measuring the inability of a 0.6 attogram centre-of-mass mode to emit energy from its ground state. Moreover, the optical output of our strongly coupled cavity-optomechanical system contains a spectroscopic record of the energy exchanged betwe...

  4. Deep-UV high resolution cavity ring-down spectroscopy of the Schumann-Runge bands in O-16(2) and O-18(2) at wavelengths 197-203 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannemann, S.; Duijn, van E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    With the use of a novel titanium: sapphire laser source delivering, upon fourth harmonic generation, narrowband and tunable radiation in the deep-UV, spectroscopic studies were performed on weak Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen. Improved values for rotational and fine structure molecular parameters fo

  5. Fiber-bragg grating-loop ringdown method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuji

    2008-01-29

    A device comprising a fiber grating loop ringdown (FGLRD) system of analysis is disclosed. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) or Long-Period grating (LPG) written in a section of single mode fused silica fiber is incorporated into a fiber loop. By utilizing the wing areas of the gratings' bandwidth as a wavelength dependent attenuator of the light transmission, a fiber grating loop ringdown concept is formed. One aspect of the present invention is temperature sensing, which has been demonstrated using the disclosed device. Temperature measurements in the areas of accuracy, stability, high temperature, and dynamic range are also described.

  6. Phase-shift Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy Set-up for NO2 Sensing : Design and Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherry Dhiman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An indigenously designed cavity ring down spectroscopy cell of 80 cm length of mild steel material was fabricated by attaching two 1″ diameter high reflecting concave mirrors with reflectivity 99.997 % at 405 nm and radius of curvature was 1 m in specially designed mirror holding assemblies to the cell at two ends. Fine alignment of the resonator is facilitated with three tip-tilt adjusting screws to the mirror-mounting plate assembly. The PS-CRDS experimental set-up is evaluated by measuring the phase shift values corresponding to the absorption of NO2 gas filled at low pressures in the cell. The limit of detection of pure NO2 using the set-up under given conditions of Ar @ 50 mbar is estimated to be 1.50 × 1011 cm-3 and @ 60 mbar as 2 × 1011 cm-3.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 1, January 2015, pp.25-30, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.7790

  7. Using active resonator impedance matching for shot-noise limited, cavity enhanced amplitude modulated laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Jong H; Littler, Ian C M; Rabeling, David S; McClelland, David E; Gray, Malcolm B

    2008-05-26

    We introduce a closed-loop feedback technique to actively control the coupling condition of an optical cavity, by employing amplitude modulation of the interrogating laser. We show that active impedance matching of the cavity facilitates optimal shot-noise sensing performance in a cavity enhanced system, while its control error signal can be used for intra-cavity absorption or loss signal extraction. We present the first demonstration of this technique with a fiber ring cavity, and achieved shot-noise limited loss sensitivity. We also briefly discuss further use of impedance matching control as a tool for other applications.

  8. Water Vapor Self-Continuum by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the 1.6 Micron Transparency Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Alain; Kassi, Samir; Mondelain, Didier

    2014-06-01

    Since its discovery one century ago, a deep and unresolved controversy remains on the nature of the water vapor continuum. Several interpretations are proposed: accumulated effect of the distant wings of many individual spectral lines, metastable or true bound water dimers, collision-induced absorption. The atmospheric science community has largely sidestepped this controversy, and has adopted a pragmatic approach: most radiative transfer codes used in climate modelling, numerical weather prediction and remote sensing use the MT_CKD model which is a semi-empirical formulation of the continuum The MT_CKD cross-sections were tuned to available observations in the mid-infrared but in the absence of experimental constraints, the extrapolated near infrared (NIR) values are much more hazardous. Due to the weakness of the broadband absorption signal to be measured, very few measurements of the water vapor continuum are available in the NIR windows especially for temperature conditions relevant for our atmosphere. This is in particular the case for the 1.6 μm window where the very few available measurements show a large disagreement. Here we present the first measurements of the water vapor self-continuum cross-sections in the 1.6 μm window by cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). The pressure dependence of the absorption continuum was investigated during pressure cycles up to 12 Torr for selected wavenumber values. The continuum level is observed to deviate from the expected quadratic dependence with pressure. This deviation is interpreted as due to a significant contribution of water adsorbed on the super mirrors to the cavity loss rate. The pressure dependence is well reproduced by a second order polynomial. We interpret the linear and quadratic terms as the adsorbed water and vapour water contribution, respectively. The derived self-continuum cross sections, measured between 5875 and 6450 wn, shows a minimum value around 6300 wn. These cross sections will be compared

  9. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M.; Navitski, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  10. Linear and nonlinear surface spectroscopy of supported size selected metal clusters and organic adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaemer, Martin Georg

    2012-03-08

    The spectroscopic investigation of supported size selected metal clusters over a wide wavelength range plays an important role for understanding their outstanding catalytic properties. The challenge which must be overcome to perform such measurements is the difficult detection of the weak spectroscopic signals from these samples. As a consequence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are applied, such as surface Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and surface Second Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy. The spectroscopic apparatus developed is shown to have a sensitivity which is high enough to detect sub-monolayer coverages of adsorbates on surfaces. In the measured spectra of small supported silver clusters of the sizes Ag{sub 4}2, Ag{sub 2}1, Ag{sub 9}, and Ag atoms a stepwise transition from particles with purely metallic character to particles with molecule-like properties can be observed within this size range.

  11. High-resolution Fourier-transform cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the near-infrared using an incoherent broad-band light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphal, Johannes; Ruth, Albert A

    2008-11-10

    An incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption (IBB-CEA) set-up was used in combination with a Fourier-transform (FT) spectrometer in order to explore the potential of this technique for high-resolution molecular spectroscopy in the near-infrared region. Absorption spectra of overtone bands of CO2, OCS, and HD18O were measured between 5800 and 7000 cm(-1) using a small sampling volume (1100 cm3, based on a 90 cm cavity length). The quality of the spectra in this study is comparable to that obtained with Fourier transform spectrometers employing standard multi-pass reflection cells, which require substantially larger sampling volumes. High-resolution methods such as FT-IBB-CEAS also provide an elegant way to determine effective mirror reflectivities (R(eff), i.e. a measure of the inherent overall cavity loss) by using a calibration gas with well-known line strengths. For narrow absorption features and non-congested spectra this approach does not even require a zero-absorption measurement with the empty cavity. Absolute cross-sections or line strengths of a target species can also be determined in one single measurement, if gas mixtures with known partial pressures are used. This feature of FT-IBB-CEAS reduces systematic errors significantly; it is illustrated based on CO2 as calibration gas.

  12. Cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid-infrared - application to trace detection of H2O2

    CERN Document Server

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Fleisher, Adam J; Bjork, Bryce; Ye, Jun

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the first cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid-infrared wavelength region and report the sensitive real-time trace detection of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a large amount of water. The experimental apparatus is based on a mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator synchronously pumped by a high power Yb:fiber laser, a high finesse broadband cavity, and a fast-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer with autobalancing detection. The comb spectrum with a bandwidth of 200 nm centered around 3.75 {\\mu}m is simultaneously coupled to the cavity and both degrees of freedom of the comb, i.e., the repetition rate and carrier envelope offset frequency, are locked to the cavity to ensure stable transmission. The autobalancing detection scheme reduces the intensity noise by a factor of 300, and a sensitivity of 5.4 {\\times} 10^-9 cm^-1 Hz^-1/2 with a resolution of 800 MHz is achieved (corresponding to 6.9 {\\times} 10^-11 cm^-1 Hz^-1/2 per spectral element for 6000 resolve...

  13. Matched-filtering and parameter estimation of ringdown waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Cavaglia, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Using recent results from numerical relativity simulations of non-spinning binary black hole mergers we revisit the problem of detecting ringdown waveforms and of estimating the source parameters, considering both LISA and Earth-based interferometers. We find that Advanced LIGO and EGO could detect intermediate-mass black holes of mass up to about 1000 solar masses out to a luminosity distance of a few Gpc. For typical multipolar energy distributions, we show that the single-mode ringdown templates presently used for ringdown searches in the LIGO data stream can produce a significant event loss (> 10% for all detectors in a large interval of black hole masses) and very large parameter estimation errors on the black hole's mass and spin. We estimate that more than 10^6 templates would be needed for a single-stage multi-mode search. Therefore, we recommend a "two stage" search to save on computational costs: single-mode templates can be used for detection, but multi-mode templates or Prony methods should be use...

  14. Instantaneous Frequency and Damping from Transient Ring-Down Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuether, Robert J.; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2015-10-01

    Broadband impact excitation in structural dynamics is a common technique used to detect and characterize nonlinearities in mechanical systems since it excites many frequencies of a structure at once and can be applied with a variety of boundary conditions. Non-stationary time signals from transient ring-down measurements require time-frequency analysis tools to observe variations in frequency and energy dissipation as the response evolves. This work uses the short-time Fourier transform to estimate the instantaneous frequency and damping ratio from either measured or simulated transient ring-down data. By combining the discrete Fourier transform with an expanding or contracting window function that moves along the time axis, the resulting spectrum is used to estimate the instantaneous frequencies, damping and complex Fourier coefficients. This method is demonstrated on a multi-degree-of-freedom beam with a cubic spring attachment, and investigates the amplitudefrequency dependence in connection to the undamped nonlinear normal modes. A second example shows the results from experiment ring-down response on a beam with a lap joint, and reveals how the system behaves as energy dissipates.

  15. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. D. Hendriks

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A DLT-100 Fast Methane Analyser (FMA from Los Gatos Research (LGR Ltd. is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2×10³ to 20×10³ m. Statistical testing, a calibration experiment and comparison with high tower data showed high precision and very good stability of the instrument. The measurement cell response time was tested to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a Gill Windmaster Pro 3 axis Ultrasonic Anemometer and a Licor 7500 open path infrared gas analyzer. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instrument are satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates. The correspondence with CH4 flux chamber measurements is good and the observed CH4 emissions are comparable with (eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas.

    CH4 emissions are rather variable over time and show a diurnal pattern. The average CH4 emission is 50±12.5 nmol m−2 s−1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission is 120±30 nmol m−2 s−1 (during daytime and the typical minimum flux is –20±2.5 nmol m−2 s−1 (uptake, during night time.

    Additionally, the set-up was tested for three measurement techniques with slower measurement rates, which could be used in the future to make the scroll pump superfluous and save energy. Both disjunct eddy covariance as well as slow 1 Hz eddy covariance showed results very similar to normal 10 Hz eddy covariance. Relaxed eddy accumulation (REA only matched with normal 10 Hz eddy covariance over an averaging period of at least several weeks.

  16. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. D. Hendriks

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up in a peat meadow. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2–20×103 m. Statistical testing and a calibration experiment showed high precision (7.8×10−3 ppb and accuracy (<0.30% of the instrument, while no drift was observed. The instrument response time was determined to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a 3-axis ultrasonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer for measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instruments were satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates.

    Due to erroneous measurements, spikes and periods of low turbulence the data series consisted for 26% of gaps. Observed CH4 fluxes consisted mainly of emission, showed a diurnal cycle, but were rather variable over. The average CH4 emission was 29.7 nmol m−2 s−1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission was approximately 80.0 nmol m−2 s−1 and the typical minimum flux was approximately 0.0 nmol m−2 s−1. The correspondence of the measurements with flux chamber measurements in the footprint was good and the observed CH4 emission rates were comparable with eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas.

    Additionally, three measurement techniques with lower sampling frequencies were simulated, which might give the possibility to measure CH4 fluxes without an external pump and save energy. Disjunct eddy covariance appeared to be the most reliable substitute for 10 Hz eddy covariance, while relaxed eddy accumulation gave

  17. A CMOS millimeter-wave transceiver embedded in a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity for molecular spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Brian J; Tang, Adrian; Schlecht, Erich; Brageot, Emily; Gu, Q Jane; Ye, Y; Shu, R; Frank Chang, Mau-Chung; Kim, Y

    2016-08-21

    The extension of radio frequency complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry into millimeter wavelengths promises the extension of spectroscopic techniques in compact, power efficient systems. We are now beginning to use CMOS millimeter devices for low-mass, low-power instrumentation capable of remote or in situ detection of gas composition during space missions. We have chosen to develop a Flygare-Balle type spectrometer, with a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity to amplify the pump power of a mm-wavelength CMOS transmitter that is directly coupled to the planar mirror of the cavity. We have built a pulsed transceiver system at 92-105 GHz inside a 3 cm base length cavity and demonstrated quality factor up to 4680, allowing for modes with 20 MHz bandwidth, with a sufficient cavity amplification factor for mW class transmitters. This work describes the initial gas measurements and outlines the challenges and next steps.

  18. Frequency Modulated Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy: A General Technique for Trace Gas and Isotope Measurements with Unprecedented Sensitivity Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new technique is proposed for improved trace gas detection and measurement that combines the high absorption depths afforded by mid-infrared Integrated Cavity...

  19. A CMOS millimeter-wave transceiver embedded in a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity for molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Brian J.; Tang, Adrian; Schlecht, Erich; Brageot, Emily; Gu, Q. Jane; Ye, Y.; Shu, R.; Frank Chang, Mau-chung; Kim, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The extension of radio frequency complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry into millimeter wavelengths promises the extension of spectroscopic techniques in compact, power efficient systems. We are now beginning to use CMOS millimeter devices for low-mass, low-power instrumentation capable of remote or in situ detection of gas composition during space missions. We have chosen to develop a Flygare-Balle type spectrometer, with a semi-confocal Fabry-Perot cavity to amplify the pump power of a mm-wavelength CMOS transmitter that is directly coupled to the planar mirror of the cavity. We have built a pulsed transceiver system at 92-105 GHz inside a 3 cm base length cavity and demonstrated quality factor up to 4680, allowing for modes with 20 MHz bandwidth, with a sufficient cavity amplification factor for mW class transmitters. This work describes the initial gas measurements and outlines the challenges and next steps.

  20. Fully reflective external-cavity setup for quantum-cascade lasers as a local oscillator in mid-infrared wavelength heterodyne spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupar, Dusan; Krieg, Jürgen; Krötz, Peter; Sonnabend, Guido; Sornig, Manuela; Giesen, Thomas F; Schieder, Rudolf

    2008-06-01

    To our knowledge we present the first experiments with a fully reflective external-cavity quantum-cascade laser system at mid-infrared wavelengths for use as a local oscillator in a heterodyne receiver. The performance of the presented setup was investigated using absorption spectroscopy as well as heterodyne techniques. Tunability over approximately 30 cm(-1) at 1130 cm(-1) was demonstrated using a grating spectrometer. A continuous tuning range of 0.28 cm(-1) was verified by observing the spectra of an internally coupled confocal Fabry-Pérot interferometer and the absorption lines of gas phase SO(2). In a second step the output from the system was used as a local oscillator signal for a heterodyne setup. We show that spectral stability and side mode suppression are excellent and that a compact external-cavity quantum-cascade laser system is well suited to be used as a local oscillator in infrared heterodyne spectrometers.

  1. Enhancing the sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser-based cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using RF current perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfred, Katherine M; Kirkbride, James M R; Ciaffoni, Luca; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), often limited by cavity mode structure and diffraction losses, was enhanced by applying a broadband RF noise to the laser current. A pump-probe measurement demonstrated that the addition of bandwidth-limited white noise effectively increased the laser linewidth, thereby reducing mode structure associated with CEAS. The broadband noise source offers a more sensitive, more robust alternative to applying single-frequency noise to the laser. Analysis of CEAS measurements of a CO(2) absorption feature at 1890  cm(-1) averaged over 100 ms yielded a minimum detectable absorption of 5.5×10(-3)  Hz(-1/2) in the presence of broadband RF perturbation, nearly a tenfold improvement over the unperturbed regime. The short acquisition time makes this technique suitable for breath applications requiring breath-by-breath gas concentration information.

  2. Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive, high-speed measurements in a shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-01-11

    We report the first application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive and rapid gaseous species time-history measurements in a transient environment (in this study, a shock tube). The broadband nature of the ps pulses enabled instantaneous coupling of the laser beam into roughly a thousand cavity modes, which grants excellent immunity to laser-cavity coupling noise in environments with heavy vibrations, even with an on-axis alignment. In this proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrated an absorption gain of 49, which improved the minimum detectable absorbance by ~20 compared to the conventional single-pass strategy at similar experimental conditions. For absorption measurements behind reflected shock waves, an effective time-resolution of ~2 μs was achieved, which enabled time-resolved observations of transient phenomena, such as the vibrational relaxation of O(2) demonstrated here. The substantial improvement in detection sensitivity, together with microsecond measurement resolution implies excellent potential for studies of transient physical and chemical processes in nonequilibrium situations, particularly via measurements of weak absorptions of trace species in dilute reactive systems.

  3. Is the gravitational-wave ringdown a probe of the event horizon?

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Pani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the ringdown signal from a binary coalescence provides a conclusive proof for the formation of an event horizon after the merger. This expectation is based on the assumption that the ringdown waveform at intermediate times is dominated by the quasinormal modes of the final object. We point out that this assumption should be taken with great care, and that basically any compact object with a light ring will display a similar ringdown stage, even when its quasinormal-mode spectrum is completely different from that of a black hole. In other words, universal ringdown waveforms indicate the presence of light rings, rather than of horizons. Only precision observations of the late-time ringdown signal, where the differences in the quasinormal-mode spectrum eventually show up, can be used to rule out exotic alternatives to black holes and to test quantum effects at the horizon scale.

  4. Is the Gravitational-Wave Ringdown a Probe of the Event Horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Franzin, Edgardo; Pani, Paolo

    2016-04-29

    It is commonly believed that the ringdown signal from a binary coalescence provides a conclusive proof for the formation of an event horizon after the merger. This expectation is based on the assumption that the ringdown waveform at intermediate times is dominated by the quasinormal modes of the final object. We point out that this assumption should be taken with great care, and that very compact objects with a light ring will display a similar ringdown stage, even when their quasinormal-mode spectrum is completely different from that of a black hole. In other words, universal ringdown waveforms indicate the presence of light rings, rather than of horizons. Only precision observations of the late-time ringdown signal, where the differences in the quasinormal-mode spectrum eventually show up, can be used to rule out exotic alternatives to black holes and to test quantum effects at the horizon scale.

  5. Measurement of glyoxal using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Washenfelder

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe an instrument for simultaneous measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The output of a Xenon arc lamp is coupled into a 1 m optical cavity, and the spectrum of light exiting the cavity is recorded by a grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD array detector. The mirror reflectivity and effective path lengths are determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and dry zero air (N2+O2. Least-squares fitting, using published reference spectra, allow the simultaneous retrieval of CHOCHO, NO2, O4, and H2O in the 441 to 469 nm spectral range. For a 1-min sampling time, the minimum detectable absorption is 4×10−10 cm−1, and the precision (±1σ on signal for measurements of CHOCHO and NO2 is 29 pptv and 20 pptv, respectively. We directly compare the incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer to 404 and 532 nm cavity ringdown instruments for CHOCHO and NO2 detection, and find linear agreement over a wide range of concentrations. The instrument has been tested in the laboratory with both synthetic and real air samples, and the demonstrated sensitivity and specificity suggest a strong potential for field measurements of both CHOCHO and NO2.

  6. External cavity-quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy for secondary structure analysis of proteins at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta R.; Araman, Can; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy are analytical techniques employed for the analysis of protein secondary structure. The use of CD spectroscopy is limited to low protein concentrations (5 mg ml-1). Here we introduce a quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based IR transmission setup for analysis of protein and polypeptide secondary structure at concentrations as low as 0.25 mg ml-1 in deuterated buffer solution. We present dynamic QCL-IR spectra of the temperature-induced α-helix to β-sheet transition of poly-L-lysine. The concentration dependence of the α-β transition temperature between 0.25 and 10 mg ml-1 was investigated by QCL-IR, FTIR and CD spectroscopy. By using QCL-IR spectroscopy it is possible to perform IR spectroscopic analysis in the same concentration range as CD spectroscopy, thus enabling a combined analysis of biomolecules secondary structure by CD and IR spectroscopy.

  7. Noninvasive Vibrational Mode Spectroscopy of Ion Coulomb Crystals through Resonant Collective Coupling to an Optical Cavity Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan; Albert, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    We report on a novel noninvasive method to determine the normal mode frequencies of ion Coulomb crystals in traps based on the resonance enhanced collective coupling between the electronic states of the ions and an optical cavity field at the single photon level. Excitations of the normal modes...... are observed through a Doppler broadening of the resonance. An excellent agreement with the predictions of a zero-temperature uniformly charged liquid plasma model is found. The technique opens up for investigations of the heating and damping of cold plasma modes, as well as the coupling between them....

  8. Near-ultraviolet Incoherent Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy for OClO and CH20 in Cl-initiated Photooxidation Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-li Dong; Wei-xiong Zhao; Ming-qiang Huang; Wei-dong Chen; Chang-jin Hu; Xue-jun Gu; Shi-xin Pei

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (OClO) is an important indicator for Cl-activation.The monitoring of OClO appears to be crucial for understanding the chemistry of Cl-initialed oxidation and its impact on air quality in polluted coastal regions and industrialized areas.We report the development of a Xe arc lamp based near-ultraviolet (335-375 nm) incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) spectrometer for quantitative assessment of OClO in an atmospheric simulation chamber.The important intermediate compound CH2O,and other key atmospheric trace species (NO2) were also simultaneously measured.The instrumental performance shows a strong potential of this kind of IBBCEAS instrument for field and laboratory studies of atmospheric halogen chemistry.

  9. Is black-hole ringdown a memory of its progenitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaretsos, Ioannis; Hannam, Mark; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2012-10-05

    We perform an extensive numerical study of coalescing black-hole binaries to understand the gravitational-wave spectrum of quasinormal modes excited in the merged black hole. Remarkably, we find that the masses and spins of the progenitor are clearly encoded in the mode spectrum of the ringdown signal. Some of the mode amplitudes carry the signature of the binary's mass ratio, while others depend critically on the spins. Simulations of precessing binaries suggest that our results carry over to generic systems. Using Bayesian inference, we demonstrate that it is possible to accurately measure the mass ratio and a proper combination of spins even when the binary is itself invisible to a detector. Using a mapping of the binary masses and spins to the final black-hole spin allows us to further extract the spin components of the progenitor. Our results could have tremendous implications for gravitational astronomy by facilitating novel tests of general relativity using merging black holes.

