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Sample records for cavity frequency doubling

  1. Quantum frequency doubling based on tripartite entanglement with cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Guo; Zhi-Feng, Wei; Su-Ying, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the entanglement characteristics of three harmonic modes, which are the output fields from three cavities with an input tripartite entangled state at fundamental frequency. The entanglement properties of the input beams can be maintained after their frequencies have been up-converted by the process of second harmonic generation. We have calculated the parametric dependences of the correlation spectrum on the initial squeezing factor, the pump power, the transmission coefficient, and the normalized analysis frequency of cavity. The numerical results provide references to choose proper experimental parameters for designing the experiment. The frequency conversion of the multipartite entangled state can also be applied to a quantum communication network. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91430109), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20111401110004), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014011005-3).

  2. Threshold for strong thermal dephasing in periodically poled KTP in external cavity frequency doubling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundeman, Jesper Holm; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    We present a measurement series of the efficiency of periodically poled KTP used for second-harmonic generation in an external phase-locked cavity. Due to the high absorption (0.01 cm^−1) in the PPKTP crystal at the pump wavelength a strong thermal dephasing of the periodically poled grating...

  3. A high-finesse Fabry–Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled green laser for precision Compton polarimetry at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhman, A., E-mail: rahim@ornl.gov [Syracuse University, Department of Physics, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Research Accelerator Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hafez, M. [Old Dominion University, Applied Research Center, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Nanda, S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Benmokhtar, F. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Camsonne, A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Cates, G.D. [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Dalton, M.M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Franklin, G.B. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Friend, M. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Michaels, R.W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Nelyubin, V. [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Parno, D.S. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics and Department of Physics, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Paschke, K.D. [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Quinn, B.P. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); and others

    2016-06-21

    A high-finesse Fabry–Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled continuous wave green laser (532 nm) has been built and installed in Hall A of Jefferson Lab for high precision Compton polarimetry. The infrared (1064 nm) beam from a ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier seeded by a Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator laser is frequency doubled in a single-pass periodically poled MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} crystal. The maximum achieved green power at 5 W infrared pump power is 1.74 W with a total conversion efficiency of 34.8%. The green beam is injected into the optical resonant cavity and enhanced up to 3.7 kW with a corresponding enhancement of 3800. The polarization transfer function has been measured in order to determine the intra-cavity circular laser polarization within a measurement uncertainty of 0.7%. The PREx experiment at Jefferson Lab used this system for the first time and achieved 1.0% precision in polarization measurements of an electron beam with energy and current of 1.06 GeV and 50 μA.

  4. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  5. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  6. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  7. Frequency doubling crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Francis; Velsko, Stephan P.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic approach to the production of frequency conversion crystals is described in which a chiral molecule has attached to it a "harmonic generating unit" which contributes to the noncentrosymmetry of the molecule. Certain preferred embodiments of such harmonic generating units include carboxylate, guanadyly and imidazolyl units. Certain preferred crystals include L-arginine fluoride, deuterated L-arginine fluoride, L-arginine chloride monohydrate, L-arginine acetate, dithallium tartrate, ammonium N-acetyl valine, N-acetyl tyrosine and N-acetyl hydroxyproline. Chemical modifications of the chiral molecule, such as deuteration, halogenation and controlled counterion substitution are available to adapt the dispersive properties of a crystal in a particular wavelength region.

  8. Cavity Control and Panel Control Strategies in Double-Panel Structures for Transmitted Noise Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, J.; Kalverboer, J.; Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation and comparisons of the cavity control and the panel control in a double-panel structure are presented in this paper. The double-panel structure, which comprises two panels with air in the gap, provides the advantages of low sound-transmission at high frequency, low heat-transmission

  9. Design, prototyping and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Binping; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdú-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    A novel design of superconducting Crab Cavity was proposed and designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The new cavity shape is a Double Quarter Wave or DQWCC. After fabrication and surface treatments, the niobium proof-of-principle cavity was cryogenically tested in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service for the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The electromagnetic properties of the cavity are also well matched for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the requirement for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC of 3.34 MV. In this paper we present the design, prototyping and test results of the DQWCC.

  10. Efficient 525 nm laser generation in single or double resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shilong; Han, Zhenhai; Liu, Shikai; Li, Yinhai; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Shi, Baosen

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a study into highly efficient sum frequency generation from 792 and 1556 nm wavelength light to 525 nm wavelength light using either a single or double resonant ring cavity based on a periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystal (PPKTP). By optimizing the cavity's parameters, the maximum power achieved for the resultant 525 nm laser was 263 and 373 mW for the single and double resonant cavity, respectively. The corresponding quantum conversion efficiencies were 8 and 77% for converting 1556 nm photons to 525 nm photons with the single and double resonant cavity, respectively. The measured intra-cavity single pass conversion efficiency for both configurations was about 5%. The performances of the sum frequency generation in these two configurations was studied and compared in detail. This work will provide guidelines for optimizing the generation of sum frequency generated laser light for a variety of configurations. The high conversion efficiency achieved in this work will help pave the way for frequency up-conversion of non-classical quantum states, such as the squeezed vacuum and single photon states. The proposed green laser source will be used in our future experiments, which includes a plan to generate two-color entangled photon pairs and achieve the frequency down-conversion of single photons carrying orbital angular momentum.

  11. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhihui; Fu Shinian

    2015-01-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 500 kW in the China Spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase Ⅱ, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 m long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting coupled cavity linac (CCL) structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to the TE mode structure and has a smaller transverse dimension compared with that of the TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the drift tube Linac (DTL) section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between the charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it has larger velocity acceptance compared with the double frequency TH structures. The superconducting section consists of 14 periods, each of which includes 3 superconducting cavities encapsulated in one cryomodule and a doublet in room temperate. The general considerations on cavity and beam dynamics design are discussed and the main results are presented. (authors)

  12. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  13. Double diffusion in arbitrary porous cavity: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, N. Ameer; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum

    2017-07-01

    Double diffusion refers to the heat and mass transfer that takes place simultaneously. The current work highlights the double diffusion when a solid block is placed at the bottom of a square porous cavity. The whole cavity is filed with saturated porous medium except the small block placed at the bottom left corner of the domain. The left vertical surface of porous cavity is maintained at concentration Ch and right vertical surface possesses lowest concentration Cc in the porous domain. The results are discussed in terms of isotherms, iso-concentration and streamlines inside the domain for various physical parameters. It is seen that the mass transfer is substantially different in present case as compared to the case of natural convection.

  14. Entangling movable mirrors in a double cavity system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinard, Michel; Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Vitali, David

    2005-01-01

    We propose a double-cavity set-up capable of generating a stationary entangled state of two movable mirrors at cryogenic temperatures. The scheme is based on the optimal transfer of squeezing of input optical fields to mechanical vibrational modes of the mirrors, realized by the radiation pressure...

  15. Sound transmission loss of double plates with an air cavity between them in a rigid duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Sil; Kim, Sang-Ryul; Lee, Seong-Hyun; Seo, Yun-Ho; Ma, Pyung-Sik

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the sound transmission loss (STL) of thin double plates with an air cavity between them in a rigid duct is considered using an analytical approach. The vibration motion of the plate and sound pressure field are expanded in terms of an infinite series of the modal functions. Under the plane wave condition, a low frequency solution is derived by including the first few symmetric modes. It is determined that the peak frequencies of the double plates coincide with those of each single plate. When the two plates are identical, the STL becomes zero at the natural frequencies of the single plate. However, when the two plates are not identical, the STL is always greater than zero. The location and amplitude of the dips are investigated using an approximate solution when the cavity depth is very small. It is observed that dividing the single plate into two plates with an air cavity in between degrades the STL in the low frequency range, while the equivalent surface mass density is preserved. However, when the cavity depth is not small, the STL of the single plate can be smaller than that of the double plates.

  16. HOM frequency control of SRF cavity in high current ERLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2018-03-01

    The acceleration of high-current beam in Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities is a challenging but essential for a variety of advanced accelerators. SRF cavities should be carefully designed to minimize the High Order Modes (HOM) power generated in the cavities by the beam current. The reduction of HOM power we demonstrate in a particular case can be quite large. This paper presents a method to systematically control the HOM resonance frequencies in the initial design phase to minimize the HOM power generation. This method is expected to be beneficial for the design of high SRF cavities addressing a variety of Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) applications.

  17. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binping Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity’s electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  18. Microwave Detection of Electron-Phonon Interactions in a Cavity-Coupled Double Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartke, T. R.; Liu, Y.-Y.; Gullans, M. J.; Petta, J. R.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum confinement leads to the formation of discrete electronic states in quantum dots. Here we probe electron-phonon interactions in a suspended InAs nanowire double quantum dot (DQD) that is electric-dipole coupled to a microwave cavity. We apply a finite bias across the wire to drive a steady state population in the DQD excited state, enabling a direct measurement of the electron-phonon coupling strength at the DQD transition energy. The amplitude and phase response of the cavity field exhibit oscillations that are periodic in the DQD energy level detuning due to the phonon modes of the nanowire. The observed cavity phase shift is consistent with theory that predicts a renormalization of the cavity center frequency by coupling to phonons.

  19. Dielectric supported radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, David U. L.; Lee, Terry G.

    2000-01-01

    A device which improves the electrical and thermomechanical performance of an RF cavity, for example, in a disk-loaded accelerating structure. A washer made of polycrystalline diamond is brazed in the middle to a copper disk washer and at the outer edge to the plane wave transformer tank wall, thus dissipating heat from the copper disk to the outer tank wall while at the same time providing strong mechanical support to the metal disk. The washer structure eliminates the longitudinal connecting rods and cooling channels used in the currently available cavities, and as a result minimizes problems such as shunt impedance degradation and field distortion in the plane wave transformer, and mechanical deflection and uneven cooling of the disk assembly.

  20. Calculation of mechanical vibration frequencies of stiffened superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.J.; Spalek, G.

    1992-01-01

    We calculated the frequencies of transverse and longitudinal mechanical-vibration modes of the HEPL- modified, CERN/DESY four-cell superconducting cavity, using finite-element techniques. We compared the results of these calculations, including the stiffening of the cavity with rods, with mode frequencies measured at HEPL. The correlation between data was significant. The same techniques were also used to design and optimize the stiffening scheme for the seven-cell 805-MHz superconducting cavity being developed at Los Alamos. In this report, we describe the final stiffening scheme and the results of our calculations

  1. Cavity design for single-frequency Yb:YAB microchip lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.; Dawes, J.M.; Piper, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have proposed a cavity configuration for compact, stable, single-frequency operation in Yb:YAB. Modelling of the cavity output in the infrared and green has shown that sufficient mode discrimination can be achieved within the tuning range of the crystal. Experiments are planned to demonstrate efficient single longitudinal mode infrared operation of the devices that can be extended to include the self-frequency-doubled output. Details of the modelling and preliminary results will be presented at the conference

  2. High bandwidth frequency lock of a rigid tunable optical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millo, Jacques; Merzougui, Mourad; Di Pace, Sibilla; Chaibi, Walid

    2014-11-10

    In this paper, we present a high bandwidth frequency lock of a rigid tunable Fabry Perot cavity based on a set of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuators. The cavity spacer was specifically designed such that the frequency of the first resonance of the whole assembly under PZT excitation is above 35 kHz, thus allowing a servo-loop bandwidth of 13 kHz. It is demonstrated that no significant noise is added by the cavity to the output beam with respect to the input beam over the servo-loop bandwidth. This cavity can be used as a pre-mode cleaner in interferometric gravitational wave detectors such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo.

  3. Surface processing for bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. P.; Reid, T.

    2017-04-01

    The majority of niobium cavities for superconducting particle accelerators continue to be fabricated from thin-walled (2-4 mm) polycrystalline niobium sheet and, as a final step, require material removal from the radio frequency (RF) surface in order to achieve performance needed for use as practical accelerator devices. More recently bulk niobium in the form of, single- or large-grain slices cut from an ingot has become a viable alternative for some cavity types. In both cases the so-called damaged layer must be chemically etched or electrochemically polished away. The methods for doing this date back at least four decades, however, vigorous empirical studies on real cavities and more fundamental studies on niobium samples at laboratories worldwide have led to seemingly modest improvements that, when taken together, constitute a substantial advance in the reproducibility for surface processing techniques and overall cavity performance. This article reviews the development of niobium cavity surface processing, and summarizes results of recent studies. We place some emphasis on practical details for real cavity processing systems which are difficult to find in the literature but are, nonetheless, crucial for achieving the good and reproducible cavity performance. New approaches for bulk niobium surface treatment which aim to reduce cost or increase performance, including alternate chemical recipes, barrel polishing and ‘nitrogen doping’ of the RF surface, continue to be pursued and are closely linked to the requirements for surface processing.

  4. Frequency Doubling Broadband Light in Multiple Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, William J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2000-01-01

    The authors compare frequency doubling of broadband light in a single nonlinear crystal with doubling in five crystals with intercrystal temporal walk off compensation, and with doubling in five crystals adjusted for offset phase matching frequencies. Using a plane-wave, dispersive numerical model of frequency doubling they study the bandwidth of the second harmonic and the conversion efficiency as functions of crystal length and fundamental irradiance. For low irradiance the offset phase matching arrangement has lower efficiency than a single crystal of the same total length but gives a broader second harmonic bandwidth. The walk off compensated arrangement gives both higher conversion efficiency and broader bandwidth than a single crystal. At high irradiance, both multicrystal arrangements improve on the single crystal efficiency while maintaining broad bandwidth

  5. Effects of cavity-cavity interaction on the entanglement dynamics of a generalized double Jaynes-Cummings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Mahasweta; Das, Sreetama; Singha Roy, Sudipto; Shekhar Dhar, Himadri; Sen, Ujjwal

    2018-02-01

    We consider a generalized double Jaynes-Cummings model consisting of two isolated two-level atoms, each contained in a lossless cavity that interact with each other through a controlled photon-hopping mechanism. We analytically show that at low values of such a mediated cavity-cavity interaction, the temporal evolution of entanglement between the atoms, under the effects of cavity perturbation, exhibits the well-known phenomenon of entanglement sudden death (ESD). Interestingly, for moderately large interaction values, a complete preclusion of ESD is achieved, irrespective of its value in the initial atomic state. Our results provide a model to sustain entanglement between two atomic qubits, under the adverse effect of cavity induced perturbation, by introducing a non-intrusive inter-cavity photon exchange that can be physically realized through cavity-QED setups in contemporary experiments.

  6. Frequency of HPV in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Priscila Marinho; Có, Anna Clara Gregório; Azevedo, Pedro Leite; do Valle, Isabella Bittencourt; de Oliveira, Karine Gadioli; Gouvea, Sônia Alves; Cordeiro-Silva, Melissa Freitas; Louro, Iúri Drummond; de Podestá, José Roberto Vasconcelos; Lenzi, Jeferson; Sena, Agenor; Mendonça, Elismauro Francisco; von Zeidler, Sandra Lúcia Ventorin

    2018-03-27

    The prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) varies widely. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of high-risk HPV DNA in a large Brazilian cohort of patients with oral cavity SCC. Biopsy and resected frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens of oral cavity SCC were available from 101 patients who were recruited at two Brazilian centres. Stringent measures with respect to case selection and prevention of sample contamination were adopted to ensure reliability of the data. Nested PCR using MY09/MY11 and GP5 + /GP6 + as well as PGMY09/11 L1 consensus primers were performed to investigate the presence of HPV DNA in the tumours. HPV-positive cases were subjected to direct sequencing. Shapiro-Wilk and Student t test were used to evaluate data normality and to compare the means, respectively. Qualitative variables were analysed by logistic regression. Our results demonstrate that the frequency of high-risk HPV types in oral cavity SCC is very low and is less than 4%. All HPV-positive cases were HPV16. In addition, our results do not show a significant association between the tumour clinical features and the risk factors (tobacco, alcohol and HPV) for oral cavity SCC. In the current study, we observed an overlapping pattern of risk factors that are related to tumour development. This, along with a low frequency of high-risk HPV DNA, supports the findings that HPV is not involved in the genesis of oral cavity SCC in Brazilian population.

  7. Overlapping double potential wells in a single optical microtube cavity with vernier-scale-like tuning effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, A.; Schmidt, O. G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Bolaños Quiñones, V. A.; Ma, L. B., E-mail: l.ma@ifw-dresden.de; Jorgensen, M. R. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Miao, S. D. [Anhui Key Lab of Controllable Chemical Reaction and Material Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Tunxi Road. 193, Hefei, Anhui 230009 (China)

    2016-04-25

    Spatially and temporally overlapping double potential wells are realized in a hybrid optical microtube cavity due to the coexistence of an aggregate of luminescent quantum dots embedded in the tube wall and the cone-shaped tube's geometry. The double potential wells produce two independent sets of optical modes with different sets of mode numbers, indicating phase velocity separation for the modes overlapping at the same frequency. The overlapping mode position can be tuned by modifying the tube cavity, where these mode sets shift with different magnitudes, allowing for a vernier-scale-like tuning effect.

  8. Analytical & Experimental Study of Radio Frequency Cavity Beam Profile Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2017-10-22

    The purpose of this analytical and experimental study is multifold: 1) To explore a new, radiation-robust, hadron beam profile monitor for intense neutrino beam applications; 2) To test, demonstrate, and develop a novel gas-filled Radio-Frequency (RF) cavity to use in this monitoring system. Within this context, the first section of the study analyzes the beam distribution across the hadron monitor as well as the ion-production rate inside the RF cavity. Furthermore a more effecient pixel configuration across the hadron monitor is proposed to provide higher sensitivity to changes in beam displacement. Finally, the results of a benchtop test of the tunable quality factor RF cavity will be presented. The proposed hadron monitor configuration consists of a circular array of RF cavities located at a radial distance of 7cm { corresponding to the standard deviation of the beam due to scatering { and a gas-filled RF cavity with a quality factor in the range 400 - 800.

  9. Frequency control of RF booster cavity in TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Laverty, M.

    1993-01-01

    A booster is used in the TRIUMF cyclotron to increase the energy gain per turn for beam orbits corresponding to energies greater than 370 MeV. It operates at 92.24 MHz, the 4 th harmonic of the cyclotron main rf, and at a nominal voltage of 150 kV. Excitation is provided by a 90 kW rf system that is phase locked to the main rf. When the main rf is interrupted due to sparking or other causes, a controller built into the low frequency source of the booster rf system disables the phase-locked loop, and reconfigures the source as a temperature stabilized oscillator operating at the last locked frequency. When the cyclotron rf is restored it usually will be at different frequency. The oscillator tunes automatically to this new frequency. The acquisition time is extended by the controller to match the response time of the mechanical tuner in the cavity

  10. Transmission loss of orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structures with cavity absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2011-04-01

    The transmission loss of sound through infinite orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structures having cavity-filling fibrous sound absorptive materials is theoretically investigated. The propagation of sound across the fibrous material is characterized using an equivalent fluid model, and the motions of the rib-stiffeners are described by including all possible vibrations, i.e., flexural displacements, bending, and torsional rotations. The effects of fluid-structure coupling are account for by enforcing velocity continuity conditions at fluid-panel interfaces. By taking full advantage of the periodic nature of the double-panel, the space-harmonic approach and virtual work principle are applied to solve the sets of resultant governing equations, which are eventually truncated as a finite system of simultaneous algebraic equations and numerically solved insofar as the solution converges. To validate the proposed model, a comparison between the present model predictions and existing numerical and experimental results for a simplified version of the double-panel structure is carried out, with overall agreement achieved. The model is subsequently employed to explore the influence of the fluid-structure coupling between fluid in the cavity and the two panels on sound transmission across the orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structure. Obtained results demonstrate that this fluid-structure coupling affects significantly sound transmission loss (STL) at low frequencies and cannot be ignored when the rib-stiffeners are sparsely distributed. As a highlight of this research, an integrated optimal algorithm toward lightweight, high-stiffness and superior sound insulation capability is proposed, based on which a preliminary optimal design of the double-panel structure is performed.

  11. Laser cooling of beryllium ions using a frequency-doubled 626 nm diode laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozijn, F.M.J.; Biesheuvel, J.; Flores, A.S.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Blume, G.; Wicht, A.; Paschke, K.; Erbert, G.; Koelemeij, J.C.J.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate laser cooling of trapped beryllium ions at 313 nm using a frequency-doubled extended cavity diode laser operated at 626 nm, obtained by cooling a ridge waveguide diode laser chip to -31°C. Up to 32 mW of narrowband 626 nm laser radiation is obtained. After passage through an optical

  12. Frequencies of Transverse and Longitudinal Oscillations in Supersonic Cavity Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Handa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A supersonic flow over a rectangular cavity is known to oscillate at certain predominant frequencies. The present study focuses on the effect of the cavity length-to-depth (L/D ratio on the frequency for a free-stream Mach number of 1.7. The pressure oscillations are measured by changing the L/D ratio from 0.5 to 3.0, and the power spectral density is calculated from the temporal pressure signals for each L/D ratio. The results demonstrate that the spectral peaks for an L/D ratio of less than ~1 and greater than ~2 are accounted for by the feedback mechanisms of the transverse and longitudinal oscillations, respectively. The results also demonstrate that the spectral peaks in the transition (1 <~ L/D <~ 2 are accounted for by either of the two feedback mechanisms of transverse and longitudinal oscillations; that is, the flows under the transition regime oscillate both transversely and longitudinally.

  13. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Artoos, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Capelli, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Carra, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Leuxe, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Kuder, N. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zanoni, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ratti, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  14. High frequency generation in the corona: Resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, I. C.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2018-03-01

    Aims: Null points are prominent magnetic field singularities in which the magnetic field strength strongly decreases in very small spatial scales. Around null points, predicted to be ubiquitous in the solar chromosphere and corona, the wave behavior changes considerably. Null points are also responsible for driving very energetic phenomena, and for contributing to chromospheric and coronal heating. In previous works we demonstrated that slow magneto-acoustic shock waves were generated in the chromosphere propagate through the null point, thereby producing a train of secondary shocks escaping along the field lines. A particular combination of the shock wave speeds generates waves at a frequency of 80 MHz. The present work aims to investigate this high frequency region around a coronal null point to give a plausible explanation to its generation at that particular frequency. Methods: We carried out a set of two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in the neighborhood of a null point located in the corona. We varied both the amplitude of the driver and the atmospheric properties to investigate the sensitivity of the high frequency waves to these parameters. Results: We demonstrate that the wave frequency is sensitive to the atmospheric parameters in the corona, but it is independent of the strength of the driver. Thus, the null point behaves as a resonant cavity generating waves at specific frequencies that depend on the background equilibrium model. Moreover, we conclude that the high frequency wave train generated at the null point is not necessarily a result of the interaction between the null point and a shock wave. This wave train can be also developed by the interaction between the null point and fast acoustic-like magneto-acoustic waves, that is, this interaction within the linear regime.

  15. Double diffusion in arbitrary porous cavity: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, N. Ameer; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Salman Ahmed N., J.; Soudagar, Manzoor Elahi M.; Khan, T. M. Yunus

    2017-07-01

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium is one of the fundamental topics of interest. The present article is dedicated to study the effect of a small block placed at center of left vertical surface of the cavity. The block is maintained at isothermal temperature That three of its edges attached with porous medium. The left surface of cavity is maintained at highest concentration and right surface at lowest concentration. The right surface of cavity is at cold isothermal temperature Tc. Governing equations are converted into matrix form of equations with the help of finite element method and solved iteratively by using a computer code generated in MATLAB.

  16. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  17. Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission from quantum cascades inside mirror-grating metal cavities at THz frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Yanko; Sagnes, Isabelle; Abram, Izo; Minot, Christophe

    2007-11-30

    Quantum cascade devices processed into double metal cavities with subwavelength thickness and a grating on top are studied at terahertz frequencies. The power extracted from the devices as a function of the device thickness and the grating period is analyzed owing to electrodynamical modeling of dipole emission based on a modal method in multilayer systems. The experimental data thus reveal a strong Purcell enhancement, with Purcell factors up to approximately 50.

  18. Frequency tuning and stability of Nd:YVO4 in a dual coupled cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P. L.; Pedersen, Christian; Buchhave, Preben

    1996-01-01

    previously been demonstrated using dual coupled linear cavity. Frequency tuning versus temperature and cavity length of a coupled cavity Nd:YVO4 have been investigated and compared to those of a non-planar monolithic, unidirectional Nd:YAG ring laser. A way to extend the tuning range by design of the air......Frequency tuning and stability properties of single- and multi-cavity designs have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. Special attention is paid to a dual coupled cavity single-frequency diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YVO4 laser crystal. 350 mW single frequency output power has...... to crystal length ratio is proposed. Finally the long term frequency stability of both lasers has been measured. The stability of the lasers are presented through the Allan variance of the frequency fluctuations....

  19. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiangao; Shao, Mingzhen; Zeng, Xiaoqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances ...

  20. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  1. Generation of single-frequency tunable green light in a coupled ring tapered diode laser cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    in the broad wavelength range from 1049 nm to 1093 nm and the beam propagation factor is improved from M2 = 2.8 to below 1.1. The laser frequency is automatically locked to the cavity resonance frequency using optical feedback. Furthermore, we show that this adaptive external cavity approach leads to efficient...

  2. Active control of turbulent boundary layer-induced sound transmission through the cavity-backed double panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of active control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound transmission through the cavity-backed double panels. The aerodynamic model used is based on the Corcos wall pressure distribution. The structural-acoustic model encompasses a source panel (skin panel), coupled through an acoustic cavity to the radiating panel (trim panel). The radiating panel is backed by a larger acoustic enclosure (the back cavity). A feedback control unit is located inside the acoustic cavity between the two panels. It consists of a control force actuator and a sensor mounted at the actuator footprint on the radiating panel. The control actuator can react off the source panel. It is driven by an amplified velocity signal measured by the sensor. A fully coupled analytical structural-acoustic model is developed to study the effects of the active control on the sound transmission into the back cavity. The stability and performance of the active control system are firstly studied on a reduced order model. In the reduced order model only two fundamental modes of the fully coupled system are assumed. Secondly, a full order model is considered with a number of modes large enough to yield accurate simulation results up to 1000 Hz. It is shown that convincing reductions of the TBL-induced vibrations of the radiating panel and the sound pressure inside the back cavity can be expected. The reductions are more pronounced for a certain class of systems, which is characterised by the fundamental natural frequency of the skin panel larger than the fundamental natural frequency of the trim panel.

  3. A dual-loss-modulated intra-cavity frequency-doubled Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:Lu0.15Y0.85VO4/KTP green laser with a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber and an acousto-optic modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Gang; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Cheng, Kang; Han, Chao; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    By using both a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) and an acousto-optic (AO) modulator, a dual-loss-modulated intra-cavity frequency-doubled Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:Lu 0.15 Y 0.85 VO 4 /KTP (KTiOPO 4 ) green laser was demonstrated for the first time. The QML green laser characteristics such as the pulse width and single-pulse energy have been measured for different modulation frequencies of the AO modulator (f p ). In particular, in comparison with the solely passively QML green laser with an SWCNT-SA, the dual-loss-modulated QML green laser can generate a more stable pulse train, a shorter pulse width of the Q-switched envelope, a greater pulse energy and a higher average peak power. For the dual-loss-modulated QML green laser, at a pump power of 7.9 W and a repetition rate of 10 kHz, the pulse width and the pulse energy of the Q-switch envelope and the average peak power of the QML green laser are 50 ns, 20.34 µJ and 15.5 kW, respectively, corresponding to a pulse width compression of 77%, a pulse energy improvement factor of six times and a QML peak power increase factor of 16 times when compared with those for the solely passively QML green laser. The experimental results show that the dual-loss modulation is an efficient method for the generation of a stable QML green laser with an SWCNT-SA

  4. Mechanical design of RFQ resonator cavities in the 400-MHz frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.; Potter, J.M.; Wilson, N.G.

    1981-01-01

    Many RFQ resonator-cavity design concepts have been proposed in the 400-MHz frequency range. Los Alamos has been evaluating RFQ resonator-cavity designs that provide acceptable combinations of necessary mechanical features, easy tunability and long-term stability. Four RFQ resonator test cavities have been fabricated to test rf joints between the RFQ vanes and the resonator cavity. Two of these joints (the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint) allow vane movement for tuning. These test data, and the design of the present generation of RFQ resonator cavities, are presented

  5. Frequency doubling perimetry using a liquid crystal display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, P G; Gibbs, M L; Johnson, C A; Howard, D L

    2001-03-01

    To compare frequency doubling contrast thresholds using a new liquid crystal window display with those obtained with the commercial video-based Frequency Doubling Technology perimeter. One eye of 49 glaucoma patients and one eye of 49 normal controls were tested with the liquid crystal window and Frequency Doubling Technology systems. Both displays employed identical stimulus conditions and test strategies, although the dynamic range of the liquid crystal window-based display was approximately 30% smaller than that of the Frequency Doubling Technology system. Measurements were repeated using the video-based Frequency Doubling Technology perimeter in a subset of 21 eyes. Relationships between and within displays were assessed using a chance-corrected agreement measure (quadratic weighted kappa) and paired measurement differences. Variability was quantified using standard deviation from the mean paired measurement difference. Over the restricted operating range of the liquid crystal display system, between-display and within-video display variability was 2.3 dB and 3.2 dB, respectively, between-display agreement was 0.66, and within-display agreement (test-retest for Frequency Doubling Technology) was 0.65. Levels of agreement and variability between the two frequency doubling displays were of similar magnitude to repeated (test-retest) Frequency Doubling Technology measures, suggesting that contrast threshold measurements made using the two displays may be used interchangeably. However, the operating range of the current liquid crystal window-based display is smaller.

  6. Fundamental Frequency Tuning and Its Influence on LHC 200MHz ACN Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Tückmantel, Joachim; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LHC Division

    2001-01-01

    To study the influence of the tuner on the fundamental mode frequency, the Q factor as well as the shunt impedance of the LHC 200MHz ACN cavities, 3D simulations have been done in the frequency domain using MAFIA. Curves giving the variation of RF frequency and other RF parameters with tuner position relative to the inner surface of the cavity have been obtained for the fundamental mode. This paper details the simulation results.

  7. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  8. Chaos-based communications using semiconductor lasers subject to feedback from an integrated double cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tronciu, V Z; Mirasso, Claudio R; Colet, Pere [Instituto de Fisica Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos (IFISC) CSIC-UIB, Campus Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)], E-mail: vasile@ifisc.uib.es

    2008-08-14

    We report the results of numerical investigations of the dynamical behaviour of an integrated device composed of a semiconductor laser and a double cavity that provides optical feedback. Due to the influence of the feedback, under the appropriate conditions, the system displays chaotic behaviour appropriate for chaos-based communications. The optimal conditions for chaos generation are identified. It is found that the double cavity feedback requires lower feedback strengths for developing high complexity chaos when compared with a single cavity. The synchronization of two unidirectional coupled (master-slave) systems and the influence of parameters mismatch on the synchronization quality are also studied. Finally, examples of message encoding and decoding are presented and discussed.

  9. Self-frequency doubling in a laser-active whispering-gallery resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Simon J; Folwill, Yannick; Buse, Karsten; Breunig, Ingo

    2017-07-01

    Lasing and self-frequency doubling are achieved in a millimeter-sized laser-active whispering-gallery resonator made of neodymium-doped lithium niobate. A low-cost 808-nm laser diode without external frequency stabilization is sufficient to pump the neodymium ions. Laser oscillation around 1.08 μm drives a frequency-doubling process within the same cavity providing green light. The electrical-optical efficiency of the system reaches up to 2×10 -4 . To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of combining lasing and χ (2) frequency conversion in a single high-Q whispering-gallery resonator. This approach is general and can be applied to other materials and other nonlinear optical processes.

