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Sample records for cavity preparation efeitos

  1. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...

  2. Cavity preparation machine for the standardization of in vitro preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos José Soares

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Several in vitro studies employ the confection of cavity preparations that are difficult to standardize by means of manual high speed handpieces. This study presents the development of a cavity preparation machine designed to standardize in vitro cavity preparations. A metal base of 25 mm x 25 mm x 4 mm (length x width x height was coupled to a small mobile table which was designed to be able to move by means of two precision micrometers (0.01-mm accuracy in the horizontal directions (right-left, and back-front. A high speed handpiece was coupled to a metallic connecting rod which had an accurate dial indicator enabling control of the vertical movement. The high speed handpiece is also able to move 180° around its longitudinal axis and 360° around its transversal axis. The suggested cavity preparation machine precisely helps in the standardization of cavity preparations for in vitro studies.

  3. Histopathological study of the effects of low-intensity laser irradiation ({lambda}=650 nm) on dental pulp tissue after cavity preparation; Estudo histopatologico dos efeitos da irradiacao laser em baixa intensidade ({lambda}=650nm) em tecido pulpar apos preparo cavitario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertella, Claudio

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate (in vivo) the effects of low-intensity Arsenide Gallium Aluminium laser application post-cavity preparation class 1. Six patients with bilateral pre-molars and molars indicated to extraction for orthodontics aim were selected. Four samples of these teeth underwent cavity preparation with deep from medium to high and two samples underwent cavity preparation from high to pulp expositions. The samples were constituted of two teeth of the same patient and received different treatments. One of the teeth underwent laser exposition and the other one was maintained as control, before restorative procedure with polycarboxylate cement. A diode laser ({lambda}=650 nm), output power 30 mW and fluencies of 1,8 J/cm{sup 2} and 2,7 J/cm{sup 2} in pre-molars and molars, respectively, was used for irradiation with repetition rate of 18 Hz in interrupted continuous wave mode. After seven days, the teeth were extracted and processed histologically with HE to verify morphological changes in the pulpy tissue. The four samples, which cavity preparation and restorative material were not in contact with the pulp, did not show histological differences between irradiated and non-irradiated teeth. Both of them presented the same characteristics of normality. The two samples with exposed pulpy tissue showed different results. The irradiated teeth presented no or slight inflammatory signs when compared to the control samples, which showed abscess in the coronary pulp interior and intense inflammatory infiltrated. These results suggest that the laser irradiation can be used as a therapeutic modality in clinical trials, in the conditions employed in this study. (author)

  4. Preparation and handling of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takaaki

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines the recent preparation methods for superconducting cavities used in various laboratories and universities, and reports the problems of the cavity fabrication at KEK as an example of mass production. Preparation and handling are first addressed, focusing on material, fabrication, surface treatment, rinsing, clean environment, and heat treatment. Cavity production at KEK is then described, centering on defects on the surface and clean environments. Field gradients of more than 20 MV/m have been obtained by 1.5-3 GHz single cavities, for multi-cell cavities Eacc of 10 MV/m are available at any frequency range. The successful construction of thirty-two cavities for TRISTAN at KEK is due to the careful checking of the surface and quality control of all processes against the surface defects and contaminations. Eacc of 5 MV/m has been achieved by 94 % of the TRISTAN cavities at the first cold test, but 6 % of them had to be reworked because of the surface defects. These defects could not be detected by an X-ray photograph or visual inspections during the fabrication processes. (N.K.)

  5. Correlation Between the Two Manual and Cavity Preparation Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moravej-Salehi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Acquiring fine psychomotor skills is challenging for dental students. Objectives This study aimed to assess the correlation of cavity preparation skills with drawing skills and handwriting of dental students. Methods Ninety-two male and female dental students taking the preclinical course of restorative dentistry in Shahid Beheshti dental school participated in three tests of handwriting, drawing a smile and an amalgam class (CL I cavity preparation and were scored using a specific scoring system. The correlation among the three skills was assessed using multivariate linear regression. Results Most dental students had cavity preparation, handwriting and drawing skills above the average. A significant correlation was found between drawing and tooth preparation skills (P < 0.05. Conclusions A statistically significant difference existed between drawing and cavity preparation skills in students; however, this correlation was not clinically considerable.

  6. Effects of low-intensity GaAlAs laser radiation ({lambda}=660 nm) on dentine-pulp interface after class I cavity preparation; Efeitos da radiacao laser GaAlAs ({lambda}=660 nm) em baixa intensidade na interface dentina-polpa pos-preparo cavitario classe 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy, Bruno Miranda

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity irradiation with GaAlAs laser (red emission) on the ultrastructure of dentine-pulp interface after conventionally prepared class I cavity preparation. Two patients with 8 premolars for extraction indicated for orthodontic reasons. Class I cavities were prepared in these teeth that were then divided into two groups. The first group received a treatment with laser with continuous emission, {lambda}=660 nm, with maximum power output of 30 mW. The dosimetry applied was of approximately 2J/cm{sup 2}, directly and perpendicularly into the cavity in only one section. After the irradiation, the cavities were filled with composite resin. The second group received the same treatment, except by the laser therapy. Twenty-eight days after the preparation, the teeth were extracted and were processed for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Two sound teeth, without any preparation, were also studied. The irradiated group presented odontoblastic processes in higher contact with the extracellular matrix and the collagen fibers appeared more aggregated and organized than those of control group. These results were also observed in the healthy-teeth. Thus, we suggest that laser irradiation accelerates the recovery of the dental structures involved in the cavity preparation at the pre-dentine level. (author)

  7. Cavity Processing and Preparation of 650 MHz Elliptical Cell Cavities for PIP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Allan [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, Saravan Kumar [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Merio, Margherita [Fermilab; Reid, Thomas [Argonne (main); Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab

    2017-05-01

    The PIP-II project at Fermilab requires fifteen 650 MHz SRF cryomodules as part of the 800 MeV LINAC that will provide a high intensity proton beam to the Fermilab neutrino program. A total of fifty-seven high-performance SRF cavities will populate the cryomodules and will operate in both pulsed and continuous wave modes. These cavities will be processed and prepared for performance testing utilizing adapted cavity processing infrastructure already in place at Fermilab and Argonne. The processing recipes implemented for these structures will incorporate state-of-the art processing and cleaning techniques developed for 1.3 GHz SRF cavities for the ILC, XFEL, and LCLS-II projects. This paper describes the details of the processing recipes and associated chemistry, heat treatment, and cleanroom processes at the Fermilab and Argonne cavity processing facilities. This paper also presents single and multi-cell cavity test results with quality factors above 5·10¹⁰ and accelerating gradients above 30 MV/m.

  8. A two-stage shape optimization process for cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Fok, Alex S L; Qualtrough, Alison

    2008-11-01

    Clinical data indicate that previously restored teeth are more likely to fracture under occlusal loads. The reason for this is attributed to the high stresses at the tooth-restoration interface, especially following debonding of the restoration from the tooth. This work aims to minimise these interfacial stresses by optimizing the cavity shape using modern shape optimisation techniques. Shape optimisation methods based on the principle of biological adaptive growth were incorporated into a finite element program and used to optimize the design of cavity preparations as previous work had successfully used one such method to minimise stresses at the internal line angles of conventional restorations with defective bonds. The overall shapes of the cavity preparations were maintained while the profiles of the internal line angles were modified. In the present study, the overall shape of the cavity preparation was also subject to modification in the optimization process. A topological optimization method which placed the restorative material according to the stress distribution was first used to obtain a draft design for the cavity shape, assuming perfect bonding at the tooth-restoration interface. The draft shape was then refined using the method employed in the previous study, to allow for deterioration in the interfacial bond strength. These optimization methods were incorporated into the commercial finite element package ABAQUS as a User Material Subroutine (UMAT) to automate the optimization process. Compared with the conventional design, the stress level at the tooth-restoration interface in the optimized design was reduced significantly, irrespective of the bonding condition. Finite-element based shape optimization methods provide a useful tool for minimizing the interfacial stresses in dental restorations. The longevity of restored teeth using the optimized designs is therefore expected to be prolonged.

  9. Times required for cavity preparation using ultrasonic tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Nergiz, Ibrahim; Pfeiffer, Peter; Tütüncü, Rengin

    1999-01-01

    Poster for: Date/Event/Venue: 10.03.99-13.03.99 77th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR Vancouver The purpose of this study was to evaluate the required time for opening the proximal cavities using three ultrasonic tips of different sizes and fine diamond inlay bur followed by ultrasonic tip.

  10. Guided endodontics: accuracy of a novel method for guided access cavity preparation and root canal location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, M S; Connert, T; Weiger, R; Krastl, G; Kühl, S

    2016-10-01

    To present a novel method utilizing 3D printed templates to gain guided access to root canals and to evaluate its accuracy in vitro. Sixty extracted human teeth were placed into six maxillary jaw models. Preoperative CBCT scans were matched with intra-oral scans using the coDiagnostix(™) software. Access cavities, sleeves and templates for guidance were virtually planned. Templates were produced by a 3D printer. After access cavity preparation by two operators, a postoperative CBCT scan was superimposed on the virtual planning. Accuracy was measured by calculating the deviation of planned and prepared cavities in three dimensions and angle. Ninety-five per cent confidence intervals were calculated for both operators. All root canals were accessible after cavity preparation with 'Guided Endodontics'. Deviations of planned and prepared access cavities were low with means ranging from 0.16 to 0.21 mm for different aspects at the base of the bur and 0.17-0.47 mm at the tip of the bur. Mean of angle deviation was 1.81°. Overlapping 95% confidence intervals revealed no significant difference between operators. 'Guided Endodontics' allowed an accurate access cavity preparation up to the apical third of the root utilizing printed templates for guidance. All root canals were accessible after preparation. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mother's bacteria from being passed to the child. Treatment of Cavities Fluoride Fillings Root canal or tooth extraction If ... to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people ...

  12. Preparation and handling of surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloess, D.

    1988-01-01

    Fortunately, surface treatment for s.c. cavities knows only one simple rule. If one observes this rule strictly one will be successful, if not, one will fail! The rule is CLEANLINESS. This means: clean material (high purity niobium without inclusions), clean (analytical grade) polishing chemicals and solvents, ultraclean (semiconductor grade) rinsing water, ultraclean (class 100) assembly environment. In general, if one applies the same working practice as the semiconductor industry, one will produce surfaces that are less clean than silicon wafers, due to the shape of the cavity (an inner surface is much more difficult to clean than a flat wafer); due to its size and due to the material (niobium is hydrophilic which makes the water with all the dirt in it stick to the surface). 9 references

  13. Quantum nonlinear cavity quantum electrodynamics with coherently prepared atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guoqing; Gu, Wen-ju; Li, Gaoxiang; Zou, Bichen; Zhu, Yifu

    2015-09-01

    We propose a method to study the quantum nonlinearity and observe the multiphoton transitions in a multiatom cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system. We show that by inducing simultaneously destructive quantum interference for the single-photon and two-photon excitations in the CQED system, it is possible to observe the direct three-photon excitation of the higher-order ladder states of the CQED system. We report an experiment with cold Rb atoms confined in an optical cavity and demonstrate such interference control of the multiphoton excitations of the CQED system. The observed nonlinear excitation of the CQED ladder states agrees with a theoretical analysis based on a fully quantized treatment of the CQED system, but disagrees with the semiclassical analysis of the CQED system. Thus it represents a direct observation of the quantum nature of the multiatom CQED system and opens new ways to explore quantum nonlinearity and its applications in quantum optical systems in which multiple absorbers or emitters are coupled with photons in confined cavity structures.

  14. A comparison of Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghanizad, Nasrin; Kalhori, Katayoun AM; Khalilak, Zohreh; Esmaeili, Maryam Ali; de Fatima Zanirato Lizarelli, Rosane

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare Er, Cr: YSGG laser with ultrasonic preparation on the seal of retrograde cavities. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight maxillary anterior teeth were used in this study. After removing the crowns, the canals were prepared with the step-back technique and filled with guttapercha. Three millimeters below the apex; each root was cut with a fissure diamond bur. The root surfaces were then covered with nail polish and three millimeters deep retrograde class I cavities were prepared, using Er, Cr: YSGG laser (group L=12 roots) or ultrasonic retro-tip (group U=12 roots). Four roots were arranged for negative and positive control groups. Retrograde cavities were then filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and teeth were placed in 2% methylene blue dye for 72 hours. The amount of dye penetration in sagittal sections of each tooth was measured with a stereomicroscope. An independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results: Cavities prepared with the Er, Cr: YSGG laser (1.61 + 0.81) showed significantly less micro-leakage than those prepared with the ultrasound (2.55+ 1.84) (P value =0.02). Conclusions: Under the conditions of this research, the use of Er, Cr: YSGG laser for retrograde cavity preparation causes significantly less apical leakage and may increase the success rate of endodontic surgeries. PMID:25941423

  15. Pulpal reaction in dogs following cavity preparation by Er:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Y.; Ebihara, Arata; Takeda, A.; Suda, H.

    1995-04-01

    A histopathological study was performed on the tooth pulp of mongrel dogs after cavity preparation using the conventional high speed method (control group) and the newly developed Er:YAG laser system (laser group, output energy: 100 mJ, 150 mJ, and 200 mJ/pulse). All samples were divided into two groups (deep cavity and shallow cavity) according to the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) and histopathologically evaluated. After 1, 2, 4, 7 and 28 days postoperatively, there was no histopathological difference between the control group and the laser group. Er:YAG laser irradiation with three different output energies made little difference in the degree of pulpal damage. In the deep cavities, damage of the pulp was more remarkable than the shallow cavities in all groups. The efficacy of cutting rate in the laser group was not very different from the control group.

  16. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Content Medical News Cavities ˈkav-ət-ē (Dental Caries) By James T. Ubertalli, DMD, Private Practice, Hingham, ... access to dental care, and better treatment for tooth decay and periodontal disease. When teeth are lost, chewing is greatly hindered, and speaking ...

  17. Microleakage in conservative cavities varying the preparation method and surface treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Abdallah Atoui

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess microleakage in conservative class V cavities prepared with aluminum-oxide air abrasion or turbine and restored with self-etching or etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Forty premolars were randomly assigned to 4 groups (I and II: air abrasion; III and IV: turbine and class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces. Conditioning approaches were: groups I/III - 37% phosphoric acid; groups II/IV - self-priming etchant (Tyrian-SPE. Cavities were restored with One Step Plus/Filtek Z250. After finishing, specimens were thermocycled, immersed in 50% silver nitrate, and serially sectioned. Microleakage at the occlusal and cervical interfaces was measured in mm and calculated by a software. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05. RESULTS: Marginal seal provided by air abrasion was similar to high-speed handpiece, except for group I. There was SIGNIFICANT difference between enamel and dentin/cementum margins for to group I and II: air abrasion. The etch-and-rinse adhesive system promoted a better marginal seal. At enamel and dentin/cementum margins, the highest microleakage values were found in cavities treated with the self-etching adhesive system. At dentin/cementum margins, high-speed handpiece preparations associated with etch-and-rinse system provided the least dye penetration. CONCLUSION: Marginal seal of cavities prepared with aluminum-oxide air abrasion was different from that of conventionally prepared cavities, and the etch-and-rinse system promoted higher marginal seal at both enamel and dentin margins.

  18. Investigation of Plasma Etching for Superconducting RF Cavities Surface Preparation. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuskovic, Leposava

    2009-01-01

    Our results show that plasma-treated samples are comparable or superior to a BCP sample, both in the size of features and sharpness of the boundaries between individual features at the surface. Plasma treatment of bulk Nb cavities is a promising technique for microwave cavities preparation used in particle acceleration application. Etching rates are sufficiently high to enable efficient removal of mechanically damaged surface layer with high reproducibility. No impurities are deposited on the bulk Nb surface during plasma treatment. Surface topology characteristic are promising for complex cavity geometry, since discharge conforms the profile of the reaction chamber. In view of these experimental results, we propose plasma treatment for producing microwave cavities with high Q factor instead of using bulk Nb treated with wet etching process.

  19. Comparison of Dentin Permeability After Tooth Cavity Preparation with Diamond Bur and Er:YAG Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the permeability of dentin after using diamond bur and Er:YAG laser.Materials and Methods: Seventy-two recently extracted, intact, and restoration-free human permanent molars were used in this study. The samples were randomly divided into three groups of 24 each and class I cavities were prepared as follows. Group 1: High speed diamond bur with air and water spray. Group 2: Er:YAG laser. Group 3: Er:YAG laser followed by additional sub-ablative laser treatment. Each group consisted of two subgroups with different cavity depths of 2mm and 4mm.  The entire cavity floor was in dentin. Two samples from each subgroup were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM. The external surfaces of other samples were covered with nail varnish (except the prepared cavity and immersed in 0.5% methylene blue solution for 48 hours.  After irrigation of samples with water, they were sectioned in bucco-lingual direction. Then, the samples were evaluated under a stereomicroscope at ×160 magnification. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test.Results: Two-way ANOVA showed significant difference in permeability between groups 2 and 3 (laser groups with and without further treatment and group 1 (bur group. The highest permeability was seen in the group 1. There was no significant difference in dentin permeability between groups 2 and 3 and no significant difference was observed between different depths (2mm and 4mm.Conclusion: Cavities prepared by laser have less dentin permeability than cavities prepared by diamond bur.

  20. Microleakage of Er:YAG laser and dental bur prepared cavities in primary teeth restored with different adhesive restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghalian, Ali; Nakhjavani, Yahya B; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Motahhary, Pouria; Bahramian, Hoda

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation and conventional dental bur cavity preparation on in vitro microleakage of class V cavities restored with different adhesive restorative materials and two types of self-etching adhesives in primary teeth. Standard class V cavities were prepared on 80 extracted primary, and the teeth were randomly divided into eight subgroups prepared either by dental bur or Er:YAG laser irradiation and then restored with self-cured glass ionomer (GI), resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), resin composite and Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etching adhesive), and resin composite and Clearfil S3 Bond (one-step self-etching adhesive). Restorations were finished and stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and then subjected to thermocycling. All the teeth were sealed with nail varnish, placed in a silver nitrate solution, and then vertically cut in a buccolingually direction. Subsequently, the specimens were evaluated for gingival and occlusal microleakage using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney test. Wilcoxon test was used for comparing occlusal microleakage with gingival microleakage at p laser irradiation resulted in a significantly higher degree of microleakage only at the gingival margins for teeth restored with GI or RMGI, or composite and Clearfil S3 Bond compared with the bur preparation. The Er:YAG laser-prepared teeth restored with composite and Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated a better marginal seal on occlusal and gingival margins compared with that of bur-prepared cavities. The degree of microleakage in class V cavities was affected by the type of adhesive restorative materials, type of self-etching adhesive, cavity margin location, and tooth preparation method either by Er:YAG laser or dental bur.

  1. Vibro-acoustic and nonlinear analysis of cadavric femoral bone impaction in cavity preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberst Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Tikhonov regularisation, as inverse deconvolution technique, is applied to calculate the acoustic transfer functions from the acoustic responses and their mechanical impacts. The extracted spectra highlight that system characteristics altered during the cavity preparation process: in the high-frequency range the number of resonances increased with impacts and broach size. By applying nonlinear time series analysis the system dynamics increase in complexity and demand for a larger minimum embedding dimension. The growing number of resonances with similar level of the transfer function indicates a higher propensity to dissipate energy over sound; the change in embedding dimension indicates a decrease in linearity. The spectral changes as well as the altered dimension requirements indicate either an improved coupling between the bone and the broach or the onset of micro-fractures caused by growing stress levels within the bone.

  2. Active measurement-based quantum feedback for preparing and stabilizing superpositions of two cavity photon number states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube-Lauziere, Yves

    The measurement-based quantum feedback scheme developed and implemented by Haroche and collaborators to actively prepare and stabilize specific photon number states in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) is a milestone achievement in the active protection of quantum states from decoherence. This feat was achieved by injecting, after each weak dispersive measurement of the cavity state via Rydberg atoms serving as cavity sensors, a low average number classical field (coherent state) to steer the cavity towards the targeted number state. This talk will present the generalization of the theory developed for targeting number states in order to prepare and stabilize desired superpositions of two cavity photon number states. Results from realistic simulations taking into account decoherence and imperfections in a CQED set-up will be presented. These demonstrate the validity of the generalized theory and points to the experimental feasibility of preparing and stabilizing such superpositions. This is a further step towards the active protection of more complex quantum states than number states. This work, cast in the context of CQED, is also almost readily applicable to circuit QED. YBL acknowledges financial support from the Institut Quantique through a Canada First Research Excellence Fund.

  3. LED light attenuation through human dentin: a first step toward pulp photobiomodulation after cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrioni, Ana Paula S; Alonso, Juliana R L; Basso, Fernanda G; Moriyama, Lilian T; Hebling, Josimeri; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; De Souza, Costa Carlos A

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the transdentinal light attenuation of LED at three wavelengths through different dentin thicknesses, simulating cavity preparations of different depths. Forty-two dentin discs of three thicknesses (0.2, 0.5 and 1 mm; n = 14) were prepared from the coronal dentin of extracted sound human molars. The discs were illuminated with a LED light at three wavelengths (450+/-10 nm, 630 +/-10 nm and 850 +/-10 nm) to determine light attenuation. Light transmittance was also measured by spectrophotometry. In terms of minimum (0.2 mm) and maximum (1.0 mm) dentin thicknesses, the percentage of light attenuation varied from 49.3% to 69.9% for blue light, 42.9% to 58.5% for red light and 39.3% to 46.8% for infrared. For transmittance values, an increase was observed for all thicknesses according to greater wavelengths, and the largest variation occurred for the 0.2 mm thickness. All three wavelengths were able to pass through the dentin barrier at different thicknesses. Furthermore, the LED power loss and transmittance showed wide variations, depending on dentin thickness and wavelength.

  4. A comparative evaluation of DIAGNOdent and caries detector dye in detection of residual caries in prepared cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Majid; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Jafari, Marzieh

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the association between DIAGNOdent laser and caries detector dye in detection of the remaining caries in restorative cavities. The sample consisted of 100 cavities prepared in patients referring to the Department of Restorative Dentistry of Mashhad Dental School. After confirming caries absence by tactile examination, the presence of any residual caries was determined by a laser fluorescence (LF) device (DIAGNOdent Pen) and then by caries detector dye. The data were analyzed through McNemar test. When the cut off value was considered as ≥13, both DIAGNOdent Pen and caries detector dye found 54 cavities as without caries and 12 cavities as carious. There were 32 teeth diagnosed as decayed only by the dye and two cases that were diagnosed as having residual caries only by the DIAGNOdent. The McNemar test revealed a significant difference in the diagnosis of residual caries between the two methods (p laser fluorescence and tactile examination in residual caries detection (p > 0.05). Both DIAGNOdent Pen and caries detector dye can be considered as adjuncts for detecting residual caries in prepared cavities. However, the use of laser fluorescence device can provide results that are more consistent with tactile examination, while relying on caries detector dye may result in excessive removal of tooth tissue, and thus increase the risk of pulpal exposure. Incomparision with caries detector dye, Residual caries detection by DIAGNOdent Pen is more consistent with tactile examination.

  5. Biocompatibility of a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement applied in very deep cavities prepared in human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Scheffel, Débora Lopes Sales; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated whether a restorative resin-modified glass ionomer cement, Vitremer (VM), would be biocompatible with pulp tissue when used as a liner in very deep cavities prepared in young human permanent teeth. Two dental cements in current use as liner materials, Vitrebond (VB) and Dycal (DY), were compared to VM. Class V cavities were prepared in 36 sound premolars that were scheduled for extraction, and the cavity floor was lined with the restorative cement (VM) or a liner/base control cement (VB or DY). For VM specimens, the cavity floor was pretreated with a primer (polyacrylic acid plus 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Teeth were extracted after 7 or 30 days and processed for microscopic evaluation. In the VM group, inward diffusion of dental material components through dentinal tubules, associated with disruption of the odontoblastic layer, moderate to intense inflammatory response, and resorption of inner dentin, was observed in 2 teeth at 7 days. These histologic features were observed in 1 tooth at 30 days. In the VB group, mild inflammatory reactions and tissue disorganization observed at 7 days were resolved at 30 days. No pulpal damage occurred in the DY specimens. Of the materials tested, only Vitremer was not considered biocompatible, because it caused persistent pulpal damage when applied in very deep cavities (remaining dentin thickness less than 0.3 mm).

  6. Industrialization of the nitrogen-doping preparation for SRF cavities for LCLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, D.; Aderhold, S.; Burrill, A.; Daly, E.; Davis, K.; Grassellino, A.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Marhauser, F.; Melnychuk, O.; Palczewski, A.; Posen, S.; Ross, M.; Sergatskov, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Wilson, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art coherent X-ray source being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It employs 280 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in order operate in continuous wave (CW) mode. To reduce the overall cryogenic cost of such a large accelerator, nitrogen-doping of the SRF cavities is being used. Nitrogen-doping has consistently been shown to increase the efficiency of SRF cavities operating in the 2.0 K regime and at medium fields (15-20 MV/m) in vertical cavity tests and horizontal cryomodule tests. While nitrogen-doping's efficacy for improvement of cavity performance was demonstrated at three independent labs, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and Cornell University, transfer of the technology to industry for LCLS-II production was not without challenges. Here we present results from the beginning of LCLS-II cavity production. We discuss qualification of the cavity vendors and the first cavities from each vendor. Finally, we demonstrate that nitrogen-doping has been successfully transferred to SRF cavity vendors, resulting in consistent production of cavities with better cryogenic efficiency than has ever been achieved for a large-scale accelerator.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the interaction pattern between dentin and resin after cavity preparation using Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schein, Marcelo Thome

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the interaction pattern formed between dentin and resin on cavities prepared with an erbium laser (Er:YAG). The morphological aspect of the irradiated dentin after acid etching was also observed. Ten dentin disks were obtained from fresh extracted third molars. Each disk received two cavities, one prepared with a conventional high-speed drill, while the other cavity was obtained by the use of an Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser, KaVo Co.). The laser treatment was performed with 250 mJ/pulse, 4 Hz, non contact mode, focused beam, and a fine water mist was used. Five disks were prepared for morphological analysis of the acid etched dentin. The other five disks had their cavities restored with Single Bond (3M) followed by Z100 resin (3M). The specimens were observed under scanning electron microscopy after dentin-resin interface demineralization and deproteinization. It was observed that the morphological characteristics of the acid-etched irradiated dentin were not favorable to the diffusion of monomers through the collagen network. The dentin resin interfacial aspect of irradiated dentin, after acid etching, showed thin tags and scarce hybridization zones, which agreed with the morphology of the irradiated and acid-etched dentin substrate observed. (author)

  8. A self-designed instrument to evaluate cavosurface angle for class I amalgam cavity preparation: A learning aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankit; Acharya, Shashi Rashmi; Ballal, Vasudev; Sharma, Padmaja

    2012-07-01

    Fighting the controversies, amalgam, as a posterior restorative material has survived till date. The fate of amalgam restoration is determined by geometry of the cavity preparation and cavosurface angle is one integral part of the cavity, which decides the marginal characteristics of the restoration and health of the tooth. Low edge strength of amalgam highlights the importance of cavosurface angle. However, at the same time conservation of the tooth also should be considered. This article presents a self-designed instrument to evaluate and obtain a cavosurface angle close to 110°. The design of the instrument also helps in evaluating parameters, such as depth of the cavity, undercut angle, and allows finishing of the buccal or lingual walls.

  9. Generation and Preparation of the Sustained Optimal Entropy Squeezing State of a Motional Atom Inside Vacuum Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Juan; Luo, An; Peng, Zhao-Hui; Jia, Chun-Xia; Jiang, Chun-Lei; Zhou, Bing-Ju

    2018-01-01

    Considering two two-level atoms initially in Bell state, we send one atom into a vacuum cavity while leaving the other outside, and consider the motion of atom inside the cavity. Using quantum information entropy squeezing theory, the time evolution of the entropy squeezing factor of atom inside the cavity is discussed for two cases, i.e., before and after performing rotation operations and measuring atom outside, the influences of the field mode structure and atomic motions on the atomic entropy squeezing are evaluated. It is shown that atom inside the cavity has no entropy squeezing phenomenon before operating atom outside the cavity. However, the optimal entropy squeezing phenomenon of period T = 2 π/ p emerges and constant entropy squeezing phenomenon can occur by adjusting rotation operation to R( π/4), and setting the field mode structure parameter 0 50, a sustained optimal entropy squeezing state (SOESS) can be generated. We also present the schematic circuit diagram of preparation of SOESS. Our proposal provides a possible way for the initial decoherent state recovering into sustained maximal coherent superposition state of single atom in the quantum noise environment.

  10. Preparation of Schrödinger cat states of a cavity field via coupling to a superconducting charge qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Dagoberto S.; Nemes, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    We extend the approach in Ref. 5 [Y.-X. Liu, L. F. Wei and F. Nori, Phys. Rev. A 71 (2005) 063820] for preparing superposition states of a cavity field interacting with a superconducting charge qubit. We study effects of the nonlinearity on the creation of such states. We show that the main contribution of nonlinear effects is to shorten the time necessary to build the superposition.

  11. Influence of cavity preparation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser and restorative materials on in situ secondary caries development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Ana Carolina Tedesco; Cassoni, Alessandra; de Freitas, Patrícia Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Brugnera Junior, Aldo; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of cavity preparation and restorative materials containing fluorides in the prevention of secondary caries lesion development in situ. A total of 120 blocks obtained from human teeth were divided into two groups and standardized cavities were prepared using diamond burs (DB) or Er,Cr:YSGG-laser [20 Hz, 4.0W, 55% water, 65% air (LA)]. They were divided into three subgroups according to the restorative material (n=20): glass-ionomer cement (GI), resin modified glass-ionomer (RM) or composite resin (CR). Blocks were fixed in palatal intra-oral appliances worn in situ by 20 human volunteers, who dropped 20% sucrose solution eight times daily. After 21 days, blocks were removed and restorations were cross-sectioned to evaluate microhardness [Knoop hardness number (KHN)] underneath enamel surface from 30 to 200 μm. Factors "cavity preparation," "restorative materials," and "depth" were evaluated by three way ANOVA, followed by Tukey test (plaser increases caries resistance of enamel walls, and reduce caries lesion depth development regardless of fluoride presence in the restorative material. CR showed higher caries lesion development than GI, and RM showed intermediate results.

  12. Effect of type of cavity preparation (bur,Er:YAG laser and restorative materials on prevention of caries lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Despite the reduction of incidence of dental caries in recent years, this disease is common and many efforts were conducted to decrease the prevalence of dental caries. On the other hand secondary caries lesions are the main reason for replacement of direct restorations. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate suitable methods of preparation and restorative materials to reduce caries recurrence. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, eighty human teeth were collected and stored in normal saline. The teeth were soft-tissue debrided and cleaned with water/pumice slurry and rubber cups in a low-speed handpiece. Speciments were randomly divided in two main groups. Cavities were prepared with diamond burs or Er:YAG laser (10 Hz, 300 mJ, 3W. Each group was divided into 4 sub-groups, and restored with a glass-ionomer cement (Fuji IX, resin modified glass-ionomer (Fuji II LC, total etch bonding + composite resin or self-etch bonding + composite resin. The specimens were submitted to pH cycling. Speciments were then sectioned, polished and Vickers microhardness measurements were performed on each specimen. Differences among the medians were analyzed using two way ANOVA test at a 95% confidence level and Tukey test. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant difference in the type of substrate (enamel, dentin in both main groups (P<0.0001 but no differences in the caries lesion development between the cavities restored with the same material and prepared with diamond burs or Er:YAG laser. Conclusion: The Er:YAG laser used for cavity preparation and different types of restorative materials used did not show the ability to guarantee significantly more acid-resistance tooth structure against demineralization.

  13. A low energy muon spin rotation and point contact tunneling study of niobium films prepared for superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, Tobias; Calatroni, S.; Sublet, A.; Terenziani, G.; Prokscha, T.; Salman, Z.; Suter, A.; Proslier, T.; Zasadzinski, J.

    2017-12-01

    Point contact tunneling and low energy muon spin rotation are used to probe, on the same samples, the surface superconducting properties of micrometer thick niobium films deposited onto copper substrates using different sputtering techniques: diode, dc magnetron and HIPIMS. The combined results are compared to radio-frequency tests performances of RF cavities made with the same processes. Degraded surface superconducting properties are found to correlate to lower quality factors and stronger Q-slope. In addition, both techniques find evidence for surface paramagnetism on all samples and particularly on Nb films prepared by HIPIMS.

  14. Evolução dos preparos das cavidades de classe II Developments in preparation of class II cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Miyuki ONO

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A evolução dos preparos de classe II com a introdução de novos materiais e a conscientização da importância da preservação de estrutura dental sadia são abordadas nos preparos do tipo Almqvist, Roggenkamp e túnel, em que se observa a necessidade de menor desgaste da estrutura dentária, com aumento da resistência à fratura, melhor estética e melhor retençãoDevelopments in preparation of class II cavities with the introduction of new materials and awareness of the importance of preservation of a sound dental structure are broached in preparations of the type Almqvist, Roggenkamp and tunnel, where the need for less wear of the dental structure was observed with an increase in fracture strength, better aesthetics, and better retention

  15. Effects of low-intensity GaAlAs laser radiation (λ=660 nm) on dentine-pulp interface after class I cavity preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, Bruno Miranda

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity irradiation with GaAlAs laser (red emission) on the ultrastructure of dentine-pulp interface after conventionally prepared class I cavity preparation. Two patients with 8 premolars for extraction indicated for orthodontic reasons. Class I cavities were prepared in these teeth that were then divided into two groups. The first group received a treatment with laser with continuous emission, λ=660 nm, with maximum power output of 30 mW. The dosimetry applied was of approximately 2J/cm 2 , directly and perpendicularly into the cavity in only one section. After the irradiation, the cavities were filled with composite resin. The second group received the same treatment, except by the laser therapy. Twenty-eight days after the preparation, the teeth were extracted and were processed for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Two sound teeth, without any preparation, were also studied. The irradiated group presented odontoblastic processes in higher contact with the extracellular matrix and the collagen fibers appeared more aggregated and organized than those of control group. These results were also observed in the healthy-teeth. Thus, we suggest that laser irradiation accelerates the recovery of the dental structures involved in the cavity preparation at the pre-dentine level. (author)

  16. Morphological evaluation of cavity preparation surface after duraphat and Er:YAG laser treatment by scanning electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Luciane Borelli

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of dental surface using different lasers to prevent dental caries has been studied for several on last years. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the morphological changes on dentin surface from pulpal wall of cavity preparations performed by high-speed drill, treated with 2,26% fluoride varnish (Duraphat) and Er:YAG laser, and then submitted after receiving or not to EDTA 15% treatment. Twenty Class V cavities were performed on ten humans molars. The specimens were randomly divided in to 4 groups: group 1- treatment with Duraphat followed by Er:YAG laser irradiation (120 mJ/ 4 Hz); group 2: Er:YAG laser irradiation, same parameters, followed by Duraphat treatment; group 3- same group 1 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min); group 4 - same as group 2 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min). The specimens were processed for SEM analysis. The micrographs showed that Duraphat treatment promoted morphological changes on dentin, closing dentinal tubules; the specimens treated by Duraphat and Er:YAG laser and immersed in EDTA (group 3) showed homogeneous surface, closed and protected dentinal tubules, maintenance of the fluoride varnish on the dentin surface and around the dentinal tubules, showing feasible and efficiency of these therapies the feasibility.(author)

  17. Assessment of residual coronal tooth structure postendodontic cavity preparation using digital dental impressions and micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nuaimi, Nassr; Patel, Shanon; Foschi, Federico; Mannocci, Francesco; Austin, Rupert S

    To evaluate the in vitro accuracy of digital impressions for three-dimensional (3D) volumetric measurement of residual coronal tooth structure postendodontic cavity preparation, with reference to micro-computed tomography (μCT). Quantification of the accuracy and precision of the intraoral digital scanner (3M True Definition Scanner - IOS) was performed using a metrology gauge block and a profilometric calibration model. Thirty-four human extracted molars with endodontic access cavities were scanned using both intraoral scanning (test scanner) in high-resolution mode, and µCT (reference scanner: GE Locus SP μCT scanner) in high- (HiResCT) and low- (LoResCT) resolution modes. Comparisons of volumetric accuracy and 3D profilometric deviations were performed using surface metrology software. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), in combination with the Bonferroni post hoc test, was implemented to compare the differences in volume measurements between scanning methods. Digital scanning revealed smaller volume measurements by 1.36% and 0.68% compared to HiResCT and LoResCT, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in the volumetric measurements obtained from the IOS scanner and both HiResCT and LoResCT scans (P digital scanner was able to reliably measure the extra- and intracoronal aspect of the endodontically accessed tooth.

  18. Influence of different cavity preparation designs on fracture resistance of onlay and overlay restorations using different CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ön Salman, Gizem; Tacír, Ɣbrahim Halil; Polat, Zelal Seyfioğlu; Salman, Afşin

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate fracture strength of different preparation designed onlay and overlay restorations produced by Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and three different new ceramic-polymer blocks. Ninety-one extracted human mandibular molars were used in this study. Preparations were made as (1) Only functional cusps reduction, (2) Only functional cusps reduction+rounded shoulder finish line, (3) All cusps reduction, or (4) All cusps reduction+rounded shoulder finish line. Then these four cavity types were restored with three different materials: VITA Enamic, GC Cerasmart, Lava Ultimate. Thirteen groups were created by added control group (n= 7). Adhesive cementation was achieved by using a dual cured composite resin adhesive cement RelyX Ultimate. All samples were subjected to thermocycling for 5,000 cycles in water baths between 50°C and 55°C. The fracture resistance of specimens was determined under compressive loads along the long axis of the restored teeth at 0.5 mm/minute crosshead speed until fracture with a universal test machine. Fracture types of restored groups were evaluated. For fracture resistance data, one-way ANOVA; for correlation between material type and preparation design, two-way ANOVA were used. Percentage table and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed for analysis of fracture types. There was no significant difference between all the groups (one-way ANOVA, P> 0.05). Group 4 showed statistically higher fracture strength values than Group 1 and no significant difference was found among other preparation designs by two-way ANOVA that compared all types of preparation designs regardless of material difference (Poverlay restorations produced with newly introduced ceramic-polymer CAD/CAM materials.

  19. Marginal microleakage in vitro study on class V cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with acid or etched with Er:YAG laser and acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Henrique Dutra Simoes

    2001-01-01

    Microleakage at the interface between the teeth and the restorative materials remains a problem with composite resin restorations. Microleakage at the gingival margins of class V cavities restorations still challenge as they are usually placed in dentin and/or cementum. Previous studies have shown that the cavity preparation with Er:YAG laser is possible. It has been reported that Er:YAG laser has ability to create irregular surface providing micromechanical retention for adhesive dental restorative materials and to improve marginal sealing. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal microleakage on class V cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with acid or with Er:YAG laser and acid, in compared to those prepared and etched conventionally. Thirty human molars were divided into three groups, namely: group I - prepared with Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser II - Germany) and etched with 37% phosphoric acid; group II - prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with Er:YAG laser and 37% phosphoric acid; group III (control group) - prepared with high speed drill and etched with 37% phosphoric acid. All cavities were treated with same adhesive system (Single Bond - 3M) and restored with the composite resin (Z100 - 3M), according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored at 37 deg C in water for 24 hours, polished with Sof-Lex discs (3M), thermally stressed, sealed with a nail polish coating except for the area of the restoration and 1 mm around it, and immersed in a 50% aqueous solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours. After that, the specimens were rinsed in water, soaked in a photodeveloping solution and exposed to a fluorescent light for 8 hours. The teeth were embedded in an autopolymerizing resin and sectioned longitudinally using a diamond saw microtome under running water. The sections were photographed. The microleakage at the occlusal cavity and at the gingival margins of each specimen was evaluated with scores (0-3) by

  20. Comparative histopathological analysis of human pulps after class I cavity preparation with a high-speed air-turbine handpiece or Er:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kina, J. F.; Benitez, P. C.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.; Martinez, T. C.; Oliveira, C. F.; Hebling, J.; Costa, C. A. S.