  10. Nonlinear conductivity and the ringdown of currents in metallic holography

    CERN Document Server

    Withers, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We study the electric and heat current response resulting from an electric field quench in a holographic model of momentum relaxation at nonzero charge density. After turning the electric field off, currents return to equilibrium as governed by the vector quasi-normal modes of the dual black brane, whose spectrum depends qualitatively on a parameter controlling the strength of inhomogeneity. We explore the dynamical phase diagram as a function of this parameter, showing that signatures of incoherent transport become identifiable as an oscillatory ringdown of the heat current. We also study nonlinear conductivity by holding the electric field constant. For small electric fields a balance is reached between the driving electric field and the momentum sink -- a steady state described by DC linear response. For large electric fields Joule heating becomes important and the black branes exhibit significant time dependence. In a regime where the rate of temperature increase is small, the nonlinear electrical conduct...

  11. Frequency tuning of the whispering-gallery modes of silica microspheres for cavity quantum electrodynamics and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, W; Long, R; Ilchenko, V S; Hare, J; Lefèvre-Seguin, V

    2001-02-01

    We have tuned the whispering-gallery modes of a fused-silica microresonator over nearly 1 nm at 800 nm, i.e., over half a free spectral range, or 10(6) linewidths of the resonator. This result has been achieved by use of a new method based on the stretching of a two-stem microsphere. We describe devices that will permit new cavity QED experiments with this high- Q optical resonator when it is desirable to optimize its coupling to emitters with given transition frequencies. The demonstrated tuning capability is compatible with both UHV and low-temperature operation, which should be useful for future experiments with laser-cooled atoms or single quantum dots.

  12. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  13. Application of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to the Detection of Nitric Oxide, Carbonyl Sulphide, and Ethane—Breath Biomarkers of Serious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wojtas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents one of the laser absorption spectroscopy techniques as an effective tool for sensitive analysis of trace gas species in human breath. Characterization of nitric oxide, carbonyl sulphide and ethane, and the selection of their absorption lines are described. Experiments with some biomarkers showed that detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level is possible using this technique. Thanks to cavity enhanced spectroscopy application, detection limits at the ppb-level and short measurements time (<3 s were achieved. Absorption lines of reference samples of the selected volatile biomarkers were probed using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser and a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generator. Setup using the first source provided a detection limit of 30 ppb for nitric oxide and 250 ppb for carbonyl sulphide. During experiments employing a second laser, detection limits of 0.9 ppb and 0.3 ppb were obtained for carbonyl sulphide and ethane, respectively. The conducted experiments show that this type of diagnosis would significantly increase chances for effective therapy of some diseases. Additionally, it offers non-invasive and real time measurements, high sensitivity and selectivity as well as minimizing discomfort for patients. For that reason, such sensors can be used in screening for early detection of serious diseases.

  14. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  15. Nanogap-enhanced infrared spectroscopy with template-stripped wafer-scale arrays of buried plasmonic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Ciracì, Cristian; Smith, David R; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-01-14

    We have combined atomic layer lithography and template stripping to produce a new class of substrates for surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. Our structure consists of a buried and U-shaped metal-insulator-metal waveguide whose folded vertical arms efficiently couple normally incident light. The insulator is formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 and precisely defines the gap size. The buried nanocavities are protected from contamination by a silicon template until ready for use and exposed by template stripping on demand. The exposed nanocavity generates strong infrared resonances, tightly confines infrared radiation into a gap that is as small as 3 nm (λ/3300), and creates a dense array of millimeter-long hotspots. After partial removal of the insulators, the gaps are backfilled with benzenethiol molecules, generating distinct Fano resonances due to strong coupling with gap plasmons, and a SEIRA enhancement factor of 10(5) is observed for a 3 nm gap. Because of the wafer-scale manufacturability, single-digit-nanometer control of the gap size via ALD, and long-term storage enabled by template stripping, our buried plasmonic nanocavity substrates will benefit broad applications in sensing and spectroscopy.

  16. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiczek, O; Friedreich, S; Juhász, B; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for (4)He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised (3)He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the (3)He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  17. Liquid helium-free cryostat and hermetically sealed cryogenic microwave cavity for hyperfine spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massiczek, O., E-mail: oswald.massiczek@cern.ch [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Friedreich, S.; Juhasz, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J. [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-12-11

    The design and properties of a new cryogenic set-up for laser-microwave-laser hyperfine structure spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium - an experiment performed at the CERN-Antiproton Decelerator (AD), Geneva, Switzerland - are described. Similar experiments for {sup 4}He have been performed at the AD for several years. Due to the usage of a liquid helium operated cryostat and therefore necessary refilling of coolants, a loss of up to 10% beamtime occurred. The decision was made to change the cooling system to a closed-circuit cryocooler. New hermetically sealed target cells with minimised {sup 3}He gas volume and different dimensions of the microwave resonator for measuring the {sup 3}He transitions were needed. A new set-up has been designed and tested at Stefan Meyer Institute in Vienna before being used for the 2009 and 2010 beamtimes at the AD.

  18. Time-domain fiber loop ringdown sensor and sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Malik

    Optical fibers have been mostly used in fiber optic communications, imaging optics, sensing technology, etc. Fiber optic sensors have gained increasing attention for scientific and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. In this study, fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) sensors were fabricated for scientific, SHM, and sensor networking applications. FLRD biosensors were fabricated for both bulk refractive index (RI)- and surface RI-based DNA sensing and one type of bacteria sensing. Furthermore, the effect of glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilization at the sensor head on sensor performance was evaluated for both glucose and synthetic urine solutions with glucose concentration between 0.1% and 10%. Detection sensitivities of the glucose sensors were achieved as low as 0.05%. For chemical sensing, heavy water, ranging from 97% to 10%, and several elemental solutions were monitored by using the FLRD chemical sensors. Bulk index-based FLRD sensing showed that trace elements can be detected in deionized water. For physical sensing, water and cracking sensors were fabricated and embedded into concrete. A partially-etched single-mode fiber (SMF) was embedded into a concrete bar for water monitoring while a bare SMF without any treatment was directly embedded into another concrete bar for monitoring cracks. Furthermore, detection sensitivities of water and crack sensors were investigated as 10 ml water and 0.5 mm surface crack width, respectively. Additionally fiber loop ringdown-fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors were developed in the laboratory; two sensor units for water, crack, and temperature sensing were deployed into a concrete cube in a US Department of Energy test bed (Miami, FL). Multi-sensor applications in a real concrete structure were accomplished by testing the six FLRD sensors. As a final stage, a sensor network was assembled by multiplexing two or three FLRD sensors in series and parallel. Additionally, two FLRD sensors were combined in series and

  19. Short-lived species detection of nitrous acid by external-cavity quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Hongming [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Maamary, Rabih; Fertein, Eric; Chen, Weidong, E-mail: chen@univ-littoral.fr [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Atmosphère, Université du Littoral Côte d' Opale, 189A, Av. Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Gao, Xiaoming [Laboratory of Atmospheric Physico-Chemistry, Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1125, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sigrist, Markus W. [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, HPT H4.1, Auguste-Piccard-Hof 1, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-03-09

    Spectroscopic detection of short-lived gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) at 1254.85 cm{sup −1} was realized by off-beam coupled quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) in conjunction with an external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCL). High sensitivity monitoring of HONO was performed within a very small gas-sample volume (of ∼40 mm{sup 3}) allowing a significant reduction (of about 4 orders of magnitude) of air sampling residence time which is highly desired for accurate quantification of chemically reactive short-lived species. Calibration of the developed QEPAS-based HONO sensor was carried out by means of lab-generated HONO samples whose concentrations were determined by direct absorption spectroscopy involving a ∼109.5 m multipass cell and a distributed feedback QCL. A minimum detection limit (MDL) of 66 ppbv (1 σ) HONO was achieved at 70 mbar using a laser output power of 50 mW and 1 s integration time, which corresponded to a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. This MDL was down to 7 ppbv at the optimal integration time of 150 s. The corresponding 1σ minimum detected absorption coefficient is ∼1.1 × 10{sup −7 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 3 ppbv) in 1 s and ∼1.1 × 10{sup −8 }cm{sup −1} (MDL ∼ 330 pptv) in 150 s, respectively, with 1 W laser power.

  20. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data.

  1. Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for N2O detection at 2.86μm using a continuous tunable color center laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaocheng Li(李少成); Qingxu Yu(于清旭); Maarten van Herpen; Sacco te Lintel Hekkert; Frans J. M. Harren

    2003-01-01

    The cavity enhanced absorption technique is applied to N2O detection around 2.86 μm using a continuouswave color center laser. A high-finesse triangular ring cavity is used in this technology. Transmission through the cavity is obtained by jittering the cavity-length with a piezo on one of the cavity mirrors.A minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 2 × 10-6 cm-1 is achieved with a mirror reflectivity of 99.24%, corresponding to a N2O detection limit of 600 parts per billion.

  2. Nonlinear conductivity and the ringdown of currents in metallic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    We study the electric and heat current response resulting from an electric field quench in a holographic model of momentum relaxation at nonzero charge density. After turning the electric field off, currents return to equilibrium as governed by the vector quasi-normal modes of the dual black brane, whose spectrum depends qualitatively on a parameter controlling the strength of inhomogeneity. We explore the dynamical phase diagram as a function of this parameter, showing that signatures of incoherent transport become identifiable as an oscillatory ringdown of the heat current. We also study nonlinear conductivity by holding the electric field constant. For small electric fields a balance is reached between the driving electric field and the momentum sink — a steady state described by DC linear response. For large electric fields Joule heating becomes important and the black branes exhibit significant time dependence. In a regime where the rate of temperature increase is small, the nonlinear electrical conductivity is well approximated by the DC linear response calculation at an appropriate effective temperature.

  3. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  4. High resolution and high precision absorption spectroscopy using high finesse cavities: application to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest; Cavites de haute finesse pour la spectroscopie d'absorption haute sensibilite et haute precision: application a l'etude de molecules d'interet atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V.

    2005-12-15

    High finesse cavities are used to measure very weak absorption features. Two different methodologies are investigated and applied to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest. First, Continuous Wave - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) is used to study the atmospheric spectra of water vapour in the near infrared range. These measurements are performed for temperature and pressure of atmospheric relevance for DIAL applications (Differential Absorption Lidar). This study, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA), goes with the WALES mission (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). The experimental setup was conceived in order to control pressure, temperature and relative humidity conditions. A particular attention is done to characterize and describe the spectrometer. Then, measurements of red Oxygen B band are performed to demonstrate the huge performance of Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). The desired optical feedback is obtained by light injection into the high finesse cavity through a glass plate placed inside the cavity and closed to the Brewster angle. We show a measurement dynamical range of 5 orders of magnitude (10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10} /cm) and a sensitivity of 10{sup -10} /cm/{radical} Hz. Also, sampling absorption spectra by the super linear cavity frequency comb allows very precise frequency measurements. This is demonstrated by the determination of Oxygen pressure shifts with an absolute accuracy of around 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -1}/atm. To our knowledge, we provide the highest accuracy ever reported for this parameter. (author)

  5. Novel Instrument to Measure Aerosol Fluorescence, Absorption, and Scattering Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Picarro, Inc proposes to develop the first cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) system to measure fluorescence, absorption, and scattering properties of atmospheric...

  6. The near infrared spectrum of ozone by CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy between 5850 and 7000 cm(-1): new observations and exhaustive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, A; Barbe, A; De Backer-Barilly, M-R; Tyuterev, Vl G; Kassi, S

    2008-05-28

    Weak vibrational bands of (16)O(3) could be detected in the 5850-7030 cm(-1) spectral region by CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy using a set of fibered DFB diode lasers. As a result of the high sensitivity (noise equivalent absorption alpha(min) approximately 3 x 10(-10) cm(-1)), bands reaching a total of 16 upper vibrational states have been previously reported in selected spectral regions. In the present report, the analysis of the whole investigated region is completed by new recordings in three spectral regions which have allowed: (i) a refined analysis of the nu(1) + 3nu(2) + 3nu(3) band from new spectra in the 5850-5900 cm(-1) region; (ii) an important extension of the assignments of the 2nu(1)+5nu(3) and 4nu(1) + 2nu(2) + nu(3) bands in the 6500-6600 cm(-1) region, previously recorded by frequency modulation diode laser spectroscopy. The rovibrational assignments of the weak 4nu(1) + 2nu(2) + nu(3) band were fully confirmed by the new observation of the 4nu(1) + 2nu(2) + nu(3)- nu(2) hot band near 5866.9 cm(-1) reaching the same upper state; (iii) the observation and modelling of three A-type bands at 6895.51, 6981.87 and 6990.07 cm(-1) corresponding to the highest excited vibrational bands of ozone detected so far at high resolution. The upper vibrational states were assigned by comparison of their energy values with calculated values obtained from the ground state potential energy surface of (16)O(3). The vibrational mixing and consequently the ambiguities in the vibrational labelling are discussed. For each band or set of interacting bands, the spectroscopic parameters were determined from a fit of the corresponding line positions in the frame of the effective Hamiltonian (EH) model. A set of selected absolute line intensities was measured and used to derive the parameters of the effective transition moment operator. The exhaustive review of the previous observations gathered with the present results is presented and discussed. It leads to a total number

  7. Towards Solvation of a Chiral Alpha-Hydroxy Ester: Broadband Chirp and Narrow Band Cavity Fouirier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy of Methyl Lactate-Water Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Javix; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Jaeger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2013-06-01

    Methyl lactate (ML), a chiral alpha-hydroxy ester, has attracted much attention as a prototype system in studies of chirality transfer,[1] solvation effects on chiroptical signatures,[2] and chirality recognition.[3] It has multiple functional groups which can serve both as a hydrogen donor and acceptor. By applying rotational spectroscopy and high level ab initio calculations, we examine the delicate competition between inter- and intramolecular hydrogen-bonding in the ML-water clusters. Broadband rotational spectra obtained with a chirp Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometer, reveal that the insertion conformations are the most favourable ones in the binary and ternary solvated complexes. In the insertion conformations, the water molecule(s) inserts itself (themselves) into the existing intramolecular hydrogen-bonded ring formed between the alcoholic hydroxyl group and the oxygen of the carbonyl group of ML. The final frequency measurements have been carried out using a cavity based FTMW instrument where internal rotation splittings due to the ester methyl group have also been detected. A number of insertion conformers with subtle structural differences for both the binary and ternary complexes have been identified theoretically. The interconversion dynamics of these conformers and the identification of the most favorable conformers will be discussed. 1. C. Merten, Y. Xu, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2013, 52, 2073 -2076. 2. M. Losada, Y. Xu, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2007, 9, 3127-3135; Y. Liu, G. Yang, M. Losada, Y. Xu, J. Chem. Phys., 2010, 132, 234513/1-11. 3. A. Zehnacker, M. Suhm, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2008, 47, 6970 - 6992.

  8. Digital Cavities and Their Potential Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Karki, Khadga; Widom, Julia R; Marcus, Andrew H; Pullerits, Tonu

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a digital cavity is presented. The functionality of a tunable radio-frequency/microwave cavity with unrestricted Q-factor is implemented. The theoretical aspects of the cavity and its potential applications in high resolution spectroscopy and synchronization of clocks together with examples in signal processing and data acquisition are discussed.

  9. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of PAHs in supersonic jets and ultracold liquid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Staicu, Angela; Krasnokutski, Serge; Henning, Thomas

    Neutral and cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are discussed as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), still unassigned astrophysical absorption features observed in the spectra of reddened stars (Salama et al. 1999). Despite the importance of this class of molecules for astrophysics and nanophysics (PAHs can be regarded as nanoscale fragments of a sheet of graphite), the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs under well-defined conditions (low temperature and collision-free environment) has remained a challenge. Recently we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer combined with a pulsed supersonic jet expansion to study neutral and cationic PAHs under astrophysical conditions. PAHs studied so far include the neutral molecules anthracene (Staicu et al. 2004) and pyrene (Rouillé et al. 2004) as well as the cationic species naphthalene+ and anthracene+ (Sukhorukov et al. 2004). Employing another molecular beam apparatus, the same molecules (except of the cationic species) were also studied in liquid helium droplets (Krasnokutski et al. 2005, Rouillé et al. 2004). This novel technique combines several advantages of conventional matrix spectroscopy with those of gas phase spectroscopy. Notable advantages are the possibility to study molecules with low vapor pressure and to use a mass spectrometer facilitating spectral assignments. The most recent studies were devoted to phenanthrene and the more complicated (2,3)-benzofluorene. These molecules were investigated in the gas phase by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and in liquid helium droplets using depletion spectroscopy. For benzofluorene the present studies constitute the first reported measurements both in the gas phase and in helium droplets. The origin of the S1 ← S0 gas phase transition could be located at 29 894.3 cm-1, and a series of vibronic bands was recorded below 31 500 cm-1. In contrast to previously studied PAHs, the shift induced by the helium droplets was very

  10. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trenikhina, Y., E-mail: yuliatr@fnal.gov [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Romanenko, A., E-mail: aroman@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Zasadzinski, J. F. [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ∼100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  11. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed black holes in LIGO S4 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Behnke, B.; Benacquista, M.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Brunet, G.; Bullington, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Cardoso, V.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Daudert, B.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dueck, J.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Edgar, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Faltas, Y.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Finn, L. S.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G. D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Isogai, T.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, H.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonor, I.; Li, C.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McKenzie, K.; Mehmet, M.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moreno, G.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Muhammad, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Dell, J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perraca, A.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Punken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raics, Z.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Rehbein, H.

    2009-09-01

    According to general relativity a perturbed black hole will settle to a stationary configuration by the emission of gravitational radiation. Such a perturbation will occur, for example, in the coalescence of a black hole binary, following their inspiral and subsequent merger. At late times the waveform is a superposition of quasinormal modes, which we refer to as the ringdown. The dominant mode is expected to be the fundamental mode, l=m=2. Since this is a well-known waveform, matched filtering can be implemented to search for this signal using LIGO data. We present a search for gravitational waves from black hole ringdowns in the fourth LIGO science run S4, during which LIGO was sensitive to the dominant mode of perturbed black holes with masses in the range of 10M⊙ to 500M⊙, the regime of intermediate-mass black holes, to distances up to 300 Mpc. We present a search for gravitational waves from black hole ringdowns using data from S4. No gravitational wave candidates were found; we place a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of ringdowns from black holes with mass between 85M⊙ and 390M⊙ in the local universe, assuming a uniform distribution of sources, of 3.2×10-5yr-1Mpc-3=1.6×10-3yr-1L10-1,where L10 is 1010 times the solar blue-light luminosity.

  12. Measurement of OCS, CO2, CO and H2O aboard NASA's WB-57 High Altitude Platform Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J. B.; Owano, T. G.; Du, X.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been implicated in controlling the sulfur budget and aerosol loading of the stratosphere. In the troposphere, OCS is irreversibly consumed during photosynthesis and may serve as a tracer for gross primary production (GPP). Its primary sources are ocean outgassing, industrial processes, and biomass burning. Its primary sinks are vegetation and soils. Despite the importance of OCS in atmospheric processes, the OCS atmospheric budget is poorly determined and has high uncertainty. OCS is typically monitored using either canisters analyzed by gas chromatography or integrated atmospheric column measurements. Improved in-situ terrestrial flux and airborne measurements are required to constrain the OCS budget and further elucidate its role in stratospheric aerosol formation and as a tracer for biogenic volatile organics and photosynthesis. Los Gatos Research has developed a flight capable mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to simultaneously quantify OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O in ambient air at up to 2 Hz. The prototype was tested on diluted, certified samples and found to be precise (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O to better than ±4 ppt, ±0.2 ppm, ±0.31 ppb, and ±3.7 ppm respectively, 1s in 1 sec) and linear (R2 > 0.9997 for all gases) over a wide dynamic range (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O ranging from 0.2 - 70 ppb, 500 - 3000 ppm, 150 - 480 ppb, and 7000 - 21000 ppm respectively). Cross-interference measurements showed no appreciable change in measured OCS concentration with variations in CO2 (500 - 3500 ppm) or CO. We report on high altitude measurements made aboard NASA's WB-57 research aircraft. Two research flights were conducted from Houston, TX. The concentration of OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O were continuously recorded from sea level to approximately 60,000 feet. The concentration of OCS was observed to increase with altitude through the troposphere due to the

  13. High-power, narrow-band, high-repetition-rate, 5.9 eV coherent light source using passive optical cavity for laser-based angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omachi, J; Yoshioka, K; Kuwata-Gonokami, M

    2012-10-08

    We demonstrate a scheme for efficient generation of a 5.9 eV coherent light source with an average power of 23 mW, 0.34 meV linewidth, and 73 MHz repetition rate from a Ti: sapphire picosecond mode-locked laser with an output power of 1 W. Second-harmonic light is generated in a passive optical cavity by a BiB(3)O(6) crystal with a conversion efficiency as high as 67%. By focusing the second-harmonic light transmitted from the cavity into a β-BaB(2)O(4) crystal, we obtain fourth-harmonic light at 5.9 eV. This light source offers stable operation for at least a week. We discuss the suitability of the laser light source for high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy by comparing it with other sources (synchrotron radiation facilities and gas discharge lamp).

  14. Time-resolved in situ detection of CO in a shock tube using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser near 4.6 µm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-10-06

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a mid-infrared DFB quantum-cascade laser is reported for sensitive time-resolved (10 μs) in situ CO measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 91 was demonstrated, which enabled sub-ppm detection sensitivity for gas temperatures of 1000-2100K in a 15 cm diameter shock tube. This substantial improvement in detection sensitivity compared to conventional single-pass absorption measurements, shows great potential for the study of reaction pathways of high-temperature combustion kinetics mechanisms in shock tubes.

  15. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Crepaz; Li Yuan Ley; Rainer Dumke

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage...

  16. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  17. Kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms: Testing gravitational-wave tests of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Samajdar, Anuradha; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We describe a variety of self-consistent modifications of the effective-one-body framework that yield kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveforms. These waveforms do not correspond to any particular modified theory of gravity, but offer parametrized deviations from general relativity in various regimes. They can thus be used to test the performance of various gravitational wave tests of general relativity (GR). As an example, we introduce the IMR consistency test, which tests for consistency between the estimations of the final mass and spin from the inspiral and merger-ringdown portions of a binary black hole waveform. We show that for reasonable source parameters and SNRs in Advanced LIGO, this test is able to detect a deviation from GR with high confidence for certain modifications of the GR energy flux that are not constrained by observations of the double pulsar. We also consider the performance of a parameterized test of GR on these kludge modified gravity waveforms.