  10. Conical Double Frequency Emission by Femtosecond Laser Pulses from DKDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi-Peng, Zhang; Hong-Bing, Jiang; Shan-Chun, Tang; Qi-Huang, Gong

    2009-01-01

    Conical double frequency emission is investigated by femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm in a DKDP crystal. It is demonstrated that the sum frequency of incident wave and its scattering wave accounts for the conical double frequency emission. The gaps on the conical rings are observed and they are very sensitive to the propagation direction, and thus could be used to detect the small angle deviation of surface direction. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  11. Resonance frequency control of RF normal conducting cavity using gradient estimator of reflected power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leewe, R.; Shahriari, Z.; Moallem, M.

    2017-10-01

    Control of the natural resonance frequency of an RF cavity is essential for accelerator structures due to their high cavity sensitivity to internal and external vibrations and the dependency of resonant frequency on temperature changes. Due to the relatively high radio frequencies involved (MHz to GHz), direct measurement of the resonant frequency for real-time control is not possible by using conventional microcontroller hardware. So far, all operational cavities are tuned using phase comparison techniques. The temperature dependent phase measurements render this technique labor and time intensive. To eliminate the phase measurement, reduce man hours and speed up cavity start up time, this paper presents a control theme that relies solely on the reflected power measurement. The control algorithm for the nonlinear system is developed through Lyapunov's method. The controller stabilizes the resonance frequency of the cavity using a nonlinear control algorithm in combination with a gradient estimation method. Experimental results of the proposed system on a test cavity show that the resonance frequency can be tuned to its optimum operating point while the start up time of a single cavity and the accompanied man hours are significantly decreased. A test result of the fully commissioned control system on one of TRIUMF's DTL tanks verifies its performance under real environmental conditions.

  12. Design and test of the microwave cavity in an optically-pumped Rubidium beam frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Yan-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a compact rubidium atomic beam frequency standard with optical pumping and detection. The cavity for microwave interrogation is an important part of the clock. The cavity in our design is a Ramsey-type, E-bend one, which is the same as the conventional method in most cesium beam clocks. Requirements for the design are proposed based on the frequency shift associated with the cavity. The basic structure of the cavity is given by theoretical analysis and detailed dimensions are determined by means of electromagnetic field simulation with the help of commercial software. The cavity is manufactured and fabricated successfully. The preliminary test result of the cavity is given, which is in good agreement with the simulation. The resonant frequency is 6.835 GHz, equal to the clock transition frequency of 87Rb, and the loaded quality factor is 500. These values are adjustable with posts outside the cavity. Estimations on the Ramsey line width and several frequency shifts are made. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174015).

  13. Coherent Phonon Rabi Oscillations with a High-Frequency Carbon Nanotube Phonon Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong; Wang, Xin-He; Kong, Wei-Cheng; Deng, Guang-Wei; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Jiang, Kai-Li; Dai, Xing-Can; Guo, Guang-Can; Nori, Franco; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2017-02-08

    Phonon-cavity electromechanics allows the manipulation of mechanical oscillations similar to photon-cavity systems. Many advances on this subject have been achieved in various materials. In addition, the coherent phonon transfer (phonon Rabi oscillations) between the phonon cavity mode and another oscillation mode has attracted many interest in nanoscience. Here, we demonstrate coherent phonon transfer in a carbon nanotube phonon-cavity system with two mechanical modes exhibiting strong dynamical coupling. The gate-tunable phonon oscillation modes are manipulated and detected by extending the red-detuned pump idea of photonic cavity electromechanics. The first- and second-order coherent phonon transfers are observed with Rabi frequencies 591 and 125 kHz, respectively. The frequency quality factor product fQ m ∼ 2 × 10 12 Hz achieved here is larger than k B T base /h, which may enable the future realization of Rabi oscillations in the quantum regime.

  14. Preparation and handling of surfaces for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloess, D.

    1988-01-01

    Fortunately, surface treatment for s.c. cavities knows only one simple rule. If one observes this rule strictly one will be successful, if not, one will fail! The rule is CLEANLINESS. This means: clean material (high purity niobium without inclusions), clean (analytical grade) polishing chemicals and solvents, ultraclean (semiconductor grade) rinsing water, ultraclean (class 100) assembly environment. In general, if one applies the same working practice as the semiconductor industry, one will produce surfaces that are less clean than silicon wafers, due to the shape of the cavity (an inner surface is much more difficult to clean than a flat wafer); due to its size and due to the material (niobium is hydrophilic which makes the water with all the dirt in it stick to the surface). 9 references

  15. The low frequency facility Fabry-Perot cavity used as a speed-meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Virgilio, A.; Braccini, S.; Ballardin, G.; Bradaschia, C.; Cella, G.; Cuoco, E.; Dattilo, V.; Fazzi, M.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Frasconi, F.; Giazotto, A.; Gennai, A.; Holloway, L.H.; La Penna, P.; Lomtadze, T.; Losurdo, G.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Poggiani, R.; Porzio, A.; Puppo, P.; Raffaelli, F.; Rapagnani, P.; Ricci, F.; Ricciardi, I.; Solimeno, S.; Stanga, R.; Vetrano, F.; Zhou, Z

    2003-09-15

    Fabry-Perot cavities have many different applications as scientific instruments. In the gravitational waves research field they are extensively used to frequency stabilize lasers and to measure very small distance variations. In the present Letter a method to evaluate from the transmitted power only the relative speed and position of the mirrors of a cavity, having finesse F>40, is described. A displacement spectral sensitivity of the order of about 3x10{sup -10} m/Hz{sup -1/2} at 10 Hz is obtained with the cavity of the low frequency facility.

  16. Development of a fast piezo-based frequency tuner for superconducting CH cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, a fast piezo-based frequency tuner for current and prospective superconducting (sc) CH-cavities has been developed. The novel tuning concept differs fundamentally from conventional tuning systems for superconducting cavities. So called dynamic bellow tuners are welded into the resonator to act against slow and fast frequency variations during operation. Because of their adjustable length it is possible to specifically influence the capacitance and therefore the resonance frequency of the cavity. To change the length of the dynamic bellow tuners the frequency tuner drive, which consists of a slow tuning device controlled by a stepper motor and a fast piezo-based tuning system, is mounted to the helium vessel of the cavity. To validate the whole tuning concept a frequency tuner drive prototype was built in the workshop of the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP) of Frankfurt University. First successful room temperature measurements show that the developed frequency tuning system is an excellent and promising candidate to fulfill the requirements of slow and fast frequency tuning of sc CH-cavities during operation. Furthermore, several coupled structural and electromagnetic simulations of the sc 325 MHz CH-cavity as well as the sc 217 MHz CH-cavity have been performed with the simulation softwares ANSYS Workbench and CST MicroWave Studio, respectively. With these simulations it was possible to reduce the required frequency range and thus the mechanical stroke of the dynamic bellow tuners on the one hand, and on the other hand the mechanical stability of the particular CH-cavity was investigated to avoid plastic deformations due to limiting external effects. To verify the accuracy of the coupled simulations the structural mechanical behaviour and the resulting frequency variations of the sc CH-cavities dependent on the external influences were measured at room temperature as well as at cryogenic temperatures around 4.2 K. The measurement results of both

  17. Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity Field Profile Analysis and Higher Order Mode Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Carlos [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Physics and Astronomy Dept.; Xiao, B. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Accelerator R and D Div.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Physics and Astronomy Dept.

    2014-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is underway for a major upgrade to increase its luminosity by an order of magnitude beyond its original design specifications. This novel machine configuration known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on various innovative technologies including very compact and ultra-precise superconducting crab cavities for beam rotation. A double quarter wave crab cavity (DQWCC) has been designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the HL-LHC. This cavity as well as the structural support components were fabricated and assembled at Niowave. The field profile of the crabbing mode for the DQWCC was investigated using a phase shift bead pulling technique and compared with simulated results to ensure proper operation or discover discrepancies from modeled results and/or variation in fabrication tolerances. Higher-Order Mode (HOM) characterization was also performed and correlated with simulations.

  18. Cooling the APS storage ring radio-frequency accelerating cavities: Thermal/stress/fatigue analysis and cavity cooling configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primdahl, K.; Kustom, R.

    1995-01-01

    The 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source positron storage ring requires sixteen separate 352-MHz radio-frequency (rf) accelerating cavities. Cavities are installed as groups of four, in straight sections used elsewhere for insertion devices. They occupy the first such straight section after injection, along with the last three just before injection. Cooling is provided by a subsystem of the sitewide deionized water system. Pumping equipment is located in a building directly adjacent to the accelerator enclosure. A prototype cavity was fabricated and tested where cooling was via twelve 19-mm-diameter [3/4 in] brazed-on tubes in a series-parallel flow configuration. Unfortunately, the thermal contact to some tubes was poor due to inadequate braze filler. Here, heat transfer studies, including finite-element analysis and test results, of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring 352-MHz rf accelerating cavities are described. Stress and fatigue life of the copper are discussed. Configuration of water cooling is presented

  19. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mother's bacteria from being passed to the child. Treatment of Cavities Fluoride Fillings Root canal or tooth extraction If ... to help the world be well. From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people ...

  20. Magnesium diboride on inner wall of copper tube: A test case for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenura K. Withanage

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Superconductor magnesium diboride is considered one of the viable materials to substitute bulk niobium for superconducting radio frequency cavities. Utilizing a MgB_{2} coating on the inner wall of a copper cavity will allow operation at higher temperatures (20–25 K than Nb cavities due to the high transition temperature of MgB_{2} (39 K and the high thermal conductivity of Cu. In this paper, we present results of MgB_{2} coating on Cu tubes with similar dimensions to a 3 GHz cavity, as the first step towards coating the actual cavity, using the hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition technique. The results show successful coating of a uniform MgB_{2} layer on the inner wall of the Cu tubes with T_{c} as high as 37 K.

  1. The fast piezo-based frequency tuner for sc CH-cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amberg, Michael [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (HIM), Mainz (Germany); IAP University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aulenbacher, Kurt; Barth, Winfried [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (HIM), Mainz (Germany); Busch, Marco; Dziuba, Florian; Podlech, Holger; Ratzinger, Ulrich [IAP University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Superconducting (sc) structures have to fulfill strict mechanical requirements to assure a stable operation of a cavity. Even small mechanical disturbances caused by effects like microphonic noise, pressure fluctuations of the liquid helium bath or Lorentz force detuning can change the resonance frequency of the cavity in the range of several hundred kHz. To control the slow and fast frequency variations during operation a compact frequency tuner prototype equipped with a stepper motor and a piezo actuator has been developed at the Institute for Applied Physics (IAP) of Frankfurt University. The tuner design and the results of first mechanical tests at room temperature of the first prototype are presented.

  2. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqi Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102. This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  3. Multiorder nonlinear diffraction in frequency doubling processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, Solomon M.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2009-01-01

    We analyze experimentally light scattering from 2 nonlinear gratings and observe two types of second-harmonic frequency-scattering processes. The first process is identified as Raman–Nath type nonlinear diffraction that is explained by applying only transverse phase-matching conditions. The angular...... position of this type of diffraction is defined by the ratio of the second-harmonic wavelength and the grating period. In contrast, the second type of nonlinear scattering process is explained by the longitudinal phase matching only, being insensitive to the nonlinear grating...

  4. Electromagnetic and mechanical design of gridded radio-frequency cavity windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsharo' a, Mohammad M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses of radio-frequency (RF) cavities were performed as part of a developmental RF cavity program for muon cooling. RF cavities are necessary to provide longitudinal focusing of the muons and to compensate for their energy loss. Closing the cavity ends by electrically conducting windows reduces the power requirement and increases the on-axis electric field for a given maximum surface electric field. Many factors must be considered in the design of RF cavity windows. RF heating can cause the windows to deform in the axial direction of the cavity. The resulting thermal stresses in the window must be maintained below the yield stress of the window material. The out-of-plane deflection must be small enough so that the consequent frequency shift is tolerable. For example, for an 805 MHz cavity, the out-of-plane deflection must be kept below 25 microns to prevent the frequency of the cavity from shifting more than 10 kHz. In addition, the window design should yield smooth electric and magnetic fields, terminate field leakage beyond the window, and minimize beam scattering. In the present thesis, gridded-tube window designs were considered because of their high structural integrity. As a starting point in the analysis, a cylindrical pillbox cavity was considered as a benchmark problem. Analytical and finite element solutions were obtained for the electric and magnetic fields, power loss density, and temperature profile. Excellent agreement was obtained between the analytical and finite element results. The finite element method was then used to study a variety of gridded-tube windows. It was found that cooling of the gridded-tube windows by passing helium gas inside the tubes significantly reduces the out-of-plane deflection and the thermal stresses. Certain tube geometries and grid patterns were found to satisfy all of the design requirements.

  5. Electromagnetic and mechanical design of gridded radio-frequency cavity windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharoa, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    Electromagnetic, thermal and structural analyses of radio-frequency (RF) cavities were performed as part of a developmental RF cavity program for muon cooling. RF cavities are necessary to provide longitudinal focusing of the muons and to compensate for their energy loss. Closing the cavity ends by electrically conducting windows reduces the power requirement and increases the on-axis electric field for a given maximum surface electric field. Many factors must be considered in the design of RF cavity windows. RF heating can cause the windows to deform in the axial direction of the cavity. The resulting thermal stresses in the window must be maintained below the yield stress of the window material. The out-of-plane deflection must be small enough so that the consequent frequency shift is tolerable. For example, for an 805 MHz cavity, the out-of-plane deflection must be kept below 25 microns to prevent the frequency of the cavity from shifting more than 10 kHz. In addition, the window design should yield smooth electric and magnetic fields, terminate field leakage beyond the window, and minimize beam scattering. In the present thesis, gridded-tube window designs were considered because of their high structural integrity. As a starting point in the analysis, a cylindrical pillbox cavity was considered as a benchmark problem. Analytical and finite element solutions were obtained for the electric and magnetic fields, power loss density, and temperature profile. Excellent agreement was obtained between the analytical and finite element results. The finite element method was then used to study a variety of gridded-tube windows. It was found that cooling of the gridded-tube windows by passing helium gas inside the tubes significantly reduces the out-of-plane deflection and the thermal stresses. Certain tube geometries and grid patterns were found to satisfy all of the design requirements

  6. Adaptive frequency comb illumination for interferometry in the case of nested two-beam cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harder, Irina; Leuchs, Gerd; Mantel, Klaus; Schwider, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    The homogeneity test of glass plates in a Fizeau interferometer is hampered by the superposition of multiple interference signals coming from the surfaces of the glass plate as well as the empty Fizeau cavity. To evaluate interferograms resulting from such nested cavities, various approaches such as the use of broadband light sources have been applied. In this paper, we propose an adaptive frequency comb interferometer to accomplish the cavity selection. An adjustable Fabry-Perot resonator is used to generate a variable frequency comb that can be matched to the length of the desired cavity. Owing to its flexibility, the number of measurements needed for the homogeneity test can be reduced to four. Furthermore, compared to approaches using a two-beam interferometer as a filter for the broadband light source, the visibility of the fringe system is considerably higher if a Fabry-Perot filter is applied.

  7. Design of radio-frequency cavities and Tera-Hertz electron injectors for advanced applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyedfakhari, Seyedmoein

    2016-06-01

    Design of three accelerator components including a buncher cavity for REGAE, a normal conducting cavity for arrival time stabilization at FLASH and ultra-fast guns for the AXSIS project is presented in this thesis. Using RF cavities caused a revolution in accelerators and made it possible to generate high energy particle beams. In advanced accelerators, cavities are not only used to increase the particle energy but they are also widely used to improve the beam quality and additionally for beam diagnostic purposes. In the present dissertation, such applications are discussed. First, design of a buncher cavity which compresses the bunch at the REGAE facility is presented. The design pursues improving the mode separation of the cavity. The simulation result illustrates that the difference between the operating mode and its adjacent mode has been increased from 2 MHz for the existing cavity to 9.5 MHz for the new design. In the second part, a normal conducting cavity is discussed, which will be used to regulate the arrival time ofthe bunches at FLASH and at the European XFEL. The designed cavity is able to correct the arrival time jitter of ± 150 fs in order to provide femtosecond precision synchronization between the electron beam and the external laser pulses. Thermal, wakefield and multipacting simulations have also been performed for the designed cavity in order to evaluate its operation efficiency. In advanced accelerators however RF cavities should be replaced by novel structures to accelerate the particles in shorter distances using higher operating frequency. To this end, ultra-fast guns are designed which will be discussed in the last part of this work. The designed guns accelerate the electrons from their rest mass up to 2 MeV using a single cycle THz signal with a total energy of 2 mJ.

  8. Contribution of thermal noise to frequency stability of rigid optical cavity via Hertz-linewidth lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notcutt, Mark; Ma, L.-S.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun; Hall, John L.

    2006-01-01

    We perform detailed studies of state-of-the-art laser stabilization to high finesse optical cavities, revealing fundamental mechanical thermal noise-related length fluctuations. We compare the frequency noise of lasers tightly locked to the resonances of a variety of rigid Fabry-Perot cavities of differing lengths and mirror substrate materials. The results are in agreement with the theoretical model proposed in K. Numata, A. Kemery, and J. Camp [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 250602 (2004)]. The results presented here on the fundamental limits of FP references will impact planning and construction of next generation ultrastable optical cavities

  9. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    OpenAIRE

    Faqi Li; Dan Song; Deping Zeng; Zhou Lin; Min He; Guangrong Lei; Junru Wu; Dong Zhang; Zhibiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasoun...

  10. Frequency-feedback tuning for single-cell cavity under rf heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.D.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    A tuning system is described that is being used to match the source frequency of a high-power klystron on the resonant frequency of the prototype single-cell cavity for the 7-GeV Advance Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Typically a water-cooled piston tuner is required to adjust the reactive component of the cavity's impedance to minimize reflected power back to the RF drive source. As the cavity watts expand due to RF heating, the resonant frequency decreases. Adjusting the source frequency to follow the cavity resonant frequency is a convenient method used to condition the cavity (for vacuum) at high power levels, in this case, 1 MV gap voltage at 100 kW power level. The tuning system consists of two coupling ports, a phase detector, a digitizing I/O system, and a DC coupled FM-modulated RF source. Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) loop parameters for the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) software are calculated, and data is presented showing the damped response to peturbations on the loop. The timing system presented here does not need water-cooling, has no moving parts to wear out, and has an inherently faster response time. Its one limitation is the digitizing sampling rate. The only limitation in tuning range is the bandwidth of the RF source

  11. Development of Ultra High Gradient and High Q0 Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the recent progress at Jefferson Lab in developing ultra high gradient and high Q 0 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for future SRF based machines. A new 1300 MHz 9-cell prototype cavity is being fabricated. This cavity has an optimized shape in terms of the ratio of the peak surface field (both magnetic and electric) to the acceleration gradient, hence the name low surface field (LSF) shape. The goal of the effort is to demonstrate an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q 0 of 10 10 at 2 K in a 9-cell SRF cavity. Fine-grain niobium material is used. Conventional forming, machining and electron beam welding method are used for cavity fabrication. New techniques are adopted to ensure repeatable, accurate and inexpensive fabrication of components and the full assembly. The completed cavity is to be first mechanically polished to a mirror-finish, a newly acquired in-house capability at JLab, followed by the proven ILC-style processing recipe established already at JLab. In parallel, new single-cell cavities made from large-grain niobium material are made to further advance the cavity treatment and processing procedures, aiming for the demonstration of an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q 0 of 2пїЅ10 10 at 2K

  12. Laser cooling of beryllium ions using a frequency-doubled 626 nm diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozijn, F M J; Biesheuvel, J; Flores, A S; Ubachs, W; Blume, G; Wicht, A; Paschke, K; Erbert, G; Koelemeij, J C J

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate laser cooling of trapped beryllium ions at 313 nm using a frequency-doubled extended cavity diode laser operated at 626 nm, obtained by cooling a ridge waveguide diode laser chip to -31°C. Up to 32 mW of narrowband 626 nm laser radiation is obtained. After passage through an optical isolator and beam shaping optics, 14 mW of 626 nm power remains of which 70% is coupled into an external enhancement cavity containing a nonlinear crystal for second-harmonic generation. We produce up to 35 μW of 313 nm radiation, which is subsequently used to laser cool and detect 6×10(2) beryllium ions, stored in a linear Paul trap, to a temperature of about 10 mK, as evidenced by the formation of Coulomb crystals. Our setup offers a simple and affordable alternative for Doppler cooling, optical pumping, and detection to presently used laser systems.

  13. A new approach to sum frequency generation of single-frequency blue light in a coupled ring cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present a generic approach for the generation of tunable single-frequency light and demonstrate generation of more than 300 mW tunable light around 460 nm. One tapered diode laser is operated in a coupled ring cavity containing the nonlinear crystal and another tapered diode laser is sent thro...

  14. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Content Medical News Cavities ˈkav-ət-ē (Dental Caries) By James T. Ubertalli, DMD, Private Practice, Hingham, ... access to dental care, and better treatment for tooth decay and periodontal disease. When teeth are lost, chewing is greatly hindered, and speaking ...

  15. High Quality Plasmonic Sensors Based on Fano Resonances Created through Cascading Double Asymmetric Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangao; Shao, Mingzhen; Zeng, Xiaoqi

    2016-10-18

    In this paper, a type of compact nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal structure is proposed and investigated through cascading double asymmetric cavities, in which their metal cores shift along different axis directions. The cascaded asymmetric structure exhibits high transmission and sharp Fano resonance peaks via strengthening the mutual coupling of the cavities. The research results show that with the increase of the symmetry breaking in the structure, the number of Fano resonances increase accordingly. Furthermore, by modulating the geometrical parameters appropriately, Fano resonances with high sensitivities to the changes in refractive index can be realized. A maximum figure of merit (FoM) value of 74.3 is obtained. Considerable applications for this work can be found in bio/chemical sensors with excellent performance and other nanophotonic integrated circuit devices such as optical filters, switches and modulators.

  16. The influence of finite cavities on the sound insulation of double-plate structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2005-06-01

    Lightweight walls are often designed as frameworks of studs with plates on each side--a double-plate structure. The studs constitute boundaries for the cavities, thereby both affecting the sound transmission directly by short-circuiting the plates, and indirectly by disturbing the sound field between the plates. The paper presents a deterministic prediction model for airborne sound insulation including both effects of the studs. A spatial transform technique is used, taking advantage of the periodicity. The acoustic field inside the cavities is expanded by means of cosine-series. The transmission coefficient (angle-dependent and diffuse) and transmission loss are studied. Numerical examples are presented and comparisons with measurement are performed. The result indicates that a reasonably good agreement between theory and measurement can be achieved.

  17. Computation of the frequency response of a nonlinearly loaded antenna within a cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gronwald

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze a nonlinearly loaded dipole antenna which is located within a rectangular cavity and excited by an electromagnetic signal. The signal is composed from two different frequencies. In order to calculate the spectrum of the resulting electromagnetic field within the resonator we transform the antenna problem into a network problem. This requires to precisely determine the antenna impedance within the cavity. The resulting nonlinear equivalent network is solved by means of the harmonic balance technique. As a result the occurrence of low intermodulation frequencies within the spectrum is verified.

  18. Tunable Resonant-Cavity-Enhanced Photodetector with Double High-Index-Contrast Grating Mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Yvind, Kresten; Chung, Il-Sug

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists...... of a top InP HCG mirror, a p-i-n photodiode embedding multiple quantum wells, and a Si HCG mirror formed in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The detection wavelength can be changed by moving the top InP HCG mirror suspended in the air. High reflectivity and small penetration length of HCGs...

  19. Label-Free, Single Molecule Resonant Cavity Detection: A Double-Blind Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Chistiakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonant cavity sensors are gaining increasing interest as a potential diagnostic method for a range of applications, including medical prognostics and environmental monitoring. However, the majority of detection demonstrations to date have involved identifying a “known” analyte, and the more rigorous double-blind experiment, in which the experimenter must identify unknown solutions, has yet to be performed. This scenario is more representative of a real-world situation. Therefore, before these devices can truly transition, it is necessary to demonstrate this level of robustness. By combining a recently developed surface chemistry with integrated silica optical sensors, we have performed a double-blind experiment to identify four unknown solutions. The four unknown solutions represented a subset or complete set of four known solutions; as such, there were 256 possible combinations. Based on the single molecule detection signal, we correctly identified all solutions. In addition, as part of this work, we developed noise reduction algorithms.

  20. Frequency tracking and stabilization of a tunable dual-wavelength external-cavity diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, L.; Chi, L. C.; Wang, S. C.; Pan, Ci-Ling

    1999-09-01

    We show a unique dual-wavelength external-cavity laser diode with frequency tracking capability and obtain a stable beat frequency between the dual-wavelength output. By using a Fabry-Perot interferometer as the frequency discriminator and the time-gating technique in a servo loop, the peak-to-peak frequency fluctuations were stabilized, with respect to the Fabry-Perot cavity, to 86 kHz in the dual-wavelength output at 802.5 and 804.5 nm, and to 17 kHz in their 0.9 THz beat signal. Similar performance was achieved for tuning of the dual wavelength separation ranging from 0.2 to 4 nm.

  1. Frequency-temperature compensated sapphire loaded cavity for compact hydrogen masers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuan Rang, Wang; Ren Fu, Yang; Tie Zhong, Zhou; Lian Shan, Gao [Beijing Institute of Radio Metrology and Measurement, Beijing, People' s Republic (China); Nuan Rang, Wang; Lian Shan, Gao [National Key Laboratory of Metrology and Calibration Technology, Beijing, People' s Republic (China)

    2008-10-15

    We report some theoretical and experimental results about a frequency-temperature compensated sapphire loaded cavity for compact hydrogen maser atomic clocks. Based on theoretical calculations, the frequency-temperature coefficients in the TE{sub 011} mode of a sapphire cavity associated with two small rings of SrTiO{sub 3} can be reduced. For instance, at 50 C, when the thickness of the SrTiO{sub 3} ring is 5 mm, the frequency-temperature coefficient can be reduced by about five times, and in the meantime, the quality factor can be kept at above 40 000 synchronously. A sapphire loaded cavity and eight small compensated chips of SrTiO{sub 3} were prepared and a combined cavity of sapphire with SrTiO{sub 3} chips was simulated by the finite element method and measured by experiments. The simulation and the related experimental results agree well. In addition, the frequency-temperature coefficients in two different configurations of eight SrTiO{sub 3} chips were also measured and compared. (authors)

  2. Flight-Like Optical Reference Cavity for GRACE Follow-On Laser Frequency Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Pierce, R.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe a prototype optical cavity and associated optics that has been developed to provide a stable frequency reference for a future space-based laser ranging system. This instrument is being considered for inclusion as a technology demonstration on the recently announced GRACE follow-on mission, which will monitor variations in the Earth's gravity field.

  3. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stockklauser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2g/2π=238  MHz at a resonator linewidth κ/2π=12  MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ_{2}/2π=40  MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  4. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  5. Surface analyses of electropolished niobium samples for superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Nishiwaki, M.; Saeki, T.; Sawabe, M.; Hayano, H.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S. [GUAS, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); KAKEN Inc., Hokota, Ibaraki 311-1416 (Japan); GUAS, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan) and KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    The performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities is sometimes limited by contaminations present on the cavity surface. In the recent years extensive research has been done to enhance the cavity performance by applying improved surface treatments such as mechanical grinding, electropolishing (EP), chemical polishing, tumbling, etc., followed by various rinsing methods such as ultrasonic pure water rinse, alcoholic rinse, high pressure water rinse, hydrogen per oxide rinse, etc. Although good cavity performance has been obtained lately by various post-EP cleaning methods, the detailed nature about the surface contaminants is still not fully characterized. Further efforts in this area are desired. Prior x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of EPed niobium samples treated with fresh EP acid, demonstrated that the surfaces were covered mainly with the niobium oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) along with carbon, in addition a small quantity of sulfur and fluorine were also found in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. In this article, the authors present the analyses of surface contaminations for a series of EPed niobium samples located at various positions of a single cell niobium cavity followed by ultrapure water rinsing as well as our endeavor to understand the aging effect of EP acid solution in terms of contaminations presence at the inner surface of the cavity with the help of surface analytical tools such as XPS, SIMS, and scanning electron microscope at KEK.

  6. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-01-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O 2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM 010 -mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper

  7. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Shahid, E-mail: shahid.ahmed@ieee.org [BML Munjal University, Gurgaon, Haryana 123413 (India); Mammosser, John D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O{sub 2} (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM{sub 010}-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  8. Spread of smoke and heat along narrow air cavity in double-skin façade fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Lun Cheuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A scenario on double-skin façade fire was identified earlier for hazard assessment. A flashover room fire occurred next to the façade, broke the interior glass pane and spread to the façade cavity. As observed in experiments, hot gas moved up as a vertical channel flow for narrow façade cavity. Heat and smoke spread along the narrow air cavity of a double-skin façade will be studied in this paper. A simple mathematical model is developed from basic heat transfer theory for studying the vertical air temperature profiles of the hot gas flowing along the cavity. Assuming one-dimensional flow for hot gas moving up the façade cavity, conservation equations on mass and enthalpy were solved. Experimental results on two double-skin façade rigs of height 6 m and 15 m with narrow cavity depth were used to justify the results. A total of 11 tests were carried out. Correlation expressions between cavity air temperature and the height above ceiling of the fire room were derived.

  9. Frequency locking of an extended-cavity quantum cascade laser to a frequency comb for precision mid infrared spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaif, Bidoor

    2017-11-02

    Extended-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) enable mode-hope-free frequency sweeps in the mid-infrared region over ranges in excess of 100 cm−1, at speeds up to 1 THz/s and with a 100-mW optical power level. This makes them ideally suited for broadband absorption spectroscopy and for the simultaneous detection of multiple gases. On the other hand, their use for precision spectroscopy has been hampered so far by a large amount of frequency noise, resulting in an optical linewidth of about 30 MHz over 50 ms [1]. This is one of the reasons why neither their frequency nor their phase have been so far locked to a frequency comb. Their use in combination with frequency combs has been performed in an open loop regime only [2], which has the merit of preserving the inherently fast modulation speed of these lasers, yet not to afford high spectral resolution and accuracy.

  10. Frequency-agile terahertz-wave parametric oscillator in a ring-cavity configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamide, Hiroaki; Ikari, Tomofumi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2009-12-01

    We demonstrate a frequency-agile terahertz wave parametric oscillator (TPO) in a ring-cavity configuration (ring-TPO). The TPO consists of three mirrors and a MgO:LiNbO(3) crystal under noncollinear phase-matching conditions. A novel, fast frequency-tuning method was realized by controlling a mirror of the three-mirror ring cavity. The wide tuning range between 0.93 and 2.7 THz was accomplished. For first demonstration using the ring-TPO, terahertz spectroscopy was performed as the verification of the frequency-agile performance, measuring the transmission spectrum of the monosaccharide glucose. The spectrum was obtained within about 8 s in good comparison to those of Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  11. PSpice modeling of broadband RF cavities for transient and frequency domain simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harzheim, Jens [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Fachgebiet Beschleunigertechnik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the future accelerator facility FAIR, Barrier-Bucket Systems will play an important role for different longitudinal beam manipulations. As the function of this type of system is to provide single sine gap voltages, the components of the system have to operate in a broad frequency range. To investigate the different effects and to design the different system components, the whole Barrier-Bucket System is to be modeled in PSpice. While for low power signals, the system shows linear behavior, nonlinear effects arise at higher amplitudes. Therefore, simulations in both, frequency and time domain are needed. The highly frequency dependent magnetic alloy ring cores of the future Barrier-Bucket cavity have been mod eled in a first step and based on these models, the whole cavity was analyzed in PSpice. The simulation results show good agreement with former measurements.