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to comparatively evaluate the response of human pulps after cavity preparation with different devices. Deep class I cavities were prepared in sound mandibular premolars using either a high-speed air-turbine handpiece (Group 1) or an Er:YAG laser (Group 2). Following total acid etching and the application of an adhesive system, all cavities were restored with composite resin. Fifteen days after the clinical procedure, the teeth were extracted and processed for analysis under optical microscopy. In Group 1 in which the average for the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) between the cavity floor and the coronal pulp was 909.5 μm, a discrete inflammatory response occurred in only one specimen with an RDT of 214 μm. However, tissue disorganization occurred in most specimens. In Group 2 (average RDT = 935.2 μm), the discrete inflammatory pulp response was observed in only one specimen (average RDT = 413 μm). It may be concluded that the high-speed air-turbine handpiece caused greater structural alterations in the pulp, although without inducing inflammatory processes.

  1. Comparative study of the influence of cavity preparation with high-speed rotation or Er:YAG laser on infiltration of aesthetic restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D. P. T. S.; Beatrice, L. C. S.; Guerra, L. S. C.; Ribeiro, M. A.; Zanin, F. A. A.; Queiroga, A. S.; Limeira Júnior, F. A.; Gerbi, M. E. M. M.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare marginal infiltration in Class V cavities prepared on extracted human premolars with either high-speed rotation or a Er:YAG laser. Class V cavities were executed on the vestibular and lingual faces of twelve premolars, with high-speed rotation or a Er:YAG laser (300 mJ, 4 Hz, and 3 W), and cavity surfaces were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid combined with laser treatment (80 mJ, 5 Hz, 3 W) or without laser treatment in the following manner: G1—high-speed rotation + conditioning with phosphoric acid; G2—high-speed rotation + conditioning with laser and phosphoric acid; G3—laser + conditioning with phosphoric acid; and G4—laser + conditioning with laser and phosphoric acid. Specimens were restored with the composite resin, thermocycled and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 h. Specimens were then cross-cut and analyzed using a stereoscopic magnifying glass. Evaluations were submitted to the Kruskall-Wallis statistical test. No significant differences were found between the averages of the groups ( p > 0.05). High-speed rotation and Er:YAG laser for the confection of cavity preparation exhibited a similar performance with regard to marginal infiltration.

  2. Microleakage of Self-Etch Adhesive System in Class V Cavities Prepared by Using Er:YAG Laser with Different Pulse Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanombualert, Jutipond; Chimtim, Pijitta; Heebthamai, Thitirat; Weera-Archakul, Wilawan

    2015-09-01

    In vitro studies evaluated cementum surface morphology and microleakage of three different energy density parameters of Erbium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser compared with diamond bur preparation on class V cavities with self-etch adhesive system and composite resin restoration. Standard class V cavities were prepared at cervical area below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) in 80 extracted premolars, by using a diamond bur on the buccal surface. All teeth were randomly allocated into four groups: Group 1, diamond bur; Group 2, Er:YAG 50 mJ/15 Hz, 3.77 J/cm(2); Group 3, Er:YAG 75 mJ/15 Hz, 5.65 J/cm(2); and Group 4, Er:YAG 100 mJ/15 Hz, 7.53 J/cm(2). Five cavities from each group were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 15 remaining cavities from each group were restored with self-etch adhesive and nano-hybrid composite. After thermocycling, all sample teeth were immersed in 0.2% methylene blue dye and sectioned buccolingually. Statistics were analyzed using the one way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests with Bonferroni correction. The morphology showed micro-irregularities in the cementum surface of the laser group with the absence of a smear layer. The microstructure characteristics were increased surface roughness followed by increasing laser energy transmission. The Er:YAG laser groups were statistically significant, with less microleakage than the diamond bur group (pself-etch adhesive system. Therefore, the microleakage of Er:YAG laser irradiation was significantly decreased compared with diamond bur cavities.

  3. Frequency of Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during class II cavity preparation among dental students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Yazdani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during proximal cavity preparation is one of the most common side effects in operative dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of iatrogenic damages to adjacent tooth during the preparation of proximal Class II cavities among undergraduate students at dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010 .   Materials and Methods: 106 posterior permanent teeth which had Class II decay with sound proximal surfaces of adjacent teeth were selected and restored by dental students awarding the aims of the present study. After finishing restoration, proximal surfaces were completely dried by air and evaluated with dental chair light. In doubtful cases, surfaces were evaluated with × 3 magnification. Damages were classified into 2 groups; abrasion and groove. Data were analyzed using Fishers exact and Pearson chi square tests .   Results: The frequency of adjacent surfaces damage were 57.5%, with 31.1% damages as abrasion and 26.4% as groove. Students who used matrix band and wedge in proximal area as preventive instruments showed 53.4% damages and other students showed 57.3% damages (P>0.05. A significantly higher number of females and students at restorative course level (3 used wedge and matrix band than males and students at restorative course level (4 for protecting adjacent teeth (P<0.05.   Conclusion: According to the high percentage of iatrogenic damages on adjacent sound teeth in class II cavity preparation, teaching of preventive methods and using proper techniques is necessary for dental students as future dentists.

  4. Influence of different composite materials and cavity preparation designs on the fracture resistance of mesio-occluso-distal inlay restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Pala, Kansad; Demirci, Mustafa; Tuncer, Safa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study to evaluate the fracture resistance of a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and three indirect composite materials for three different mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) inlay cavity designs. A total of 120 mandibular third molar were divided into three groups: (G1) non-proximal box, (G2) 2-mm proximal box, and (G3) 4-mm proximal box. Each cavity design received four composite materials: Estenia, Epricord (Kuraray, Japan), Tescera (Bisco, USA), and Cerasmart CAD/CAM blocks (GC, USA). The specimens were subjected to a compressive load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data was analyzed using the two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc test (pinlay restoration.

  5. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka?a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20?30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having p...

  6. In vitro cavity and crown preparations and direct restorations: A comparison of performance at the start and end of the FD programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J T; Ravaghi, V; Mackenzie, L; Priest, N; Falcon, H C

    2017-04-21

    Aim To assess the performance and thereby the progress of the FDs when they carried out a number of simulated clinical exercises at the start and at the end of their FD year.Methods A standardised simulated clinical restorative dentistry training exercise was carried out by a group of 61 recently qualified dental graduates undertaking a 12 months' duration foundation training programme in England, at both the start and end of the programme. Participants completed a Class II cavity preparation and amalgam restoration, a Class IV composite resin restoration and two preparations for a porcelain-metal full crown. The completed preparations and restorations were independently assessed by an experienced consultant in restorative dentistry, using a scoring system based on previously validated criteria. The data were subjected to statistical analysis.Results There was wide variation in individual performance. Overall, there was a small but not statistically significant improvement in performance by the end of the programme. A statistically significant improvement was observed for the amalgam preparation and restoration, and, overall, for one of the five geographical sub-groups in the study. Possible reasons for the variable performance and improvement are discussed.Conclusions There was variability in the performance of the FDs. The operative performance of FDs at the commencement and end of their FD year indicated an overall moderately improved performance over the year and a statistically significant improvement in their performance with regard to amalgam restoration.

  7. Effect of irradiation mode and filling technique on resin/dentin bonding strength in class I cavities Efeito do modo de ativação e da técnica restauradora na resistência de união entre compósito e dentina em cavidades classe I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex José Souza dos Santos

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Factors such as light-curing mode, filling technique and cavity configuration may affect the bonding strength to dentin. This study evaluated the effect of irradiation mode and filling technique on resin/dentin bonding strength on the buccal wall of class I cavities in human teeth. Occlusal enamel was removed to expose a flat dentin surface. Occlusal cavities (4 x 3 x 3 mm were prepared in dentin. The adhesive Single Bond was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and TPH Spectrum composite resin was placed using the following: oblique incremental, horizontal incremental or bulk filling techniques. The composite resin was light-cured either by continuous (600 mW/cm² for 40 s or Soft-Start (250 mW/cm² for 10 s + 600 mW/cm² for 30 s modes. Specimens of the control group were obtained by bonding the material to the flat exposed buccal wall of the cavity (C-factor = 1. The teeth were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h and prepared for microtensile testing. Bonded beams of approximately 0.8 mm² were obtained from the buccal wall and tested with a tension of 0.5 mm/min. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Dunnett's test (alpha = 0.05. Incremental placement techniques with both irradiation modes produced higher bonding strength values than the bulk technique (p Fatores como o modo de ativação, a técnica restauradora e a configuração cavitária podem afetar a resistência adesiva à dentina. Este estudo avaliou os efeitos dos modos de ativação e das técnicas restauradoras na resistência de união compósito/dentina na parede vestibular de restaurações classe I. O esmalte oclusal dos dentes foi removido para expor uma superfície dentinária planificada. Cavidades oclusais (4 x 3 x 3 mm foram preparadas em dentina. O adesivo Single Bond foi aplicado de acordo com as instruções do fabricante, e o compósito TPH Spectrum, inserido através de três diferentes técnicas: oblíqua incremental, horizontal

  8. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids in plaque damage the enamel covering your teeth. It also creates holes in the tooth called cavities. Cavities usually do not hurt, unless they grow very large and affect nerves or cause a tooth fracture. An untreated cavity can lead to an infection ...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a device that consists of a compound intended to coat a prepared cavity of a tooth before insertion of...

  10. Cavity-cavity conditional logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Gao, Yvonne Y.; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    In a superconducting circuit architecture, the highest coherence times are typically offered by 3D cavities. Moreover, these cavities offer a hardware-efficient way of redundantly encoding quantum information. While single-qubit control on a cavity has already been demonstrated, there is a need for a universal two-qubit gate between such cavities. In this talk, we demonstrate a cavity-cavity gate by parametric pumping on a fixed-frequency transmon interacting with the two cavities. Every gate application lowers the state fidelity by only 1%, while maintaining an entangling rate on-off ratio of 29dB. Additionally, we show that the gate is applicable not only to qubits consisting of single photons, but also to more complex encodings. These results illustrate the usefulness of cavities beyond the mere storage of quantum information, and pave the way towards gates between error-corrected logical qubits.

  11. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aune

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of E_{acc}≥25 MV/m at a quality factor Q_{0}≥5×10^{9}. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF linac was set to the more moderate value of E_{acc}≥15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} was measured to be 20.1±6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} amounts to 25.0±3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  12. Cavity types

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In the field of particle accelerators the most common use of RF cavities is to increase the particle velocity of traversing particles. This feature makes them one of the core ingredients of every accelerator, and in the case of linear accelerators they are even the dominant machine component. Since there are many different types of accelerator, RF cavities have been optimized for different purposes and with different abilities, e.g., cavities with fixed or variable RF frequency, cavities for short or long pulses/CW operation, superconducting and normal-conducting cavities. This lecture starts with a brief historical introduction and an explanation on how to get from Maxwell's equations to a simple cavity. Then, cavities will be classified by the type of mode that is employed for acceleration, and an explanation is given as to why certain modes are used in particular cavity types. The lecture will close with a comparison of normal versus superconducting cavities and a few words on the actual power consumption ...

  13. Efeito de diferentes métodos de preparo na germinação de sementes de tomate Effects of different methods of seed preparation on the germination of tomato seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Augusto do Lago

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available Sementes de tomate, extraídas mecanicamente dos frutos e após diferentes métodos de preparo, tiveram seu poder germinativo determinado após 0, 4 e 12 meses de armazenagem. Ao todo, foram estudados os efeitos de 30 métodos de preparo conseguidos com a combinação de cinco tipos de fermentação, dois de desinfecção e três de secagem. O poder germinativo das sementes diminuiu com o aumento do tempo de fermentação e, principalmente, quando se utilizou ácido acético glacial na massa de fermentação. A desinfecção das sementes com sublimado corrosivo proporcionou melhores resultados, o mesmo ocorrendo quando da secagem das sementes à sombra. Os efeitos de interações entre as variáveis foram também analisados.Tomato seeds mechanically extracted from the fruits were subjected to different methods of preparation, i.e., five types of fermentation, two of desinfection, and three of drying. Viability of such seeds was determined after 0, 4, and 12 months of storage. Germination of tomato seeds decreased with the increase of time of fermentation, and, mostly when acetic acid was added to the mass being fermented. The best product for seed desinfection was HgCl2, and shade-drying was the most adequate for tomato seeds.

  14. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D

    2016-01-01

    into dentine. The distance was measured between the centres of the performed drill path and the apical target by two examiners. A maximum distance of 0.7 mm was defined based on the radius of the bur (0.6 mm) and the radius of a root canal just visible on a radiograph (0.1 mm). The t-test was used...... for evaluation, and intra- and inter-examiner reproducibility was expressed by intraclass correlation coefficients. RESULTS: The mean distance between the drill path and the target was significantly lower than 0.7 mm, and null hypothesis H0 : μ = 0.7 was rejected (CI 95%: 0.31;0.49, P .... An apical canal preparation was created to simulate remnants of an apical root canal that acted as the target for a drill path. The test blocks were surface scanned, and merged with a CBCT scan, and a guide rail was made. A pathway for the bur was created through a metal sleeve within the guide rail...

  15. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  16. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  17. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  18. Influence of cavity preparation, light-curing units, and composite filling on intrapulpal temperature increase in an in vitro tooth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S H; Roulet, J F; Heintze, S D; Park, S H

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of both the tooth substance and restorative filling materials on the increase in pulp chamber temperature when using light-curing units with different power densities. The tip of a temperature sensor was positioned on the pulpal dentinal wall of the buccal side of a maxillary premolar. Metal tubes were inserted in the palatal and buccal root of the tooth, one for water inflow and the other for water outflow. Polyethylene tubes were connected from the metal tubes to a pump to control the flow rate. For the unprepared tooth group (group 1), the tooth was light-cured from the buccal side using two light-curing units (three curing modes): the VIP Junior (QTH, BISCO, Schaumburg, IL, USA) and the Bluephase LED light-curing units (two modes: LEDlow and LEDhigh; Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein). The power densities of each light-curing unit for the LEDlow, QTH, and LEDhigh modes were 785 mW/cm(2), 891 mW/cm(2), and 1447 mW/cm(2), respectively. All light-curing units were activated for 60 seconds. For the prepared tooth group (group 2), a Class V cavity, 4.0 mm in width by 4.0 mm in height by 1.8 mm in depth in size, was prepared on the buccal surface of the same tooth for the temperature measurement. The light-curing and temperature measurements were performed using the same methods used in group 1. The cavity prepared in group 2 was filled with a resin composite (Tetric N Ceram A3 shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) (group 3) or a flowable composite (Tetric N Flow with A3 shade, Ivoclar Vivadent) (group 4). The light-curing and temperature measurements were performed for these groups using the same methods used for the other groups. The highest intrapulpal temperature (TMAX) was measured, and a comparison was conducted between the groups using two-way analysis of variance with a post hoc Tukey test at the 95% confidence level. The TMAX values were as follows: 38.4°C (group 1), 39.0°C (group 2), 39.8°C (group 3), and 40.3°C (group 4) for the

  19. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  20. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities......) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using...... a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (alpha= 0.05). 1/4-inlay cavities had higher percent mean mass loss (9.71%) than composite resin cavities with the same width (7.07%). 1/3-inlay preparations also produced higher percent mean...

  1. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities...

  2. Cavity Optomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kippenberg, T. J.; Vahala, K. J.

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical and optical degrees of freedom via radiation pressure has been a subject of early research in the context of gravitational wave detection. Recent experimental advances have allowed studying for the first time the modifications of mechanical dynamics provided by radiation pressure. This paper reviews the consequences of back-action of light confined in whispering-gallery dielectric micro-cavities, and presents a unified treatment of its two manifestations: notably th...

  3. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  4. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  5. Changeability of oral cavity environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka A, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. 24 healthy individuals aged 20-30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O'Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca(2+), Pi, Na(+), Cl(-), total protein, albumins, F(-) and Sr(2+) were determined. The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca(2+) (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K(+) (P<.04), Sr(2+) (P<.03), Na(+) (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters.

  6. The effect of insertion and photopolymerization techniques on microleakage of Class V cavities: a quantitative evaluation Efeito de diferentes técnicas de inserção e fotopolimerização na microinfiltração de cavidades Classe V: avaliação quantitativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Mantovani Gomes França

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate by spectrophotometry the influence of the incremental technique and progressive light curing in the microleakage of Class V cavities. Forty samples were prepared with class V cylindrical cavities on the buccal root surface of bovine incisive teeth and filled with composite resin (Z250. The samples were divided into four groups: I: cavity was bulk filled and the composite was light cured for 40 seconds; Group II: cavity was bulk filled and a "soft-start" polymerization was used; Group III: cavity was filled with the incremental technique in two coats and light cured for 40 seconds; Group IV: cavity was filled with the incremental technique in two coats and light cured with "soft-start" polymerization. After the restoration, the specimens were thermally stressed for 3,000 cycles in bath at 5 ± 2°C and 55 ± 2°C, protected with nail enamel, colored with 2% methylene blue and cut into sections. These sections were triturated and the dye was recovered with PA ethanol and the supernatant was evaluated. The data were submitted to ANOVA and the results showed the following averages: bulk filled and conventional photopolymerization (I 0.06075 µg/ml; bulk filled and progressive photopolymerization (II 0.04030 µg/ml; incremental insertion and conventional photopolymerization (III 0.04648 µg/ml; incremental insertion and progressive photopolymerization (IV 0.04339 µg/ml. No significant statistic differences were observed among the mean values. The Degulux "soft-start" equipment probably emits too high initial light intensity to promote progressive photopolymerization.O objetivo deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar através de espectrofotometria a influência das técnicas de inserção incremental e de fotopolimerização progressiva na microinfiltração de cavidades Classe V. Foram preparadas 40 cavidades cilíndricas na superfície radicular vestibular de incisivos bovinos e preenchidas com resina

  7. Influence of the power level of an ultra-sonic system on dental cavity preparation Influência do nível de potência de um sistema de ultra-som em preparos cavitários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Botelho Josgrilberg

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shape of dental cavities made with the CVDentus® system using different ultrasound power levels. One standard cavity was made on the buccal aspect of 15 bovine incisors with a CVDentus® cylindrical bur (82142. The sample was divided into three groups: G1 - ultrasound with power II; G2 - ultrasound with power III; and G3 - ultrasound with power IV. A standardizing device was used to obtain standardized preparations and ultrasound was applied during one minute in each dental preparation. The cavities were sectioned in the middle, allowing observation of the cavity’s profile with a magnifying glass, and width and depth measurement using the Leica Qwin program. The Kruskal-Wallis (p O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o formato dos preparos cavitários realizados com o sistema CVDentus® utilizando potências variadas do ultra-som. Uma cavidade padronizada foi realizada na face vestibular de 15 incisivos bovinos utilizando as pontas cilíndricas CVDentus® (82142. A amostra foi dividida em 3 grupos: G1 - ultra-som com potência II; G2 - ultra-som com potência III; e G3 - ultra-som com potência IV. Foi utilizada uma máquina padronizadora de preparos cavitários e o ultra-som foi aplicado durante 1 minuto em cada preparo. As cavidades foram seccionadas no centro, permitindo a visualização do perfil cavitário em uma lupa estereoscópica, e esse foi medido em largura e profundidade por meio do programa Leica Qwin. O teste estatístico Kruskal-Wallis (p < 0,05 e o método de Dunn demonstraram diferenças entre os formatos das cavidades produzidas com as potências III e IV. Entretanto, as cavidades realizadas com a potência III apresentaram dimensões semelhantes às da ponta utilizada. Concluiu-se que a potência indicada pelo fabricante (III é a mais adequada para uso do sistema CVDentus®.

  8. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  9. Marginal microleakage in vitro study on class V cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with acid or etched with Er:YAG laser and acid; Estudo in vitro da microinfiltracao marginal em cavidades classe V preparadas com laser de Er:YAG e condicionadas com acido ou com laser de Er:YAG e acido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Henrique Dutra Simoes

    2001-07-01

    Microleakage at the interface between the teeth and the restorative materials remains a problem with composite resin restorations. Microleakage at the gingival margins of class V cavities restorations still challenge as they are usually placed in dentin and/or cementum. Previous studies have shown that the cavity preparation with Er:YAG laser is possible. It has been reported that Er:YAG laser has ability to create irregular surface providing micromechanical retention for adhesive dental restorative materials and to improve marginal sealing. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal microleakage on class V cavities prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with acid or with Er:YAG laser and acid, in compared to those prepared and etched conventionally. Thirty human molars were divided into three groups, namely: group I - prepared with Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser II - Germany) and etched with 37% phosphoric acid; group II - prepared with Er:YAG laser and etched with Er:YAG laser and 37% phosphoric acid; group III (control group) - prepared with high speed drill and etched with 37% phosphoric acid. All cavities were treated with same adhesive system (Single Bond - 3M) and restored with the composite resin (Z100 - 3M), according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were stored at 37 deg C in water for 24 hours, polished with Sof-Lex discs (3M), thermally stressed, sealed with a nail polish coating except for the area of the restoration and 1 mm around it, and immersed in a 50% aqueous solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours. After that, the specimens were rinsed in water, soaked in a photodeveloping solution and exposed to a fluorescent light for 8 hours. The teeth were embedded in an autopolymerizing resin and sectioned longitudinally using a diamond saw microtome under running water. The sections were photographed. The microleakage at the occlusal cavity and at the gingival margins of each specimen was evaluated with scores (0

  10. Scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the interaction pattern between dentin and resin after cavity preparation using Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao, atraves de microscopia eletronica de varredura, do padrao de interacao dentina-resina em cavidades preparadas com laser de Er:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schein, Marcelo Thome

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the interaction pattern formed between dentin and resin on cavities prepared with an erbium laser (Er:YAG). The morphological aspect of the irradiated dentin after acid etching was also observed. Ten dentin disks were obtained from fresh extracted third molars. Each disk received two cavities, one prepared with a conventional high-speed drill, while the other cavity was obtained by the use of an Er:YAG laser (KaVo KEY Laser, KaVo Co.). The laser treatment was performed with 250 mJ/pulse, 4 Hz, non contact mode, focused beam, and a fine water mist was used. Five disks were prepared for morphological analysis of the acid etched dentin. The other five disks had their cavities restored with Single Bond (3M) followed by Z100 resin (3M). The specimens were observed under scanning electron microscopy after dentin-resin interface demineralization and deproteinization. It was observed that the morphological characteristics of the acid-etched irradiated dentin were not favorable to the diffusion of monomers through the collagen network. The dentin resin interfacial aspect of irradiated dentin, after acid etching, showed thin tags and scarce hybridization zones, which agreed with the morphology of the irradiated and acid-etched dentin substrate observed. (author)

  11. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lilje, L; Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Bloess, D; Charrier, J P; Chiaveri, Enrico; Ferreira, L; Losito, R; Matheisen, A; Preis, H; Proch, D; Reschke, D; Safa, H; Schmüser, P; Trines, D; Visentin, B; Wenninger, Horst

    2004-01-01

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper, results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity.

  12. Experimental analysis of surface finish in normal conducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrebini-Esfahani, A.; Aslaninejad, M.; Ristic, M.; Long, K.

    2017-10-01

    A normal conducting 805 MHz test cavity with an in built button shaped sample is used to conduct a series of surface treatment experiments. The button enhances the local fields and influences the likelihood of an RF breakdown event. Because of their smaller sizes, compared to the whole cavity surface, they allow practical investigations of the effects of cavity surface preparation in relation to RF breakdown. Manufacturing techniques and steps for preparing the buttons to improve the surface quality are described in detail. It was observed that even after the final stage of the surface treatment, defects on the surface of the cavities still could be found.

  13. O efeito facilitatório do óxido nítrico sobre a transmissão neuromuscular de preparações nervo frênico- diafragma isolado de ratos é Ca++ dependente - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v26i4.1528 NO- induced neuromuscular facilitation in the phrenic nerve diaphragm preparation of rats is Ca++ dependent - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v26i4.1528

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo Esheveria Borges

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa foi conduzida para verificar se os efeitos neuromusculares induzidos por óxido nítrico (NO poderiam depender dos níveis extracelulares de Ca++. O doador de NO, nitroprussiato de sódio (NPS, e o análogo de GMPc, 8-Br-cGMP, aumentaram a amplitude das contrações musculares (ACM em preparações indiretamente estimuladas a 0.2 Hz, mas não produziram efeitos quando a solução nutriente (Krebs normal foi trocada por Krebs com baixo Ca++/ alto Mg++. NPS e 8-Br-cGMP reduziram a ACM quando as preparações foram diretamente estimuladas, mas tal efeito não foi observado com o uso de Krebs com baixo Ca++/ alto Mg++. Dados sugerem que os efeitos neuromusculares induzidos por NO dependem dos níveis extracelulares de Ca++The research was carried out to verify whether the neuromuscular effects induced by nitric oxide (NO might depend on extracellular level of Ca++. The donor of NO, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, and the analogue of cGMP, 8-Br-cGMP, increased the muscular contraction amplitude (MCA in preparations indirectly stimulated at 0.2 Hz, but did not produce any effect when the nutrient solution was exchanged by Krebs buffer low Ca++/ high Mg++. SNP and 8-Br-cGMP reduced the MCA in preparations directly stimulated. Such effect was not recorded in Krebs buffer low Ca++/ high Mg++. Data suggest that the neuromuscular effects induced by NO or cGMP depend on extracellular level of Ca++

  14. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  15. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  16. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland); Simrock, S.; Brand, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Chase, B.; Carcagno, R.; Cancelo, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Koeth, T.W. [Rutgers - the State Univ. of New Jersey, NJ (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The digital control of several superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity and ACC1 module of the VU-FEL TTF in DESY-Hamburg have both been driven by a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based system. Additionally, a single 9-cell TESLA Superconducting cavity of the FNPL Photo Injector at FERMILAB has been remotely controlled from WUT-ISE laboratory with the support of the DESY team using the same FPGA control system. These experiments focused attention on the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. An electrical model of the resonator was taken as a starting point. Calibration of the signal path is considered key in preparation for the efficient driving of a cavity. Identification of the resonator parameters has been proven to be a successful approach in achieving required performance; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time while requiring reasonable levels of power consumption. Feed-forward and feedback modes were successfully applied in operating the cavities. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  17. Cavity-Enhanced Transport of Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmüller, David; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Schütz, Stefan; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate charge transport through electronic bands of a mesoscopic one-dimensional system, where interband transitions are coupled to a confined cavity mode, initially prepared close to its vacuum. This coupling leads to light-matter hybridization where the dressed fermionic bands interact via absorption and emission of dressed cavity photons. Using a self-consistent nonequilibrium Green's function method, we compute electronic transmissions and cavity photon spectra and demonstrate how light-matter coupling can lead to an enhancement of charge conductivity in the steady state. We find that depending on cavity loss rate, electronic bandwidth, and coupling strength, the dynamics involves either an individual or a collective response of Bloch states, and we explain how this affects the current enhancement. We show that the charge conductivity enhancement can reach orders of magnitudes under experimentally relevant conditions.

  18. A database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, P.D.; Goessel, A.; Gubarev, V.; Iversen, J.

    2006-01-01

    We look back on 10 years experience using a database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). The database was developed to collect data of every preparation step and measurement in order to optimize cavity production and preparation techniques to meet the ambitious goal of high accelerating gradients at high quality factors. Data from 110 superconducting 9-cell cavities, 50 single cell cavities, several 2- to 7-cell cavities and about 60 RF couplers were collected in the database. In addition, company measurements on sub-assemblies and parts forming the next 30 9-cell cavities were stored, thus establishing the database as part of a quality management system. This database is dynamically accessible via an extensive graphical web-interface based on ORACLE products, which enables the users to select and analyse the collected data easily from anywhere

  19. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  20. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  1. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  2. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients E_{acc} up to 35  MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP and up to 42  MV/m after electropolishing (EP. More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients E_{acc} of 30–35  MV/m were measured after BCP and E_{acc} up to 40  MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of E_{acc}=30–35  MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and

  3. Multicolor cavity soliton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rui; Liang, Hanxiao; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-25

    We show a new class of complex solitary wave that exists in a nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The cavity soliton consists of multiple soliton-like spectro-temporal components that exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, formed together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor cavity soliton shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which would be very useful for versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy.

  4. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  5. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  6. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  7. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  8. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  9. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  10. Continuous pumping and control of mesoscopic superposition state in a lossy QED cavity

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, M. C.; Moussa, M. H. Y.; Mizrahi, S. S.

    2000-01-01

    Here we consider the continuous pumping of a dissipative QED cavity and derive the time-dependent density operator of the cavity field prepared initially as a superposition of mesoscopic coherent states. The control of the coherence of this superposition is analyzed considering the injection of a beam of two-level Rydberg atoms through the cavity. Our treatment is compared to other approaches.

  11. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  12. Materials for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal material for superconducting cavities should exhibit a high critical temperature, a high critical field, and, above all, a low surface resistance. Unfortunately, these requirements can be conflicting and a compromise has to be found. To date, most superconducting cavities for accelerators are made of niobium. The reasons for this choice are discussed. Thin films of other materials such as NbN, Nb 3 Sn, or even YBCO compounds can also be envisaged and are presently investigated in various laboratories. It is shown that their success will depend critically on the crystalline perfection of these films. (author)

  13. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Preparation of single-photon states via cavity-assisted spontaneous parametric down-conversion for quantum memory based on Y7LiF4:Nd3+ crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akatiev Dmitrii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the realization of a tunable single-photon source compatible with quantum memories based on isotopically pure Y7LiF4 crystals doped with Nd3+ ions. The source is based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a PPLN crystal placed in a resonator. The latter is formed by two mirrors which are transparent for the pump (532 nm and idler (1377 nm fields but high reflective for the signal field (867 nm. The width of the second-order cross-correlation function between the signal and idler photons is determined to be 1.5 ns for the cavity length of 8 cm, which corresponds to a cavity bandwidth of 100 MHz.

  15. Preparação e caracterização de membranas assimétricas de poli (fluoreto de vinilideno suportadas em poliéster - I: efeito do tratamento térmico nas propriedades das membranas Preparation and characterization of asymmetric membranes of poly (vinylidene fluoride supported in polyester - I: effect of heat treatment in the properties of membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica B. Thürmer

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available O poli(fluoreto de vinilideno (PVDF é um polímero semicristalino contendo uma fase amorfa e uma cristalina. Essa característica é importante para o preparo de membranas assimétricas, pois a fase cristalina tem grande influência na formação da estrutura da membrana e a fase amorfa na porosidade. Membranas de PVDF foram preparadas pelo processo de inversão de fases e avaliadas quanto à permeabilidade e morfologia, bem como o efeito do tratamento térmico. Foram comparadas as seguintes membranas: membrana sem tratamento térmico, membrana com tratamento térmico e membrana comercial. Ensaios de resistência química, fluxo permeado de água a várias pressões, difusão de íons, Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura (MEV, Calorimetria Exploratória Diferencial (DSC e Análise Termogravimétrica (TGA foram realizados para verificar o comportamento das membranas.Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride (PVDF is a semicrystalline polymer containing an amorphous and a crystalline phase. This characteristic is important for the preparation of asymmetric membranes, because the crystalline phase has great influence on the membranes structure, while the amorphous phase affects the porosity. PVDF membranes were prepared by the phase inversion process, which were then evaluated with regard to permeability and morphology, as well as the thermal treatment effect. The following membranes were compared: without thermal treatment, with thermal treatment and commercially-available membrane. The analysis of chemical resistance, water permeability flux to different pressures and diffusion of ions, in addition to studies with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, were performed to investigate the membranes properties.

  16. Efeito das condições de preparação na condutividade elétrica de blendas de poli(fluoreto de vinilideno e poli(o-metoxianilina Effect of preparation conditions on the electrical conductivity of blends of poly (vinylidene fluoride and poly(o-methoxyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Francisco Malmonge

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho estudou-se o efeito das condições de preparação na condutividade elétrica de blendas condutoras de poli(fluoreto de vinilideno (PVDF com poli(o-metoxianilina (POMA. A condutividade elétrica e a qualidade dos filmes produzidos dependem significativamente do solvente, dopante e das condições de preparação das blendas. Filmes flexíveis e auto-sustentáveis da blenda PVDF/POMA dopada com o ácido p-tolueno sulfônico (TSA foram obtidos em condições otimizadas. Estes apresentam condutividade elétrica em uma larga faixa (10-12 - 10-2 S/cm, onde para baixos teores de POMA-TSA (In this work, the effect of preparation conditions on the properties of conductive blends of poly (vinylidene fluoride (PVDF and poly(o-methoxyaniline (POMA was studied. The quality and conductivity of the films produced depend significantly on the solvent, dopant and preparation conditions of the blends. Flexible, free-standing films of PVDF/POMA blends doped with p-toluene sulfonic acid (TSA were obtained in optimized conditions. These blends can exhibit electrical conductivity in a wide range (10-12 - 10-2 S/cm. Furthermore, relatively high conductivity values (10-7 S/cm are reached starting from low contents of POMA-TSA (<2,0% weight without definition of a percolation threshold.

  17. Methyl biodiesel from Dipteryx lacunifera: preparation, characterization and effect of antioxidant on the oxidation stability; Biodiesel metilico de Dipteryx lacunifera: preparacao, caracterizacao e efeito de antioxidantes na estabilidade a oxidacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Francisca Diana da Silva; Moura, Carla Veronica Rodarte de; Chaves, Mariana H., E-mail: mariana@ufpi.edu.b [Universidade Federal do Piaui (UFPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this work was to study the potentialities of Dipteryx lacunifera Ducke seeds oil for biodiesel production. The yield in oil was of 46.11 {+-} 0.37%. Methyl biodiesel was prepared by base catalyzed transesterification yielding 88.13% and percentage conversion of triglycerides to corresponding methyl ester of 89.1%. The addition of the tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ, 50 ppm), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, 50 ppm) and cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL, 2000 ppm) antioxidants in the biodiesel contributed to the increase of the induction period of 2.97 h for 8.08; 6.06 and 6.02 h, respectively. (author)

  18. Superconducting elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J K

    2011-01-01

    We give a brief overview of the history, state of the art, and future for elliptical superconducting cavities. Principles of the cell shape optimization, criteria for multi-cell structures design, HOM damping schemes and other features are discussed along with examples of superconducting structures for various applications.

  19. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  20. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  1. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  2. What's a Cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a ... made up mostly of the germs that cause tooth decay. The bacteria in your mouth make acids and when plaque clings to your teeth, the acids can eat away at the outermost ...

  3. Effect of the addition of collagen in the preparation of hydroxyapatite, aiming the application of pulp capping; Efeito da adicao de colageno na preparacao de hidroxiapatita visando a aplicacao como capeador pulpar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Geysy L.; Mendes, Luis C., E-mail: geysylopes@ima.ufrj.br [Instituto de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano (IMA) - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ. Centro de Tecnologia, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work studied the action of collagen (COLL) in the hydroxyapatite (HA) synthesis, produced through sol-gel process, in order to mimetize the chemical composition of dental tissue. The resulting material was characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Ca/P ratio was determined through EDX - 1,89 e 2,38, with and without collagen, respectively. The FT-IR analysis showed no significant interaction between the constituents of the composite. The R-ray diffractograms indicated an increase of the resolution and intensity of the HA peak. The photomicrographies showed that the preparation method exhibited significantly influence onto the hydroxyapatite morphology, as well as resulted in a homogeneously dispersed composite. (author)

  4. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  5. Single-cavity SLED device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, B.A.

    1984-09-01

    The conventional SLED device used at SLAC requires two cavities. However, the same effect can be obtained with a single cavity; the theory and operation of the device is the same, only the hardware is changed. The single-cavity device is described here

  6. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  7. Efeito da ordem de adição de componentes nas propriedades de misturas NR/BR Properties of NR/BR mixtures and their dependence on the preparation mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele F. Castro

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Misturas de elastômeros vêm sendo largamente utilizadas na indústria de borracha com a finalidade de se conseguir propriedades específicas, sem a necessidade de sintetizar novos polímeros. O polibutadieno puro (BR não apresenta boas características de processamento e de resistência à tração e ao rasgamento sendo, por essa razão, normalmente utilizado em misturas com outros elastômeros, principalmente NR e SBR. Tais misturas são amplamente utilizadas na indústria de pneus. Neste trabalho o polibutadieno (BR foi misturado à borracha natural (NR na proporção de 1:1 em peso. As composições foram preparadas em misturador de cilindros, empregando-se quatro maneiras distintas de incorporação dos aditivos. Após a vulcanização, foram estudadas as propriedades mecânicas (resistência à tração, ao rasgamento e dureza e a morfologia das composições. Os resultados mostram que, apesar de apresentarem a mesma formulação, as propriedades das misturas são bastante influenciadas pelo modo de preparo.Elastomer Blends have been widely used in the rubber industry with the purpose of reaching specific properties without the need of synthesizing new polymers. Polybutadiene rubber (BR presents poor stress and tear strengths, which is the main reason why BR is usually blended with NR and SBR. These blends are extensively used in the manufacture of tyres. In this work natural rubber (NR was mixed to polybutadiene rubber (BR in a 50:50 w/w ratio. The compositions were prepared in a two-roll mill employing four different modes of introducing the additives. After vulcanization, the mixtures were studied with evaluation of their mechanical (stress and tear strengths and hardness properties and morphology. The results show that the properties varied even using the same NR/BR formulations due to the different preparation techniques.

  8. Geometric design method for occlusal outlines of complex class I and class II inlay cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Takada, Yukyo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a geometric design method for the occlusal outlines of complex inlay cavities as a continuation study of a previous design method for simple class I inlay cavity. A method for extending the occlusal outline to the buccal or lingual groove and to three preparation types of the proximal portions of class II inlay cavities -namely, straight line preparation, sweeping curve preparation, and reverse curve preparation- was investigated. To ensure the smoothness of the occlusal outline, a Bézier curve was introduced in the design. A minimal number of control points for the curve was applied to define each preparation type. The design method was experimentally applied to mandibular and maxillary first molars. Smooth outlines of the complex inlay cavities in the molars with tool accessibility throughout the cavities were achievable by using the present method.

  9. Efeito da enxertia em mandioca

    OpenAIRE

    Bomfim, Nayra Nascimento

    2011-01-01

    Enxertos de duas espécies silvestres (M. glaziovii e M. fortalezensis) sobre M. esculenta, mandioca, foram estudados morfologicamente, anatomicamente e citogeneticamente e a fim de se avaliar possíveis efeitos devido à interação entre enxerto e porta-enxerto. Foram feitas análises anatômicas das raízes dos porta-enxertos UnB 201 e UnB 122 (variedades de M. esculenta), em comparação com as variedades não enxertadas. Analisou-se a meiose em enxerto da espécie M. glaziovii que apresentava morfol...