  18. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  19. Time-resolved spectral characterization of ring cavity surface emitting and ridge-type distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers by step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Markus; Genner, Andreas; Schwarzer, Clemens; Mujagic, Elvis; Strasser, Gottfried; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-02-10

    We present the time-resolved comparison of pulsed 2nd order ring cavity surface emitting (RCSE) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) and pulsed 1st order ridge-type distributed feedback (DFB) QCLs using a step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. Laser devices were part of QCL arrays and fabricated from the same laser material. Required grating periods were adjusted to account for the grating order. The step-scan technique provided a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm(-1) and a time resolution of 2 ns. As a result, it was possible to gain information about the tuning behavior and potential mode-hops of the investigated lasers. Different cavity-lengths were compared, including 0.9 mm and 3.2 mm long ridge-type and 0.97 mm (circumference) ring-type cavities. RCSE QCLs were found to have improved emission properties in terms of line-stability, tuning rate and maximum emission time compared to ridge-type lasers.

  20. Chiroptical Spectroscopy in the Vapor Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Priyanka; Long, Benjamin D.; Wiberg, Kenneth B.; Vaccaro, Patrick H.

    2011-06-01

    Electromagnetic radiation propagating through an isotropic chiral medium experiences a complex index of refraction that differs in both real (in-phase) and imaginary (in-quadrature) parts for the right-circular and left-circular polarization states that define the helicity basis. The resulting phenomena of circular birefringence (CB) and circular dichroism (CD) lead to observable effects in the form of dispersive rotation and absorptive elliptization for an impinging beam of plane-polarized light, which commonly are measured under conditions of nonresonant and resonant excitation, respectively. This talk will discuss ongoing efforts designed to elucidate the provenance of electronic optical activity under complementary solvated and isolated conditions, with the latter vapor-phase work made possible by our continuing development of Cavity Ring-Down Polarimetry (CRDP). Molecules of interest include the rigid bicyclic ketone (1R,4R)-norbornenone, where the spatial arrangement of distal alkene and carbonyl moeities gives rise to extraordinarily large specific rotation (CB) parameters that are predicted incongruously by different quantum-chemical methods; the monoterpene constitutional isomers (S)-2-carene and (S)-3-carene, which display surprisingly distinct chiroptical properties; and conjugated ketones such as (S)-verbenone, where CD probes of weak π*←n absorption bands have been performed at vibronic resolution. The disparate nature of gas-phase and condensed-phase optical activity will be highlighted, with complementary ab initio calculations serving to elucidate the structural, chemical, and electronic origins of observed behavior. T. Müller, K. B. Wiberg, P. H. Vaccaro, J. R. Cheeseman, and M. J. Frisch, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 19, 125 (2002) P. H. Vaccaro, ``Chapter 1.II.10: Optical Rotation and Intrinsic Optical Activity'' in Comprehensive Chiroptical Spectroscopy, N. Berova, P. L. Polavarapu, K. Nakanishi, and R. W. Woody, eds. (John Wiley and Sons, Inc

  1. Using a fourth-generation cavity enhanced spectrometer to isotopically investigate nitrous oxide emissions from biochar amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabenhofer, Jutta; Dercon, Gerd; Heiling, Maria; Mayr, Leo; Resch, Christian; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    Research into the impacts of biochar on key processes in the nitrogen cycle is important to understand biochar's potential role in sustainable agriculture. There is conflicting evidence that biochar can reduce globally significant greenhouse gas emissions, especially N2O, one of the most important greenhouse gases in agriculture. However to date there is little information on the mechanisms involved. The source of N2O is dependent on the physical, chemical and biological status of the soil at a microbial scale and we need to understand how biochar influences it. Using the 15N2O gas flux method combined with gross rate measurements of nitrification and modelling, it should be possible to determine the parameters which drive N2O emissions and to evaluate the specific impact of biochar on these important N loss processes. To date the scope of isotopic studies on nitrous oxide emissions have been limited, due in part to technical and infrastructural access to complex and expensive mass spectrometry. With the advent of laser based systems these logistical and analytical constraints could be overcome and allow for a deeper and geographically more representative, understanding and assessment of the role of biochar in reducing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. In this study we have developed a simple method for investigated nitrous oxide emissions from soils amended with biochar, employing state of the art stable isotope techniques, using a fourth-generation cavity enhanced absorption technique a variant of conventional Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for measurement of isotopes of nitrous oxide. We will present methodologies used and results from these experiments, techniques that should path the way for a greater global understand nitrous oxide emissions from soils.

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  3. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  4. Measuring fast variations of δ^{18}O and δ^2H in atmospheric water vapour using laser spectroscopy: an instrument inter-comparison and characterisation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-04-01

    Fast variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable lately using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This allows us to perform process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales of significant weather events. An important prerequisite for such studies implying automatic field measurements lasting for several weeks or even months is a detailed knowledge about sources of uncertainty and instrument properties. We present a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Resarch). The old versions (L1115-i, WVIA) and the new versions (L2130-i, WVIA-EP) of both systems were tested. The uncertainty components of the measurements were assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Knowledge from our laboratory experiments was used to setup a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the L1115-i and WVIA systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. Using this field measurement data we address the question of how well the deuterium excess (d=δ2H-8δ18O) of atmospheric water vapour can be determined with laser spectroscopy. The deuterium excess is an interesting parameter for process-based atmospheric water cycle studies, which depends on humidity and temperature conditions at source location of water vapour. Up to now only very few high-time-resolution measurements of deuterium excess exist. Our concurrent measurements of atmospheric isotopes in water vapour

  5. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Möhle, Katharina; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-01-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1 x 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (> 1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  6. High-Q 3D coaxial resonators for cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taekwan; Owens, John C.; Naik, Ravi; Lachapelle, Aman; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Schuster, David I.

    Three-dimensional microwave resonators provide an alternative approach to transmission-line resonators used in most current circuit QED experiments. Their large mode volume greatly reduces the surface dielectric losses that limits the coherence of superconducting circuits, and the well-isolated and controlled cavity modes further suppress coupling to the environment. In this work, we focus on unibody 3D coaxial cavities which are only evanescently coupled and free from losses due to metal-metal interfaces, allowing us to reach extremely high quality-factors. We achieve quality-factor of up to 170 million using 4N6 Aluminum at superconducting temperatures, corresponding to an energy ringdown time of ~4ms. We extend our methods to other materials including Niobium, NbTi, and copper coated with Tin-Lead solder. These cavities can be further explored to study their properties under magnetic field or upon coupling to superconducting Josephson junction qubits, e.g. 3D transmon qubits. Such 3D cavity QED system can be used for quantum information applications, or quantum simulation in coupled cavity arrays.

  7. Trace species detection in the near infrared using Fourier transform broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy: initial studies on potential breath analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzer, W; Hancock, G; Islam, M; Langley, C E; Peverall, R; Ritchie, G A D; Taylor, D

    2011-02-21

    Cavity enhanced absorption measurements have been made of several species that absorb light between 1.5 and 1.7 µm using both a supercontinuum source and superluminescent light emitting diodes. A system based upon an optical enhancement cavity of relatively high finesse, consisting of mirrors of reflectivity ∼99.98%, and a Fourier transform spectrometer, is demonstrated. Spectra are recorded of isoprene, butadiene, acetone and methane, highlighting problems with spectral interference and unambiguous concentration determinations. Initial results are presented of acetone within a breath-like matrix indicating ppm precision at absorption coefficient of ∼4 × 10(-9) cm(-1) reported within a 4 min acquisition time. Finally, two superluminescent light emitting diodes are coupled together to increase the wavelength coverage, and measurements are made simultaneously on acetylene, CO(2), and butadiene. The absorption cross-sections for acetone and isoprene have been measured with an instrumental resolution of 4 cm(-1) and are found to be 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10(-21) cm(2) at a wavelength of 1671.9 nm and 3.6 ± 0.2 × 10(-21) cm(2) at 1624.7 nm, respectively.

  8. Theoretical investigation on the effect of ASE noise for amplified fiber loop ring-down gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chunfu; Zeng, Yan; Ou, Yiwen; Zhang, Jinye; Lv, Qinghua; Zhu, Jinrong; Lv, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The effect of spontaneous emission (ASE) noise produced by the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) on the performance of amplified fiber loop ring-down gas sensing systems is theoretically investigated. The results show that the EDFA placed after the gas cell with a smaller ASE noise can improve the measurement accuracy. The more narrower the noise equivalent optical bandwidth of the optical band pass filter following the EDFA is, the up shift of baseline of ring-down signal can be more effectively suppressed and thus improving the measurement accuracy. It is also found the longer ring-down time can be obtained by reducing the input power due to the smaller gain fluctuations of the EDFA.

  9. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspiral, merger and ringdown

    OpenAIRE

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; G. Allen; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.; Anderson, W.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first modeled search for gravitational waves using the complete binary black hole gravitational waveform from inspiral through the merger and ringdown for binaries with negligible component spin. We searched approximately 2 years of LIGO data taken between November 2005 and September 2007 for systems with component masses of 1-99 solar masses and total masses of 25-100 solar masses. We did not detect any plausible gravitational-wave signals but we do place upper limits on the m...

  10. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  11. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  12. Sky Localization of Complete Inspiral-Merger-Ringdown Signals for Nonspinning Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Lang, Ryan N.; Baker, John G.; Thorpe, James Ira

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the capability of LISA to measure the sky position of equal-mass, nonspinning black hole binaries, including for the first time the entire inspiral-merger-ringdown signal, the effect of the LISA orbits, and the complete three-channel LISA response. For an ensemble of systems near the peak of LISA's sensitivity band, with total rest mass of 2 x l0(exp 6) Stellar Mass at a redshift of z = 1 with random orientations and sky positions, we find median sky localization errors of approximately approx. 3 arcminutes. This is comparable to the field of view of powerful electromagnetic telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, that could be used to search for electromagnetic signals associated with merging black holes. We investigate the way in which parameter errors decrease with measurement time, focusing specifically on the additional information provided during the merger-ringdown segment of the signal. We find that this information improves all parameter estimates directly, rather than through diminishing correlations with any subset of well-determined parameters.

  13. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using laser spectroscopy: an instrument characterisation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pfahl

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research. The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i water vapour mixing ratio, (ii measurement stability, (iii uncertainties due to calibration and (iv response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals of the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric water cycle and the

  14. Investigation of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells and vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser structures using modulated reflectance spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Choulis, S A

    2001-01-01

    study on a representative InGaAs/GaAs/AlAs/AIGaAs as-grown VCSEL structure, using PR spectroscopy as a function of position on a non-uniform wafer. We also show how temperature dependent PR and the appropriate lineshape model can be used to obtain a full picture of the relative movements between the gain and the CM over the full range of temperature. This information allows calculating the material gain in the temperature range of interest, independent from the effect of the CM and also provides an alternative method for characterising the growth, which can be applied to uniform wafers. PR and non-destructive ER can be used to identify regions suitable for fabrication into devices. For this reason modulation spectroscopy can be very useful for industry to reject wafers where good alignment between the CM and the QW does not occur and can thus save on the time consuming and expensive fabrication procedures. We investigate the electronic band structure of device relevant GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQW...

  15. Near Infrared Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy Study of N2 O%N2 O的近红外腔增强吸收光谱技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴志伟; 董燕婷; 周卫东

    2014-01-01

    Using a tunable near infrared external cavity diode laser and a 650mm long high finesse optical cavity consisting of two highly reflective (R= 99. 97% at 6 561. 39 cm-1 )plan-concave mirrors of curvature radius ~1 000 mm,a cavity enhanced ab-sorption spectroscopy (CEAS)system was made.The absorption spectra centered at 6 561. 39 cm-1 of pure N2 O gas and gas mixtures of N2 O and N2 were recorded.According to the absorption of N2 O at 6 561. 39 cm-1 in the cavity,the measured effec-tive absorption path was about 1 460 km.The spectra line intensity and line-width of N2 O centered at 6 561. 39 cm-1 were care-fully studied.The relationship between the line-width of absorption spectra and the gas pressure was derived.The pressure broadening parameter of N2 gas for N2O line centered at 6 561. 39 cm-1 was deduced and given a value of ~(0. 114±0. 004) cm-1 ·atm-1 .The possibility to detect trace N2 O gas in mixture using this CEAS system was investigated.By recording the ab-sorption spectra of N2 O gas mixtures at different concentration,the relationship between the line intensity and gas concentration was derived.The minimum detectable absorption was found to be 2. 34×10-7 cm-1 using this cavity enhanced absorption spec-troscopy system.And te measurement precision in terms of relative standard deviation (RSD)for N2 O is ~1. 73%,indicating the possibility of using the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy system for micro gas N2 O analysis in the future.%以外腔式可调谐、窄线宽近红外半导体激光为光源,以一对曲率半径r=1000 mm 的宽带高反射率平凹镜(反射率R=99.97%)构成的腔长为650 mm的对称高精度光学稳定腔,建立了腔增强吸收光谱系统。详细研究了纯净 N2 O 气体、以及 N2 O 和 N2的混合气体在不同浓度和不同气压下、中心波长位于6561.39 cm-1的腔增强吸收光谱、光谱强度和谱线宽度,该腔增强吸收光谱系统的有效吸收光程可达1460 km。

  16. Exploring the gas-phase spectroscopy of interstellar PAH and dust analogs: Astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biennier, Ludovic; Salama, Farid; Allamandola, Lou; Gupta, Manish; O'Keefe, Anthony; Scherer, James J.

    We present and discuss the gas-phase electronic absorption spectra of selected ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in the UV-Visible-NIR range in an astrophysically relevant environment. This type of measurements provides data on PAHs and nanometer-sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical spectra of the UV interstellar (IS) extinction curve and of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. This source combines a pulsed slit supersonic free jet expansion of argon seeded with PAHs (Salama, F., Allamandola, L. J. & Scherer, J. J., `Pulsed discharge nozzle cavity ringdown spectroscopy of cold PAH ions', J. Chem Phys.;in press) that have been pre-selected from Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy (MIS) studies. The absorption spectrum of the Pyrene cation (C16H10+) has also been measured. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of free, large carbon-containing molecules and ions in the gas phase. The electronic bands measured for this selection of PAH ions are all found to be intrinsically broad (>˜20 cm-1). The laboratory data are compared with recent astronomical spectra of large DIBs. Preliminary results also show that carbon nanoparticles (˜2 nm size) are formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma. This finding holds great potential for the spectroscopy of nanoparticles isolated in the gas-phase in an interstellar-like environment and for understanding the formation process of interstellar grains.

  17. Rotationally-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of the νb{16} Band of 1,3,5-TRIOXANE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Bradley M.; Koeppen, Nicole; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    1,3,5-trioxane is the simplest cyclic form of polyoxymethylene (POM), a class of formaldehyde polymers that has been proposed as the origin of distributed formaldehyde formation in comet comae and a potential source of formaldehyde in prebiotic chemistry. Although claimed POM detections have since been proven to be inconclusive, laboratory simulations of cometary conditions have yielded trioxane and other POMs While the microwave spectrum of 1,3,5-trioxane has been studied extensively, 4-7.}, to date only one rotationally-resolved ro-vibrational spectrum has been published. Here, we present our studies of the νb{16} band of gas-phase trioxane centered at 1177 wn. Trioxane was entrained in a supersonic expansion of argon and characterized by continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy using an etalon-stabilized external-cavity quantum cascade laser. Rotationally resolved spectra were obtained with less than 15 MHz resolution. Cottin, H., Bénilan, Y., Gazeau, M-C., and Raulin, F. Origin of Cometary Extended Sources from Degradation of Refractory Organics on Grains: Polyoxymethylene as Formaldehyde Parent Molecule. Icarus 167 (2004), 397-416. Oka, T., Tsuchiya, K., Iwata, S., and Morino, Y. Microwave Spectrum of s-Trioxane. Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn. 37 (1964), 4-7. Henninot, J-F., Bolvin, H., Demaison, J., and Lemoine, B. The Infrared Spectrum of Trioxane in a Supersonic Slit Jet. J. Mol. Spect. 152 (1992), 62-68. Gibson, B.M. and McCall, B.J., contribution TJ08, presented at the 69th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, Urbana, IL, USA, 2014.

  18. The Uncertainty Evaluation of Determining the Moisture in Gases by the Method of Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy%光腔衰荡光谱法测定气体中微痕量水不确定度评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周鑫; 周泽义

    2012-01-01

    介绍了基于光腔衰荡光谱法测定气体中的微量水的方法原理,该方法适用于含量为0.2×10-9 ~20×10-6 mol/mol的所有气体中水分的测定.建立了光谱分析法的原始数学模型,对测定方法的不确定度进行了评估,结果表明该方法的扩展不确定度为(8 ~20)×10-9 mol/mol(k =2,p =95%).%A new method for determining the moisture in gases by the cavity ring down spectroscopy is available to measure the concentration between 0. 2 × 10-9 mol/mol and 20 × 10 -6 mol/moL A mathematical model is established for the uncertainty evaluation,and the results of the expanded uncertaunties are in the range of (8 ~20) × 10-9mol/mol (k =2, p = 95%).

  19. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspiral, merger and ringdown

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aronsson, M; Aso, Y; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballinger, T; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M G; Belletoile, A; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Boccara, C; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Boyle, M; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Budzyński, R; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cain, J; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia`, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coulon, J -P; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Davis, A; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Devanka, P; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dueck, J; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Ely, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hall, P; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Krause, T; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kullman, J; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lang, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Lundgren, A D; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Mak, C; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D J A; Meadors, G; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menéndez, D F; Mercer, R A; Merill, L; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mino, Y; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreau, J; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Morioka, T; Mors, K; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Nash, T; Nawrodt, R; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; Oldenburg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Pardi, S; Pareja, M; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pathak, D; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Postiglione, F; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radke, T; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rolland, L; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Röver, C; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sakosky, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Santostasi, G; Saraf, S; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Satterthwaite, M; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Speirits, F C; Sperandio, L; Stein, A J; Stein, L C; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szokoly, G P; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thüring, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tseng, K; Turner, L; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vaishnav, B; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A E; Vinet, J -Y; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Wei, P; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Yvert, M; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2011-01-01

    We present the first modeled search for gravitational waves using the complete binary black hole gravitational waveform from inspiral through the merger and ringdown for binaries with negligible component spin. We searched approximately 2 years of LIGO data taken between November 2005 and September 2007 for systems with component masses of 1-99 solar masses and total masses of 25-100 solar masses. We did not detect any plausible gravitational-wave signals but we do place upper limits on the merger rate of binary black holes as a function of the component masses in this range. We constrain the rate of mergers for binary black hole systems with component masses between 19 and 28 solar masses and negligible spin to be no more than 2.0 per Mpc^3 per Myr at 90% confidence.

  20. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antonucci, F.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aronsson, M.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballinger, T.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Behnke, B.; Beker, M. G.; Belletoile, A.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birindelli, S.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Boccara, C.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Boyle, M.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Budzyński, R.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campagna, E.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chaibi, O.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Colacino, C. N.; Colas, J.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coulon, J.-P.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Davier, M.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Derosa, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Prete, M.; Dergachev, V.; de Rosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Fiore, L.; di Lieto, A.; di Palma, I.; di Paolo Emilio, M.; di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J.-C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Ely, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Flaminio, R.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garofoli, J. A.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Greverie, C.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hoyland, D.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Jaranowski, P.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.

    2011-06-01

    We present the first modeled search for gravitational waves using the complete binary black-hole gravitational waveform from inspiral through the merger and ringdown for binaries with negligible component spin. We searched approximately 2 years of LIGO data, taken between November 2005 and September 2007, for systems with component masses of 1-99M⊙ and total masses of 25-100M⊙. We did not detect any plausible gravitational-wave signals but we do place upper limits on the merger rate of binary black holes as a function of the component masses in this range. We constrain the rate of mergers for 19M⊙≤m1, m2≤28M⊙ binary black-hole systems with negligible spin to be no more than 2.0Mpc-3Myr-1 at 90% confidence.

  1. Possible Discovery of Nonlinear Tail and Quasinormal Modes in Black Hole Ringdown

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear evolution of black hole ringdown in the framework of higher-order metric perturbation theory. By solving the initial-value problem of a simplified nonlinear field model analytically as well as numerically, we find that (i) second-order quasinormal modes (QNMs) are indeed excited at frequencies different from those of first-order QNMs, as predicted recently. We also find serendipitously that (ii) late-time evolution is dominated by a new type of power-law tail. This ``second-order power-law tail'' decays more slowly than any late-time tails known in the first-order (i.e., linear) perturbation theory, and is generated at the wavefront of the first-order perturbation by an essentially nonlinear mechanism. These nonlinear components should be particularly significant for binary black hole coalescences, and could open a new precision science in gravitational wave studies.

  2. Evaluation of continuous water vapor δD and δ18O measurements by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, N.; Newman, B. D.; Araguas-Araguas, L. J.; Aggarwal, P.