  12. Trimming algorithm of frequency modulation for CIAE-230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron model cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengzhan; Zhang, Tianjue; Ji, Bin; Hou, Shigang; Guo, Juanjuan; Yin, Meng; Xing, Jiansheng; Lv, Yinlong; Guan, Fengping; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    A new project, the 230 MeV proton superconducting synchrocyclotron for cancer therapy, was proposed at CIAE in 2013. A model cavity is designed to verify the frequency modulation trimming algorithm featuring a half-wave structure and eight sets of rotating blades for 1 kHz frequency modulation. Based on the electromagnetic (EM) field distribution analysis of the model cavity, the variable capacitor works as a function of time and the frequency can be written in Maclaurin series. Curve fitting is applied for theoretical frequency and original simulation frequency. The second-order fitting excels at the approximation given its minimum variance. Constant equivalent inductance is considered as an important condition in the calculation. The equivalent parameters of theoretical frequency can be achieved through this conversion. Then the trimming formula for rotor blade outer radius is found by discretization in time domain. Simulation verification has been performed and the results show that the calculation radius with minus 0.012 m yields an acceptable result. The trimming amendment in the time range of 0.328-0.4 ms helps to reduce the frequency error to 0.69% in Simulation C with an increment of 0.075 mm/0.001 ms, which is half of the error in Simulation A (constant radius in 0.328-0.4 ms). The verification confirms the feasibility of the trimming algorithm for synchrocyclotron frequency modulation.

  13. A digital frequency stabilization system of external cavity diode laser based on LabVIEW FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuohuan; Hu, Zhaohui; Qi, Lu; Wang, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Frequency stabilization for external cavity diode laser has played an important role in physics research. Many laser frequency locking solutions have been proposed by researchers. Traditionally, the locking process was accomplished by analog system, which has fast feedback control response speed. However, analog system is susceptible to the effects of environment. In order to improve the automation level and reliability of the frequency stabilization system, we take a grating-feedback external cavity diode laser as the laser source and set up a digital frequency stabilization system based on National Instrument's FPGA (NI FPGA). The system consists of a saturated absorption frequency stabilization of beam path, a differential photoelectric detector, a NI FPGA board and a host computer. Many functions, such as piezoelectric transducer (PZT) sweeping, atomic saturation absorption signal acquisition, signal peak identification, error signal obtaining and laser PZT voltage feedback controlling, are totally completed by LabVIEW FPGA program. Compared with the analog system, the system built by the logic gate circuits, performs stable and reliable. User interface programmed by LabVIEW is friendly. Besides, benefited from the characteristics of reconfiguration, the LabVIEW program is good at transplanting in other NI FPGA boards. Most of all, the system periodically checks the error signal. Once the abnormal error signal is detected, FPGA will restart frequency stabilization process without manual control. Through detecting the fluctuation of error signal of the atomic saturation absorption spectrum line in the frequency locking state, we can infer that the laser frequency stability can reach 1MHz.

  14. Alignment sensing for optical cavities using radio-frequency jitter modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulda, P; Voss, D; Mueller, C; Ortega, L F; Ciani, G; Mueller, G; Tanner, D B

    2017-05-01

    Alignment sensing is often required in precision interferometry applications such as Advanced LIGO in order to achieve the optimum performance. Currently favored sensing schemes rely on the use of two separate radio-frequency (RF) quadrant photodetectors and Gouy phase telescopes to determine the alignment of a beam relative to an optical cavity axis. In this paper, we demonstrate an alternative sensing scheme that has potential advantages over the current standard schemes. We show that by using electro-optic beam deflectors to impose RF jitter sidebands on a beam, it is possible to extract full alignment signals for two in-line optical cavities from just one single-element photodetector in reflection of each cavity.

  15. The experimental program for high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities for muon cooling channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemire, B.; Chung, M.; Hanlet, P. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Torun, Y.; Yonehara, K.

    2018-01-01

    An intense beam of muons is needed to provide a luminosity on the order of 1034 cm‑2s‑1 for a multi-TeV collider. Because muons produced by colliding a multi-MW proton beam with a target made of carbon or mercury have a large phase space, significant six dimensional cooling is required. Through ionization cooling—the only cooling method that works within the lifetime of the muon—and emittance exchange, the desired emittances for a Higgs Factory or higher energy collider are attainable. A cooling channel utilizing gas filled radio frequency cavities has been designed to deliver the requisite cool muon beam. Technology development of these RF cavities has progressed from breakdown studies, through beam tests, to dielectric loaded and reentrant cavity designs. The results of these experiments are summarized.

  16. Green pulsed lidar-radar emitter based on a multipass frequency-shifting external cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyang; Brunel, Marc; Romanelli, Marco; Vallet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the radio frequency (RF) up-conversion properties of a frequency-shifting external cavity on a laser beam. We consider an infrared passively Q-switched pulsed laser whose intensity modulation results from the multiple round-trips in the external cavity, which contains a frequency shifter. The output beam undergoes optical second-harmonic generation necessary to reach the green wavelength. We model the pulse train using a rate-equation model to simulate the laser pulses, together with a time-delayed interference calculation taking both the diffraction efficiency and the Gaussian beam propagation into account. The predictions are verified experimentally using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser passively Q-switched by Cr4+:YAG whose pulse train makes multiple round-trips in a mode-matched external cavity containing an acousto-optic frequency shifter driven at 85 MHz. Second-harmonic generation is realized in a KTP crystal, yielding RF-modulated pulses at 532 nm with a modulation contrast of almost 100%. RF harmonics up to the 6th order (1.020 GHz) are observed in the green output pulses. Such a RF-modulated green laser may find applications in underwater detection and ranging.

  17. Effect of the Wavy permeable Interface on Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Partially Porous Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mehdaoui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional, double diffusion, natural convection in a partially porous cavity satured with a binary fluid is investigated numerically. Multiple motions are driven by the external temperature and concentration differences imposed across vertical walls. The wavy interface between fluid and porous layer is horizontal. The equations which describe the fluid flow and heat and mass transfer are described by the Navier-Stokes equations (fluid region, Darcy-Brinkman equation (porous region and energy and mass equations. The finite element method was applied to solve the governing equations. The fluid flow and heat and mass transfer has been investigated for different values of the amplitude and the wave number of the interface and the buoyancy ratio. The results obtained in the form of isotherms, stream lines, isoconcentrations and the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers; show that the wavy interface has a significant effect on the flow and heat and mass transfer.

  18. Flow transitions in three-dimensional double-diffusive fingering convection in a porous cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezai, I.

    2002-08-01

    In the present study the existence of multiple three-dimensional double-diffusive flow patterns in a horizontal rectangular porous cavity of a square cross-section, having horizontal aspect ratios Ax = Ay = 2 is investigated numerically. Opposing vertical gradients of temperature and concentration are applied between the two horizontal walls of the cavity, where the solute gradient is destabilizing against a stabilizing temperature gradient. All vertical walls are considered to be impermeable and adiabatic. The Brinkman and Forchheimer terms are included in the momentum equations where the convective terms are retained. The effect of the buoyancy ratio, N, thermal Rayleigh number, RaT and Lewis number, Le, on the formation of multiple flow patterns is investigated over a wide range of parameters. Altogether 36 symmetric flow structures have been identified when each of the parameters N, RaT, and Le is varied independently, keeping the others as constants. The results of the calculations are presented in terms of the average Sherwood number curves consisting of different solution branches, where transitions between the branches are indicated. The flow patterns are classified according to their symmetry properties and the type of symmetries broken or preserved are identified during the bifurcation processes.

  19. Generation and control of optical frequency combs using cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahua; Qu, Ye; Yu, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2018-02-01

    We explore theoretically the generation and all-optical control of optical frequency combs (OFCs) in photon transmission based on a combination of single-atom-cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Here an external control field is used to form the cavity dark mode of the CQED system. When the strengths of the applied EIT control field are appropriately tuned, enhanced comb generation can be achieved. We discuss the properties of the dark mode and clearly show that the formation of the dark mode enables the efficient generation of OFCs. In our approach, the comb spacing is determined by the beating frequency between the driving pump and seed lasers. Our demonstrated theory may pave the way towards all-optical coherent control of OFCs using a CQED architecture.

  20. Displacement sensor based on intra-cavity tuning of dual-frequency gas laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haisha; Niu, Yanxiong; Liu, Ning; Li, Jiyang

    2018-01-01

    A nanometer-resolution displacement measurement instrument based on tunable cavity frequency-splitting method is presented. One beam is split into two orthogonally polarized beams when anisotropic element inserted in the cavity. The two beams with fixed frequency difference are modulated by the movement of the reflection mirror. The changing law of the power tuning curves between the total output and the two orthogonally polarized beams is researched, and a method splitting one tuning cycle to four equal parts is proposed based on the changing law, each part corresponds to one-eighth wavelength of displacement. A laser feedback interferometer (LFI) and piezoelectric ceramic are series connected to the sensor head to calibrate the displacement that less than one-eighth wavelength. The displacement sensor achieves to afford measurement range of 20mm with resolution of 6.93nm.

  1. Dual-wavelength high-power diode laser system based on an external-cavity tapered amplifier with tunable frequency difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-01-01

    knowledge, this is the broadest tuning range of the frequency difference from a dual-wavelength diode laser system. The spectrum, output power, and beam quality of the diode laser system are characterized. The power stability of each wavelength is measured, and the power fluctuations of the two wavelengths......A dual-wavelength high-power semiconductor laser system based on a tapered amplifier with double-Littrow external cavity is demonstrated around 800 nm. The two wavelengths can be tuned individually, and the frequency difference of the two wavelengths is tunable from 0.5 to 10.0 THz. To our...

  2. Frequency and time domain analysis of an external cavity laser with strong filtered optical feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detoma, Enrico; Tromborg, Bjarne; Montrosset, Ivo

    The stability properties of an external cavity laser with strong grating-filtered optical feedback to an anti-reflection coated facet are studied with a general frequency domain model. The model takes into account non-linear effects like four wave mixing and gain compression. A small......-signal analysis in the frequency domain allows a calculation of the range of operation without mode hopping around the grating reflectivity peak. This region should be as large as possible for proper operation of the tunable laser source. The analysis shows this stabilizing effect of mode coupling and gain...

  3. Comparison of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well extended-cavity diode lasers for broadband passive mode-locking at 780  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Heike; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V; Wenzel, Hans; Bugge, Frank; Weyers, Markus; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Tränkle, Günther

    2017-07-01

    We present a compact, mode-locked diode laser system designed to emit a frequency comb in the wavelength range around 780 nm. We compare the mode-locking performance of symmetric and asymmetric double quantum well ridge-waveguide diode laser chips in an extended-cavity diode laser configuration. By reverse biasing a short section of the diode laser chip, passive mode-locking at 3.4 GHz is achieved. Employing an asymmetric double quantum well allows for generation of a mode-locked optical spectrum spanning more than 15 nm (full width at -20  dB) while the symmetric double quantum well device only provides a bandwidth of ∼2.7  nm (full width at -20  dB). Analysis of the RF noise characteristics of the pulse repetition rate shows an RF linewidth of about 7 kHz (full width at half-maximum) and of at most 530 Hz (full width at half-maximum) for the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well devices, respectively. Investigation of the frequency noise power spectral density at the pulse repetition rate shows a white noise floor of approximately 2100  Hz 2 /Hz and of at most 170  Hz 2 /Hz for the diode laser employing the asymmetric and symmetric double quantum well structures, respectively. The pulse width is less than 10 ps for both devices.

  4. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  5. Advances in development of Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, Sam; Liepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached Bp k>50 mT , well above Bc 1=25 ±7 mT , without the strong Q -slope observed in previous Nb3Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q0 of approximately 1 ×1 010 at >10 MV /m , far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ˜55 mT , apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a Tc of 18.0 ±0.1 K , close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near Tc, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb3Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q -slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb3Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  6. Advances in development of Nb_{3}Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Posen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A 1.3 GHz Nb_{3}Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached B_{pk}>50  mT, well above B_{c1}=25±7  mT, without the strong Q-slope observed in previous Nb_{3}Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q_{0} of approximately 1×10^{10} at >10  MV/m, far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ∼55  mT, apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a T_{c} of 18.0±0.1  K, close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near T_{c}, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb_{3}Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q-slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb_{3}Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  7. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  8. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring...... cavity and another tapered diode laser is single-passed through a nonlinear crystal which is contained in the coupled ring cavity. Using this method, the single-pass conversion efficiency is more than 25%. In contrast to SFG in an external cavity, the system is entirely self-stabilized with no electronic...

  9. Frequency stabilization of multiple lasers on a single medium-finesse cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengyin; Zhou, Min; Gao, Qi; Li, Shangyan; Zhang, Shuang; Qiao, Hao; Ai, Di; Zhang, Mengya; Lou, Ge; Luo, Limeng; Xu, Xinye

    2018-04-01

    We present a simple, compact, and robust frequency stabilization system of three lasers operating at 649, 759, and 770 nm, respectively. These lasers are applied in experiments on ytterbium optical lattice clocks, for which each laser needs to have a linewidth of a few hundred or tens of kilohertz while maintaining a favorable long-term stability. Here, a single medium-finesse cavity is adopted as the frequency reference and the standard Pound-Drever-Hall technique is used to stabilize the laser frequencies. Based on the independent phase modulation, multiple-laser locking is demonstrated without mutual intervention. The locked lasers are measured to have a linewidth of 100 kHz and the residual frequency drift is about 78.5 Hz s-1. This kind of setup provides a construction that is much simpler than that in previous work.

  10. The transition from quantum Zeno to anti-Zeno effects for a qubit in a cavity by varying the cavity frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiufeng, E-mail: xfcao@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Ai, Qing; Sun, Chang-Pu [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2012-01-09

    We propose a strategy to demonstrate the transition from the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) to the anti-Zeno effect (AZE) using a superconducting qubit coupled to a transmission line cavity, by varying the central frequency of the cavity mode. Our results are obtained without the rotating wave approximation (RWA), and the initial state (a dressed state) is easy to prepare. Moreover, we find that in the presence of both qubit's intrinsic bath and the cavity bath, the emergence of the QZE and the AZE behaviors relies not only on the match between the qubit energy-level-spacing and the central frequency of the cavity mode, but also on the coupling strength between the qubit and the cavity mode. -- Highlights: ► We propose how to demonstrate the transition from Zeno effect to anti-Zeno effect. ► Our results are beyond the RWA, and the initial state is easy to prepare. ► The case of both qubit's intrinsic bath and cavity bath coexist is also studied.

  11. A Two-Frequency RF Cavity for the PSI Low Emittance Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Raguin, J Y; Li, K S B; Pedrozzi, M

    2005-01-01

    In the Low Emittance Gun (LEG) under development at PSI an extremely bright electron beam is produced from a field emission array and then rapidly accelerated in a diode configuration up to 1 MeV with gradients of the order of 250 to 500 MV/m. The electronic emission from such a cold cathode allows normalized intrinsic emittance below 0.1 mm.mrad well suited for X-ray FELs or linear collider applications. The diode is followed by an L-band RF-gun like cavity to further accelerate the beam. A third harmonic field is superposed to the fundamental [1] 1.5 GHz pi-mode field to minimize the RF emittance. We report here on the design of such a two-frequency RF cavity with some details on the RF coupling and possible tuning mechanisms. Beam dynamics studies, performed with PARMELA and the fully self-consistent code MAFIA, are presented and compared with the results obtained for an RF cavity excited with the fundamental frequency only.

  12. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Liu, Na; Wibowo, Sigit Basuki

    2018-03-01

    A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  13. Measures of maximum magnetic field in 3 GHz radio frequency superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical models have shown that the maximum magnetic field in radio frequency superconducting cavities is the superheating field H sh . For niobium, H sh is 25 - 30% higher than the thermodynamical H c field: H sh within (240 - 274) mT. However, the maximum magnetic field observed so far is in the range H c,max = 152 mT for the best 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. This field is lower than the critical field H c1 above which the superconductor breaks up into divided normal and superconducting zones (H c1 ≤H c ). Thermal instabilities are responsible for this low value. In order to reach H sh before thermal breakdown, high power short pulses are used. The cavity needs then to be strongly over-coupled. The dedicated test bed has been built from the collaboration between Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) - Sezione di Genoa, and the Service d'Etudes et Realisation d'Accelerateurs (SERA) of Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL). The maximum magnetic field, H rf,max , measurements on INFN cavities give lower results than the theoretical speculations and are in agreement with previous results. The superheating magnetic fields is linked to the magnetic penetration depth. This superconducting characteristic length can be used to determine the quality of niobium through the ratio between the resistivity measured at 300 K and 4.2 K in the normal conducting state (RRR). Results have been compared to previous ones and agree pretty well. They show that the RRR measured on cavities is superficial and lower than the RRR measured on samples which concerns the volume. (author)

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of electronics for the temperature control of cavity windows and helium gas return lines for the superconducting cavities of the LEP200 radio frequency system

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of electronics for the temperature control of cavity windows and helium gas return lines for the superconducting cavities of the LEP200 radio frequency system

  15. Double-diffusive mixed convection in a lid-driven cavity with non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S SIVASANKARAN

    2017-11-11

    Nov 11, 2017 ... transfer in a lid-driven square cavity is numerically investigated. The horizontal walls of the cavity are adiabatic and impermeable. Sinusoidal boundary temperatures and concentrations are imposed along the left and right sidewalls of the cavity. The governing unsteady equations for continuity, momentum, ...

  16. Widely tunable terahertz source based on intra-cavity frequency mixing in quantum cascade laser arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Aiting; Jung, Seungyong; Jiang, Yifan; Kim, Jae Hyun; Belkin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mbelkin@ece.utexas.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Vijayraghavan, Karun [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); ATX Photonics, 10100 Burnet Rd., Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2015-06-29

    We demonstrate a compact monolithic terahertz source continuously tunable from 1.9 THz to 3.9 THz with the maximum peak power output of 106 μW at 3.46 THz at room temperature. The source consists of an array of 10 electrically tunable quantum cascade lasers with intra-cavity terahertz difference-frequency generation. To increase fabrication yield and achieve high THz peak power output in our devices, a dual-section current pumping scheme is implemented using two electrically isolated grating sections to independently control gain for the two mid-IR pumps.

  17. Study of Temperature Wave Propagation in Superfluid Helium Focusing on Radio-Frequency Cavity Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Koettig, T; Avellino, S; Junginger, T; Bremer, J

    2015-01-01

    Oscillating Superleak Transducers (OSTs) can be used to localize quenches of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. Local hot spots at the cavity surface initiate temperature waves in the surrounding superfluid helium that acts as cooling fluid at typical temperatures in the range of 1.6 K to 2 K. The temperature wave is characterised by the properties of superfluid helium such as the second sound velocity. For high heat load densities second sound velocities greater than the standard literature values are observed. This fast propagation has been verified in dedicated small scale experiments. Resistors were used to simulate the quench spots under controlled conditions. The three dimensional propagation of second sound is linked to OST signals. The aim of this study is to improve the understanding of the OST signal especially the incident angle dependency. The characterised OSTs are used as a tool for quench localisation on a real size cavity. Their sensitivity as well as the time resolution was proven to b...

  18. Laser frequency stabilization and control of optical cavities with suspended mirrors for the VIRGO interferometric detector of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsuglia, Matteo

    1999-01-01

    The VIRGO detector is an interferometer with 3 km Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms. It is aimed at the detection of gravitational radiation emitted by astrophysical sources. This thesis comprises two independent parts. The first part is devoted to the laser frequency stabilization. In the second one we present a study of a suspended cavity. We determine the impact of laser frequency fluctuations on the overall VIRGO sensitivity. We study the frequency stabilization of the interferometer considered as an ultra-stable standard and we evaluate the noise pertaining to different signals taken into consideration. A strategy of control is discussed. We then study the VIRGO mode-cleaner prototype, a 30 m suspended triangular cavity, for which we have developed a control in order to keep it locked. Finally, we characterize this cavity in terms of mode spectra, finesse and mechanical transfer functions. (author)

  19. Temporal characterization of FEL micropulses as function of cavity length detuning using frequency-resolved optical gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richman, B.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Results of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements on the Stanford mid-IR FEL system show the effect of FEL cavity length detuning on the micropulse temporal structure. The FROG technique enables the acquisition of complete and uniquely invertible amplitude and phase temporal dependence of optical pulses. Unambiguous phase and amplitude profiles are recovered from the data. The optical pulses are nearly transform limited, and the pulse length increases with cavity length detuning.

  20. Occurrence, frequency, and significance of cavities in fractured-rock aquifers near Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    Virtually all wells drilled into bedrock intercept a water-bearing fracture, but cavities occur only in areas underlaid by limy rocks. Multiple cavities are common in wells in the Conasauga and Knox Groups but are rare in the Rome Formation and the Chickamauga Group. The geometric mean height (vertical dimension) of the cavities is 0.59 m, the geometric mean depth is 14 m, the average lateral spatial frequency is 0.16, and the average vertical spatial frequency is 0.019. Differences in cavity parameter values are caused partly by geologic factors such as lithology, bed thickness, and spatial fracture frequency. However, hydrologic factors such as percolation rate, recharge amount, aquifer storage capacity, and differences between lateral and vertical permeability may also be important. Tracer tests show that groundwater velocity in some cavities is in the range 20-300 m/d, and relatively rapid flow rates occur near springs. In contrast, wells that intercept cavities have about the same range in hydraulic conductivity as wells in regolith and fractured rock. The hydraulic conductivity data indicate a flow rate of less than 1.0 m/d. This difference cannot be adequately explained, but rapid groundwater movement may be much more common above the water table than below. Rapid groundwater flows below the water table might be rare except near springs in the Knox Group. 10 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Liang [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  2. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Denise Christine [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  3. Reclamation of niobium compounds from ionic liquid electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wixtrom, Alex I. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Buhler, Jessica E. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States); Reece, Charles E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride (vitamin B4)-based solutions can be used as a greener alternative to acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. This study demonstrated a successful method for electrochemical deposition of niobium compounds onto the surface of copper substrates using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. Niobium ions present in the ionic liquid solution were dissolved into the solution prior to deposition via electrochemical polishing of solid niobium. A black coating was clearly visible on the surface of the Cu following deposition. This coating was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). This ionic liquid-based electrochemical deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.

  4. Low-frequency fluctuations in vertical cavity lasers: Experiments versus Lang-Kobayashi dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torcini, Alessandro; Barland, Stephane; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Marin, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    The limits of applicability of the Lang-Kobayashi (LK) model for a semiconductor laser with optical feedback are analyzed. The model equations, equipped with realistic values of the parameters, are investigated below the solitary laser threshold where low-frequency fluctuations (LFF's) are usually observed. The numerical findings are compared with experimental data obtained for the selected polarization mode from a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to polarization selective external feedback. The comparison reveals the bounds within which the dynamics of the LK model can be considered as realistic. In particular, it clearly demonstrates that the deterministic LK model, for realistic values of the linewidth enhancement factor α, reproduces the LFF's only as a transient dynamics towards one of the stationary modes with maximal gain. A reasonable reproduction of real data from VCSEL's can be obtained only by considering the noisy LK or alternatively deterministic LK model for extremely high α values

  5. Compact, single-frequency, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator pumped in an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, B; Berrou, A; Guilbaud, S; Raybaut, M; Godard, A; Lefebvre, M

    2011-03-01

    We report on a nested-cavity, doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (NesCOPO) architecture for widely tunable, mid-IR, single-frequency generation. By use of an achromatic phase-adapted double-pass pumping scheme, this new, low-threshold, semimonolithic architecture only requires two free-standing cavity mirrors and a nonlinear crystal with a mirror coating deposited on its input facet while the other facet is antireflection coated. It is thus as simple and compact as any basic linear optical parametric oscillator cavity, is easily tunable, and displays low sensitivity to mechanical vibrations. Using a high-repetition-rate (4.8 kHz) microlaser as the pump source of the NesCOPO, we demonstrate a compact source that provides pulsed, stable single-frequency output over a wide spectral range (3.8-4.3 μm) with a high peak power (up to 50 W), which are properties well suited for practical gas sensing applications.

  6. An innovative MRE absorber with double natural frequencies for wide frequency bandwidth vibration absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shuaishuai; Yang, Jian; Li, Weihua; Alici, Gursel; Deng, Huaxia; Du, Haiping; Yan, Tianhong

    2016-01-01

    A new design of adaptive tuned vibration absorber was proposed in this study for vibration reduction. The innovation of the new absorber is the adoption of the eccentric mass on the top of the multilayered magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) structure so that this proposed absorber has two vibration modes: one in the torsional direction and the other in translational direction. This property enables the absorber to expand its effective bandwidth and to be more capable of reducing the vibrations especially dealing with those vibrations with multi-frequencies. The innovative MRE absorber was designed and tested on a horizontal vibration table. The test results illustrate that the MRE absorber realized double natural frequencies, both of which are controllable. Inertia’s influence on the dynamic behavior of the absorber is also investigated in order to guide the design of the innovative MRE absorber. Additionally, the experimentally obtained natural frequencies coincide with the theoretical data, which sufficiently verifies the feasibility of this new design. The last part in terms of the vibration absorption ability also proves that both of these two natural frequencies play a great role in absorbing vibration energy. (paper)

  7. Single-mode cavities at frequencies of 172 and 178 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Volkov, V N; Fomin, N G; Kurkin, G Ya; Tribendis, A G

    2001-01-01

    In the report presented here the projects of two accelerating cavities with strong damping of higher modes (HOM) with special vacuum loads are presented.The designs of the cavities and loads are described.The design parameters of cavities,their spectra of higher modes and calculation results of the beam phase motion stability are given for the VEPP-2000 and NANOHANA Projects.

  8. Frequency doubling of an InGaAs multiple quantum wells semiconductor disk laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidan, Jiang; Renjiang, Zhu; Maohua, Jiang; Dingke, Zhang; Yuting, Cui; Peng, Zhang; Yanrong, Song

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate a good beam quality 483 nm blue coherent radiation from a frequency doubled InGaAs multiple quantum wells semiconductor disk laser. The gain chip is consisted of 6 repeats of strain uncompensated InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and 25 pairs of GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector. A 4 × 4 × 7 mm3 type I phase-matched BBO nonlinear crystal is used in a V-shaped laser cavity for the second harmonic generation, and 210 mW blue output power is obtained when the absorbed pump power is 3.5 W. The M2 factors of the laser beam in x and y directions are about 1.04 and 1.01, respectively. The output power of the blue laser is limited by the relatively small number of the multiple quantum wells, and higher power can be expected by increasing the number of the multiple quantum wells and improving the heat management of the laser.

  9. Optomechanically induced transparency with Bose–Einstein condensate in double-cavity optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Wei; Gengzang, Duo-Jie; An, Xiu-Jia; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2018-03-01

    We propose a novel technique of generating multiple optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) of a weak probe field in hybrid optomechanical system. This system consists of a cigar-shaped Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC), trapped inside each high finesse Fabry-Pérot cavity. In the resolved sideband regime, the analytic solutions of the absorption and the dispersion spectrum are given. The tunneling strength of the two resonators and the coupling parameters of the each BEC in combination with the cavity field have the appearance of three distinct OMIT windows in the absorption spectrum. Furthermore, whether there is BEC in each cavity is a key factor in the number of OMIT windows determination. The technique presented may have potential applications in quantum engineering and quantum information networks. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11564034, 11105062, and 21663026) and the Scientific Research Funds of College of Electrical Engineering, Northwest University, China (Grant No. xbmuyjrc201115).

  10. A Microbolometer System for Radiation Detection in the THz Frequency Range with a Resonating Cavity Fabricated in the CMOS Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesek, Aleksander; Zemva, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2018-02-14

    The THz sensors using microbolometers as a sensing element are reported as one of the most sensitive room-temperature THz detectors suitable for THz imaging and spectroscopic applications. Microbolometer detectors are usually fabricated using different types of the MEMS technology. The patent for the detection system presented in this paper describes a method for microbolometer fabrication using a standard CMOS technology with advanced micromachining techniques. The measured sensitivity of the sensors fabricated by the patented method is 1000 V/W at an optimal frequency and is determined by the performance of a double-dipole antenna and quarter-wavelength resonant cavity. The paper presents a patented method for fabrication of a microbolometer system for radiation detection in the THz frequency range (16). The method is divided into several stages regarding the current silicon micromachining process. Main stages are fabrication of supporting structures for micro bridge, creation of micro cavities and fabrication of Aluminum antenna and Titanium microbolometer. Additional method for encapsulation in the vacuum is described which additionally improves the performance of bolometer. The CMOS technology is utilized for fabrication as it is cost effective and provides the possibility of larger sensor systems integration with included amplification. At other wavelengths (e.g. IR region) thermistors are usually also the receivers with the sensor resistance change provoked by self-heating. In the THz region the energy is received by an antenna coupled to a thermistor. Depending on the specific application requirement, two types of the antenna were designed and used; a narrow-band dipole antenna and a wideband log-periodic antenna. With method described in the paper, the microbolometer detector reaches sensitivities up to 500 V/W and noise equivalent power (NEP) down to 10 pW/√Hz. Additional encapsulation in the vacuum improves its performance at least by a factor of 2

  11. The comparison of double-diffusive mixed convection in square driven cavities with one and two moving lids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Ghaffarpasand

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the unsteady double-diffusive mixed convection in the one and two-sided lid-driven cavities are studied and compared together using numerical SIMPLE algorithm. Uniform but different temperatures and mass concentrations are assumed at horizontal walls. The used fluid (pure air was assumed incompressible and Newtonian. The used numerical method is firstly validated against previously published numerical results. Then, the numerical simulations were carried out for almost a wide range of Richardson number, whereby the study of various convection regimes would be possible. Results show that the convection heat and mass transfer are reduced with increasing Richardson number. The conductive mode of heat transfer is enhanced by increasing Ri value, so cavities are quasi-conductive domains when fluid flow was dominated by free convection. It was also observed that the heat and mass are better transferred in two-sided lid-driven cavities with respect to the other ones which was due to the extra mechanical forces imposed by the two-sided lids movement. The velocity profile variations demonstrate that the flow is decelerated with increasing Richardson number especially near the bottom horizontal wall. It has also been found that both of entropy generation and total kinetic energy reduce as either Richardson number enhances or two-sided lids movement reduces to one-sided lid movement.

  12. Evaluation of Continuous Irrigation and Drainage with a Double-Cavity Sleeve Tube to Treat Brain Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenxing; Du, Li; Liu, Renzhong; Jian, Zhihong; Wan, Yu

    2017-10-01

    Brain abscesses carries a high morbidity and mortality, and despite medical advances, it continues to pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges worldwide. The traditional surgical approaches to treating brain abscess (burr hole aspiration and craniotomy) have both advantages and disadvantages and remain controversial. Here we report a single institution's experience with a new surgical approach for brain abscess. We retrospectively analyzed 46 patients with intracranial abscess who underwent continuous irrigation and drainage through a double-cavity sleeve tube placed surgically in conjunction with a 4-week course of intravenous cefotaxime and metronidazole at Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University between January 2008 and December 2016. The patients' medical records were analyzed for demographic data, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, imaging findings, microbiological test results, treatments, surgical techniques, and outcomes. The 46 patients included 29 males and 17 females, ranging in age from 22 to 74 years. A single abscess was detected in 34 patients, whereas 12 patients had multiple abscesses. The average duration of hospitalization was 12.6 days. After treatment, 38 of the 46 patients resumed a normal life despite minor deficits (Glasgow Outcome Score [GOS] 5), 6 patients exhibited slight neurologic deficits (GOS 4), and 2 patients died of severe systemic infection and multiorgan failure. In particular, a patient with a brain abscess broken into the ventricle recovered well (GOS 5). No patient required repeat aspiration or surgical excision. Continuous brain abscess cavity irrigation and drainage with a double-cavity sleeve tube is an effective treatment for brain abscess and produces excellent results, especially for an abscess broken into the ventricle. It combines the advantages of burr hole aspiration and open craniotomy excision. It is easy to perform and reduces costs and damage to the patient, and also shortens hospitalization time and

  13. Systematic cavity design approach for a multi-frequency gyrotron for DEMO and study of its RF behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaria, P. C., E-mail: parth.kalaria@partner.kit.edu; Avramidis, K. A.; Franck, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S.; Pagonakis, I. Gr. [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Thumm, M.; Jelonnek, J. [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics (IHE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    High frequency (>230 GHz) megawatt-class gyrotrons are planned as RF sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in DEMOnstration fusion power plants (DEMOs). In this paper, for the first time, a feasibility study of a 236 GHz DEMO gyrotron is presented by considering all relevant design goals and the possible technical limitations. A mode-selection procedure is proposed in order to satisfy the multi-frequency and frequency-step tunability requirements. An effective systematic design approach for the optimal design of a gradually tapered cavity is presented. The RF-behavior of the proposed cavity is verified rigorously, supporting 920 kW of stable output power with an interaction efficiency of 36% including the considerations of realistic beam parameters.