  10. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  11. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-01-01

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth

  12. Efeito da linhaça (Linum usitatissimum L. sob diferentes formas de preparo na resposta biológica em ratos Effect of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L. prepared by different methods on the biological response of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne y Castro Marques

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar as possíveis atividades biológicas causadas pelo consumo diário de linhaça em diferentes condições de preparo, em ratos Wistar machos recém-desmamados. MÉTODOS: Os ratos recém-desmamados (n=32 foram divididos em 4 grupos de 8 animais: ração padrão; ração com 16% de grão de linhaça cru; ração com 16% de grão de linhaça assado; e ração com 7% de óleo de linhaça. Os animais foram pesados a cada três dias e, após 23 dias de período experimental, foram sacrificados por punção cardíaca, sendo os órgãos imediatamente pesados e o sangue coletado e armazenado a -18ºC para realização das análises (glicose, colesterol total, lipoproteína de alta densidade - colesterol, triglicerídios e proteínas totais. As fezes foram coletadas para a determinação de umidade, lipídeo excretado e lipídeo absorvido. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença entre os grupos quanto ao ganho de peso total, consumo diário, coeficiente de eficácia alimentar e peso dos órgãos. A excreção diária, o teor de umidade das fezes e a quantidade de lipídeo fecal foram maiores nos grupos linhaça cru e linhaça assada em comparação aos grupos padrão e óleo de linhaça. Com exceção do lipoproteína de alta densidade-colesterol, todos os demais parâmetros bioquímicos avaliados apresentaram diferenças estatísticas entre os tratamentos. CONCLUSÃO: O consumo de linhaça, seja como grão cru, assado ou óleo, possui atividade biológica em ratos, destacando-se por reduzir os níveis de glicose, triglicerídios e colesterol. Além disso, o consumo do grão de linhaça aumentou significativamente o volume do bolo fecal e a excreção de lipídeos nas fezes.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L. prepared by different methods on the biological response of rats. METHODS: Weaned rats (n=32 were divided into 4 groups of 8 animals each: standard feed, standard

  13. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  14. Electro Polishing of Niobium Cavities at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Matheisen, A; Morales, H; Petersen, B; Schmoekel, M; Steinhau-Kühl, N

    2004-01-01

    At DESY a facility for electro polishing (EP) of the super conducting (s.c.) TESLA/TTF cavities have been built and is operational since summer 2003. The EP infrastructure is capable to handle single-cell structures and the standard TESLA/ TTF nine-cell cavities. Several electro polishing processes have been made since and acceleration voltage up to 40 MV/m have been reached in nine cell structures. We report on measurements and experiences gained since 2003 as well as on handling procedures developed for the preparation of electro polished resonators. Specific data like heat production, variation of current density and bath aging will be presented. Another important point for reproducible results is the quality control of the electro polishing process. First quality control steps to be implanted in the EP procedure for large-scale production will be described.

  15. Morphological evaluation of cavity preparation surface after duraphat and Er:YAG laser treatment by scanning electronic microscopy; Avaliacao das alteracoes morfologicas da superficie do preparo cavitario apos condicionamento com verniz fluoretado a 2,26 % e laser de Er:YAG atraves de microscopia eletronica de varredura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Luciane Borelli

    2002-07-01

    The treatment of dental surface using different lasers to prevent dental caries has been studied for several on last years. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the morphological changes on dentin surface from pulpal wall of cavity preparations performed by high-speed drill, treated with 2,26% fluoride varnish (Duraphat) and Er:YAG laser, and then submitted after receiving or not to EDTA 15% treatment. Twenty Class V cavities were performed on ten humans molars. The specimens were randomly divided in to 4 groups: group 1- treatment with Duraphat followed by Er:YAG laser irradiation (120 mJ/ 4 Hz); group 2: Er:YAG laser irradiation, same parameters, followed by Duraphat treatment; group 3- same group 1 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min); group 4 - same as group 2 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min). The specimens were processed for SEM analysis. The micrographs showed that Duraphat treatment promoted morphological changes on dentin, closing dentinal tubules; the specimens treated by Duraphat and Er:YAG laser and immersed in EDTA (group 3) showed homogeneous surface, closed and protected dentinal tubules, maintenance of the fluoride varnish on the dentin surface and around the dentinal tubules, showing feasible and efficiency of these therapies the feasibility.(author)

  16. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  17. Development of large grain cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DESY activities on 1.3 GHz tesla shape single cell and nine-cell large grain (LG resonators are presented; results of the past five years are covered. The R&D program explores the potential for production of elliptical superconducting cavities. The main efforts have been devoted to material investigation, development of LG disk production, cavity fabrication from this material, and a search for appropriate treatment. More than 250 LG disks are manufactured; several single cell and 11 nine-cell resonators are produced and rf tested after buffered chemical polishing and after additional electropolishing. A maximum accelerating gradient of approximately 45  MV/m for this type of cavity was achieved in two resonators. Two of the LG cavities have been installed and are currently being used in the FLASH accelerator operation. Assembly of a cryomodule, consisting of LG cavities only, is in the works. Perspectives of the LG cavity application are discussed.

  18. MEDICI reactor cavity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Trebilcock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MEDICI reactor cavity model is currently under development with the goal of providing a flexible, relatively realistic treatment of ex-vessel severe accident phenomena suitable for large-system codes like CONTAIN and MELCOR. The code is being developed with an emphasis on top-down design, to facilitate adaptability and multiple applications. A brief description of the overall code structure is provided. One of the key new models is then described in more detail. This is a dynamic quench model for debris beds. An example calculation using this model is presented. The question of whether it is necessary to consider the simultaneous motion of the quench front and ablation of the concrete is addressed with some scoping models

  19. In situ Measurements of the SPS 200MHz Accelerating Cavity III

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Patrick; Caspers, Fritz; Vollinger, Christine; Montesinos, Eric; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The main 200MHz travelling wave RF system of the SPS consists of two 5-tank and two 4-tank cavities. This system will be modified during LS 2, and the preparation work has already started. The 5 tank 200MHz travelling wave cavity III was measured in reflection. This Internal Note presents results obtained for the matching of cavity and feeder line, by looking at both frequency and time domain data. Techniques for estimating the feeder line attenuation are also presented.

  20. The quest for high-gradient superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padamsee, H.

    1999-01-01

    Superconducting RF cavities excel in applications requiring continuous waves or long pulse voltages. Since power losses in the walls of the cavity increase as the square of the accelerating voltage, copper cavities become uneconomical as demand for high continuous wave voltage grows with particle energy. For these reasons, RF superconductivity has become an important technology for high energy and high luminosity accelerators. The state of art in performance of sheet metal niobium cavities is best represented by the statistics of more than 300 5-cell, 1.5-GHz cavities built for CEBAF. Key aspects responsible for the outstanding performance of the CEBAF cavities set are the anti-multipactor, elliptical cell shape, good fabrication and welding techniques, high thermal conductivity niobium, and clean surface preparation. On average, field emission starts at the electric field of 8.7 MV/m, but there is a large spread, even though the cavities received nominally the same surface treatment and assembly procedures. In some cavities, field emission was detected as low as 3 MV/m. In others, it was found to be as high as 19 MV/m. As we will discuss, the reason for the large spread in the gradients is the large spread in emitter characteristics and the random occurrence of emitters on the surface. One important phenomenon that limits the achievable RF magnetic field is thermal breakdown of superconductivity, originating at sub-millimeter-size regions of high RF loss, called defects. Simulation reveal that if the defect is a normal conducting region of 200 mm radius, it will break down at 5 MV/m. Producing high gradients and high Q in superconducting cavities demands excellent control of material properties and surface cleanliness. The spread in gradients that arises from the random occurrence of defects and emitters must be reduced. It will be important to improve installation procedures to preserve the excellent gradients now obtained in laboratory test in vertical cryostats

  1. Fundamental tests in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of quantum physics, Einstein and Bohr had the dream to confine a photon in a box and to use this contraption in order to illustrate the strange laws of the quantum world. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics has now made this dream real, allowing us to actually achieve in the laboratory variants of the thought experiments of the founding fathers of quantum theory. In our work at Ecole Normale Supérieure, we use a beam of Rydberg atoms to manipulate and probe non-destructively microwave photons trapped in a very high Q superconducting cavity. We realize ideal quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements of photon numbers, observe the radiation quantum jumps due to cavity relaxation and prepare non-classical fields such as Fock and Schrödinger cat states. Combining QND photon counting with a homodyne mixing method, we reconstruct the Wigner functions of these non-classical states and, by taking snapshots of these functions at increasing times, obtain movies of the decoherence process. These experiments ope...

  2. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  4. Development of an advanced electropolishing setup for multicell high gradient niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éozénou, F.; Chel, S.; Gasser, Y.; Servouin, C.; Visentin, B.; Charrier, J.-P.; Wang, Z.

    2012-08-01

    Reproducible operation at high performances of superconducting cavities is required for linear accelerators. High beta elliptical cavities are thus of concern and, to achieve required performances for such resonators, surface preparation including electropolishing is recommended. We have designed and operate a setup for electropolishing in the vertical position of multicell cavities in order to: (i) obtain high yield with large elliptical cavities for Superconducting Linac (SPL) or European Spallation Source projects; (ii) develop a reference installation demonstrating that this process is appropriate for the large scale treatment of cavities in industry. The setup described here is the first one able to electropolish vertically multicell cavities with circulating acid and high safety standards. This equipment makes it possible to use a wide range of parameters such as voltage, acid flow rate, temperature, and nitrogen injection with an R&D purpose in mind. Optimization is studied using modeling with COMSOL software for different cavities. As examples, we present some results for the 704 MHz high-beta SPL cavity and the 1300 MHz International Linear Collider cavity and show the influence of cathode shape on both acid flow and electric field distribution during the process. Importance of the size of the cavity and first results achieved on single-cell and nine-cell cavities will be discussed.

  5. Development of an advanced electropolishing setup for multicell high gradient niobium cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Éozénou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Reproducible operation at high performances of superconducting cavities is required for linear accelerators. High beta elliptical cavities are thus of concern and, to achieve required performances for such resonators, surface preparation including electropolishing is recommended. We have designed and operate a setup for electropolishing in the vertical position of multicell cavities in order to: (i obtain high yield with large elliptical cavities for Superconducting Linac (SPL or European Spallation Source projects; (ii develop a reference installation demonstrating that this process is appropriate for the large scale treatment of cavities in industry. The setup described here is the first one able to electropolish vertically multicell cavities with circulating acid and high safety standards. This equipment makes it possible to use a wide range of parameters such as voltage, acid flow rate, temperature, and nitrogen injection with an R&D purpose in mind. Optimization is studied using modeling with COMSOL software for different cavities. As examples, we present some results for the 704 MHz high-beta SPL cavity and the 1300 MHz International Linear Collider cavity and show the influence of cathode shape on both acid flow and electric field distribution during the process. Importance of the size of the cavity and first results achieved on single-cell and nine-cell cavities will be discussed.

  6. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  7. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  8. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  9. Call for Papers: Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, W.; Gerard, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    Cavity QED interactions of light and matter have been investigated in a wide range of systems covering the spectrum from microwaves to optical frequencies, using media as diverse as single atoms and semiconductors. Impressive progress has been achieved technologically as well as conceptually. This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is intended to provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of cavity QED by uniting contributions from researchers active across this field. As Guest Editors of this topical issue, we invite manuscripts on current theoretical and experimental work on any aspects of cavity QED. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletCavity QED in optical microcavities bulletSemiconductor cavity QED bulletQuantum dot cavity QED bulletRydberg atoms in microwave cavities bulletPhotonic crystal cavity QED bulletMicrosphere resonators bulletMicrolasers and micromasers bulletMicrodroplets bulletDielectric cavity QED bulletCavity QED-based quantum information processing bulletQuantum state engineering in cavities The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the

  10. Field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Junginger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface resistance R_{S} of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied rf field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film induces heating of the inner cavity wall, resulting in a higher R_{S}. Introducing helium gas in the cavity, and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by less than 120 mK when R_{S} increases with E_{acc} by 100  nΩ. This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally, the effects of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for the current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered R_{S}.

  11. Surface preparation of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneisel, P.

    1980-01-01

    Any discussion of surface preparation for superconducting rf-surfaces is certainly connected with the question what is the best recipe for achieving high Q-values and high break-down fields. Since the break-down in a cavity is not understood so far and because several mechanisms play a role, it also is not possible to give one recipe which always works. Nevertheless in the past certain preparation techniques for niobium surfaces have been developed and certain rules for preparation can be applied. In the following the to-days state of the art will be described and it is attempted to give a short description of the surface in conjunction with the methods of surface treatments, which generally can be applied to niobium cavities. (orig./WTR)

  12. Effect of low temperature baking on niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel; Ganapati Myneni; William Lanford; Gianluigi Ciovati

    2003-09-01

    A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor and a recovery from the so-called ''Q-drop'' without field emission at high field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37K-280K and resonant frequency shift between 6K-9.3K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity using a modified version of the computer code originally written by J. Halbritter [1] . Small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation were analyzed with respect to their hydrogen content with a Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper describes the results from these experiments and comments on the existing models to explain the effect of baking on the performance of niobium RF cavities.

  13. Bistability of Cavity Magnon Polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Pu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Dengke; Li, Tie-Fu; Hu, C.-M.; You, J. Q.

    2018-01-01

    We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small numbers of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either a positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.

  14. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  15. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  16. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  17. Bistability of Cavity Magnon Polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Pu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Dengke; Li, Tie-Fu; Hu, C-M; You, J Q

    2018-02-02

    We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small numbers of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either a positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.

  18. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective open study the sterility of the uterine cavity was evaluated in 99 women admitted for hysterectomy. The indications for hysterectomy were in most cases persistent irregular vaginal bleeding and fibromyomas of the uterus. Samples for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, Chlamydia ...... which may play a causative role in endometritis. The results indicate that inflammation of the uterine cavity should be evaluated by hysteroscopic examination before hysterectomy is undertaken in patients with persistent irregular vaginal bleeding. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Mar...

  19. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  20. Engineering interactions between long-lived cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yvonne; Rosenblum, Serge; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    The availability of large Hilbert dimensions and outstanding coherence properties make superconducting cavities promising systems for storing quantum information. Recent experiments in cQED has demonstrated that redundantly encoding logical qubits in such cavities is a hardware-efficient approach toward error-correctable quantum memories. In order to tap into the power of these protected memories for quantum information processing, robust inter-cavity operations are required. A simple way to realise such operations between two cavities is using the non-linearity of the Josephson junction. To do so, we adopt a multi-cavity architecture where a fixed-frequency, single junction transmon simultaneously couples to two highly coherent 3D cavities. Using only external RF drives, we demonstrate transmon-cavity as well as cavity-cavity SWAP operations and show that such interactions are essential building blocks for implementing multi-cavity conditional logics.

  1. Thermal conditions within tree cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests: potential implications for cavity users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierling, Kerri T.; Lorenz, Teresa J.; Cunningham, Patrick; Potterf, Kelsi

    2017-11-01

    Tree cavities provide critical roosting and breeding sites for multiple species, and thermal environments in these cavities are important to understand. Our objectives were to (1) describe thermal characteristics in cavities between June 3 and August 9, 2014, and (2) investigate the environmental factors that influence cavity temperatures. We placed iButtons in 84 different cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in central Washington, and took hourly measurements for at least 8 days in each cavity. Temperatures above 40 °C are generally lethal to developing avian embryos, and 18% of the cavities had internal temperatures of ≥ 40 °C for at least 1 h of each day. We modeled daily maximum cavity temperature, the amplitude of daily cavity temperatures, and the difference between the mean internal cavity and mean ambient temperatures as a function of several environmental variables. These variables included canopy cover, tree diameter at cavity height, cavity volume, entrance area, the hardness of the cavity body, the hardness of the cavity sill (which is the wood below the cavity entrance which forms the barrier between the cavity and the external environment), and sill width. Ambient temperature had the largest effect size for maximum cavity temperature and amplitude. Larger trees with harder sills may provide more thermally stable cavity environments, and decayed sills were positively associated with maximum cavity temperatures. Summer temperatures are projected to increase in this region, and additional research is needed to determine how the thermal environments of cavities will influence species occupancy, breeding, and survival.

  2. Assessment of a Cavity to Optimize Ultrasonic Efficiency to Remove Intraradicular Posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Izabela Araujo Aguiar; Sponchiado Júnior, Emílio Carlos; Marques, André Augusto Franco; de Moura Martins, Leandro; Garrido, Ângela Delfina Bittencourt

    2017-08-01

    The study assessed an in vitro protocol for the removal of cast metal posts using ultrasonic vibration in multirooted teeth by drilling a cavity in the coronal portion of the post followed by ultrasound application in the cavity. Forty endodontically treated molars received intraradicular cast posts and were divided into 4 groups according to the removal protocol: the control group, no cavity and no ultrasonic vibration; the ultrasonic group, no cavity and ultrasonic vibration in the coronal portion of the core; the cavity group, a cavity in the core and no ultrasonic vibration; and the cavity ultrasonic group, a cavity in the core and ultrasonic vibration inside the cavity. The traction test was performed on all samples using a universal testing machine (EMIC DL-2000; EMIC Equipamentos e Sistemas de Ensaio LTDA, São José dos Pinhais, PR, Brazil) at a speed of 1 mm/min, obtaining values in Newtons. The data were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance and the Tukey-Kramer test (P ultrasonic group = 283.09 N, cavity group = 244.00 N, and cavity ultrasonic group = 237.69 N). The lowest mean strength was found in the group that received ultrasonic vibration inside the cavity. Preparing a cavity in the coronal core followed by ultrasonic vibration reduces the traction force required for removal. The removal protocol was effective for removing posts in multirooted teeth cemented with zinc phosphate. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. GPR Experiments of the Simulated Cavity Detection in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changryol; Kang, Woong; Son, Jeongsul; Jeong, Soocheol

    2017-04-01

    Recent years, the deteriorated underground facilities such as sewage or water supply pipes have increased significantly with growing urban development in Korea. The soils surrounding old damaged pipes were washed away beneath the roadbed, causing underground cavities and eventual ground cave-ins in the urban areas. The detection of the roadbed cavities is, therefore, required to prevent property damage and loss of human lives for precautionary measures. In general, GPR is well known as a suitable geophysical technique for shallow underground cavity detection. 3-D GPR technique was applied to conduct the full-scale experiment for roadbed cavity detection. The physical experiment has employed the testing ground with soil characteristics of silty sand soils. The experimental test ground consists of physically simulated cavities with dome-shaped structure, and of hume concrete and cast-iron pipes to simulate underground facilities. The pipes were installed more than one meter below the land surface and simulated cavities nearby were also installed at regular intervals in spatial distribution. The land surface of the site was not paved with asphalt concrete at the current stage of the experiments. The GPR data was obtained to investigate GPR responses due to different antenna orientations (HH and VV antenna orientations) over the testing ground. The results of the experiment show that the reflection patterns from the simulated cavities are hyperbolic returns typical to the point source in 2-D perspective. The different antenna orientations have shown the different areal extents of the hyperbolic reflections patterns from the cavities, and have shown the different characteristics over the pipes on the data. A closer inspection of 3-D GPR volume data has yielded more clear interpretation than 2-D GPR data regarding where the cavities are situated and what kind of shape the cavities show in space. This study is an ongoing project of KIGAM at a second stage of the physical

  4. Multipartite quantum correlations among atoms in QED cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batle, J.; Farouk, A.; Tarawneh, O.; Abdalla, S.

    2018-02-01

    We study the nonlocality dynamics for two models of atoms in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED); the first model contains atoms in a single cavity undergoing nearest-neighbor interactions with no initial correlation, and the second contains atoms confined in n different and noninteracting cavities, all of which were initially prepared in a maximally correlated state of n qubits corresponding to the atomic degrees of freedom. The nonlocality evolution of the states in the second model shows that the corresponding maximal violation of a multipartite Bell inequality exhibits revivals at precise times, defining, nonlocality sudden deaths and nonlocality sudden rebirths, in analogy with entanglement. These quantum correlations are provided analytically for the second model to make the study more thorough. Differences in the first model regarding whether the array of atoms inside the cavity is arranged in a periodic or open fashion are crucial to the generation or redistribution of quantum correlations. This contribution paves the way to using the nonlocality multipartite correlation measure for describing the collective complex behavior displayed by slightly interacting cavity QED arrays.

  5. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  6. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  7. Coeliac cavity ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, O.; Suwaki, T.

    1983-07-05

    A coeliac cavity ultrasonic diagnosis apparatus is disclosed which includes an ultrasonic transducer or scanner portion adapted to be inserted into a coeliac cavity to effect a sector scan of an ultrasonic beam to produce an ultrasonic image of internal tissues and in which the ultrasonic oscillator on the one hand and an ultrasonic reflecting mirror and rotary disc on the other hand are relatively rotated so as to effect the sector scan of the ultrasonic beam and the rotary angle of the rotary disc is detected so as to obtain a deflecting angle of the ultrasonic beam and a display on a cathode ray tube of a precise ultrasonic picture image.

  8. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heremans K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  9. Conduction cooling systems for linear accelerator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Robert

    2017-05-02

    A conduction cooling system for linear accelerator cavities. The system conducts heat from the cavities to a refrigeration unit using at least one cavity cooler interconnected with a cooling connector. The cavity cooler and cooling connector are both made from solid material having a very high thermal conductivity of approximately 1.times.10.sup.4 W m.sup.-1 K.sup.-1 at temperatures of approximately 4 degrees K. This allows for very simple and effective conduction of waste heat from the linear accelerator cavities to the cavity cooler, along the cooling connector, and thence to the refrigeration unit.

  10. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide ...

  11. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  12. On the collapse of cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N. K.

    The collapse of a single cavity, or a cloud of bubbles has several physical consequences when in proximity to a structure or resident within a material during deformation. The earliest recognized of these was cavitation erosion of the propellers of steam ships. However, other processes include the rapid collapse of cavities leading to hot spots in explosives from which reaction ensues, or the more recent phenomenon of light generation by oscillating single bubbles or clouds. In the collapse of a cavity, the least considered but the most important mechanism is asymmetric closure. One of the consequences of this is the formation of jets leading to local high pressures and shears that result in the damage or reaction mechanisms observed. The challenge for the future remains in understanding the effects of cloud cavitation since it is likely that only one bubble in perhaps millions in a cloud catalyses an event. The review follows the author's work in the understanding of shock-induced cavity collapse and highlights several results which indicate the importance of this problem in a variety of fields.

  13. A 200 MHz prebunching cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This cavity was installed in the PS ring and proved very efficient in providing a modulation on the PS beam before it is injected into the SPS machine. Moreover it allowed longitudinal instabilities studies at high intensities. Roberto Cappi stands on the left.

  14. Improving cooling of cavity blackbodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Catherine; Chauvel, Gildas

    2013-10-01

    A cavity blackbody is the appropriate IR reference source for IR sensors which require high radiance levels. It combines high emissivity independent from wavelength and high speed warm up and high stability thanks to its light trap structure. However, the inconvenient of this structure is that it leads to a prohibitive cooling time. HGH developed a method to speed up the cooling time.

  15. Seismic resonances of acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, F. M.; Esterhazy, S.; Perugia, I.; Bokelmann, G.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of an On-Site Inspection (OSI) is to clarify at a possible testsite whether a member state of the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)has violated its rules by conducting a underground nuclear test. Compared toatmospheric and underwater tests underground nuclear explosions are the mostdifficult to detect.One primary structural target for the field team during an OSI is the detectionof an underground cavity, created by underground nuclear explosions. Theapplication of seismic-resonances of the cavity for its detection has beenproposed in the CTBT by mentioning "resonance seismometry" as possibletechnique during OSIs. We modeled the interaction of a seismic wave-field withan underground cavity by a sphere filled with an acoustic medium surrounded byan elastic full space. For this setting the solution of the seismic wave-fieldcan be computed analytically. Using this approach the appearance of acousticresonances can be predicted in the theoretical calculations. Resonance peaksappear in the spectrum derived for the elastic domain surrounding the acousticcavity, which scale in width with the density of the acoustic medium. For lowdensities in the acoustic medium as for an gas-filled cavity, the spectralpeaks become very narrow and therefore hard to resolve. The resonancefrequencies, however can be correlated to the discrete set of eigenmodes of theacoustic cavity and can thus be predicted if the dimension of the cavity isknown. Origin of the resonance peaks are internal reverberations of wavescoupling in the acoustic domain and causing an echoing signal that couples outto the elastic domain again. In the gas-filled case the amplitudes in timedomain are very low.Beside theoretical considerations we seek to find real data examples fromsimilar settings. As example we analyze a 3D active seismic data set fromFelsőpetény, Hungary that has been conducted between 2012 and 2014 on behalf ofthe CTBTO. In the subsurface of this area a former clay mine is

  16. Waveguide based external cavity semiconductor lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud; Klein, E.J.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Lee, Christopher James; Verhaegen, M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on progress of the project waveguide based external cavity semiconductor laser (WECSL) arrays. Here we present the latest results on our efforts to mode lock an array of tunable, external cavity semiconductor lasers.

  17. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  18. An economical wireless cavity-nest viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel P. Huebner; Sarah R. Hurteau

    2007-01-01

    Inspection of cavity nests and nest boxes is often required during studies of cavity-nesting birds, and fiberscopes and pole-mounted video cameras are sometimes used for such inspection. However, the cost of these systems may be prohibitive for some potential users. We describe a user-built, wireless cavity viewer that can be used to access cavities as high as 15 m and...

  19. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  20. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  1. Gastrophysics of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-01-01

    Gastrophysics is the science that pertains to the physical and physico-chemical description of the empirical world of gastronomy, with focus on sensory perception in the oral cavity and how it is related to the materials properties of food and cooking processes. Flavor (taste and smell), mouthfeel, chemesthesis, and astringency are all related to the chemical properties and the texture of the food and how the food is transformed in the oral cavity. The present topical review will primarily focus attention on the somatosensory perception of food (mouthfeel or texture) and how it interacts with basic tastes (sour, bitter, sweet, salty, and umami) and chemesthetic action. Issues regarding diet, nutrition, and health will be put into an evolutionary perspective, and some mention will be made of umami and its importance for (oral) health.

  2. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  3. The transition from quantum Zeno to anti-Zeno effects for a qubit in a cavity by varying the cavity frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiufeng, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Ai, Qing; Sun, Chang-Pu [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2012-01-09

    We propose a strategy to demonstrate the transition from the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) to the anti-Zeno effect (AZE) using a superconducting qubit coupled to a transmission line cavity, by varying the central frequency of the cavity mode. Our results are obtained without the rotating wave approximation (RWA), and the initial state (a dressed state) is easy to prepare. Moreover, we find that in the presence of both qubit's intrinsic bath and the cavity bath, the emergence of the QZE and the AZE behaviors relies not only on the match between the qubit energy-level-spacing and the central frequency of the cavity mode, but also on the coupling strength between the qubit and the cavity mode. -- Highlights: ► We propose how to demonstrate the transition from Zeno effect to anti-Zeno effect. ► Our results are beyond the RWA, and the initial state is easy to prepare. ► The case of both qubit's intrinsic bath and cavity bath coexist is also studied.

  4. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also...... described, and their implications for microdroplet resonator technology are discussed. Optofluidic implementations of microdroplet resonators are reviewed with emphasis on the basic optomechanical properties....

  5. Buffer Chemical Polishing and RF Testing of the 56 MHz SRF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrill,A.

    2009-01-01

    The 56 MHz cavity presents a unique challenge in preparing it for RF testing prior to construction of the cryomodule. This challenge arises due to the physical dimensions and subsequent weight of the cavity, and is further complicated by the coaxial geometry, and the need to properly chemically etch and high pressure rinse the entire inner surface prior to RF testing. To the best of my knowledge, this is the largest all niobium SRF cavity to be chemically etched and subsequently tested in a vertical dewar at 4K, and these processes will be the topic of this technical note.

  6. Quantum iSWAP gate in optical cavities with a cyclic three-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guo-an; Qiao, Hao-xue; Lu, Hua

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present a scheme to directly implement the iSWAP gate by passing a cyclic three-level system across a two-mode cavity quantum electrodynamics. In the scheme, a three-level Δ -type atom ensemble prepared in its ground state mediates the interaction between the two-cavity modes. For this theoretical model, we also analyze its performance under practical noise, including spontaneous emission and the decay of the cavity modes. It is shown that our scheme may have a high fidelity under the practical noise.

  7. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  8. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El-Jallal, Said [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Physique du Rayonnement et de l’Interaction Laser Matière, Faculté des sciences, Université de Moulay Ismail, Meknès (Morocco)

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  9. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  10. Investigation of superconducting niobium 1170 MHz cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anashin, V.V.; Bibko, S.I.; Fadeyev, E.I.

    1988-01-01

    The design, fabrication and experiments with superconducting L-band single cell cavities are described. These cavities model a cell of an accelerating RF structure. The cavities have been fabricated from technical grade and higher purity grade sheet niobium using deep-drawing, electron beam welding and chemical polishing. They have spherical geometry and are excited in the TM 010 mode. A computerized set-up was used for cavity tests. Qo=1.5 x 10 9 and E acc = 4.3 MV/m were obtained in the cavity made of higher purity grade niobium. 6 references, 8 figures, 3 tables

  11. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR CAVITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrage, D.

    2000-01-01

    The static and dynamic structural behavior of superconducting cavities for various projects was determined by finite element structural analysis. The β = 0.61 cavity shape for the Neutron Science Project was studied in detail and found to meet all design requirements if fabricated from five millimeter thick material with a single annular stiffener. This 600 MHz cavity will have a Lorentz coefficient of minus1.8 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2 and a lowest structural resonance of more than 100 Hz. Cavities at β = 0.48, 0.61, and 0.77 were analyzed for a Neutron Science Project concept which would incorporate 7-cell cavities. The medium and high beta cavities were found to meet all criteria but it was not possible to generate a β = 0.48 cavity with a Lorentz coefficient of less than minus3 Hz/(Mv/meter) 2

  12. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  13. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Burt, G. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Lingwood, C. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Rimmer, Robert [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  14. EFEITO ADVERSO DO VENTO EM ARROZ IRRIGADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Marchezan

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se os sintomas de danos em panículas de arroz irrigado por efeito de ventos de direção norte com alta velocidade, associado à temperatura elevada e umidade relativa do ar baixa, observados na região de Santa Maria - RS. Apresenta-se a metodologia utilizada para confirmação do que foi constatado nas lavouras. Os prejuízos dependeram da fase de desenvolvimento da cultura e manifestaram-se através de panículas ou espiguetas estéreis.

  15. Preparatory procedure and equipment for the European x-ray free electron laser cavity implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Reschke

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The European x-ray free electron laser is under construction at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY. The electron beam energy of up to 17.5 GeV will be achieved by using superconducting accelerator technology. Final prototyping, industrialization, and new infrastructure are the actual challenges with respect to the accelerating cavities. This paper describes the preparation strategy optimized for the cavity preparation procedure in industry. For the industrial fabrication and preparation, several new hardware components have been already developed at DESY. The design and construction of a semiautomated rf-measurement machine for dumbbells and end groups are described. In a collaboration among FNAL, KEK, and DESY, an automatic cavity tuning machine has been designed and four machines are under construction. The functionality of these machines with special attention to safety aspects is described in this paper. A new high pressure rinsing system has been developed and is operational.

  16. Understanding cavity QED effects from cavity classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddei, M.M.; Kort-Kamp, W.J.M.; Farina, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Our work intends to show how cavity classical electrodynamics can be used for achieving results with direct quantum analogues. It is shown how the classical interaction between a real radiating electric dipole and a perfectly-conducting surface can be used to obtain information about some cavity quantum electrodynamics effects related to radiative properties of atomic systems. Based on the case of an oscillating electric dipole (a classical representation of an excited atom) in front of a perfectly-conducting sphere, two main physical quantities can be computed, the classical dipole frequency shift and the change in the rate of energy loss from radiation reaction, both due to the presence of the sphere. The link from classical to quantum can be made via interpreting, for example, the dipole frequency as the atom's dominant transition frequency. The frequency shift due to the sphere can be related through E = (h/2π) to the energy shift of the system, i.e., the dispersive interaction between the atom and the sphere; while the change in energy loss can be related to the alteration of the atom's spontaneous emission due to the sphere. The amazing result is that this classical method, once corresponded classical quantities to quantum ones such as exemplified above with frequency, can predict the two above-mentioned quantum effects analytically with the correct functional dependencies on all geometric and atomic parameters, being off only by a constant pre factor. (author)

  17. Temperature Structure of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    we analyze the temperature structure of a coronal cavity observed in Aug. 2007. coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and x-rays. when these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs. It is important to establish the temperature structure of cavities in order to understand the thermodynamics of cavities in relation to their three-dimensional magnetic structure. To analyze the temperature we compare temperature ratios of a series of iron lines observed by the Hinode/EUv Imaging spectrometer (EIS). We also use those lines to constrain a forward model of the emission from the cavity and streamer. The model assumes a coronal streamer with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel lenth. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. The general cavity morphology and the cavity and streamer density have already been modeled using data from STEREO's SECCHI/EUVI and Hinode/EIS (Gibson et al 2010 and Schmit & Gibson 2011).

  18. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics using quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, J.M.; Gayral, B.; Moreau, E.; Robert, I.; Abram, I.

    2001-01-01

    We review the recent development of solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics using single self-assembled InAs quantum dots and three-dimensional semiconductor microcavities. We discuss first prospects for observing a strong coupling regime for single quantum dots. We then demonstrate that the strong Purcell effect observed for single quantum dots in the weak coupling regime allows us to prepare emitted photons in a given state (the same spatial mode, the same polarization). We present finally the first single-mode solid-state source of single photons, based on an isolated quantum dot in a pillar microcavity. This optoelectronic device, the first ever to rely on a cavity quantum electrodynamics effect, exploits both Coulomb interaction between trapped carriers in a single quantum dot and single mode photon tunneling in the microcavity. (author)

  20. Supporting Cavity Production Using an Engineering Data Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Bürger, Jochen; Hagge, Lars; Iversen, Jens; Matheisen, Axel; Singer, Waldemar

    2005-01-01

    The reliable production of superconducting cavities is an essential issue for any future accelerator applying the “cold” technology. At DESY the complex manufacturing process is supported by an engineering data management system (EDMS). During the mechanical manufacturing process many quality checks are performed and their results are documented in inspection sheets, which are stored in the system and used for controlling. The EDMS further controls the subsequent preparation process by automatically creating and issuing work instructions for the treatment of the surfaces of the cavities. In parallel the necessary documentation for quality assurance is generated. The documentation is linked to the product breakdown structure; this enables users to easily navigate from inspection sheets of selected components forward to their 3D CAD model as well as back to the results of the examination of the original niobium sheet. The poster presents the structural approach for the documentation using a ...

  1. Efeitos tardios dos praguicidas organoclorados no homem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Mônica Vannucci

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Procurou-se relacionar as informações disponíveis sobre os organoclorados e os efeitos crônicos provocados pela exposição. Os compostos organoclorados são os praguicidas mais persistentes já fabricados. Embora sejam geralmente eficientes no controle das pragas, são importantes poluentes ambientais e potenciais causas de problemas de saúde para o homem, tendo sido proibidos ou controlados na maioria dos países. Com poucas exceções, os efeitos tardios desses compostos sobre a saúde humana são difíceis de detectar, em função de dificuldades metodológicas e da extrapolação dos resultados. A genotoxicidade está entre os mais sérios dos possíveis danos causados por esses compostos e merece atenção especial, devido à natureza irreversível do processo. Outro ponto a ser considerado é o aumento na incidência de alterações no desenvolvimento do trato reprodutivo e na fertilidade masculina observada nas últimas décadas provavelmente decorrente do aumento da exposição intra-uterina a compostos estrogênicos e anti-androgênicos, como os organoclorados.

  2. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, E. [Fermilab; Arkan, T. [Fermilab; Borissov, E. [Fermilab; Dhanaraj, N. [Fermilab; Hocker, A. [Fermilab; Orlov, Y. [Fermilab; Peterson, T. [Fermilab; Premo, K. [Fermilab

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  3. Cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Srinivasulu Raju; M Umapathy; G Uma

    2015-01-01

    Energy harvesting employing piezoelectric materials in mechanical structures such as cantilever beams, plates, diaphragms, etc, has been an emerging area of research in recent years. The research in this area is also focused on structural tailoring to improve the harvested power from the energy harvesters. Towards this aim, this paper presents a method for improving the harvested power from a cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester by introducing multiple rectangular cavities. A generalized model for a piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple rectangular cavities at a single section and two sections is developed. A method is suggested to optimize the thickness of the cavities and the number of cavities required to generate a higher output voltage for a given cantilever beam structure. The performance of the optimized energy harvesters is evaluated analytically and through experimentation. The simulation and experimental results show that the performance of the energy harvester can be increased with multiple cavities compared to the harvester with a single cavity. (paper)

  4. Unique space saving accelerator cavity design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.; Fugitt, J.; Crosby, F.; Johnson, R.

    1981-03-01

    A cavity with 3 series gaps was designed and modeled to operate at 70 MHz as a SuperHILAC post acceleration buncher (8.5 MeV/A). Because of a cross-coupling scheme, the 3 cells operate in the 1/2 β lambda mode instead of the β lambda mode of an Alvarez cavity. This coupling results in a cavity with diameter reduced from 3 to less than one meter and a length half that of an Alvarez cavity for the same energy gain. The 3 gaps are electrically in parallel but mechanically in series. The cavity has high Q and shunt impedance. This type of cavity appears to be useful for low velocity beams with β less than or equal to 0.2

  5. Design of 325 MHz spoke cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Peng; Huang Hong; Dai Jianping; Zu Guoquan; Li Han

    2012-01-01

    Spoke cavity can be used in the low-energy section of the proton accelerator. It has many significant advantages: compact structure, high value of R/Q, etc. The ADS (Accelerator Driven System) project will adopt many spoke cavities with different β values. Therefore, IHEP has began the research of β=0.14, 325 MHz spoke cavity. In this pa per, the dimensions, RF performances and mechanical properties of it are studied. (authors)

  6. Induced Cavities for Photonic Quantum Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahad, Ohr; Firstenberg, Ofer

    2017-09-01

    Effective cavities can be optically induced in atomic media and employed to strengthen optical nonlinearities. Here we study the integration of induced cavities with a photonic quantum gate based on Rydberg blockade. Accounting for loss in the atomic medium, we calculate the corresponding finesse and gate infidelity. Our analysis shows that the conventional limits imposed by the blockade optical depth are mitigated by the induced cavity in long media, thus establishing the total optical depth of the medium as a complementary resource.

  7. Novel Geometries for the LHC CRAB Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme b...

  8. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  9. Superconducting niobium cavity with cooling fins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, Shigeru.

    1978-04-01

    Cooling efficiency of a superconducting cavity is shown to be improved by applying a fin structure. Internal heating can be suppressed in a certain degree and the higher rf field is expected to be reached on surfaces of the cavity which is immersed in superfluid He 4 liquid. The rf measurements were made on a C-band niobium cavity with cylindrical and circular fins around the wall. Fields of 39 mT and 25 MV/m were attained for TM 010 mode cavity after surface treatments including high temperature annealing in a UHV furnace. (auth.)

  10. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  11. Assessing the Performance of the Laser Fluorescence Technique in Detecting Proximal Caries Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Akbari

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosing the necessity of cavity preparation and restoration in demineralized proximal areas is always considered as a challenge in restorative treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of the laser fluorescence (LF technique in detection of proximal cavities.Materials & Methods: In this clinical trial, 44 proximal surfaces in 38 dental students were evaluated. The selected patients had radiolucent proximal lesions restricted to inner half of enamel or outer third of dentine in bitewing radiographs (BW. DIAGNOdent pen (LF pen device was used to determine the presence or absence of caries cavities in suspected proximal surfaces. Orthodontic elastic separators were then placed in the contact areas to provide enough space for direct visual and tactile examination. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the laser fluorescence technique were calculated versus the reference standard. The ROC curve was drawn and the best cut-off to determine the presence or absence of proximal cavities was determined.Results: Using DIAGNOdent pen, the optimal cut-off for detecting proximal cavities was 18. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of DIAGNOdent pen for diagnosing proximal caries cavities were 100 per cent, 97.3 per cent and 97.7 per cent, respectively. Conclusion: Due to the high diagnostic accuracy of DIAGNOdent pen in detecting proximal caries cavities, it can be used as a valuable supplement in restorative treatment planning.