    2012-08-01

    Recent commercially available laser spectroscopy systems enabled us to continuously and reliably measure the δD and δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. The use of this new technology is becoming popular because of its advantages over the conventional approach based on cold trap collection. These advantages include much higher temporal resolution/continuous monitoring and the ability to make direct measurements of both isotopes in the field. Here, we evaluate the accuracy and precision of the laser based water vapor isotope instrument through a comparison of measurements with those found using the conventional cold trap method. A commercially available water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA) with the vaporization system of a liquid water standard (Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source, WVISS) from Los Gatos Research (LGR) Inc. was used for this study. We found that the WVIA instrument can provide accurate results if (1) correction is applied for time-dependent isotope drift, (2) normalization to the VSMOW/SLAP scale is implemented, and (3) the water vapor concentration dependence of the isotopic ratio is also corrected. In addition, since the isotopic value of water vapor generated by the WVISS is also dependent on the concentration of water vapor, this effect must be considered to determine the true water vapor concentration effect on the resulting isotope measurement. To test our calibration procedure, continuous water vapor isotope measurements using both a laser instrument and a cold trap system were carried out at the IAEA Isotope Hydrology Laboratory in Vienna from August to December 2011. The calibrated isotopic values measured using the WVIA agree well with those obtained via the cold trap method. The standard deviation of the isotopic difference between both methods is about 1.4‰ for δD and 0.28‰ for δ18O. This precision allowed us to obtain reliable values for d-excess. The day-to-day variation of d-excess measured by WVIA also agrees well with that found

  3. Evaluation of continuous water vapor δD and δ18O measurements by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Araguas-Araguas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent commercially available laser spectroscopy systems enabled us to continuously and reliably measure the δD and δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. The use of this new technology is becoming popular because of its advantages over the conventional approach based on cold trap collection. These advantages include much higher temporal resolution/continuous monitoring and the ability to make direct measurements of both isotopes in the field. Here, we evaluate the accuracy and precision of the laser based water vapor isotope instrument through a comparison of measurements with those found using the conventional cold trap method. A commercially available water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA with the vaporization system of a liquid water standard (Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source, WVISS from Los Gatos Research (LGR Inc. was used for this study. We found that the WVIA instrument can provide accurate results if: (1 correction is applied for time-dependent isotope drift, (2 normalization to the VSMOW/SLAP scale is implemented, and (3 the water vapor concentration dependence of the isotopic ratio is also corrected. In addition, since the isotopic value of water vapor generated by the WVISS is also dependent on the concentration of water vapor, this effect must be considered to determine the true water vapor concentration effect on the resulting isotope measurement. To test our calibration procedure, continuous water vapor isotope measurements using both a laser instrument and a cold trap system were carried out at the IAEA Isotope Hydrology Laboratory in Vienna from August to December 2011. The calibrated isotopic values measured using the WVIA agree well with those obtained via the cold trap method. The standard deviation of the isotopic difference between both methods is about 1.4‰ for δD and 0.28‰ for δ18O. This precision allowed us to obtain reliable values for d-excess. The day-to-day variation of d-excess measured by WVIA also agrees well

  4. Evaluation of continuous water vapor δD and δ18O measurements by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Araguas-Araguas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent commercially available laser spectroscopy systems enabled us to continuously and reliably measure the δD and δ18O of atmospheric water vapor. The use of this new technology is becoming popular because of its advantages over the conventional approach based on cold trap collection. These advantages include much higher temporal resolution/continuous monitoring and the ability to make direct measurements of both isotopes in the field. Here, we evaluate the accuracy and precision of the laser based water vapor isotope instrument through a comparison of measurements with those found using the conventional cold trap method. A commercially available water vapor isotope analyzer (WVIA with the vaporization system of a liquid water standard (Water Vapor Isotope Standard Source, WVISS from Los Gatos Research (LGR Inc. was used for this study. We found that the WVIA instrument can provide accurate results if (1 correction is applied for time-dependent isotope drift, (2 normalization to the VSMOW/SLAP scale is implemented, and (3 the water vapor concentration dependence of the isotopic ratio is also corrected. In addition, since the isotopic value of water vapor generated by the WVISS is also dependent on the concentration of water vapor, this effect must be considered to determine the true water vapor concentration effect on the resulting isotope measurement. To test our calibration procedure, continuous water vapor isotope measurements using both a laser instrument and a cold trap system were carried out at the IAEA Isotope Hydrology Laboratory in Vienna from August to December 2011. The calibrated isotopic values measured using the WVIA agree well with those obtained via the cold trap method. The standard deviation of the isotopic difference between both methods is about 1.4‰ for δD and 0.28‰ for δ18O. This precision allowed us to obtain reliable values for d-excess. The day-to-day variation of d-excess measured by WVIA also agrees well

  5. A new method for continuous measurements of oceanic and atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2: performance of off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS coupled to non-dispersive infrared detection (NDIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Arévalo-Martínez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new system for continuous, highly-resolved oceanic and atmospheric measurements of N2O, CO and CO2 is described. The system is based upon off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS and a non-dispersive infrared analyzer (NDIR both coupled to a Weiss-type equilibrator. Performance of the combined setup was evaluated by testing its precision, accuracy, long-term stability, linearity and response time. Furthermore, the setup was tested during two oceanographic campaigns in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to explore its potential for autonomous deployment onboard voluntary observing ships (VOS. Improved equilibrator response times for N2O (2.5 min and CO (45 min were achieved in comparison to response times from similar chamber designs used by previous studies. High stability of the OA-ICOS analyzer was demonstrated by low optimal integration times of 2 and 4 min for N2O and CO respectively, as well as detection limits of −1/2. Results from a direct comparison of the method presented here and well-established discrete methods for oceanic N2O and CO2 measurements showed very good consistency. The favorable agreement between underway atmospheric N2O, CO and CO2 measurements and monthly means at Ascension Island (7.96° S 14.4° W further suggests a reliable operation of the underway setup in the field. The potential of the system as an improved platform for measurements of trace gases was explored by using continuous N2O and CO2 data to characterize the development of the seasonal equatorial upwelling in the Atlantic Ocean during two R/V Maria S. Merian cruises. A similar record of high-resolution CO measurements was simultaneously obtained offering for the first time the possibility of a comprehensive view on the distribution and emissions of these climate relevant gases on the area. The relatively simple underway N2O/CO/CO2 setup is suitable for long-term deployment on board of research and commercial vessels although

  6. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  7. Inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms of spinning, precessing black-hole binaries in the effective-one-body formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Yi; Taracchini, Andrea; Kidder, Lawrence E; Mroue, Abdul H; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Scheel, Mark A; Szilagyi, Bela

    2013-01-01

    We describe a general procedure to generate spinning, precessing waveforms that include inspiral, merger and ringdown stages in the effective-one-body (EOB) approach. The procedure uses a precessing frame in which precession-induced amplitude and phase modulations are minimized, and an inertial frame, aligned with the spin of the final black hole, in which we carry out the matching of the inspiral-plunge to merger-ringdown waveforms. As a first application, we build spinning, precessing EOB waveforms for the gravitational modes l=2 such that in the nonprecessing limit those waveforms agree with the EOB waveforms recently calibrated to numerical-relativity waveforms. Without recalibrating the EOB model, we then compare EOB and post-Newtonian precessing waveforms to two numerical-relativity waveforms produced by the Caltech-Cornell-CITA collaboration. The numerical waveforms are strongly precessing and have 35 and 65 gravitational-wave cycles. We find a remarkable agreement between EOB and numerical-relativity ...

  8. From black holes to their progenitors: A full population study in measuring black hole binary parameters from ringdown signals

    CERN Document Server

    Kamaretsos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    A perturbed black hole emits gravitational radiation, usually termed the ringdown signal, whose frequency and damping time depends on the mass and spin of the black hole. I investigate the case of a binary black hole merger resulting from two initially non-spinning black holes of various mass ratios, in quasi-circular orbits. The observed ringdown signal will be determined, among other things, by the black hole's spin-axis orientation with respect to Earth, its sky position and polarization angle - parameters which can take any values in a particular observation. I have carried out a statistical analysis of the effect of these variables, focusing on detection and measurement of the multimode ringdown signals using the reformulated European LISA mission, Next Gravitational-Wave Observatory, NGO, the third generation ground-based observatory, Einstein Telescope and the advanced era detector, aLIGO. To the extent possible I have discussed the effect of these results on plausible event rates, as well as astrophys...

  9. Investigations of a Coherently Driven Semiconductor Optical Cavity QED System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    wavelength range of interest, the wavelength blueshift be- tween room and low temperature is 17 nm. 2 PL measure- ments through the fiber taper are...from the cryostat and blueshifted through a digital etching process 50 and the steps are repeated. 1. Room temperature cavity mode spectroscopy Room...small cavity mode blueshift of 0.8 nm per cycle, and does not degrade the cavity Q for the devices studied Q=105 and the number of etch cycles in

  10. Dawn of Cavity Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Can-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Merging the progress of spintronics with the advancement in cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity polaritons, a new field of Cavity Spintronics is forming, which connects some of the most exciting modern physics, such as quantum information and quantum optics, with one of the oldest science on the earth, the magnetism.

  11. Ring-down gravity waves: How far wormhole observables can mimic those of a black hole?

    CERN Document Server

    Nandi, Kamal K; Yanbekov, Almir A; Shayakhmetov, Azat A

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that the recently detected ring-down gravity waveforms could be indicative only of the presence of light rings in a horizonless object, such as a surgical Schwarzschild wormhole, with the frequencies differing drastically from those of the horizon quasinormal mode frequencies $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$. While the possibility of such a horizonless alternative is novel by itself, we show by an appropriate example that the difference in frequencies need not be drastic. We shall consider here an analytic (as opposed to surgical) stable traversable Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole and show that observables such as the $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$, strong field Bozza lensing parameters and the accretion disk signatures of the Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole could actually be very close to those of a black hole (say, SgrA$^{\\ast }$ hosted by our galaxy) of the same mass. This situation indicates that the wormhole observables could remarkably mimic those of a black hole unless highly precise measurements distinguishing the...

  12. TIGER's tail: Testing the no-hair theorem with black hole ringdowns

    CERN Document Server

    Meidam, J; Broeck, C Van Den; Veitch, J; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2014-01-01

    The Einstein Telescope (ET), a proposed third-generation gravitational wave observatory, would enable tests of the no-hair theorem by looking at the characteristic frequencies and damping times of black hole ringdown signals. In previous work it was shown that with a single $500 - 1000\\,M_\\odot$ black hole at distance $\\lesssim 6$ Gpc (or redshift $z \\lesssim 1$), deviations of a few percent in the frequencies and damping times of dominant and sub-dominant modes would be within the range of detectability. Given that such sources may be relatively rare, it is of interest to see how well the no-hair theorem can be tested with events at much larger distances and with smaller signal-to-noise ratios, thus accessing a far bigger volume of space and a larger number of sources. We employ a model selection scheme called TIGER (Test Infrastructure for GEneral Relativity), which was originally developed to test general relativity with weak binary coalescence signals that will be seen in second-generation detectors such ...

  13. Inspiral, merger and ringdown of unequal mass black hole binaries: a multipolar analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, E; Cardoso, V; González, J A; Hannam, M; Husa, S; Sperhake, U; Berti, Emanuele; Bruegmann, Bernd; Cardoso, Vitor; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Hannam, Mark; Husa, Sascha; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study the inspiral, merger and ringdown of unequal mass black hole binaries by analyzing a catalogue of numerical simulations for seven different values of the mass ratio (from q=M2/M1=1 to q=4). We compare numerical and Post-Newtonian results by projecting the waveforms onto spin-weighted spherical harmonics, characterized by angular indices (l,m). We find that the Post-Newtonian equations predict remarkably well the relation between the wave amplitude and the orbital frequency for each (l,m), and that the convergence of the Post-Newtonian series to the numerical results is non-monotonic. To leading order the total energy emitted in the merger phase scales like eta^2 and the spin of the final black hole scales like eta, where eta=q/(1+q)^2 is the symmetric mass ratio. We study the multipolar distribution of the radiation, finding that odd-l multipoles are suppressed in the equal mass limit. Higher multipoles carry a larger fraction of the total energy as q increases. We introduce and compare three differe...

  14. Inspiral, merger and ring-down of equal-mass black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Buonanno, A; Pretorius, F; Buonanno, Alessandra; Cook, Gregory B.; Pretorius, Frans

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics and gravitational-wave (GW) emission in the binary merger of equal-mass black holes as obtained from numerical relativity simulations. Results from the evolution of three sets of initial data are explored in detail, corresponding to different initial separations of the black holes. We find that to a good approximation the inspiral phase of the evolution is quasi-circular, followed by a "blurred, quasi-circular plunge", then merger and ring down. We present first-order comparisons between analytical models of the various stages of the merger and the numerical results. We provide comparisons between the numerical results and analytical predictions based on the adiabatic Newtonain, post-Newtonian (PN), and non-adiabatic resummed-PN models. From the ring-down portion of the GW we extract the fundamental quasi-normal mode and several of the overtones. Finally, we estimate the optimal signal-to-noise ratio for typical binaries detectable by GW experiments.

  15. NO2 Analyzer for Miniature Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to employ incoherent Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (iCRDS) to develop a...

  16. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  17. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  18. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  19. Complete Measurement of Stable Isotopes in N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O) Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in water is a worldwide environmental problem and source apportionment is critical to managing nitrate pollution. Fractionation caused by physical, chemical and biological processes alters the isotope ratios of nitrates (15N/14N, 18O/16O and 17O/16O) and biochemical nitrification and denitrification impart different intramolecular site preference (15N14NO vs. 14N15NO). Additionally, atmospheric nitrate is anomalously enriched in 17O compared to other nitrate sources. The anomaly (Δ17O) is conserved during fractionation processes, providing a tracer of atmospheric nitrate. All of these effects can be used to apportion nitrate in soil. Current technology for measuring nitrate isotopes is complicated and costly - it involves conversion of nitrate to nitrous oxide (N2O), purification, preconcentration and measurement by isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Site specific measurements require a custom IRMS. There is a pressing need to make this measurement simpler and more accessible. Los Gatos Research has developed a next generation mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to quantify all stable isotope ratios of N2O (δ15N, δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ18O, δ17O). We present the latest performance data demonstrating the precision and accuracy of the OA-ICOS based measurement. At an N2O concentration of 322 ppb, the analyzer quantifies [N2O], δ15N, δ15Na, δ15Nb, and δ18O with a precision of ±0.05 ppb, ±0.4 ‰, ±0.45 ‰, and ±0.6 ‰, and ±0.8 ‰ respectively (1σ, 100s; 1σ, 1000s for δ18O). Measurements of gas standards demonstrate accuracy better than ±1 ‰ for isotope ratios over a wide dynamic range (200 - 100,000 ppb). The measurement of δ17O requires a higher concentration (1 - 50 ppm), easily obtainable through conversion of nitrates in water. For 10 ppm of N2O, the instrument achieves a δ17O precision of ±0.05 ‰ (1σ, 1000s). This performance is sufficient to quantify atmospheric

  20. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  1. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  2. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  3. Energy Levels of Coupled Plasmonic Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Pu Liu; Xin-Li Zhu; Jia-Sen Zhang; Jun Xu; Yamin Leprince-Wang; Da-Peng Yu

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the hybridization of the plasmonic modes in directly coupled whispering gallery cavities fabricated on silver films and present the mode patterns and energy levels using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy.Although the energy of the most antisymmetrically coupled modes is higher than that of the corresponding symmetrically coupled ones,the contrary cases happen for small quantum number modes.We attribute the phenomenon to the different surface plasmon polariton paths between the symmetrically and antisymmetrically coupled modes.These results provide an understanding of the resonant properties in coupled plasmonic cavities,which have potential applications in nanophotonic devices.

  4. 2OH Overtone Spectroscopy of Water-Containing Van Der Waals Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfleteren, Thomas; Földes, Tomas; Herman, Michel; Liévin, Jacques; Loreau, Jérome; Coudert, L. H.

    2016-06-01

    We have used continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy to record part of the 2OH excitation range in an Ar/Kr supersonic expansion seeded with H_2O. Various bands were observed, and are being rotationally analyzed, of Ar-H_2O and Kr-H_2O. The analysis of experimental linewidths allowed us to determine the mean upper state predissociation lifetime to be 3 ns for Ar-H_2O and 4 ns for Kr-H_2O. In this talk, the latest results concerning Ar-H_2O will be presented. Several bands were identified and analyzed, highlighting some strong perturbations. The assignment of the many bands, as well as the perturbation processes, is complicated and is still in progress. The results of the analysis will be presented along with the perturbing effects of the dark states. Identification of these will be attempted using a multidimensional approach, based on the intramolecular potential energy surface of water monomer and on the intermolecular potential energy surface of the complex, allowing us to evaluate the rovibrational energy levels of H_2O perturbed by the argon atom. Although several such intermolecular potentials are already available, like those reported by Makarewicz and by Hou et al., none of them can be used in the present investigation as they were designed for vibrational states of the water monomer below the (101) state, involved in the present spectra. A 6D intermolecular potential energy surface is currently being computed through ab initio calculations to deal with high lying states of the water monomer like the (101) state. With the help of this new surface and of the multidimensional approach, we are hoping to assign the bright and the dark states of the complex, near 7 500 cm-1, involved in the present spectra. H. Partridge and D. W. Schwenke, J. Chem. Phys. 106 (1997) 4618. J. Makarewicz, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 184310.

  5. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Benacquista, M; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Donath, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dossa, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Goggin, L M; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hooper, S; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, N G; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kremin, A; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C -H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Litvine, V; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Luijten, E; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; 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Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Verma, S S; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yang, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass $50 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 450$ and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass $100 \\le M/\\mathrm{M}_\\odot \\le 150$, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of $6.9\\times10^{-8}\\,$Mpc$^{-3}$yr$^{-1}$. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs,...

  6. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Bustillo, J. Calderón; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corpuz, A.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Donath, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dossa, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Goggin, L. M.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hooper, S.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.

    2014-05-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency 50≤f0/Hz≤2000 and decay timescale 0.0001≲τ/s≲0.1 characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass 50≤M/M⊙≤450 and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass 100≤M/M⊙≤150, we report a 90% confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with nonspinning and equal mass components of 6.9×10-8 Mpc-3 yr-1. We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, ℓ=m =2, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  7. Search for Gravitational Wave Ringdowns from Perturbed Intermediate Mass Black Holes in LIGO-Virgo Data from 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency 50 less than or equal to italic f0/Hz less than or equal to 2000 and decay timescale 0.0001 approximately less than t/s approximately less than 0.1 characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass 50 less than or equal to M/solar mass less than or equal to 450 and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass 100 less than or equal to M/solar mass 150, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of 6:9 x 10(exp 8) Mpc(exp -3)yr(exp -1). We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, l=m=2, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  8. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  9. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  10. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  11. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  12. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  13. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  14. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  15. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  16. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  17. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  18. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  19. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  20. Cavity-enhanced Raman Microscopy of Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hümmer, Thomas; Hofmann, Matthias S; Hänsch, Theodor W; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information, and combined with imaging provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here we use a tunable high-finesse optical microcavity to demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in combination with high-resolution scanning-cavity imaging. We detect cavity-enhanced Raman spectra of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes, expand the technique to hyperspectral imaging, and co-localize measurements with cavity-enhanced absorption microscopy. Direct comparison with confocal Raman microscopy yields a 550-times enhanced collectable Raman scattering spectral density and a 11-fold enhancement of the integrated count rate. The quantitative character, the inherent spectral filtering, and the absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering renders our technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman tran...

  1. Template-space metric for searches for gravitational waves from the inspiral, merger and ringdown of binary black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaghatgi, Chinmay; Arun, K G

    2015-01-01

    Searches for gravitational waves (GWs) from binary black holes using interferometric GW detectors require the construction of template banks for performing matched filtering while analyzing the data. Placement of templates over the parameter space of binaries, as well as coincidence tests of GW triggers from multiple detectors make use of the definition of a metric over the space of gravitational waveforms. Although recent searches have employed waveform templates coherently describing the inspiral, merger and ringdown (IMR) of the coalescence, the metric used in the template banks and coincidence tests was derived from post-Newtonian inspiral waveforms. In this paper, we compute the template-space metric of the IMR waveform family IMRPhenomB over the parameter space of masses and the effective spin parameter. We also propose a coordinate system, which is a modified version of post-Newtonian chirp time coordinates, in which the metric is slowly varying over the parameter space. The match function analytically...

  2. Decreased vibrational susceptibility of Fabry-Perot cavities via designs of geometry and structural support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Tao; Li Wen-Bo; Zang Er-Jun; Chen Li-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Ultra-stable optical cavities are widely used for laser frequency stabilization. In these experiments the laser performance relies on the length stability of the Fabry-Perot cavities. Vibration-induced deformation is one of the dominant factors that affect the stability of ultra-stable optical cavities. We have quantitatively analysed the elastic deformation of Fabry-Perot cavities with various shapes and mounting configurations. Our numerical result facilitates a novel approach for the design of ultra-stable cavities that are insensitive to vibrational perturbations. This approach can be applied to many experiments such as laser frequency stabilization, high-precision laser spectroscopy, and optical frequency standards.

  3. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  4. Light extinction by secondary organic aerosol: an intercomparison of three broadband cavity spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, R. M.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Ruth, A. A.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Thieser, J.; Wahner, A.; Venables, D. S.

    2013-11-01

    Broadband optical cavity spectrometers are maturing as a technology for trace-gas detection, but only recently have they been used to retrieve the extinction coefficient of aerosols. Sensitive broadband extinction measurements allow explicit separation of gas and particle phase spectral contributions, as well as continuous spectral measurements of aerosol extinction in favourable cases. In this work, we report an intercomparison study of the aerosol extinction coefficients measured by three such instruments: a broadband cavity ring-down spectrometer (BBCRDS), a cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectrometer (CE-DOAS), and an incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (IBBCEAS). Experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR atmospheric simulation chamber as part of the NO3Comp campaign to compare the measurement capabilities of NO3 and N2O5 instrumentation. Aerosol extinction coefficients between 655 and 690 nm are reported for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed by the NO3 oxidation of β-pinene under dry and humid conditions. Despite different measurement approaches and spectral analysis procedures, the three instruments retrieved aerosol extinction coefficients that were in close agreement. The refractive index of SOA formed from the β-pinene + NO3 reaction was 1.61, and was not measurably affected by the chamber humidity or by aging of the aerosol over several hours. This refractive index is significantly larger than SOA refractive indices observed in other studies of OH and ozone-initiated terpene oxidations, and may be caused by the large proportion of organic nitrates in the particle phase. In an experiment involving ammonium sulfate particles, the aerosol extinction coefficients as measured by IBBCEAS were found to be in reasonable agreement with those calculated using the Mie theory. The results of the study demonstrate the potential of broadband cavity spectrometers for determining the optical properties of aerosols.

  5. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  7. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  8. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index...

  9. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  10. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  11. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  12. Finemet cavity impedance studies

    CERN Document Server

    Persichelli, S; Migliorati, M; Salvant, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the impedance of the Finemet kicker cavity to be installed in the PS straight section 02 during LS1, under realistic assumptions of bunch length. Time domain simulations with CST Particle Studio have been performed in order to get the impedance of the cavity and make a comparison with the longitudinal impedance measured for a single cell prototype. The study has been performed on simplified 3D geometries imported from a mechanical CATIA drawing, assuming that the simplications have small impact on the nal results. Simulations confirmed that the longitudinal impedance observed with measurements can be excited by bunches circulating in the PS. In the six-cells Finemet cavity, PS bunches circulating in the center can excite a longitudinal impedance, the real part of which has a maximum of 2 kOhm at 4 MHz. This mode does not seem to have any transverse component. All the eigenmodes of the cavity are strongly damped by the Finemet rings: we predict to have no issues regarding tr...

  13. Statistical electromagnetics: Complex cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2008-01-01

    A selection of the literature on the statistical description of electromagnetic fields and complex cavities is concisely reviewed. Some essential concepts, for example, the application of the central limit theorem and the maximum entropy principle, are scrutinized. Implicit assumptions, biased choic

  14. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  15. Teleportation of Cavity Field States via Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss two schemes of teleportation of cavity field states. In the first scheme we consider cavities prepared in a coherent state and in the second scheme we consider cavities prepared in a superposition of zero and one Fock states.