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the electromagnetic adjustment of a quadrupolar radio-frequency cavity accelerating an intense ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoens, Francois

    2002-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis describes radio-frequency quadrupolar (RFQ) cavities in terms of electrostatic and electro-dynamic properties. It describes the construction of a RFQ four-wire model which leads to a differential equation describing the cavity electromagnetic behaviour. The operator spectral theory allows the eigenvalue problem to be solved. An experimental methodology applied to this cavity is presented, and experimental studies are reported with a good correlation between the model resonance modes and measurements performed on the mock-up. The second part reports the development of a mathematical formulation based on the perturbation of line parameters of the previously developed model. This allows the assessment of mechanical defects and of tuning piston control

  15. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  16. Investigation of in-house superconducting radio-frequency 9-cell cavity made of large grain niobium at KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmae, Takeshi; Umemori, Kensei; Yamanaka, Masashi; Watanabe, Yuichi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    The first in-house, 9-cell, superconducting radio-frequency cavity made of large grain Nb was fabricated at KEK. Some characteristic techniques were employed for the fabrication that were not used for fine grain (FG) Nb. Even though a penetrated hole was created during electron beam welding, it was successfully repaired and did not affect the cavity performance. The completed cavity then underwent vertical tests (VTs) via several surface treatment processes. A defect that caused quenches was found after a VT at 25 mm from the equator where the typical local grinding machine developed at KEK could not be utilized. A new local grinding machine using a 3D printer was thus developed for the first time, and it completely removed this defect. Finally, the cavity achieved a maximum Q0 value of 3.8 ×1010 and accelerating gradient of 38 MV/m. The obtained Q0 value is about 1.5 times higher than that for the KEK in-house FG cavity.

  17. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashutosh, E-mail: asingh.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in [Faculty of Physical Sciences, Institute of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Lucknow-Deva Road, Uttar Pradesh 225003 (India); Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Jain, P. K. [Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  18. Cavity-cavity conditional logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Serge; Gao, Yvonne Y.; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    In a superconducting circuit architecture, the highest coherence times are typically offered by 3D cavities. Moreover, these cavities offer a hardware-efficient way of redundantly encoding quantum information. While single-qubit control on a cavity has already been demonstrated, there is a need for a universal two-qubit gate between such cavities. In this talk, we demonstrate a cavity-cavity gate by parametric pumping on a fixed-frequency transmon interacting with the two cavities. Every gate application lowers the state fidelity by only 1%, while maintaining an entangling rate on-off ratio of 29dB. Additionally, we show that the gate is applicable not only to qubits consisting of single photons, but also to more complex encodings. These results illustrate the usefulness of cavities beyond the mere storage of quantum information, and pave the way towards gates between error-corrected logical qubits.

  19. Detection of Second Sound in He-II for Thermal Quench Mapping of Superconducting Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Stegmaier, Tobias; Kind, Matthias; Furci, Hernán; Koettig, Torsten; Peters, Benedikt

    The development of future particle accelerators requires intensive testing of superconducting radio frequency cavities with different sizes and geometries. Non-contact thermometry quench localisation techniques proved to be beneficial for the localisation of surface defects that can originate a quench (sudden loss of superconducting state). These techniques are based on the detection of second sound in helium II. Transition Edge Sensors (TES) are highly sensitive thin film thermometers with fast time response. In the present work, their capability as a thermal quench mapping device for superconducting radio frequency cavities is proven experimentally by detecting second sound waves emitted by SMD heaters in a He-II bath at saturated vapour pressure. A characterisation of the sensors at steady bath temperatures was conducted to calculate the thermal sensitivity. An intense metallurgical study of gold-tin TES with different compositions revealed important relations between the superconducting behaviour and the ...

  20. Prototype development of radio frequency cavity and quadrupole for ADSS - initial efforts by mechanical design and prototype development section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manish; Kamble, Sunil; Choughule, L.S.; Kumar, Sunil; Patankar, S.R.; Phalke, V.M.; Dharmik, D.A.; Singh, Tejinder; Ram, Y.; Chaudhari, A.T.; Pathak, Kavindra; Prasad, N.K.; Marathe, V.V.; Matkar, A.W.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical Design and Prototype Development Section has participated in the efforts for development of RF cavity and Quadrupole for ADSS. Recently prototype Super conducting RF cavity, Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) Simulation Chamber and related experimental setups were developed, fabricated and delivered for the characterisation of various relevant parameters. Under the program for development of Super conducting RF Cavity for high-energy section of LINAC of ADS first prototype RF Cavity of ETP copper was developed by machining and brazing process. The prototype cavity having elliptical and circular profile is the heart of this setup. The cavity is made up of two symmetrical cups joined together by welding or brazing. Various methods are being tried out by MD and PDS for the fabrication of cups and joining them together. Manufacturing of cup by machining and joining them by conventional brazing technique to make the cavity was the first step in this direction. Another method of manufacturing and joining viz forming of cup by deep drawing and joining them by EB welding is in progress. RFQ is a versatile and efficient system for accelerating ion beams especially at low energy. It works in quadrupole mode, which is at 350M Hz. RFQ Focuses, Bunches and Accelerates the beam simultaneously. The bunching is done in this RFQ, which results in more than 95% transmission where as in the normal buncher the transmission is less than 40%. The actual RFQ, which is designed for the PURNIMA facility, will be fabricated from OFHC copper that will accelerate a deuteron (D+) ion beam from 50keV to 400keV over its 1.37meter length. For the validation of manufacturing process and characterisation of various parameters at low frequency a 500mm long prototype RFQ in Aluminium with an accuracy of ± 25microns and surface finish of 1.6 micron has been fabricated by MD and PDS. A simplified simulation chamber to facilitate the development of RFQ for

  1. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsala, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to

  2. Dynamic evolution of double Λ five-level atom interacting with one-mode electromagnetic cavity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, N. H.; Salah, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the model describing a double Λ five-level atom interacting with a single mode electromagnetic cavity field in the (off) non-resonate case is studied. We obtained the constants of motion for the considered model. Also, the state vector of the wave function is given by using the Schrödinger equation when the atom is initially prepared in its excited state. The dynamical evolutions for the collapse revivals, the antibunching of photons and the field squeezing phenomena are investigated when the field is considered in a coherent state. The influence of detuning parameters on these phenomena is investigated. We noticed that the atom-field properties are influenced by changing the detuning parameters. The investigation of these aspects by numerical simulations is carried out using the Quantum Toolbox in Python (QuTip).

  3. OPTICAL PARAMETRIC OSCILLATORS: Optimal feedback in efficient ring double-cavity optical parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petnikova, V. M.; Shuvalov, Vladimir V.

    2010-09-01

    It is shown that the use of two feedback circuits with matched transfer constants and optimal phase incursions in a nondegenerate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) makes it possible to localise the extremes of intensity distributions of interacting waves on the output face of a nonlinear crystal, which provides maximum possible conversion efficiency of pump energy. The optimisation procedure in this case is rather flexible because it is reduced to ambiguous matching of the period and shift of the extremes of exact analytic solutions of the corresponding problem in the form of cnoidal waves with respect to the nonlinear crystal position. Unlike the single-cavity OPO scheme, both these parameters can substantially exceed the nonlinear crystal length and even tend to infinity, which corresponds to solitary soliton-like solutions.

  4. Quad-Chip Double-Balanced Frequency Tripler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert H.; Ward, John S.; Bruneau, Peter J.; Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand C.; Maestrini, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state frequency multipliers are used to produce tunable broadband sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. The maximum power produced by a single chip is limited by the electrical breakdown of the semiconductor and by the thermal management properties of the chip. The solution is to split the drive power to a frequency tripler using waveguides to divide the power among four chips, then recombine the output power from the four chips back into a single waveguide. To achieve this, a waveguide branchline quadrature hybrid coupler splits a 100-GHz input signal into two paths with a 90 relative phase shift. These two paths are split again by a pair of waveguide Y-junctions. The signals from the four outputs of the Y-junctions are tripled in frequency using balanced Schottky diode frequency triplers before being recombined with another pair of Y-junctions. A final waveguide branchline quadrature hybrid coupler completes the combination. Using four chips instead of one enables using four-times higher power input, and produces a nearly four-fold power output as compared to using a single chip. The phase shifts introduced by the quadrature hybrid couplers provide isolation for the input and output waveguides, effectively eliminating standing waves between it and surrounding components. This is accomplished without introducing the high losses and expense of ferrite isolators. A practical use of this technology is to drive local oscillators as was demonstrated around 300 GHz for a heterodyne spectrometer operating in the 2-3-THz band. Heterodyne spectroscopy in this frequency band is especially valuable for astrophysics due to the presence of a very large number of molecular spectral lines. Besides high-resolution radar and spectrographic screening applications, this technology could also be useful for laboratory spectroscopy.

  5. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97% and the PPV 99% within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  6. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenskat, M.

    2017-05-01

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97 % and the positive predictive value (PPV) 99 % within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ = -0.93 with a significance of 6 σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  7. Automated optical inspection and image analysis of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc

    2017-04-15

    The inner surface of superconducting cavities plays a crucial role to achieve highest accelerating fields and low losses. For an investigation of this inner surface of more than 100 cavities within the cavity fabrication for the European XFEL and the ILC HiGrade Research Project, an optical inspection robot OBACHT was constructed. To analyze up to 2325 images per cavity, an image processing and analysis code was developed and new variables to describe the cavity surface were obtained. The accuracy of this code is up to 97% and the PPV 99% within the resolution of 15.63 μm. The optical obtained surface roughness is in agreement with standard profilometric methods. The image analysis algorithm identified and quantified vendor specific fabrication properties as the electron beam welding speed and the different surface roughness due to the different chemical treatments. In addition, a correlation of ρ=-0.93 with a significance of 6σ between an obtained surface variable and the maximal accelerating field was found.

  8. Coherent-state storage and retrieval between superconducting cavities using parametric frequency conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirois, A. J.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; DeFeo, M. P.; Ranzani, L.; Lecocq, F.; Simmonds, R. W.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J.

    2015-01-01

    In superconducting quantum information, machined aluminum superconducting cavities have proven to be a well-controlled, low-dissipation electromagnetic environment for quantum circuits such as qubits. They can possess large internal quality factors, Q int  > 10 8 , and present the possibility of storing quantum information for times far exceeding those of microfabricated circuits. However, in order to be useful as a storage element, these cavities require a fast “read/write” mechanism—in other words, they require tunable coupling between other systems of interest such as other cavity modes and qubits, as well as any associated readout hardware. In this work, we demonstrate these qualities in a simple dual cavity architecture in which a low-Q “readout” mode is parametrically coupled to a high-Q “storage” mode, allowing us to store and retrieve classical information. Specifically, we employ a flux-driven Josephson junction-based coupling scheme to controllably swap coherent states between two cavities, demonstrating full, sequenced control over the coupling rates between modes

  9. Analysis of Nb3Sn surface layers for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Chaoyue; Posen, Sam; Hall, Daniel Leslie; Groll, Nickolas; Proslier, Thomas; Cook, Russell; Schlepütz, Christian M.; Liepe, Matthias; Pellin, Michael; Zasadzinski, John

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of Nb 3 Sn surface layers grown on a bulk Niobium (Nb) coupon prepared at the same time and by the same vapor diffusion process used to make Nb 3 Sn coatings on 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. Tunneling spectroscopy reveals a well-developed, homogeneous superconducting density of states at the surface with a gap value distribution centered around 2.7 ± 0.4 meV and superconducting critical temperatures (T c ) up to 16.3 K. Scanning transmission electron microscopy performed on cross sections of the sample's surface region shows an ∼2 μm thick Nb 3 Sn surface layer. The elemental composition map exhibits a Nb:Sn ratio of 3:1 and reveals the presence of buried sub-stoichiometric regions that have a ratio of 5:1. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments indicate a polycrystalline Nb 3 Sn film and confirm the presence of Nb rich regions that occupy about a third of the coating volume. These low T c regions could play an important role in the dissipation mechanisms occurring during RF tests of Nb 3 Sn-coated Nb cavities and open the way for further improving a very promising alternative to pure Nb cavities for particle accelerators

  10. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S_{(1,1} varying from 0 to −30  db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. The coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  11. Effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser on microbial mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yansheng; Wang, Luyan; Zheng, Heng; Yin, Hongping; Chen, Xiangdong; Tan, Zheng; Wu, Wutong

    1999-09-01

    We are going to report the mutagenic effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on microbe. After irradiation with pulse laser, mutants of abscisic acid producing strains and erythromycin producing strains were obtained, one of which could produce 62.1% and 57% more products than control, respectively. In the study of mutagenization of Spirulina platensis caused by pulse laser, we selected a high photosynthetic strains, with improved productivity of protein and exocellular ploysaccharides of 12% and 246%, respectively. The experimental results indicate that frequency-doubling pulse laser (532 nm) is a potential new type of physical mutagenic factor.

  12. The change of electric potentials in the oral cavity after application of extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Skomro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric potentials occurring in the oral cavity deserve attention as they may cause various diseases and subjective feelings, which are very difficult to treat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the electric potentials within the oral cavity in patients with metal fillings and metal prosthetic restorations, after using a pulsed electromagnetic field. The study was carried out on 84 patients. The Viofor JPS Classic device was used in the treatment. It generates a pulsed electromagnetic field with low induction of the extremely low frequency (ELF range. Average values of electric potentials in the preliminary test were about the same in both groups; they were 148.8 mV and 145.5 mV. After another appliance of ELF fields there was found a steady decline in the average value of electric potentials in the study group. This decrease was statistically highly significant, while mean values of electric potentials in the control group were characterized by a slightly upward tendency. The obtained statistically significant reduction of electric potentials in the oral cavity of patients having metal fillings and metal prosthetic restorations, after application of the Viofor JPS Classic device, implies a huge impact of ELF pulsed electromagnetic field on inhibition of electrochemical processes, as well as on inhibition of dental alloy corrosion. 

  13. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots” were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD, and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations. All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. The local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  14. Conditioning of high voltage radio frequency cavities by using fuzzy logic in connection with rule based programming

    CERN Document Server

    Perréard, S

    1993-01-01

    Many processes are controlled by experts using some kind of mental model to decide actions and make conclusions. This model, based on heuristic knowledge, can often be conveniently represented in rules and has not to be particularly accurate. This is the case for the problem of conditioning high voltage radio-frequency cavities: the expert has to decide, by observing some criteria, if he can increase or if he has to decrease the voltage and by how much. A program has been implemented which can be applied to a class of similar problems. The kernel of the program is a small rule base, which is independent of the kind of cavity. To model a specific cavity, we use fuzzy logic which is implemented as a separate routine called by the rule base. We use fuzzy logic to translate from numeric to symbolic information. The example we chose for applying this kind of technique can be implemented by sequential programming. The two versions exist for comparison. However, we believe that this kind of programming can be powerf...

  15. External-cavity high-power dual-wavelength tapered amplifier with tunable THz frequency difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-01-01

    is achieved with a frequency difference of 0.86 THz, the output power is higher than 1.3 W in the 5.0 THz range of frequency difference, and the amplified spontaneous emission intensity is more than 20 dB suppressed in the range of frequency difference. The beam quality factor M2 is 1.22±0.15 at an output...

  16. Vortex Ring Formation Characteristics in Synthetic Jet due to Changes of Excitation Frequency in the ½-Ball Cavity Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosasih, Engkos A.; Harinaldi; Trisno, Ramon

    2017-04-01

    A jet flow that contains vortex ring has a large energy compared to a regular jet. As one of the causes of the aerodynamic drag to the vehicle, the flow separation that occurs behind the bluff body must be controlled, so that aerodynamic drag can be significantly reduced. This study is a basic work on the development of turbulent flow separation control for aerodynamic purpose, especially in the design of the vehicle body. The main objective of this study is to analyze the performance of the synthetic jet (SJA) as one of flow control tool to reduce separation area. To get the maximum performance of the synthetic jet actuator, the research starts by characterizing the actuator. Characterization of ½ ball-shaped cavity is done with excitation frequency changes and orifice diameter of 3, 5 and 8 mm. The study was conducted using computational and experimental methods. The experimental data was obtained by testing synthetic jet actuator with providing sinusoidal signal to drive the membrane and at the orifice end a hotwire probe that is set and plugged into a CTA (Constant Temperature Anemometry) to obtain the speed velocity of the exhaust jet. Computational methods used a commercial CFD software (FLUENT 6.3) with a Reynolds Stress Model as a model of turbulence. Each of these calculations or measurements was conducted under the same conditions. The research result is displayed in frequency testing curve to get the maximum velocity of the jet stream. The results are further indicative of the synthetic jet actuator capability to generate vortex rings. In the experimental results, the determination of ring vortex formation taken from the calculation of the flow velocity, while the CFD simulations, the formation of vortex rings can be seen from the visualization of the flow contour. Vortex ring formed from this ½ -ball cavity, occurred at 3 mm and 5 mm orifice diameter, while the 8 mm orifice diameter cavity cannot form a ring vortex.

  17. Development of Control System for Fast Frequency Tuners of Superconducting Resonant Cavities for FLASH and XFEL Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Przygoda, K

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation covers the recent research and development (R&D) activities of control systems for the fast frequency tuners of TESLA cavities and predicts the implications foreseen for large scale machines such as the FLASH and the planned XFEL. In particular, the framework of the presented activities is the effort toward the: 1. R&D of the driving circuit, 2. R&D of the control algorithm, 3. R&D of the control system. The main result of these activities is the permanent installation of the target piezo control system and its commissioning for 40 cavities divided into 5 accelerating modules at the DESY FLASH facility. The author’s contribution was the study of possible designs of high-voltage, high-current power amplifiers, used for driving the fast frequency tuners, shows that several parameters of such a device needs to be considered. The most important parameter is the input and output power estimation. This arises from the fact that the estimation is the most crucial issue for both po...

  18. Cavity types

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In the field of particle accelerators the most common use of RF cavities is to increase the particle velocity of traversing particles. This feature makes them one of the core ingredients of every accelerator, and in the case of linear accelerators they are even the dominant machine component. Since there are many different types of accelerator, RF cavities have been optimized for different purposes and with different abilities, e.g., cavities with fixed or variable RF frequency, cavities for short or long pulses/CW operation, superconducting and normal-conducting cavities. This lecture starts with a brief historical introduction and an explanation on how to get from Maxwell's equations to a simple cavity. Then, cavities will be classified by the type of mode that is employed for acceleration, and an explanation is given as to why certain modes are used in particular cavity types. The lecture will close with a comparison of normal versus superconducting cavities and a few words on the actual power consumption ...

  19. Computer program for calculating the resonant frequency, shunt impedance and quality factor of a pill-box cavity in a storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguero, V.M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1983-10-01

    Keil and Zotter have analyzed the electromagnetic fields excited by the longitudinal density fluctuations of an unbunched relativistic particle beam drifting in a corrugated vacuum chamber of circular cross section. At higher frequencies, these corrugations become resonant cavities. Zotter has written a computer program known as KN7C to compute the resonant frequencies. However, in the actual use of KN7C, some difficulties are encountered. To surmount these difficulties, the program known as CAVITY was written to analyze this pill-box shaped resonant cavity. Although there are many input variables to this program, only two are essential and need to be specified. They are BD = b/d = the ratio of the circular beampipe radius to that of the pill-box cavity and GD = g/d where g is the length of the cavity. When they are specified, CAVITY will print out the dimensionless normalized fundamental resonant frequency FD, shunt impedance Z and figure of merit Q. From these, the actual resonant frequency, shunt impedance and figure of merit can be deduced. The program is described and a listing is provided

  20. A quadrature frequency converter in a feedback loop of high frequency cavities in the Proton Synchrotron at CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Truszczynski, T

    This thesis presents the author’s work during the internship at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN). The quadrature frequency converter is one of the modules that has been developed to upgrade the Proton Synchrotron RF system. Basic information about accelerators, fundamentals of IQ signal representation, mixing and phase shifting techniques are introduced. The development process of the converter is presented with the design details and measurements of the prototype board.

  1. Cavity-augmented frequency tripling of a continuous wave mode-locked laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Gail; Ferguson, Allister I.; Langford, Nigel

    2001-01-01

    We present a model and experimental investigation of a singly-resonant optical cavity to enhance the nonlinear conversion efficiency of a continuous wave mode-locked all-solid-state laser source to produce an efficient source of ultraviolet radiation. For input pulses of approximately 33 ps duration at 4.4 ns intervals, our model predicts greater than 30% conversion from fundamental to third harmonic which is particularly attractive for fundamental sources of modest average power. Experimentally, we have achieved overall optical conversion efficiencies from fundamental to third harmonic wavelength typically greater than 11%, compared with less than 0.4% in a single pass geometry. We have measured an average power of 320 mW at λ=355 nm at picosecond pulse duration, which corresponds to a generated third harmonic average power of 0.5 W. (author)

  2. Fabrication and measurement of a 10x scale model of a double-sided planar mm-wave linac cavity structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Matthews, P.; Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    A double-sided planar mm-wave linear accelerating cavity, structure has been investigated. An 80-cell constant impedance structure working with 2π/3-mode traveling wave was chosen as an accelerator section. A 10x scale model of the structure has been fabricated and the basic electrical performances have been tested. The nodal shift measurement technique with a rectangular detuning plunger was used to measure the phase advance between the cells with a vector network analyzer

  3. Phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines in a χ(2) phase-matched aluminum nitride microring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hojoong; Guo, Xiang; Zhu, Na; Papp, Scott B; Diddams, Scott A; Tang, Hong X

    2016-08-15

    Nonlinear optical conversion with frequency combs is important for self-referencing and for generating shorter wavelength combs. Here we demonstrate efficient frequency comb doubling through the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) of an input comb with a high Q, phase-matched χ(2) microring resonator. Phase coherence of the SHG and SFG nonlinear conversion processes is confirmed by sinusoidal phase-dependent interference between frequency doubled comb lines.

  4. Efficient generation of 3.5W laser light at 515nm by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Müller, André

    2017-01-01

    More than 3.5 W of green light at 515 nm is generated by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser. The frequency doubling is performed in a cascade of PPMgLN and PPMgSLT crystals in order to reach high power and avoid thermal effects present in PPMgLN at high power....... The green light is diffraction limited (M2

  5. Double-diffusive natural convection in inclined porous cavities with various aspect ratios and temperature-dependent heat source or sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamkha, Ali J.; Al-Mudhaf, Ali

    2008-04-01

    Laminar double-diffusive natural convective flow of a binary fluid mixture in inclined square and rectangular cavities filled with a uniform porous medium in the presence of temperature-difference dependent heat generation (source) or absorption (sink) is considered. Transverse gradients of heat and mass are applied on two opposing walls of the cavity while the other two walls are kept adiabatic and impermeable to mass transfer. The problem is put in terms of the stream function-vorticity formulation. A numerical solution based on the finite-difference methodology is obtained for relatively high Lewis numbers. Representative results illustrating the effects of the inclination angle of the cavity, buoyancy ratio, Darcy number, heat generation or absorption coefficient and the cavity aspect ratio on the contour maps of the streamline, temperature, and concentration as well as the profiles of velocity, temperature and concentration at mid-section of the cavity are reported. In addition, numerical results for the average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented for various parametric conditions and discussed.

  6. Frequency Characteristics of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube Resonator with Different Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ha LEE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have conducted classical molecular dynamics simulations for DWCNTs of various wall lengths to investigate their use as ultrahigh frequency nano-mechanical resonators. We sought to determine the variations in the frequency of these resonators according to changes in the DWCNT wall lengths. For a double-walled carbon nanotube resonator with a shorter inner nanotube, the shorter inner nanotube can be considered to be a flexible core, and thus, the length influences the fundamental frequency. In this paper, we analyze the variation in frequency of ultra-high frequency nano-mechnical resonators constructed from DWCNTs with different wall lengths.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.12951

  7. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  8. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  9. Dispersive-cavity actively mode-locked fiber laser for stable radio frequency delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Yitang; Wang, Ruixin; Yin, Feifei; Xu, Kun; Li, Jianqiang; Lin, Jintong

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel technique for highly stable transfer of a radio frequency (RF) comb over long optical fiber link, which is highly dispersive and is a part of an actively mode-locked fiber laser. Phase fluctuation along the fiber link, which is mainly induced by physical vibration and temperature fluctuations, is automatically compensated by the self-adapted wavelength shifting. Without phase-locking loop or any tunable parts, stable radio frequency is transferred over a 2-km fiber link, with a time jitter suppression ratio larger than 110. (letter)

  10. Over 8 W high peak power UV laser with a high power Q-switched Nd:YVO4 oscillator and the compact extra-cavity sum-frequency mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, X P; Liu, Q; Gong, M; Wang, D S; Fu, X

    2009-01-01

    A 8.2 W UV laser was reported with the compact extra-cavity sum-frequency mixing. The IR fundamental frequency source was a high power and high beam quality Q-switched Nd:YVO 4 oscillator. 38 W fundamental frequency laser at 1064 nm was obtained at the pulse repetition rate of 450 kHz with the beam quality factors of M 2 x = 1.27, M 2 y = 1.21. The type I and type II phase-matched LBO crystals were used as the extra-cavity frequency doubling and mixing crystals respectively. At 38 kHz, 8.2 W UV laser at 355 nm was achieved with the pulse duration of 8 ns corresponding to the pulse peak power as high as 27 kW, and the optical-optical conversion efficiency from IR to UV was 25.6%. The output characteristics of the IR and the harmonic generations varying with the pulse repetition rate were also investigated detailedly

  11. Study of fuzzy adaptive PID controller on thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Qingkai; Zhang, Tao; Yan, Yining

    2016-10-01

    There are contradictions among speediness, anti-disturbance performance, and steady-state accuracy caused by traditional PID controller in the existing light source systems of thermal frequency stabilizing laser with double longitudinal modes. In this paper, a new kind of fuzzy adaptive PID controller was designed by combining fuzzy PID control technology and expert system to make frequency stabilizing system obtain the optimal performance. The experiments show that the frequency stability of the designed PID controller is similar to the existing PID controller (the magnitude of frequency stability is less than 10-9 in constant temperature and 10-7 in open air). But the preheating time is shortened obviously (from 10 minutes to 5 minutes) and the anti-disturbance capability is improved significantly (the recovery time needed after strong interference is reduced from 1 minute to 10 seconds).

  12. Evaluation of magnocellular pathway abnormalities in schizophrenia: a frequency doubling technology study and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Benites Vaz de Lima

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual processing deficits have been reported for patients with schizophrenia. Previous studies demonstrated differences in early-stage processing of schizophrenics, although the nature, extent, and localization of the disturbance are unknown. The magnocellular and parvocellular visual pathways are associated with transient and sustained channels, but their respective contributions to schizophrenia-related visual deficits remains controversial. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate magnocellular dysfunction in schizophrenia using frequency doubling technology. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with schizophrenia and 34 healthy volunteers were examined. Frequency doubling technology testing was performed in one session, consisting of a 15-minute screening strategy followed by the C-20 program for frequency doubling technology. RESULTS: Schizophrenic patients showed lower global mean sensitivity (30,97 ± 2,25 dB compared with controls (32,17 ± 3,08 dB, p<0.009. Although there was no difference in the delta sensitivity of hemispheres, there was a difference in sensitivity analysis of the fibers crossing the optic chiasm, with lower mean sensitivity in the patient group (28,80 dB versus controls (30,66 dB. The difference was higher in fibers that do not cross the optic chiasm, with lower mean sensitivity in patients (27,61 dB versus controls (30,26 dB, p<0.005. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that there are differences between global sensitivity and fiber sensitivity measured by frequency doubling technology. The different sensitivity of fibers that do not cross the optic chiasm is consistent with most current etiological hypotheses for schizophrenia. The decreased sensitivity responses in the optic radiations may significantly contribute to research assessing early-stage visual processing deficits for patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Radio frequency plasma method for uniform surface processing of RF cavities and other three-dimensional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Svetozar; Upadhyay, Janardan; Vuskovic, Leposava; Phillips, H. Lawrence; Valente-Feliciano, Anne-Marie

    2017-12-26

    A method for efficient plasma etching of surfaces inside three-dimensional structures can include positioning an inner electrode within the chamber cavity; evacuating the chamber cavity; adding a first inert gas to the chamber cavity; regulating the pressure in the chamber; generating a plasma sheath along the inner wall of the chamber cavity; adjusting a positive D.C. bias on the inner electrode to establish an effective plasma sheath voltage; adding a first electronegative gas to the chamber cavity; optionally readjusting the positive D.C. bias on the inner electrode reestablish the effective plasma sheath voltage at the chamber cavity; etching the inner wall of the chamber cavity; and polishing the inner wall to a desired surface roughness.

  14. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [Old Dominion U.; Delayen, Jean R. [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  15. A double quantum (129)Xe NMR experiment for probing xenon in multiply-occupied cavities of solid-state inclusion compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Darren H; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2007-03-07

    A method is presented for detecting multiple xenon atoms in cavities of solid-state inclusion compounds using (129)Xe double quantum NMR spectroscopy. Double quantum filtered (129)Xe NMR spectra, performed on the xenon clathrate of Dianin's compound were obtained under high-resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) conditions, by recoupling the weak (129)Xe-(129)Xe dipole-dipole couplings that exist between xenon atoms in close spatial proximity. Because the (129)Xe-(129)Xe dipole-dipole couplings are generally weak due to dynamics of the atoms and to large internuclear separations, and since the (129)Xe Chemical Shift Anisotropy (CSA) tends to be relatively large, a very robust dipolar recoupling sequence was necessary, with the symmetry-based SR26 dipolar recoupling sequence proving appropriate. We have also attempted to measure the (129)Xe-(129)Xe dipole-dipole coupling constant between xenon atoms in the cavities of the xenon-Dianin's compound clathrate and have found that the dynamics of the xenon atoms (as investigated with molecular dynamics simulations) as well as (129)Xe multiple spin effects complicate the analysis. The double quantum NMR method is useful for peak assignment in (129)Xe NMR spectra because peaks arising from different types of absorption/inclusion sites or from different levels of occupancy of single sites can be distinguished. The method can also help resolve ambiguities in diffraction experiments concerning the order/disorder in a material.