  12. Self-cavity lasing in optically pumped single crystals of p-sexiphenyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagi, Hisao, E-mail: yanagi@ms.naist.jp; Tamura, Kenji [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Sasaki, Fumio [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Organic single-crystal self-cavities are prepared by solution growth of p-sexiphenyl (p-6P). Based on Fabry-Pérot feedback inside a quasi-lozenge-shaped platelet crystal, edge-emitting laser is obtained under optical pumping. The multimode lasing band appears at the 0-1 or 0-2 vibronic progressions depending on the excitation conditions which affect the self-absorption effect. Cavity-size dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is investigated with laser-etched single crystals of p-6P. As the cavity length of square-shaped crystal is reduced from 100 to 10 μm, ASE threshold fluence is decreased probably due to size-dependent light confinement in the crystal cavity.

  13. Colisão com o 'efeito estilingue'

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira,Fernando Lang da; Braun,Luci F.M; Braun,Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Abordamos teoricamente a colisão com o 'efeito estilingue' onde um corpo transfere momento linear e energia cinética para um segundo corpo de massa menor, fazendo com que a energia mecânica desse segundo corpo cresça de forma surpreendente. Mostramos que, mesmo quando as colisões são inelásticas, o ganho de energia mecânica pode ser grande. Apresentamos um estudo experimental do interessante efeito realizado a partir de um vídeo. Finalmente discutimos o 'efeito estilingue gravitacional' utili...

  14. Influence of cavity configuration on the adhesion of two resin-based composites to pulpal floor dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagawa, Hirotoshi; Nikaido, Toru; Burrow, Michael F; Tagami, Junji

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of cavity configuration on microtensile bond strengths of two resin composites for core build-up to pulpal floor dentin. Access cavity preparation and root canal filling with gutta percha were performed on extracted human molars. Following this, the gutta percha in the pulp chamber was completely removed to expose pulpal floor dentin. The cavity walls remained as a control group (Cavity). For another group, the cavity walls were removed to create a flat surface for bonding (Flat). For the Cavity group, Clearfil SE Bond was applied to the cavity according to the manufacturer's instructions, and either a light-cured resin composite (PH, Clearfil Photo Core) or a dual-cured resin composite (DC, Clearfil DC Core), was placed in the bonded cavity. Clearfil Photo Core was placed in three increments while bulk-filling was used for Clearfil DC Core. The application of the bonding system and the composites to the flat dentin surface was the same as that for cavity. Specimens were stored in water for 1 week, then sectioned vertically into 2 or 3 slabs (0.7 mm thick) and trimmed for the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) test. The MTBSs were measured with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The results (mean +/- SD, MPa, n=10) of PH/Cavity, PH/Flat and DC/Flat were 21.9 +/- 3.4, 28.9 +/- 4.0, and 27.6 +/- 6.1 respectively. The MTBS could not be determined in DC/Cavity because of debonding occurred during sample preparation.

  15. Primary leiomyosarcoma of peritoneal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Naresh Bharti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcomas of soft tissue are the rare tumors and the retroperitoneum is the most common site involved. We report a case of primary leiomyosarcoma of the peritoneal cavity which clinically presented with suprapubic, freely mobile, nontender mass which measured 10×10 cm in size. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed well defined heterogenous hypodense solid cystic mass. The mass was surgically excised out in its entirety. The histopathological examination revealed spindle cells arranged in alternating fascicles having pleomorphic nuclei, indistinct margin and eosinophilic cytoplasm with foci of haemorrhage, necrosis and 5-6 mitosis/HPF. The spindle cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, desmin and negative for S-100, CD-34 and c-kit. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were helpful in making the final confirmatory diagnosis. Leiomyosarcomas are aggressive tumors, with poor prognosis and often difficult to treat. The survival rates are lowest among all soft tissue sarcomas.

  16. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Shirani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering.

  17. O Efeito Foucault: Desnaturalizando Verdades, Superando Dicotomias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coimbra Cecilia Maria Bouças

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo parte de idéias contidas em algumas obras de Foucault, levantando questões referentes à produção de verdades, a hegemonia da ciência positiva e aos binarismos presentes no mundo contemporâneo. Aponta, ainda, como o pensamento desse filósofo tem sido uma potente ferramenta, que tem possibilitado colocar em análise as crenças produzidas pelo pensamento platônico, ainda hoje dominante no Ocidente. A partir daí, coloca em discussão a divisão psicologia versus política, procurando pensar que efeitos têm sido produzidos por tal dicotomia cotidiana.

  18. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  19. Chá verde brasileiro (Camellia sinensis var assamica: efeitos do tempo de infusão, acondicionamento da erva e forma de preparo sobre a eficiência de extração dos bioativos e sobre a estabilidade da bebida Brazilian green tea (Camellia sinensis var assamica: effect of infusion time, mode of packaging and preparation on the extraction efficiency of bioactive compounds and on the stability of the beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Fernandes Nishiyama

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos do chá verde brasileiro (Camellia sinensis var assamica ainda são escassos quando comparados aos realizados com chás verdes produzidos em outros países. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram avaliar os efeitos do tempo de infusão, forma de acondicionamento da erva (a granel ou em sachês e forma de preparo da bebida na extração dos biativos do chá verde brasileiro e na estabilidade da bebida obtida. Foram avaliados os parâmetros sólidos solúveis e compostos fenólicos extraídos, bem como as propriedades antioxidantes da bebida pelo método DPPH (radicais 2,2-difenil-1-picrilhidrazil. Os dados obtidos evidenciam que o uso da erva a granel sob agitação e tempo de infusão de 5 minutos foi a condição mais propícia para a extração dos bioativos do chá verde. Aumentando-se o volume de preparação da bebida sem alteração da razão erva:água, aumentou-se a eficiência da extração dos bioativos, devido ao fato de que o resfriamento de volumes maiores é mais demorado que o resfriamento de volumes menores. As bebidas obtidas foram estáveis por 24 horas em temperatura ambiente e em geladeira, visto não terem sido detectadas redução das propriedades antioxidantes e variações significativas dos seus principais bioativos epigalocatequina galato, epicatequina, catequina e cafeína.Studies on the Brazilian green tea (Camellia sinensis var assamica are still scarce when compared with the great number of investigations conducted on the green tea produced in other countries. The purposes of the present study were to evaluate the effects of infusion time, mode of packaging (tea in bulk or in tea bags and preparation on the extraction of bioactive compounds from the Brazilian green tea and on the stability of the beverage. The evaluated parameters were: the amounts of soluble solutes and phenolic compounds that were extracted as well as the antioxidant properties of the beverage using the DPPH method (2,2-diphenyl-1

  20. Cavity ring down spectrometry for disease diagnostics using exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, G.; Grundšteins, K.; Alnis, J.; Skudra, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we report the current stage of the development of a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS) system using exhaled human breath analysis for the diagnostics of different diseases like diabetes and later lung cancer. The portable CRDS system is made in ultraviolet spectral region using Nd:Yag laser 266 nm pulsed light. Calibration of the CRDS system was performed using generated samples by KinTek automated permeation tube system and self-prepared mixtures with known concentration of benzene and acetone in air. First experiments showed that the limits of detection for benzene and acetone are several tens of ppb.

  1. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    demonstrate a PhC cavity with a quality factor of Q15 000 that exhibits a temperature-independent resonance. Temperature-stable cavities constitute a major building block in the development of a large suite of applications from high-sensitivity sensor systems for chemical and biomedical applications...

  2. Superconducting rf cavities for accelerator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proch, D.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a review of superconducting cavities for accelerator application (β = 1). The layout of a typical accelerating unit is described and important parameters are discussed. Recent cavity measurements and storage ring beam tests are reported and the present state of the art is summarized

  3. Telescopic Examination of the mastoid Cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Anita; Sharma, Man Prakash; Bapna, A. S.

    1998-01-01

    Otoendoscopy enables viewing of different angles of the tympanomastoid area and approach to them for better prognosis. A comparative study of post-operative mastoid cavities has been done using the Hopkin’s rod telescope, Otoscope and microscope. Various procedures have also been done successfully on the mastoid cavity using the telescope on an outdoor basis.

  4. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  5. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  6. The gastro-oesophageal common cavity revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, M. C.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Samsom, M.; Smout, A. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    The manometric common cavity phenomenon has been used as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux of liquid or gaseous substances. Using combined pH and impedance recording as reference standard the value of a common cavity as indicator of gastro-oesophageal reflux was tested. Ten healthy male

  7. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  8. Inertial confinement fusion reactor cavity phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Hafer, J.F.; Devaney, J.J.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Cavity phenomena in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are created by the interaction of energy released by the fuel pellet microexplosion with the medium inside the reactor cavity. The ambient state of the medium in ICF reactor cavities is restricted primarily by its effects on laser beam propagation and on the fuel pellet trajectory. Therefore, a relatively wide choice of ambient conditions can be exploited to gain first-wall protection and advantages in energy extraction. Depending on the choice of ambient cavity conditions and on fuel pellet design, a variety of physical phenomena may develop and dominate the ICF reactor cavity design. Because of the cavity phenomena, the forms of energy released by the fuel-pellet microexplosion are modified before reaching the first wall, thus giving rise to different cavity design problems. The types of cavity phenomena encountered in the conceptual design of ICF reactors are examined, the approaches available for their modeling and analysis are discussed, and some results are presented. Most phenomena are sufficiently well understood to permit valid engineering assessments of the proposed ICF reactor concepts

  9. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlage, Steven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  10. Cavity cooling of free silicon nanoparticles in high vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenbaum, Peter; Kuhn, Stefan; Nimmrichter, Stefan; Sezer, Ugur; Arndt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Laser cooling has given a boost to atomic physics throughout the last 30 years, as it allows one to prepare atoms in motional states, which can only be described by quantum mechanics. Most methods rely, however, on a near-resonant and cyclic coupling between laser light and well-defined internal states, which has remained a challenge for mesoscopic particles. An external cavity may compensate for the lack of internal cycling transitions in dielectric objects and it may provide assistance in the cooling of their centre-of-mass state. Here we demonstrate cavity cooling of the transverse kinetic energy of silicon nanoparticles freely propagating in high vacuum (<10(-8) mbar). We create and launch them with longitudinal velocities down to v≤1 m s(-1) using laser-induced ablation of a pristine silicon wafer. Their interaction with the light of a high-finesse infrared cavity reduces their transverse kinetic energy by up to a factor of 30.

  11. Fiber cavities with integrated mode matching optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Podoliak, Nina; Horak, Peter; Keller, Matthias

    2017-07-17

    In fiber based Fabry-Pérot Cavities (FFPCs), limited spatial mode matching between the cavity mode and input/output modes has been the main hindrance for many applications. We have demonstrated a versatile mode matching method for FFPCs. Our novel design employs an assembly of a graded-index and large core multimode fiber directly spliced to a single mode fiber. This all-fiber assembly transforms the propagating mode of the single mode fiber to match with the mode of a FFPC. As a result, we have measured a mode matching of 90% for a cavity length of ~400 μm. This is a significant improvement compared to conventional FFPCs coupled with just a single mode fiber, especially at long cavity lengths. Adjusting the parameters of the assembly, the fundamental cavity mode can be matched with the mode of almost any single mode fiber, making this approach highly versatile and integrable.

  12. Statistics of magnetoconductance in ballistic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Ishio, H.; Burgdoerfer, J.

    1995-01-01

    The statistical properties of magnetoconductance in ballistic microcavities are investigated numerically. The distribution of conductance for chaotic cavities is found to follow the renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution suggested by random-matrix theory for the Gaussian ensemble while the conductance distribution of regular cavities in magnetic fields is nonuniversal and shifted towards the maximum value for a given number of open channels. The renormalized Porter-Thomas distribution implies a universal dependence of fluctuation amplitude on the mean conductance for chaotic cavities in the absence of time-reversal symmetry. The fluctuation amplitude for regular cavities is found to be larger than the saturation value of the fluctuation amplitude of chaotic cavities predicted by random-matrix theory. The change of the mean conductance as a function of the external magnetic field is consistent with semiclassical predictions

  13. New achievements in RF cavity manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, G.; Pimiskern, K.; Kaiser, H.

    1993-01-01

    Dornier has been engaged in development, manufacturing and testing of Cu-, Cu/Nb- and Nb-cavities for many years. Recently, several different types of RF cavities were manufactured. A prototype superconducting (s.c.) B-Factory accelerating cavity (1-cell, 500 MHz) was delivered to Cornell University, Laboratory of Nuclear Studies. A second lot of 6 s.c. cavities (20-cell, 3000 MHz) was fabricated on contract from Technical University of Darmstadt for the S-DALINAC facility. Finally, the first copper RF structures (9-cell, 1300 MHz) for TESLA were finished and delivered to DESY, two s.c. niobium structures of the same design are in production. Highlights from the manufacturing processes of these cavities are described and first performance results will be reported

  14. Luminescent photonic crystal cavities for fiber-optic sensors, coupled dissimilar cavities and optofluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mehmet A.; Wang, Bowen; Siahaan, Timothy; Voorbraak, Joost A. M.; Speijcken, Noud W. L.; Nötzel, Richard; van der Hoek, Marinus J.; He, Sailing; Fiore, Andrea; Van der Heijden, Rob W.

    2012-06-01

    Photonic crystal (PhC) cavities made in broadband luminescent material offer attractive possibilities for flexible active devices. The luminescence enables the cavity to operate as an autonomous entity. New applications of this property are demonstrated for cavities made in the InGaAsP underetched semiconductor membrane with embedded InAs Quantum Dots that emit in the range of 1400-1600 nm. Planar photonic crystal membrane nanocavities were released from the parent chip by mechanical nanomanipulation. The released cavity particle could be bonded on an arbitrary surface, which was exploited to make a novel fiber-optic tip sensor with a PhC cavity attached to the tip. A single mode from a short cavity is shown to couple simultaneously to at least three cavity modes of a long cavity, as concluded from level anticrossing data when the small cavity was photothermally tuned. Reconfigurable and movable cavities were created by locally varying the infiltration status by liquid oil near a PhC waveguide or defect cavity. Liquid was displaced locally on a micron scale using capillary force effects or laser-induced evaporation and condensation phenomena.

  15. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyreff, G. [Optique Nonlineaire Theorique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), CP 231 (Belgium); Gelens, L. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  16. The HIE-ISOLDE Superconducting Cavities: Surface Treatment and Niobium Thin Film Coating

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, G; Ferreira, L M A; Gustafsson, A E; Pasini, M; Trilhe, P; Palmieri, V

    2010-01-01

    CERN has designed and prepared new facilities for the surface treatment and niobium sputter coating of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting cavities. We describe here the design choices, as well as the results of the first surface treatments and test coatings.

  17. Cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity are curable. When early tumor (T1 and T2) is diagnosed and treated, cure rates by surgery or irradiation are high. The choice of therapeutic modalities for these lesions is complex and depends on the site of origin and size of the tumor, the presence or absence of nodal metastases, and the age, physical, medical, and socioeconomic status of the patient. Other factors include the willingness of the patient to return for a protracted course of radiation therapy, the skill of the physician, and the relative morbidity and cosmesis of the two forms of treatment. In general, surgery may be considered for early (T1) lesions if the deformity resulting from surgery is minimal. If resection involves major morbidity, such as a deformity that alters cosmesis or the function of the speech and swallowing mechanisms, then radiation therapy is preferred. For medium-sized (T2) tumors, superficial radiation therapy is the treatment of choice, for it controls the disease and preserves normal function and anatomy. Surgery is reserved for radiation failures. Extensive disease (T3 and T4) often associated with bone and muscle involvement and cervical lymph node metastases is rarely curable by radiation therapy or surgery alone; a combined approach using radiation therapy and surgery is therefore the procedure of choice

  18. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson was a critical test of...

  19. The MEDICI reactor cavity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Trebikock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MEDICI reactor cavity model is currently under development with the goal of providing a flexible, relatively realistic treatment of ex-vessel severe accident phenomena suitable for large system codes like CONTAIN and MELCOR. The code is being developed with an emphasis on top-down design, to facilitate adaptability and multiple applications. A brief description of the overall code structure is provided. One of the key new models is then described in more detail. This is a dynamic quench model for debris beds. An example calculation using this model is presented. The question of whether it is necessary to consider the simultaneous motion of the quench front and ablation of the concrete is addressed with some scoping models. It is found that for realistic parameters and coolable beds, concrete ablation is too slow a process to be important on the quenching time scale. Remelt in the dry zone, however, is found to be potentially important on this time scale, so quench and remelt are considered simultaneously

  20. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, W.; Kaiser, H.; Singer, X.; Gonin, I.; Zhelezov, I.; Khabibullin, T.; Kneisel, P.; Saito, K.

    2000-01-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10 10 at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n(Omega) after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 (micro)m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E acc ∼ 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 (micro)m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E acc (ge) 42 MV/m

  1. Passive control of supersonic cavity flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokani, N.; Kim, I.

    1991-01-01

    A computational investigation has been conducted to study the effect and mechanisms of the passive control of a supersonic flow over a rectangular two-dimensional cavity. The passive control was included through the use of a porous surface over a vent chamber in the floor of the cavity. The passive control effectively suppressed the low-frequency pressure oscillations for the open type cavity, (length-to-depth ratio = 6.0). The mechanism for the suppression was observed to be the stabilization of the motion of the free shear layer. For the closed type cavity flow, (length-to-depth ratio = 17.5), the passive control modified the flowfield to nearly that of an open type cavity flow; further the cavity drag was reduced by a factor of four. The computational results of both cases showed good agreement with the available experimental data and the predictions of a semiempirical formula. This study demonstrates that the passive control concept can be used to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of open and closed cavity flowfields.

  2. The CEBAF separator cavity resonance control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wissmann; C. Hovater; A. Guerra; T. Plawski

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade will increase the maximum beam energy from 6 GeV to 12 GeV available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three halls. The resulting increase in RF separator cavity gradient and subsequent increase in RF power needed for these higher energies will require the cavities to have active resonance control. Currently, at the present 4 to 6 GeV energies, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW) which is maintained at a constant temperature of 95 Fahrenheit. This approach is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system that controls both water temperature and flow has been designed and built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to regulate water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately, closed loop control will be maintained by monitoring each cavity's reflected power. This paper describes this system

  3. Forward Modeling of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a forward model of emission from a coronal cavity in an effort to determine the temperature and density distribution in the cavity. Coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and X-rays. When these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs The model consists of a coronal streamer model with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. We apply this model to a cavity observed in Aug. 2007 by a wide array of instruments including Hinode/EIS, STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/EIT. Studies such as these will ultimately help us understand the the original structures which erupt to become CMEs and ICMES, one of the prime Solar Orbiter objectives.

  4. Design of the Advanced LIGO recycling cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Muzammil A; Mueller, Guido

    2008-07-07

    The current LIGO detectors will undergo an upgrade which is expected to improve their sensitivity and bandwidth significantly. These advanced gravitational-wave detectors will employ stable recycling cavities to better confine their spatial eigenmodes instead of the currently installed marginally stable power recycling cavity. In this letter we describe the general layout of the recycling cavities and give specific values for a first possible design. We also address the issue of mode mismatch due to manufacturing tolerance of optical elements and present a passive compensation scheme based upon optimizing the distances between optical elements.

  5. Interaction of IREB with a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawhney, R.; Mishra, Mamta; Purkayastha, A.D.; Rambabu, P.; Maheshwari, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    The propagation of an intense pulsed relativistic electron beam (IREB) through a cavity resonator is considered. The cavity gets shock excited. The electromagnetic fields so generated interact with the beam in such a way that the energy is transferred from the front of the beam to the back. As a result the beams gets energized but shortened in time. Analysis for the chosen dominant mode of the cavity viz. TMsub(010) is carried out. The induced electric field excited is calculated and the accelerating potential is estimated. The results are compared with the recent-experiments. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig

  6. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  7. Indirect coupling of magnons by cavity photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare Rameshti, Babak; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between two magnetic spheres in microwave cavities is studied by Mie scattering theory beyond the magnetostatic and rotating wave approximations. We demonstrate that two spatially separated dielectric and magnetic spheres can be strongly coupled over a long distance by the electric field component of standing microwave cavity modes. The interactions split acoustical (dark) and optical (bright) modes in a way that can be mapped on a molecular orbital theory of the hydrogen molecule. Breaking the symmetry by assigning different radii to the two spheres introduces "ionic" character to the magnonic bonds. These results illustrate the coherent and controlled energy exchange between objects in microwave cavities.

  8. Analysis of dual coupler nested coupled cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, George A; Sabry, Yasser M; Khalil, Diaa

    2017-12-01

    Coupled ring resonators are now forming the basic building blocks in several optical systems serving different applications. In many of these applications, a small full width at half maximum is required, along with a large free spectral range. In this work, a configuration of passive coupled cavities constituting dual coupler nested cavities is proposed. A theoretical study of the configuration is presented allowing us to obtain analytical expressions of its different spectral characteristics. The transfer function of the configuration is also used to generate design curves while comparing these results with analytical expressions. Finally, the configuration is compared with other coupled cavity configurations.

  9. Cavity Pressure Behaviour in Micro Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C.A.; Dimov, S.S.; Scholz, S.

    2010-01-01

    Process monitoring of micro injection moulding (µIM) is of crusial importance to analyse the effect of different parameter settings on the process and to assess its quality. Quality factors related to cavity pressure can provide useful information directly connected with the dyanmics of the process...... as well as with the filling of the cavity by the polymer melt. In this paper, two parameters derived from cavity pressure over time (i.e. pressure work). The influence of four µIM parameters (melt temperature, mould temperature, injection speed, aand packing pressure) on the two pressure-related outputs...

  10. On the field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Junginger, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The surface resistance Rs of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a thin niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied RF field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that due to the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film Rs is enhanced due to global heating of the inner cavity wall. Introducing helium gas in the cavity and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by only 60+/-60 mK when Rs increases with Eacc by 100 nOhm. This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally the effect of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered Rs.

  11. Cavity Adaptation of Water-Based Restoratives Placed as Liners under a Resin Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela B. Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the cavity adaptation of mineral trioxide (ProRoot MTA/MT, tricalcium silicate (Biodentine/BD, and glass ionomer (Equia Fil/EF cements used as liners and the interfacial integrity between those liners and a composite resin placed as the main restorative material. Materials and Methods. Standardized class I cavities (n: 8 per group were prepared in upper premolars. Cavities were lined with a 1 mm thick layer of each of the tested materials and restored with Optibond FL adhesive and Herculite Precis composite resin. Cavity adaptation of the restorations was investigated by computerized X-ray microtomography. The regions of interest (ROI were set at the cavity-liner (CL interface and the liner-resin (LR interface. The percentage void volume fraction (%VVF in the ROI was calculated. The specimens were then sectioned and the interfaces were evaluated by reflection optical microscopy, to measure the % length (%LD of the interfacial gaps. Selected samples were further evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (a=0.05. Results. MT showed significantly higher %VVF and %LD values in CL interfaces than BD and EF (p<0.05. No significant differences were found among the materials for the same values at the LR interfaces. Conclusions. When used as a composite liner, ProRoot MTA showed inferior cavity adaptation at dentin/liner interface when compared to Biodentine and Equia Fil.

  12. Efficacy of XP-endo Finisher File in Removing Calcium Hydroxide from Simulated Internal Resorption Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Cangül; Sariyilmaz, Evren; Sariyilmaz, Öznur

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of supplementary use of XP-endo Finisher file, passive ultrasonic activation (PUI), EndoActivator (EA), and CanalBrush (CB) on the removal of calcium hydroxide (CH) paste from simulated internal resorption cavities. The root canals of 110 extracted single-rooted teeth with straight canals were prepared up to size 50. The specimens were split longitudinally, and standardized internal resorption cavities were prepared with burs. The cavities and root canals were filled with CH paste. The specimens were divided into 5 groups as follows: XP-endo Finisher, EA, PUI, CB, and syringe irrigation (SI). The root canals were irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA for 2 minutes, respectively. Apart from the SI group, both solutions were activated by using tested techniques for 1 minute. The quantity of CH remnants on resorption cavities was scored. Data were analyzed by using Kruskal-Wallis H and Mann-Whitney U tests. XP-endo Finisher and PUI removed significantly more CH than SI, EA, and CB (P  .05). Differences among SI, EA, and CB were also non-significant (P > .05). None of the tested techniques render the simulated internal resorption cavities free of CH debris. XP-endo Finisher and PUI were superior to SI, CB, and EA. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  14. Preparation and characterization of asymmetric membranes of poly (vinylidene fluoride) supported in polyester - I: effect of heat treatment in the properties of membranes; Preparacao e caracterizacao de membranas assimetricas de poli (fluoreto de vinilideno) suportadas em poliester - I: efeito do tratamento termico nas propriedades das membranas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuermer, Monica B.; Poletto, Patricia; Marcolin, Marcos; Ferreira, Daiane G.; Zeni, Mara [Universidade de Caxias do Sul (CCET/UCS), RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia], E-mail: mzandrad@ucs.br

    2010-07-15

    Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride) (PVDF) is a semicrystalline polymer containing an amorphous and a crystalline phase. This characteristic is important for the preparation of asymmetric membranes, because the crystalline phase has great influence on the membranes structure, while the amorphous phase affects the porosity. PVDF membranes were prepared by the phase inversion process, which were then evaluated with regard to permeability and morphology, as well as the thermal treatment effect. The following membranes were compared: without thermal treatment, with thermal treatment and commercially-available membrane. The analysis of chemical resistance, water permeability flux to different pressures and diffusion of ions, in addition to studies with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), were performed to investigate the membranes properties. (author)

  15. Microleakage of three self-etch bonding agents in class 5 composite cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nemati Anaraki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Microleakage is one of the most common problems in bonding systems, which cause different clinical shortcomings such as post operative sensitivity, marginal discoloration and pulp necrosis that can decrease those using bonding systems. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of three self etch bonding agents (generation 6 and 7 in class 5 composite cavities. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 facial class 5 cavities were prepared in 30 human premolar teeth which were freshly extracted for orthodontic purposes. Cl V cavities were prepared in 2*3*2 mm dimensions. Occlusal margins were in enamel and gingival ones in cementum and randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 each. Then the cavities were treated by clearhil SE Bond (Kuraray, Japan, G Bond (GC, Japan, and Opti Bond Solo Plus (Kerr, USA, according to the manufacturers’ insductions. Then the cavities were filled using Z100 resin composite. The specimens were then immersed in a 50% AgNo solution for 24 hrs. Then, the teeth were cut buccolingually to be evaluated for dye penetration with stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: This study revealed that Opti bond solo plus had type1 microleakage (dye penetration up to 1/3 of cavity in 80% of specimen, and type 4 microleakage (along axial wall in 10%. Clearfil SE bond had no leakage in 50%, type1 in 40% and type 2 (up to 2/3 of cavity in 10%. But there was no significant difference in the microleakage at the gingival margins between 3 groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: Clearfil SE Bond and G bond could prevent microleakage more effectively than that of Opti Bond Solo Plus on the occlusal margins. However, no difference in the microleakage on the gingival surfaces was found.

  16. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jae Won

    1993-01-01

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60 Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  17. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Potter, J.M.; Earley, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity

  18. Molding of L band niobium superconductor cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Saito, Kenji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Koizumi, Susumu [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    A cavity to produce high accelerating electron field was developed. The L-band (1.3 GHz) niobium superconductor unit cell cavity was ellipsoid with {phi}217.3 mm outer diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and consisted of two pieces of half cell, two beam pipes and flange. A deep drawing process was adapted. In spite of the first trial manufacture, each good cavity was obtained. Characteristic properties of niobium materials, molding method of cavity, extension of sheet after molding, production of beam pipe, accuracy and the cost were explained. Niobium materials. showed tensile strength 15.6 kg/mm{sup 2}, load-carrying capacity 4.1 kg/mm{sup 2}, density 8.57, extension 42.5% and RRR (resistance residual ratio){>=}200. (S.Y.)

  19. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  20. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  1. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  2. Cavity squeezing by a quantum conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, Udson C; Mora, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid architectures integrating mesoscopic electronic conductors with resonant microwave cavities have a great potential for investigating unexplored regimes of electron–photon coupling. In this context, producing nonclassical squeezed light is a key step towards quantum communication with scalable solid-state devices. Here we show that parametric driving of the electronic conductor induces a squeezed steady state in the cavity. We find that squeezing properties of the cavity are essentially determined by the electronic noise correlators of the quantum conductor. In the case of a tunnel junction, we predict that squeezing is optimized by applying a time-periodic series of quantized δ—peaks in the bias voltage. For an asymmetric quantum dot, we show that a sharp Leviton pulse is able to achieve perfect cavity squeezing. (paper)

  3. Design of an optical cavity for gravimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billion Reyes, M. S.; Lopez-Vazquez, A.; Pimenta, W. M.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Franco-Villafane, J. A.; Gomez, E.

    2017-04-01

    Atomic interferometry is a widely used method to perform precision measurements of accelerations. We enhance the interferometric signal by adding an optical cavity around the free-falling atoms inside of a vacuum chamber. We use a bow-tie configuration to support a traveling wave and avoid spatial fluctuations in the light shift. To induce collective behavior (entangled state), we design the optical cavity with a cooperativity factor higher than one. We present the characterization of an optical cavity with a maximized beam waist to reach homogeneous illumination of the atomic cloud. The mirrors have high reflectivity (R =99.999%) at 780 nm, in a non-confocal arrangement so that we can excite transverse modes independently or simultaneously. We describe our progress to achieve a transverse mode closer to a flat-top and a cavity design that fits our geometrical restrictions. Funding from CONACYT.

  4. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  5. HOM power in FCC-ee cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, Ivan; Chapochnikova, Elena

    2018-01-01

    This Note summarizes the results of the power loss calculations for FCC-ee machines with 400.79 MHz cavity options. The requirements for the single-cell cavity design and for the operation with beam are obtained from the results for the high-current FCC-ee machine (Z). For other machines the power loss is sufficiently low and can be absorbed and extracted by foreseen HOM couplers.

  6. Cavity-Assisted Quantum Bath Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, K. W.; Vool, U.; Zhou, D.; Weber, S. J.; Girvin, S. M.; Siddiqi, I.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate quantum bath engineering for a superconducting artificial atom coupled to a microwave cavity. By tailoring the spectrum of microwave photon shot noise in the cavity, we create a dissipative environment that autonomously relaxes the atom to an arbitrarily specified coherent superposition of the ground and excited states. In the presence of background thermal excitations, this mechanism increases state purity and effectively cools the dressed atom state to a low temperature.

  7. Performance experience with the CEBAF SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Mammosser, J.; Preble, J.

    1995-12-31

    The full complement of 169 pairs of niobium superconducting cavities has been installed in the CEBAF accelerator. This paper surveys the performance characteristics of these cavities in vertical tests, commissioning in the tunnel, and operational experience to date. Although installed performance exceeds specifications, and 3.2 GeV beam has been delivered on target, present systems do not consistently preserve the high performance obtained in vertical dewar tests as operational capability. Principal sources of these limitations are discussed.

  8. Ultrasensitive and broadband magnetometry with cavity optomechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bei-Bei; Bulla, Douglas; Bilek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    We achieved sensitivity of 30 pT/Hz1/2 and working bandwidth larger than 100 MHz, using cavity optomechanical magnetometry, and also demonstrated quantum light enhanced sensitivity in such a magnetometer.......We achieved sensitivity of 30 pT/Hz1/2 and working bandwidth larger than 100 MHz, using cavity optomechanical magnetometry, and also demonstrated quantum light enhanced sensitivity in such a magnetometer....

  9. Quantum cavities with alternating boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchi, Paolo; Garnero, Giancarlo; Ligabò, Marilena

    2018-03-01

    We consider the quantum dynamics of a free nonrelativistic particle moving in a cavity and we analyze the effect of a rapid switching between two different boundary conditions. We show that this procedure induces, in the limit of infinitely frequent switchings, a new effective dynamics in the cavity related to a novel boundary condition. We obtain a dynamical composition law for boundary conditions which gives the emerging boundary condition in terms of the two initial ones.

  10. Early 500 MHz prototype LEP RF Cavity with superposed storage cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The principle of transferring the RF power back and forth between the accelerating cavity and a side-coupled storage cavity was demonstrated with this 500 MHz prototype. In LEP, the accelerating frequency was 352.2 MHz, and accelerating and storage cavities were consequently larger. See also 8002294, 8006061, 8407619X, and Annual Reports 1980, p.115; 1981, p.95; 1985, vol.I, p.13.

  11. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayu; Li Peng; Liu Yong; Xie Qingchun

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238 U 72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  12. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  13. High field tests of 1.3 GHz niobium superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kako, Eiji; Noguchi, Shuichi; Ono, Masaaki

    1993-01-01

    Four single-cell cavities prepared by various surface treatments have been tested repeatedly since 1991. A maximum accelerating gradient of 25.1 MV/m with a high Q 0 value of ∼10 10 was successfully achieved after heat treatment at 1400degC. A temperature mapping system with a high thermal sensitivity under superfluid helium was developed to understand phenomena limiting a maximum accelerating gradient. The cavity performances and the phenomena at high fields are reported in this paper. (author)

  14. Effect of Ca and Li additions on densification and electrical conductivity of 10 mol% gadolinia-doped ceria prepared by the coprecipitation technique; Efeito de adicoes de litio e calcio na densificacao e na condutividade eletrica da ceria-10% mol gadolinia preparada pela tecnica de co-precipitacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porfirio, T.C.

    2010-07-01

    Ceria containing rare-earth ceramics are potential candidates for application in intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells. One of the main problems related to these ceramic materials is their relatively low sinterability. In this work, the effects of Ca and Li additions on densification and electrical conductivity of 10 mol% gadolinia-doped ceria was investigated. Ceramic compositions containing 1.5 mol% Ca or Li were prepared by the oxalate coprecipitation technique. Results of sintered density and electrical conductivity were compared to those of ceramic samples obtained by solid state reactions showing the effects of the synthesis method on densification and total electrical conductivity of the sintered materials. (author)

  15. Preparation and characterization of artemether inclusion complexes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate experimentally the inclusion of artemether into the cavity of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and examine its effect on the solubility and dissolution rate of the drug. Methods: Inclusion complexes of artemether with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin of molar ratios 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 were prepared using the ...

  16. Efeitos multiplicadores da economia florestal brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde Sebastião Renato

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho trata da importância do setor florestal para o desenvolvimento socioeconômico brasileiro por meio dos modelos econômicos de equilíbrio geral multissetoriais, através das análises das matrizes de insumo-produto (MIP e de contabilidade social (MCS. As principais fontes dos dados foram as Tabelas de Insumo-Produto (TIP do Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística (IBGE, além de informações obtidas no Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social (BNDES, no Banco Central (BACEN e na Secretaria da Receita Federal (SRF, referentes ao ano de 1995. Observou-se que tão importante quanto contribuir para a geração e formação do PIB, de emprego, impostos, salários e balança comercial é o poder que um setor produtivo tem a mais que o outro de multiplicar estes indicadores quando uma unidade monetária é gasta a mais pelos consumidores finais na demanda por produtos deste determinado setor. Os resultados indicaram que o setor florestal é um dos setores da economia brasileira que apresentou os maiores efeitos multiplicadores para os indicadores socioeconômicos, sendo superiores aos de outros como o da indústria automobilística, de equipamentos elétricos e eletrônicos, de máquinas e equipamentos e de produtos químicos e petróleo.

  17. Fracture Strength of Endodontically Treated Teeth with Different Access Cavity Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Isufi, Almira; Ioppolo, Pietro; Pedullà, Eugenio; Bedini, Rossella; Gambarini, Gianluca; Testarelli, Luca

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare in vitro the fracture strength of root-filled and restored teeth with traditional endodontic cavity (TEC), conservative endodontic cavity (CEC), or ultraconservative "ninja" endodontic cavity (NEC) access. Extracted human intact maxillary and mandibular premolars and molars were selected and assigned to control (intact teeth), TEC, CEC, or NEC groups (n = 10/group/type). Teeth in the TEC group were prepared following the principles of traditional endodontic cavities. Minimal CECs and NECs were plotted on cone-beam computed tomographic images. Then, teeth were endodontically treated and restored. The 160 specimens were then loaded to fracture in a mechanical material testing machine (LR30 K; Lloyd Instruments Ltd, Fareham, UK). The maximum load at fracture and fracture pattern (restorable or unrestorable) were recorded. Fracture loads were compared statistically, and the data were examined with analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons. The mean load at fracture for TEC was significantly lower than the one for the CEC, NEC, and control groups for all types of teeth (P  .05). Unrestorable fractures were significantly more frequent in the TEC, CEC, and NEC groups than in the control group in each tooth type (P < .05). Teeth with TEC access showed lower fracture strength than the ones prepared with CEC or NEC. Ultraconservative "ninja" endodontic cavity access did not increase the fracture strength of teeth compared with the ones prepared with CEC. Intact teeth showed more restorable fractures than all the prepared ones. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimating tree cavity distributions from historical FIA data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Nelson; Charlotte. Roy

    2012-01-01

    Tree cavities provide important habitat features for a variety of wildlife species. We describe an approach for using historical FIA data to estimate the number of trees containing cavities during the 1990s in seven states of the Upper Midwest. We estimated a total of 280 million cavity-containing trees. Iowa and Missouri had the highest percentages of cavity-...

  19. Soliton laser: A computational two-cavity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, P.; If, F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1987-01-01

    An improved computational two-cavity model of the soliton laser proposed and designed by Mollenauer and Stolen [Opt. Lett. 9, 13 (1984)] is obtained through refinements of (i) the laser cavity model, (ii) the pulse propagation in the fiber cavity, and (iii) the coupling between the two cavities...

  20. High field conditioning of cryogenic RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, M.; Debiak, T.; Lom, C.; Shephard, W.; Sredniawski, J.

    1993-01-01

    Space-based and other related accelerators have conditioning and operation requirements that are not found in most machines. The use of cryogenic copper, relatively poor vacuum, and limited power storage and operating time put unusual demands on the high-field conditioning process and present some concerns. Two CW cryogenic engineering model open-quotes sparkerclose quotes cavities have been fabricated and tested to fairly high field levels. Tests included initial and repeated conditioning as well as sustained RF operations. The two cavities were an engineering model TDL and an engineering model RFQ. Both cavities operated at 425 MHz. The DTL was conditioned to 46 MV/m at 100% duty factor (CW) at cryogenic temperature. This corresponds to a gap voltage of 433 kV and a real estate accelerating gradient (energy gain/total cavity length) of 6.97 MV/m. The authors believe this to be record performance for cryo CW operation. During cryo pulsed operation, the same cavity reached 48 MV/m with 200 μsec pulses at 0.5% DF. The RFQ was conditioned to 30 MV/m CW at cryo, 85 kV gap voltage. During a brief period of cryo pulsed operation, the RFQ operated at 46 MV/m, or 125 kV gap voltage. Reconditioning experiments were performed on both cavities and no problems were encountered. It should be noted that the vacuum levels were not very stringent during these tests and no special cleanliness or handling procedures were followed. The results of these tests indicate that cavities can run CW without difficulty at cryogenic temperatures at normal conservative field levels. Higher field operation may well be possible, and if better vacuums are used and more attention is paid to cleanliness, much higher fields may be attainable

  1. Hard dental tissue minimal-invasive preparation using contemporary polymer rotating instruments and laser

    OpenAIRE

    Beloica Miloš; Vulićević Zoran R.; Mandinić Zoran; Radović Ivana; Jovičić Olivera; Carević Momir; Tekić Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Goal of contemporary dentistry is to decrease the patient’s discomfort during treatment. Dentists aim to achieve maximum with the newly developed dental materials as well as with new cavity preparation techniques in the shortest time span. Since the development of the first constructed borer (drilling machine) for caries removal, the preparation techniques have considerably changed. The progress of dental materials as well as the cavity preparation techniqu...