  16. Quantum Dot-Photonic Crystal Cavity QED Based Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Physical Review A, 2012] 3. Study of the off-resonant quantum dot-cavity coupling in solid-state cavity QED system, and the phonon mediated off...resonant interaction between two quantum dots [Majumdar et al., Physical Review B , 2012] 4. Coherent optical spectroscopy of a single quantum dot via an off...Resonant cavity - much simpler than in conventional approaches [Majumdar et al, Physical Review B, 2011; Papageorge et al., New. Journal of Physics

  17. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of fluid inclusions in speleothems using laser absorption spectroscopy: Application to stalagmites from Borneo and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, Stéphane; Fleitmann, Dominik; Nele Meckler, Anna; Leuenberger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Speleothems are recognised as key continental archives for paleoclimate reconstructions. They contain fluid inclusions representing past drip water trapped in the calcite structure. Speleothem can be precisely dated and therefore the oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δD) isotopes of fluid inclusions constitute powerful proxies for paleotemperature or to investigate changes in the moisture source over several interglacial-glacial cycles. To liberate fluid inclusion water and to analyse its isotopic composition, a new online extraction method developed at Bern is used. The principle can be summarised as follows: Prior to crushing, the sample is placed into a copper tube, fixed to the line previously heated to 140° C and flushed with a nitrogen and standard water mixture. Thereafter, the speleothem sample is crushed using a simple hydraulic crushing device and the released water from fluid inclusions is transferred by the nitrogen-standard water mixture flow to a Picarro L1102-i isotopic liquid water and water vapor analyser. The measuring principle is based on wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) technology that allows us to simultaneously monitor hydrogen and oxygen isotopes. Reproducibility of standard water measurements is typically better than 1.5 o for δD and 0.4 o for δ18O. With this method, we successfully analysed δD and δ18O isotopic composition of a stalagmite from Northern Borneo (tropical West Pacific) covering almost two glacial-interglacial cycles from MIS 12 to early MIS 9 (460-330 ka) as well as recent samples from Switzerland and Borneo. These results are used in combination with calcite δ18O to reconstruct paleotemperature. Currently, we are measuring a stalagmite from Milandre cave (Jura, Switzerland) covering the Bølling-Allerød, Younger Dryas cold phase and the Holocene.

  18. External cavity diode laser around 657 nm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desheng Lǖ (吕德胜); Kaikai Huang (黄凯凯); Fengzhi Wang (王凤芝); DonghaiYang (杨东海)

    2003-01-01

    Operating a laser diode in an external cavity, which provides frequency-selective feedback, is a very effective method to tune the laser frequency to a range far from its free running frequency. For the Ca atomic Ramsey spectroscopy experiment, we have constructed a 657-nm laser system based on the LittmanMetcalf configuration with a 660-nm commercial laser diode. Continuously 10-GHz tuning range was achieved with about 100-kHz spectral linewidth, measured with beat-note spectrum of two identical laser systems.

  19. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  20. Access cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  1. Perturbed black holes in Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity: Stability, ringdown, and gravitational-wave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis; Macedo, Caio F. B.; Cardoso, Vitor; Ferrari, Valeria; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Khoo, Fech Scen; Kunz, Jutta; Pani, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational waves emitted by distorted black holes—such as those arising from the coalescence of two neutron stars or black holes—carry not only information about the corresponding spacetime but also about the underlying theory of gravity. Although general relativity remains the simplest, most elegant, and viable theory of gravitation, there are generic and robust arguments indicating that it is not the ultimate description of the gravitational universe. Here, we focus on a particularly appealing extension of general relativity, which corrects Einstein's theory through the addition of terms which are second order in curvature: the topological Gauss-Bonnet invariant coupled to a dilaton. We study gravitational-wave emission from black holes in this theory and (i) find strong evidence that black holes are linearly (mode) stable against both axial and polar perturbations, (ii) discuss how the quasinormal modes of black holes can be excited during collisions involving black holes, and finally (iii) show that future ringdown detections with a large signal-to-noise ratio would improve current constraints on the coupling parameter of the theory.

  2. Measuring gravitational waves from binary black hole coalescences; 1, Signal to noise for inspiral, merger, and ringdown

    CERN Document Server

    Flanagan, E E; Flanagan, Eanna E.; Hughes, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    We estimate the expected signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from the three phases (inspiral,merger,ringdown) of coalescing binary black holes (BBHs) for initial and advanced ground-based interferometers (LIGO/VIRGO) and for space-based interferometers (LISA). LIGO/VIRGO can do moderate SNR (a few tens), moderate accuracy studies of BBH coalescences in the mass range of a few to about 2000 solar masses; LISA can do high SNR (of order 10^4) high accuracy studies in the mass range of about 10^5 to 10^8 solar masses. BBHs might well be the first sources detected by LIGO/VIRGO: they are visible to much larger distances(up to 500 Mpc by initial interferometers) than coalescing neutron star binaries (heretofore regarded as the "bread and butter" workhorse source for LIGO/VIRGO, visible to about 30 Mpc by initial interferometers). Low-mass BBHs (up to 50 solar masses for initial LIGO interferometers; 100 for advanced; 10^6 for LISA) are best searched for via their well-understood inspiral waves; higher mass BBHs must be s...

  3. Cavity QED by the Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, H. J.; Boca, A.; Boozer, A. D.; Bowen, W. P.; Buck, J. R.; Chou, C. W.; Duan, L.-M.; Kuzmich, A.; McKeever, J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations of cooling and trapping of N = 1,2,3,... atoms inside a small optical cavity are described. The atom-cavity system operates in a regime of strong coupling for which single photons are sufficient to saturate the atomic response. New theoretical protocols for the efficient engineering of multi-atom entanglement within the setting of cavity QED are described. By trapping a single atom within the cavity mode, a one-atom laser is experimentally realized in a regime of strong coupling. Beyond the setting of cavity QED, quantum correlations have been observed for photon pairs emitted from an atomic ensemble and with a programmable time offset.

  4. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  5. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  6. 非相干光宽带腔增强吸收光谱技术应用于SO2弱吸收的测量%An Incoherent Broadband Optical Cavity Spectroscopy for Measuring Weak Absorption Cross Section of Sulfur Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段俊; 秦敏; 方武; 胡仁志; 卢雪; 沈兰兰; 王丹; 谢品华; 刘建国

    2016-01-01

    As a highly sensitive detection technology ,incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) have successfully measured a variety of trace gases .According to the principle of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy ,if the accurate concentration of the target gas ,the curve of the mirror reflectance ,effective absorption path length ,the light intensity of the absorbing gas and non-absorbing gas are known ,the absorption cross section of the absorption gas can be measured .The accurate measurements of absorption cross section are necessary for satellite retrievals of atmospheric trace gases and the atmos-pheric research .This paper describes an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) instrument with 365 nm LED as the light source for measuring absorption cross section of SO2 from 357 to 385 nm which is arising from the spin-forbidden a3 B1 — X1 A1 transition .In comparison to the literature absorption cross section of SO 2 ,and correlation coeffi-cient r is 0.997 3 .The result shows the potential of the IBBCEAS system for measuring weak absorption cross section .%非相干光宽带腔增强吸收光谱作为高灵敏检测技术 ,已成功应用于多种大气痕量气体浓度的测量.根据腔增强吸收光谱技术测量原理可知 ,若已知测量气体准确浓度 ,镜片反射率随波长的变化曲线、有效吸收长度、光学腔内有无测量气体吸收前后的光辐射变化 ,可测量出待测气体的吸收截面.SO2 由于 a 3 B1 —X1 A1 自旋禁阻跃迁 ,在345~420 nm波段吸收截面较低(~10-22 cm2/molecule) ,其测量有一定难度 ,而准确的弱吸收截面对于卫星反演大气痕量气体浓度以及大气研究等方面均有重要意义.采用365 nm L ED光源的宽带腔增强吸收光谱实验装置测量357~385 nm波段范围SO2 的弱吸收 ,获得该波段SO2 弱吸收截面 ,并与已公开发表的SO2 吸收截面进行对比 ,相关系数 r为0. 997 3 ,验证

  7. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  8. Cavity Optomechanical Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Forstner, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2011-01-01

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated where the magnetic field induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator. The resulting motion is read out optically with ultra-high sensitivity. Detecting the magnetostrictive deformation of Terfenol-D with a toroidal whispering gallery mode (TWGM) resonator a peak sensitivity of 400 nT/Hz^.5 was achieved with theoretical modelling predicting that sensitivities of up to 500 fT/Hz^.5 may be possible. This chip-based magnetometer combines high-sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  9. Cavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, S; Prams, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2012-03-23

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated. The magnetic-field-induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is resonantly transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator and read out optically with ultrahigh sensitivity. A peak magnetic field sensitivity of 400  nT  Hz(-1/2) is achieved, with theoretical modeling predicting the possibility of sensitivities below 1  pT  Hz(-1/2). This chip-based magnetometer combines high sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  10. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Michael [Booz Allen Hamilton, 3811 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  11. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  12. Estimating parameters of binary black holes from gravitational-wave observations of their inspiral, merger, and ringdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Archisman; Del Pozzo, Walter; Ajith, Parameswaran

    2016-11-01

    We characterize the expected statistical errors with which the parameters of black hole binaries can be measured from gravitational-wave (GW) observations of their inspiral, merger, and ringdown by a network of second-generation ground-based GW observatories. We simulate a population of black hole binaries with uniform distribution of component masses in the interval (3 ,80 )M⊙, distributed uniformly in comoving volume, with isotropic orientations. From signals producing signal-to-noise ratio ≥5 in at least two detectors, we estimate the posterior distributions of the binary parameters using the Bayesian parameter estimation code LALInference. The GW signals will be redshifted due to the cosmological expansion, and we measure only the "redshifted" masses. By assuming a cosmology, it is possible to estimate the gravitational masses by inferring the redshift from the measured posterior of the luminosity distance. We find that the measurement of the gravitational masses will be, in general, dominated by the error in measuring the luminosity distance. In spite of this, the component masses of more than 50% of the population can be measured with accuracy better than ˜25 % using the Advanced LIGO-Virgo network. Additionally, the mass of the final black hole can be measured with median accuracy ˜18 %. Spin of the final black hole can be measured with median accuracy ˜5 %(17 %) for binaries with nonspinning (aligned-spin) black holes. Additional detectors in Japan and India significantly improve the accuracy of sky localization, and moderately improve the estimation of luminosity distance, and hence, that of all mass parameters. We discuss the implication of these results on the observational evidence of intermediate-mass black holes and the estimation of cosmological parameters using GW observations.

  13. JLEIC SRF cavity RF Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The initial design of a low higher order modes (HOM) impedance superconducting RF (SRF) cavity is presented in this paper. The design of this SRF cavity is for the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC). The electron ring of JLEIC will operate with electrons of 3 to 10 GeV energy. The ion ring of JLEIC will operate with protons of up to 100 GeV energy. The bunch lengths in both rings are ~12 mm (RMS). In order to maintain the short bunch length in the ion ring, SRF cavities are adopted to provide large enough gradient. In the first phase of JLEIC, the PEP II RF cavities will be reused in the electron ring to lower the initial cost. The frequency of the SRF cavities is chosen to be the second harmonic of PEP II cavities, 952.6 MHz. In the second phase of JLEIC, the same frequency SRF cavities may replace the normal conducting PEP II cavities to achieve higher luminosity at high energy. At low energies, the synchro-tron radiation damping effect is quite weak, to avoid the coupled bunch instability caused by the intense closely-spaced electron bunches, low HOM impedance of the SRF cavities combined with longitudinal feedback sys-tem will be necessary.

  14. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  15. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  16. Optical control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Arijit; Sawant, Rahul V; Sheikholeslami, G; Budker, D; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the manipulation of transmitted light through an optical Fabry-Perot cavity, built around a spectroscopy cell containing enriched rubidium vapor. Light resonant with the $^{87}$Rb D$_{2}$ ($F=2/F=1$) $\\leftrightarrow F'$ manifold, is controlled by transverse intersection of the cavity mode by another resonant light beam. The cavity transmission can be suppressed or enhanced depending on the coupling of atomic states due to the intersecting beams. The extreme manifestation of cavity mode control is the precipitious destruction (negative logic switching) or buildup (positive logic switching) of the transmitted light intensity, on intersection of the transverse control beam with the cavity mode. Both the steady state and transient response are experimentally investigated. The mechanism behind the change in cavity transmission is discussed in brief.

  17. A Scanning Cavity Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Mader, Matthias; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1700-fold signal enhancement compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity below 1 nm2, we show a method to improve spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for opt...

  18. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  19. Frequency Tuning for a DQW Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Leuxe, Raphael; Skaritka, John; Wu, Qiong; Xiao, Binping; Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The nominal operating frequency for the HL-LHC crab cavities is 400.79 MHz within a bandwidth of ±60kHz. Attaining the required cavity tune implies a good understanding of all the processes that influence the cavity frequency from the moment when the cavity parts are being fabricated until the cavity is installed and under operation. Different tuning options will be available for the DQW crab cavity of LHC. This paper details the different steps in the cavity fabrication and preparation that may introduce a shift in the cavity frequency and introduces the different tuning methods foreseen to bring the cavity frequency to meet the specifications.

  20. LEP radio-frequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    One of the copper radio-frequency accelerating cavities installed for the first phase of LEP (1989-1995). Bunches of electrons and positrons circulated in LEP in opposite directions and were accelerated in eight different sets of 16 cavities (situated on either side of the four experiments), gaining 400 million volts of accelerating power per turn.

  1. Single and Coupled Nanobeam Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Shyroki, Dzmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    for analysis and design of photonic crystal devices, such as 2D ring resonators for filters, single and coupled nanobeam cavities, birefringence in photonic crystal cavities, threshold analysis in photonic crystal lasers, gap solitons in photonic crystals, novel photonic atolls, dynamic characteristics...

  2. Quantum entanglement purification in cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, J L; Saavedra, C; Retamal, J C

    2002-01-01

    A physical implementation of an entanglement purification protocol is studied using a cavity quantum electrodynamic based proposal, where, the quantum information is stored in quantum field sates inside cavities. Also a procedure is given for quantifying the degree of entanglement between quantum fields. (Author)

  3. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  4. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  5. Cavity-Enhanced Gas Analyzer for In-Situ Sampling of Biogenic Gases and Their Isotopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project concerns the novel application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy to quantify biogenic gases (CH4,...

  6. New developed cylindrical TM010 mode EPR cavity for X-band in vivo tooth dosimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Junwang

    Full Text Available EPR tooth in vivo dosimetry is an attractive approach for initial triage after unexpected nuclear events. An X-band cylindrical TM010 mode resonant cavity was developed for in vivo tooth dosimetry and used in EPR applications for the first time. The cavity had a trapezoidal measuring aperture at the exact position of the cavity's cylindrical wall where strong microwave magnetic field H1 concentrated and weak microwave electric field E1 distributed. Theoretical calculations and simulations were used to design and optimize the cavity parameters. The cavity features were evaluated by measuring DPPH sample, intact incisor samples embed in a gum model and the rhesus monkey teeth. The results showed that the cavity worked at designed frequency and had the ability to make EPR spectroscopy in relative high sensitivity. Sufficient modulation amplitude and microwave power could be applied into the aperture. Radiation induced EPR signal could be observed remarkably from 1 Gy irradiated intact incisor within only 30 seconds, which was among the best in scan time and detection limit. The in vivo spectroscopy was also realized by acquiring the radiation induced EPR signal from teeth of rhesus monkey whose teeth was irradiated by dose of 2 Gy. The results suggested that the cavity was sensitive to meet the demand to assess doses of significant level in short time. This cavity provided a very potential option for the development of X-band in vivo dosimetry.

  7. Development of a cavity enhanced aerosol albedometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a cavity enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS approach and an integrating sphere (IS for simultaneous in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients in the exact same sample volume. The cavity enhanced albedometer employed a blue light-emitting diode (LED based IBBCEAS approach for the measurement of wavelength-resolved aerosol optical extinction over the spectral range of 445–480 nm. An integrating sphere nephelometer coupled to the IBBCEAS setup was used for the measurement of aerosol scattering. The scattering signal was measured with a single channel photomultiplier tube (PMT, providing an integrated value over a narrow bandwidth (FWHM ~ 9 nm in the spectral region of 465–474 nm. A scattering coefficient at a wavelength of 470 nm was deduced as an averaged scattering value and used for data analysis and instrumental performance comparison. Performance evaluation of the albedometer was carried out using laboratory-generated particles and ambient aerosol. The scattering and extinction measurements of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL spheres generated in laboratory proved excellent correlation between two channels of the albedometer. The retrieved refractive index (RI from the measured scattering and extinction efficiencies agreed well with the values reported in previously published papers. Aerosol light scattering and extinction coefficients, single scattering albedo (SSA and NO2 concentrations in an ambient sample were directly and simultaneously measured using the developed albedometer. The developed instrument was validated via an intercomparison of the measured aerosol scattering coefficient and NO2 trace concentration against a TSI 3563 integrating nephelometer and a chemiluminescence detector, respectively.

  8. Pulse shape control in a dual cavity laser: numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashkir, Yuri

    2006-04-01

    We present a numerical model of the laser system for generating a special shape of the pulse: a steep peak at the beginning followed by a long pulse tail. Laser pulses of this nature are required for various applications (laser material processing, optical breakdown spectroscopy, etc.). The laser system consists of two "overlapped" cavities with different round-trip times. The laser crystal, the Q-switching element, the back mirror, and the output coupler are shared. A shorter pulse is generated in a short cavity. A small fraction of this pulse is injected into the long cavity as a seed. It triggers generation of the longer pulse. The output emission from this hybrid laser produces a required pulse shape. Parameters of the laser pulse (ratios of durations and energies of short- and long- pulse components) can be controlled through cavity length and the output coupler reflection. Modelling of the laser system is based on a set of coupled rate equations for dynamic variables of the system: the inverse population in an active laser media and photon densities in coupled cavities. Numerical experiments were provided with typical parameters of a Nd:YAG laser to study the system behaviour for different combinations of parameters.

  9. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-01-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  10. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  11. Vibration insensitive optical ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Jin; Jiang Yan-Yi; Fang Su; Bi Zhi-Yi; Ma Long-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The mounting configuration of an optical ring cavity is optimized for vibration insensitivity by finite element analysis. A minimum response to vertical accelerations is found by simulations made for different supporting positions.

  12. Imaging of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesa, Indu Rekha; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is a challenging area in head and neck imaging because of its complex anatomy and the numerous pathophysiologies that involve its contents. This challenge is further compounded by the ubiquitous artifacts that arise from the dental amalgam, which compromise image quality. In this article, the anatomy of the oral cavity is discussed in brief, followed by a description of the imaging technique and some common pathologic abnormalities.

  13. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  14. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  15. Miniaturization of Airborne Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy Instrument Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New measurement technologies are required to support science campaigns to better quantify rapid changes in the Earth atmosphere system. A key factor in this...

  16. Polishing Difficult-To-Reach Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1990-01-01

    Springy abrasive tool used to finish surfaces of narrow cavities made by electrical-discharge machining. Robot arm moves vibrator around perimeters of cavities, polishing walls of cavities as it does so. Tool needed because such cavities inaccessible or at least difficult to reach with most surface-finishing tools.

  17. 3D cavity detection technique and its application based on cavity auto scanning laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ling; LI Xi-bing; LI Fa-ben; ZHAO Guo-yan; QIN Yu-hui

    2008-01-01

    Ground constructions and mines are severely threatened by underground cavities especially those unsafe or inaccessible ones. Safe and precise cavity detection is vital for reasonable cavity evaluation and disposal. The conventional cavity detection methods and their limitation were analyzed. Those methods cannot form 3D model of underground cavity which is used for instructing the cavity disposal; and their precisions in detection are always greatly affected by the geological circumstance. The importance of 3D cavity detection in metal mine for safe exploitation was pointed out; and the 3D cavity laser detection method and its principle were introduced. A cavity auto scanning laser system was recommended to actualize the cavity 3D detection after comparing with the other laser detection systems. Four boreholes were chosen to verify the validity of the cavity auto scanning laser system. The results show that the cavity auto scanning laser system is very suitable for underground 3D cavity detection, especially for those inaccessible ones.

  18. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  19. Search for Gravitational Waves from Binary Black Hole Inspiral, Merger and Ringdown in LIGO-Virgo Data from 2009-2010

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorsher, S; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Farr, B F; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufman, K; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kurdyumov, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Langley, A; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Roux, A Le; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Lhuillier, V; Li, J; Li, T G F; Lindquist, P E; Litvine, V; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Logue, J; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M; Lueck, H; Lundgren, A P; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marka, S; Marka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menendez, D F; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mori, T; Morriss, S R; Mosca, S; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Mueller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nash, T; Naticchioni, L; Necula, V; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nishizawa, A; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Oldenberg, R G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Paoletti, R; Papa, M A; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pihlaja, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Poeld, J; Postiglione, F; Poux, C; Prato, M; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Racz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Rankins, B; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, M; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, C; Rodruck, M; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosinska, D; Roever, C; Rowan, S; Ruediger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santamaria, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Santostasi, G; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R L; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G R; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Speirits, F C; Sperandio, L; Stefszky, M; Steinert, E; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S E; Stroeer, A S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Szeifert, G; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; ter Braack, A P M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thuering, A; Titsler, C; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Ugolini, D; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasuth, M; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicere, A; Villar, A E; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A; Wade, L; Wade, M; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wan, Y; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, L; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, K; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrozny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a search for gravitational waves from the inspiral, merger and ringdown of binary black holes (BBH) with total mass between 25 and 100 solar masses, in data taken at the LIGO and Virgo observatories between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010. The maximum sensitive distance of the detectors over this period for a (20,20) Msun coalescence was 300 Mpc. No gravitational wave signals were found. We thus report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of BBH as a function of the component masses for non-spinning components, and also evaluate the dependence of the search sensitivity on component spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum. We find an upper limit at 90% confidence on the coalescence rate of BBH with non-spinning components of mass between 19 and 28 Msun of 3.3 \\times 10^-7 mergers /Mpc^3 /yr.

  20. Search for gravitational waves from binary black hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown in LIGO-Virgo data from 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Paolo Emilio, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.