  16. Translocation frequency of double-stranded DNA through a solid-state nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-01-01

    Solid-state nanopores are single-molecule sensors that measure changes in ionic current as charged polymers such as DNA pass through. Here, we present comprehensive experiments on the length, voltage, and salt dependence of the frequency of double-stranded DNA translocations through conical quartz nanopores with mean opening diameter 15 nm. We observe an entropic barrier-limited, length-dependent translocation frequency at 4M LiCl salt concentration and a drift-dominated, length-independent translocation frequency at 1M KCl salt concentration. These observations are described by a unifying convection-diffusion equation, which includes the contribution of an entropic barrier for polymer entry. PMID:26986356

  17. Robust Deterministic Controlled Phase-Flip Gate and Controlled-Not Gate Based on Atomic Ensembles Embedded in Double-Sided Optical Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, A.-Peng; Cheng, Liu-Yong; Guo, Qi; Zhang, Shou

    2018-02-01

    We first propose a scheme for controlled phase-flip gate between a flying photon qubit and the collective spin wave (magnon) of an atomic ensemble assisted by double-sided cavity quantum systems. Then we propose a deterministic controlled-not gate on magnon qubits with parity-check building blocks. Both the gates can be accomplished with 100% success probability in principle. Atomic ensemble is employed so that light-matter coupling is remarkably improved by collective enhancement. We assess the performance of the gates and the results show that they can be faithfully constituted with current experimental techniques.

  18. Clinical analysis of 532nm frequency-doubled laser in treating retinal holes of 78 eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the clinical effect of photocoagulation with 532nm frequency-doubled laser in patients with retinal hole.METHODS: Seventy-two cases(78 eyeswith retinal holes were treated with 532nm frequency-doubled laser. All the eyes were divided according to the quadrants of location of retinal holes and the size of retinal hole and existence of local retinal detachment accompanying retinal holes. Statistical analysis was made on these data.RESULTS: 1The retinal holes were located in the upper quadrants of retina in 44 eyes and there were also retinal holes located in the lower quadrants of retina in 31 eyes(there were 3 eyes with retinal holes both located in the upper and lower quadrants of retina, which were not included in control group. The difference of photocoagulation effect between the two groups was statistically significant. 2The retinal holes diameter ≤2 papilla diameter(PDwere present in 37 eyes, the holes diameter of retina >2PD were seen in 41 eyes, the difference of photocoagulation effect between the two groups was statistically significant. 3Retinal holes without local retinal detachment were observed in 45 eyes, retinal holes with local retinal detachment were seen in 33 eyes, the difference of photocoagulation effect between the two groups was statistically significant.CONCLUSION:Photocoagulation with 532nm frequency-doubled laser is effective and safe to treat retinal holes. The effect is better in patients with retinal holes in the upper quadrants and with the retinal holes diameter ≤2PD and without local retinal detachment.

  19. Temporal structure of double plasma frequency emission of thin beam-heated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Sklyarov, V. F.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Gavrilenko, D. Ye.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Kasatov, A. A.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Popov, S. S.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Sudnikov, A. V.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Trunev, Yu. A.; Vyacheslavov, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    In the work presented here dynamics of spiky microwave emission of a beam-heated plasma near the double plasma frequency in ˜100 GHz band was studied. The plasma is heated by 80 keV, ˜2 MW, sub-ms electron beam that is injected into the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The beam-heated plasma diameter is of the order of the emitted wavelength. Modulation of individual emission spikes in the microwave radiation is found. The radiation dynamics observed can be attributed to a small number of compact emitting zones that are periodically distorted.

  20. Green frequency-doubled laser-beam propagation in high-temperature hohlraum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, C; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Jones, O; Kirkwood, R K; Meezan, N; Moody, J D; Ross, J; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter losses of a frequency-doubled (2omega) laser beam interacting with inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas. The electron temperature of 3.3 keV, approximately a factor of 2 higher than achieved in previous experiments with open geometry targets, approaches plasma conditions of high-fusion yield hohlraums. In this new temperature regime, we measure 2omega laser-beam transmission approaching 80% with simultaneous backscattering losses of less than 10%. These findings suggest that good laser coupling into fusion hohlraums using 2omega light is possible.

  1. Reduction of a Double Supply Frequency Pressure Pulsation in an Electro-Magnetic Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Seung-Hwan; Park, Rae-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Seong-O

    2007-01-01

    Fast breeder reactors using sodium coolant have adopted the AC induction electro-magnetic (EM) pump as a coolant pump for a liquid metal flow. The EM pumps have some disadvantages such as a double supply frequency (DSF) pressure pulsation and so on. The DSF pressure pulsation occurs in the induction EM pump, when an alternating current is supplied to the coils. The magnetic field produced by the coils reacts with the alternating current being passed through the sodium, and then the pressure developed pulsates at twice the input frequency. The DSF pressure pulsation is dominantly affected by the disturbances of the electromagnetic force near the stator or core ends. The disturbance of the electromagnetic force can be derived the Lenz's Law which means that the opposite forces are generated when the magnetic field abruptly changed by the liquid metal flows near the stator ends. This phenomenon is called as the end effect

  2. Explicit formulation for natural frequencies of double-beam system with arbitrary boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzabeigy, Alborz; Madoliat, Reza [Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabbagh, Vahid [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, free transverse vibration of two parallel beams connected through Winkler type elastic layer is investigated. Euler- Bernoulli beam hypothesis has been applied and it is assumed that boundary conditions of upper and lower beams are similar while arbitrary without any limitation even for non-ideal boundary conditions. Material properties and cross-section geometry of beams could be different from each other. The motion of the system is described by a homogeneous set of two partial differential equations, which is solved by using the classical Bernoulli-Fourier method. Explicit expressions are derived for the natural frequencies. In order to verify accuracy of results, the problem once again solved using modified Adomian decomposition method. Comparison between results indicates excellent accuracy of proposed formulation for any arbitrary boundary conditions. Derived explicit formulation is simplest method to determine natural frequencies of double-beam systems with high level of accuracy in comparison with other methods in literature.

  3. Frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by gamma irradiation in single, double and triple dwarf wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhonukshe, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Induced mutation studies were carried with three dwarf wheat varieties viz., ''Sonalika'', ''Chhoti Lerma'' and ''Hira'', considered to be single, double and trible dwarfs, respectively. Gamma-rays were used as a source of irradiation. Frequency of chlorophyll mutations were comparatively low and the spectrum was narrow. Chlorophyll mutations were altogether absent in the variety ''Sonalika''. A very wide spectrum of viable mutations affecting stem, leaf, ear growth habit, maturity and fertility characteristics was observed in the M 2 . The cumulative frequency of all the mutants together was quite high, which varied with the varieties. There were varietal differences in the composition and width of the spectrum induced by gamma-rays. The dwarf mutants having desirable leaf and spike characters were isolated in all the three varieties. (author)

  4. Tunable-wavelength picosecond vortex generation in fiber and its application in frequency-doubled vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wending; Wei, Keyan; Wang, Heng; Mao, Dong; Gao, Feng; Huang, Ligang; Mei, Ting; Zhao, Jianlin

    2018-01-01

    We present a method for tunable-wavelength picosecond vortex pulse generation by using an acoustically-induced fiber grating (AIFG). The AIFG-driven mode conversion characteristic was activated via a shear-mode piezoelectric transducer that excels in excitation efficiency of acoustic flexural wave and mechanical stability. The linearly-polarized ±1-order picosecond vortex pulse was experimentally generated via AIFG with a uniform coupling efficiency of ∼98.4% from the fundamental mode to the ±1-order vortex mode within the wavelength range 1540 nm ∼ 1560 nm. The topological charge and the linearly-polarized characteristic of the picosecond vortex pulse were verified by examination of the off-axial interference and the polarization angle-dependent intensity, respectively. Furthermore, the picosecond vortex pulse with wavelength tunability was input to a nonlinear BBO crystal to generate a frequency-doubled ±2-order vortex in the wavelength range 770 nm ∼ 780 nm. This technology provides a convenient apparatus for generating a picosecond vortex pulse and the frequency-doubled vortex with wavelength tunability.

  5. Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Sean; Barnard, Patrick L.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Frazer, Neil; Erikson, Li; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding. In most coastal regions, the amount of sea-level rise occurring over years to decades is significantly smaller than normal ocean-level fluctuations caused by tides, waves, and storm surge. However, even gradual sea-level rise can rapidly increase the frequency and severity of coastal flooding. So far, global-scale estimates of increased coastal flooding due to sea-level rise have not considered elevated water levels due to waves, and thus underestimate the potential impact. Here we use extreme value theory to combine sea-level projections with wave, tide, and storm surge models to estimate increases in coastal flooding on a continuous global scale. We find that regions with limited water-level variability, i.e., short-tailed flood-level distributions, located mainly in the Tropics, will experience the largest increases in flooding frequency. The 10 to 20 cm of sea-level rise expected no later than 2050 will more than double the frequency of extreme water-level events in the Tropics, impairing the developing economies of equatorial coastal cities and the habitability of low-lying Pacific island nations.

  6. Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Sean; Barnard, Patrick L; Fletcher, Charles H; Frazer, Neil; Erikson, Li; Storlazzi, Curt D

    2017-05-18

    Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding. In most coastal regions, the amount of sea-level rise occurring over years to decades is significantly smaller than normal ocean-level fluctuations caused by tides, waves, and storm surge. However, even gradual sea-level rise can rapidly increase the frequency and severity of coastal flooding. So far, global-scale estimates of increased coastal flooding due to sea-level rise have not considered elevated water levels due to waves, and thus underestimate the potential impact. Here we use extreme value theory to combine sea-level projections with wave, tide, and storm surge models to estimate increases in coastal flooding on a continuous global scale. We find that regions with limited water-level variability, i.e., short-tailed flood-level distributions, located mainly in the Tropics, will experience the largest increases in flooding frequency. The 10 to 20 cm of sea-level rise expected no later than 2050 will more than double the frequency of extreme water-level events in the Tropics, impairing the developing economies of equatorial coastal cities and the habitability of low-lying Pacific island nations.

  7. Double jeopardy revisited: clinical decision making in unstable patients with, thoraco-abdominal stab wounds and, potential injuries in multiple body cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Damian L; Gall, Tamara M H; Thomson, Sandie R

    2011-05-01

    In the setting of the hypovolaemic patient with a thoraco-abdominal stab wound and potential injuries in both the chest and abdomen, deciding which cavity to explore first may be difficult.Opening the incorrect body cavity can delay control of tamponade or haemorrhage and exacerbate hypothermia and fluid shifts. This situation has been described as one of double jeopardy. All stab victims from July 2007 to July 2009 requiring a thoracotomy and laparotomy at the same operation were identified from a database. Demographics, site and nature of injuries, admission observations and investigations as well as operative sequence were recorded. Correct sequencing was defined as first opening the cavity with most lethal injury. Incorrect sequencing was defined as opening a cavity and finding either no injury or an injury of less severity than a simultaneous injury in the unopened cavity. The primary outcome was survival or death. Sixteen stab victims underwent thoracotomy and laparotomy during the same operation. All were male with an age range of 18–40 (mean/median 27). Median systolic blood pressure on presentation was 90 mm Hg. (quartile range 80–90 mm Hg). Median base excess was 6.5 (quartile range 12 to 2.2). All the deaths were the result of cardiac injuries. Incorrect sequencing occurred in four patients (25%). In this group there were four negative abdominal explorations prior to thoracotomy with two deaths. There was one death in the correct sequencing group. Incorrect sequencing in stab victims who require both thoracotomy and laparotomy at the same sitting is associated with a high mortality. This is especially true when the abdomen is incorrectly entered first whilst the life threatening pathology is in the chest. Clinical signs may be confusing, leading to incorrect sequencing of exploration. The common causes for confusion include failure to appreciate that cardiac tamponade does not present with bleeding and difficulty in assessing peritonism in an

  8. Investigation of self-frequency doubling crystals, yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB), doped with neodymium or ytterbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing

    1999-09-01

    There is a need for low cost red, green, and blue (RGB) lasers for a number of commercial applications such as high-resolution laser printing, full color laser display. While semiconductor lasers still have both availability (green and blue) and beam quality (red) problems, nonlinear frequency conversion of diode-pumped solid state lasers are good alternatives. Among them, self- frequency doubling is an attractive approach because of its simpler design and lower cost. Unfortunately, few known crystals possess self-frequency doubling property. A newly discovered yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB) can fill in the role because it has adequate lasing and nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency. More importantly, YCOB crystal melts congruently so that high quality, large size single crystals can be grown using conventional Czochralski melt pulling technique. The thermal mechanical properties, linear and nonlinear optical properties of YCOB, laser properties of Nd:YCOB and Yb:YCOB crystals were investigated. Based on the calculated second harmonic phase matching angles, Nd:YCOB laser rods were fabricated. Self-frequency doubled green emission with 62 mW output power and red emission with 16 mW output power were successfully demonstrated using diode-pumping. It is the first time to achieve the continuous wave (cw) red lasing in Nd doped rare-earth calcium oxyborates. Rare-earth ions doping in YCOB crystal can not only achieve lasing, but also affect the physical and chemical properties of the crystal. The stability field of YCOB is reduced in proportion to both the ionic size differences from yttrium and doping concentrations of the rare-earth ions. The doping also changes the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the material. For example, the second harmonic conversion efficiency of 20% Yb doped YCOB was enhanced by more than 15% compared to undoped YCOB. The absorption cutoff edge of 20% Yb:YCOB was red- shift by more than 60 nm. Similar effects were observed in

  9. Frequency Modulated Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy: A General Technique for Trace Gas and Isotope Measurements with Unprecedented Sensitivity, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new technique is proposed for improved trace gas detection and measurement that combines the high absorption depths afforded by mid-infrared Integrated Cavity...

  10. Tolerance of low-frequency ultrasound sonophoresis: a double-blind randomized study on humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruani, Annabel; Vierron, Emilie; Machet, Laurent; Giraudeau, Bruno; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Boucaud, Alain

    2012-05-01

    Sonophoresis [low-frequency ultrasound (US)] has been used in animals and in vitro to investigate enhanced percutaneous absorption of drugs. No study focused on its clinical human tolerance has been published as yet. We aimed to assess the bioeffects of low-frequency US in vivo on human skin in a double-blind randomized-controlled study. We applied pulse-mode US at 36 kHz for 5 min in a step procedure of increasing dosage, from 1.57 to 3.50 W/cm(2), and placebo. The primary outcome was toxic effects of the procedure, defined as a pain score >40 on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale or necrosis. Erythema (scored from 0 to 3 in severity) was also evaluated. The secondary outcomes were measurements of skin thickness by high-resolution skin imaging, of skin capacitance and temperature. We included 34 healthy volunteers. We found no pain score >38 and no skin necrosis with either US or placebo. Erythema was systematically observed immediately after US application, but after 1 day, we observed three cases in the knee group. The most frequent adverse effect was tinnitus. We observed no marked increase in temperature or cutaneous thickness after US or placebo. Cutaneous capacitance increased immediately after both applications. Such data demonstrating good tolerance of sonophoresis can be useful before the initiation of a clinical trial of the therapeutic use of low-frequency sonophoresis in humans. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Conjugating precision and acquisition time in a Doppler broadening regime by interleaved frequency-agile rapid-scanning cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotti, Riccardo; Gatti, Davide; Masłowski, Piotr; Lamperti, Marco; Belmonte, Michele; Laporta, Paolo; Marangoni, Marco

    2017-10-01

    We propose a novel approach to cavity-ring-down-spectroscopy (CRDS) in which spectra acquired with a frequency-agile rapid-scanning (FARS) scheme, i.e., with a laser sideband stepped across the modes of a high-finesse cavity, are interleaved with one another by a sub-millisecond readjustment of the cavity length. This brings to time acquisitions below 20 s for few-GHz-wide spectra composed of a very high number of spectral points, typically 3200. Thanks to the signal-to-noise ratio easily in excess of 10 000, each FARS-CRDS spectrum is shown to be sufficient to determine the line-centre frequency of a Doppler broadened line with a precision of 2 parts over 1011, thus very close to that of sub-Doppler regimes and in a few-seconds time scale. The referencing of the probe laser to a frequency comb provides absolute accuracy and long-term reproducibility to the spectrometer and makes it a powerful tool for precision spectroscopy and line-shape analysis. The experimental approach is discussed in detail together with experimental precision and accuracy tests on the (30 012) ← (00 001) P12e line of CO2 at ˜1.57 μm.

  12. Frequency-doubled diode laser for direct pumping of Ti:sapphire lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Unterhuber, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    A single-pass frequency doubled high-power tapered diode laser emitting nearly 1.3 W of green light suitable for direct pumping of Ti:sapphire lasers generating ultrashort pulses is demonstrated. The pump efficiencies reached 75 % of the values achieved with a commercial solid-state pump laser....... However, the superior electro-optical efficiency of the diode laser improves the overall efficiency of the Ti:sapphire laser by a factor > 2. The optical spectrum emitted by the Ti:sapphire laser shows a spectral width of 112 nm (FWHM). Based on autocorrelation measurements, pulse widths of less than 20...... fs are measured. These results open the opportunity of establishing diode laser pumped Ti:sapphire lasers for e.g. biophotonic applications like retinal optical coherence tomography or pumping of photonic crystal fibers for CARS microscopy....

  13. Double variable frequency pendulum isolator for seismic isolation of liquid storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, D.P., E-mail: soni_svit@yahoo.co [Civil Engineering Department, Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel Institute of Technology, Vasad 388 306, Gujarat (India); Mistry, B.B., E-mail: bbm_7@yahoo.co.i [Engineering College, Tuwa 389 001 (India); Panchal, V.R., E-mail: vijay_svit@yahoo.co.i [Civil Engineering Department, Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel Institute of Technology, Vasad 388 306, Gujarat (India)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: The seismic response of liquid storage tanks isolated by the DVFPI is investigated. Four DVFPI design cases are considered by varying properties of the both surfaces. Criterion to optimize its performance is proposed based on minimum responses. Different stiffness of top and bottom surfaces optimizes the DVFPI for a slender tank. Equal stiffness of top and bottom surfaces optimizes the DVFPI for a broad tank. - Abstract: The paper describes the behaviour of liquid storage slender and broad tanks isolated by the double variable frequency pendulum isolator (DVFPI). The DVFPI is a double sliding isolation system having elliptical sliding surfaces. The geometry and coefficient of friction of top and bottom sliding surfaces can be unequal. The governing equations of motion and energy balance equation of the tank-isolation system subjected to bilateral ground excitation are derived and solved in the incremental form. In order to investigate the behaviour of the DVFPI, the response is obtained under different parametric variations for a set of 20 far-field earthquake ground motions. Four different combinations of the DVFPI design cases having different isolator geometry and coefficient friction at top and bottom sliding surfaces are studied and the criterion to optimize its performance is proposed based on minimum responses and energy quantities. Further, influences of the initial time period, coefficient of friction and frequency variation factors at the two sliding surfaces and the tank aspect ratio are investigated. It is found that the performance of the DVFPI can be optimized by designing the top sliding surface with high initial stiffness relative to the bottom one and the coefficient of friction of both sliding surfaces to be equal for a slender tank whereas both surfaces should be designed with equal initial stiffness and coefficient of friction for a broad tank.

  14. Double-grid finite-difference frequency-domain (DG-FDFD) method for scattering from chiral objects

    CERN Document Server

    Alkan, Erdogan; Elsherbeni, Atef

    2013-01-01

    This book presents the application of the overlapping grids approach to solve chiral material problems using the FDFD method. Due to the two grids being used in the technique, we will name this method as Double-Grid Finite Difference Frequency-Domain (DG-FDFD) method. As a result of this new approach the electric and magnetic field components are defined at every node in the computation space. Thus, there is no need to perform averaging during the calculations as in the aforementioned FDFD technique [16]. We formulate general 3D frequency-domain numerical methods based on double-grid

  15. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dhakal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q_{0} values of the order of 2×10^{10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B_{p} of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q_{0} value of (5±1×10^{10} at 2.0 K and B_{p}=90  mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  16. Multicolor cavity soliton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rui; Liang, Hanxiao; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-25

    We show a new class of complex solitary wave that exists in a nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The cavity soliton consists of multiple soliton-like spectro-temporal components that exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, formed together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor cavity soliton shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which would be very useful for versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy.

  17. Effect of low temperature baking in nitrogen on the performance of a niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Chetri, Santosh; Balachandran, Shreyas; Lee, Peter J.; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2018-03-01

    We report the rf performance of a single cell superconducting radiofrequency cavity after low temperature baking in a nitrogen environment. A significant increase in quality factor has been observed when the cavity was heat treated in the temperature range of 120 - 160 °C with a nitrogen partial pressure of ˜25 m Torr . This increase in quality factor as well as the Q -rise phenomenon (anti-Q -slope) is similar to those previously obtained with high temperature nitrogen doping as well as titanium doping. In this study, a cavity N2 -treated at 120 °C and at 140 °C showed no degradation in accelerating gradient, however the accelerating gradient was reduced by ˜25 % with a 160 °C N2 treatment, compared to the baseline tests after electropolishing. Sample coupons treated in the same conditions as the cavity were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a complex surface composition of Nb2O5 , NbO and NbN(1 -x )Ox within the rf penetration depth. Furthermore, magnetization measurements showed no significant change on bulk superconducting properties.

  18. Effect of low temperature baking in nitrogen on the performance of a niobium superconducting radio frequency cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashupati Dhakal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the rf performance of a single cell superconducting radiofrequency cavity after low temperature baking in a nitrogen environment. A significant increase in quality factor has been observed when the cavity was heat treated in the temperature range of 120–160 °C with a nitrogen partial pressure of ∼25  m Torr. This increase in quality factor as well as the Q-rise phenomenon (anti-Q-slope is similar to those previously obtained with high temperature nitrogen doping as well as titanium doping. In this study, a cavity N_{2}-treated at 120 °C and at 140 °C showed no degradation in accelerating gradient, however the accelerating gradient was reduced by ∼25% with a 160 °C N_{2} treatment, compared to the baseline tests after electropolishing. Sample coupons treated in the same conditions as the cavity were analyzed by scanning electron microscope, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a complex surface composition of Nb_{2}O_{5}, NbO and NbN_{(1−x}O_{x} within the rf penetration depth. Furthermore, magnetization measurements showed no significant change on bulk superconducting properties.

  19. Measures of maximum magnetic field in 3 GHz radio frequency superconducting cavities; Mesures du gradient accelerateur maximum dans des cavites supraconductrices en regime impulsionnel a 3 GHz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Catherine [Paris-11 Univ., 91 Orsay (France)

    2000-01-19

    Theoretical models have shown that the maximum magnetic field in radio frequency superconducting cavities is the superheating field H{sub sh}. For niobium, H{sub sh} is 25 - 30% higher than the thermodynamical H{sub c} field: H{sub sh} within (240 - 274) mT. However, the maximum magnetic field observed so far is in the range H{sub c,max} = 152 mT for the best 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. This field is lower than the critical field H{sub c1} above which the superconductor breaks up into divided normal and superconducting zones (H{sub c1}{<=}H{sub c}). Thermal instabilities are responsible for this low value. In order to reach H{sub sh} before thermal breakdown, high power short pulses are used. The cavity needs then to be strongly over-coupled. The dedicated test bed has been built from the collaboration between Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) - Sezione di Genoa, and the Service d'Etudes et Realisation d'Accelerateurs (SERA) of Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL). The maximum magnetic field, H{sub rf,max}, measurements on INFN cavities give lower results than the theoretical speculations and are in agreement with previous results. The superheating magnetic fields is linked to the magnetic penetration depth. This superconducting characteristic length can be used to determine the quality of niobium through the ratio between the resistivity measured at 300 K and 4.2 K in the normal conducting state (RRR). Results have been compared to previous ones and agree pretty well. They show that the RRR measured on cavities is superficial and lower than the RRR measured on samples which concerns the volume. (author)

  20. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-01-01

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth

  1. Second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling optical pulse injection for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking of an SOA fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Jui; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-09-01

    A second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling of a 10 GHz optical pulse-train is demonstrated to backward injection mode-lock a semiconductor optical amplifier fiber laser (SOAFL) for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking (RHML). That is, a real all-optical gain-modulation of the SOAFL can be created by injecting such a time-multiplexed but pseudo-frequency-doubled pulse-train into the cavity. The time-multiplexing pulse-train can thus be transformed into a frequency-multiplied pulse-train via cross-gain modulation (XGM). The optical pulse-train at 10 GHz is generated by nonlinearly driving an electro-absorption modulator (EAM), which experiences the second-order fractional Talbot effect after propagating through a 4 km long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF). The DCF not only plays the role of frequency-doubler but also compensates the frequency chirp of the 10 GHz optical pulse-train. The pulsewidth broadening from 22 to 60 ps for initiating the time-domain Talbot effect is simulated by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. With careful detuning of the RF modulation power of the EAM at 5 dBm, the generated 20 GHz optical pulse-train exhibits a positive frequency chirp with minimum peak-to-peak value of 2 GHz, and the peak-amplitude fluctuation between adjacent pulses is below 1.4%. In comparison with the SOAFL pulse-train repeated at 40 GHz generated by the fourth-order purely RHML process, the optimized second-order fractional Talbot effect in combination with the second-order RHML mechanism significantly enhances the modulation-depth of RHML, thus improving the on/off extinction ratio of the 40 GHz SOAFL pulse-train from 1.8 to 5.6 dB. Such a new scheme also provides a more stable 40 GHz RHML pulse-train from the SOAFL with its timing jitter reducing from 0.51 to 0.23 ps.

  2. Glaucoma progression detection with frequency doubling technology (FDT) compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP) in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Jansonius, Nomdo M.

    Purpose: To determine the usefulness of frequency doubling perimetry (FDT) for progression detection in glaucoma, compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP). Methods: Data were used from 150 eyes of 150 glaucoma patients from the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study. After baseline, SAP was

  3. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J; Tang, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications.

  4. Role of frequency doubling technology perimetry in screening of diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh Rajul

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the ability of frequency-doubling technology perimetry (FDT to detect sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy. Method: Fifty-eight eyes of fifty-eight patients with established diagnosis of diabetes mellitus with diabetic retinopathy, fifty-five eyes of fifty-five diabetic patients without retinopathy, and forty-one eyes of forty-one normals underwent FDT and dilated stereo-biomicroscopic fundus examination. The sensitivity and specificity of FDT in identification of "sight-threatening retinopathy" (severe and very severe nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy and clinically significant macular edema (CSME were determined. Results: For the detection of sight-threatening retinopathy, two abnormal adjacent points depressed to any level on the 20-1 screening program had a sensitivity of 90.5% and specificity of 97.6%. At (assuming a 10% prevalence of sight-threatening retinopathy in a diabetic clinic, two abnormal adjacent points anywhere in the field depressed to any level has a positive predictive value (PPV of 48% with a negative predictive value of 98.8%. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CSME was poor. Conclusions: The 20-1 screening program of the FDT is useful in the detection of sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (PPV 48%. A normal 20-1 test rules out sight-threatening retinopathy. FDT was not useful in the detection of CSME.

  5. Simultaneous Stabilization of Gyrotron Frequency and Power by PID Double Feedback Control on the Acceleration and Anode Voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results of simultaneous stabilization of both the frequency and the output power by a double PID feedback control on the acceleration and anode voltages in the 460-GHz gyrotron FU CW GVI, also known as "Gyrotron FU CW GO-1" (according to the nomenclature adopted at Osaka University). The approach used in the experiments is based on the modulation of the cyclotron frequency and the pitch factor (velocity ratio) of the electron beam by varying the acceleration and the anode voltages, respectively. In a long-term experiment, the frequency and power stabilities were made to be better than ±10-6 and ±1%, respectively.

  6. A novel multi-dimensional absolute distance measurement system using a basic frequency modulated continuous wave radar and an external cavity laser with trilateration metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xingting; Qu, Xinghua; Zhang, Fumin

    2018-01-01

    We propose and describe a novel multi-dimensional absolute distance measurement system. This system incorporates a basic frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar and an second external cavity laser (ECL). Through the use of trilateration, the system in our paper can provide 3D resolution inherently range. However, the measured optical path length differences (OPD) is often variable in industrial environments and this will causes Doppler effect, which has greatly impact on the measurement result. With using the second ECL, the system can correct the Doppler effect to ensure the precision of absolute distance measurement. Result of the simulation will prove the influence of Doppler effect.

  7. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  8. Finite element analysis and frequency shift studies for the bridge coupler of the coupled cavity linear accelerator of the spallation neutron source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z. (Zukun)

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron scattering research facility. The linear accelerator (linac) is the principal accelerating structure and divided into a room-temperature linac and a superconducting linac. The normal conducting linac system that consists of a Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and a Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) is to be built by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The CCL structure is 55.36-meters long. It accelerates H- beam from 86.8 Mev to 185.6 Mev at operating frequency of 805 MHz. This side coupled cavity structure has 8 cells per segment, 12 segments and 11 bridge couplers per module, and 4 modules total. A 5-MW klystron powers each module. The number 3 and number 9 bridge coupler of each module are connected to the 5-MW RF power supply. The bridge coupler with length of 2.5 {beta}{gamma} is a three-cell structure and located between the segments and allows power flow through the module. The center cell of each bridge coupler is excited during normal operation. To obtain a uniform electromagnetic filed and meet the resonant frequency shift, the RF induced heat must be removed. Thus, the thermal deformation and frequency shift studies are performed via numerical simulations in order to have an appropriate cooling design and predict the frequency shift under operation. The center cell of the bridge coupler also contains a large 4-inch slug tuner and a tuning post that used to provide bulk frequency adjustment and field intensity adjustment, so that produce the proper total field distribution in the module assembly.

  9. Surprising Performance for Vibrational Frequencies of the Distinguishable Clusters with Singles and Doubles (DCSD) and MP2.5 Approximations

    OpenAIRE

    Kesharwani, Manoj K.; Sylvetsky, Nitai; Martin, Jan M. L.

    2017-01-01

    We show that the DCSD (distinguishable clusters with all singles and doubles) correlation method permits the calculation of vibrational spectra at near-CCSD(T) quality but at no more than CCSD cost, and with comparatively inexpensive analytical gradients. For systems dominated by a single reference configuration, even MP2.5 is a viable alternative, at MP3 cost. MP2.5 performance for vibrational frequencies is comparable to double hybrids such as DSD-PBEP86-D3BJ, but without resorting to empir...

  10. Frequency-domain lifetime fluorometry of double-labeled creatine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, M; Kubala, M; Amler, E; Mejsnar, J

    2003-01-01

    Myofibril-bound creatine kinase EC 2.7.3.2 (CK), a key enzyme of muscle energy metabolism, has been selected for studies of conformational changes that underlie the cellular control of enzyme activity. For fluorescence spectroscopy measurements, the CK molecule was double-labeled with IAF (5-iodoacetamidofluorescein) and ErITC (erythrosin 5'-isothiocyanate). Measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from fluorescein to erythrosin was used to obtain information about the donor-acceptor pair distance. Frequency-domain lifetime measurements evaluate the donor-acceptor distance in the native CK molecule as 7.8 nm. The Förster radius equals 5.3 nm with the resolution range from 0.2 to 1.0 nm. Erythrosin-fluorescein labeling (EFL) was tested for artificial conformational changes of the CK molecule with high-salt concentration treatment. The transition distance, defined by His-97 and Cys-283 and derived from a 3D model equals 0.766 nm for the open (inactive) form and 0.277 nm for the closed (reactive) form of the CK molecule. In this way, the resolution range of the used spectroscopy method is significant, concerning the difference of 0.489 nm. Nevertheless, the CK enzyme activity, assessed by the hexokinase-coupled assay, was diminished down to 1 % of the activity of the native enzyme. EFL is suitable for description of conformational behavior implied from the regulation of creatine kinase. However, the observed inhibition restricts EFL to studies of conformational changes during natural catalytic activity.