  2. Feedback control of the hyperfine ground states of neutral atoms in an optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakhane, Stefan; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Kampschulte, Tobias; Reimann, Rene; Meschede, Dieter [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Widera, Artur [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, TU Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Str., 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Detection and manipulation of atomic spin states is essential for many experimental realizations of quantum gates. Feedback schemes to stabilize the states and their superpositions can counteract perturbations caused by the environment. In our experiment we deduce the atomic spin state of one or two Caesium atoms by measuring the transmission of a probe laser through a high-finesse cavity. Depending on the number of atoms in the hyperfine state that strongly couples to the cavity, the resonance of the cavity is shifted and the probe laser transmission is decreased. We employ a Bayesian update formalism to obtain time-dependent probabilities for the atomic states of one and two atoms. I present an experimental implementation using a digital signal processor which allows us to determine the atomic spin state in real-time. First experimental results of an extension to a feedback loop for the preparation and stabilization of atomic states are shown.

  3. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Bougouffa, Smail [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, PO Box 30002, Madinah (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-02-14

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  4. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail; Bougouffa, Smail

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  5. Natural cavity characteristics and cavity bird abundance on West Virginia forested islands of the Ohio River

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Anderson; Karen A. Riesz

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife habitats connected with forested islands and their back channels (areas where commercial traffic is prohibited) on the Ohio River are valuable to diverse species. However, quantitative data on the importance of these areas to cavity-nesting birds are lacking. We compared cavity-nesting bird use and habitat between back and navigational channel sides of islands...

  6. Dispersive optomechanics: a membrane inside a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayich, A M; Sankey, J C; Zwickl, B M; Yang, C; Thompson, J D; Girvin, S M; Harris, J G E [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Clerk, A A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Marquardt, F [Department of Physics, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for Nanoscience, Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: jack.harris@yale.edu

    2008-09-15

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies of dispersively coupled (or 'membrane in the middle') optomechanical systems. We calculate the linear optical properties of a high finesse cavity containing a thin dielectric membrane. We focus on the cavity's transmission, reflection and finesse as a function of the membrane's position along the cavity axis and as a function of its optical loss. We compare these calculations with measurements and find excellent agreement in cavities with empty-cavity finesses in the range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5}. The imaginary part of the membrane's index of refraction is found to be {approx}10{sup -4}. We calculate the laser cooling performance of this system, with a particular focus on the less-intuitive regime in which photons 'tunnel' through the membrane on a timescale comparable to the membrane's period of oscillation. Lastly, we present calculations of quantum non-demolition measurements of the membrane's phonon number in the low signal-to-noise regime where the phonon lifetime is comparable to the QND readout time.

  7. Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar Ali, Abu; Ziauddin

    2018-02-01

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is revisited via the input probe field intensity. A strongly interacting Rydberg atomic medium ensemble is considered in a cavity, where atoms behave as superatoms (SAs) under the dipole blockade mechanism. Each atom in the strongly interacting Rydberg atomic medium (87 Rb) follows a three-level cascade atomic configuration. A strong control and weak probe field are employed in the cavity with the ensemble of Rydberg atoms. The features of the reflected and transmitted probe light are studied under the influence of the input probe field intensity. A transparency peak (cavity EIT) is revealed at a resonance condition for small values of input probe field intensity. The manipulation of the cavity EIT is reported by tuning the strength of the input probe field intensity. Further, the phase and group delay of the transmitted and reflected probe light are studied. It is found that group delay and phase in the reflected light are negative, while for the transmitted light they are positive. The magnitude control of group delay in the transmitted and reflected light is investigated via the input probe field intensity.

  8. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  9. A spherical cavity model for quadrupolar dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Iglika M.; Slavchov, Radomir I.; Ivanov, Tzanko; Mosbach, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The dielectric properties of a fluid composed of molecules possessing both dipole and quadrupole moments are studied based on a model of the Onsager type (molecule in the centre of a spherical cavity). The dielectric permittivity ɛ and the macroscopic quadrupole polarizability αQ of the fluid are related to the basic molecular characteristics (molecular dipole, polarizability, quadrupole, quadrupolarizability). The effect of αQ is to increase the reaction field, to bring forth reaction field gradient, to decrease the cavity field, and to bring forth cavity field gradient. The effects from the quadrupole terms are significant in the case of small cavity size in a non-polar liquid. The quadrupoles in the medium are shown to have a small but measurable effect on the dielectric permittivity of several liquids (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, CO2, CS2, C6H6, H2O, CH3OH). The theory is used to calculate the macroscopic quadrupolarizabilities of these fluids as functions of pressure and temperature. The cavity radii are also determined for these liquids, and it is shown that they are functions of density only. This extension of Onsager's theory will be important for non-polar solutions (fuel, crude oil, liquid CO2), especially at increased pressures.

  10. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  11. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  12. Antibacterial effect of root canal preparation and calcium hydroxide paste (Calen intracanal dressing in primary teeth with apical periodontitis Efeito antibacteriano do preparo biomecânico e do curativo de demora com pasta à base de hidróxido de cálcio (Calen em dentes decíduos com lesão periapical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Faria

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial action of root canal mechanical preparation using 2.5% sodium hypochlorite as the irrigating solution and a calcium hydroxide paste as the antibacterial intracanal dressing in human primary teeth root canals with pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis by means of microbial culture. A total of 26 root canals of human primary teeth with pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis were used. Samples were collected before, 72h after biomechanical treatment and 72h after removal of the intracanal dressing. Comparison by Wilcoxon test showed that root canal mechanical preparation effectively eliminated all microorganisms in 20% of the root canals, and the intracanal dressing in 62.5%; however, the cumulative action of biomechanical treatment and intracanal dressing eliminated the microorganisms of 70% of the root canals (pO objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar, por meio de cultura bacteriológica, a ação antibacteriana do preparo biomecânico utilizando como solução irrigadora o hipoclorito de sódio a 2,5% e da pasta Calen utilizada como curativo de demora em canais radiculares de dentes decíduos de humanos com necrose pulpar e lesão periapical. Foram selecionados 26 dentes decíduos de humanos portadores de necrose pulpar e lesão periapical. As colheitas microbiológicas foram efetuadas antes e 72 horas após o preparo biomecânico e 72 horas após a remoção do curativo de demora. A comparação por meio do teste de Wilcoxon mostrou que o preparo biomecânico foi eficaz na eliminação dos microrganismos dos canais radiculares em 20% dos casos e o curativo de demora em 62,5%, enquanto que a ação cumulativa do preparo biomecânico e do curativo de demora eliminou os microrganismos em 70,0% dos casos (p<0.001. Pôde-se concluir que o preparo biomecânico, isoladamente, apresentou resultados microbiológicos inferiores àqueles obtidos quando o mesmo foi associado ao curativo de demora

  13. Scheme for the implementation of a universal quantum cloning machine via cavity-assisted atomic collisions in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Xubo; Pahlke, K.; Mathis, W.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the 1→2 universal quantum cloning machine of Buzek and Hillery [Phys. Rev. A 54, 1844 (1996)] in the context of cavity QED. The scheme requires cavity-assisted collision processes between atoms, which cross through nonresonant cavity fields in the vacuum states. The cavity fields are only virtually excited to face the decoherence problem. That's why the requirements on the cavity quality factor can be loosened

  14. Application of backscatter electrons for large area imaging of cavities produced by neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastukhov, V.I. [Joint Stock Company “Institute of Nuclear Materials” (JSC “INM”), Zarechny, Sverdlovsk Region (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University Named After the First President of Russia, B. N. Yeltsyn, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Averin, S.A.; Panchenko, V.L. [Joint Stock Company “Institute of Nuclear Materials” (JSC “INM”), Zarechny, Sverdlovsk Region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Portnykh, I.A. [Joint Stock Company “Institute of Nuclear Materials” (JSC “INM”), Zarechny, Sverdlovsk Region (Russian Federation); Freyer, P.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Giannuzzi, L.A. [L.A. Giannuzzi & Associates LLC, Fort Myers, FL (United States); Garner, F.A., E-mail: frank.garner@dslextreme.com [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Radiation Effects Consulting LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-11-15

    It is shown that with proper optimization, backscattered electrons in a scanning electron microscope can produce images of cavity distribution in austenitic steels over a large specimen surface for a depth of ∼500–700 nm, eliminating the need for electropolishing or multiple specimen production. This technique is especially useful for quantifying cavity structures when the specimen is known or suspected to contain very heterogeneous distributions of cavities. Examples are shown for cold-worked EK-164, a very heterogeneously-swelling Russian fast reactor fuel cladding steel and also for AISI 304, a homogeneously-swelling Western steel used for major structural components of light water cooled reactors. This non-destructive overview method of quantifying cavity distribution can be used to direct the location and number of required focused ion beam prepared transmission electron microscopy specimens for examination of either neutron or ion-irradiated specimens. This technique can also be applied in stereo mode to quantify the depth dependence of cavity distributions.

  15. Collective state synthesis in an optical cavity using Rydberg atom dipole blockade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon A; Fan, Haoquan; Shaffer, James P

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the coherent manipulation of interacting Rydberg atoms placed inside a high-finesse optical cavity for the deterministic preparation of strongly coupled light-matter systems. We consider a four-level diamond scheme with one common Rydberg level for N interacting atoms. One side of the diamond is used to excite the atoms into a collective ‘superatom’ Rydberg state using either π-pulses or stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) pulses. The upper transition on the other side of the diamond is used to transfer the collective state to one that is coupled to a field mode of an optical cavity. Due to the strong interaction between the atoms in the Rydberg level, the Rydberg blockade mechanism plays a key role in the deterministic quantum state synthesis of the atoms in the cavity. We use numerical simulation to show that non-classical states of light can be generated and that the state that is coupled to the cavity field is a collective one. We also investigate how different decay mechanisms affect this interacting many-body system. We also analyze our system in the case of two Rydberg excitations within the blockade volume. The simulations are carried out with parameters corresponding to realizable high-finesse optical cavities and alkali atoms like rubidium. (paper)

  16. TM01 mode accelerating cavity optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, J.J.; Knapp, E.A.

    1978-08-01

    The cost of an accelerator depends greatly upon the effective use of rf power for particle acceleration. Before completing an accelerator design, an optimization of the accelerating cells relative to the effective shunt impedance should be made to measure the structure's efficiency in providing a high and effective acceleration of particles for a given rf power. Optimization of the accelerating cell resonant at f/sub r/ = 1350 MHz (TM 01 mode) relative to the maximum effective shunt impedance ZT 2 was performed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory using the computer program SUPERFISH. The study was parametric; one parameter was changed while the others were held constant. Frequency adjustments were made by changing the cavity radius. Results presented in this report can be used to design similar cavities at different resonant frequencies or to design a more complicated cavity (TM 02 mode) for the disk and washer structure

  17. Single Atoms in Nearly Concentric Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utama, Adrian Nugraha; Nguyen, Chi Huan; Lewty, Nick; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Quantum Optics Group Team

    2017-04-01

    Strong interaction between photons and neutral single atoms are usually observed in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) systems with high finesse mirrors and small physical volume. We demonstrate another approach that employs a near concentric cavity with relatively low finesse mirrors ( 100) and large physical separation between mirrors ( 10 mm). The transmission spectrum of our CQED system with trapped single atoms is observed to exhibit two resolved normal mode peaks, in which the single atom cooperativity is estimated to be around 0.4. The cooperativity of the system can be improved further by increasing the finesse of the mirrors or moving the cavity closer to the concentric point. The successful realization of concentric CQED systems will open opportunities for scaling up with applications in quantum computing. This work is supported by the National Research Foundation and Ministry of Education, Singapore.

  18. PEP-II RF cavity revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Folwell, N.; Hodgson, J.; Ko, K.; McCandless, B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed

  19. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  20. Coupled Photonic Crystal Cavity Array Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin

    This thesis describes the design, fabrication and characterization of photonic crystal slab lasers. The main focus is on coupled photonic crystal cavity lasers which are examined in great detail. The cavity type which is mainly explored consists of a defect formed by a single missing hole...... in the quadratic lattice. Processing techniques are developed and optimized in order fabricate photonic crystals membranes in gallium arsenide with quantum dots as gain medium and in indium gallium arsenide phosphide with quantum wells as gain medium. Several key issues in process to ensure good quality...... are identified such as the size and material for the carrier wafer in the III-V etch and the importance of removing all remains of the e-beam lithography mask after the etch of the hard mask. Detailed simulations are shown for a simple system with two coupled cavities in different coupling directions...

  1. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Deppe, Frank; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), 80799 Muenchen (Germany); Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fedorov, Kirill; Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems, on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present studies on transmon qubits capacitively coupled to 3D cavities. The internal quality factors of our 3D cavities, machined out of high purity aluminum, are above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. For characterization of the sample, we perform dispersive shift measurements up to the third energy level of the qubit. We show simulations and data describing the effect of the transmon geometry on it's capacitive properties. In addition, we present progress towards an integrated quantum memory application.

  2. Minimum wakefield achievable by waveguide damped cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X.E.; Kroll, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    The authors use an equivalent circuit to model a waveguide damped cavity. Both exponentially damped and persistent (decay t -3/2 ) components of the wakefield are derived from this model. The result shows that for a cavity with resonant frequency a fixed interval above waveguide cutoff, the persistent wakefield amplitude is inversely proportional to the external Q value of the damped mode. The competition of the two terms results in an optimal Q value, which gives a minimum wakefield as a function of the distance behind the source particle. The minimum wakefield increases when the resonant frequency approaches the waveguide cutoff. The results agree very well with computer simulation on a real cavity-waveguide system

  3. Cavity lining after excavating caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Göstemeyer, Gerd; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: After removal of dentin caries lesions, cavity lining has been advocated. Non-clinical data support this approach, but clinical data are sparse and ambiguous. We aimed at evaluating the benefits and harms of cavity lining using meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis. DATA: We...... included randomized clinical trials comparing restorations without versus with cavity lining for treating primary caries lesions. Only trials reporting failure (defined as need to re-retreat) after ≥1 year follow-up were included. Trial selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were conducted....... STUDY SELECTION: From 128 studies, three randomized trials (89/130 patients or teeth), all treating primary teeth, were included. The trials had high risk of bias. All trials compared no lining versus calcium hydroxide lining after selective caries removal followed by adhesive restoration. Follow...

  4. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Donald J.; Gibson, S.; Luna, M.; Karpen, J.; Innes, D.

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system; the cavity is under-dense because it it evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolutin of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model and diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prminence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 A badpass near he prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset between emission enhancements in the other EUV bandpasses. While these predictions match well a subset of the horn observations, the range of variations in the observed structures is not captured by the model. We discuss the implications of one-dimensional loop simulations for the three-dimensional time-averaged equilibrium in the prominence and the cavity. Evidence suggests that horns are likely caused by condensing prominence plasma, but the larger question of whether this process produces a density-depleted cavity requires a more tightly constrained model of heating and better knowledge of the associated magnetic structure.

  5. Seismic wave interaction with underground cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    Realization of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will require ensuring its compliance, making the CTBT a prime example of forensic seismology. Following indications of a nuclear explosion obtained on the basis of the (IMS) monitoring network further evidence needs to be sought at the location of the suspicious event. For such an On-Site Inspection (OSI) at a possible nuclear test site the treaty lists several techniques that can be carried out by the inspection team, including aftershock monitoring and the conduction of active seismic surveys. While those techniques are already well established, a third group of methods labeled as "resonance seismometry" is less well defined and needs further elaboration. A prime structural target that is expected to be present as a remnant of an underground nuclear explosion is a cavity at the location and depth the bomb was fired. Originally "resonance seismometry" referred to resonant seismic emission of the cavity within the medium that could be stimulated by an incident seismic wave of the right frequency and observed as peaks in the spectrum of seismic stations in the vicinity of the cavity. However, it is not yet clear which are the conditions for which resonant emissions of the cavity could be observed. In order to define distance-, frequency- and amplitude ranges at which resonant emissions could be observed we study the interaction of seismic waves with underground cavities. As a generic model for possible resonances we use a spherical acoustic cavity in an elastic full-space. To solve the forward problem for the full elastic wave field around acoustic spherical inclusions, we implemented an analytical solution (Korneev, 1993). This yields the possibility of generating scattering cross-sections, amplitude spectrums and synthetic seismograms for plane incident waves. Here, we focus on the questions whether or not we can expect resonant responses in the wave field scattered from the cavity. We show

  6. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  7. Coherent acoustic excitation of cavity polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; de Lima, M. M.; Hey, R.

    and highly nonlinear optical response.Our sample consists of epitaxially grown GaAs/AlGaAs QWs located at the anti-node ofa high Q lambda cavity, which is resonant with the QW excitonic transition3. The SAWfield, which is excited by an interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric GaAs samplesurface......, modulates the refractive index and displaces the material causing a harmonicmodulation of the PBG structure1. This periodic modulation of the cavity-exciton systemleads to in-plane mini-Brillouin zone (MBZ) formation. The very high vacuum-Rabisplitting of our sample enables us to clearly resolve...

  8. Electrically Pumped Vertical-Cavity Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine

    2007-01-01

    . Detailed descriptions of the structure designs, clean room processing procedures and characterisations of the designs are presented in this thesis. Furthermore, comprehensive simulations of carrier distributions in the quantum well sections and the gain saturation of the different designs are performed...... of one of our bottom-emitting designs are good. It has an optical output power that is promising for use in an external-cavity mode-locked laser. The growth of the structure however went wrong and the structure has no net gain, which spoiled our chances to investigate it further in an external cavity...

  9. Parasitic Cavities Losses in SPEAR-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M.; /SLAC

    2016-12-19

    In PEP the large number of particles in a bunch, together with the small bunch length, may cause grievous energy loss from the beam to parasitic modes in the accelerating cavities. I have recently tried to estimate the parasitic cavity in PEP, based on a paper of Keil and I have obtained the result that the loss to parasitic modes will be about 10 MeV per particle per revolution for a bunch length of about 10 cm. In this note, I bring together some of the considerations that might bear on an experimental investigation of the loss using SPEAR-2.

  10. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  11. Numerical simulation of coupler cavities for linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.K.; Derutyer, H.; Ko, K.

    1993-04-01

    We present numerical procedures involved in the evaluation of the performance of coupler cavities for linacs. The MAFIA code is used to simulate an X-Band accelerator section in the time domain. The input/output coupler cavities for the structure arc of the symmetrical double-input design. We calculate the transmission properties of the coupler and compare the results with measurements. We compare the performance of the symmetrical double-input design with that of the conventional single-input type by evaluating the field amplitude and phase asymmetries. We also evaluate the peak field gradient in the computer.

  12. Coupled Geomechanical Simulations of UCG Cavity Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J P; Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y

    2009-07-13

    This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project to develop predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (both natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). In this paper we will focus upon the development of coupled geomechanical capabilities for simulating the evolution of the UCG cavity using discrete element methodologies. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) has unique advantages for facilitating the prediction of the mechanical response of fractured rock masses, such as cleated coal seams. In contrast with continuum approaches, the interfaces within the coal can be explicitly included and combinations of both elastic and plastic anisotropic response are simulated directly. Additionally, the DEM facilitates estimation of changes in hydraulic properties by providing estimates of changes in cleat aperture. Simulation of cavity evolution involves a range of coupled processes and the mechanical response of the host coal and adjoining rockmass plays a role in every stage of UCG operations. For example, cavity collapse during the burn has significant effect upon the rate of the burn itself. In the vicinity of the cavity, collapse and fracturing may result in enhanced hydraulic conductivity of the rock matrix in the coal and caprock above the burn chamber. Even far from the cavity, stresses due to subsidence may be sufficient to induce new fractures linking previously isolated aquifers. These mechanical processes are key in understanding the risk of unacceptable subsidence and the potential for groundwater contamination. These mechanical processes are inherently non-linear, involving significant inelastic response, especially in the region closest to the cavity. In addition, the response of the rock mass involves both continuum and discrete mechanical behavior. We have recently coupled the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) and NUFT (Non

  13. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  14. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  15. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, D.M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P.J.; Mcclelland, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system

  16. Progress in diagnostic techniques for sc cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    While routinely achieved performance characteristics of superconducting cavities have now reached a level which makes them useful in large scale applications, achieving this level has come only through the knowledge gained by systematic studies of performance limiting phenomena. Despite the very real progress that has been made, the routine performance of superconducting cavities still falls far short of both the theoretical expectations and the performance of a few exception examples. It is the task of systematically applied diagnostic techniques to reveal additional information concerning the response of superconducting surfaces to applied RF fields. Here recent developments in diagnostic techniques are discussed. 18 references, 12 figures

  17. Advanced acoustic cavity technology. [for hydrogen oxygen rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, W. S.; Oberg, C. L.; Kusak, L.

    1974-01-01

    A series of rocket motor firings was performed in a modified linear aerospike thrust chamber with the H2/O2 propellant combination to allow determination of the physical properties of the combustion gases in acoustic cavities located in the chamber side walls. A preliminary analytical study was first conducted to define theoretically both the appropriate cavity dimensions and the combustion gas flow field adjacent to the cavity openings. During the subsequent motor firings, cavity gas temperature profiles were measured and gas samples were withdrawn from the bottom of the cavities for compositional analysis by measurement of pressure/temperature variation and gas chromatography. Data were obtained with both radially and axially oriented cavities and with and without hydrogen bleed flow through the cavities. A simplified procedure was developed for predicting gas cavity and acoustic velocity for use in acoustic cavity design analyses.

  18. Influence from cavity decay on geometric quantum computation in the large-detuning cavity QED model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changyong; Zhang Xiaolong; Deng Zhijiao; Gao Kelin; Feng Mang

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a general displacement operator to investigate the unconventional geometric quantum computation with dissipation under the model of many identical three-level atoms in a cavity, driven by a classical field. Our concrete calculation is made for the case of two atoms, based on a previous scheme [S.-B. Zheng, Phys. Rev. A 70, 052320 (2004)] for the large-detuning interaction of the atoms with the cavity mode. The analytical results we present will be helpful for experimental realization of geometric quantum computation in real cavities

  19. Injector Cavities Fabrication, Vertical Test Performance and Primary Cryomodule Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cheng, Guangfeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Davis, G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Macha, Kurt [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Overton, Roland [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Spell, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    After the electromagnetic design and the mechanical design of a β=0.6, 2-cell elliptical SRF cavity, the cavity has been fabricated. Then both 2-cell and 7-cell cavities have been bench tuned to the target values of frequency, coupling external Q and field flatness. After buffer chemistry polishing (BCP) and high pressure rinses (HPR), Vertical 2K cavity test results have been satisfied the specifications and ready for the string assembly. We will report the cavity performance including Lorenz Force Detuning (LFD) and Higher Order Modes (HOM) damping data. Its integration with cavity tuners to the cryomodule design will be reported.

  20. Analysis of mechanical fabrication experience with CEBAF's production SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammosser, J.; Kneisel, P.; Benesch, J.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF has received a total of 360 five-cell niobium cavities, the largest group of industrially fabricated superconducting cavities so far. An extensive data base exists on the fabrication, surface treatment, assembly and cavity performance parameters. Analysis of the mechanical features of the cavities includes the following: the spread in fabrication tolerances of the cells derived from field profiles of the ''as fabricated'' cavities and the ''as fabricated'' external Q-values of the fundamental power coupler compared to dimensional deviations. A comparison is made of the pressure sensitivity of cavities made of materials from different manufacturers between 760 torr (4.2 K) and 23 torr (2 K)

  1. Atmospheric signals produced by cavity rebound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.M.; App, F.N.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of the atmospheric acoustic signals produced by a class of low-yield tests conducted just below the base of the alluvial cover in Yucca Flat of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has revealed a clear manifestation of an elastic, cavity rebound signal. We use modeling as the basis for understanding the observed phenomena

  2. AGN Heating Through Cavities and Shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nulsen, P.E.J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W.R.; David, L.P.; McNamara, B.R.; Rafferty, D.A.; Bîrzan, L.; Wise, M.

    2007-01-01

    Three comments are made on AGN heating of cooling flows. A simple physical argument is used to show that the enthalpy of a buoyant radio lobe is converted to heat in its wake. Thus, a significant part of ``cavity'' enthalpy is likely to end up as heat. Second, the properties of the repeated weak

  3. Lambda shifted photonic crystal cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin; Skovgård, Troels Suhr; Ek, Sara

    2010-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an alternative type of photonic crystal laser design that shifts all the holes in the lattice by a fixed fraction of the targeted emission wavelength. The structures are realized in InGaAsP =1.15 with InGaAsP quantum wells =1.52 as gain material. Cavities with shifts of...

  4. The Design of the Orthogonal Box Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Alfred; /Fermilab

    2010-09-15

    The muon collider and/or the neutrino factory require large accelerating electric field gradients immersed in large (3 to 6 T) solenoidal magnetic fields for ionization cooling of muon beams. Our original vacuum breakdown study demonstrated a loss of achievable peak accelerating gradient in solenoidal magnetic fields by a factor 2 or greater. The Muon Collaboration has developed a theory of a method to suppress high electric field breakdown in vacuum cavities needed for a Muon collider or neutrino factory. It has been shown in our studies and by others that high gradient electric field emitted electrons (dark current) are the primary cause of breakdown. A DC magnetic field orthogonal to the RF electric accelerating field prevents dark current high field emitted electrons from traveling across the accelerating gap and then will prevent breakdown. We have decided to test this theory by building a special cavity in the shape of vacuum box. Figure 1 is a simplified view of the cavity design. The design is based on an 805 MHz WR975 waveguide cavity resonating in the TE{sub 101} mode. For the TE{sub 101} mode the resonant frequency f{sub 0} is given by the relationship f{sub 0} = c[(I/a){sup 2} + (m/b){sup 2} + (n/d){sup 2}]{sup 0.5}/2 where a and d are the lengths of the base sides and b is the height of the box in MKS units and c is the velocity of light.

  5. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  6. Lasers with intra-cavity phase elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulses, A. Alkan; Kurtz, Russell; Islas, Gabriel; Anisimov, Igor

    2018-02-01

    Conventional laser resonators yield multimodal output, especially at high powers and short cavity lengths. Since highorder modes exhibit large divergence, it is desirable to suppress them to improve laser quality. Traditionally, such modal discriminations can be achieved by simple apertures that provide absorptive loss for large diameter modes, while allowing the lower orders, such as the fundamental Gaussian, to pass through. However, modal discrimination may not be sufficient for short-cavity lasers, resulting in multimodal operation as well as power loss and overheating in the absorptive part of the aperture. In research to improve laser mode control with minimal energy loss, systematic experiments have been executed using phase-only elements. These were composed of an intra-cavity step function and a diffractive out-coupler made of a computer-generated hologram. The platform was a 15-cm long solid-state laser that employs a neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate crystal rod, producing 1064 nm multimodal laser output. The intra-cavity phase elements (PEs) were shown to be highly effective in obtaining beams with reduced M-squared values and increased output powers, yielding improved values of radiance. The utilization of more sophisticated diffractive elements is promising for more difficult laser systems.

  7. A variational computation for coved cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Weimin; Zhou Wenzhen

    1992-01-01

    In order to improve the beam quality and reduce the beam breakup and wake effects caused by the high beam current in electron linac, the coved cavity with big beam hole is used in the world. A variational method is used, and the results are similar to that of Boeing Company

  8. Congenital malformation of inner ear, single cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Pazmino, Julio Cesar; Marrugo Pardo, Gilberto Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital malformations of the inner ear are rare conditions, but their detection requires high diagnostic accuracy. In this report we describe the case of a patient with single or common cavity, discuss the corresponding radiological images, describe the treatment of this patient with a cochlear implant, and review the classification and differential diagnosis of the other anomalies of the inner ear.

  9. Quantization of Electromagnetic Fields in Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakazu, Kiyotaka; Oshiro, Kazunori

    1996-01-01

    A quantization procedure for the electromagnetic field in a rectangular cavity with perfect conductor walls is presented, where a decomposition formula of the field plays an essential role. All vector mode functions are obtained by using the decomposition. After expanding the field in terms of the vector mode functions, we get the quantized electromagnetic Hamiltonian.

  10. Nonlinear Analysis of Cavities in Rock Salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, N. S.; Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The paper covers some material and computational aspects of the rock mechanics of leached cavities in salt. A material model is presented in which the instantaneous stiffness of the salt is obtained by interpolation between the unloaded state and a relevant failure state. The model enables predic...

  11. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  12. Plasma Evolution within an Erupting Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David M.; Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah A.; Warren, Harry P.; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Doschek, George A.; Hara, Hirohisa; Jenkins, Jack M.

    2018-03-01

    Coronal cavities have previously been observed to be associated with long-lived quiescent filaments and are thought to correspond to the associated magnetic flux rope. Although the standard flare model predicts a coronal cavity corresponding to the erupting flux rope, these have only been observed using broadband imaging data, restricting an analysis to the plane-of-sky. We present a unique set of spectroscopic observations of an active region filament seen erupting at the solar limb in the extreme ultraviolet. The cavity erupted and expanded rapidly, with the change in rise phase contemporaneous with an increase in nonthermal electron energy flux of the associated flare. Hot and cool filamentary material was observed to rise with the erupting flux rope, disappearing suddenly as the cavity appeared. Although strongly blueshifted plasma continued to be observed flowing from the apex of the erupting flux rope, this outflow soon ceased. These results indicate that the sudden injection of energy from the flare beneath forced the rapid eruption and expansion of the flux rope, driving strong plasma flows, which resulted in the eruption of an under-dense filamentary flux rope.

  13. All-optical tunable photonic crystal cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Liu, Liu; Ou, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-small photonic crystal cavity with two resonant modes. An all-optical tuning operation based on the free-carrier plasma effect is, for the first time, realized utilizing a continuous wave light source. The termo-optical effect is minimized by isoproponal infiltration...

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of Driven Cavity Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.; Wissink, J.G.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D driven cavity flows have been performed. The simulations exhibit that the flow converges to a periodically oscillating state at Re=11,000, and reveal that the dynamics is chaotic at Re=22,000. The dimension of the attractor and the Kolmogorov entropy have been

  15. Characterization and simulation of a pillbox cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Moran Guizan, Carla

    2017-01-01

    A cylindrical pillbox cavity is characterized and its principal parameters, such as the cut-off frequencies of the modes, the quality factor and R/Q figure, are calculated. Additionally, these measurements are compared with an analytical analysis and with a simulation with the software CST Studio to determine how precise they are.

  16. Shear Layer Dynamics in Resonating Cavity Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    .... The PIV data was also combined with the surface pressure measurements through the application of the Quadratic Stochastic Estimation procedure to provide time resolved snapshots of the flow field. Examination of these results indicate the strong pumping action of the cavity regardless of whether resonance existed and was used to visualize the large scale structures interacting with the aft wall.

  17. Natural convection inside an irregular porous cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, Jorge I. LLagostera; Trevisan, Osvair Vidal

    1990-01-01

    Natural convection flow induced by heating from below in a irregular porous cavity is investigated numerically. The influence of the modified Rayleigh number and geometric ratios on heat transfer and fluid flow is studied. Global and local Nusselt for Rayleigh numbers covering the range 0 - 1600 and for several geometric ratios. The fluid flow and the temperature field are illustrated by contour maps. (author)

  18. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  19. HOM study and parameter calculation of the TESLA cavity model

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Ri-Hua; Gerigk Frank; Wang Guang-Wei; Wegner Rolf; Liu Rong; Schuh Marcel

    2010-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is the project for a superconducting, high current H-accelerator at CERN. To find dangerous higher order modes (HOMs) in the SPL superconducting cavities, simulation and analysis for the cavity model using simulation tools are necessary. The. existing TESLA 9-cell cavity geometry data have been used for the initial construction of the models in HFSS. Monopole, dipole and quadrupole modes have been obtained by applying different symmetry boundaries on various cavity models. In calculation, scripting language in HFSS was used to create scripts to automatically calculate the parameters of modes in these cavity models (these scripts are also available in other cavities with different cell numbers and geometric structures). The results calculated automatically are then compared with the values given in the TESLA paper. The optimized cavity model with the minimum error will be taken as the base for further simulation of the SPL cavities.

  20. Microfabrication of cavities in polydimethylsiloxane using DRIE silicon molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Ut-Binh T; Lee, Dooyoung; King, Michael R; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel method to create cavities in PDMS that is simple and exhibits wide process latitude allowing control over the radius of curvature to form shallow concave pits or deep spherical cavities.

  1. Solution preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results

  2. Theory of optical cavity and laser with output coupling

    OpenAIRE

    氏原, 紀公雄

    2006-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical analysis of an optical cavity having output coupling is presented withapplications to the laser theory. The rigorous treatment of the output coupling allows unifiedanalysis of the optical field inside and outside of the cavity. This treatment had lead to a newexpression for the laser line-width that contained the influences of non-uniform oscillating fielddistribution of the real cavity mode as well as the deviation from the cavity field mode due to non-uniformgain satura...

  3. Scaling of reactor cavity wall loads and stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1977-11-01

    Scalings of reactor cavity wall loads and stresses are determined by deriving an analytic expression in terms of relevant parameters for each loading induced in the reactor cavity walls by fuel pellet microexplosion and by deriving associated expressions relating resulting stresses to shell thicknesses. Also identified are problems that require additional investigations to obtain satisfactory explicit stress estimates for the reactor cavity walls

  4. Diagnostic Role of Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio in Oral Cavity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Aim: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic role of neutrophil– lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and other hemogram parameters in differentiating nonmalignant oral cavity lesions from oral cavity cancers. Methods: Ninety- five patients who were performed oral cavity biopsy between the years 2013 and.

  5. Meeting to discuss laser cavity design for photon linear collider ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The design is fairly insensitive to displacements transverse to the beam but very sensitive to change in length of the cavity (as the power enhancement of the laser cavity is lost). In fact an accuracy of less than 1 nm is required, which implies that adaptive optics are required to maintain the cavity enhancement. Power deposit ...

  6. Decoherence in semiconductor cavity QED systems due to phonon couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of electron-phonon interactions on the coherence properties of single photons emitted from a semiconductor cavity QED (quantum electrodynamics) system, i.e., a quantum dot embedded in an optical cavity. The degree of indistinguishability, governing the quantum mechanical...... diagonalization approach. We find that for large cavity decay rates the perturbation theory may break down....

  7. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. 872.3250 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of a...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder form...

  9. Diagnostic Role of Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio in Oral Cavity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic role of neutrophil– lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and other hemogram parameters in differentiating nonmalignant oral cavity lesions from oral cavity cancers. Methods: Ninetyfive patients who were performed oral cavity biopsy between the years 2013 and 2015 were ...

  10. Use of a fiberscope for examining cavity nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathryn L. Purcell

    1997-01-01

    A system is described that uses a fiberscope to view nests in cavities to provide detailed information on eggs and nestlings. The flexible probe can be inserted around bends, and the tip articulates to allow viewing of the entire cavity and nest. A light guide bundle furnishes light to enable viewing of dark cavities and optical fibers transmit the impage from the lens...

  11. BIOREACTOR WITH LID FOR EASY ACCESS TO INCUBATION CAVITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible....

  12. Efeitos dos choques fiscais sobre o mercado de trabalho brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Baerlocher Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho tem por objetivo entender quais os efeitos dos choques fiscais sobre o mercado de trabalho brasileiro. Em particular, utiliza se uma abordagem SVAR para avaliar esses efeitos sobre o emprego e o salário real. Os choques fiscais são identificados a partir da imposição de restrições de sinais puras sobre a relação dinâmica entre os gastos do governo, o produto real e a oferta de trabalho. As restrições são obtidas a partir de funções de resposta a impulso Bayesianas derivadas de um modelo DSGE na tradição da Nova Síntese Neoclássica. As funções de resposta a impulso obtidas a partir da abordagem SVAR mostram que choques fiscais aumentam o salário real e o emprego.

  13. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Anand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer.

  14. Investigation of free air in peritoneal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sam Gyoun; Park, Bok Hwan; Lee, Dong Hoon; Oh, Jang Suk

    1972-01-01

    On the radiographic findings of simple abdomen, detection of free air in peritoneal cavity indicates a perforation of hollow viscus. In general, free air in abdomen indicate perforation of hollow viscus caused by various disease conditions, i.e. perforation of peptic ulcer, ulcerating malignancy, colon diverticulitis and rupture of pneumatosis cystoides intestinale etc., or by trauma, however it can be rarely noticeable in the cases of intraabdominal infection with overgrowth of gas forming organisms. Eighty eight cases of free air in peritoneal cavity were analysed during the period from July, 1970 to August, 1972 at Kyungpook National University Hospital. As shown in the following tables, various clinical findings were analysed; overview of cases, causating factors and location of rupture, and it's seasonal preponderance

  15. Multipass optical cavity for inverse Compton interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollason, A.J. E-mail: a.j.rollason@keele.ac.uk; Fang, X.; Dugdale, D.E

    2004-07-01

    The recycling of laser beams in the focal region of non-resonant multipass optical cavities has been investigated as a means of providing a high intensity of photons for weak interaction experiments. Ray-tracing simulations and measurements with an Ar-ion laser have been carried out to examine the intensity profiles of the laser field in different 2-mirror geometries. In particular, the use of such cavities in the generation of X-rays by inverse Compton scattering is considered. X-ray yields are calculated for electron beams of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5 mm diameter yielding enhancement factors of 10-200 compared to a free space laser interaction.

  16. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented

  17. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  18. Tunable Q-Factor RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Kazakevitch, Gregory [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    Intense neutrino beam is a unique probe for researching beyond the standard model. Fermilab is the main institution to produce the most powerful and widespectrum neutrino beam. From that respective, a radiation robust beam diagnostic system is a critical element in order to maintain the quality of the neutrino beam. Within this context, a novel radiation-resistive beam profile monitor based on a gasfilled RF cavity is proposed. The goal of this measurement is to study a tunable Qfactor RF cavity to determine the accuracy of the RF signal as a function of the quality factor. Specifically, measurement error of the Q-factor in the RF calibration is investigated. Then, the RF system will be improved to minimize signal error.

  19. Investigation of free air in peritoneal cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sam Gyoun; Park, Bok Hwan; Lee, Dong Hoon; Oh, Jang Suk [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1972-12-15

    On the radiographic findings of simple abdomen, detection of free air in peritoneal cavity indicates a perforation of hollow viscus. In general, free air in abdomen indicate perforation of hollow viscus caused by various disease conditions, i.e. perforation of peptic ulcer, ulcerating malignancy, colon diverticulitis and rupture of pneumatosis cystoides intestinale etc., or by trauma, however it can be rarely noticeable in the cases of intraabdominal infection with overgrowth of gas forming organisms. Eighty eight cases of free air in peritoneal cavity were analysed during the period from July, 1970 to August, 1972 at Kyungpook National University Hospital. As shown in the following tables, various clinical findings were analysed; overview of cases, causating factors and location of rupture, and it's seasonal preponderance.

  20. Heat loss from an open cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

  1. HPV and cancer of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübbers, Christian U; Akgül, Baki

    2015-01-01

    Increased awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as an etiological cause of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has increased the interest in analysis of distinct oral sub-sites. It is currently under debate, whether HPV plays a role in the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC). The weakness in most published studies is the lack of performing different HPV detection tests combined with analysis for biological activity of the virus. In addition, different sub-sites of the oral cavity had been combined to a single entity, which retrospectively leads to a highly heterogeneous basis of data. In this review we mainly discuss the unclear role of HPV in OSCC development.