    2013-01-01

    We report a search for gravitational waves from the inspiral, merger and ringdown of binary black holes (BBH) with total mass between 25 and 100 solar masses, in data taken at the LIGO and Virgo observatories between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010. The maximum sensitive distance of the detectors over this period for a (20,20)M⊙ coalescence was 300 Mpc. No gravitational wave signals were found. We thus report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of BBH as a function of the component masses for nonspinning components, and also evaluate the dependence of the search sensitivity on component spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum. We find an upper limit at 90% confidence on the coalescence rate of BBH with nonspinning components of mass between 19 and 28M⊙ of 3.3×10-7 mergers Mpc-3yr-1.

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...

  2. Cavity as a source of conformational fluctuation and high-energy state: High-pressure NMR study of a cavity-enlarged mutant of T4 lysozyme

    CERN Document Server

    Maeno, Akihiro; Hirata, Fumio; Otten, Renee; Dahlquist, Frederick W; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Akasaka, Kazuyuki; Mulder, Frans A A; Kitahara, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Although the structure, function, conformational dynamics, and controlled thermodynamics of proteins are manifested by their corresponding amino acid sequences, the natural rules for molecular design and their corresponding interplay remain obscure. In this study, we focused on the role of internal cavities of proteins in conformational dynamics. We investigated the pressure-induced responses from the cavity-enlarged L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme, using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The signal intensities of the methyl groups in the 1H/13C HSQC spectra, particularly those around the enlarged cavity, decreased with the increasing pressure, and disappeared at 200 MPa, without the appearance of new resonances, thus indicating the presence of heterogeneous conformations around the cavity within the ground state ensemble. Above 200 MPa, the signal intensities of more than 20 methyl groups gradually decreased with the increasing pressure, without the appearance of new resonances. Interestingly, these residues closel...

  3. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  4. Dual-cavity basket promotes encapsulation in water in an allosteric fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shigui; Yamasaki, Makoto; Polen, Shane; Gallucci, Judith; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2015-09-30

    We prepared dual-cavity basket 1 to carry six (S)-alanine residues at the entrance of its two juxtaposed cavities (289 Å(3)). With the assistance of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and calorimetry, we found that 1 could trap a single molecule of 4 (K1 = 1.45 ± 0.40 × 10(4) M(-1), ITC), akin in size (241 Å(3)) and polar characteristics to nerve agent VX (289 Å(3)). The results of density functional theory calculations (DFT, M06-2X/6-31G*) and experiments ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) suggest that the negative homotropic allosterism arises from the guest forming C-H···π contacts with all three of the aromatic walls of the occupied basket's cavity. In response, the other cavity increases its size and turns rigid to prevent the formation of the ternary complex. A smaller guest 6 (180 Å(3)), akin in size and polar characteristics to soman (186 Å(3)), was also found to bind to dual-cavity 1, although giving both binary [1⊂6] and ternary [1⊂62] complexes (K1 = 7910 M(-1) and K2 = 2374 M(-1), (1)H NMR spectroscopy). In this case, the computational and experimental ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) results suggest that only two aromatic walls of the occupied basket's cavity form C-H···π contacts with the guest to render the singly occupied host flexible enough to undergo additional structural changes necessary for receiving another guest molecule. The structural adaptivity of dual-cavity baskets of type 1 is unique and important for designing multivalent hosts capable of effectively sequestering targeted guests in an allosteric manner to give stable supramolecular polymers.

  5. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, A G; Ducloux, O; Chartier, C; Traon, O Le; Briant, T; Cohadon, P -F; Heidmann, A; Michel, C; Pinard, L; Flaminio, R

    2011-01-01

    We present a new micromechanical resonator designed for cavity optomechanics. We have used a micropillar geometry to obtain a high-frequency mechanical resonance with a low effective mass and a very high quality factor. We have coated a 60-$\\mu$m diameter low-loss dielectric mirror on top of the pillar and are planning to use this micromirror as part of a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, to laser cool the resonator down to its quantum ground state and to monitor its quantum position fluctuations by quantum-limited optical interferometry.

  6. Entanglement swapping between atom and cavity and generation of entangled state of cavity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ai-Xi; Deng Li

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme where entanglement swapping between atom and cavity can be realized. A-type three-level atoms interacting resonantly with cavity field are considered. By detecting atom and cavity field, it realizes entanglement swapping between atom and cavity. It uses the technique of entanglement swapping to generate an entangled state of two cavity fields by measuring on atoms. It discusses the experimental feasibility of the proposed scheme and application of entangled state of cavity fields.

  7. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  8. On cavity modification of stimulated Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Matsko, A B; Letargat, R J; Ilchenko, V S; Maleki, L

    2003-01-01

    We study theoretically stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a nonlinear dielectric microcavity and compare SRS thresholds for the cavity and the bulk material it is made of. We show that cavity SRS enhancement results solely from the intensity build up in the cavity and from the differences of the SRS dynamics in free and confined space. There is no significant modification of the Raman gain due to cavity QED effects. We show that the SRS threshold depends significantly on the nature of the dominating cavity decay as well as on the coupling technique with the cavity used for SRS measurements.

  9. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...

  10. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul;

    1995-01-01

    from the same sites. Nearly a quarter of all the patients harbored one or more microorganisms in the uterus, mostly Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterobacter and Streptococcus agalactiae. We found that in a significant number of cases, the uterine cavity is colonized with potentially pathogenic organisms...

  11. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  12. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  13. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  14. A 200 MHz prebunching cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This cavity was installed in the PS ring and proved very efficient in providing a modulation on the PS beam before it is injected into the SPS machine. Moreover it allowed longitudinal instabilities studies at high intensities. Roberto Cappi stands on the left.

  15. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavi-tation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator,which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emer-gence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects,of both model and prototype,on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length be-low aerators was suggested,which considers overall effects of the above men-tioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  16. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianHua; RUAN ShiPing

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavitation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator, which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emergence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects, of both model and prototype, on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length below aerators was suggested, which considers overall effects of the above mentioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  17. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  18. Frequency comb velocity-modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Laura C; Cossel, Kevin C; Coffey, Tyler; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric A

    2011-08-26

    We have demonstrated a new technique that provides massively parallel comb spectroscopy sensitive specifically to ions through the combination of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with velocity-modulation spectroscopy. Using this novel system, we have measured electronic transitions of HfF⁺ and achieved a fractional absorption sensitivity of 3×10⁻⁷ recorded over 1500 simultaneous channels spanning 150  cm⁻¹ around 800 nm with an absolute frequency accuracy of 30 MHz (0.001  cm⁻¹). A fully sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements is acquired in 30 min.

  19. Frequency Comb Velocity-Modulation Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Laura C; Coffey, Tyler; Ye, Jun; Cornell, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated a new technique that provides massively parallel comb spectroscopy sensitive specifically to ions through the combination of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy with velocity modulation spectroscopy. Using this novel system, we have measured electronic transitions of HfF+ and achieved a fractional absorption sensitivity of 3 x 10-7 recorded over 1500 simultaneous channels spanning 150 cm-1 around 800 nm with an absolute frequency accuracy of 30 MHz (0.001 cm-1). A fully sampled spectrum consisting of interleaved measurements is acquired in 30 minutes.

  20. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  1. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  2. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. Ian Wilso seems to hold it in his hands. The storage cavities had 4 portholes, 1 each for: RF feed; tuning; connection to the accelerating cavity; vacuum pump. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the lower LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. See also 8002294, 8006510X, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  3. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  4. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  5. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  6. Normal mode splitting and mechanical effects of an optical lattice in a ring cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Klinner, J; Lindholdt, M; Nagorny, B; Hemmerich, Andreas; Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris

    2005-01-01

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detunedby about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  7. Normal Mode Splitting and Mechanical Effects of an Optical Lattice in a Ring Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinner, Julian; Lindholdt, Malik; Nagorny, Boris; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    A novel regime of atom-cavity physics is explored, arising when large atom samples dispersively interact with high-finesse optical cavities. A stable far-detuned optical lattice of several million rubidium atoms is formed inside an optical ring resonator by coupling equal amounts of laser light to each propagation direction of a longitudinal cavity mode. An adjacent longitudinal mode, detuned by about 3 GHz, is used to perform probe transmission spectroscopy of the system. The atom-cavity coupling for the lattice beams and the probe is dispersive and dissipation results only from the finite photon-storage time. The observation of two well-resolved normal modes demonstrates the regime of strong cooperative coupling. The details of the normal mode spectrum reveal mechanical effects associated with the retroaction of the probe upon the optical lattice.

  8. Fullerene photoemission time delay explores molecular cavity in attoseconds

    CERN Document Server

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Dixit, Gopal; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Chakraborty, Himadri S

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy can probe interference oscillations in C60 valence emissions that produce series of minima whose energy separation depends on the molecular size. We show that the quantum phase associated with these minima exhibits rapid variations due to electron correlations, causing rich structures in the photoemission time delay. These findings provide a way to utilize temporal information to access the fullerene cavity size, that is making the time to "see" the space, and can be generalized to photoemissions from clusters and nanostructures.

  9. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; Molendijk, John; Timko, Helga; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently configured for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power and lead to saturation. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test a new algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the cavity phase modulation that would minimize klystron forward power.

  10. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Paris (France); Van Brackel, Emmanuel [Département de Physique, ENS, Paris (France); Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier [Département Mesures Physiques, ONERA, Châtillon (France); Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele [Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés, IN2P3-CNRS, Lyon (France)

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  11. Dissipative structures in optomechanical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquín; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Patera, Giuseppe; Roldán, Eugenio; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the increasing interest in the properties of multimode optomechanical devices, here we study a system in which a driven longitudinal mode of a large-area optical cavity is dispersively coupled to a deformable mechanical element. Two different models naturally appear in such scenario, for which we predict the formation of periodic patterns, localized structures (cavity solitons), and domain walls, among other complex nonlinear phenomena. Further, we propose a realistic design based on intracavity membranes where our models can be studied experimentally. Apart from its relevance to the field of nonlinear optics, the results put forward here are a necessary step towards understanding the quantum properties of optomechanical systems in the multimode regime of both the optical and the mechanical degrees of freedom.

  12. Retention proposal in complex cavities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alvarez Rodríguez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental Operatory is the main structure in which Odontology lies. It is not an easy discipline that gives enjoyable results with little effort due to the difficulties that a correct reconstruction of a destroyed dental element offers.The frequency with which pulpar injury occurs while anchoring additional retainers in complex cavities, the technical difficulties the lack of these devices cause and the need to simplify dental procedures lead this study to show the advantages to substitute additional retainers for a retainer surcus. Method: An observational descriptive study was applied to 53 patients(42% of the universe , sample which was selected by means of a simple randomized sample . From a proximal-occlusal cavity, the preparations were extended in a box-like shape towards the bucal or lingual region and the additional retainers were substituted for a surcus which was performed in the gingival wall of the preparation. Calcium Hydroxide of rapid dryness was used as a cavity cover and Policarboxilate cement as a base; then the amalgam restoration was performed. The number of restorations were studied taking into account the patient´s age and the failures due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were assessed taking into consideration the patient´s age and a one- year follow up. Results: Most of the amalgam restorations were performed in patients aged from 35 to 59 years and the relative frequencies due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were very low. Conclusion: The substitution of additional retainers for a retainer surcus in complex cavities of vital molars showed to be advantageous because it guarantees a less degree of pulpar damage and less pulpar damage.

  13. The IAGOS-core greenhouse gas package : a measurement system for continuous airborne observations of CO2, CH4, H2O and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filges, Annette; Gerbig, Christoph; Chen, Huilin; Franke, Harald; Klaus, Christoph; Jordan, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of IAGOS-ERI (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System - European Research Infrastructure), a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS)-based measurement system for the autonomous measurement of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO2 and CH4, as well as CO and water vapour was desi

  14. Rotational analysis of the A(2)Sigma(+)((nu=1,2))-X-2 Pi((nu=0)) electronic bands of (NO)-N-15-O-18

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ityaksov, D.; Stolte, S.; Linnartz, H.V.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Deep-UV spectra of (NO)-N-15-O-18 have been recorded using cavity ring-down spectroscopy in the 205-216 nm egion. The rotationally resolved spectra have been assigned for a first time as originating from the nu '' = 0 X-2 Pi(r) states toward nu' = 1 and 2 vibrationally excited levels in the upper A(

  15. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruda, Milena Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis.

  16. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  17. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El-Jallal, Said [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Physique du Rayonnement et de l’Interaction Laser Matière, Faculté des sciences, Université de Moulay Ismail, Meknès (Morocco)

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  18. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  19. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  20. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  1. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Smith, J. D.A. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Rimmer, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Delayen, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Calaga, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  2. Plasmonic Coupled Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupled cavity modes on Moire surfaces. An experimental study has been made of the propagation of SPPs on a thin silver surface that is textured with Moire surface pattern using interference lithography. The Moire surface contains periodic array of one dimensional cavities. The distance between the cavities can be controlled by changing the periodicities of Moire surface. When the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently small, we show splitting of strongly coupled plasmonic cavity modes through numerical simulations. Conversely, when the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently large, SPP cavity modes are found to be localized and do not show splitting of SPP cavity modes . This splitting of SPP cavity modes are well explained with a tight binding model that has been succesfully applied in photonic coupled cavities. Reflection measurements and numerical simulation of a large number of adjacent SPP cavities have shown a coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) type plasmonic waveguide band formation within the band gap region of unperturbed uniform grating.

  3. CHECHIA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland). ELHEP Laboratory, ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). TESLA

    2005-07-01

    The initial control of the superconductive cavity has recently been performed by applying the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system in DESY Hamburg. This first experiment turned attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the cavity is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The cavity parameters identification is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  4. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  5. SPS RF System an Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X.

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  7. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Drug Information, Search Drug Names, Generic and Brand Natural Products, Search Pill Identifier News & Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures Images Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of Health ...

  8. Length measurement in absolute scale via low-dispersion optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravdova, Lenka; Lesundak, Adam; Smid, Radek; Hrabina, Jan; Rerucha, Simon; Cip, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    We report on the length measuring instrument with the absolute scale that was based on the combination of an optical frequency comb and a passive optical cavity. The time spacing of short femtosecond pulses, generated by the optical frequency comb, is optically phase locked onto the cavity free spectral range with a derivative spectroscopy technique so that the value of the repetition frequency of the femtosecond laser is tied to and determines the measured displacement. The instantaneous value of the femtosecond pulse train frequency is counted by a frequency counter. This counted value corresponds to the length given by the spacing between the two mirrors of the passive cavity. The phase lock between the femtosecond pulsed beam and the passive cavity is possible due to the low-dispersion of the cavity mirrors, where the silver coating on the mirrors was used to provide the low dispersion for the broadband radiation of the comb. Every reflection on the output mirror feeds a portion of the beam back to the cavity so that the output beam is a result of multiple interfering components. The parameters of the output beam are given not only by the parameters of the mirrors but mainly by the absolute distance between the mirror surfaces. Thus, one cavity mirror can be considered as the reference starting point of the distance to be measured and the other mirror is the measuring probe surveying the unknown distance. The measuring mirror of the experimental setup of the low-dispersion cavity is mounted on a piezoelectric actuator which provides small changes in the cavity length we used to test the length measurement method. For the verification of the measurement accuracy a reference incremental interferometer was integrated into our system so that the displacement of the piezoelectric actuator could be obtained with both measuring methods simultaneously.

  9. Gettering of diffused Au and of Cu and Ni contamination in silicon by cavities induced by high energy He implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouayadi, R. el; Regula, G.; Pichaud, B.; Lancin, M. [Faculte des Sciences et Techniques de St Jerome, Marseille (France). Lab. TECSEN; Dubois, C.; Ntsoenzok, E.

    2000-11-01

    Silicon samples were gold-diffused at different temperatures (870-950 C) and implanted with He ions at 1.6 MeV and fluences ranging from 2 x 10{sup 16} up to 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The implantation induced defects observed by conventional and high resolution cross section electron microscopy were found to be essentially cavities 10 to 100 nm in size which are faceted mainly along {l_brace}111{r_brace}, but also along {l_brace}110{r_brace} and {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes. The cavities are located at the sample depth predicted by the transport range of ions in matter simulation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles exhibit a shouldered shape with a maximum at the projected range. They demonstrate that the cavities are very efficient sinks for Au atoms; the shoulder of the profile could be related to the presence of smaller cavities and dislocations in the vicinity of the projected range. Gold concentration in the cavity area was below the detection limit of the energy dispersive spectroscopy technique, but both Cu and Ni contamination gave rise to silicides and could be chemically analysed. Cu{sub 3}Si precipitates have grown in cavities as already reported in the literature, while NiSi{sub 2} precipitates were observed for the first time in cavities. (orig.)

  10. Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  11. Dynamical tunneling in optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Hackenbroich, G; Hackenbroich, Gregor; Noeckel, Jens U.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime of whispering gallery modes in a dielectric cavity with a metallic inclusion is shown to fluctuate by orders of magnitude when size and location of the inclusion are varied. We ascribe these fluctuations to tunneling transitions between resonances quantized in different regions of phase space. This interpretation is confirmed by a comparison of the classical phase space structure with the Husimi distribution of the resonant modes. A model Hamiltonian is introduced that describes the phenomenon and shows that it can be expected in a more general class of systems.

  12. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  13. Nanobeam photonic crystal cavity quantum dot laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yiyang; Shambat, Gary; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James S; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The lasing behavior of one dimensional GaAs nanobeam cavities with embedded InAs quantum dots is studied at room temperature. Lasing is observed throughout the quantum dot PL spectrum, and the wavelength dependence of the threshold is calculated. We study the cavity lasers under both 780 nm and 980 nm pump, finding thresholds as low as 0.3 uW and 19 uW for the two pump wavelengths, respectively. Finally, the nanobeam cavity laser wavelengths are tuned by up to 7 nm by employing a fiber taper in near proximity to the cavities. The fiber taper is used both to efficiently pump the cavity and collect the cavity emission.

  14. Electron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegbahn, Kai

    Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery of X radiation in 1895 in Wörzburg resulted in an immediate break-through not only in physics but also in Society, the latter mainly because of its sensational radiological applications. Within a short time it furthermore indirectly led to the discovery of radioactivity by Henri Becquerel. The discovery of X radiation opened the gate to modern atomic physics, and radioactivity to nuclear physics. Later on, the discovery of X-ray diffraction by Laue, Friedrich and Knipping in 1912 initiated the field of X-ray spectroscopy with its fundamental contributions to atomic and crystal structures. Secondary electrons were early observed in the scattered radiation when X-rays were hitting a sample. The development of the corresponding electron spectroscopy had to wait a much longer time for its maturity. A survey of electron spectroscopy is presented.

  15. Rationale for designing cavity preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laswell, H R; Welk, D A

    1985-04-01

    Increased resistance to caries, increased dental awareness, superior diagnostic capabilities, better illumination, optical aids that significantly enhance vision, improved and standardized materials for restoration, and a deeper understanding of the caries process enable a far more conservative approach to tooth preparation. The dentist can concentrate on preserving as much sound tooth structure as possible with less attention being devoted to resistance and retention form that previously demanded in bulk restorations and massive channels and locks that are no longer appropriate. Although caries inhibitory effects have been shown with materials such as silicate cement, glass ionomers, and resins that leach fluoride, in general, dentists should not rely on restorative materials to inhibit the development of future decay. Characteristics of the carious lesion are unique for each tooth according to many factors centering around the plaque pattern for that tooth and not according to zones of natural susceptibility or immunity strictly dictated by morphology. Therefore, no single cavity preparation duplicated from a textbook is likely to be satisfactory for an individual tooth. Furthermore, novices learning the subject of cavity preparation often leave decalcified enamel when they attempt to replicate under clinical conditions that which they have learned in technique courses. This is the major invitation to future caries reappearing adjacent to restorations. Also, failure to duplicate the exact morphology of the tooth surface that has been replaced is likely to alter the pattern of plaque accumulation and create other caries prone areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Cavity QED-based quantum walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, Tiegang; Hillery, Mark; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2004-09-01

    We discuss a possible experimental scheme for the implementation of a quantum walk. The scheme is based on the passage of an atom inside a high- Q cavity. The chirality is characterized by the atomic states and the displacement is characterized by the photon number inside the cavity. The quantum steps are described by appropriate interactions with a sequence of classical and quantized cavity fields.

  17. Ray splitting in paraxial optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Puentes, G; Woerdman, J P

    2003-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the ray dynamics in a paraxial optical cavity when a ray splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. We show that depending on the position of the beam splitter the optical resonator can become unstable and the ray dynamics displays a positive Lyapunov exponent.

  18. Tunable Cavity Optomechanics with Ultracold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, T P; Botter, T; Brahms, N; Ma, Z -Y; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2010-01-01

    We present an atom-chip-based realization of quantum cavity optomechanics with cold atoms localized within a Fabry-Perot cavity. Effective sub-wavelength positioning of the atomic ensemble allows for tuning the linear and quadratic optomechanical coupling parameters, varying the sensitivity to the displacement and strain of a compressible gaseous cantilever. We observe effects of such tuning on cavity optical nonlinearity and optomechanical frequency shifts, providing their first characterization in the quadratic-coupling regime.

  19. Continuously tunable, split-cavity gyrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, G. F.; Gross, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a gyrotron cavity configuration which is split in halves longitudinally, to allow any frequency lying between the fixed cavity resonance to be assessed by mechanically changing the separation of the two halves. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the rate-of-change in resonant frequency with separation is greatest if the minor axis of the cavity cross section is the one undergoing change. Excellent agreement with theory is noted for these results.

  20. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Marty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  1. [The internal cavities of pike alpha-parvalbumin probably contain water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishchenko, V M

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen exchange of pike a-parvalbumin was investigated using the method of infrared spectroscopy (sensitive to the amide hydrogen atoms in the peptide) and radioisotope method (sensitive to all labile hydrogen atoms). Ultraslow exchangeable hydrogen atoms were found to be substantially less in the first case than in the second one. Taking into account that the internal cavities in the parvalbumin are formed by hydrophobic amino acid residues, devoid of labile hydrogen atoms, it is possible to make the most appropriate assumption, namely, these cavities contain water molecules, hydrogen atoms of which are ultraslow exchangeable.

  2. Dynamics of Turing and Faraday instabilities in a longitudinally modulated fiber-ring cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, F; Conforti, M; Kudlinski, A; Trillo, S; Mussot, A

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally investigate the round-trip-to-round-trip dynamics of the modulation instability spectrum in a passive fiber-ring cavity presenting an inhomogeneous dispersion profile. By implementing a real-time spectroscopy technique, we are able to record successive single-shot spectra, which display the evolution of the system toward a stationary state. We find that the two instability regimes (Turing and Faraday) that compete in this kind of inhomogeneous cavity not only differ by their characteristic frequency but also by their dynamical behavior. The dynamic transition between those two regimes of instability is also presented.