  11. Combining Frequency Doubling Technology Perimetry and Scanning Laser Polarimetry for Glaucoma Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Warren, Joshua L; Hochberg, Jessica T; Budenz, Donald L; Chang, Robert T; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2015-01-01

    To determine the ability of frequency doubling technology (FDT) and scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx-VCC) to detect glaucoma when used individually and in combination. One hundred ten normal and 114 glaucomatous subjects were tested with FDT C-20-5 screening protocol and the GDx-VCC. The discriminating ability was tested for each device individually and for both devices combined using GDx-NFI, GDx-TSNIT, number of missed points of FDT, and normal or abnormal FDT. Measures of discrimination included sensitivity, specificity, area under the curve (AUC), Akaike's information criterion (AIC), and prediction confidence interval lengths. For detecting glaucoma regardless of severity, the multivariable model resulting from the combination of GDx-TSNIT, number of abnormal points on FDT (NAP-FDT), and the interaction GDx-TSNIT×NAP-FDT (AIC: 88.28, AUC: 0.959, sensitivity: 94.6%, specificity: 89.5%) outperformed the best single-variable model provided by GDx-NFI (AIC: 120.88, AUC: 0.914, sensitivity: 87.8%, specificity: 84.2%). The multivariable model combining GDx-TSNIT, NAP-FDT, and interaction GDx-TSNIT×NAP-FDT consistently provided better discriminating abilities for detecting early, moderate, and severe glaucoma than the best single-variable models. The multivariable model including GDx-TSNIT, NAP-FDT, and the interaction GDx-TSNIT×NAP-FDT provides the best glaucoma prediction compared with all other multivariable and univariable models. Combining the FDT C-20-5 screening protocol and GDx-VCC improves glaucoma detection compared with using GDx or FDT alone.

  12. Single crystal growth and nonlinear optical properties of Nd3+ doped STGS crystal for self-frequency-doubling application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feifei; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Xinle; Cheng, Xiufeng; Yu, Fapeng; Wang, Zhengping; Zhao, Xian

    2017-11-01

    The self-frequency-doubling crystal is an important kind of multi-functional crystal materials. In this work, Nd3+ doped Sr3TaGa3Si2O14 (Nd:STGS) single crystals were successfully grown by using Czochralski pulling method, in addition, the nonlinear and laser-frequency-doubling properties of Nd:STGS crystals were studied. The continuous-wave laser at 1064 nm was demonstrated along different physical axes, where the maximum output power was obtained to be 295 mW for the Z-cut samples, much higher than the Y-cut (242 mW) and X-cut (217 mW) samples. Based on the measured refractive indexes, the phase matching directions were discussed and determined for type I (42.5°, 30°) and type II (69.5°, 0°) crystal cuts. As expected, self-frequency-doubling green laser at 529 nm was achieved with output powers being around 16 mW and 12 mW for type I and type II configurations, respectively.

  13. Double-wavelet approach to study frequency and amplitude modulation in renal autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Pavlov, A.N.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2004-01-01

    Biological time series often display complex oscillations with several interacting rhythmic components. Renal autoregulation, for instance, involves at least two separate mechanisms both of which can produce oscillatory variations in the pressures and flows of the individual nephrons. Using doubl...

  14. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  15. The importance of oral hygiene on adults with the focus on preventive measures resulting in the reduction of oral cavity diseases frequency.

    OpenAIRE

    KÁPLOVÁ, Hana

    2015-01-01

    The Dissertation work presented herein monitors the significance of oral hygiene in adults, while aiming at preventive measures leading to lowering mouth cavity illness occurrences. Within the theoretical part, I focus on the delineation of important terms relating to preventive care for oral cavity, information concerning anatomy, physiology of oral cavity, influence of foods and other problems within the oral cavity, among which there are tooth cavities and diseases of gingiva. In the pract...

  16. MOSFET technologies for double-pole four-throw radio-frequency switch

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Viranjay M

    2014-01-01

    This book provides analysis and discusses the design of various MOSFET technologies which are used for the design of Double-Pole Four-Throw (DP4T) RF switches for next generation communication systems. The authors discuss the design of the (DP4T) RF switch by using the Double-Gate (DG) MOSFET, as well as the Cylindrical Surrounding double-gate (CSDG) MOSFET.  The effect of HFO2 (high dielectric material) in the design of DG MOSFET and CSDG MOSFET  is also explored. Coverage includes comparison of Single-gate MOSFET and Double-gate MOSFET switching parameters, as well as testing of MOSFETs parameters using image acquisition.  ·         Provides a single-source reference to the latest technologies for the design of Double-gate MOSFET, Cylindrical Surrounding double-gate MOSFET and HFO2 based MOSFET; ·         Explains the design of RF switches using the technologies presented and simulates switches; ·         Verifies parameters and discusses feasibility of devices and switches.

  17. Frequency of Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during class II cavity preparation among dental students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Yazdani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during proximal cavity preparation is one of the most common side effects in operative dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of iatrogenic damages to adjacent tooth during the preparation of proximal Class II cavities among undergraduate students at dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010 .   Materials and Methods: 106 posterior permanent teeth which had Class II decay with sound proximal surfaces of adjacent teeth were selected and restored by dental students awarding the aims of the present study. After finishing restoration, proximal surfaces were completely dried by air and evaluated with dental chair light. In doubtful cases, surfaces were evaluated with × 3 magnification. Damages were classified into 2 groups; abrasion and groove. Data were analyzed using Fishers exact and Pearson chi square tests .   Results: The frequency of adjacent surfaces damage were 57.5%, with 31.1% damages as abrasion and 26.4% as groove. Students who used matrix band and wedge in proximal area as preventive instruments showed 53.4% damages and other students showed 57.3% damages (P>0.05. A significantly higher number of females and students at restorative course level (3 used wedge and matrix band than males and students at restorative course level (4 for protecting adjacent teeth (P<0.05.   Conclusion: According to the high percentage of iatrogenic damages on adjacent sound teeth in class II cavity preparation, teaching of preventive methods and using proper techniques is necessary for dental students as future dentists.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei : sensitivity enhancements using double frequency sweeps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iuga, Dinu

    2003-01-01

    Exploiting adiabatic passages of the spin transitions, this thesis reports sensitivity enhancements of the MAS and MQMAS experiments on half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. The processes governing frequency sweeping are described. During such experiments the irradiation frequency sweeps through the

  19. Aging of the HF-H_{2}SO_{4} electrolyte used for the electropolishing of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities: Origins and cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eozénou

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Electropolishing (EP in the HF-H_{2}SO_{4} electrolyte is the most desirable surface treatment for niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities yet demonstrated, in terms of performance and surface finish. However, the efficiency of the electrolyte declines quickly with time (decrease in removal rate, deterioration of the niobium surface, increased sulfur generation. Previous studies at CEA Saclay have highlighted the impact of the water content in EP mixtures rather than the content of dissolved niobium. Knowledge of the electrochemical system was improved thanks to studies using a rotating disk electrode (RDE. Measurements with a RDE give precious information concerning mass transport of the different ionic groups present in the solution. The performed measurements prove that EP is controlled by the diffusion of fluorine ions and the value of the related diffusion coefficient D_{F-} was estimated for different mixtures. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements were also performed with different EP mixtures. Both volt ampere metric and EIS measurements prove the central role of fluorine during EP and show that EP mechanisms evolve with the aging of the bath. Another major problem related to electrolytes is the formation of impurities such as sulfur. We have proved that working at a reduced voltage of 5 V does not alter cavity performance and makes it possible to reduce the undesirable particulate contamination in electrolytes and to increase their lifetime.

  20. Squeezing based on nondegenerate frequency doubling internal to a realistic laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Buchhave, Preben

    2004-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the quantum fluctuations of the fundamental field in the output of a nondegenerate second-harmonic generation process occurring inside a laser cavity. Due to the nondegenerate character of the nonlinear medium, a field orthogonal to the laser field is for some operating...... conditions independent of the fluctuations produced by the laser medium. We show that this fact may lead to perfect squeezing for a certain polarization mode of the fundamental field. The experimental feasibility of the system is also discussed....

  1. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids in plaque damage the enamel covering your teeth. It also creates holes in the tooth called cavities. Cavities usually do not hurt, unless they grow very large and affect nerves or cause a tooth fracture. An untreated cavity can lead to an infection ...

  2. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  3. Raman scattering of a photon with frequency doubling by a channelled positron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalashnikov, N P [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation); Krokhin, O N [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We have analysed the possibility of appearance of anti-Stokes lines in the spectrum of Raman scattering of a photon by a 'quasi-bound' charged particle in the regime of planar (axial) channelling. It is shown that radiation may emerge at the frequency, which is a combination of the incident photon frequency ω{sub 0} and transition frequency ω{sub i} in the transverse quantised motion of a channelled particle: ω = ω{sub 0} ± 2γ{sup 2}ω{sub i}, where γ is the relativistic (Lorentz) factor of a channelled particle. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Laser frequency stabilization and control of optical cavities with suspended mirrors for the VIRGO interferometric detector of gravitational waves; Stabilisation en frequence du laser et controle de cavites optiques a miroirs suspendus pour le detecteur interferometrique d'ondes gravitationnelles VIRGO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsuglia, Matteo [Paris-11 Univ., 91 Orsay (France)

    1999-05-17

    The VIRGO detector is an interferometer with 3 km Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms. It is aimed at the detection of gravitational radiation emitted by astrophysical sources. This thesis comprises two independent parts. The first part is devoted to the laser frequency stabilization. In the second one we present a study of a suspended cavity. We determine the impact of laser frequency fluctuations on the overall VIRGO sensitivity. We study the frequency stabilization of the interferometer considered as an ultra-stable standard and we evaluate the noise pertaining to different signals taken into consideration. A strategy of control is discussed. We then study the VIRGO mode-cleaner prototype, a 30 m suspended triangular cavity, for which we have developed a control in order to keep it locked. Finally, we characterize this cavity in terms of mode spectra, finesse and mechanical transfer functions. (author)

  5. A Frequency-Domain Adaptive Filter (FDAF) Prediction Error Method (PEM) Framework for Double-Talk-Robust Acoustic Echo Cancellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil-Cacho, Jose M.; van Waterschoot, Toon; Moonen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new framework to tackle the double-talk (DT) problem in acoustic echo cancellation (AEC). It is based on a frequency-domain adaptive filter (FDAF) implementation of the so-called prediction error method adaptive filtering using row operations (PEM-AFROW) leading...... to the FDAF-PEM-AFROW algorithm. We show that FDAF-PEM-AFROW is by construction related to the best linear unbiased estimate (BLUE) of the echo path. We depart from this framework to show an improvement in performance with respect to other adaptive filters minimizing the BLUE criterion, namely the PEM...

  6. Glaucoma progression detection with frequency doubling technology (FDT) compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP) in the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselink, Christiaan; Jansonius, Nomdo M

    2017-09-01

    To determine the usefulness of frequency doubling perimetry (FDT) for progression detection in glaucoma, compared to standard automated perimetry (SAP). Data were used from 150 eyes of 150 glaucoma patients from the Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study. After baseline, SAP was performed approximately yearly; FDT every other year. First and last visit had to contain both tests. Using linear regression, progression velocities were calculated for SAP (Humphrey Field Analyzer) mean deviation (MD) and FDT MD and the number of test locations with a total deviation probability below p glaucoma progression in patients who cannot perform SAP reliably. © 2017 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2017 The College of Optometrists.

  7. LD-pumped Nd:YVO sub 4 frequency-doubled by CPM LBO laser at 671 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng Quan; Qian Long Sheng; Zhao Ling

    2001-01-01

    A design of LD-pumped high efficient Nd:YVO sub 4 /LBO red laser is reported. Using critical phase-matching LBO for the first time, 671 nm red laser is obtained by 1.342 mu m intracavity frequency doubling. With 800 mW incident pump laser, 52 mW and 97 mW TEM00 mode red laser output are obtained by II-typed and I-typed LBO. The optical-to-optical conversions are up to 6.5% and 12.1% respectively

  8. Characterization of fast acoustic wave propagation using OFDR with double interrogation and frequency tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive OFDR system capable of detecting and tracking fast acoustic wave propagation is described. The system was tested by dropping a screw (50gr) and a paperclip (impact of the screw led to a transient shift in the frequency of the interrogating light which corrupted the observed response. By tracking the beat frequencies of predefined reflectors and extracting their amplitudes significant improvement in the system's output was obtained.

  9. Polarized-photon frequency filter in double-ferromagnetic barrier silicene junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantngarm, Peerasak; Yamada, Kou [Domain of Mechanical Science and Technology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Gunma (Japan); Soodchomshom, Bumned, E-mail: Bumned@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2017-05-01

    We present an analytical study of effects from circularly polarized light illumination on controlling spin-valley currents in a dual ferromagnetic-gated silicene. Two different perpendicular electric fields are applied into the ferromagnetic (FM) gates and the photo-irradiated normal (NM) area between the gates. One parallel (P) and two anti-parallel (AP) configurations of exchange fields applied along with chemical potential to the gates are used in this investigation. Interestingly, the studied junction might give rise to polarized-photon frequency filter. Spin-valley filtering can be achieved at the off-resonant frequency region with appropriate direction of electric fields and the configuration of exchange fields (AP-1 or AP-2). Under the photo irradiation, this study found that tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) is controllable to achieve giant magnetoresistance (GMR) by adjusting electric fields or chemical potentials. Our study suggests the potential of photo-sensing devices in spin-valleytronics realm. - Highlights: • Photon-frequency control of spin-valley currents in silicene is investigated. • Complete photon frequency filtering effect is predicted. • Giant magnetoresistance induced by polarized photon is also found. • The junction is applicable for photo-sensing devices in spin-valleytronics realm.

  10. A practical double-sided frequency selective surface for millimeter-wave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohyuddin, Wahab; Woo, Dong Sik; Choi, Hyun Chul; Kim, Kang Wook

    2018-02-01

    Analysis, design, and implementation of a practical, high-rejection frequency selective surface (FSS) are presented in this paper. An equivalent circuit model is introduced for predicting the frequency response of the FSS. The FSS consists of periodic square loop structures fabricated on both sides of the thin dielectric substrate by using the low-cost chemical etching technique. The proposed FSS possesses band-stop characteristics and is implemented to suppress the 170 GHz signal with attenuation of more than 45 dB with insensitivity to an angle of incident plane wave over 20°. Good agreement is observed among calculated, simulated, and measured results. The proposed FSS filter can be used in various millimeter-wave applications such as the protection of imaging diagnostic systems from high spurious input power.

  11. Simultaneous frequency stabilization and high-power dense wavelength division multiplexing (HP-DWDM) using an external cavity based on volume Bragg gratings (VBGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengesbach, Stefan; Klein, Sarah; Holly, Carlo; Witte, Ulrich; Traub, Martin; Hoffmann, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Multiplexing technologies enable the development of high-brightness diode lasers for direct industrial applications. We present a High-Power Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexer (HP-DWDM) with an average channel spacing of 1.7 (1.5) nm and a subsequent external cavity mirror to provide feedback for frequency stabilization and multiplexing in one step. The "self-optimizing" multiplexing unit consists of four reflective Volume Bragg Gratings (VBGs) with 99% diffraction efficiency and seven dielectric mirrors to overlay the radiation of five input channels with an adjustable channel spacing of 1-2 nm. In detail, we focus on the analysis of the overall optical efficiency, the change of the beam parameter product and the spectral width. The performance is demonstrated using five 90 μm multimode 9xx single emitters with M2angular intensity distribution changes strongly and the beam parameter product decreases by a factor of 1.2 to 1.9. Thereby the angular intensity distribution is more affected than the width of the beam waist. The spectral width per emitter decreases to 3-200 pm (FWHM) depending on the injection current and the reflectance of the feedback mirror (0.75%, 1.5%, 4%, 6% or 8%). The overall optical multiplexing efficiency ranges between 77% and 86%. With some modifications (e.g. enhanced AR-coatings) we expect 90-95%.

  12. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  13. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  14. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2015-02-01

    double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been fabricated. The clad seamless tubes were produced using hot bonding or explosive bonding and subsequent flow forming. The thicknesses of Nb and Cu layers in the tube wall are about 1 and 3 mm respectively. The rf performance of the best NbCu clad cavities is similar to that of bulk Nb cavities. The highest accelerating gradient achieved was 40  MV/m. The advantages and disadvantages of hydroformed cavities are discussed in this paper.

  15. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  16. Superconducting Storage Cavity for RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi,I.

    2009-01-02

    This document provides a top-level description of a superconducting cavity designed to store hadron beams in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It refers to more detailed documents covering the various issues in designing, constructing and operating this cavity. The superconducting storage cavity is designed to operate at a harmonic of the bunch frequency of RHIC at a relatively low frequency of 56 MHz. The current storage cavities of RHIC operate at 197 MHz and are normal-conducting. The use of a superconducting cavity allows for a high gap voltage, over 2 MV. The combination of a high voltage and low frequency provides various advantages stemming from the resulting large longitudinal acceptance bucket.

  17. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  18. Improvement of the frequency-doubling efficiency of high-average-power lasers using multicrystal scheme with opposite thermal properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Various multicrystal schemes have been widely used in the frequency conversion process of high power lasers or short-pulse lasers. Here we propose and numerically demonstrate a novel multicrystal scheme for improving the frequency-doubling efficiency of high-average-power lasers. Our proposed multicrystal scheme includes two different kinds of nonlinear crystals with opposite thermal properties, in which thermal-induced phase mismatches in the first crystal may be compensated by the next crystal. As a result, the sensitivity of conversion efficiency to temperature deviations is reduced. The simulation results show that the temperature acceptance bandwidth of our two-crystal scheme is 5 times larger than that of common single crystal scheme. And a broader temperature acceptance bandwidth will be obtained if a three-crystal scheme is adopted. More important of all, the temperature-insensitive property of multicrystal scheme is independent of pump wavelength, which means it can be applied in various high-average-power laser systems. OCIS codes: (190.2620 Harmonic generation and mixing, (190.4410 Nonlinear optics, (140.6810 Thermal effects

  19. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  20. High-frequency isotopic analysis of liquid water samples in the field - initial results from continuous water sampling and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Freyberg, Jana; Studer, Bjørn; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Studying rapidly changing hydrochemical signals in catchments can help to improve our mechanistic understanding of their water flow pathways and travel times. For these purposes, stable water isotopes (18O and 2H) are commonly used as natural tracers. However, high-frequency isotopic analyses of liquid water samples are challenging. One must capture highly dynamic behavior with high precision and accuracy, but the lab workload (and sample storage artifacts) involved in collecting and analyzing thousands of bottled samples should also be avoided. Therefore, we have tested Picarro, Inc.'s newly developed Continuous Water Sampler Module (CoWS), which is coupled to their L2130-i Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to enable real-time on-line measurements of 18O and 2H in liquid water samples. We coupled this isotope analysis system to a dual-channel ion chomatograph (Metrohm AG, Herisau, Switzerland) for analysis of major cations and anions, as well as a UV-Vis spectroscopy system (s::can Messtechnik GmbH, Vienna, Austria) and electrochemical probes for characterization of basic water quality parameters. The system was run unattended for up to a week at a time in the laboratory and at a small catchment. At the field site, stream-water and precipitation samples were analyzed, alternating at sub-hourly intervals. We observed that measured isotope ratios were highly sensitive to the liquid water flow rate in the CoWS, and thus to the hydraulic head difference between the CoWS and the samples from which water was drawn. We used a programmable high-precision dosing pump to control the injection flow rate and eliminate this flow-rate artifact. Our experiments showed that the precision of the CoWS-L2130-i-system for 2-minute average values was typically better than 0.06‰ for δ18O and 0.16‰ for δ2H. Carryover effects were 1% or less between isotopically contrasting water samples for 30-minute sampling intervals. Instrument drift could be minimized through periodic analysis of

  1. Engineering interactions between long-lived cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yvonne; Rosenblum, Serge; Reinhold, Philip; Wang, Chen; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    The availability of large Hilbert dimensions and outstanding coherence properties make superconducting cavities promising systems for storing quantum information. Recent experiments in cQED has demonstrated that redundantly encoding logical qubits in such cavities is a hardware-efficient approach toward error-correctable quantum memories. In order to tap into the power of these protected memories for quantum information processing, robust inter-cavity operations are required. A simple way to realise such operations between two cavities is using the non-linearity of the Josephson junction. To do so, we adopt a multi-cavity architecture where a fixed-frequency, single junction transmon simultaneously couples to two highly coherent 3D cavities. Using only external RF drives, we demonstrate transmon-cavity as well as cavity-cavity SWAP operations and show that such interactions are essential building blocks for implementing multi-cavity conditional logics.

  2. Generation of more than 300 mW diffraction-limited light at 405 nm by second-harmonic generation of a tapered diode laser with external cavity feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Holm, J.; Sumpf, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have constructed a blue laser source consisting of a single-frequency tapered diode laser with external cavity feedback that is frequency doubled by a quasi-phase matched KTP (PPKTP) in a bowtie ring cavity and extract more than 360 mW of power at 405 nm. The conversion efficiency from fundame...... fundamental laser power to second harmonic power is 35 %, while it is 64 % from coupled fundamental power to extracted blue light. Thermal effects and gray tracking set an upper limit on the amount of generated blue light.......We have constructed a blue laser source consisting of a single-frequency tapered diode laser with external cavity feedback that is frequency doubled by a quasi-phase matched KTP (PPKTP) in a bowtie ring cavity and extract more than 360 mW of power at 405 nm. The conversion efficiency from...

  3. AIR FLOW AND ENVIRONMENTAL WIND VISUALIZATION USING A CW DIODE PUMPED FREQUENCY DOUBLED Nd:YAG Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea UDREA

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results obtained in developing a visualisation technique for non-invasive analysis of air flow inside INCAS subsonic wind tunnel and its appendages are presented. The visualisation technique is based on using a green light sheet generated by a continuous wave (cw longitudinally diode pumped and frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The output laser beam is expanded on one direction and collimated on rectangular direction. The system is tailored to the requirements of qualitative analysis and vortex tracking requirements inside the INCAS 2.5m x 2.0m subsonic wind tunnel test section, for measurements performed on aircraft models. Also the developed laser techniques is used for non-invasive air flow field analysis into environmental facilities settling room (air flow calming area. Quantitative analysis is enabled using special image processing tools upon movies and pictures obtained during the experiments. The basic experimental layout in the wind tunnel takes advantage of information obtained from the investigation of various aircraft models using the developed visualisation technique. These results are further developed using a Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV experimental technique.The focus is on visualisation techniques to be used for wind flow characterization at different altitudes in indus-trial and civil buildings areas using a light sheet generated by a Nd:YAG cw pumped and doubled laser at 532 nm wave-length. The results are important for prevention of biological/chemical disasters such as spreading of extremely toxic pol-lutants due to wind. Numerical simulations of wind flow and experimental visualisation results are compared. A good agreement between these results is observed.

  4. Low and high-frequency TENS in post-episiotomy pain relief: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitangui, Ana C. R.; Araújo, Rodrigo C.; Bezerra, Michelle J. S.; Ribeiro, Camila O.; Nakano, Ana M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of low-frequency TENS (LFT) and high-frequency TENS (HFT) in post-episiotomy pain relief. Method A randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial with placebo composed of 33 puerperae with post-episiotomy pain. TENS was applied for 30 minutes to groups: HFT(100 Hz; 100 µs), LFT (5 Hz; 100 µs), and placebo (PT). Four electrodes were placed in parallel near the episiotomy and four pain evaluations were performed with the numeric rating scale. The first and the second evaluation took place before TENS application and immediately after its removal and were done in the resting position and in the activities of sitting and ambulating. The third and fourth evaluation took place 30 and 60 minutes after TENS removal, only in the resting position. Intragroup differences were verified using the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests, and the intergroup analysis employed the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results In the intragroup analysis, there was no significant difference in the PT during rest, sitting, and ambulation (P>0.05). In the HFT and LFT, a significant difference was observed in all activities (P<0.001). In the intergroup analysis, there was a significant difference in the resting position in the HFT and LFT (P<0.001). In the sitting activity, a significant difference was verified in the second evaluation in the HFT and LFT (P<0.008). No significant difference was verified among the groups in ambulation (P<0.20). Conclusions LFT and HFT are an effective resource that may be included in the routine of maternity wards. PMID:24675915

  5. Low and high-frequency TENS in post-episiotomy pain relief: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. R. Pitangui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of low-frequency TENS (LFT and high-frequency TENS (HFT in post-episiotomy pain relief. Method: A randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial with placebo composed of 33 puerperae with post-episiotomy pain. TENS was applied for 30 minutes to groups: HFT(100 Hz; 100 µs, LFT (5 Hz; 100 µs, and placebo (PT. Four electrodes were placed in parallel near the episiotomy and four pain evaluations were performed with the numeric rating scale. The first and the second evaluation took place before TENS application and immediately after its removal and were done in the resting position and in the activities of sitting and ambulating. The third and fourth evaluation took place 30 and 60 minutes after TENS removal, only in the resting position. Intragroup differences were verified using the Friedman and Wilcoxon tests, and the intergroup analysis employed the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In the intragroup analysis, there was no significant difference in the PT during rest, sitting, and ambulation (P>0.05. In the HFT and LFT, a significant difference was observed in all activities (P<0.001. In the intergroup analysis, there was a significant difference in the resting position in the HFT and LFT (P<0.001. In the sitting activity, a significant difference was verified in the second evaluation in the HFT and LFT (P<0.008. No significant difference was verified among the groups in ambulation (P<0.20. Conclusions: LFT and HFT are an effective resource that may be included in the routine of maternity wards.

  6. Single-frequency operation of a broad-area laser diode by injection locking of a complex spatial mode via a double phase conjugate mirror

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Voorst, P.D.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate what is believed to be the first phase-coherent locking of a high-power broad-area diode to a single-frequency master laser. We use photorefractive double phase conjugation to lock the diode in a selfoptimized complex spatial mode while the photorefractive crystal diffracts that

  7. Learning effect, normal range, and test-retest variability of Frequency Doubling Perimetry as a function of age, perimetric experience, and the presence or absence of glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, GP; Ponsioen, TL; Jansonius, NM

    2003-01-01

    The learning effect for several different Frequency Doubling Perimetry parameters was studied in full threshold mode in a large group of patients (n = 342) of various ages, with and without perimetric experience, and with and without glaucoma. A significant learning effect was only found for the

  8. The Groningen Longitudinal Glaucoma Study. I. Baseline sensitivity and specificity of the frequency doubling perimeter and the GDx nerve fibre analyser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeg, GP; Blanksma, LJ; Hardus, PLLJ; Jansonius, NM

    Purpose: To describe the baseline data of a large cohort of patients included for follow-up with perimetry using the frequency doubling technique (FDT) and with quantification of the retinal nerve fibre layer as assessed by GDx, and to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of both devices from

  9. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  10. Cooperative Transmission in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks with Multiple Carrier Frequency Offsets: A Double-Differential Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the rapidly increasing mobility of sensor nodes, mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs would be subject to multiple carrier frequency offsets (MCFOs, which result in time-varying channels and drastically degrade the network performance. To enhance the performance of such MWSNs, we propose a relay selection (RS based double-differential (DD cooperative transmission scheme, termed RSDDCT, in which the best relay sensor node is selected to forward the source sensor node’s signals to the destination sensor node with the detect-and-forward (DetF protocol. Assuming a Rayleigh fading environment, first, exact closed-form expressions for the outage probability and average bit error rate (BER of the RSDDCT scheme are derived. Then, simple and informative asymptotic outage probability and average BER expressions at the large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR regime are presented, which reveal that the RSDDCT scheme can achieve full diversity. Furthermore, the optimum power allocation strategy in terms of minimizing the average BER is investigated, and simple analytical solutions are obtained. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed RSDDCT scheme can achieve excellent performance over fading channels in the presence of unknown random MCFOs. It is also shown that the proposed optimum power allocation strategy offers substantial average BER performance improvement over the equal power allocation strategy.

  11. New methods for isolation of keratolytic bacteria inducing intractable hoof wall cavity (Gidoh) in a horse; double screening procedures of the horn powder agar-translucency test and horn zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Atsutoshi; Niwa, Hidekazu; Arai, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    To establish a new system to isolate keratolytic bacteria from the hoof wall cavity ( Gidoh ) of a racehorse, we invented the horn powder agar-translucency (HoPAT) test and horn zymography (HZ). Using routine bacteriological techniques and these methods, we isolated five strains of keratolytic soil bacteria, which were then identified by means of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing analysis. The findings from the study on the horse suggested that Brevibacterium luteolum played the main role in the local fragility of the hoof, eventually forming a Gidoh in coordination with four other strains of keratolytic bacteria. The double screening procedures of the HoPAT test and HZ were useful and easy techniques for isolating the keratolytic bacteria from the horn lesions.

  12. Expansion of lower-frequency locally resonant band gaps using a double-sided stubbed composite phononic crystals plate with composite stubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Suobin; Chen, Tianning [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Wang, Xiaopeng, E-mail: xpwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Li, Yinggang [Key Laboratory of High Performance Ship Technology of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430070 (China); Chen, Weihua [School of Mechanical Engineering and State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2016-06-03

    We studied the expansion of locally resonant complete band gaps in two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) using a double-sided stubbed composite PC plate with composite stubs. Results show that the introduction of the proposed structure gives rise to a significant expansion of the relative bandwidth by a factor of 1.5 and decreases the opening location of the first complete band gap by a factor of 3 compared to the classic double-sided stubbed PC plate with composite stubs. Furthermore, more band gaps appear in the lower-frequency range (0.006). These phenomena can be attributed to the strong coupling between the “analogous rigid mode” of the stub and the anti-symmetric Lamb modes of the plate. The “analogous rigid mode” of the stub is produced by strengthening the localized resonance effect of the composite plates through the double-sided stubs, and is further strengthened through the introduction of composite stubs. The “analogous rigid mode” of the stubs expands the out-of-plane band gap, which overlaps with in-plane band gap in the lower-frequency range. As a result, the complete band gap is expanded and more complete band gaps appear. - Highlights: • Expansion of lower-frequency locally resonant BGs using novel composite phononic crystals plates. • The proposed structure expands the relative bandwidth 1.5 times compared to classic doubled-sided stubbed PC plates. • The opening location of the first complete BG decreases 3 times compared to the classic doubled-sided stubbed PC plates. • The concept “analogous rigid mode” is put forward to explain the expansion of lower-frequency BGs.

  13. Simultaneous spatial and temporal walk-off compensation in frequency-doubling femtosecond pulses in β -BaB2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehr, R.J.; Kimmel, M.W.; Smith, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the benefits of simultaneous compensation of spatial and temporal walk-off in frequency doubling of 800-nm 250-fs pulses, using three active and two compensating β-BaB 2 O 4 crystals. The compensating crystals reverse both birefringent and group-velocity walk-off, resulting in a factor-of-4.5 improvement in doubling efficiency relative to one of the active crystals while maintaining the short pulse duration and the symmetric spatial profile that are characteristic of the single crystal. copyright 1998 Optical Society of America

  14. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  15. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  16. Cavity Optomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Kippenberg, T. J.; Vahala, K. J.

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical and optical degrees of freedom via radiation pressure has been a subject of early research in the context of gravitational wave detection. Recent experimental advances have allowed studying for the first time the modifications of mechanical dynamics provided by radiation pressure. This paper reviews the consequences of back-action of light confined in whispering-gallery dielectric micro-cavities, and presents a unified treatment of its two manifestations: notably th...