  2. Dielectric supported radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, David U. L.; Lee, Terry G.

    2000-01-01

    A device which improves the electrical and thermomechanical performance of an RF cavity, for example, in a disk-loaded accelerating structure. A washer made of polycrystalline diamond is brazed in the middle to a copper disk washer and at the outer edge to the plane wave transformer tank wall, thus dissipating heat from the copper disk to the outer tank wall while at the same time providing strong mechanical support to the metal disk. The washer structure eliminates the longitudinal connecting rods and cooling channels used in the currently available cavities, and as a result minimizes problems such as shunt impedance degradation and field distortion in the plane wave transformer, and mechanical deflection and uneven cooling of the disk assembly.

  3. Quantum networks based on cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Stephan; Bochmann, Joerg; Figueroa, Eden; Hahn, Carolin; Kalb, Norbert; Muecke, Martin; Neuzner, Andreas; Noelleke, Christian; Reiserer, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Quantum repeaters require an efficient interface between stationary quantum memories and flying photons. Single atoms in optical cavities are ideally suited as universal quantum network nodes that are capable of sending, storing, retrieving, and even processing quantum information. We demonstrate this by presenting an elementary version of a quantum network based on two identical nodes in remote, independent laboratories. The reversible exchange of quantum information and the creation of remote entanglement are achieved by exchange of a single photon. Quantum teleportation is implemented using a time-resolved photonic Bell-state measurement. Quantum control over all degrees of freedom of the single atom also allows for the nondestructive detection of flying photons and the implementation of a quantum gate between the spin state of the atom and the polarization of a photon upon its reflection from the cavity. Our approach to quantum networking offers a clear perspective for scalability and provides the essential components for the realization of a quantum repeater.

  4. Os efeitos da estrutura organizacional no processo de aprendizagem organizacional

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes Júnior, Macário

    2001-01-01

    Este trabalho tem como objetivo analisar os efeitos da estrutura organizacional nos processos de aprendizagem organizacional, considerando o contexto ambiental que circunscreve esta relação e os aspectos moderadores de facilitadores e bloqueadores dos processos de aprendizagem organizacional. A unidade de análise é a organização. O estudo descreve a relação dos dois construtos de pesquisa (estrutura organizacional e processos de aprendizagem organizacional), utilizando uma meto...

  5. Efeitos pleiotrópicos das estatinas na sepse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Menegoto Nogueira Di Giusto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi revisar os efeitos da terapia com estatinas em pacientes com quadro de sepse. Foi realizada uma busca bibliográfica de artigos na base de dados MEDLINE/PubMed, SciELO e LILACS, no período de publicação delimitado entre 2009 e 2013. Foram incluídos artigos referentes a ensaios clínicos randomizados controlados e estudos de coorte observacionais clínicos. Foram encontrados diversos estudos clínicos e observacionais que investigaram o efeito do uso de estatinas em infecções e em sepse, tanto de uso contínuo pré-hospitalar (com ou sem interrupção durante internação ou com início imediato pós-internação. Alguns estudos descrevem prováveis efeitos positivos e benéficos da terapia com estatinas no quadro de sepse, dentre eles a melhora dos parâmetros inflamatórios e da taxa de mortalidade, porém, esses resultados não se sustentam quando são aplicados métodos estatísticos que levam em conta diferentes variáveis, tais como idade, sexo, comorbidades e gravidade da doença. Até o momento nenhum estudo demonstrou evidências sólidas e significativas quanto à redução de mortalidade e morbidade no quadro séptico associado ao uso de estatinas, indicando que seu efeito benéfico e protetor ainda não foi plenamente delimitado, sendo necessários mais estudos que confirmem os resultados até agora encontrados. 

  6. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-18

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the October 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Dental sealants, applied soon after a child's permanent molars come in, can protect against cavities for up to nine years. Applying sealants in schools for low-income children could save millions in dental treatment costs.  Created: 10/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/18/2016.

  7. Capture cavity II results at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branlard, Julien; Chase, Brian; Cancelo, G.; Carcagno, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Hanna, B.; Harms, Elvan; Hocker, A.; Koeth, T.; Kucera, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    As part of the research and development towards the International Linear Collider (ILC), several test facilities have been developed at Fermilab. This paper presents the latest Low Level RF (LLRF) results obtained with Capture Cavity II (CCII) at the ILC Test Accelerator (ILCTA) test facility. The main focus will be on controls and RF operations using the SIMCON based LLRF system developed in DESY [1]. Details about hardware upgrades and future work will be discussed.

  8. Single cavity Fabry-Perot modulator enhancements and integrated vertically coupled cavity light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daxin

    Fabry-Perot modulators with Multi-Quantum Wells (MQWs) cavities have been studied with great interest during recent years. Usually operating as intensity modulators, these devices have very high modulation contrast ratios, can be operated at very high speed, can be easily made into two dimensional arrays and can be integrated with silicon ICs. They are thus very promising for optical interconnects, optical switching and image processing applications. But before these modulators are to be used in real applications, there are several issues that need to be solved, including the parasitic phase modulation, the bandwidth of such modulators and the alignment of modulator operation wavelength with the wavelength of lasers or light emitting diodes. In this work, the phase properties of Fabry-Perot reflection modulators will be discussed first and an experimental method using a modified Michelson interferometer to characterize the exact phase change will be demonstrated. It is demonstrated that the phase of the reflection light beam from a Fabry-Perot modulator is determined not only by the refractive index change inside the cavity but also by the absorption change inside the cavity. With the purpose of expanding the limited bandwidth of such modulator, devices with short passive cavities are designed and fabricated, the results are described and trade-offs between modulation depth and bandwidth will be discussed. In order to solve the problem of alignment and expand the functionality of Fabry-Perot modulators further, vertically coupled cavity devices with each cavity being electrically controlled independently have been developed. Both a coupled cavity modulator and an integrated light emitting diode with a transmission Fabry-Perot modulator are demonstrated; the first device enhances the modulation bandwidth while the second device has the potential of combining the advantage of high speed operation of MQWs modulators with the long lifetime and low cost of light

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Automobile Cavity Tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, Konstantin; Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Navier Stokes equation is solved computationally by the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme for the flow and acoustic fields associated with a laminar boundary layer flow over an automobile door cavity. In this work, the flow Reynolds number is restricted to R(sub delta*) < 3400; the range of Reynolds number for which laminar flow may be maintained. This investigation focuses on two aspects of the problem, namely, the effect of boundary layer thickness on the cavity tone frequency and intensity and the effect of the size of the computation domain on the accuracy of the numerical simulation. It is found that the tone frequency decreases with an increase in boundary layer thickness. When the boundary layer is thicker than a certain critical value, depending on the flow speed, no tone is emitted by the cavity. Computationally, solutions of aeroacoustics problems are known to be sensitive to the size of the computation domain. Numerical experiments indicate that the use of a small domain could result in normal mode type acoustic oscillations in the entire computation domain leading to an increase in tone frequency and intensity. When the computation domain is expanded so that the boundaries are at least one wavelength away from the noise source, the computed tone frequency and intensity are found to be computation domain size independent.

  10. Quasilinear infiltration from an elliptical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Warrick, Arthur W.

    2008-08-01

    We develop analytic solutions to the linearized steady-state Richards equation for head and total flowrate due to an elliptic cylinder cavity with a specified pressure head boundary condition. They are generalizations of the circular cylinder cavity solutions of Philip [Philip JR. Steady infiltration from circular cylindrical cavities. Soil Sci Soc Am J 1984;48:270-8]. The circular and strip sources are limiting cases of the elliptical cylinder solution, derived for both horizontally- and vertically-aligned ellipses. We give approximate rational polynomial expressions for total flowrate from an elliptical cylinder over a range of sizes and shapes. The exact elliptical solution is in terms of Mathieu functions, which themselves are generalizations of and computed from trigonometric and Bessel functions. The required Mathieu functions are computed from a matrix eigenvector problem, a modern approach that is straightforward to implement using available linear algebra libraries. Although less efficient and potentially less accurate than the iterative continued fraction approach, the matrix approach is simpler to understand and implement and is valid over a wider parameter range.

  11. Coupling superconducting qubits via a cavity bus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majer, J; Chow, J M; Gambetta, J M; Koch, Jens; Johnson, B R; Schreier, J A; Frunzio, L; Schuster, D I; Houck, A A; Wallraff, A; Blais, A; Devoret, M H; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2007-09-27

    Superconducting circuits are promising candidates for constructing quantum bits (qubits) in a quantum computer; single-qubit operations are now routine, and several examples of two-qubit interactions and gates have been demonstrated. These experiments show that two nearby qubits can be readily coupled with local interactions. Performing gate operations between an arbitrary pair of distant qubits is highly desirable for any quantum computer architecture, but has not yet been demonstrated. An efficient way to achieve this goal is to couple the qubits to a 'quantum bus', which distributes quantum information among the qubits. Here we show the implementation of such a quantum bus, using microwave photons confined in a transmission line cavity, to couple two superconducting qubits on opposite sides of a chip. The interaction is mediated by the exchange of virtual rather than real photons, avoiding cavity-induced loss. Using fast control of the qubits to switch the coupling effectively on and off, we demonstrate coherent transfer of quantum states between the qubits. The cavity is also used to perform multiplexed control and measurement of the qubit states. This approach can be expanded to more than two qubits, and is an attractive architecture for quantum information processing on a chip.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of syrinx cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Teruo; Inoue, Yuichi; Nemoto, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    Syrinx cavity may result from a number of intramedullary tumors or non-neoplastic conditions such as Chiari malformation, trauma and meningitis. The surgical procedure to repair the syrinx is quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, it is important to determine whether syrinx is associated with tumor or not before surgery. We reviewed MR images of 26 cases with syrinx cavity; 20 of which were not associated with tumor (12 Chiari malformation, 5 trauma, 1 meningitis, 1 hydrocephalus, 1 idiopathic) and 6 of which were associated with intramedullary tumor (3 ependymoma, 2 astrocytoma, 1 hemangioendothelioma). The syrinx showed low signal in all 26 cases on T1 weighted images (SE 600/40). All 6 cases with syrinx associated with intramedullary tumor showed high intensity on T2 weighted images (SE 2000/120). On the other hand, the syrinx of 19 of 20 cases with no tumor condition showed reduced intensity on T2 weighted images. Only one post-traumatic small syrinx showed high signal. This was quite different between the cases with spinal cord tumor and without tumor. Therefore, when the syrinx cavity shows high signal on T2 weighted images, an intramedullary tumor is strongly suggested. (author)

  13. Canine oral cavity neoplasias - Brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Filipe Requicha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Requicha J.F., Pires M. dos A., Albuquerque C.M. & Viegas C.A. [Canine oral cavity neoplasias - Brief review.] Neoplasias da cavidade oral do cão - Breve revisão. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(1:41-46, 2015. Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, Campo Grande, 1749-024 Lisboa, Portugal e Department of Veterinary Sciences, School of Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, P.O. Box 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal. E-mail: jfrequicha@gmail.com Oral proliferative lesions are relatively common in domestic carnivores but, fortunately, a lot of these lesions are benign. The oral cavity is place of 6% of all tumours in dogs, being the sixth most important localization of neoplasias in this specie. The non-odontogenic tumors arise from structures of the oral cavity, except from dental tissue, and they are mostly malignant. Odontogenic tumors are those originated from the dental structures. In the case of tumors of non-odontogenic, will be described the oral papillomatosis, the melanoma, the squamous cell carcinoma, and the fibrosarcoma. Among the odontogenic tumors, the focus will be on the epulides, ameloblastoma, odontoma and dentigerous cysts.

  14. Bioengineering in the oral cavity: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalfamo L

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available L Catalfamo,1 E Belli,2 C Nava,1 E Mici,1 A Calvo,1 B D'Alessandro,1 FS De Ponte1 1Unit of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Messina, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Policlinico G Martino, Messina, Italy; 2Unit of Maxillofacial Surgery, University Rome Sapienza, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant Andrea, Rome, Italy Background: To date, there are no studies reported in the literature on the possible use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, or synthetic hyaluronic acid medications in the oral cavity. The aim of this paper is to report the use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, and synthetic hyaluronic acid medications to improve wound healing in the oral cavity by stimulating granulomatous tissue. Methods: From 2007 to 2011, 80 patients (median age 67 years suffering from oral mucosal lesions participated in this double-blind study. The patients were divided into two groups, each consisting of 40 patients. One group received conventional medications, while the other group of patients were treated with the advanced medications. Results: Advanced medications allowed re-epithelialization of the wound margin in 2–20 days, whereas patients receiving conventional medication showed a median healing duration of 45 days. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that treating oral mucosal wounds with advanced medication has an advantage with regard to wound healing time, allowing patients to have a rapid, functional, and esthetic recovery. Keywords: bioengineering, oral cavity, mucosal recovery

  15. A new awakening for accelerator cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Imagine: an accelerator unbound by length; one that can bring a beam up to the TeV level in just a few hundred metres. Sounds like a dream? Perhaps not for long. At CERN’s Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE), physicists may soon be working to bring this contemporary fairy-tale to life.   The AWAKE experiment in the CNGS facility. Wherever you find a modern linear particle accelerator, you’ll find with it a lengthy series of RF accelerating cavities. Although based on technology first developed over half a century ago, RF cavities have dominated the accelerating world since their inception. However, new developments in plasma accelerator systems may soon be bringing a new player into the game. By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by beams in plasma cells, physicists may be able to produce accelerator gradients of many GV/m –  hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current RF cavities. “Plasma wakef...

  16. A split-cavity design for the incorporation of a DC bias in a 3D microwave cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, M.A.; Yuan, M.; de Jong, B.W.A.; Beukers, Ewout; Bosman, S.J.; Steele, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a technique for applying a DC bias in a 3D microwave cavity. We achieve this by isolating the two halves of the cavity with a dielectric and directly using them as DC electrodes. As a proof of concept, we embed a variable capacitance diode in the cavity and tune the resonant

  17. Frequency-temperature compensated sapphire loaded cavity for compact hydrogen masers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuan Rang, Wang; Ren Fu, Yang; Tie Zhong, Zhou; Lian Shan, Gao [Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement, Beijing, People' s Republic (China); Nuan Rang, Wang; Lian Shan, Gao [National Key Laboratory of Metrology and Calibration Technology, Beijing, People' s Republic (China)

    2008-10-15

    We report some theoretical and experimental results about a frequency-temperature compensated sapphire loaded cavity for compact hydrogen maser atomic clocks. Based on theoretical calculations, the frequency-temperature coefficients in the TE{sub 011} mode of a sapphire cavity associated with two small rings of SrTiO{sub 3} can be reduced. For instance, at 50 C, when the thickness of the SrTiO{sub 3} ring is 5 mm, the frequency-temperature coefficient can be reduced by about five times, and in the meantime, the quality factor can be kept at above 40 000 synchronously. A sapphire loaded cavity and eight small compensated chips of SrTiO{sub 3} were prepared and a combined cavity of sapphire with SrTiO{sub 3} chips was simulated by the finite element method and measured by experiments. The simulation and the related experimental results agree well. In addition, the frequency-temperature coefficients in two different configurations of eight SrTiO{sub 3} chips were also measured and compared. (authors)

  18. Advances in development of Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, Sam; Liepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached Bp k>50 mT , well above Bc 1=25 ±7 mT , without the strong Q -slope observed in previous Nb3Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q0 of approximately 1 ×1 010 at >10 MV /m , far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ˜55 mT , apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a Tc of 18.0 ±0.1 K , close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near Tc, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb3Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q -slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb3Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  19. Advances in development of Nb_{3}Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Posen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 1.3 GHz Nb_{3}Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached B_{pk}>50  mT, well above B_{c1}=25±7  mT, without the strong Q-slope observed in previous Nb_{3}Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q_{0} of approximately 1×10^{10} at >10  MV/m, far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ∼55  mT, apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a T_{c} of 18.0±0.1  K, close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near T_{c}, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb_{3}Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q-slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb_{3}Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  20. Hydrogen gas evolution from water in zeolite and silica gel cavities with γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Hayama, Y.; Okai, T.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen gas evolution from water in zeolite cavities caused by gamma irradiation was examined. Metal oxides prepared in the cavities of Y-type zeolites and silica gels were also used for this examination. The G-values for hydrogen gas evolution of water in the cavity were higher than those of pure water. The mechanism of water decomposition by the effect of gamma irradiation was studied and clarified to an extent. It is supposed that hydrogen gas evolution is increased if the H radicals can mutually combine. The interfering reactions for hydrogen gas evolution would the existence of electrons and OH radicals, and the recombination reactions. The size of a spur in which the reaction of gamma-rays with the metal oxides takes place is assumed to be about 3 nm. ZSM-5 zeolites, Y-type zeolites, and silica gels were used, the size of the cavities was 3, 5 and 7 nm. The wet zeolites, silica gels and those containing the metal oxides were irradiated with 37.4-78.8 KGy of 60 Co under nitrogen. The evolving hydrogen gas was determined by gas chromatography. From among the samples examined, silica gel A exhibited the highest yield. Although the reasons for these results are not clear, it s evident that the surface of the zeolites and silica gels plays an important role with respect to the radicals produced by the action of gamma radiation

  1. Niobium Coatings for the HIE-ISOLDE QWR Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jecklin, N; Delaup, B; Ferreira, L; Mondino, I; Sublet, A; Therasse, M; Venturini Desolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy at ISOLDE) project is the upgrade of the existing ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line DEvice) facility at CERN, which is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics experiments. A new linear accelerator made of 20 ȕ=10.3% and 12 ȕ=6.3% quarter-wave resonators (QWR) superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities at 101 MHz will be built, and in a first phase two cryomodules of 5 high-ȕ cavities each are scheduled to accelerate first beams in 2015. The cavities are made of a copper substrate, with a sputter-coated superconductive niobium (Nb) layer, operated at 4.5 K with an accelerating field of 6 MV/m at 10W Radio-Frequency (RF) losses (Q=4.5· 108). In this paper we will discuss the baseline surface treatment and coating procedure which allows obtaining the required performance, as well as the steps undertaken in order to prepare series production of the required number of cavities guaranteeing their quality and functional...

  2. Anatomy of the bucco-pharyngeal cavity of Salminus brasiliensis (Cuvier, 1817 (Pisces, Characidae, Salmininae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Menin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The bucco-pharyngeal cavity of Salminus brasiliensis, an ichthyophagous species of fresh water, is anatomically adapted to predation. The wide buccal rift, the oral-aboral enlargement of the buccal cavity and the reduced thickness of the pharyngeal mastigatory apparatus favor the capture and deglutition of larger prey. In function of the oral and pharyngeal dentition type, pre-digestive food preparation does not occur. The pointed and curved teeth, together with the tongue which is relatively mobile, prevent the prey’s escape from the buccopharyngeal cavity. The passage of the food is facilitated by the absence of pronounced folds in the mucous membrane of this cavity and by the disposition of the oral and pharyngeal teeth. The characteristics of flat and thin lips, developed oral dentition, relatively mobile tongue, mucous membrane without folds, pharynx with denticules disposed in dentigerous areas and plates, and short and sharp gill-rackers are anatomical adaptations which are shared by S. brasiliensis and other ichthyophagous Characiformes species such as Salminus maxillosus, Salminus hilarii, Hoplias malabaricus, Hoplias lacerdae, Acestrorhynchus lacustris and Acestrorhynchus britskii. However, different to the mentioned species, except other Salmininae, S. brasiliensis possesses oral teeth of an unique type, present only in the jawbones and distributed in two series.

  3. Optical single photons on-demand teleported from microwave cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling the optical and microwave output modes of the respective cavities by using a micro mechanical resonator. The micro mechanical resonator, on one side, is capacitively coupled to the microwave cavity and, on the other side, it is coupled to a high-finesses optical cavity. We then show how this continuous variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport the non-Gaussian number state |1> and the superposition (|0\\rangle +|1\\rangle )/\\sqrt 2 from the microwave cavity output mode onto an output of the optical cavity mode with fidelity much larger than the no-cloning limit.

  4. Control of ring lasers by means of coupled cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Skettrup, Torben

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only. Coupling of optical cavities offers a means of controlling the properties of one cavity (e.g. a laser) by making adjustments to another, external cavity. In this contribution we consider a unidirectional ring laser (bow-tie laser) coupled to an external ring cavity. Using...... different configurations we can control the out-coupling from the ring laser thereby influencing the threshold and the circulating power in the different ring cavities. This may be used to obtain the best balance between the passive losses and a nonlinear loss such as e.g. conversion to the second harmonic...... or operation of an optical parametric oscillator....

  5. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, P. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Intravia, F [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  6. Status of the LCLS-II Accelerating Cavity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Ed [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Marhauser, Frank [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fitzpatrick, Jarrod A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Preble, Joe [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, Katherine M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Grimm, C. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burrill, Andrew B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gonnella, Daniel [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cavity serial production for the LCLS-II 4 GeV CM SRF linac has started. A quantity of 266 accelerating cavities has been ordered from two industrial vendors. Jefferson Laboratory leads the cavity procurement activities for the project and has successfully transferred the Nitrogen-Doping process to the industrial partners in the initial phase, which is now being applied for the production cavities. We report on the results from vendor qualification and the status of the cavity production for LCLS-II.

  7. Compression Pad Cavity Heating Augmentation on Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to assess the effects of compression pad cavities on the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle heat shield. Testing was conducted in Mach 6 and 10 perfect-gas wind tunnels to obtain heating measurements in and around the compression pads cavities using global phosphor thermography. Data were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers that produced laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow within and downstream of the cavities. The effects of cavity dimensions on boundary-layer transition and heating augmentation levels were studied. Correlations were developed for transition onset and for the average cavity-heating augmentation.

  8. Gas Cavities inside Dust Cavities in Disks Inferred from ALMA Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Nienke; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Bruderer, Simon; Pinilla, Paola; van Kempen, Tim; Perez, Laura; Isella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks with cavities in their dust distribution, also named transitional disks, are expected to be in the middle of active evolution and possibly planet formation. In recent years, millimeter-dust rings observed by ALMA have been suggested to have their origin in dust traps, caused by pressure bumps. One of the ways to generate these is by the presence of planets, which lower the gas density along their orbit and create pressure bumps at the edge. We present spatially resolved ALMA Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 observations of CO and CO isotopologues of several famous transitional disks. Gas is found to be present inside the dust cavities, but at a reduced level compared with the gas surface density profile of the outer disk. The dust and gas emission are quantified using the physical-chemical modeling code DALI. In the majority of these disks we find clear evidence for a drop in gas density of at least a factor of 10 inside the cavity, whereas the dust density drops by at least a factor 1000. The CO isotopologue observations reveal that the gas cavities are significantly smaller than the dust cavities. These gas structures suggest clearing by one or more planetary-mass companions.

  9. Microleakage of cavit in varnish-lined, matrix-supported endodontic access preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M K; Saad, N A

    1998-07-01

    The effect of the application of a matrix band and the use of cavity varnish on the microleakage of Cavit in endodontic access preparations was investigated. Sixty human upper premolars were divided into six groups of ten specimens each. Access cavities with proximal extensions were prepared and filled with 1, Cavit only; 2, Cavit after application of varnish; 3, Cavit with the use of a matrix band; 4, Cavit with a matrix band and varnish; 5, incremental deposition of Cavit with the use of a matrix band and varnish; and 6, gutta percha stopping. The specimens were placed in 2% methylene blue dye, thermocycled, and evaluated for both proximal and occlusal linear leakage. The experimental group in which Cavit was incrementally deposited in varnish-lined and matrix-supported cavities exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) less proximal microleakage than those groups in which cavities were filled without the application of both a matrix band and a cavity varnish.

  10. Effects of pneumoperitoneum in rats Efeitos do pneumoperitônio em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Valadão Fagundes

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different pneumoperitoneal pressures on kidney and liver functions and on arterial gasometry in rats are provided. A sample of twenty male rats weighing from 350 to 400 grams and distributed into two groups of ten animals was used. Each animal served as experimental control from which blood samples were collected before introducing CO2 into the peritoneal cavity. Samples underwent pressures of 4 and 6 mm Hg during one hour. Results show that increase in intra-abdominal pressure by CO2 in rats causes changes in their arterial gasometry, liver and kidney. However, no liver or kidney lesions during the above mentioned time were reported.O objetivo deste trabalho é investigar o efeito de diferentes pressões de pneumoperitônio na gasometria arterial, rins e fígado de ratos. Foram utilizados 20 ratos machos, com peso entre 350 e 400 gramas distribuídos em 2 grupos de 10 animais. O controle do experimento foi o próprio animal. Retiraram-se retirou-se amostras de sangue antes da introdução do CO2 na cavidade peritonial, as quais foram submetidas ao tempo de 1 hora, em pressões de 4 e 6 mm Hg. Os resultados observados permitem concluir que o aumento da pressão intra-abdominal por dióxido de carbono em ratos promove alterações na gasometria arterial, fígado e rins. Porém, no fígado e rins, estas alterações não traduzem lesão hepática e renal neste tempo estudado.

  11. Rigorous analysis of trapped modes in accelerating cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Schuhmann

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of different algorithms for the calculation of quality factors of eigenmodes in accelerating cavities, which have resonance frequencies above the cutoff frequency of the beam tubes. The analysis is based on a discretization of such cavity structures by the finite integration technique, and the radiation at the open boundaries is systematically taken into account by different approaches in time and frequency domain. Results indicate that even single cell cavities of the TESLA type show Q values of 10^{3} and multicell cavities values in excess of 10^{4}. Thus these modes may cause considerable beam instabilities. Comparison with the conventional method of analyzing closed cavities and identifying modes with little change in frequency as a function of boundary condition shows qualitative differences. Some modes from the closed cavity model do not exist in the open structure and thus would be misinterpreted as trapped modes when only a closed cavity analysis is employed.

  12. Radiation-pressure-mediated control of an optomechanical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripe, Jonathan; Aggarwal, Nancy; Singh, Robinjeet; Lanza, Robert; Libson, Adam; Yap, Min Jet; Cole, Garrett D.; McClelland, David E.; Mavalvala, Nergis; Corbitt, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a method to control a detuned movable-mirror Fabry-Pérot cavity using radiation pressure in the presence of a strong optical spring. At frequencies below the optical spring resonance, self-locking of the cavity is achieved intrinsically by the optomechanical (OM) interaction between the cavity field and the movable end mirror. The OM interaction results in a high rigidity and reduced susceptibility of the mirror to external forces. However, due to a finite delay time in the cavity, this enhanced rigidity is accompanied by an antidamping force, which destabilizes the cavity. The cavity is stabilized by applying external feedback in a frequency band around the optical spring resonance. The error signal is sensed in the amplitude quadrature of the transmitted beam with a photodetector. An amplitude modulator in the input path to the cavity modulates the light intensity to provide the stabilizing radiation pressure force.

  13. Sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis is certainly one of the most important steps to consider in trace or ultratrace analysis. For many years scientists have tried to simplify the sample preparation process. It is rarely possible to inject a neat liquid sample or a sample where preparation may not be any more complex than dissolution of the sample in a given solvent. The last process alone can remove insoluble materials, which is especially helpful with the samples in complex matrices if other interactions do not affect extraction. Here, it is very likely a large number of components will not dissolve and are, therefore, eliminated by a simple filtration process. In most cases, the process of sample preparation is not as simple as dissolution of the component interest. At times, enrichment is necessary, that is, the component of interest is present in very large volume or mass of material. It needs to be concentrated in some manner so a small volume of the concentrated or enriched sample can be injected into HPLC. 88 refs

  14. Results from the first single cell Nb3Sn cavity coatings at JLab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Nb3Sn is a promising superconducting material for SRF applications and has the potential to exceed the limitations of niobium. We have used the recently commissioned Nb3Sn coating system to investigate Nb3Sn coatings on several single cell cavities by applying the same coating procedure on several different single cells with different history and pre-coating surface preparation. We report on our findings with four 1.5 GHz CEBAF-shape single cell and one 1.3 GHz ILC-shape single cavities that were coated, inspected, and tested.

  15. Evaluation of cavity size, kind, and filling technique of composite shrinkage by finite element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Toloo; Alaghehmad, Homayoon; Moodi, Ehsan

    2018-01-01

    Cavity preparation reduces the rigidity of tooth and its resistance to deformation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dimensional changes of the repaired teeth using two types of light cure composite and two methods of incremental and bulk filling by the use of finite element method. In this computerized in vitro experimental study, an intact maxillary premolar was scanned using cone beam computed tomography instrument (SCANORA, Switzerland), then each section of tooth image was transmitted to Ansys software using AUTOCAD. Then, eight sizes of cavity preparations and two methods of restoration (bulk and incremental) using two different types of composite resin materials (Heliomolar, Brilliant) were proposed on software and analysis was completed with Ansys software. Dimensional change increased by widening and deepening of the cavities. It was also increased using Brilliant composite resin and incremental filling technique. Increase in depth and type of filling technique has the greatest role of dimensional change after curing, but the type of composite resin does not have a significant role.

  16. Effects of cavity-cavity interaction on the entanglement dynamics of a generalized double Jaynes-Cummings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Mahasweta; Das, Sreetama; Singha Roy, Sudipto; Shekhar Dhar, Himadri; Sen, Ujjwal

    2018-02-01

    We consider a generalized double Jaynes-Cummings model consisting of two isolated two-level atoms, each contained in a lossless cavity that interact with each other through a controlled photon-hopping mechanism. We analytically show that at low values of such a mediated cavity-cavity interaction, the temporal evolution of entanglement between the atoms, under the effects of cavity perturbation, exhibits the well-known phenomenon of entanglement sudden death (ESD). Interestingly, for moderately large interaction values, a complete preclusion of ESD is achieved, irrespective of its value in the initial atomic state. Our results provide a model to sustain entanglement between two atomic qubits, under the adverse effect of cavity induced perturbation, by introducing a non-intrusive inter-cavity photon exchange that can be physically realized through cavity-QED setups in contemporary experiments.

  17. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  18. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Cho, Kyu-Jeong; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Bin-Na; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Oh, Won-Mann; Hwang, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  19. Effectiveness of the self-adjusting file versus ProTaper systems to remove the smear layer in artificially induced internal root resorption cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Yigit Özer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Smear layer removal from artificially prepared internal root resorption (IRR cavities using the self-adjusting file (SAF system with activated continuous irrigation or the ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland with conventional syringe/needle irrigation was compared. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight maxillary central incisors were selected, decoronated and 20 of them were randomizedly splited along the coronal plane into labial and lingual sections, and artificial IRR cavities were prepared in both walls. Tooth segments were rejoined and teeth were divided into two groups. Each group (n = 10 was prepared using the SAF or ProTaper system with 12-mL 5.25% NaOCl and 12-mL 17% EDTA. Root canals were prepared in six intact positive control teeth using the SAF or ProTaper system with 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA. As negative controls, two intact teeth were prepared using NaOCl only. Roots were than split longitudinally from the rejoined segments and samples were evaluated under scanning electron microscopy using a five-point scoring system. Results: Most SAF (87% and ProTaper (83% samples (P > 0.05, had scores of 1 and 2 indicating clean canal walls for the IRR cavities. Conclusions: SAF with activated continuous irrigation and ProTaper with conventional syringe/needle irrigation both successfully removed the smear layer from artificially prepared IRR cavities

  20. Elliptical superconducting RF cavities for FRIB energy upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Contreras, C.; Plastun, A. S.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Taylor, A.; Wei, J.; Xu, M.; Xu, T.; Zhao, Q.; Gonin, I. V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2018-04-01

    The multi-physics design of a five cell, βG = 0 . 61, 644 MHz superconducting elliptical cavity being developed for an energy upgrade in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is presented. The FRIB energy upgrade from 200 MeV/u to 400 MeV/u for heaviest uranium ions will increase the intensities of rare isotope beams by nearly an order of magnitude. After studying three different frequencies, 1288 MHz, 805 MHz, and 644 MHz, the 644 MHz cavity was shown to provide the highest energy gain per cavity for both uranium and protons. The FRIB upgrade will include 11 cryomodules containing 5 cavities each and installed in 80-meter available space in the tunnel. The cavity development included extensive multi-physics optimization, mechanical and engineering analysis. The development of a niobium cavity is complete and two cavities are being fabricated in industry. The detailed design of the cavity sub-systems such as fundamental power coupler and dynamic tuner are currently being pursued. In the overall design of the cavity and its sub-systems we extensively applied experience gained during the development of 650 MHz low-beta cavities at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) for the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) II.

  1. Photoprocesses of photosensitizing drugs within cyclodextrin cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Sandra; Sortino, Salvatore

    2002-09-01

    Recently some interest has been focused on the photobehavior of CD-drug inclusion complexes in relation to the problem of the biological photosensitization by drugs. This review is dedicated to the illustration of the mechanistic aspects of the photoprocesses occurring in some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), with photosensitising side effects, within CD cavities. It is shown how the photobehavior of the CD-drug associates can help to model the photoreactivity of the drugs in biological sites. The limitations for the use of CDs as protective systems for the clinical administration of photosensitising drugs is also evidenced.

  2. Criteria for vacuum breakdown in rf cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.; Faehl, R.J.; Kadish, A.; Thode, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    A new high-voltage scaling based on Kilpatrick's criterion is presented that suggests that voltages more than twice the Kilpatrick limit can be obtained with identical initial conditions of vacuum and surface cleanliness. The calculations are based on the experimentally observed decrease in secondary electron emission with increasing ion-impact energy above 100 keV. A generalized secondary-emission package has been developed to simulate actual cavity dynamics in conjunction with our 2 1/2-dimensional fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code CEMIT. The results are discussed with application to the suppression of vacuum breakdown in rf accelerator devices

  3. Wave Dynamical Chaos in Superconducting Microwave Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Rehfeld, H; Dembowski, C; Gräf, H D; Hofferbert, R; Richter, A; Lengeler, Herbert

    1997-01-01

    During the last few years we have studied the chaotic behavior of special Euclidian geometries, so-called billiards, from the quantum or in more general sense "wave dynamical" point of view. Due to the equivalence between the stationary Schroedinger equation and the classical Helmholtz equation in the two-dimensional case (plain billiards), it is possible to simulate "quantum chaos" with the help of macroscopic, superconducting microwave cavities. Using this technique we investigated spectra of three billiards from the family of Pascal's Snails (Robnik-Billiards) with a different chaoticity in each case in order to test predictions of standard stochastical models for classical chaotic systems.

  4. Giant Submandibular Calculus Eroding Oral Cavity Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eng Haw Lim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sialolithiasis is the formation of calculi or sialoliths in the salivary gland. It is the most common benign condition of the salivary gland. Sialolithiasis can occur in all salivary glands. The submandibular gland is most commonly affected followed by the parotid gland. Calculi commonly measure less than 10 mm. Calculi of more than 15 mm are termed giant salivary gland calculi and are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of unusually large submandibular gland calculus of 5 cm in greatest dimension which caused erosion of the oral cavity.

  5. Fiberoptic microphone using a polymeric cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Soetanto, William; Gu, Kebin

    2011-04-01

    The fabrication and experimental investigation of a fiberoptic microphone is described. The sensing element is a silicon diaphragm with gold thin film coating that is positioned inside a silicone rubber mold at the end of a single mode optical fiber. Thus, a Fabry-Perot interferometer is formed between the inner fiber and the diaphragm. An acoustic pressure change is detected by using the developed microphone. The polymeric cavity and silicon diaphragm-based system exhibits excellent physicochemical properties with a small, simple, low cost, and lightweight design. The system is also electromagnetic interference / radio frequency interference immunity due to the use of fiberoptics.

  6. Giant Submandibular Calculus Eroding Oral Cavity Mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eng Haw; Nadarajah, Sanjeevan; Mohamad, Irfan

    2017-09-01

    Sialolithiasis is the formation of calculi or sialoliths in the salivary gland. It is the most common benign condition of the salivary gland. Sialolithiasis can occur in all salivary glands. The submandibular gland is most commonly affected followed by the parotid gland. Calculi commonly measure less than 10 mm. Calculi of more than 15 mm are termed giant salivary gland calculi and are infrequently reported in the literature. Here, we report a case of unusually large submandibular gland calculus of 5 cm in greatest dimension which caused erosion of the oral cavity.

  7. Intra-cavity vortex beam generation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available in Fig. 3. For a Gaussian pump beam (Fig. 4(a)) we achieved a Gaussian output (Fig. 4(b)) and for a ring shaped pump beam (Fig. 4(c)) we achieved a LG01 (Fig. 4(d)) eigenmode of pure modal quality. The idea of pump shaping is employed to a plano... plano-concave laser cavity with a ring shaped pump intensity profile. The beam shaping element could be removed to revert back to the Gaussian pump scenario. Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8130 813009-4 Downloaded from SPIE Digital Library on 30 Sep 2011...

  8. Interacting collective modes in a laser cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graca, E.L.; Brito, A.L. de; Baseia, B.

    1985-01-01

    Collective operators are defined for the quantized radiation field in a one-dimensional laser cavity coupled to a semi-infinite outside region and the overlaps of neighbouring collective modes are considered to show how they modify, in the linear appoximation, the time evolution of the radiation field below threshold. The model and procedure work directly within a continuous spectrum of modes and allow us to get an improved insight on the prescription for the laser field in single-mode operation. (Author) [pt

  9. Cavity enhanced rephased amplified spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Williamson, Lewis; J Longdell, Jevon

    2014-01-01

    Amplified spontaneous emission is usually treated as an incoherent noise process. Recent theoretical and experimental work using rephasing optical pulses has shown that rephased amplified spontaneous emission (RASE) is a potential source of wide bandwidth time-delayed entanglement. Due to poor echo efficiency the plain RASE protocol does not in theory achieve perfect entanglement. Experiments done to date show a very small amount of entanglement at best. Here we show that RASE can, in principle, produce perfect multimode time-delayed two mode squeezing when the active medium is placed inside a Q-switched cavity. (paper)

  10. Superconducting RF Cavities Past, Present and Future

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaveri, Enrico

    2003-01-01

    In the last two decades many laboratories around the world, notably Argonne (ANL), TJNAF (formerly CEBAF), CERN, DESY and KEK, decided to develop the technology of superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities. The aim was either to increase the accelerator energy or to save electrical consumption or both. This technology has been used extensively in the operating machines showing good performances and strong reliability. At present, the technology using bulk niobium (Nb) or Nb coated on copper (Cu) is mature enough to be applied for many different applications, such as synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron drivers. Results, R&D work and future projects will be presented with emphasis on application to linear accelerators.

  11. A Rare Tumor of Nasal Cavity: Glomangiopericytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Verim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomangiopericytoma is a rare vascular neoplasm characterized by a pattern of prominent perivascular growth. A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic complaining of nasal obstruction, frequent epistaxis, and facial pain. A reddish tumor filling the left nasal cavity was observed on endoscopy and treated with endoscopic excision. Microscopically, closely packed cells interspersed with numerous thin-walled, branching staghorn vessels were seen. Glomangiopericytoma is categorized as a borderline low malignancy tumor by WHO classification. Long-term follow-up with systemic examination is necessary due to high risk of recurrence.