  3. The cavity electromagnetic field within the polarizable continuum model of solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipolo, Silvio, E-mail: silvio.pipolo@nano.cnr.it [Center S3, CNR Institute of Nanoscience, Modena (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy); Corni, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.corni@nano.cnr.it [Center S3, CNR Institute of Nanoscience, Modena (Italy); Cammi, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.cammi@unipr.it [Department of Chemistry, Università degli studi di Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2014-04-28

    Cavity field effects can be defined as the consequences of the solvent polarization induced by the probing electromagnetic field upon spectroscopies of molecules in solution, and enter in the definitions of solute response properties. The polarizable continuum model of solvation (PCM) has been extended in the past years to address the cavity-field issue through the definition of an effective dipole moment that couples to the external electromagnetic field. We present here a rigorous derivation of such cavity-field treatment within the PCM starting from the general radiation-matter Hamiltonian within inhomogeneous dielectrics and recasting the interaction term to a dipolar form within the long wavelength approximation. To this aim we generalize the Göppert-Mayer and Power-Zienau-Woolley gauge transformations, usually applied in vacuo, to the case of a cavity vector potential. Our derivation also allows extending the cavity-field correction in the long-wavelength limit to the velocity gauge through the definition of an effective linear momentum operator. Furthermore, this work sets the basis for the general PCM treatment of the electromagnetic cavity field, capable to describe the radiation-matter interaction in dielectric media beyond the long-wavelength limit, providing also a tool to investigate spectroscopic properties of more complex systems such as molecules close to large nanoparticles.

  4. 3D microwave cavity with magnetic flux control and enhanced quality factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshitnyk, Yarema [The University of Queensland, School of Mathematics and Physics, St Lucia (Australia); Jerger, Markus [The University of Queensland, ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, 4072 (Australia); Fedorov, Arkady [The University of Queensland, School of Mathematics and Physics, St Lucia (Australia); The University of Queensland, ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, 4072 (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) microwave cavities have been extensively used for coupling and interacting with superconducting quantum bits (qubits), providing a versatile platform for quantum control experiments and for realizing hybrid quantum systems. While having high quality factors (>10{sup 6}) superconducting cavities do not permit magnetic field control of qubits. In contrast, cavities made of normal metals are transparent to magnetic fields, but experience lower quality factors (∝10{sup 4}). We have created a hybrid cavity which is primarily composed of aluminium but also contains a small copper insert reaching the internal quality factor of ≅10{sup 5}, an order of magnitude improvement over all previously tested normal metal cavities. In order to demonstrate precise magnetic control, we performed spectroscopy of three superconducting qubits, where individual control of each qubit's frequency was exerted with small external wire coils. An improvement in quality factor and magnetic field control makes this 3D hybrid cavity an attractive new element for circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments. (orig.)

  5. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  6. Novel Geometries for the LHC CRAB Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme b...

  7. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: coherence in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, H; Doherty, A C

    2002-11-15

    Modern cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) illuminates the most fundamental aspects of coherence and decoherence in quantum mechanics. Experiments on atoms in cavities can be described by elementary models but reveal intriguing subtleties of the interplay of coherent dynamics with external couplings. Recent activity in this area has pioneered powerful new approaches to the study of quantum coherence and has fueled the growth of quantum information science. In years to come, the purview of cavity QED will continue to grow as researchers build on a rich infrastructure to attack some of the most pressing open questions in micro- and mesoscopic physics.

  8. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  9. Engineering topological materials in microwave cavity arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Brandon M; Owens, Clai; Schuster, David I; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scalable architecture for the exploration of interacting topological phases of photons in arrays of microwave cavities, using established techniques from cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. A time-reversal symmetry breaking (non-reciprocal) flux is induced by coupling the microwave cavities to ferrites, allowing for the production of a variety of topological band structures including the $\\alpha=1/4$ Hofstadter model. Effective photon-photon interactions are included by coupling the cavities to superconducting qubits, and are sufficient to produce a $\

  10. State of the Art SRF Cavity Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Lilje, L

    2004-01-01

    The paper will review superconducting RF cavity performance for β=1 cavities used in both linear and circular accelerators. These superconducting cavities are used in two kinds of applications: High current storage rings and efficient high duty cycle linacs. In recent years the performance of those cavities has been improving steadily. High accelerating gradients have been achieved using advanced surface preparation techniques like electropolishing and surface cleaning methods like high pressure water rinsing. High intensity beams can be handled with advanced higher-order-mode damping schemes.

  11. 腔增强拉曼技术下的过饱和硫酸镁液滴蒸发动力学初探%Preliminary Assessment of Evaporating Supersaturated MgSO4 Droplet at Low Relative Humidity with Cavity Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈斯华; 蔡宸; 冷春波; 张韫宏

    2013-01-01

    This paper is aimed to study the response of a single MgSO4 droplet to the variation of relative humidity through the combination of single beam gradient force optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy.The evaporation dynamic of a single MgSO4 droplet which is trapped by a single beam gradient force optical tweezers is investigated by varying the relative humidity in a stepwise manner.The measurements of the variation in equilibrium wet droplet size with relative humidity (RH) are made using cavity enhanced Raman scattering(CERS),where the stimulated Raman signals appear at wavelength commensurate to the Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) are applied to determine the size of droplet with high precision.This study demonstrates the real time monitoring of MgSO4 droplet size over a RH range that had not previously been explored with aerosol optical tweezers.The results show that the MgSO4 droplet radius variation gradually becomes smaller as the RH=~44% and is greatly depressed when RH lower than 40%,indicating that water evaporation rate of captured MgSO4 droplet is limited at high concentration.On the other hand,the deliquescence of shrinked MgSO4 droplet is not equivalent with the dehumidification process.The re-growth of MgSO4 droplet size is observed to be significantly slower in response to the increase of RH.It is suggested that mass transfer effect caused by the gel formation has contributed to the retardation of water mass transfer.%本文通过单光束梯度力光学镊子-拉曼光谱系统,对硫酸镁单液滴随着相对湿度变化的反应进行了探究.当硫酸镁单液滴被光镊捕获之后,通过相对湿度的梯度变化探究了捕获液滴的蒸发动力学变化.发生在与耳语回音模相称波长的受激拉曼散射可以用来准确地确定液滴半径,因此,可以通过腔增强拉曼散射得到在不同湿度下处于平衡的液滴半径信息.本研究通过光镊对硫酸镁单液滴的实时监测,阐述了在某个相对

  12. Comparison of coherently coupled multi-cavity and quantum dot embedded single cavity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Serdar; Sayan, Gönül Turhan

    2016-12-12

    Temporal group delays originating from the optical analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) are compared in two systems. Similar transmission characteristics are observed between a coherently coupled high-Q multi-cavity array and a single quantum dot (QD) embedded cavity in the weak coupling regime. However, theoretically generated group delay values for the multi-cavity case are around two times higher. Both configurations allow direct scalability for chip-scale optical pulse trapping and coupled-cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED).

  13. Modern Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the basic ideas of modern spectroscopy. Both the angular momenta and wave-nature approaches to the determination of energy level patterns for atomic and molecular systems are discussed. The interpretation of spectra, based on atomic and molecular models, is considered. (LC)

  14. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    causes relaxation processes with characteristic contributions to the frequency-dependent complex dielectric constant. These dipolar relaxations were initially described by Debye (Polare Molekeln 1929). They are the basis of impedance spectroscopy (K’Owino and Sadik Electroanalysis 17(23):2101–2113, 2005...

  15. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  16. Slow plasmons in grating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-03-01

    Recent research on surface plasmon polaritons and their applications have brought forward a wealth of information and continues to be of interest to many. In this report, we concentrate on propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their interaction with matter. Using grating based metallic structures, it is possible to control the electrodynamics of propagating SPPs. Biharmonic gratings loaded with periodic Si stripes allow excitation of SPPs that are localized inside the band gap with grating coupling. The cavity state is formed due to periodic effective index modulation obtained by one harmonic of the grating and loaded Si stripes. More complicated grating structures such as metallic Moiré surfaces have also been shown to form a localized state inside the band gap when excited with Kretschmann configuration.

  17. Primary leiomyosarcoma of peritoneal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Naresh Bharti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcomas of soft tissue are the rare tumors and the retroperitoneum is the most common site involved. We report a case of primary leiomyosarcoma of the peritoneal cavity which clinically presented with suprapubic, freely mobile, nontender mass which measured 10×10 cm in size. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed well defined heterogenous hypodense solid cystic mass. The mass was surgically excised out in its entirety. The histopathological examination revealed spindle cells arranged in alternating fascicles having pleomorphic nuclei, indistinct margin and eosinophilic cytoplasm with foci of haemorrhage, necrosis and 5-6 mitosis/HPF. The spindle cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, desmin and negative for S-100, CD-34 and c-kit. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were helpful in making the final confirmatory diagnosis. Leiomyosarcomas are aggressive tumors, with poor prognosis and often difficult to treat. The survival rates are lowest among all soft tissue sarcomas.

  18. Leaky Modes of Dielectric Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud; Jakobsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of external excitation, light trapped within a dielectric medium generally decays by leaking out (and also by getting absorbed within the medium). We analyze the leaky modes of a parallel-plate slab, a solid glass sphere, and a solid glass cylinder, by examining those solutions of Maxwell's equations (for dispersive as well as non-dispersive media) which admit of a complex-valued oscillation frequency. Under certain circumstances, these leaky modes constitute a complete set into which an arbitrary distribution of the electromagnetic field residing inside a dielectric body can be expanded. We provide completeness proofs, and also present results of numerical calculations that illustrate the relationship between the leaky modes and the resonances of dielectric cavities formed by a simple parallel-plate slab, a glass sphere, and a glass cylinder.

  19. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  20. Scheme for Implementation of Quantum Game in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Chun; CAO Shu-Ai; WU Yue-Qin; FANG Mao-Fa; LI Huai-Fan; ZHENG Xiao-Juan; ZHAO Ren; WANG Xin-Wen; LI Ze-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to implement two-player quantum game in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). During the process, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus our scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. The scheme can be realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  1. A scheme for implementing quantum game in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoShuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Liu Jian-Bin; Wang Xin-Wen; Zheng Xiao-juan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme fot implementing quantum game (QG) in cavity quantum electrodynam-ics(QED). In the scheme, the cavity is only virtually excited and thus the proposal is insensitive to the cavity fields states and cavity decay. So our proposal can be experimentally realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  2. The ADMX Microwave Cavity: Present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollett, Nathan; ADMX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), a direct-detection axion search, uses a tunable resonant cavity to enhance axion to photon conversion rates to a detectable level when the cavity resonance matches the mass of the axion. It has successfully taken data in the 460 - 890 MHz frequency range and is now probing a similar range with much higher sensitivity. However the axion mass is unknown and may be at higher frequencies than the currently operating system. In anticipation of future runs with an increased mass range, ADMX is conducting extensive research and development of microwave cavities. These developments include photonic band-gap cavities, multi-vane cavities, partitioned cavities, in-phase coupled cavities, and superconducting hybrid cavities. Many of these projects are in different stages between simulations and testing of physical prototypes. The status and current objectives of these projects will be presented. Supported by DOE Grants DE-SC0010280, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, the Heising-Simons Foundation and the LLNL, FNAL and PNNL LDRD program.

  3. Collapsing cavities in reactive and nonreactive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Neil K.; Field, John E.

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents results of a high-speed photographic study of cavities collapsed asymmetrically by shocks of strengths in the range 0.26 GPa to 3.5 GPa. Two-dimensional collapses of cavity configurations punched into a 12% by weight gelatine in water sheet, and an ammonium nitrate/sodium nitrate (AN/SN) emulsion explosive were photographed using schlieren optics. The single cavity collapses were characterized by the velocity of the liquid jet formed by the upstream wall as it was accelerated by the shock and by the time taken for the cavity to collapse. The shock pressure did not qualitatively affect the collapse behaviour but jet velocities were found to exceed incident shock velocities at higher pressures. The more violent collapses induced light emission from the compressed gas in the cavity. When an array of cavities collapsed, a wave, characterized by the particle velocity in the medium, the cavity diameter and the inter-cavity spacing, was found to run through the array. When such an array was created within an emulsion explosive, ignition of the reactive matrix occurred ahead of the collapse wave when the incident shock was strong.

  4. A spherical cavity in an Einstein universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofinti, N.K.

    1980-03-01

    Suitable metric forms for the regions and a outside a sperical cavity in an Einstein universe are derived by means of perturbation. It is shown that for low proper pressure, the cavity behaves like ''negative'' Schwarzchild mass. Finally, the possibility of carrying over to the exact theory a proposed definition of the gravitational field in a matter is examined.

  5. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...

  6. Cavity-enhanced absorption for optical refrigeration

    CERN Document Server

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    A 20-fold increase over the single path optical absorption is demonstrated with a low loss medium placed in a resonant cavity. This has been applied to laser cooling of Yb:ZBLAN glass resulting in 90% absorption of the incident pump light. A coupled-cavity scheme to achieve active optical impedance matching is analyzed.

  7. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra;

    2009-01-01

    We present a principle for the temperature stabilization of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities based on optofluidics. We introduce an analytic method enabling a specific mode of a cavity to be made wavelength insensitive to changes in ambient temperature. Using this analysis, we experimentally demon...

  8. Coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, D. J.; Omalley, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program is developed for analysis of coupled cavity traveling waves tubes (TWT's) which are used in variety of radar and communications applications. Programmers can simulate tubes of arbitrary complexity such as input and output couplers and other features peculiar to one or few cavities which may be modeled by correct choices of input data.

  9. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  10. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmidt, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D. K.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  11. Superconducting accelerating four-cell cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A close view of the four-cell cavity. This was a prototype designed for LEP2 (LEP1 had warm copper cavities as accelerating elements). The first successful tests were made in December 1980 - reaching a Q = 10^6. (see photo 8012650X)

  12. Continuous optical discharge in a laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivel', Yu. A.

    2016-08-01

    Optical discharge in a laser cavity is experimentally studied. A significant increase in the absorption of laser radiation (up to total absorption) is revealed. Optical schemes for initiation and maintaining of optical discharge in the cavity are proposed for technological applications of the optical discharge.

  13. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  14. Subglacial Silicic Eruptions: Wet Cavities and Moist Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J. A.; McGarvie, D. W.; Gilbert, J. S.; Smellie, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    ice produces water, however in the Kerlingarfjöll eruption (which is thought to have been relatively brief and the vesicular magma is likely to have contained less heat per unit volume) the volumes were small and the subglacial cavity could be appropriately described as 'moist'. The Prestahnúkur eruption occurred in a 'wet' cavity but 'lacustrine' conditions were never developed and the ice was always close to the edifice. Poor sorting and structure in the subglacial deposits are due to a lack of time and space for sorting to occur. In contrast to more mafic eruptions, which are characterised by very strong meltwater-ice interactions, the main influence of the ice during subglacial rhyolite eruptions is reflected in the confinement of eruptive products.

  15. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disk on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  16. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  17. Performance of 3-cell Seamless Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLBA; Jelezov, I. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, W. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, X. [DESY, Hamburg

    2009-11-01

    In the last several months we have surface treated and cryogenically tested three TESLA-type 3-cell cavities, which had been manufactured at DESY as seamless assemblies by hydroforming. The cavities were completed at JLab with beam tube/flange assemblies. All three cavities performed very well after they had been post-purified with titanium at 1250C for 3 hrs. The cavities, two of which consisted of an end cell and 2 center cells and one was a center cell assembly, achieved gradients of Eacc = 32 MV/m, 34 MV/m and 35 MV/m without quenches. The performance was limited by the appearance of the “Q-drop” in the absence of field emission. This contribution reports about the various measurements undertaken with these cavities.

  18. A gas jet impacting a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffler, A. Kent; Bakhsh, Hazoor

    1986-11-01

    A subsonic jet impinging upon a cavity is studied to explain the resultant heating phenomenon. Flow visualization within the cavity shows a large central vortex dominating the flow pattern. Velocity measurements inside the cavity are made using a hot-wire anemometer. Temperature is measured with a copper-constantan thermocouple. The velocity field within the cavity is described by a modified Rankine combined vortex. An uncommon form of the energy equation is used to account for turbulent heating in adverse pressure gradients. A theoretical solution is developed to model the temperature field in the cavity. There is a good agreement between the calculated and measured temperatures. The heating effect is related to Ranque-Hilsch tubes.

  19. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-06

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling.

  20. Niobium Cavity Electropolishing Modelling and Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, L M A; Forel, S; Shirra, J A

    2013-01-01

    It’s widely accepted that electropolishing (EP) is the most suitable surface finishing process to achieve high performance bulk Nb accelerating cavities. At CERN and in preparation for the processing of the 704 MHz high-beta Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cavities a new vertical electropolishing facility has been assembled and a study is on-going for the modelling of electropolishing on cavities with COMSOL® software. In a first phase, the electrochemical parameters were taken into account for a fixed process temperature and flow rate, and are presented in this poster as well as the results obtained on a real SPL single cell cavity. The procedure to acquire the data used as input for the simulation is presented. The modelling procedure adopted to optimise the cathode geometry, aimed at a uniform current density distribution in the cavity cell for the minimum working potential and total current is explained. Some preliminary results on fluid dynamics is also briefly described.

  1. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave-mixing between photons and phonons and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong nonlocal effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a novel multi-cavity optomechanical device: a "photon see-saw", in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of the see-saw, are modulated anti-symmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other...

  2. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  3. Proven procedures guide cavity VCO design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrak, F.

    1981-05-01

    The design of a high performance voltage-tuned cavity oscillator is discussed. The circuit is to be modeled with an equivalent inductance and capacitance. Close attention is to be given to the influence of cavity loading. Center frequency and impedance are computed on the basis of the model's L and C values. The last step is particularly important, since the size of a cavity-based oscillator, such as the Gunn/varactor version is directly related to operating frequency. Attention is given to the parallel L-C circuit representing the cavity, parameter relations concerning the height, higher-order TE modes, and effects of post inductance. The basic oscillator consists of a hollow cavity with metal walls, and diodes mounted on posts.

  4. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities......) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using...... mass loss (13.91%) than composite resin preparations with the same width (10.02%). 1/2-inlay cavities had 21.34% of mass loss versus 16.19% for the 1/2-composite resin cavities. Fracture strength means (in kgf) were: GI = 187.65; GII = 143.62; GIII = 74.10; GIV = 164.22; GV = 101.92; GVI = 50...

  5. Vertical external cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, M

    2001-01-01

    Active stabilisation showed a relative locked linewidth of approx 3 kHz. Coarse tuning over 7 nm was achieved using a 3-plate birefingent filter plate while fine-tuning using cavity length change allowed tuning over 250 MHz. Vertical external cavity semiconductor lasers have emerged as an interesting technology based on current vertical cavity semiconductor laser knowledge. High power output into a single transverse mode has attracted companies requiring good fibre coupling for telecommunications systems. The structure comprises of a grown semiconductor Bragg reflector topped with a multiple quantum well gain region. This is then included in an external cavity. This device is then optically pumped to promote laser action. Theoretical modelling of AIGaAs based VECSEL structures was undertaken, showing the effect of device design on laser characteristics. A simple 3-mirror cavity was constructed to assess the static characteristics of the structure. Up to 153 mW of output power was achieved in a single transver...

  6. Astronomical Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopy is one of the most important tools that an astronomer has for studying the universe. This chapter begins by discussing the basics, including the different types of optical spectrographs, with extension to the ultraviolet and the near-infrared. Emphasis is given to the fundamentals of how spectrographs are used, and the trade-offs involved in designing an observational experiment. It then covers observing and reduction techniques, noting that some of the standard practices of flat-fielding often actually degrade the quality of the data rather than improve it. Although the focus is on point sources, spatially resolved spectroscopy of extended sources is also briefly discussed. Discussion of differential extinction, the impact of crowding, multi-object techniques, optimal extractions, flat-fielding considerations, and determining radial velocities and velocity dispersions provide the spectroscopist with the fundamentals needed to obtain the best data. Finally the chapter combines the previous materi...

  7. Grain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  8. Laser spectroscopy of gas confined in nanoporous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We show that high-resolution laser spectroscopy can probe surface interactions of gas confined in nano-cavities of porous materials. We report on strong line broadening and unfamiliar lineshapes due to tight confinement, as well as signal enhancement due to multiple photon scattering. This new domain of laser spectroscopy constitute a challenge for the theory of collisions and spectroscopic lineshapes, and open for new ways of analyzing porous materials and processes taking place therein.

  9. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyreff, G. [Optique Nonlineaire Theorique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), CP 231 (Belgium); Gelens, L. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  10. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreff, G.; Gelens, L.

    2011-08-01

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  11. Cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, A G; Gurevich, S V; Panajotov, K; Averlant, E; Tlidi, M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a control of the motion of localized structures of light by means of delay feedback in the transverse section of a broad area nonlinear optical system. The delayed feedback is found to induce a spontaneous motion of a solitary localized structure that is stationary and stable in the absence of feedback. We focus our analysis on an experimentally relevant system namely the Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL). In the absence of the delay feedback we present experimental evidence of stationary localized structures in a 80 $\\mu$m aperture VCSEL. The spontaneous formation of localized structures takes place above the lasing threshold and under optical injection. Then, we consider the effect of the time-delayed optical feedback and investigate analytically the role of the phase of the feedback and the carrier lifetime on the self-mobility properties of the localized structures. We show that these two parameters affect strongly the space time dynamics of two-dimensional localized structures...

  12. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  13. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  14. Dispersion of coupled mode-gap cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; De Rossi, Sylvain Combrié Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of a CROW made of photonic crystal mode-gap cavities is pronouncedly asymmetric. This asymmetry cannot be explained by the standard tight binding model. We show that the fundamental cause of the asymmetric dispersion is the fact that the cavity mode profile itself is dispersive, i.e., the mode wave function depends on the driving frequency, not the eigenfrequency. This occurs because the photonic crystal cavity resonances do not form a complete set. By taking into account the dispersive mode profile, we formulate a mode coupling model that accurately describes the asymmetric dispersion without introducing any new free parameters.

  15. Piezoelectric Voltage Coupled Reentrant Cavity Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Natalia C; Floch, Jean-Michel Le; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2014-01-01

    A piezoelectric voltage coupled microwave reentrant cavity has been developed. The central cavity post is bonded to a piezoelectric actuator allowing the voltage control of small post displacements over a high dynamic range. We show that such a cavity can be implemented as a voltage tunable resonator, a transducer for exciting and measuring mechanical modes of the structure and a transducer for measuring comparative sensitivity of the piezoelectric material. Experiments were conducted at room and cryogenic temperatures with results verified using Finite Element software.