  17. Mechanical design and fabrication of power feed cavity test setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghodke, S.R.; Dhavle, A.S.; Sharma, Vijay; Sarkar, Shreya; Kumar, Mahendra; Nayak, Susanta; Barnwal, Rajesh; Jayaprakash, D.; Mondal, J.; Nimje, V.T.; Mittal, K.C.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Power feed cavity set up consists of nine number of accelerating cavity and eight numbers of coupling cavity for testing of power feed cavity with coupling flange for 2856 MHz S band standing wave coupled cavity linac. When we are assembling the cavity and applying the pressure, its resonance frequency changes with applied pressure/load. After some critical pressure/load frequency change becomes negligible or zero. This set up will be used to find out assembly performance of power feed cavity and its coupler. Top four cavity or eight half cells as well as bottom four cavity or eight half cells will be brazed separately. Power feed cavity will be sandwiched between this two brazed cavity assemblies. This paper discuss about linear motion bush, linear motion rod, load cell, hydraulic actuator, power pack, stepper motor PLC control, jig boring, alignment, tolerances and assembly procedure for this test setup. (author)

  18. 303 nm continuous wave ultraviolet laser generated by intracavity frequency-doubling of diode-pumped Pr3+:LiYF4 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhang, Chaomin; Zhu, Kun; Ping, Yunxia; Song, Pei; Sun, Xiaohui; Wang, Fuxin; Yao, Yi

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate an efficient and compact ultraviolet laser at 303 nm generated by intracavity frequency doubling of a continuous wave (CW) laser diode-pumped Pr3+:YLiF4 laser at 607 nm. A cesium lithium borate (CLBO) crystal, cut for critical type I phase matching at room temperature, is used for second-harmonic generation (SHG) of the fundamental laser. By using an InGaN laser diode array emitting at 444.3 nm with a maximum incident power of 10 W, as high as 68 mW of CW output power at 303 nm is achieved. The output power stability in 4 h is better than 2.85%. To the best of our knowledge, this is high efficient UV laser generated by frequency doubling of an InGaN laser diode array pumped Pr3+:YLiF4 laser.

  19. Low-Frequency Fatigue Assessed as Double to Single Twitch Ratio after Two Bouts of Eccentric Exercise of the Elbow Flexors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecki, Damian; Jaskólska, Anna; Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólski, Artur

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess low-frequency fatigue as a double to single twitch ratio after repeated eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Maximal isometric torque, single and double twitch responses and low-frequency fatigue were assessed on the elbow flexors in 16 untrained male volunteers before, immediately after, 24 and 48 hours following two bouts of eccentric exercise consisted of 30 repetitions of lowering a dumbbell adjusted to ~75% of each individual's maximal isometric torque. Maximal isometric torque and electrically evoked responses decreased significantly in all measurements after the first bout of eccentric exercise (p twitch ratio could be used as a sensitive tool in the evaluation of muscle recovery and adaptation to repeated eccentric exercise.

  20. Probing the internal energy structure of a serially coupled double quantum dot system with Rashba spin-orbit coupling through finite-frequency shot noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hai-Bin; Liu, Xu-Ping; Chen, Bin

    2018-01-01

    The finite-frequency shot noise of electron transport through a serially coupled double quantum dot system with Rashba spin-orbit coupling is studied based on an effective particle-number-resolved quantum master equation. We demonstrate that the finite-frequency shot noise displays an obvious dip, and the dip position, which is independent of the spin polarizations of the source and drain electrodes, is determined by the energy difference between the coherent singly-occupied eigenstates of the quantum dot system. These results suggest that the dip position of the finite-frequency shot noise can be used to quantitatively extract the information about the energy difference between the coherent singly-occupied eigenstates and the magnitude of Rashba spin-orbit coupling. The predicted properties of the finite-frequency shot noise are of particular interest for understanding of the internal dynamics of the coupled quantum dot systems.

  1. Additive Manufactured Superconducting Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Eric; Rosen, Yaniv; Woolleet, Nathan; Materise, Nicholas; Voisin, Thomas; Wang, Morris; Mireles, Jorge; Carosi, Gianpaolo; Dubois, Jonathan

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities provide an ultra-low dissipative environment, which has enabled fundamental investigations in quantum mechanics, materials properties, and the search for new particles in and beyond the standard model. However, resonator designs are constrained by limitations in conventional machining techniques. For example, current through a seam is a limiting factor in performance for many waveguide cavities. Development of highly reproducible methods for metallic parts through additive manufacturing, referred to colloquially as 3D printing\\x9D, opens the possibility for novel cavity designs which cannot be implemented through conventional methods. We present preliminary investigations of superconducting cavities made through a selective laser melting process, which compacts a granular powder via a high-power laser according to a digitally defined geometry. Initial work suggests that assuming a loss model and numerically optimizing a geometry to minimize dissipation results in modest improvements in device performance. Furthermore, a subset of titanium alloys, particularly, a titanium, aluminum, vanadium alloy (Ti - 6Al - 4V) exhibits properties indicative of a high kinetic inductance material. This work is supported by LDRD 16-SI-004.

  2. Upgraded cavities for the positron accumulator ring of the APS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Y.W.; Jiang, X.; Mangra, D.

    1997-01-01

    Upgraded versions of cavities for the APS positron accumulator ring (PAR) have been built and are being tested. Two cavities are in the PAR: a fundamental 9.8-MHz cavity and a twelfth harmonic 117.3-MHz cavity. Both cavities have been manufactured for higher voltage operation with improved Q-factors, reliability, and tuning capability. Both cavities employ current-controlled ferrite tuners for control of the resonant frequency. The harmonic cavity can be operated in either a pulsed mode or a CW mode. The rf properties of the cavities are presented

  3. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  4. The frequency of double-positive thymocytes expressing an αβ TCR clonotype regulates peripheral CD4 T cell compartment homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Amy J; Zarrabi, Yasaman; Perate, Alison L; Jeganathan, Arjun; Naji, Ali; Noorchashm, Hooman

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether the frequency of double positive (DP) thymocytes expressing αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes at the time of selection regulates peripheral CD4 T-cell compartment size. Scid recipients were inoculated with various ratios of TCR Cα0/0 and wild-type bone marrow (BM) stem cells. Increasing the frequency of TCR Cα0/0 thymocytes at steady-state introduced a graded decrease in the maturation probability of the total DP thymocyte pool. At 12–14 weeks following BM inoculation, the frequency of TCR Cα0/0 DP thymocytes was inversely correlated with that of CD4 single positive (SP) thymocytes. Notwithstanding, a decreased frequency of wild-type DP thymocytes led to a marked increase in their transit efficiency from the DP to SP compartments. The frequency-dependent increase in thymocyte transit efficiency was associated with a CD4 SP cell surface phenotype indicative of increased antigenic experience. Importantly, the frequency of DP thymocytes capable of expressing TCR clonotypes dictated the steady-state size of the peripheral CD4 T cell compartment and its potential for homeostatic proliferation. Collectively, these results indicate that the efficiency of DP to CD4 SP transit is a frequency dependent process, which determines (1) the steady-state size of the peripheral T cell compartment and (2) the threshold for homeostatic expansion of peripheral CD4 T cells. PMID:16236130

  5. The improvement of a simple theoretical model for the prediction of the sound insulation of double leaf walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, John L

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a revised theory for predicting the sound insulation of double leaf cavity walls that removes an approximation, which is usually made when deriving the sound insulation of a double leaf cavity wall above the critical frequencies of the wall leaves due to the airborne transmission across the wall cavity. This revised theory is also used as a correction below the critical frequencies of the wall leaves instead of a correction due to Sewell [(1970). J. Sound Vib. 12, 21-32]. It is found necessary to include the "stud" borne transmission of the window frames when modeling wide air gap double glazed windows. A minimum value of stud transmission is introduced for use with resilient connections such as steel studs. Empirical equations are derived for predicting the effective sound absorption coefficient of wall cavities without sound absorbing material. The theory is compared with experimental results for double glazed windows and gypsum plasterboard cavity walls with and without sound absorbing material in their cavities. The overall mean, standard deviation, maximum, and minimum of the differences between experiment and theory are -0.6 dB, 3.1 dB, 10.9 dB at 1250 Hz, and -14.9 dB at 160 Hz, respectively.

  6. Quasi-continuous-wave 589-nm radiation based on intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:GGG/BaWO4 Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Zhaojun; Cong, Zhenhua; Men, Shaojie; Rao, Han; Xia, Jinbao; Zhang, Sasa; Zhang, Huaijin

    2016-07-01

    Quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) 589-nm radiation was realized based on a frequency-doubled crystalline Raman laser. The fundamental wave with macro-micro-pulse trains was generated from an acousto-optically Q-switched QCW diode side-pumped Nd:GGG laser. Intracavity Raman conversion was accomplished by a BaWO4 crystal and the second harmonic generation was finished by a KTP crystal. Under a pumping power of 126.0 W with a macro-pulse frequency of 300 Hz and duration of 300 μs, the maximum 589 nm output power of 4.2 W was obtained at a micro-pulse frequency of 33.3 kHz. The micro-pulse width was 13.6 ns.

  7. Implementation of wireless battery-free microgyrosensor by utilizing one-port SAW delay line and an antenna with double resonant frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, C.; Elmarzia, O.; Lee, K.

    2014-03-01

    A wireless, battery-free gyroscope was developed by employing a one-port surface acoustic wave (SAW) reflective delay line, a SAW resonator, and an antenna. Two SAW devices with different center frequencies were simultaneously activated by one antenna with double resonant frequencies. During wireless testing, the developed gyroscope showed clear reflection peaks with high S/N ratios in both the time and frequency domains. Upon rotation of the device, large shifts of the reflection peaks were observed owing to a secondary wave interference effect caused by the Coriolis force that depends on the spinning rate. The measured sensitivity and linearity of the developed gyroscope were, respectively, 1.35 deg/(deg/s) and 0.91, which are promising values for our targeted applications. The temperature and vibration/shock effects were also characterized

  8. Effect of asymmetrical double-pockets and gate-drain underlap on Schottky barrier tunneling FET: Ambipolar conduction vs. high frequency performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Ahmed; Ossaimee, Mahmoud; Zekry, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a proposed structure based on asymmetrical double pockets SB-TFET with gate-drain underlap is presented. 2D extensive modeling and simulation, using Silvaco TCAD, were carried out to study the effect of both underlap length and pockets' doping on the transistor performance. It was found that the underlap from the drain side suppresses the ambipolar conduction and doesn't enhance the high-frequency characteristics. The enhancement of the high-frequency characteristics could be realized by increasing the doping of the drain pocket over the doping of the source pocket. An optimum choice was found which gives the conditions of minimum ambipolar conduction, maximum ON current and maximum cut-off frequency. These enhancements render the device more competitive as a nanometer transistor.

  9. High-power Microwave Pulse Compression of Klystrons by Phase-Modulation of High-Q Storage Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bossart, Rudolf; Mourier, J; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L

    2004-01-01

    At the CERN linear electron accelerators LIL and CTF, the peak RF power from the 3GHz-klystrons was doubled by means of LIPS microwave pulse compressors. To produce constant RF power from the cavity-based pulse compressors, the klystrons were driven by a fast RF-phase modulation program. For the CLIC Test Facility CTF3, a new type of a Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) with a high quality factor Q0 has been developed. Contrary to LIPS with two resonant cavities, BOC operates with a single cavity supporting two orthogonal resonant modes TM 10,1,1 in the same cavity. For both LIPS and BOC storage cavities, it is important that the RF power reflected back to the klystron is minimal. This implies that the resonant frequencies, Q-factors and coupling factors of the two resonant modes of a pulse compressor are closely matched, and that the resonant frequencies are accurate to within a few KHz. The effects of small differences between the two orthogonal modes of the BOC cavity have been investigated. The dynamic pulse respon...

  10. Bistability of Cavity Magnon Polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Pu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Dengke; Li, Tie-Fu; Hu, C.-M.; You, J. Q.

    2018-01-01

    We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small numbers of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either a positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.

  11. Bistability of Cavity Magnon Polaritons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Pu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Dengke; Li, Tie-Fu; Hu, C-M; You, J Q

    2018-02-02

    We report the first observation of the magnon-polariton bistability in a cavity magnonics system consisting of cavity photons strongly interacting with the magnons in a small yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere. The bistable behaviors emerged as sharp frequency switchings of the cavity magnon polaritons (CMPs) and related to the transition between states with large and small numbers of polaritons. In our experiment, we align, respectively, the [100] and [110] crystallographic axes of the YIG sphere parallel to the static magnetic field and find very different bistable behaviors (e.g., clockwise and counter-clockwise hysteresis loops) in these two cases. The experimental results are well fitted and explained as being due to the Kerr nonlinearity with either a positive or negative coefficient. Moreover, when the magnetic field is tuned away from the anticrossing point of CMPs, we observe simultaneous bistability of both magnons and cavity photons by applying a drive field on the lower branch.

  12. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  13. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Burt, G. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Lingwood, C. [CI Lancaster University (Great Britain); Rimmer, Robert [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  14. 2.1-watts intracavity-frequency-doubled all-solid-state light source at 671 nm for laser cooling of lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, U; Bergschneider, A; Sievers, F; Kretzschmar, N; Salomon, C; Chevy, F

    2013-04-08

    We present an all-solid-state laser source emitting up to 2.1 W of single-frequency light at 671 nm developed for laser cooling of lithium atoms. It is based on a diode-pumped, neodymium-doped orthovanadate (Nd:YVO(4)) ring laser operating at 1342 nm. Optimization of the thermal management in the gain medium results in a maximum multi-frequency output power of 2.5 W at the fundamental wavelength. We develop a simple theory for the efficient implementation of intracavity second harmonic generation, and its application to our system allows us to obtain nonlinear conversion efficiencies of up to 88%. Single-mode operation and tuning is established by adding an etalon to the resonator. The second-harmonic wavelength can be tuned over 0.5 nm, and mode-hop-free scanning over more than 6 GHz is demonstrated, corresponding to around ten times the laser cavity free spectral range. The output frequency can be locked with respect to the lithium D-line transitions for atomic physics applications. Furthermore, we observe parametric Kerr-lens mode-locking when detuning the phase-matching temperature sufficiently far from the optimum value.

  15. Calculation of the resonance frequency change for a cavity charged by a plasma with or without a static magnetic field; Calcul du glissement de la frequence de resonance d'une cavite chargee par un plasma en presence ou non d'un champ magnetique statique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Service de physique appliquee, service d' ionique generale, section d' etude des interractions onde-plasma

    1967-03-01

    In the mere case of a cold plasma with or without static magnetic field, are given two methods of calculation of resonance frequency shift and absorption in a cylindrical cavity crossed by a plasma column: 1. A perturbation method, already known and used for electronic density measurements is restated and its application is used for several high frequency cavity modes. 2. An exact method employing Maxwell's equations, which however necessitates a computer, is compared with the first one; it permits a determination of the validity limits of the perturbation method and to draw conclusions,. [French] On donne Dans le cas d'un plasma froid en presence ou non de champ magnetique statique deux methodes de calcul de la derive de frequence de resonance et de l'absorption dans une cavite cylindrique traversee par une colonne de plasma: 1. Une methode de perturbation deja connue et employee dans les mesures de densite eleetronique; on en rappelle le principe et on en fait l'application pour plusieurs modes de la cavite haute frequence. 2. Une methode rigoureuse a partir des equations de Maxwell, dont la resolution necessite l'emploi d'un ordinateur; cette methode comparee a la precedente permet d'en determiner les limites de validite et de tirer des conclusions. (auteur)

  16. The intermediate frequency modes of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes: a Raman spectroscopic and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbac, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Zukalová, Markéta; Dunsch, Lothar

    2006-05-24

    The intermediate frequency modes (IFM) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry. The inner and outer tubes of DWCNTs manifested themselves as distinct bands in the IFM region. This confirmed the diameter dependence of IFM frequencies. Furthermore, the analysis of inner tubes of DWCNTs allowed a more-precise assignment of the bands in the IFM region to features intrinsic for carbon nanotubes. Although the inner tubes in DWCNTs are assumed to be structurally perfect, the role of defects on IFM was discussed. The dependence of IFM on electrochemical charging was also studied. In situ spectroelectrochemical data provide a means to distinguish the bands of the outer and inner tubes.

  17. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  18. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  19. Call for Papers: Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, W.; Gerard, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    Cavity QED interactions of light and matter have been investigated in a wide range of systems covering the spectrum from microwaves to optical frequencies, using media as diverse as single atoms and semiconductors. Impressive progress has been achieved technologically as well as conceptually. This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is intended to provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of cavity QED by uniting contributions from researchers active across this field. As Guest Editors of this topical issue, we invite manuscripts on current theoretical and experimental work on any aspects of cavity QED. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletCavity QED in optical microcavities bulletSemiconductor cavity QED bulletQuantum dot cavity QED bulletRydberg atoms in microwave cavities bulletPhotonic crystal cavity QED bulletMicrosphere resonators bulletMicrolasers and micromasers bulletMicrodroplets bulletDielectric cavity QED bulletCavity QED-based quantum information processing bulletQuantum state engineering in cavities The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the

  20. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  1. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  2. Detection of coherent waves by time-frequency coherency with a downhole double 3 component detector; Koseinai 3 jiku AE double zonde system no kaihatsu to jikan (shuhasu hyogen ni yoru coherent ha no kenshutsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, J.; Asanuma, H.; Lesniak, A.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-05-27

    A downhole double three component detector system was developed to detect coherent waves in subsurface elastic waves by using the time-frequency-coherency (TFC) method. The TFC method measures elastic waves on two points which are several ten centimeters to several meters apart, and estimates arrival time of a coherent wave and its frequency characteristics, by expressing coherence of waveforms in terms of time and frequency with regard to the two waveforms measured between the two points. If the system is to be applied to downhole elastic wave measurement, it is preferable to detect a three-dimensional particle movement locus of the elastic waves to extract information at the maximum extent. Two sondes (each sonde consists of three components and contains an azimuth detector) are coupled (the jointing distance is variable) and installed in a well. The obtained six-component signal goes through FM modulation and mixing by a modulator in the sonde, is integrated into one component, and transmitted to the ground surface. The system was found capable of detecting the three-dimensional particle movement. However, this performance is inferior to conventional single sondes, hence requiring improvement. It was discovered possible to detect coherent waves by applying the TFC method to the Kakkonda field data. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Real-time, high frequency (1 Hz), in situ measurement of HCl and HF gases in volcanic plumes with a novel cavity-enhanced, laser-based instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P. J.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.; Kern, C.; Clor, L. E.; Baer, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    Primary magmatic halogen-containing gases (HCl, HF, HBr, HI in characteristic order of abundance) are of great interest for volcano monitoring and research because, in general, they are more soluble in magma than other commonly-monitored volcanic volatiles (e.g. CO2, SO2, H2S) and thereby can offer unique insights into shallow magmatic processes. Nevertheless, difficulties in obtaining observations of primary volcanic halogens in gas plumes with traditional methods (e.g. direct sampling, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, filter packs) have limited the number of observations reported worldwide, especially from explosive arc volcanoes. With this in mind, the USGS and Los Gatos Research, Inc. collaborated to adapt a commercially-available industrial in situ HCl-HF analyzer for use in airborne and ground-based measurements of volcanic gases. The new, portable instrument is based around two near-IR tunable diode lasers and uses a vibration-tolerant, enhanced-cavity approach that is well-suited for rugged field applications and yields fast (1 Hz) measurements with a wide dynamic range (0 -2 ppm) and sub-ppb precision (1σ: HCl: <0.4 ppb; HF: <0.1 ppb). In spring 2017 we conducted field tests at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, to benchmark the performance of the new instrument and to compare it with an accepted method for halogen measurements (OP-FTIR). The HCl-HF instrument was run in parallel with a USGS Multi-GAS to obtain in situ H2O-CO2-SO2-H2S-HCl-HF plume compositions. The results were encouraging and quasi-direct comparisons of the in situ and remote sensing instruments showed good agreement (e.g. in situ SO2/HCl = 72 vs. OP-FTIR SO2/HCl = 88). Ground-based and helicopter-based measurements made 0 - 12 km downwind from the vent (plume age 0 - 29 minutes) show that plume SO2/HCl ratios increase rapidly from 60 to 300 around the plume edges, possibly due to uptake of HCl onto aerosols.

  4. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ≥50% of the time was 1·31 (95% CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ≥1 d/week for ≥50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95% CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all Pprobiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385).

  5. Rigorous analysis of trapped modes in accelerating cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Schuhmann

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of different algorithms for the calculation of quality factors of eigenmodes in accelerating cavities, which have resonance frequencies above the cutoff frequency of the beam tubes. The analysis is based on a discretization of such cavity structures by the finite integration technique, and the radiation at the open boundaries is systematically taken into account by different approaches in time and frequency domain. Results indicate that even single cell cavities of the TESLA type show Q values of 10^{3} and multicell cavities values in excess of 10^{4}. Thus these modes may cause considerable beam instabilities. Comparison with the conventional method of analyzing closed cavities and identifying modes with little change in frequency as a function of boundary condition shows qualitative differences. Some modes from the closed cavity model do not exist in the open structure and thus would be misinterpreted as trapped modes when only a closed cavity analysis is employed.

  6. Dynamic resonance of light in Fabry-Perot cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhmanov, M.; Savage, R.L.; Reitze, D.H.; Tanner, D.B.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of light in Fabry-Perot cavities with varying length and input laser frequency are analyzed. At high frequencies, the response to length variations is very different from the response to laser frequency variations. Implications for kilometer-scale Fabry-Perot cavities such as those utilized in gravitational-wave detectors are discussed

  7. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  8. Numerical simulation of coupler cavities for linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.K.; Derutyer, H.; Ko, K.

    1993-04-01

    We present numerical procedures involved in the evaluation of the performance of coupler cavities for linacs. The MAFIA code is used to simulate an X-Band accelerator section in the time domain. The input/output coupler cavities for the structure arc of the symmetrical double-input design. We calculate the transmission properties of the coupler and compare the results with measurements. We compare the performance of the symmetrical double-input design with that of the conventional single-input type by evaluating the field amplitude and phase asymmetries. We also evaluate the peak field gradient in the computer.

  9. Early 500 MHz prototype LEP RF Cavity with superposed storage cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The principle of transferring the RF power back and forth between the accelerating cavity and a side-coupled storage cavity was demonstrated with this 500 MHz prototype. In LEP, the accelerating frequency was 352.2 MHz, and accelerating and storage cavities were consequently larger. See also 8002294, 8006061, 8407619X, and Annual Reports 1980, p.115; 1981, p.95; 1985, vol.I, p.13.

  10. Injector Cavities Fabrication, Vertical Test Performance and Primary Cryomodule Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cheng, Guangfeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Davis, G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Macha, Kurt [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Overton, Roland [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Spell, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    After the electromagnetic design and the mechanical design of a β=0.6, 2-cell elliptical SRF cavity, the cavity has been fabricated. Then both 2-cell and 7-cell cavities have been bench tuned to the target values of frequency, coupling external Q and field flatness. After buffer chemistry polishing (BCP) and high pressure rinses (HPR), Vertical 2K cavity test results have been satisfied the specifications and ready for the string assembly. We will report the cavity performance including Lorenz Force Detuning (LFD) and Higher Order Modes (HOM) damping data. Its integration with cavity tuners to the cryomodule design will be reported.

  11. Evolution of the Novalux extended cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser (NECSEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, John G.

    2016-03-01

    Novalux Inc was an enterprise founded by Aram Mooradian in 1998 to commercialise a novel electrically pumped vertical extended cavity semiconductor laser platform, initially aiming to produce pump lasers for optical fiber telecommunication networks. Following successful major investment in 2000, the company developed a range of single- and multi-mode 980 nm pump lasers emitting from 100-500 mW with excellent beam quality and efficiency. This rapid development required solution of several significant problems in chip and external cavity design, substrate and DBR mirror optimization, thermal engineering and mode selection. Output coupling to single mode fiber was exceptional. Following the collapse of the long haul telecom market in late 2001, a major reorientation of effort was undertaken, initially to develop compact 60-100 mW hybrid monolithically integrated pumplets for metro/local amplified networks, then to frequency-doubled blue light emitters for biotech, reprographics and general scientific applications. During 2001-3 I worked at Novalux on a career break from University College Cork, first as R&D Director managing a small group tasked with producing new capabilities and product options based on the NECSEL platform, including high power, pulsed and frequency doubled versions, then in 2002 as Director of New Product Realization managing the full engineering team, leading the transition to frequency doubled products.

  12. Commercial mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubeigt, Walter; Bialkowski, Bartlomiej; Lin, Jipeng; Head, C. Robin; Hempler, Nils; Maker, Gareth T.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, M Squared Lasers have successfully commercialized a range of mode-locked vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers (VECSELs) operating between 920-1050nm and producing picosecond-range pulses with average powers above 1W at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) of 200MHz. These laser products offer a low-cost, easy-to-use and maintenance-free tool for the growing market of nonlinear microscopy. However, in order to present a credible alternative to ultrafast Ti-sapphire lasers, pulse durations below 200fs are required. In the last year, efforts have been directed to reduce the pulse duration of the Dragonfly laser system to below 200fs with a target average power above 1W at a PRF of 200MHz. This paper will describe and discuss the latest efforts undertaken to approach these targets in a laser system operating at 990nm. The relatively low PRF operation of Dragonfly lasers represents a challenging requirement for mode-locked VECSELs due to the very short upper state carrier lifetime, on the order of a few nanoseconds, which can lead to double pulsing behavior in longer cavities as the time between consecutive pulses is increased. Most notably, the design of the Dragonfly VECSEL cavity was considerably modified and the laser system extended with a nonlinear pulse stretcher and an additional compression stage. The improved Dragonfly laser system achieved pulse duration as short as 130fs with an average power of 0.85W.

  13. Detection of target distance in the presence of an interfering reflection using a frequency-stepped double side-band suppressed carrier microwave radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.; Marshall, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for detecting the distance to a highly reflective target in the presence of an interesting reflection using a frequency-stepped double-sideband suppressed carrier (DSBSC) microwave-millimeter-wave radar system is analytically derived. The main result of the analysis shows that the measured group delays produced by the DSBSC system possess a periodicity inversely proportional to the difference between the time delays to the target and interferer, independent of the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR). Simulation results are presented in the context of electron plasma density range estimation using a block diagram communications CAD tool. A unique and accurate plasma model is introduced. A high-resolution spectral estimation technique based on an autoregressive time series analysis is applied to the measured group delays, and it is shown that accurate target distance estimates may be obtained, independent of SIR.

  14. Comparison of visual field test results obtained through Humphrey matrix frequency doubling technology perimetry versus standard automated perimetry in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Kocabeyoglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : The aim of this study was to compare the visual field test results in healthy children obtained via the Humphrey matrix 24-2 threshold program and standard automated perimetry (SAP using the Swedish interactive threshold algorithm (SITA-Standard 24-2 test. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 55 healthy children without ocular or systemic disorders who underwent both SAP and frequency doubling technology (FDT perimetry visual field testing. Visual field test reliability indices, test duration, global indices (mean deviation [MD], and pattern standard deviation [PSD] were compared between the 2 tests using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and paired t-test. The performance of the Humphrey field analyzer (HFA 24-2 SITA-standard and frequency-doubling technology Matrix 24-2 tests between genders were compared with Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: Fifty-five healthy children with a mean age of 12.2 ± 1.9 years (range from 8 years to 16 years were included in this prospective study. The test durations of SAP and FDT were similar (5.2 ± 0.5 and 5.1 ± 0.2 min, respectively, P = 0.651. MD and the PSD values obtained via FDT Matrix were significantly higher than those obtained via SAP (P < 0.001, and fixation losses and false negative errors were significantly less with SAP (P < 0.05. A weak positive correlation between the two tests in terms of MD (r = 0.352, P = 0.008 and PSD (r = 0.329, P = 0.014 was observed. Conclusion: Children were able to complete both the visual test algorithms successfully within 6 min. However, SAP testing appears to be associated with less depression of the visual field indices of healthy children. FDT Matrix and SAP should not be used interchangeably in the follow-up of children.

  15. A numerical and experimental investigation of the performance of sound intensity probes at high frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Cutanda, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    1998-01-01

    The high-frequency performance of a p-p intensity probe with a solid spacer between the two microphones is examined. It is shown theoretically and verified experimentally that with a spacer length that equals the diameter of the microphones, the finite difference error is almost perfectly cancell...... by a cavity resonance. It is concluded that the usable frequency range of sound intensity probes can be doubled with this configuration....

  16. The double-resonance enhancement of stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in silver-capped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. N.; Butsen, A. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ivanova, A. K.; Kuchmizhak, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Levchenko, A. O.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric nano- and (sub)microparticles exhibit magnetic and electrical dipolar Mie-resonances, which makes them useful as efficient basic elements in surface-enhanced spectroscopy, non-linear light conversion and nanoscale light control. We report the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) of a nanosecond ruby laser radiation (central wavelength λ = 694.3 nm (full-width at half-maximum ≈ 0.015 cm-1), gaussian 1/e-intensity pulsewidth τ ≈ 20 ns, TEM00-mode pulse energy Emax ≈ 0.3 J) in nanodiamond (R ≈ 120 nm) hydrosols, induced via optomechanical coherent excitation of fundamental breathing eigen-modes, and the two-fold enhancement of SLFRS in Ag-decorated nanodiamonds, characterized by hybrid dipolar resonances of electrical (silver) and magnetic (diamond) nature. Hybrid metal-dielectric particles were prepared by means of nanosecond IR-laser ablation of solid silver target in diamond hydrosols with consecutive Ag-capping of diamonds, and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis, photoluminescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Intensities of the SLFR-scattered components and their size-dependent spectral shifts were measured in the highly sensitive stimulated scattering regime, indicating the high (≈ 30%) SLFRS conversion efficiency and the resonant character of the scattering species.

  17. Sound energy harvesting using a doubly coiled-up acoustic metamaterial cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jae Eun; Kim, Jedo; Song, Kyungjun

    2017-07-01

    A new sound energy harvesting system that comprises an acoustic metastructure and a double-clamped piezoelectric bimorph plate is presented. A subwavelength-scale acoustic metastructure is specially designed by utilizing a doubly coiled-up configuration for the strong confinement of the sound energy inside the acoustic metamaterial cavity in the low frequency range. The amplified sound pressure in the acoustic metamaterial cavity then substantially increases the vibratory motions of the piezoelectric bimorph plate. For the purpose of generating more electricity from the sound, the resonant frequency of the acoustic metamaterial cavity is tuned to the fundamental frequency of the piezoelectric bimorph plate. The numerical and experiment results show that the proposed sound energy harvesting system increase a sound pressure level (SPL) by up to ∼16 dB, and yields an output voltage that is 6.32 times higher than that of the conventional piezoelectric energy harvesting plate. For the incident SPL of 100 dB, the maximum output power is measured as approximately 0.345 μW at a resonant frequency of 600 Hz.

  18. Effect of platelet-rich fibrin on frequency of alveolar osteitis following mandibular third molar surgery: a double-blinded randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghpour, Majid; Dastmalchi, Parisa; Nekooei, Amir Hossein; Nejat, AmirHossein

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in preventing the development of alveolar osteitis (AO). In a double-blinded study, patients with bilateral impacted mandibular third molars underwent surgical extractions, with one socket receiving PRF and the other one serving as a control. The surgeon and patient were unaware of the study or control side. The predictor variable was the PRF application and was categorized as PRF and non-PRF. The outcome variable was the development of AO during the first postoperative week. Other study variables included age, gender, smoking status, irrigation volume, extraction difficulty, surgeon experience, and number of anesthetic cartridges. Data were analyzed using χ(2) and t tests, with the significance level set at a P value less than .05. Seventy-eight patients (mean age, 25 yr) underwent 156 impacted third molar surgeries. The overall frequency of AO was 14.74% for all surgeries. The frequency of AO in the PRF group was significantly lower than in the non-PRF group (odds ratio = 0.44; P third molar surgery. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of Vertical Double-Diffused Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (VDMOS) Power Transistor Structure for Use in High Frequencies and Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Rozita; Farhadi, Bita

    2014-01-01

    Power transistors, such as the vertical, double-diffused, metal-oxide semiconductor (VDMOS), are used extensively in the amplifier circuits of medical devices. The aim of this research was to construct a VDMOS power transistor with an optimized structure to enhance the operation of medical devices. First, boron was implanted in silicon by implanting unclamped inductive switching (UIS) and a Faraday shield. The Faraday shield was implanted in order to replace the gate-field parasitic capacitor on the entry part of the device. Also, implanting the UIS was used in order to decrease the effect of parasitic bipolar junction transistor (BJT) of the VDMOS power transistor. The research tool used in this study was Silvaco software. By decreasing the transistor entry resistance in the optimized VDMOS structure, power losses and noise at the entry of the transistor were decreased, and, by increasing the breakdown voltage, the lifetime of the VDMOS transistor lifetime was increased, which resulted in increasing drain flow and decreasing Ron. This consequently resulted in enhancing the operation of high-frequency medical devices that use transistors, such as Radio Frequency (RF) and electrocardiograph machines.