  12. Different optical properties in different periodic slot cavity geometrical morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Shen, Meng; Du, Lan; Deng, Caisong; Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, optical properties of two-dimensional periodic annular slot cavity arrays in hexagonal close-packing on a silica substrate are theoretically characterized by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation method. By simulating reflectance spectra, electric field distribution, and charge distribution, we confirm that multiple cylindrical surface plasmon resonances can be excited in annular inclined slot cavities by linearly polarized light, in which the four reflectance dips are attributed to Fabry-Perot cavity resonances in the coaxial cavity. A coaxial waveguide mode TE11 will exist in these annular cavities, and the wavelengths of these reflectance dips are effectively tailored by changing the geometrical pattern of slot cavity and the dielectric materials filled in the cavities. These resonant wavelengths are localized in annular cavities with large electric field enhancement and dissipate gradually due to metal loss. The formation of an absorption peak can be explained from the aspect of phase matching conditions. We observed that the proposed structure can be tuned over the broad spectral range of 600-4000 nm by changing the outer and inner radii of the annular gaps, gap surface topography. Meanwhile, different lengths of the cavity may cause the shift of resonance dips. Also, we study the field enhancement at different vertical locations of the slit. In addition, dielectric materials filling in the annular gaps will result in a shift of the resonance wavelengths, which make the annular cavities good candidates for refractive index sensors. The refractive index sensitivity of annular cavities can also be tuned by the geometry size and the media around the cavity. Annular cavities with novel applications can be implied as surface enhanced Raman spectra substrates, refractive index sensors, nano-lasers, and optical trappers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178044), the Natural Science Foundation

  13. Progress on SCRF cavity manufacturing activities at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntambekar, A.; Dwivedi, J.; Mundra, G.; Srivastava, P.; Joshi, S.C.; Gupta, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    The work on development of SCRF cavities and associated technologies is ongoing at RRCAT to support its upcoming projects involving SC LINAC. RRCAT is also a member of Indian Institution Fermilab Collaboration (IIFC) working on development of SCRF cavities and associated technologies. Subsequent to 1.3 GHz single cell SCRF cavities, a 650 MHz single cell, a 1.3 GHz five cell and a 1.3 GHz nine cell SCRF cavities have been fabricated. These were tested for their mechanical, vacuum and RF qualifications at RRCAT for pre qualifications. The 1.3 GHz five cell SCRF cavity and 650 MHz single cell SCRF cavity has been processed and successfully tested at Fermi lab under IIFC. The 1.3 GHz five-cell cavity has achieved E acc of 20.3 MV/m at 2 K and 42 MV/m at 1.5-1.7 K with Q o of 2 x 10 10 . The 650 MHz single cell cavity has achieved the E acc > 19.3 MV/m with Q> 4x 10 10 at 2K. A 15 kW Electron Beam Welding (EBW) Machine has also been installed and commissioned at RRCAT as part of special infrastructure for development of SCRF cavities. One each 1.3 GHz and 650 MHz single cell SCRF cavities have also been fabricated using this EBW facility. Present focus of work is towards development of 650 MHz (β=0.92) multi-cell SCRF cavities. This paper will present the various technology development efforts on SCRF cavity fabrication, cavity test results and future plans. (author)

  14. Ventilated air cavities for the control of rising damp in historical buildings. Functional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª T. Gil Muñoz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the behavior of ventilated air cavities and their level of efficiency when used for the control of rising damp and the associated pathological damage in walls and foundations of historical buildings. The methodology is based on experiments on-site and monitoring. Knowledge of local climate conditions, the surroundings of the building, its construction features and the type of foundation constitute the preliminary conditions for the monitoring. In order to reach the goal we have measured several parameters according to a plan, developed graphical tools for the study, and prepared statistical data. The building of this system has not always been accompanied by a thorough assessment that would justify the intervention. The results show how this situation has affected the design strategies and sizing of the ventilated air cavities, limiting in many cases their efficiency.

  15. The technology of planarizing sacrificial layer on wide cavity for MEMS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bo; Chen, Jun; Ma, Jinyi; Xu, Yang; Tian, Benlang; Shi, Yu

    2017-12-01

    In order to prepare a polysilicon sacrificial layer on a wide cavity for a mirco-electromechanical system structure, this paper studied four kinds of CMP methods for polysilicon planarization. The dishing amount, polishing uniformity, surface roughness and wafer bow height were compared and discussed. A new CMP process has been developed for application to MEMS structures. Polysilicon on the backside of the wafer and outside of cavities was etched out. Then, the wafer was gross and fine polished with silicon slurry. Experimental results showed that the dishing amount was about 20 nm and showed good polishing uniformity, which meant local and global planarization. Meanwhile, its surface roughness was less than 1 nm, and the wafer bow height had no significant change pre- and post-CMP. This result suggests that the polysilicon CMP process developed in this work is effective and suits for application in MEMS fabrication.

  16. Schrodinger's catapult I: coherent launch of multi-photon cavity states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axline, C.; Pfaff, W.; Burkhart, L. D.; Vool, U.; Reinhold, P. C.; Frunzio, L.; Jiang, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    Quantum networks are a powerful paradigm for managing complexity in quantum information processing. Here we present a circuit QED tool to control the exchange of quantum information in such a network, dubbed ''Schrodinger's catapult''. It enables rapid conversion between complex, multi-photon states prepared in a cavity memory and a propagating output mode. Enabled by four-wave mixing in a single Josephson junction, this conversion rate is tunable up to three orders of magnitude faster than the intrinsic memory decay rate. In addition to such a large on/off ratio, we show that the mapping of cavity states to traveling states is faithful and state-independent. Amplitude and phase control of the conversion process anticipates the capture of propagating states using a reciprocal module.

  17. The effect of finishing sealant augmented margins in class V cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlTahawi, Hamdi Mohammed

    1989-01-01

    Class V cavities in the buccal and tingual aspects of human posterior teeth were acid etched and restored in one of two ways. In the extended primer technique, the UV polymerized primer coat was extended 2-3 mm beyond the cavity, then finished back. In the butt-joint technique, the primer coat was extended to just below the cavosurface line angle. Eight specimens for each technique were prepared and tested. A surface micro-analyzer capable of detecting one microinch surface roughness was used to determine the variance in marginal smoothness margins were also examined using a scanning electron microscope. No statistical difference in smoothness was detected between the two techniques. (author)

  18. Prototyping of a multicell superconducting cavity for acceleration of medium-velocity beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Compton

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Three 6-cell 805 MHz superconducting cavity prototypes for acceleration in the velocity range of about 0.4 to 0.53 times the speed of light have been fabricated and tested. The quality factors (Q_{0} were between 7×10^{9} and 1.4×10^{10} at the design field (accelerating gradient of 8–10  MV/m. The maximum gradients reached were between 11 and 16  MV/m; in each case, the Q_{0} values were ≥3×10^{9} at the maximum gradient. The design, fabrication, surface preparation, and rf testing of the 6-cell cavities are reported in this paper.

  19. Shrinkage of dental composite in simulated cavity measured with digital image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianying; Thakur, Preetanjali; Fok, Alex S L

    2014-07-21

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental resin composites can lead to restoration debonding or cracked tooth tissues in composite-restored teeth. In order to understand where and how shrinkage strain and stress develop in such restored teeth, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used to provide a comprehensive view of the displacement and strain distributions within model restorations that had undergone polymerization shrinkage. Specimens with model cavities were made of cylindrical glass rods with both diameter and length being 10 mm. The dimensions of the mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) cavity prepared in each specimen measured 3 mm and 2 mm in width and depth, respectively. After filling the cavity with resin composite, the surface under observation was sprayed with first a thin layer of white paint and then fine black charcoal powder to create high-contrast speckles. Pictures of that surface were then taken before curing and 5 min after. Finally, the two pictures were correlated using DIC software to calculate the displacement and strain distributions. The resin composite shrunk vertically towards the bottom of the cavity, with the top center portion of the restoration having the largest downward displacement. At the same time, it shrunk horizontally towards its vertical midline. Shrinkage of the composite stretched the material in the vicinity of the "tooth-restoration" interface, resulting in cuspal deflections and high tensile strains around the restoration. Material close to the cavity walls or floor had direct strains mostly in the directions perpendicular to the interfaces. Summation of the two direct strain components showed a relatively uniform distribution around the restoration and its magnitude equaled approximately to the volumetric shrinkage strain of the material.

  20. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics of high-Q cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbekyan, Mikayel

    2009-10-27

    In this thesis macroscopic quantum electrodynamics in linear media was applied in order to develop an universally valid quantum theory for the description of the interaction of the electromagnetic field with atomic sources in high-Q cavities. In this theory a complete description of the characteristics of the emitted radiation is given. The theory allows to show the limits of the applicability of the usually applied theory. In order to establish an as possible generally valid theory first the atom-field interaction was studied in the framework of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics in dispersive and absorptive media. In order to describe the electromagnetic field from Maxwell's equations was started, whereby the noise-current densities, which are connected with the absorption of the medium, were included. The solution of these equations expresses the electromagnetic field variables by the noise-current densities by means of Green's tensor of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. The explicit quantization is performed by means of the noise-current densities, whereby a diagonal Hamiltonian is introduced, which then guarantees the time development according to Maxwell's equation and the fulfillment of the fundamental simultaneous commutation relations of the field variables. In the case of the interaction of the medium-supported field with atoms the Hamiltonian must be extended by atom-field interactions energies, whereby the canonical coupling schemes of the minimal or multipolar coupling can be used. The dieelectric properties of the material bodies as well as their shape are coded in the Green tensor of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. As preparing step first the Green tensor was specified in order to derive three-dimensional input-output relations for the electromagnetic field operators on a plane multilayer structure. Such a general dewscription of the electromagnetic field allows the inclusion both of dispersion and absorption of the media and the

  1. Corticoterapia: minimizando efeitos colaterais Glucocorticoid therapy: minimizing side effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Longui

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Ressaltar os principais efeitos indesejáveis durante a corticoterapia, o mecanismo de seu desencadeamento e as medidas necessárias para minimizar os efeitos colaterais. FONTES DOS DADOS: Experiência do autor, complementada com trabalhos publicados no MEDLINE. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Os princípios para que se minimizem os efeitos indesejáveis da corticoterapia incluem: a indicação rígida em que o uso do glicocorticóide seja essencial; b evitar o uso de glicocorticóides de ação prolongada, preferindo glicocorticóide de ação curta ou intermediária; c reduzir ao m��nimo necessário a duração do tratamento, visto que tratamentos com duração entre 5 e 7 dias apresentam poucos efeitos colaterais e rápida recuperação do eixo hipotalâmico-hipofisário; d preferir glicocorticóides de ação local, como glicocorticóides inalatórios; e associação com outros fármacos, em especial outros antiinflamatórios ou imunossupressores mais específicos, buscando efeitos sinérgicos que permitam evitar o uso de glicocorticóides ou reduzir a dose e o tempo da corticoterapia; f oferecer a menor dose necessária para o efeito desejado, respeitando a sensibilidade de cada indivíduo aos glicocorticóides. CONCLUSÕES: o conhecimento das características farmacológicas e ações biológicas dos glicocorticóides permite a melhor opção terapêutica quanto à indicação, dose, via de administração e duração da corticoterapia.OBJECTIVE:To describe the main undesirable side effects of glucocorticoid therapy, mechanisms of action and the necessary measures to minimize side effects. SOURCES: Author's experience, supplemented with papers published in MEDLINE. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The principles for minimizing undesirable side effects of glucocorticoid therapy include: a only use glucocorticoids if they are essential; b avoid the use of long-acting glucocorticoids, using short- and intermediate-acting glucocorticoids instead; c

  2. A tunable waveguide to cavity coupler for high power accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: krajesh@barc.gov.in [LEHIPA, Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, P. [LEHIPA, Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Unnikrishnan, Divya; Kumar, Girish [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2012-02-01

    The end iris ridge waveguide couplers are used to couple power to accelerator cavities through a reduced size coupling port. However, higher electric and magnetic fields due to reduced size lead to strict requirements on dimensional tolerances during coupler fabrication process. It is shown by detailed parametric analysis that even small dimensional changes during manufacturing or operation can lead to undesired shift in design frequency and deterioration of return loss. Hence, transmitted power testing of two couplers connected back to back without an intermediate cavity cannot be carried out. Here, we propose cylindrical static tuners on impedance matching section to relax the dimensional tolerance requirements. It is also shown that an iris coupled coupler-cavity system is more tolerant towards coupler dimensional changes than a stand-alone coupler. However, same tuners can find use for tuning the coupling coefficient of coupler-cavity system. The proposed tuning scheme is expected to reduce the coupler manufacturing costs and provide an useful alternative for coupling coefficient tuning over iris machining.

  3. Compreendendo o Efeito Placebo / Understanding the Placebo Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elayne Vieira Dias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Placebo é definido em termos farmacológicos como uma substância inerte, sem propriedades farmacológicas intrínsecas. No entanto, essa definição é superficial, visto que o placebo pode gerar efeitos terapêuticos que dependem de diversos fatores como palavras, rituais, símbolos e significados que acompanham seu uso. Assim, o efeito placebo não diz respeito apenas a uma substância, mas, envolve fatores cognitivos, genéticos e mecanismos de aprendizagem implícita e explícita. Nessa revisão nós abordamos os aspectos gerais do efeito placebo apoiados em diversos estudos com diferentes enfoques, visando uma melhor compreensão desse fenômeno que pode se somar ao tratamento ativo e otimizar os resultados na prática médica. Placebo is pharmacologically defined as an inert substance, with nointrinsic pharmacological properties. However, this is a superficial definition, since placebo may trigger therapeutic effects and its effectiveness depends on various factors such as words, rituals, symbols and meanings following its use. Thus, placebo effect does not refer just to the substance, but it also involves cognitive and genetic factors and learning mechanisms. Here, we review general aspects of the placebo effect supported by several studies with different approaches, to better understand this phenomenon which may contribute to active treatment as well as optimize the results in the clinical practice.

  4. Efeito protetor do aleitamento materno contra a obesidade infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaban Geni

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar uma revisão da literatura sobre a hipótese de que o aleitamento materno teria um efeito protetor contra a obesidade infantil, a plausibilidade biológica dessa hipótese e os mecanismos potencialmente envolvidos. FONTES DOS DADOS: Informações coletadas a partir de artigos publicados em revistas científicas indexadas, livros e teses de pós-graduação. A maioria dos artigos foi identificada a partir das bases de dados MEDLINE e Scielo, usando as palavras-chave "aleitamento materno", "sobrepeso", "obesidade", "crianças" e "adolescentes". O período pesquisado foi de 1980 a 2002. Outros artigos foram identificados a partir das referências bibliográficas citadas nos primeiros artigos. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A maioria dos estudos revisados relatou um efeito protetor do aleitamento materno contra a obesidade infantil; alguns estudos não encontraram associação entre aleitamento materno e obesidade; um estudo, com um pequeno tamanho amostral, relatou maior adiposidade entre as crianças que receberam aleitamento materno. Diferentes definições de exposição e desfecho dificultam a comparação entre os estudos. Imprinting metabólico foi sugerido como um mecanismo potencialmente envolvido para explicar a associação. Aspectos comportamentais também podem estar envolvidos. CONCLUSÃO: O aleitamento materno parece ter um efeito protetor contra a obesidade infantil, porém essa questão merece uma investigação mais aprofundada.

  5. Development of oral cavity inspecting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Wu, Di; Jia, Dagong; Zhang, Yimo

    2009-11-01

    An oral cavity inspecting system is designed and developed to inspect the detail of teeth. The inspecting system is composed of microscopic imaging part, illuminating part, image capture and processing, display part. The two groups of cemented lenses were optimized to minimize the optical aberration and the collimated beam light is gotten between the two lenses. A relay lens is adopted to allow the probe to access the oral cavity depth. The illumination optic fiber is used and the brightness and color temperature can be adjustable. The illumination fiber end surface is oblique cut and the optimum angle is 37°. The image of teeth is imaged on CMOS and captured into computer. The illumination intensity and uniformity were tested and the proper parameter is set. Foucault chart was observed and the system resolution is higher than 100lp/mm. The oral inspecting system is used to test standard tooth model and patho-teeth model. The tooth image is clear and the details can be observed. The experimental results show that the system could meet dental medical application requirements.

  6. Polarization dynamics of VCSELs in external cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, M.; Javaloyes, J.; Barland, S.; Balle, S.; Giudici, M.

    2014-05-01

    We review the dynamics of VCSELs that experience both Polarization-Selective Feedback (PSF) and Crossed- Polarization Reinjection (XPR). Different regimes of regular pulsation were found. For strong enough XPR levels, the VCSEL emission in each of its linearly-polarized components displays a square-wave modulation which regularity is greatly enhanced by small levels of PSF. Such a square-wave is in antiphase for the two polarizations, and it turns out to be stable and robust over broad intervals of current. The frequency of the square-wave is determined by the length of the XPR arm. For weak levels of PSF and XPR, the VCSEL emits a regular train of short optical pulses arising from the locking of the modes in the PSF cavity. The frequency of the pulse train is stable on short time scales, but it wanders with a characteristic time scale of hundreds of roundtrips in the PSF cavity. The experimental results are successfully explained by an extension of the Spin-Flip Model that incorporates gain saturation and the effects of PSF and XPR.

  7. VERY HIGH RESOLUTION RF CAVITY BPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Marc C

    2003-05-27

    Linear collider (LC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements are expected to be a few nanometers[1]. It is important to show that the related tolerances can be achieved, with an electron beam if possible. Using recently developed component stabilization technology, very high-resolution beam position monitors (BPM's), and the ultra-low emittance beam at the KEK ATF, we plan to demonstrate the required stabilization. Our first step is to develop high-resolution RF cavity beam position monitors, using either C or X band frequencies. A C-band cavity BPM with a resolution of 25 nm has been reported in tests at FFTB [2]. By correcting for the effects of non-axial trajectories and using both position and angle BPM movers, we expect to be able to demonstrate a resolution of 2 to 3 nm over a dynamic range of {+-} 20 {micro}m. We report on the progress of the tests here.

  8. Cavity Microwave Searches for Cosmological Axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carosi, G; van Bibber, K

    2007-01-22

    This chapter will cover the search for dark matter axions based on microwave cavity experiments proposed by Pierre Sikivie. We will start with a brief overview of halo dark matter and the axion as a candidate. The principle of resonant conversion of axions in an external magnetic field will be described as well as practical considerations in optimizing the experiment as a signal-to-noise problem. A major focus of this chapter will be the two complementary strategies for ultra-low noise detection of the microwave photons--the 'photon-as-wave' approach (i.e. conventional heterojunction amplifiers and soon to be quantum-limited SQUID devices), and 'photon-as-particle' (i.e. Rydberg-atom single-quantum detection). Experimental results will be presented; these experiments have already reached well into the range of sensitivity to exclude plausible axion models, for limited ranges of mass. The section will conclude with a discussion of future plans and challenges for the microwave cavity experiment.

  9. Status of superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    For several reasons, a brief historical review seems appropriate at this time. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the first acceleration of beam with a superconducting cavity will occur shortly [1,2,3]. Also, the scope of accelerator applications of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) devices has, within the last few months, begun to increase rapidly [4] - to the point that it seems likely that early expectations for this technology will largely be fulfilled. Since the object is to accelerate beam, a simple one parameter measure of the technology is the total of how much beam has been accelerated. Figure 1 shows the total accumulated voltage in tests and/or operation of superconducting accelerating cavities with beam, up to the time indicated, as reported in the open literature [4-35]. This parameter has been divided into two terms: first, the subtotal for electron accelerating velocity-of-light structures, and second the subtotal for low-velocity, ion accelerating structures. To restate: each of these terms represents as a function of time an integrated, accumulative total voltage produced by SRF hardware and demonstrated with beam. 56 refs., 4 figs

  10. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinglan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  11. Cavity plasmon polaritons in monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, O.V.; Lozovik, Yu.E.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmon polaritons in a new system, a monolayer doped graphene embedded in optical microcavity, are studied here. The dispersion law for lower and upper cavity plasmon polaritons is obtained. Peculiarities of Rabi splitting for the system are analyzed; particularly, role of Dirac-like spinor (envelope) wave functions in graphene and corresponding angle factors are considered. Typical Rabi frequencies for maximal (acceptable for Dirac-like electron spectra) Fermi energy and frequencies of polaritons near polariton gap are estimated. The plasmon polaritons in considered system can be used for high-speed information transfer in the THz region. -- Highlights: → Plasmon polaritons in a monolayer doped graphene embedded in optical microcavity, are studied here. → The dispersion law for lower and upper cavity plasmon polaritons is obtained. → Peculiarities of Rabi splitting for the system are analyzed. → Role of Dirac-like wave functions in graphene and corresponding angle factors are considered. → Typical Rabi frequencies and frequencies of polaritons near polariton gap are estimated.

  12. O EFEITO CHAMARIZ NAS DECISÕES DE INVESTIMENTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Tibúrcio Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo das fi nanças comportamentais vem ganhando destaque e sendo objeto de diversos trabalhos acadêmicos. Muitos conceitos tradicionais de economia, sobre o homem econômico, têm sido questionados, ao se considerarem aspectos observados na prática. Principalmente, a partir dos modernos estudos de economia comportamental, aponta-se que o homem se comporta de maneira enviesada e irracional, para tomar suas decisões. É infl uenciado por detalhes que podem levá-lo a fazer escolhas menos vantajosas, relacionadas ao seu dinheiro, e nem mesmo se dar conta disso. O efeito chamariz refere-se à infl uência que um item, a ser escolhido, exerce sobre aqueles que farão uma escolha, inclusive levando- os a tomar uma decisão que, anteriormente, era duvidosa, ou até mesmo a mudar uma escolha anterior. Esse efeito mostra como o homem cria falsas bases de comparação, para simplifi car um ambiente de escolha entre opções. O trabalho faz uma pesquisa sobre uma decisão de investimento, em que há duas situações, com a presença ou não de um chamariz, algo que pode infl uenciar a decisão fi nal dos investidores. Participaram da pesquisa 386 alunos de graduação do curso de Ciências Contábeis, de cinco universidades, do Distrito Federal. Os alunos foram considerados investidores capazes de analisar índices de liquidez e de julgar qual seria a melhor opção para investir. Viu-se que as pessoas se sentem incentivadas a investir em empresas nas quais foi criada uma falsa base de comparação, pela presença do chamariz. Esse efeito é observado com maior intensidade em alguns grupos específi cos de investidores. Sugere-se a elaboração de novas pesquisas na área, com o objetivo de observar esse efeito em outras situações e de divulgar o estudo das fi nanças comportamentais.

  13. "Efeito da colchicina na fibroses hepatica induzida quimicamente em coelhos"

    OpenAIRE

    Clodomir Garcia Brandão

    1999-01-01

    Resumo: O desenvolvimento de fibrose é um ponto fundamental na formação da cirrose hepática e sua compreensão é essencial para o entendimento da fisiopatologia da cirrose e da conseqüente hipertensão portal. Assim, o desenvolvimento de um modelo experimental adequado de fibrose hepática é útil para o entendimento das enfermidades que podem evoluir para a cirrose hepática. A colchicina tem sido usada em pacientes com cirrose hepática mas efeitos não são totalmente conhecidos. Este estudo teve ...

  14. Estudo do efeito de transferência de spin

    OpenAIRE

    Artur Difini Accioly

    2011-01-01

    A ideia de transferência de spin, como forma de controle da magnetização, foi introduzida independentemente por Slonczewski e por Berger em 1996. Desde então, esse efeito tem sido alvo de inúmeras pesquisas, em especial pela possibilidade de aplicações em memorias magnéticas não voláteis e em osciladores de alta frequência. Devido _a complexidade do problema, a grande maioria das pesquisas teóricas sobre o assunto _e baseada em resultados numéricos. Porém, esses métodos podem dificultar a vis...

  15. Superconducting accelerating cavity for KEK B-factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, T.; Asano, K.; Mitsunobu, S.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kijima, Y.; Murai, T.; Sennyu, K.

    1996-01-01

    KEKB is an asymmetric collider of 3.5 GeV x 8 GeV with the circulating beams of 2.6 A(e - ) and 1.1 A(e + ). These high currents require the RF cavities which have sufficiently damped higher order modes (HOMs), because RF cavities are the main source of the ring impedance that can cause the single bunch and coupled bunch instabilities. Another problem is a multibunch instability due to the accelerating mode. Two types of accelerating cavities are under development for the RF system of KEKB: a new normal conducting cavity (ARES) and a superconducting (SC) cavity. In this paper, recent activity of an SC accelerating cavity for KEKB is reported. (K.A.)

  16. Optical cavity cooling of mechanical modes of a semiconductor nanomembrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usami, Koji; Naesby, A.; Bagci, Tolga

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical oscillators can be optically cooled using a technique known as optical-cavity back-action. Cooling of composite metal–semiconductor mirrors, dielectric mirrors and dielectric membranes has been demonstrated. Here we report cavity cooling of mechanical modes in a high-quality-factor and......Mechanical oscillators can be optically cooled using a technique known as optical-cavity back-action. Cooling of composite metal–semiconductor mirrors, dielectric mirrors and dielectric membranes has been demonstrated. Here we report cavity cooling of mechanical modes in a high......-quality-factor and optically active semiconductor nanomembrane. The cooling is a result of electron–hole generation by cavity photons. Consequently, the cooling factor depends on the optical wavelength, varies drastically in the vicinity of the semiconductor bandgap, and follows the excitonic absorption behaviour...... an alternative cooling mechanism that is a result of electronic stress via the deformation potential, and outline future directions for cavity optomechanics with optically active semiconductors....

  17. Construction of 714 MHz HOM-free accelerating cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakanaka, S; Hinode, F; Kubo, K; Urakawa, J

    1998-05-01

    A new 'higher-order-mode (HOM)-free' accelerating cavity has been developed which can provide an accelerating voltage of more than 400 kV per cavity at a frequency of 714 MHz. The harmful HOMs in the cavities, which can induce beam instabilities at high beam currents, were heavily damped by using four special waveguide ports and broadband microwave loads. Two cavities of this design were installed in the 1.54 GeV accelerator test facility (ATF) damping ring at KEK, and successfully stored beams. This cavity will also be very useful for synchrotron light sources. The basic design, characteristics of HOMs and construction of this cavity are reported.

  18. 17 GHz photonic band gap cavity with improved input coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shapiro

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the theoretical design and cold test of a 17 GHz photonic band gap (PBG cavity with improved coupling from an external rectangular waveguide. The PBG cavity is made of a triangular lattice of metal rods with a defect (missing rod in the center. The TM_{010}-like defect mode was chosen as the operating mode. Experimental results are presented demonstrating that critical coupling into the cavity can be achieved by partial withdrawal or removal of some rods from the lattice, a result that agrees with simulations. A detailed design of the PBG accelerator structure is compared with a conventional (pillbox cavity. One advantage of the PBG cavity is that its resonance frequency is much less perturbed by the input/output coupling structure than in a comparable pillbox cavity. The PBG structure is attractive for future accelerator applications.

  19. Quantum noise interference and backaction cooling in cavity nanomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elste, Florian; Girvin, S M; Clerk, A A

    2009-05-22

    We present a theoretical analysis of a novel cavity electromechanical system where a mechanical resonator directly modulates the damping rate kappa of a driven electromagnetic cavity. We show that via a destructive interference of quantum noise, the driven cavity can effectively act like a zero-temperature bath irrespective of the ratio kappa/omega_{M}, where omega_{M} is the mechanical frequency. This scheme thus allows one to cool the mechanical resonator to its ground state without requiring the cavity to be in the so-called good cavity limit kappa < omega_{M}. The system described here could be implemented directly using setups similar to those used in recent experiments in cavity electromechanics.

  20. RF kicker cavity to increase control in common transport lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method of controlling e-beam transport where electron bunches with different characteristics travel through the same beam pipe. An RF kicker cavity is added at the beginning of the common transport pipe or at various locations along the common transport path to achieve independent control of different bunch types. RF energy is applied by the kicker cavity kicks some portion of the electron bunches, separating the bunches in phase space to allow independent control via optics, or separating bunches into different beam pipes. The RF kicker cavity is operated at a specific frequency to enable kicking of different types of bunches in different directions. The phase of the cavity is set such that the selected type of bunch passes through the cavity when the RF field is at a node, leaving that type of bunch unaffected. Beam optics may be added downstream of the kicker cavity to cause a further separation in phase space.

  1. 201 MHz Cavity R and D for MUCOOL and MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael; Norem, Jim; Bross, Alan; Moretti, Alfred; Norris, Barry; Torun, Yagmur; Phillips, Larry; Rimmer, Robert; Stirbet, Mircea; Reep, Michael; Summers, Don

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, analysis and preliminary testing of the prototype 201 MHz copper cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. Cavity applications include the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as well as cooling channels for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. This cavity was developed by the US muon cooling (MUCOOL) collaboration and is being tested in the MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab. To achieve a high accelerating gradient, the cavity beam irises are terminated by a pair of curved, thin beryllium windows. Several fabrication methods developed for the cavity and windows are novel and offer significant cost savings as compared to conventional construction methods. The cavity's thermal and structural performances are simulated with an FEA model. Preliminary high power RF commissioning results will be presented

  2. Driven-Dissipative Supersolid in a Ring Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mivehvar, Farokh; Ostermann, Stefan; Piazza, Francesco; Ritsch, Helmut

    2018-03-01

    Supersolids are characterized by the counterintuitive coexistence of superfluid and crystalline order. Here we study a supersolid phase emerging in the steady state of a driven-dissipative system. We consider a transversely pumped Bose-Einstein condensate trapped along the axis of a ring cavity and coherently coupled to a pair of degenerate counterpropagating cavity modes. Above a threshold pump strength the interference of photons scattered into the two cavity modes results in an emergent superradiant lattice, which spontaneously breaks the continuous translational symmetry towards a periodic atomic pattern. The crystalline steady state inherits the superfluidity of the Bose-Einstein condensate, thus exhibiting genuine properties of a supersolid. A gapless collective Goldstone mode correspondingly appears in the superradiant phase, which can be nondestructively monitored via the relative phase of the two cavity modes on the cavity output. Despite cavity-photon losses the Goldstone mode remains undamped, indicating the robustness of the supersolid phase.

  3. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics of Continuously Monitored Bose-Condensed Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study cavity quantum electrodynamics of Bose-condensed atoms that are subjected to continuous monitoring of the light leaking out of the cavity. Due to a given detection record of each stochastic realization, individual runs spontaneously break the symmetry of the spatial profile of the atom cloud and this symmetry can be restored by considering ensemble averages over many realizations. We show that the cavity optomechanical excitations of the condensate can be engineered to target specific collective modes. This is achieved by exploiting the spatial structure and symmetries of the collective modes and light fields. The cavity fields can be utilized both for strong driving of the collective modes and for their measurement. In the weak excitation limit the condensate–cavity system may be employed as a sensitive phonon detector which operates by counting photons outside the cavity that have been selectively scattered by desired phonons.

  4. M10.3.1: LHC crab cavity specifications completed

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, E

    2010-01-01

    • The starting point of Sub-task 1 is to determine the full LHC system requirements for the crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of basic specifications for the crab cavity system. This comprises the beam requirements, the cavity impedance constraints, the operating conditions and constraints, the layout and integration constraints in LHC and very importantly machine protection issues. The specifications of the cavity itself and its ancillaries follow from these system requirements and on the technology chosen for the cavity design. • The beam requirements result from the known parameters of the LHC upgrade lattice and the expected LHC beam parameters at ultimate bunch intensity. There are boundary conditions imposed by certain beam parameters such as the bunch length and intensity and by the machine layout, mainly the available beam pipe separations at the proposed cavity positions. Requirements on RF noise and stability are tight, to avoid emittance blow-up. Machine protection issues a...

  5. LHC crab cavity specifications milestone: M10.3.1

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Jensen, E; McIntosh, P; Shaposhnikova, E; Tuckmantel, J; Zimmermann, F

    2010-01-01

    The starting point of Sub-task 1 is to determine the full LHC system requirements for the crab cavity system. This milestone concerns completion of basic specifications for the crab cavity system. This comprises the beam requirements, the cavity impedance constraints, the operating conditions and constraints, the layout and integration constraints in LHC and very importantly machine protection issues. The specifications of the cavity itself and its ancillaries follow from these system requirements and on the technology chosen for the cavity design. The beam requirements result from the known parameters of the LHC upgrade lattice and the expected LHC beam parameters at ultimate bunch intensity. There are boundary conditions imposed by certain beam parameters such as the bunch length and intensity and by the machine layout, mainly the available beam pipe separations at the proposed cavity positions. Requirements on RF noise and stability are tight, to avoid emittance blow-up. Machine protection issues arise fro...

  6. A temporary filling material during endodontic treatment may cause tooth fractures in two-surface class II cavities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennert, Christian; Fischer, Gesine Friederike; Vach, Kirstin; Woelber, Johan Peter; Hellwig, Elmar; Polydorou, Olga

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effect of a zinc oxide/zinc sulphate-based cement as a temporary filling material during root canal treatment on the occurrence of cracks within the filling material or the tooth. Root canals of 122 extracted human molars were prepared using ProTaper instruments. Standardized occlusal-distal cavities were prepared. After placing calcium hydroxide into the root canals, the teeth were divided randomly into four groups containing 33 specimens each. In the Coltosol group, the cavity was completely filled with Coltosol® F. In the Coltosol-Clearfil group, a 2-mm layer of Coltosol® F was placed into the apical part of the pulp chamber, and in the Clearfil group, a foam pellet was placed into the coronal pulp chamber. The remaining cavities were filled with Clearfil™. In the control group, the cavities were not restored. The teeth were stored at 37 °C for 14 days and examined every 24 h under a stereomicroscope. Fractures of the filling and/or the tooth were only observed in the Coltosol group. All Coltosol® F restorations had cracks after 24 h. Tooth fractures were found in 25 (76 %) teeth. Among these teeth, 21 (84 %) had crown fractures, four (16 %) had root-crown fractures. All root-crown fractures were vertical. Coltosol® F when used alone led to tooth fractures in two-surface class II cavities in teeth undergoing root canal treatment. Coltosol® F solely used as restorative material may lead to tooth fractures in two-surface class II cavities.

  7. Radioprotective preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, D.; Frattadochi, A.; Gattavecchia, E.; Ferri, E.; Tonnelli, D.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is intended for radiation injuries prophylaxis in mammals. It has an well expressed radioprotective effect against acute gamma irradiation on cellular level as well as a prolonged action when applied up to 48 hours before the acute irradiation. The preparation is a coprecipitate of the natural tripeptide glutathione (reduced form) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (pvp) in ratio 30-60/70-40. It is obtained by incubation method with subsequent lyophilization from water solution of the initial components. The molecular mass of the pvp is 20 till 360.10 3 . 2 claims

  8. First Test Results of the 4-ROD Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Burt, G; Calaga, R; Capatina, O; Calatroni, S; Ciapala, E; Doherty, D; Ferreira, L; Jensen, E; Hall, B; Lingwood, C; Maesen, P; Mongelluzzo, A; Renaglia, T; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The first compact prototype crab cavity with the 4rod geometry has undergone surface treatment and cold testing. Due to the complex geometry and unique fabrication procedure, RF validation of the field at beyond the nominal operating voltage at a sufficiently high Q0 is an important pre-requisite. Preliminary results of the first cold tests are presented along with cavity performance at different stages of the cavity processing is described.

  9. Cavity enhanced immunoassay measurements in microtiter plates using BBCEAS

    OpenAIRE

    Bajuszova, Z; Ali, Z; Scott, SM; Seetohul, LN; Islam, M

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first detailed use of broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) as a detection system for immunoassay. A vertical R ≥ 0.99 optical cavity was integrated with a motorised XY stage, which functioned as a receptacle for 96 well microtiter plates. The custom built cavity enhanced microplate reader was used to make measurements on a commercially available osteocalcin sandwich ELISA kit. A 30 fold increase in path length was obtained with a minimum detectable chang...

  10. Ultimate Gradient Limitation in Niobium Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Grassellino, Anna [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Martinello, Martina [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Posen, Sam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanenko, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zasadzinski, John [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The present study is addressed to the theoretical description of the ultimate gradient limitation in SRF cavities. Our intent is to exploit experimental data to confirm models which provide feed-backs on how to improve the current state-of-art. New theoretical insight on the cavities limiting factor can be suitable to improve the quench field of N-doped cavities, and therefore to take advantage of high Q0 at high gradients.

  11. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests

  12. Prototype 350 MHz niobium spoke-loaded cavities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delayen, J. R.; Kedzie, M.; Mammosser, J.; Piller, C.; Shepard, K. W.

    1999-05-10

    This paper reports the development of 350 MHz superconducting cavities of a spoke-loaded geometry, intended for the velocity range 0.2 < v/c < 0.6. Two prototype single-cell cavities have been designed, one optimized for velocity v/c = 0.4, and the other for v/c = 0.29. Construction of the prototype niobium cavities is nearly complete. Details of the design and construction are discussed, along with the results of cold tests.

  13. Hydrodynamic modeling of semi-planing hulls with air cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin I. Matveev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available High-speed heavy loaded monohull ships can benefit from application of drag-reducing air cavities under stepped hull bottoms. The subject of this paper is the steady hydrodynamic modeling of semi-planing air-cavity hulls. The current method is based on a linearized potential-flow theory for surface flows. The mathematical model description and parametric calculation results for a selected configuration with pressurized and open air cavities are presented.

  14. Trains of electron pulses generation using multi-stage cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Masaki; Mori, Michiya; Sugawara, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Yoko; Kurihara, Kazuteru; Shirasaka, Haruki; Nishiguchi, Takashi; Ando, Ritoku; Kamada, Keiichi

    2002-01-01

    Automodulation of an intense relativistic electron beam was reexamined experimentally to obtain trains of subnanosecond electron bunches. Sufficient beam modulation with frequency larger than 1 GHz was expected for the trains of subnanosecond bunches. It was obtained when a short pulse electron beam with energy of 550 keV, current of 4 kA, pulse duration of 12 ns and current rise time of 2ns was injected to a series of four coaxial cavities with the length of 75 mm. However, only a poor modulation was observed when a long pulse electron beam of 700 keV, 4 kA, 175 ns with current rise time of 20 ns was injected to the same cavities. Transmission line theory as well PIC code simulation suggested that the round trip time for the electromagnetic wave in the cavity must be longer than the rise time of the beam current to obtain the high level current modulation. Therefore, we studied experimentally how the ratio between the beam current rise time and the length of the cavity affects on the level of current modulation. Single cavity experiments were carried out with the short pulse beam. Single cavity with the length of 75, 150 or 300 mm was utilized. The round trip times for 75 and 150 mm cavities are shorter than the current rise time of 2 ns. The experiments with a 75 or 150 mm cavity resulted in suppression of the modulation amplitude. In the case of a 300 mm cavity, the high level modulation was obtained. The simulation results showed good agreements with the experimental results. We employed a series of cavities with decreasing lengths to improve the current rise time. For the short pulse beam, the high level current 1 GHz modulation was obtained when two 75 mm cavities were set at the downstream side of cavities with lengths of 300 mm and 150 mm. (author)

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of pulp cavity dentin in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sabás Z; Negro, Viviana B; Paulero, Rodrigo H; Toriggia, Paula G; Saccomanno, Daniela M

    2010-01-01

    Dentin morphology and tubule diameter and density of peripulpal dentin were evaluated in 36 teeth from 12 adult dogs, aged between 2.5 and 13-years. The right maxillary canine and third premolar and right mandibular first molar teeth were extracted from euthanized dogs. The teeth were prepared and photomicrographs (n=108) were taken of the radicular and coronal dentin. Dentinal tubule density (tubules/mm2) was determined and tubular diameter and luminal area were measured in 3240 randomly chosen tubules using measurement software. Results from group 1 dogs (dogs (> 7-years-old). The majority of dentinal tubules were round or oval in shape and had uniform distribution at the radicular coronal third, and coronal levels. Dentin surfaces showed morphological differences at different levels of the tooth. Group 1 dentinal tubule diameter (1.87 +/- 0.44 microm) and area (1.91 +/- 0.83 microm2) were significantly different compared with Group 2 dentinal tubule diameter (1.53 +/- 0.39 microm) and area (1.22 +/- 0.50 microm2). There was no significant difference in tubular density between groups 1 (74,692 +/- 25,991 tubules/mm2) and 2 (72,938 +/- 24,646 tubules/mm2). Site-specific differences were observed in the pulp cavity dentin in the same tooth. These results provide a reference for future research in dogs or where dogs are used as a model for investigations in human dentistry.

  16. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  17. Physical simulations of cavity closure in a creeping material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, H.J.; Preece, D.S.