  16. LHC Crab Cavity Coupler Test Boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, James; Burt, Graeme; Calaga, Rama; Macpherson, Alick; Montesinos, Eric; Silva, Subashini; Tutte, Adam; Xiao, Binping

    2016-01-01

    The LHC double quarter wave (DQW) crab cavities have two different types of Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers in addition to a fundamental power coupler (FPC). The FPC requires conditioning, so to achieve this we have designed a radio-frequency (RF) quarter wave resonator to provide high transmission between two opposing FPCs. For the HOM couplers we must ensure that the stop-band filter is positioned at the cavity frequency and that peak transmission occurs at the same frequencies as the strongest HOMs. We have designed two test boxes which preserve the cavity spectral response in order to test the couplers.

  17. Modified relaxation dynamics and coherent energy exchange in coupled vibration-cavity polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkelberger, A. D.; Spann, B. T.; Fears, K. P.; Simpkins, B. S.; Owrutsky, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Coupling vibrational transitions to resonant optical modes creates vibrational polaritons shifted from the uncoupled molecular resonances and provides a convenient way to modify the energetics of molecular vibrations. This approach is a viable method to explore controlling chemical reactivity. In this work, we report pump-probe infrared spectroscopy of the cavity-coupled C-O stretching band of W(CO)6 and the direct measurement of the lifetime of a vibration-cavity polariton. The upper polariton relaxes 10 times more quickly than the uncoupled vibrational mode. Tuning the polariton energy changes the polariton transient spectra and relaxation times. We also observe quantum beats, so-called vacuum Rabi oscillations, between the upper and lower vibration-cavity polaritons. In addition to establishing that coupling to an optical cavity modifies the energy-transfer dynamics of the coupled molecules, this work points out the possibility of systematic and predictive modification of the excited-state kinetics of vibration-cavity polariton systems.

  18. Perturbing open cavities: Anomalous resonance frequency shifts in a hybrid cavity-nanoantenna system

    CERN Document Server

    Ruesink, Freek; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a non-trivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing back-action via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  19. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M.; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A. Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  20. Frequency combs for cavity cascades: OPO combs and graphene-coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin F.; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, C.-C.; Mohr, C.; Jiang, Jie; Schunemann, Peter G.; Schibli, T. R.; Maslowski, Piotr; Fermann, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency combs can be used directly, for example as a highly precise spectroscopic light source. They can also be used indirectly, as a bridge between devices whose high precision requirements would normally make them incompatible. Here, we demonstrate two ways that a frequency comb enables new technologies by matching optical cavities. One cavity is the laser oscillator. A second cavity is a low-threshold doubly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Extending optical referencing to the doubly-resonant OPO turns the otherwise unstable device into an extremely precise midinfrared frequency comb. Another cavity is an optical enhancement cavity for amplifying spectral absorption in a gas. With the high speed of a graphene-modulated frequency comb, we can couple a frequency comb directly into a high-finesse cavity for trace gas detection.

  1. Interference and Chaos in Metamaterials Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchinitser, Natalia; Jose, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    Optical metamaterials are engineered artificial nanostructures that possess optical properties not available in nature. As metamaterials research continues to mature, their practical applications as well as fundamental questions on wave propagation in these materials attract significant interest. In this talk we focus on wave propagation and interference in chaotic wave cavities with negative or near-zero index of refraction and in double-slit configurations. In this context, we explicitly consider an incomplete two-dimensional D-cavity previously studied, which shows chaotic ray propagation together with scars. We have addressed the question as to how that type of wave propagation is modified by adding metamaterials in these chaotic cavities. We find that the wave interference patterns show significant qualitatively and quantitative changes depending on the effective parameters of the cavity, illumination conditions (planes waves versus beams), and geometry of the system. We will discuss possible experimental setups where these results may be validated.

  2. Pulp response to bases and cavity depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S J; Walton, R E; Osborne, J W

    1992-04-01

    In cavities of ferret canines, preparation depth and bases were compared as to their effect on odontoblasts and to rate of dentin formation. These were measured by injecting 3H-proline at 0, 20 and 40 days post-preparation. Odontoblast activity was determined by label density in each band; inter-band distances indicated the amount of dentin formed. Correlations were by Pearson's coefficient. The following were determined: 1) cavity depth (remaining dentin thickness) was the major factor in odontoblast response and in dentin formation; deeper cavities suppressed odontoblasts with less subsequent dentin formation at all time periods; 2) basing materials had little effect on odontoblast activity or on the rate of dentin formation. An exception was in deep cavities, with Ca(OH)2 showing more label; this activity was temporary with no increased dentin formation; 3) there was no evidence of a "rebound" response.

  3. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  4. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmit, Donald; Luna, Manuel; Karpen, Judy; Innes, Davina

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system: the cavity is under-dense because it is evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolution of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model with diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet emission (EUV) surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prominence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the SDO/AIA 171\\AA\\ bandpass near the prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset ...

  5. Stafne bone cavity--magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yoram; Puterman, Max; Bodner, Lipa

    2006-07-01

    A case of Stafne bone cavity (SBC) affecting the body of the mandible of a 51-year-old female is reported. The imaging modalities included panoramic radiograph, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Panoramic radiograph and CT were able to determine the outline of the cavity and its three dimensional shape, but failed to precisely diagnose the soft tissue content of the cavity. MR imaging demonstrated that the bony cavity is filled with soft tissue that is continuous and identical in signal with that of the submandibular salivary gland. Based on the MR imaging a diagnosis of SBC was made and no further studies or surgical treatment were initiated. MR imaging should be considered the diagnostic technique in cases where SBC is suspected. Recognition of the lesion should preclude any further treatment or surgical exploration.

  6. Reducing the convective losses of cavity receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Robert; Grobbel, Johannes; Stadler, Hannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Convective losses reduce the efficiency of cavity receivers used in solar power towers especially under windy conditions. Therefore, measures should be taken to reduce these losses. In this paper two different measures are analyzed: an air curtain and a partial window which covers one third of the aperture opening. The cavity without modifications and the usage of a partial window were analyzed in a cryogenic wind tunnel at -173°C. The cryogenic environment allows transforming the results from the small model cavity to a large scale receiver with Gr≈3.9.1010. The cavity with the two modifications in the wind tunnel environment was analyzed with a CFD model as well. By comparing the numerical and experimental results the model was validated. Both modifications are capable of reducing the convection losses. In the best case a reduction of about 50 % was achieved.

  7. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  8. Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) cavitiy modes on two dimensional Moire surfaces in the visible spectrum. Two dimensional hexagonal Moire surface can be recorded on a photoresist layer using Interference lithography (IL). Two sequential exposures at slightly different angles in IL generate one dimensional Moire surfaces. Further sequential exposure for the same sample at slightly different angles after turning the sample 60 degrees around its own axis generates two dimensional hexagonal Moire cavity. Spectroscopic reflection measurements have shown plasmonic band gaps and cavity states at all the azimuthal angles (omnidirectional cavity and band gap formation) investigated. The plasmonic band gap edge and the cavity states energies show six fold symmetry on the two dimensional Moire surface as measured in reflection measurements.

  9. Development of rebunching cavities at IAP

    CERN Document Server

    Welsch, C P; Schempp, A

    2000-01-01

    A focus of work at IAP has been the development and optimization of spiral loaded cavities since the 1970s [A. Schempp et al, NIM 135, 409 (1976)]. These cavities feature a high efficiency, a compact design and a big variety of possible fields of application. They find use both as bunchers and post accelerators to vary the final energy of the beam. In comparison to other available designs, the advantage of these structures lies in their small size. Furthermore they can easily be tuned to the required resonance frequency by varying the length of the spiral. Due to the small size of the cavities the required budget can also be kept low. Here, two slightly different types of spiral loaded cavities, which were built for the REX-ISOLDE project at CERN and the intensity upgrade program at GSI are being discussed.

  10. Stable planar mesoscopic photonic crystal cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Magno, Giovanni; Grande, Marco; Lozes-Dupuy, Françoise; Gauthier-Lafaye, Olivier; Calò, Giovanna; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Mesoscopic self-collimation in mesoscopic photonic crystals with high reflectivity is exploited to realize a novel high-Q factor cavity by means of mesoscopic PhC planar mirrors. These mirrors efficiently confine a mode inside a planar Fabry-Perot-like cavity, due to a beam focusing effect that stabilises the cavity even for small beam sizes, resembling the focusing behaviour of curved mirrors. Moreover, they show an improved reflectivity with respect to their standard distributed Bragg reflector counterparts that allows higher compactness. A Q factor higher than 10^4 has been achieved for an optimized 5-period-long mirror cavity. The optimization of the Q factor and the performances in terms of energy storage, field enhancement and confinement are detailed.

  11. Cavity loss induced generation of W states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Huai-Zhi; Yang Zhen-Biao; Su Wan-Jun; Zhong Zhi-Rong; Zheng Shi-Biao

    2008-01-01

    The existence of decoherence-free subspace (DFS) has been discussed widely.In this paper,we propose an alternative scheme for generating the four-atom W states by manipulating DF qubits.The atoms are divided into two pairs and trapped in two separate optical cavities.Manipulation of atoms within DFS may generate a two-atom maximally entangled state in an individual cavity,which is a stable state.After driving the system out of DFS,the atoms will interact resonantly with the cavity field.The photons leaking from the cavities interfere at the beamsplitter,which destroys which-path information,and are finally detected by one of the detectors,leading to the generation of a W state.In addition,the numerical simulation indicates that the fidelity of the prepared state can,for a very wide parameter regime,be very close to unity.

  12. Quantum Dynamics of Nonlinear Cavity Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nation, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of three different configurations of nonlinear cavity systems. To begin, we carry out a quantum analysis of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) mechanical displacement detector comprised of a SQUID with a mechanically compliant loop segment. The SQUID is approximated by a nonlinear current-dependent inductor, inducing a flux tunable nonlinear Duffing term in the cavity equation of motion. Expressions are derived for the detector signal ...

  13. Cavity QED: applications to quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Han; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2004-10-01

    Possible schemes to implement the basic quantum gates for quantum computation have been presented based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems. We then discuss schemes to implement several important quantum algorithms such as the discrete quantum fourier transform (QFT) algorithm and Grover's quantum search algorithm based on these quantum gates. Some other applications of cavity QED based systems including the implementations of a quantum disentanglement eraser and an entanglement amplifier are also discussed.

  14. Open safety pin in the nasal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, I; Sikder, B; Sinha, R; Paul, R

    2004-04-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are common-day occurrences in Otolaryngologic practice. But an open safety pin in nose with it' s sharp end directed towards roof is a rare incidence, and available literature is silent about this presentation; it is probably, the first of it' s kind being reported. Two cases of safety pins inside the nasal cavity, one open and the other closed, have been presented here with a brief review of literature.

  15. Open safety pin in the nasal cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, I; Sikder, B.; R. Sinha; Paul, R

    2004-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are common-day occurrences in Otolaryngologic practice. But an open safety pin in nose with it’ s sharp end directed towards roof is a rare incidence, and available literature is silent about this presentation; it is probably, the first of it’ s kind being reported. Two cases of safety pins inside the nasal cavity, one open and the other closed, have been presented here with a brief review of literature.

  16. Cavity QED with Multiple Hyperfine Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Birnbaum, K M; Kimble, H J

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the weak-driving transmission of a linearly polarized cavity mode strongly coupled to the D2 transition of a single Cesium atom. Results are relevant to future experiments with microtoroid cavities, where the single-photon Rabi frequency g exceeds the excited-state hyperfine splittings, and photonic bandgap resonators, where g is greater than both the excited- and ground-state splitting.

  17. Electrically Pumped Vertical-Cavity Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the design of electrically pumped vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (eVCAs) for use in a mode-locked external-cavity laser has been developed, investigated and analysed. Four different eVCAs, one top-emitting and three bottom emitting structures, have been designed...... and discussed. The thesis concludes with recommendations for further work towards the realisation of compact electrically pumped mode-locked vertical externalcavity surface emitting lasers....

  18. Cavity QED on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. Using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  19. Cavity quantum electrodynamics on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Sadgrove, Mark; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. By using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  20. The emission properties of an atom inside a cavity when manipulating the atoms outside the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen; YE Liu; XIONG Kuang-wei; ZHANG Jin

    2003-01-01

    Considering three two-level atoms initially in the GHZ state, then one atom of them is put into an initially empty cavity and made resonant interaction. It is shown that the emission properties of the atom inside the cavity can be affected only when both of the atoms outside the cavity have been manipulated. This conclusion can also be generalized to n two-level atoms.

  1. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  2. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  3. Cavity Mode Frequencies and Large Optomechanical Coupling in Two-Membrane Cavity Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, J; Malossi, N; Vitali, D

    2015-01-01

    We study the cavity mode frequencies of a Fabry-Perot cavity containing two vibrating dielectric membranes and the corresponding optomechanical coupling. Due to optical interference, extremely large optomechanical coupling of the membrane relative motion is achieved when the two membranes are placed very close to a resonance of the inner cavity formed by the two membranes, and in the limit of highly reflective membranes. The upper bound of the coupling strength is given by the optomechanical coupling associated with the much shorter inner cavity, consistently with the analysis of A. Xuereb et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 223601 (2012).

  4. Total internal reflection spectroscopy for studying soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David A; Bain, Colin D

    2014-02-28

    Total internal reflection (TIR) spectroscopy is a widely used technique to study soft matter at interfaces. This tutorial review aims to provide researchers with an overview of the principles, experimental design and applications of TIR spectroscopy to enable them to understand how this class of techniques might be used in their research. It also highlights limitations and pitfalls of TIR techniques, which will assist readers in critically analysing the literature. Techniques covered include attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), TIR fluorescence, TIR Raman scattering and cavity-enhanced techniques. Other related techniques are briefly described.

  5. Molecular Laser Spectroscopy as a Tool for Gas Analysis Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javis Anyangwe Nwaboh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used the traceable infrared laser spectrometric amount fraction measurement (TILSAM method to perform absolute concentration measurements of molecular species using three laser spectroscopic techniques. We report results performed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS, and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS, all based on the TILSAM methodology. The measured results of the different spectroscopic techniques are in agreement with respective gravimetric values, showing that the TILSAM method is feasible with all different techniques. We emphasize the data quality objectives given by traceability issues and uncertainty analyses.

  6. Measurements of CO2, CH4, H2O, and HDO over a 2-km Outdoor Path with Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, G. B.; Giorgetta, F. R.; Coddington, I.; Swann, W. C.; Sinclair, L. C.; Cromer, C.; Baumann, E.; Newbury, N. R.; Kofler, J.; Petron, G.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    windy conditions when the atmosphere is well-mixed and species concentrations are stable, long-time-average data (240 min) are used to achieve high signal-to-noise ratio for careful comparisons of different spectral absorption models to the measured spectrum. Shorter five minute time resolution spectra are used to track fluctuations in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations over diurnal cycles and different weather conditions, and compared with simultaneous point-sampled measurements using a commercial cavity ringdown-based gas sensor. A. M. Zolot, F. R. Giorgetta, E. Baumann, J. W. Nicholson, W. C. Swann, I. Coddington, and N. R. Newbury (2012), Direct-Comb Molecular Spectroscopy with Accurate, Resolved Comb Teeth over 43 THz, Opt. Lett., 37(4), 638-640. a) Transmitted intensity spectrum over the 2-km outdoor path showing the spectral intensity variations of the combs and fine structure from gas absorption. b) Background-corrected absorbance of CO2 (blue) fitted with a Hitran model (red). The CO2 concentration measured from the fit is 408 ppm.

  7. Compound parabolic concentrator with cavity for tubular absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland

    1983-01-01

    A compond parabolic concentrator with a V-shaped cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity redirects all energy entering between the receiver and the cavity structure onto the receiver, if the optical receiver is emplaced a distance from the cavity not greater than 0.27 r (where r is the radius of the receiver).

  8. Scheme for implementing quantum secret sharing via cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhi-Hua; Lin Xiu-Min

    2005-01-01

    An experimentally feasible scheme for implementing quantum secret sharing via cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) is proposed. The scheme requires the large detuning of the cavity field from the atomic transition, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavity is greatly loosened.

  9. Teleportation of atomic states with a weak coherent cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the teleportation of an unknown atomic state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with a coherent cavity field. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is much smaller than one and thus the cavity decay can be effectively suppressed. Another adwntage of the scheme is that only one cavity is required.

  10. Buffered Electropolishing – A New Way for Achieving Extremely Smooth Surface Finish on Nb SRF Cavities to be Used in Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2009-05-01

    Future accelerators require unprecedented cavity performance, which is strongly influenced by interior surface nano-smoothness. Electropolishing (EP) is the technique of choice to be developed for high-field superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and related techniques point to the electropolishing mechanism of Nb in a sulphuric and hydrofluoric acid electrolyte controlled by a compact surface salt film under F- diffusion-limited mass transport control. These and other findings are guiding a systematic characterization to form the basis for cavities process optimization.

  11. Final Report on Investigations of the influence of Helium concentration and implantation rate on Cavity Nucleation and Growth during neutron irradiation of Fe and EUROFER 97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, Bachu Narain; Golubov, S.

    This report presents results of investigations of damage accumulation during neutron irradiation of pure iron and EUROFER 97 steel with or without prior helium implantation. The defect microstructure, in particular the cavities, was characterized using Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS...... after He implantation in general leads to an increase of both cavity sizes and densities. Estimates of cavity sizes and densities in EUROFER 97 after neutron irradiation with or without prior helium implantation are rather uncertain, but lead to values of the same order as for iron. TEM cannot resolve...

  12. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  13. Entanglement distillation for atomic states via cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Song, Wei; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2004-10-01

    Following a recent proposal (Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 (2000) 2392) about quantum information processing using dispersive atom-cavity interaction, in this paper, we proposed a physical scheme to concentrate the pure non-maximally entangled atomic states via cavity QED by using atomic collision in a far-off-resonant cavity. The most distinctive advantage of our scheme is that there is no excitation of cavity mode during the distillation procedure. Therefore the requirement on the quality of cavity is greatly loosened.

  14. New Method to Improve the Accelerating Gradient of Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhenchao

    2013-01-01

    Quench is a common phenomenon in a superconducting cavity and often limits the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Accurate location of the quench site can be located by second sound detection. For multi-cell superconducting cavity, one defect may cause the cell with defect quenches and then the whole cavity quenches. Now we proposed a new method to eliminate the bad influence of the quench cell to the whole cavity.

  15. Preparation of Cluster States for Many Atoms in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the generation of the cluster states for many atoms in cavity QED. In our scheme,the atoms are sent through nonresonant cavity fields in the vacuum states. The cavity fields are only virtually excited and no quantum information will be transferred from the atoms to the cavity fields. The advantage is that the cavities are suppressed during the procedure. The scheme can also be generalized to the ion trap system.

  16. Cavity nano-optomechanics: a nanomechanical system in a high finesse optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Stapfner, Sebastian; Hunger, David; Paulitschke, Philipp; Reichel, Jakob; Karrai, Khaled; Weig, Eva M; 10.1117/12.705901

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical oscillators with light has seen a recent surge of interest, as recent reviews report.[1, 2] This coupling is enhanced when confining light in an optical cavity where the mechanical oscillator is integrated as back- mirror or movable wall. At the nano-scale, the optomechanical coupling increases further thanks to a smaller optomechanical interaction volume and reduced mass of the mechanical oscillator. In view of realizing such cavity nano- optomechanics experiments, a scheme was proposed where a sub-wavelength sized nanomechanical oscillator is coupled to a high finesse optical microcavity.[3] Here we present such an experiment involving a single nanomechanical rod precisely positioned into the confined mode of a miniature Fabry-P\\'erot cavity.[4] We describe the employed stabilized cavity set-up and related finesse measurements. We proceed characterizing the nanorod vibration properties using ultrasonic piezo-actuation methods. Using the optical cavity as a transducer of nanomechan...

  17. Cavity-enhanced laser cooling of solid-state materials in a standing-wave cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhua Jia; Biao Zhong; Jianping Yin

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new method to cool the Yba+-doped ZBLANP glass in a standing-wave cavity. There are two advantages of this cavity-enhanced technique: the pumping power is greatly enhanced and the absorption of the cooling material is greatly increased. We introduce the basic principle of the cavity-enhanced laser cooling and discuss the cooling effect of a solid-state material in a cavity. From the theoretical study, it is found that the laser cooling effect is strongly dependent on the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors, the length of the solid material, the surface scattering of the material, and so on. Some optimal parameters for efficient laser cooling are obtained.

  18. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  19. Inflammatory oral cavity diseases of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, N C

    1992-11-01

    There is a great deal of frustration among veterinarians about the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity of the cat. This frustration is due to both the high frequency of feline oral inflammatory lesions and our poor understanding of their causes. This poor understanding can be blamed on several things: (1) a rapidly emerging, but still relatively poor, understanding of feline diseases in general and nutrition in particular; (2) a tendency to lump rather than separate specific oral inflammations; (3) a tendency not to use a thorough and systematic approach to diagnosing oral cavity disease; and (4) the reluctance of veterinarians to apply what is already known about human oral cavity diseases to cats. When problems 2 through 4 are adequately addressed, it becomes apparent that we really know more about oral cavity disease in the cat than we thought we knew and that great progress has been made. The task ahead is to define, in precise medical terms, those remaining disease entities of the oral cavity that pose the greatest health risk to cats, to apply what has been already been discovered from human disease counterparts, and to study them systematically.

  20. Plasmonic band gap cavities on biharmonic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Seckin Senlik, S.; Aydinli, Atilla

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally demonstrated the formation of plasmonic band gap cavities in infrared and visible wavelength range. The cavity structure is based on a biharmonic metallic grating with selective high dielectric loading. A uniform metallic grating structure enables strong surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation and a superimposed second harmonic component forms a band gap for the propagating SPPs. We show that a high dielectric superstructure can dramatically perturb the optical properties of SPPs and enables the control of the plasmonic band gap structure. Selective patterning of the high index superstructure results in an index contrast in and outside the patterned region that forms a cavity. This allows us to excite the SPPs that localize inside the cavity at specific wavelengths, satisfying the cavity resonance condition. Experimentally, we observe the formation of a localized state in the band gap and measure the dispersion diagram. Quality factors as high as 37 have been observed in the infrared wavelength. The simplicity of the fabrication and the method of testing make this approach attractive for applications requiring localization of propagating SPPs.