    1985-09-01

    The finite element method has been used extensively to predict the creep closure of underground petroleum storage cavities in rock salt. Even though the numerical modeling requires many simplifying assumptions, the predictions have generally correlated with field data from instrumented wellheads, however, the field data are rather limited. To gain an insight into the behavior of three-dimensional arrays of cavities and to obtain a larger data base for the verification of analytical simulations of creep closure, a series of six centrifuge simulation experiments were performed using a cylindrical block of modeling clay, a creeping material. Three of the simulations were conducted with single, centerline cavities, and three were conducted with a symmetric array of three cavities surrounding a central cavity. The models were subjected to body force loading using a centrifuge. For the single cavity experiments, the models were tested at accelerations of 100, 125 and 150 g's for 2 hours. For the multi-cavity experiments, the simulations were conducted at 100 g's for 3.25 hours. The results are analyzed using dimensional analyses. The analyses illustrate that the centrifuge simulations yield self-consistent simulations of the creep closure of fluid-filled cavities and that the interaction of three-dimensional cavity layouts can be investigated using this technique.

  18. Accelerator cavities as a probe of millicharged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gies, H. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Jaeckel, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    We investigate Schwinger pair production of millicharged fermions in the strong electric field of cavities used for particle accelerators. Even without a direct detection mechanism at hand, millicharged particles, if they exist, contribute to the energy loss of the cavity and thus leave an imprint on the cavity's quality factor. Already conservative estimates substantially constrain the electric charge of these hypothetical particles; the resulting bounds are competitive with the currently best laboratory bounds which arise from experiments based on polarized laser light propagating in a magnetic field. We propose an experimental setup for measuring the electric current comprised of the millicharged particles produced in the cavity. (orig.)

  19. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, D.A.

    1977-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality.

  20. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, D.A.

    1977-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality

  1. Investigation on computation of elliptical microwave plasma cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiaoli; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Kai

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, the advance of the elliptical resonant cavity and focus cavity is known by many people. There are homogeneous and multipatternal virtues in the focus dimensional microwave field of the elliptical resonant cavity. It is very suitable for applying the low power microwave biological effect equipment. However, when designing the elliptical resonant cavity may meet the problems of complex and huge computation need to be solved. This paper proposed the simple way of approximate processing the Mathieu function. It can greatly simplify the difficulty and decrease the scale of computation. This method can satisfy the requirements of research and development within project permitted precision.

  2. Fabrication process for the PEP II RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, R.M.; Rimmer, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Schwarz, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1997-06-05

    This paper presents the major steps used in the fabrication of the 26 RF Cavities required for the PEP-II B-factory. Several unique applications of conventional processes have been developed and successfully implemented: electron beam welding (EBW), with minimal porosity, of .75 inch (19 mm) copper cross-sections; extensive 5-axis milling of water channels; electroplating of .37 inch (10 mm) thick OFE copper; tuning of the cavity by profiling beam noses prior to final joining with the cavity body; and machining of the cavity interior, are described here.

  3. Multipactor in crossed rf fields on the cavity equator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Shemelin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multipactor discharge in an accelerating superconducting elliptic cavity occurs usually near its equator. As simulations show, the dimensions of the trajectories of multipacting electrons are very small compared to the dimensions of a cavity. This feature gives a way for solving explicit equations of motion instead of cumbersome simulations. Electric and magnetic fields near the cavity equator are presented in a form of expansions up to the third power of coordinates. Comparisons with numerical calculations of fields made with the SLANS code for the TESLA cavity cells, as well as with the analytical solution for a spherical cavity, are done. These fields are used for solving the equations of motion of electrons in crossed rf fields near the equator. Based on the analysis of these equations, general features of multipacting in this area are obtained. Results are compared with simulations and experimental data. The experimental formulas for multipacting zones are explained and their dependence on the cavity geometries is shown. Because of small sizes of electron trajectories, the influence of the weld seams is taken into account. This suggests a possible explanation of multipacting in a cavity which was not found by simulations. The developed approach allows evaluation of multipacting in a cavity without its simulations but after an analysis of fields in the equatorial region. These fields can be computed by any code used for cavity calculation.

  4. Internalization of Calcium Oxalate Calculi Developed in Narrow Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fèlix Grases

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a patient with calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate calculi occluded in cavities. All those calculi were located inside narrow cavities covered with a thin epithelium that permits their visualization. Urinary biochemical analysis showed high calciuria, not hypercalciuria, hypocitraturia, and a ratio [calcium]/[citrate] >0.33. The existence of cavities of very low urodynamic efficacy was decisive in the formation of such calculi. It is important to emphasize that we observed a thin epithelium covering such cavities, demonstrating that this epithelium may be formed after the development of the calculi through a re-epithelialization process.

  5. Cavity characterization for general use in linear electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Neto, M.V. de.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to is to develop measurement techniques for the characterization of microwave cavities used in linear electron accelerators. Methods are developed for the measurement of parameters that are essential to the design of an accelerator structure using conventional techniques of resonant cavities at low power. Disk-loaded cavities were designed and built, similar to those in most existing linear electron accelerators. As a result, the methods developed and the estimated accuracy were compared with those from other investigators. The results of this work are relevant for the design of cavities with the objective of developing linear electron accelerators. (author) [pt

  6. A novel nano-sensor based on optomechanical crystal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yeping; Ai, Jie; Ma, Jingfang

    2017-10-01

    Optical devices based on new sensing principle are widely used in biochemical and medical area. Nowadays, mass sensing based on monitoring the frequency shifts induced by added mass in oscillators is a well-known and widely used technique. It is interesting to note that for nanoscience and nanotechnology applications there is a strong demand for very sensitive mass sensors, being the target a sensor for single molecule detection. The desired mass resolution for very few or even single molecule detection, has to be below the femtogram range. Considering the strong interaction between high co-localized optical mode and mechanical mode in optomechanical crystal (OMC) cavities, we investigate OMC splitnanobeam cavities in silicon operating near at the 1550nm to achieve high optomechanical coupling rate and ultra-small motion mass. Theoretical investigations of the optical and mechanical characteristic for the proposed cavity are carried out. By adjusting the structural parameters, the cavity's effective motion mass below 10fg and mechanical frequency exceed 10GHz. The transmission spectrum of the cavity is sensitive to the sample which located on the center of the cavity. We conducted the fabrication and the characterization of this cavity sensor on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) chip. By using vertical coupling between the tapered fiber and the SOI chip, we measured the transmission spectrum of the cavity, and verify this cavity is promising for ultimate precision mass sensing and detection.

  7. Nylon Sleeve for Cavity Amplifier Holds Tuning Despite Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Lloyd

    1964-01-01

    The problem: Detuning of cavity amplifiers with change in temperature. This results in deterioration of the performance of the amplifier at its design frequency. In cavity amplifiers and filters it is desirable that constant performance be maintained regardless of thermal changes. These changes often cause an "off resonance shift" in a cavity filter and a deterioration of performance in a cavity amplifier. The solution: Mount the tuning probe in a nylon sleeve. Thermal expansion and contraction of the nylon nullifies unwanted capacitive and inductive changes in the resonant elements.

  8. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  9. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  10. Ring cavity for a Raman capillary waveguide amplifir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, N.A.

    1981-01-27

    A regenerative ring amplifier and regenerative ring oscillator are described which function to feed back a portion of the Stokes signal to complete the ring cavity. The ring cavity configuration allows the CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal and Stokes signal to copropagate through the Raman capillary waveguide amplifier. A Raman capillary waveguide amplifier is also provided in the return leg of the ring cavity to increase gain without increasing the round trip time. Additionally, the ring cavity can be designed such that the amplified Stokes signal is synchronous with the mode-locked spikes of the incoming CO/sub 2/ laser pump signal.

  11. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  12. HOM frequency control of SRF cavity in high current ERLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2018-03-01

    The acceleration of high-current beam in Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities is a challenging but essential for a variety of advanced accelerators. SRF cavities should be carefully designed to minimize the High Order Modes (HOM) power generated in the cavities by the beam current. The reduction of HOM power we demonstrate in a particular case can be quite large. This paper presents a method to systematically control the HOM resonance frequencies in the initial design phase to minimize the HOM power generation. This method is expected to be beneficial for the design of high SRF cavities addressing a variety of Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) applications.

  13. Demonstration of an optical enhancement cavity with 10 micron wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, K.; Washio, M.; Endo, A.

    2015-05-01

    We have been developing a pulsed-laser optical enhancement cavity for laser-Compton scattering (LCS). LCS can produce high brightness X-ray through the collision between relativistic electrons generated from the accelerator and high power laser photons with a compact facility. In order to increase the number of collisions/sec, high repetition rate accelerator and laser are required. For the laser system, an optical enhancement cavity is the most powerful tool for LCS, thus we have been developing the cavity for storing 1 micron laser pulse. On the other hand, the resulting X-ray energy can be changed by the collision laser wavelength. If we have another optical cavity with different wavelength, the multicolor, quasi-monochromatic, high brightness and compact X-ray source can be realized. Therefore, we started to develop an optical cavity at 10 micron wavelength with CO2 laser. At this wavelength region, the absorption loss is dominant compared with scattering loss. Thus we carefully chose the optical mirrors for enhancement cavity. We demonstrated a more than 200 enhancement factor with 795 finesse optical cavity at 10 micron CO2 laser. Moreover, 2.3 kW storage in the optical cavity was successfully demonstrated. The design of optical cavity, first experimental results and future prospects will be presented at the conference.

  14. Perfect routing of quantum information in regular cavity QED networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Naghi; Rudsary, Sobhan Kazemi; Salmasi, Bahram Ahansaz

    2013-12-01

    We introduce a scheme for perfect routing of quantum states and entanglement in regular cavity QED networks. The couplings between the cavities are quasi-uniform and each cavity is doped with a two-level atom. Quasi-uniform couplings leads the system to evolve in invariant subspaces. Combination the evolutions of the system in its invariant subspaces with quite simple local operations on atoms in the networks, gives the perfect routing of quantum states and entanglement through the network. To provide the protocol be robust due to decoherence arisen from photon loss, the field mode of the cavities are only virtually excited.

  15. Rf drive system for the CEBAF superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fugitt, J.A.; Moore, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain the maximum accelerating gradient, the CEBAF RF system uses an individually controlled RF drive chain for each superconducting cavity. This allows one to adjust each cavity to its individual maximum field. Due to material purity and manufacturing tolerances of the cavities, it is expected that this maximum value will be distributed over an almost 2 to 1 gradient range. The requirement for precise individual phase and gradient control of 420 superconducting accelerating cavities, is accomplished through the use of individual fault tolerant RF drive chains and self monitoring control electronics. This might be thought of as the Phased Array approach to accelerator RF systems

  16. In vivo comparison of cavity disinfection efficacy with APF gel, Propolis, Diode Laser, and 2% chlorhexidine in primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V.M. Uday Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The survival of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART restorations would be enhanced if near total elimination of cariogenic microorganisms could be done in the process of cavity cleaning before placing a restoration. Thus, use of disinfecting agents for achieving this goal could herald a new beginning in the field of contemporary dentistry. Aim: To assess and compare the cavity disinfection efficacy of APF gel, Brazilian Propolis, Diode Laser, and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX. Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized, single blinded, parallel grouped, active controlled trial. Eighty primary molars in 68 children with cavitated dentinal occlusal caries were randomly assigned into four groups (20 teeth each Group I: APF gel; Group II: Propolis; Group III: Diode Laser, and Group IV: 2% CHX (control. After cavity preparation using ART procedure, dentinal samples collected before and after disinfection with respective agent of the group. These samples were subjected to microbiological evaluation, for total viable count (TVC on blood agar, Streptococcus mutans on mutans-sanguis (MS agar, and Lactobacilli (LB on Rogosa agar. Results: Intragroup comparison (Wilcoxon signed rank test showed significant reductions in TVC, MS, and LB counts in all the groups. Pairwise Mann–Whitney test showed APF gel had least bacterial reductions among the agents tested. Conclusion: This study illustrated the need for cavity disinfection. Diode Laser and Brazilian Propolis are equally effective as 2% CHX in cavity disinfection.

  17. Efeito da quercetina nas atividades fosfatasicas e seu efeito protetor na hepatotoxicidade induzida pelo acetaminofeno em camundongos

    OpenAIRE

    Camila de Andrade Camargo

    2007-01-01

    Resumo: Os flavonóides são fitocompostos polifenólicos, caracterizados quimicamente como heterosídeos flavônicos. Apresentam diversas atividades biológicas devido às suas propriedades antioxidantes e habilidades em modular a atividade de diversas enzimas ou receptores celulares, tornando-os responsáveis pelo efeito protetor contra doenças relacionadas ao sistema cardiovascular; certas formas de câncer e doenças de fotossensibilidade e envelhecimento. As fosfatases ácidas, enzimas que hidrolis...

  18. Efeito priming entre figuras de partes do corpo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Felipe Santos de

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Um estímulo visual (letra, palavra ou objeto pode ter um efeito duradouro sobre o processamento de estímulos subsequentes. Neste trabalho, investigamos o efeito priming de figuras de mãos humanas (esquerda/direita, vista palmar/dorsal sobre o Tempo de Reação Manual (TRM em uma tarefa usando as mesmas figuras como estímulo alvo. Os pares de figuras podiam ser iguais ou não, de acordo com parâmetros como lateralidade ou vista. Três experimentos foram realizados (lateralidade, vista e cor. Neles, a figura de uma mão não-informativa era apresentada por 200 ms no centro de uma tela de computador. Após 1000ms, uma segunda mão era apresentada no mesmo local até a resposta, a qual consistia em pressionar o interruptor esquerdo ou o direito dependendo da lateralidade (Exp. I, da vista (Exp. II ou da cor (Exp. III do estímulo alvo. Os resultados mostraram que a apresentação prévia da figura de uma mão influencia o TRM ao segundo estímulo apenas quando a seleção da resposta é baseada em uma característica corporal (lateralidade ou vista

  19. Cavity-type hypersonic phononic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, A; Fytas, G; Pennec, Y; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Yanagishita, T; Masuda, H; Knoll, W

    2012-01-01

    We report on the engineering of the phonon dispersion diagram in monodomain anodic porous alumina (APA) films through the porosity and physical state of the material residing in the nanopores. Lattice symmetry and inclusion materials are theoretically identified to be the main factors which control the hypersonic acoustic wave propagation. This involves the interaction between the longitudinal and the transverse modes in the effective medium and a flat band characteristic of the material residing in the cavities. Air and filled nanopores, therefore, display markedly different dispersion relations and the inclusion materials lead to a locally resonant structural behavior uniquely determining their properties under confinement. APA films emerge as a new platform to investigate the rich acoustic phenomena of structured composite matter. (paper)

  20. Compact and highly efficient laser pump cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jim J.; Bass, Isaac L.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1999-01-01

    A new, compact, side-pumped laser pump cavity design which uses non-conventional optics for injection of laser-diode light into a laser pump chamber includes a plurality of elongated light concentration channels. In one embodiment, the light concentration channels are compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) which have very small exit apertures so that light will not escape from the pumping chamber and will be multiply reflected through the laser rod. This new design effectively traps the pump radiation inside the pump chamber that encloses the laser rod. It enables more uniform laser pumping and highly effective recycle of pump radiation, leading to significantly improved laser performance. This new design also effectively widens the acceptable radiation wavelength of the diodes, resulting in a more reliable laser performance with lower cost.

  1. Photon momentum and optical forces in cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, the electromagnetic field momentum in material media has been under debate in the Abraham-Minkowski controversy as convincing arguments have been advanced in favor of both the Abraham and Minkowski forms of photon momentum. Here we study the photon momentum and optical...... forces in cavity structures in the cases of dynamical and steady-state fields. In the description of the single-photon transmission process, we use a field-kinetic one-photon theory. Our model suggests that in the medium photons couple with the induced atomic dipoles forming polariton quasiparticles...... with the Minkowski form momentum. The Abraham momentum can be associated to the electromagnetic field part of the coupled polariton state. The polariton with the Minkowski momentum is shown to obey the uniform center of mass of energy motion that has previously been interpreted to support only the Abraham momentum...

  2. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) task is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic chemical sensing techniques and apply them to detecting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Our primary application is detecting signatures of WMD production, but LWIR CES techniques are also capable of detecting chemical weapons. The LWIR CES task is concerned exclusively with developing novel point sensors; stand-off detection is addressed by other PNNL tasks and projects. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on LWIR CES sensor development.

  3. Miniature Cavity-Enhanced Diamond Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidrosos, Georgios; Wickenbrock, Arne; Bougas, Lykourgos; Leefer, Nathan; Wu, Teng; Jensen, Kasper; Dumeige, Yannick; Budker, Dmitry

    2017-10-01

    We present a highly sensitive miniaturized cavity-enhanced room-temperature magnetic-field sensor based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. The magnetic resonance signal is detected by probing absorption on the 1042-nm spin-singlet transition. To improve the absorptive signal the diamond is placed in an optical resonator. The device has a magnetic-field sensitivity of 28 pT /√{Hz } , a projected photon shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 22 pT /√{Hz } , and an estimated quantum projection-noise-limited sensitivity of 0.43 pT /√{Hz } with the sensing volume of ˜390 μ m ×4500 μ m2 . The presented miniaturized device is the basis for an endoscopic magnetic-field sensor for biomedical applications.

  4. Climate Modeling: Ocean Cavities below Ice Shelves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Mark Roger [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division

    2016-09-12

    The Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME), a new initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy, includes unstructured-mesh ocean, land-ice, and sea-ice components using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) framework. The ability to run coupled high-resolution global simulations efficiently on large, high-performance computers is a priority for ACME. Sub-ice shelf ocean cavities are a significant new capability in ACME, and will be used to better understand how changing ocean temperature and currents influence glacial melting and retreat. These simulations take advantage of the horizontal variable-resolution mesh and adaptive vertical coordinate in MPAS-Ocean, in order to place high resolution below ice shelves and near grounding lines.

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeloev, B.; Kirkegaard, J.; Hansen, H.S.; Copenhagen Univ. Hospital

    1990-01-01

    Three hundred and four patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity were treated at the Finsen Institute in cooperation with the ENT-surgical departments between 1978 and 1982. The primary treatment consisted of radiotherapy alone in 74%, surgery alone in 4%, and a combination of radiotherapy and surgery in 15% of the patients. 2% received other treatment (cryotherapy), 5% did not complete the planned radiotherapy, and 1% were not treated at all. Of 203 patients with tumour remnant or first recurrence, 45% were operated, 2% received radiotherapy, and 2% combined treatment. This treatment strategy made 38% of the patients free of disease in the follow-up period (3 1/2 to 8 years) or until the patients died from other causes. Fifty-nine percent of the patients died from their oral carcinomas. Tumour size (T), lymph node status (N), and tumour stage were as expected important prognostic factors. (orig.)

  6. Quantum quincunx in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Tregenna, Ben; Knight, Peter L.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the quantum quincunx, which physically demonstrates the quantum walk and is analogous to Galton's quincunx for demonstrating the random walk by employing gravity to draw pellets through pegs on a board, thereby yielding a binomial distribution of final peg locations. In contradistinction to the theoretical studies of quantum walks over orthogonal lattice states, we introduce quantum walks over nonorthogonal lattice states (specifically, coherent states on a circle) to demonstrate that the key features of a quantum walk are observable albeit for strict parameter ranges. A quantum quincunx may be realized with current cavity quantum electrodynamics capabilities, and precise control over decoherence in such experiments allows a remarkable decrease in the position noise, or spread, with increasing decoherence

  7. The splitring loaded RF-cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eckhard; Klein, Horst

    1984-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical work was done on the splitring loaded resonant rf-cavity. Formulae are derived for the determination of the resonance frequencies, Rp-value and shunt impedance dependent on the resonator geometry. The calculations were verified by experiments carried out by the authors as well as by measurements reported in literature. The theoretical and experimental optimizations were incorporated in a construction of a normal-conducting section laid out for a resonance frequency of 108 MHz, a particle velocity corresponding to β = v/ c = 0.057 and with an Rp-value of 14.5 MΩ producing an acceleration voltage of 1 MV. This resonator is part of a small postaccelerator, installed at the Frankfurt single-ended 7 MV CN Van de Graaff generator and has been tested with a particle beam.

  8. Electronic cigarette explosions involving the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rebecca; Hicklin, David

    2016-11-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is a rapidly growing trend throughout the United States. E-cigarettes have been linked to the risk of causing explosion and fire. Data are limited on the associated health hazards of e-cigarette use, particularly long-term effects, and available information often presents conflicting conclusions. In addition, an e-cigarette explosion and fire can pose a unique treatment challenge to the dental care provider because the oral cavity may be affected heavily. In this particular case, the patient's injuries included intraoral burns, luxation injuries, and alveolar fractures. This case report aims to help clinicians gain an increased knowledge about e-cigarette design, use, and risks; discuss the risk of spontaneous failure and explosion of e-cigarettes with patients; and understand the treatment challenges posed by an e-cigarette explosion. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Air riding seal with purge cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Thomas D; Mills, Jacob A

    2017-08-15

    An air riding seal for a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is axial moveable within an annular piston chamber formed in a stator of the turbine and forms a seal with a surface on the rotor using pressurized air that forms a cushion in a pocket of the annular piston. A purge cavity is formed on the annular piston and is connected to a purge hole that extends through the annular piston to a lower pressure region around the annular piston or through the rotor to an opposite side. The annular piston is sealed also with inner and outer seals that can be a labyrinth seal to form an additional seal than the cushion of air in the pocket to prevent the face of the air riding seal from overheating.

  10. Cavity Microwave Searches for Cosmological Axions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    The lecture will cover the searches for dark matter axions based on the microwave cavity experiment of Sikivie. The topics will begin with a brief overview of halo dark matter, and the axion as a candidate. The principle of resonant conversion of axions in an external magnetic field will be described, and practical considerations in optimizing the experiment as a signal-to-noise problem. A major focus of the lecture will be the two complementary strategies for ultra-low noise detection of the microwave photons - the "photon-as-wave" approach (i.e. conventional heterojunction amplifiers and soon quantum-limited SQUID devices), and "photon-as-particle" (i.e. Rydberg-atom single-quantum detection). Experimental results will be presented; these experiments have already reached well into the range of sensitivity to exclude plausible axion models, for limited ranges of mass. The lecture will conclude with a discussion of future plans and challenges for the microwave ca...

  11. Cavity optomechanics in gallium phosphide microdisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Matthew; Barclay, Paul E.; Hryciw, Aaron C.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate gallium phosphide (GaP) microdisk optical cavities with intrinsic quality factors >2.8 × 10 5 and mode volumes 3 , and study their nonlinear and optomechanical properties. For optical intensities up to 8.0 × 10 4 intracavity photons, we observe optical loss in the microcavity to decrease with increasing intensity, indicating that saturable absorption sites are present in the GaP material, and that two-photon absorption is not significant. We observe optomechanical coupling between optical modes of the microdisk around 1.5 μm and several mechanical resonances, and measure an optical spring effect consistent with a theoretically predicted optomechanical coupling rate g 0 /2π∼30 kHz for the fundamental mechanical radial breathing mode at 488 MHz

  12. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  13. Isolation of intact sub-dermal secretory cavities from Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodger Jason QD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biosynthesis of plant natural products in sub-dermal secretory cavities is poorly understood at the molecular level, largely due to the difficulty of physically isolating these structures for study. Our aim was to develop a protocol for isolating live and intact sub-dermal secretory cavities, and to do this, we used leaves from three species of Eucalyptus with cavities that are relatively large and rich in essential oils. Results Leaves were digested using a variety of commercially available enzymes. A pectinase from Aspergillus niger was found to allow isolation of intact cavities after a relatively short incubation (12 h, with no visible artifacts from digestion and no loss of cellular integrity or cavity contents. Several measurements indicated the potential of the isolated cavities for further functional studies. First, the cavities were found to consume oxygen at a rate that is comparable to that estimated from leaf respiratory rates. Second, mRNA was extracted from cavities, and it was used to amplify a cDNA fragment with high similarity to that of a monoterpene synthase. Third, the contents of the cavity lumen were extracted, showing an unexpectedly low abundance of volatile essential oils and a sizeable amount of non-volatile material, which is contrary to the widely accepted role of secretory cavities as predominantly essential oil repositories. Conclusions The protocol described herein is likely to be adaptable to a range of Eucalyptus species with sub-dermal secretory cavities, and should find wide application in studies of the developmental and functional biology of these structures, and the biosynthesis of the plant natural products they contain.

  14. Commensal communism and the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, B; Wilson, M

    1998-09-01

    The world we live in contains unimaginable numbers of bacteria, and these and other single-celled creatures represent the major diversity of life on our planet. During the last decade or so, the complexity and intimacy of the interactions which occur between bacteria and host eukaryotic cells during the process of infection have begun to emerge. The study of such interactions is the subject of the new discipline of cellular microbiology. This intimacy of bacteria/host interactions creates a major paradox. The average human being is 90% bacteria in terms of cell numbers. These bacteria constitute the commensal or normal microflora and populate the mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and the surface of the skin. In bacterial infections, much of the pathology is due to the release of a range of bacterial components (e.g., modulins such as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, DNA, molecular chaperones), which induce the synthesis of the local hormone-like molecules known as pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, such components must also be constantly released by the vast numbers of bacteria constituting the normal microflora and, as a consequence, our mucosae should constantly be in a state of inflammation. This is patently not the case, and a hypothesis is forwarded to account for this "commensal paradox", namely, that our commensal bacteria and mucosal surfaces exist in a state of bio-communism, forming a unified "tissue" in which interactions between bacteria and epithelia are finely balanced to ensure bacterial survival and prevent the induction of damaging inflammation. Evidence is emerging that bacteria can produce a variety of proteins which can inhibit the synthesis/release of inflammatory cytokines. The authors predict that such proteins are simply one part of an extensive signaling system which occurs between bacteria and epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces such as those found in the oral cavity.

  15. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  16. Preparation of metallic uranium tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, G.; Decours, J.

    1964-01-01

    The production furnace is an induction heated vacuum furnace having a capacity at the moment of 250 kg. Previously the crucible was heated by the inductor, the mould being outside the inductor. The tubes thus produced contained cavities, the alloy structure was fine; this was cold-mould casting, At the moment the top of the moulds are pre-heated, this is the so called hot-mould casting. This method has the advantage of eliminating the cavities but leads to a less fine microstructure. The alloy used for the 18 x 40 mm and 23 x 43 mm tubes is U-Mo (1.1 per cent). Since the moulds are now heated at the top, the solidification of the metal is very slow in this zone leading to a pronounced γ grain, whereas towards the base the faster cooling leads to a smaller γ grain. The γ structure depends essentially on the solidification rate and on the time spent in this zone. In order to obtain a fine and homogeneous grain along the whole length of the tube, a controlled cooling treatment is effected. It consists in heating the uranium tubes in the γ place and then in cooling them at a rate of between 20 and 50 deg C/mm down to 400 deg C. The 77 x 95 mm and 54 x 70 mm annular elements are at the moment being produced for research purposes. Their preparation is similar to that of 18 x 40 mm and 23 x 43 mm elements. The 77 x 95 mm tubes are at the moment made from U-Cr alloy (0.1 per cent); because of their size, their preparation is carried out in 600 mm diameter furnaces. (authors) [fr

  17. Dynamic resonance of light in Fabry-Perot cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhmanov, M.; Savage, R.L.; Reitze, D.H.; Tanner, D.B.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of light in Fabry-Perot cavities with varying length and input laser frequency are analyzed. At high frequencies, the response to length variations is very different from the response to laser frequency variations. Implications for kilometer-scale Fabry-Perot cavities such as those utilized in gravitational-wave detectors are discussed

  18. Short Note Ground cavity nest temperatures and their relevance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blue Swallows Hirundo atrocaerulea are Critically Endangered within South Africa. They nest in natural underground holes in mist-belt grasslands. Temperature dataloggers were used to record ground cavity nest (Tn) and ambient temperature (Ta) for one artificial and 11 natural Blue Swallow nests. Mean ground cavity Tn ...

  19. Toward more accurate loss tangent measurements in reentrant cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, R. D.

    1980-05-01

    Karpova has described an absolute method for measurement of dielectric properties of a solid in a coaxial reentrant cavity. His cavity resonance equation yields very accurate results for dielectric constants. However, he presented only approximate expressions for the loss tangent. This report presents more exact expressions for that quantity and summarizes some experimental results.

  20. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  1. Analysis of adiabatic transfer in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A three-level atom in a configuration trapped in an optical cavity forms a basic unit in a number of proposed protocols for quantum information processing. This system allows for efficient storage of cavity photons into long-lived atomic excitations, and their retrieval with high fidelity, in an adiabatic transfer process through ...

  2. Ultrafast Dynamics of Vibration-Cavity Polariton Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owrutsky, Jeff; Dunkelberger, Adam; Fears, Kenan; Simpkins, Blake; Spann, Bryan

    Vibrational modes of polymers, liquids, and solvated compounds can couple to Fabry-Perot optical cavity modes, creating vibration-cavity polariton modes whose energy tunes with the cavity length and incidence angle. Here we report the pump-probe infrared spectroscopy of vibration-cavity polaritons in cavity-coupled W(CO)6. At very early times, we observe quantum beating between the two polariton states find an anomalously low degree of excitation. After the quantum beating, we directly observe spectroscopic signatures of excited-state absorption from both polariton modes and uncoupled reservoir modes. An analytical expression for cavity transmission reproduces these signatures. The upper polariton mode relaxes ten times more quickly than the uncoupled vibrational mode and the polariton lifetime depends on the angle of incidence of the infrared pulses. Coupling to an optical cavity gives a means of control of the lifetime of vibration-cavity polaritons and could have important implications for chemical reactivity in vibrationally excited molecules.

  3. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  4. Manufacturing of the L band 9-cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Masanori; Ohkubo, Kohichi; Yamanaka, Toshiyuki; Kako, Eiji; Saito, Kenji; Shishido, Toshio; Ono, Masaaki; Noguchi, Shuichi.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1990, L-band niobium superconducting cavities have been developed with collaboration between our company and National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK). The manufacturing procedure and the performance of 9-cell superconducting cavity are presented. The maximum accelerating gradient of 12 MV/m was attained in a cold test. (author)

  5. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopic System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad Bin Saud

    2015-05-14

    A system and method for cavity ring-down spectroscopy can include a pulsed quantum cascade laser, an optical ring-down cavity, a photodetector, and an oscilloscope. The system and method can produce pulse widths of less than 200 ns with bandwidths greater than 300 pm, as well as provide temporal resolution of greater than 10 .mu.s.

  6. Tree structure and cavity microclimate: implications for bats and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Matthew J; Castleberry, Steven B

    2013-05-01

    It is widely assumed that tree cavity structure and microclimate affect cavity selection and use in cavity-dwelling bats and birds. Despite the interest in tree structure and microclimate, the relationship between the two has rarely been quantified. Currently available data often comes from artificial structures that may not accurately represent conditions in natural cavities. We collected data on tree cavity structure and microclimate from 45 trees in five cypress-gum swamps in the Coastal Plain of Georgia in the United States in 2008. We used hierarchical linear models to predict cavity microclimate from tree structure and ambient temperature and humidity, and used Aikaike's information criterion to select the most parsimonious models. We found large differences in microclimate among trees, but tree structure variables explained 80% of variation common to all trees. We argue that the determinants of microclimate are complex and multidimensional, and therefore cavity microclimate cannot be deduced easily from simple tree structures. Furthermore, we found that daily fluctuations in ambient conditions strongly affect microclimate, indicating that greater weather fluctuations will cause greater differences among tree cavities.

  7. [Stafne's cavity. Review and apropos of 6 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau Cases, J; Gay Escoda, C; Hernández Alfaro, F

    1991-02-01

    A retrospective study of 6 cases of Stafne's static cavities is presented in a review of 1536 cases of maxillary cysts. We have found an incidence 4:2 for men. All cases have been detected casually. The sialography show a relationship between cavities and the submaxillary gland. The treatment was surgical in four cases and conservative in two.

  8. On unsteady reacting flow in a channel with a cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Ø. Sand

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem investigated is the stability of a flame anchored by recirculation within a channel with a cavity, acting as a two-dimensional approximation to a gas turbine combustion chamber. This is related to experiments of Vaneveld, Hom and Oppenheim (1982. The hypothesis studied is that hydrodynamic oscillations within the cavity can lead to flashback.

  9. A generic travelling wave solution in dissipative laser cavity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-09

    Sep 9, 2016 ... Abstract. A large family of cosh-Gaussian travelling wave solution of a complex Ginzburg–Landau equation. (CGLE), that describes dissipative semiconductor laser cavity is derived. Using perturbation method, the stabil- ity region is identified. Bifurcation analysis is done by smoothly varying the cavity loss ...

  10. Single-cell LEP-type cavity on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    A single-cell cavity, made of copper, with tapered connectors for impedance measurements. It was used as a model of LEP-type superconducting cavities, to investigate impedance and higher-order modes and operated at around 600 MHz (the LEP acceleration frequency was 352.2 MHz). See 8202500.

  11. Integral storage-bulb and microwave cavity for masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V. S.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanically-stable integral storage-bulb/microwave cavity made out of single piece of fused quartz improves frequency stability. Single-piece construction eliminates joints, making cavity dimensionally and hence frequency-stable. Fused quartz is used because of its low thermal expansion coefficient.

  12. Biological and chemical characteristics of the coral gastric cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Casareto, B. E.; Yoshinaga, K.; Nakano, Y.; Fujimura, H.

    2012-03-01

    All corals have a common structure: two tissue layers enclose a lumen, which forms the gastric cavity. Few studies have described the processes occurring inside the gastric cavity and its chemical and biological characteristics. Here, we show that the coral gastric cavity has distinct chemical characteristics with respect to dissolved O2, pH, alkalinity, and nutrients (vitamin B12, nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, and phosphate) and also harbors a distinct bacterial community. From these results, the gastric cavity can be described as a semi-closed sub-environment within the coral. Dissolved O2 shows very low constant concentrations in the deepest parts of the cavity, creating a compartmentalized, anoxic environment. The pH is lower in the cavity than in the surrounding water and, like alkalinity, shows day/night variations different from those of the surrounding water. Nutrient concentrations in the cavity are greater than the concentrations found in reef waters, especially for phosphate and vitamin B12. The source of these nutrients may be internal production by symbiotic bacteria and/or the remineralization of organic matter ingested or produced by the corals. The importance of the bacteria inhabiting the gastric cavity is supported by the finding of a high bacterial abundance and a specific bacterial community with affiliation to bacteria found in other corals and in the guts of other organisms. The findings presented here open a new area of research that may help us to understand the processes that maintain coral health.

  13. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Milorad [Warrenville, IL; Johnson, Rolland P [Newport News, VA

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  14. High pressure discharges in cavities formed by microfabrication techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, B.A.; Cammack, D.A.; Pinker, R.D.; Racz, J.

    1997-01-01

    High pressure discharges are the basis of small high intensity light sources. In this work, we demonstrate the formation of high pressure discharges, in cavities formed by applying micromachining and integrated circuit techniques to quartz substrates. Cavities containing varying amounts of mercury and argon were fabricated to obtain high pressure discharges. A high pressure mercury discharge was formed in the electrodeless cavities by exciting them with a microwave source, operating at 2.45 GHz and in the electroded cavities by applying a dc voltage. The contraction of the discharge into a high pressure arc was observed. A broad emission spectrum due to self-absorption and collisions between excited atoms and normal atoms, typical of high pressure mercury discharges, was measured. The light output and efficacy increased with increasing pressure. The measured voltage was used to estimate the pressure within the electroded cavities, which is as high as 127 atm for one of the two cavities discussed in this work. Efficacies over 40 lumens per watt were obtained for the electrodeless cavities and over 50 scr(l)m/W for the electroded cavities. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  15. Nasal cavity of the farmed african catfish Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nasal cavity microanatomy of farmed fingerlings of African catfish, Clarias gariepunus was investigated to fill existing knowledge gap on its histology from available literatures. This becomes very important as no gustatory cell was reported from previous researches on the fingerling digestive tract. A slice of nasal cavity of ...

  16. Effect of resin coating on dentin bonding of resin cement in Class II cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shamim; Nikaido, Toru; Matin, Khairul; Ogata, Miwako; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of resin coating on the regional microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of a resin cement to the dentin walls of Class II cavities. Twenty mesio-occlusal cavities were prepared in human molars. In 10 cavities, a resin coating consisting of a self-etching primer bonding system, Clearfil SE Bond, and a low-viscosity microfilled resin, Protect Liner F, was applied. The other 10 teeth served as a non-coating group. After impression taking and temporization, they were kept in water for one day. Composite inlays were then cemented with a dual-cure resin cement, Panavia F 2.0, and stored in water for one day. Thereafter, MTBSs were measured. Two-way ANOVA (p=0.05) revealed that the MTBS of resin cement to dentin was influenced by resin coating, but not by regional difference. In conclusion, application of a resin coating to the dentin surface significantly improved the MTBS in indirect restorations.

  17. Analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie; Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas; Cook, Russell; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Liepe, Matthias; Pellin, Michael; Zasadzinski, John

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of Nb 3 Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb 3 Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T c ) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb 3 Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb 3 Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T c regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb 3 Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators

  18. Fabrication and Characterization of Plasmonic Nanopores with Cavities in the Solid Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Malekian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanostructures are widely used for various sensing applications by monitoring changes in refractive index through optical spectroscopy or as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. However, in most practical situations conventional surface plasmon resonance is preferred for biomolecular interaction analysis because of its high resolution in surface coverage and the simple single-material planar interface. Still, plasmonic nanostructures may find unique sensing applications, for instance when the nanoscale geometry itself is of interest. This calls for new methods to prepare nanoscale particles and cavities with controllable dimensions and curvature. In this work, we present two types of plasmonic nanopores where the solid support underneath a nanohole array has been etched, thereby creating cavities denoted as ‘nanowells’ or ‘nanocaves’ depending on the degree of anisotropy (dry or wet etch. The refractometric sensitivity is shown to be enhanced upon removing the solid support because of an increased probing volume and a shift of the asymmetric plasmonic field towards the liquid side of the finite gold film. Furthermore, the structures exhibit different spectral changes upon binding inside the cavities compared to the gold surface, which means that the structures can be used for location-specific detection. Other sensing applications are also suggested.

  19. Polarisation dynamics of a birefringent Fabry-Perot cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlli, A.; Della Valle, F.; Zavattini, G.

    2018-02-01

    Optical Fabry-Perot cavities always show a non-degeneracy of two orthogonal polarisation states. This is due to the unavoidable birefringence of dielectric mirrors whose effects are extremely important in Fabry-Perot-based high-accuracy polarimeters: in birefringent cavities, ellipticities and rotations mix. We have developed and present here a theory of the polarisation state dynamics in a birefringent Fabry-Perot resonator, and we validate it through measurements performed with the polarimeter of the PVLAS experiment. The measurements are performed while a laser is frequency-locked to the cavity, and provide values for the phase difference between the two orthogonal polarisation components introduced by the combination of the two cavity mirrors (equivalent wave-plate) and for the finesse of the cavity. The theoretical formulas and the experimental data agree well showing that the consequences of the mirror birefringence must be taken into account in this and in any other similar experiment.

  20. Dependence of transmon qubit relaxation rate on cavity photon population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhada, S. O.; Shankar, S.; Liu, Y.; Hatridge, M.; Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    In circuit QED experiments, a qubit is dispersively coupled to a cavity such that the cavity frequency depends on the qubit state. This dispersive shift enables quantum non-demolition readout of the qubit by exciting the cavity with a microwave pulse and detecting the phase shift of the reflected signal. However, this cavity excitation has been observed in experiments to increase the qubit relaxation rate, hence demolishing the qubit state and limiting the maximum measurement strength. Here we experimentally study this effect in a transmon qubit coupled to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity. We also explore alternate qubit circuits designed to mitigate this demolition effect. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.