  20. Understanding cavity QED effects from cavity classical electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taddei, M.M.; Kort-Kamp, W.J.M.; Farina, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Our work intends to show how cavity classical electrodynamics can be used for achieving results with direct quantum analogues. It is shown how the classical interaction between a real radiating electric dipole and a perfectly-conducting surface can be used to obtain information about some cavity quantum electrodynamics effects related to radiative properties of atomic systems. Based on the case of an oscillating electric dipole (a classical representation of an excited atom) in front of a perfectly-conducting sphere, two main physical quantities can be computed, the classical dipole frequency shift and the change in the rate of energy loss from radiation reaction, both due to the presence of the sphere. The link from classical to quantum can be made via interpreting, for example, the dipole frequency as the atom's dominant transition frequency. The frequency shift due to the sphere can be related through E = (h/2π) to the energy shift of the system, i.e., the dispersive interaction between the atom and the sphere; while the change in energy loss can be related to the alteration of the atom's spontaneous emission due to the sphere. The amazing result is that this classical method, once corresponded classical quantities to quantum ones such as exemplified above with frequency, can predict the two above-mentioned quantum effects analytically with the correct functional dependencies on all geometric and atomic parameters, being off only by a constant pre factor. (author)

  1. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  2. Integral storage-bulb and microwave cavity for masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V. S.

    1980-01-01

    Mechanically-stable integral storage-bulb/microwave cavity made out of single piece of fused quartz improves frequency stability. Single-piece construction eliminates joints, making cavity dimensionally and hence frequency-stable. Fused quartz is used because of its low thermal expansion coefficient.

  3. Radiation-pressure-mediated control of an optomechanical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripe, Jonathan; Aggarwal, Nancy; Singh, Robinjeet; Lanza, Robert; Libson, Adam; Yap, Min Jet; Cole, Garrett D.; McClelland, David E.; Mavalvala, Nergis; Corbitt, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a method to control a detuned movable-mirror Fabry-Pérot cavity using radiation pressure in the presence of a strong optical spring. At frequencies below the optical spring resonance, self-locking of the cavity is achieved intrinsically by the optomechanical (OM) interaction between the cavity field and the movable end mirror. The OM interaction results in a high rigidity and reduced susceptibility of the mirror to external forces. However, due to a finite delay time in the cavity, this enhanced rigidity is accompanied by an antidamping force, which destabilizes the cavity. The cavity is stabilized by applying external feedback in a frequency band around the optical spring resonance. The error signal is sensed in the amplitude quadrature of the transmitted beam with a photodetector. An amplitude modulator in the input path to the cavity modulates the light intensity to provide the stabilizing radiation pressure force.

  4. Stable single-frequency output at 2.01 microm from a diode-pumped monolithic double diffusion-bonded Tm:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chunqing; Gao, Mingwei; Zhang, Yunshan; Lin, Zhifeng; Zhu, Lingni

    2009-10-01

    We demonstrate a monolithic double diffusion-bonded monolithic Tm:YAG nonplanar ring laser pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode. Up to 867 mW single-frequency output at 2.01 microm was obtained from the Tm:YAG system at room temperature, with a slope efficiency and an optical-optical efficiency of 31.6% and 19.2%. The power stability of the single frequency laser was 0.32% within 30 min.

  5. Nonlinear frequency conversion in coupled ring cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Abitan, Haim; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The steady-state distribution of circulating power in coupled, unidirectional ring resonators containing a diode-pumped laser crystal and nonlinear optical elements is computed. The full set of transcendental nonlinear equations describing the interactions between the circulating power and the op......The steady-state distribution of circulating power in coupled, unidirectional ring resonators containing a diode-pumped laser crystal and nonlinear optical elements is computed. The full set of transcendental nonlinear equations describing the interactions between the circulating power...... and the optical elements is solved by a numerical root find function of a commercial mathematics software. The method allows computation of the output of sequential nonlinear processes such as laser gain, second harmonic generation and optical parametric amplification as a function of the input diode pump power...

  6. Double-Stranded Linear Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV) Stably Integrates at a Higher Frequency than Wild-Type DHBV in LMH Chicken Hepatoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shih S.; Jensen, Anne D.; Chang, C. J.; Rogler, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Integration of hepadnavirus DNAs into host chromosomes can have oncogenic consequences. Analysis of host-viral DNA junctions of DHBV identified the terminally duplicated r region of the viral genome as a hotspot for integration. Since the r region is present on the 5′ and 3′ ends of double-stranded linear (DSL) hepadnavirus DNAs, these molecules have been implicated as integration precursors. We have produced a LMH chicken hepatoma cell line (LMH 66-1 DSL) which replicates exclusively DSL duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) DNA. To test whether linear DHBV DNAs integrate more frequently than the wild type open circular DHBV DNAs, we have characterized the integration frequency in LMH 66-1 DSL cells by using a subcloning approach. This approach revealed that 83% of the LMH 66-1 DSL subclones contained new integrations, compared to only 16% of subclones from LMH-D2 cells replicating wild-type open circular DHBV DNA. Also, a higher percentage of the LMH 66-1 DSL subclones contained two or more new integrations. Mathematical analysis suggests that the DSL DHBV DNAs integrated stably once every three generations during subcloning whereas wild-type DHBV integrated only once every four to five generations. Cloning and sequencing of new integrations confirmed the r region as a preferred integration site for linear DHBV DNA molecules. One DHBV integrant was associated with a small deletion of chromosomal DNA, and another DHBV integrant occurred in a telomeric repeat sequence. PMID:9882355

  7. Design and Analysis of Double-Gate MOSFETs for Ultra-Low Power Radio Frequency Identification (RFID: Device and Circuit Co-Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony T. Kim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, double-gate MOSFETs (DGMOSFETs have been shown to be more optimal for ultra-low power circuit design due to the improved subthreshold slope and the reduced leakage current compared to bulk CMOS. However, DGMOSFETs for subthreshold circuit design have not been much explored in comparison to those for strong inversion-based design. In this paper, various configurations of DGMOSFETs, such as tied/independent gates and symmetric/asymmetric gate oxide thickness are explored for ultra-low power and high efficient radio frequency identification (RFID design. Comparison of bulk CMOS with DGMOSFETs has been conducted in ultra-low power subthreshold digital logic design and rectifier design, emphasizing the scope of the nano-scale DGMOSFET technology for future ultra-low power systems. The DGMOSFET-based subthreshold logic improves energy efficiency by more than 40% compared to the bulk CMOS-based logic at 32 nm. Among the various DGMOSFET configurations for RFID rectifiers, symmetric tied-gate DGMOSFET has the best power conversion efficiency and the lowest power consumption.

  8. High-speed singulation of electronic packages using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser in a water jet and realization of a 200-W green laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hu, Wentao; Spiegel, Akos; Vago, Nandor; Richerzhagen, Bernold

    2003-07-01

    Each electronic chip is packaged in order to connect the integrated circuit and the printed circuit board. In consequence high-speed singulation of packages is an important step in the manufacturing process of electronic devices. The widely used technique of abrasive sawing encounters problems due to the combination of different materials used in packages such as copper and mold compound. The sawing blade rapidly blunts because of the copper adhering to the saw blade and covering the diamonds. In fact, the abrasive saw, well adapted to silicon wafer sawing, has problems to adapt to package materials. It has already been shown that the water jet guided laser can be used for efficient high quality singulation of leadframe based packages. In this technique a low-pressure water jet guides the laser beam like an optical fiber, providing efficient cooling of the cutting kerf at exactly the point that was heated during the laser pulse. We present new cutting results using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with 100 W average power, and the combination setup for generating a 200 W green laser beam. The timing between the two lasers can be precisely controlled.

  9. The LHC superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Boussard, Daniel; Häbel, E; Kindermann, H P; Losito, R; Marque, S; Rödel, V; Stirbet, M

    1999-01-01

    The LHC RF system, which must handle high intensity (0.5 A d.c.) beams, makes use of superconducting single-cell cavities, best suited to minimizing the effects of periodic transient beam loading. There will be eight cavities per beam, each capable of delivering 2 MV (5 MV/m accelerating field) at 400 MHz. The cavities themselves are now being manufactured by industry, using niobium-on-copper technology which gives full satisfaction at LEP. A cavity unit includes a helium tank (4.5 K operating temperature) built around a cavity cell, RF and HOM couplers and a mechanical tuner, all housed in a modular cryostat. Four-unit modules are ultimately foreseen for the LHC (two per beam), while at present a prototype version with two complete units is being extensively tested. In addition to a detailed description of the cavity and its ancillary equipment, the first test results of the prototype will be reported.

  10. Preparation and handling of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Takaaki

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines the recent preparation methods for superconducting cavities used in various laboratories and universities, and reports the problems of the cavity fabrication at KEK as an example of mass production. Preparation and handling are first addressed, focusing on material, fabrication, surface treatment, rinsing, clean environment, and heat treatment. Cavity production at KEK is then described, centering on defects on the surface and clean environments. Field gradients of more than 20 MV/m have been obtained by 1.5-3 GHz single cavities, for multi-cell cavities Eacc of 10 MV/m are available at any frequency range. The successful construction of thirty-two cavities for TRISTAN at KEK is due to the careful checking of the surface and quality control of all processes against the surface defects and contaminations. Eacc of 5 MV/m has been achieved by 94 % of the TRISTAN cavities at the first cold test, but 6 % of them had to be reworked because of the surface defects. These defects could not be detected by an X-ray photograph or visual inspections during the fabrication processes. (N.K.)

  11. Passive control of supersonic cavity flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokani, N.; Kim, I.

    1991-01-01

    A computational investigation has been conducted to study the effect and mechanisms of the passive control of a supersonic flow over a rectangular two-dimensional cavity. The passive control was included through the use of a porous surface over a vent chamber in the floor of the cavity. The passive control effectively suppressed the low-frequency pressure oscillations for the open type cavity, (length-to-depth ratio = 6.0). The mechanism for the suppression was observed to be the stabilization of the motion of the free shear layer. For the closed type cavity flow, (length-to-depth ratio = 17.5), the passive control modified the flowfield to nearly that of an open type cavity flow; further the cavity drag was reduced by a factor of four. The computational results of both cases showed good agreement with the available experimental data and the predictions of a semiempirical formula. This study demonstrates that the passive control concept can be used to improve the aerodynamic characteristics of open and closed cavity flowfields.

  12. Tuning for the first 9-cell TESLA cavity of PKU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; He, Fei-Si; Xu, Wen-Can; Zhu, Feng; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Zhao, Kui

    2010-04-01

    A method based on circuit model is used to tune the first home-made 9-cell TESLA type superconducting niobium cavity at Peking University. After tuning, a flat field profile with a final π-mode frequency within 3 kHz of target frequency is achieved. The field flatness is measured by a bead-pull method, and the relative electric field is calculated from the frequency shift perturbed by the bead stepping along the axis of the cavity.

  13. On the impact of a doubled sampling frequency on the detection capability and accuracy of a xenon station at the example of the German IMS RN station Schauinsland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Andreas; Schlosser, Clemens; Auer, Matthias; Gohla, Herbert; Kumberg, Timo; Wernsperger, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    In order to detect any kind of nuclear explosion world-wide the Provisional Technical Secretariat to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is building up a verification regime that performs global monitoring for typical signals expected from such an event. Backbone of this regime is the 321 facilities International Monitoring System (IMS) comprising also 80 stations to monitor for airborne radionuclides known to be fission or activation products of a nuclear explosion. Whereas particulate radionuclides are very likely fully contained in the cavity of an underground nuclear test explosion, radioactive noble gases bear a good chance to be still vented or seeped through the lithosphere into the atmosphere. As the corresponding relevant isotopes Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe-133m, and Xe-135, which have the highest fission yields among the noble gases, are also not subdued to wet deposition in the atmosphere, they were regarded as important enough to add a xenon detection capability to 50% of the aforementioned 80 radionuclide stations. This, however, requires measurement methods being completely different to the one utilized for particulate monitoring. Despite tremendous progress that has been made with regard to the detection capability of radio-xenon systems in the past 10 years, gaining one order of magnitude in this metric, certain challenges still occur with regard to noble gas monitoring: • Only four xenon isotopes instead of more than 90 different particulate radio-isotopes are characteristic for the detection of a nuclear explosion with the IMS. • These four nuclides feature very different - abundances (background concentrations) that are strongly related to their different half-life times and the site. • There are known but CTBT irrelevant sources of radioxenon surrounding noble-gas stations at partly short distances (at least much shorter than the average station to station distance of the noble gas network). • Mountainous IMS stations and their

  14. Measure Of Frequency Of Alveolar Osteitis Using Two Different Methods Of Osteotomy In Mandibular Third Molar Impactions: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Hina; Hussain, Azmina; Sheikh, Abdul Hafeez; Azam, Kehkishan; Malik, Sofia; Amin, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Dento-alveolar surgical procedures involving third molar teeth are the most common surgical procedure in the field of surgery. The objective of this research was to analyse the impact of surgery on the incidence of alveolar osteitis after surgical removal of mandibular third molar and to compare two different bone cutting methods following impacted mandibular third molar surgery.. This double blinded randomized clinical trial was executed at the OPD of Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi. The study duration was four months. It was conducted on 60 patients needing unilateral mandibular third molar impaction removal. Patients were randomized to two groups (i.e., physio dispenser group and slow speed handpiece group) before surgery. The surgical procedure was performed under local anaesthesia by using standardized cross infection protocol. The frequency of alveolar osteitis was evaluated on thirdday postoperatively. Alveolar osteitis was diagnosed and confirmed by patient's history and clinical evaluation. Post-operative sequelae were observed and recorded objectively. Out of 60 patients', five patients experienced alveolar osteitis, and the incidence rate was 8.3%. A significant pvalue of 0.000 was calculated using binomial test for comparison of alveolar osteitis among both groups. Inter-examiner reliability was assessed by kappa and good (62%) agreement, which was found among the examiners, who diagnosed alveolar osteitis clinically. Post-operative sequelae were insignificant in slow speed hand piece group. It was observed that alveolar osteitis was reported in physio-dispenser group; similarly, post-operative complications were also more in this group as compared with slow speed-hand piece group. No surgical complications were observed in slow speed-hand piece group suggesting slow speed hand piece mode of osteotomy to be safer for third molar extraction as compared with physio-dispenser.

  15. Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in lower atmosphere by a 3-frequency Doppler lidar with a Na double-edge magneto-optic filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Chu, X.; Wang, Z.; Roberts, B.; Yuan, T.; Yue, J.; Harrell, S.; She, C.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a new lidar technology to simultaneously profile wind and temperature from the lower to the middle atmosphere. This was to use a Na double-edge magneto-optic filter (Na-DEMOF) in the receiver of a 3-frequency Na Doppler lidar to analyze the Doppler shift and width of the Rayleigh/Mie scattering returns from 5 to 50 km altitude range. In last AGU meeting we reported our first field demonstration of this technology with the Colorado State University’s Na lidar running at 0.4 W power and 75 cm diameter telescope. Reliable winds and temperatures were measured in the altitude range of 10-45 km at 1 km and 60 min resolutions. Further tests reveal strong wavy structures in our short-time data set. In order to assess the capability of this technique in resolving the gravity waves and to understand the origin of the wavy structures, two PMTs were integrated to improve the temporal resolution and field tests were conducted covering an entire night. The preliminary data retrieval reveals the calibration regarding the different responses of the two PMTs being a critical issue for this new technique. A second-generation Na-DEMOF has been designed for reliable and stable performance. It is currently under construction and will soon be tested in the field. In this paper we will present these field test results and assess the usefulness of this new technology in the study of atmospheric thermal and dynamic structures, especially gravity wave properties.

  16. Plasma cleaning: A new possible treatment for niobium superconducting cavity after nitrogen doping

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ziqin; Lu, Xiangyang; Xie, Datao; Lin, Lin; Zhou, Kui; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Tan, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen doping treatment with the subsequent electropolishing (EP) of the niobium superconducting cavity can significantly increase the cavity's quality factor up to a factor of 3. But the process of the EP removal may reintroduce hydrogen in the cavity surface, which may influence the cavity's radio frequency performance. Plasma cleaning study on niobium samples with gas mixtures of argon and oxgen intended to remove contaminations (hydrocarbons and micronicdust particles) from cavity surfa...

  17. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  18. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  19. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El-Jallal, Said [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Physique du Rayonnement et de l’Interaction Laser Matière, Faculté des sciences, Université de Moulay Ismail, Meknès (Morocco)

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  20. Quantum theory of cavity-assisted sideband cooling of mechanical motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, F. [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Chen, J.P.; Harris, J.G.E.; Girvin, S.M. [Dept. of Physics, Yale Univ., New Haven (United States); Clerk, A.A. [Dept. of Physics, McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    We present a fully quantum theory describing the cooling of a cantilever coupled via radiation pressure to an illuminated optical cavity. Applying the quantum noise approach to the fluctuations of the radiation pressure force, we derive the opto-mechanical cooling rate and the minimum achievable phonon number. We find that reaching the quantum limit of arbitrarily small phonon numbers requires going into the good cavity (resolved phonon sideband) regime where the cavity linewidth is much smaller than the mechanical frequency and the corresponding cavity detuning. This is in contrast to the common assumption that the mechanical frequency and the cavity detuning should be comparable to the cavity damping. (orig.)

  1. Quantum theory of cavity-assisted sideband cooling of mechanical motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Florian; Chen, Joe P; Clerk, A A; Girvin, S M

    2007-08-31

    We present a quantum-mechanical theory of the cooling of a cantilever coupled via radiation pressure to an illuminated optical cavity. Applying the quantum noise approach to the fluctuations of the radiation pressure force, we derive the optomechanical cooling rate and the minimum achievable phonon number. We find that reaching the quantum limit of arbitrarily small phonon numbers requires going into the good-cavity (resolved phonon sideband) regime where the cavity linewidth is much smaller than the mechanical frequency and the corresponding cavity detuning. This is in contrast to the common assumption that the mechanical frequency and the cavity detuning should be comparable to the cavity damping.

  2. Astigmatism inducing the degenerate effect in nearly hemispherical cavities: generation of three-dimensional structured light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, J. C.; Hsieh, Y. H.; Liang, H. C.; Su, K. W.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2017-04-01

    We originally perform an analytical form to explore the influence of the astigmatism on the degenerate effect in nearly hemispherical cavities. The frequency spectrum near hemispherical cavities clearly reveals that not only the difference of cavity lengths between each degeneracies but also frequency gaps have significant difference from non-hemispherical cavities. We further thoroughly demonstrate the laser experiment under the condition of nearly hemispherical cavities to confirm the theoretical exploration that the transverse topology of three-dimensional (3D) structured light in the degenerate cavities is well localized on the Lissajous curves.

  3. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  4. TM01 mode accelerating cavity optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, J.J.; Knapp, E.A.

    1978-08-01

    The cost of an accelerator depends greatly upon the effective use of rf power for particle acceleration. Before completing an accelerator design, an optimization of the accelerating cells relative to the effective shunt impedance should be made to measure the structure's efficiency in providing a high and effective acceleration of particles for a given rf power. Optimization of the accelerating cell resonant at f/sub r/ = 1350 MHz (TM 01 mode) relative to the maximum effective shunt impedance ZT 2 was performed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory using the computer program SUPERFISH. The study was parametric; one parameter was changed while the others were held constant. Frequency adjustments were made by changing the cavity radius. Results presented in this report can be used to design similar cavities at different resonant frequencies or to design a more complicated cavity (TM 02 mode) for the disk and washer structure

  5. Minimum wakefield achievable by waveguide damped cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X.E.; Kroll, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    The authors use an equivalent circuit to model a waveguide damped cavity. Both exponentially damped and persistent (decay t -3/2 ) components of the wakefield are derived from this model. The result shows that for a cavity with resonant frequency a fixed interval above waveguide cutoff, the persistent wakefield amplitude is inversely proportional to the external Q value of the damped mode. The competition of the two terms results in an optimal Q value, which gives a minimum wakefield as a function of the distance behind the source particle. The minimum wakefield increases when the resonant frequency approaches the waveguide cutoff. The results agree very well with computer simulation on a real cavity-waveguide system

  6. Generation of high-energy sub-20 fs pulses tunable in the 250-310 nm region by frequency doubling of a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Marcus; Ghotbi, Masood; Noack, Frank; Brida, Daniele; Manzoni, Cristian; Cerullo, Giulio

    2009-03-15

    We report on the generation of powerful sub-20 fs deep UV pulses with 10 microJ level energy and broadly tunable in the 250-310 nm range. These pulses are produced by frequency doubling a high-power noncollinear optical parametric amplifier and compressed by a pair of MgF2 prisms to an almost transform-limited duration. Our results provide a power scaling by an order of magnitude with respect to previous works.

  7. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  8. Characterization and simulation of a pillbox cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Moran Guizan, Carla

    2017-01-01

    A cylindrical pillbox cavity is characterized and its principal parameters, such as the cut-off frequencies of the modes, the quality factor and R/Q figure, are calculated. Additionally, these measurements are compared with an analytical analysis and with a simulation with the software CST Studio to determine how precise they are.

  9. Superconducting TESLA cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aune

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of E_{acc}≥25 MV/m at a quality factor Q_{0}≥5×10^{9}. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF linac was set to the more moderate value of E_{acc}≥15 MV/m. In a first series of 27 industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} was measured to be 20.1±6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering from serious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTF cavities, additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular, an eddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusions and stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. The average gradient of these cavities at Q_{0}=5×10^{9} amounts to 25.0±3.2 MV/m with the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only a moderate improvement in production and preparation techniques will be needed to meet the ambitious TESLA goal with an adequate safety margin. In this paper we present a detailed description of the design, fabrication, and preparation of the TESLA Test Facility cavities and their associated components and report on cavity performance in test cryostats and with electron beam in the TTF linac. The ongoing research and development towards higher gradients is briefly addressed.

  10. Single-cell LEP-type cavity on measurement stand

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    A single-cell cavity, made of copper, with tapered connectors for impedance measurements. It was used as a model of LEP-type superconducting cavities, to investigate impedance and higher-order modes and operated at around 600 MHz (the LEP acceleration frequency was 352.2 MHz). See 8202500.

  11. RF cavity using liquid dielectric for tuning and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Milorad [Warrenville, IL; Johnson, Rolland P [Newport News, VA

    2012-04-17

    A system for accelerating particles includes an RF cavity that contains a ferrite core and a liquid dielectric. Characteristics of the ferrite core and the liquid dielectric, among other factors, determine the resonant frequency of the RF cavity. The liquid dielectric is circulated to cool the ferrite core during the operation of the system.

  12. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  13. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayu; Li Peng; Liu Yong; Xie Qingchun

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238 U 72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  14. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  15. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  16. Cavity RF mode analysis using a boundary-integral method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, M.S. de; Adams, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    A 3-dimensional boundary-integral method has been developed for rf cavity mode analysis. A frequency-dependent, homogeneous linear matrix equation is generated from a variant of the magnetic field integral equation (MFIE) where the domain of integration is a closed surface specifying the rf envelope of the cavity. Frequencies at which the MFIE has non-zero solutions are mode frequencies of the cavity, and the solutions are the corresponding surface magnetic field distributions. The MFIE can then be used to calculate the electric and magnetic field at any other point inside the cavity. Forward iteration is used to find the largest complex eigenvalue of the matrix at a specific frequency. This eigenvalue is 1 when the frequency corresponds to a cavity rf resonance. The matrix equivalent of the MFIE is produced by approximating the cavity surface by a set of perfectly conducting surface elements, and assuming that the surface magnetic field has constant amplitude on each element. The method can handle cavities with complex symmetries, and be easily integrated with finite-element heat-transfer and stress analysis codes

  17. Nylon Sleeve for Cavity Amplifier Holds Tuning Despite Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derr, Lloyd

    1964-01-01

    The problem: Detuning of cavity amplifiers with change in temperature. This results in deterioration of the performance of the amplifier at its design frequency. In cavity amplifiers and filters it is desirable that constant performance be maintained regardless of thermal changes. These changes often cause an "off resonance shift" in a cavity filter and a deterioration of performance in a cavity amplifier. The solution: Mount the tuning probe in a nylon sleeve. Thermal expansion and contraction of the nylon nullifies unwanted capacitive and inductive changes in the resonant elements.

  18. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  19. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  20. Cavity quantum-electrodynamical response to a gravitational wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, U.H. (Department of Mathematics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States))

    1992-08-15

    What is the rate of information transfer from a gravitational wave (GW) transmitter to a receiver To this end we consider how electromagnetic modes in a cylindrical cavity respond to circularly polarized gravitational radiation. It is found that a GW changes the refractive index inside the cavity. In fact, the cavity interior becomes birefringent for electromagnetic modes circulating in opposite directions. A linearly polarized cavity mode is thus subjected to Faraday rotation by the GW. In addition, for a cavity mode circulating in the same sense as the GW, the refractive index becomes complex: the cavity interior exhibits antidamping, but only over a finite interval of the applied GW frequency. Inside this interval the cavity mode becomes unstable and its frequency locks onto one-half the GW frequency ( parametric excitation''). Outside this interval the cavity mode breaks the lock-in synchronization with the GW. Instead, the mode evolves in a stable fashion and, like a counterrotating mode, only suffers a frequency pulling away from its unperturbed value. The quantum-mechanical response of the cavity oscillator is expressed as a spinning top precessing around a fictitious magnetic field in a fictitious three-dimensional Lorentz space. In the absence of any impinging GW this magnetic field is timelike and straight up. In the presence of a GW this magnetic field gets changed. The vectorial change is directly related to the frequency and the maximum amplitude of the GW. The resultant magnetic field is tilted and timelike for stable evolution, but spacelike for unstable evolution. The set of observables of a simple harmonic oscillator (SHO) is decomposed into mutually exclusive and jointly exhaustive sets of spin-{ital j} objects. They make up the finite representations of the symmetry group of the three-dimensional Lorentz space arena for the cavity oscillator influenced by a GW.

  1. MMIC Cavity Oscillator at 50 and 94 GHz, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative, ultra low noise, single chip cavity oscillator is proposed. The oscillator is fully integrated on standard MMIC process. It operates in the frequency...

  2. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  3. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, D.A.

    1977-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality.

  4. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, D.A.

    1977-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality

  5. A novel nano-sensor based on optomechanical crystal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yeping; Ai, Jie; Ma, Jingfang

    2017-10-01

    Optical devices based on new sensing principle are widely used in biochemical and medical area. Nowadays, mass sensing based on monitoring the frequency shifts induced by added mass in oscillators is a well-known and widely used technique. It is interesting to note that for nanoscience and nanotechnology applications there is a strong demand for very sensitive mass sensors, being the target a sensor for single molecule detection. The desired mass resolution for very few or even single molecule detection, has to be below the femtogram range. Considering the strong interaction between high co-localized optical mode and mechanical mode in optomechanical crystal (OMC) cavities, we investigate OMC splitnanobeam cavities in silicon operating near at the 1550nm to achieve high optomechanical coupling rate and ultra-small motion mass. Theoretical investigations of the optical and mechanical characteristic for the proposed cavity are carried out. By adjusting the structural parameters, the cavity's effective motion mass below 10fg and mechanical frequency exceed 10GHz. The transmission spectrum of the cavity is sensitive to the sample which located on the center of the cavity. We conducted the fabrication and the characterization of this cavity sensor on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) chip. By using vertical coupling between the tapered fiber and the SOI chip, we measured the transmission spectrum of the cavity, and verify this cavity is promising for ultimate precision mass sensing and detection.

  6. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, D. M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P. J.; Mcclelland, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system.

  7. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  8. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  9. Short-cavity squeezing in barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, D.M.; Bachor, H-A.; Manson, P.J.; Mcclelland, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Broadband phase sensitive noise and squeezing were experimentally observed in a system of barium atoms interacting with a single mode of a short optical cavity. Squeezing of 13 +/- 3 percent was observed. A maximum possible squeezing of 45 +/- 8 percent could be inferred for out experimental conditions, after correction for measured loss factors. Noise reductions below the quantum limit were found over a range of detection frequencies 60-170 MHz and were best for high cavity transmission and large optical depths. The amount of squeezing observed is consistent with theoretical predictions from a full quantum statistical model of the system

  10. Construction of 714 MHz HOM-free accelerating cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakanaka, S; Hinode, F; Kubo, K; Urakawa, J

    1998-05-01

    A new 'higher-order-mode (HOM)-free' accelerating cavity has been developed which can provide an accelerating voltage of more than 400 kV per cavity at a frequency of 714 MHz. The harmful HOMs in the cavities, which can induce beam instabilities at high beam currents, were heavily damped by using four special waveguide ports and broadband microwave loads. Two cavities of this design were installed in the 1.54 GeV accelerator test facility (ATF) damping ring at KEK, and successfully stored beams. This cavity will also be very useful for synchrotron light sources. The basic design, characteristics of HOMs and construction of this cavity are reported.

  11. 17 GHz photonic band gap cavity with improved input coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Shapiro

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the theoretical design and cold test of a 17 GHz photonic band gap (PBG cavity with improved coupling from an external rectangular waveguide. The PBG cavity is made of a triangular lattice of metal rods with a defect (missing rod in the center. The TM_{010}-like defect mode was chosen as the operating mode. Experimental results are presented demonstrating that critical coupling into the cavity can be achieved by partial withdrawal or removal of some rods from the lattice, a result that agrees with simulations. A detailed design of the PBG accelerator structure is compared with a conventional (pillbox cavity. One advantage of the PBG cavity is that its resonance frequency is much less perturbed by the input/output coupling structure than in a comparable pillbox cavity. The PBG structure is attractive for future accelerator applications.

  12. Quantum noise interference and backaction cooling in cavity nanomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elste, Florian; Girvin, S M; Clerk, A A

    2009-05-22

    We present a theoretical analysis of a novel cavity electromechanical system where a mechanical resonator directly modulates the damping rate kappa of a driven electromagnetic cavity. We show that via a destructive interference of quantum noise, the driven cavity can effectively act like a zero-temperature bath irrespective of the ratio kappa/omega_{M}, where omega_{M} is the mechanical frequency. This scheme thus allows one to cool the mechanical resonator to its ground state without requiring the cavity to be in the so-called good cavity limit kappa < omega_{M}. The system described here could be implemented directly using setups similar to those used in recent experiments in cavity electromechanics.

  13. RF kicker cavity to increase control in common transport lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David R.; Ament, Lucas J. P.

    2017-04-18

    A method of controlling e-beam transport where electron bunches with different characteristics travel through the same beam pipe. An RF kicker cavity is added at the beginning of the common transport pipe or at various locations along the common transport path to achieve independent control of different bunch types. RF energy is applied by the kicker cavity kicks some portion of the electron bunches, separating the bunches in phase space to allow independent control via optics, or separating bunches into different beam pipes. The RF kicker cavity is operated at a specific frequency to enable kicking of different types of bunches in different directions. The phase of the cavity is set such that the selected type of bunch passes through the cavity when the RF field is at a node, leaving that type of bunch unaffected. Beam optics may be added downstream of the kicker cavity to cause a further separation in phase space.

  14. A fast cavity dumper for a picosecond glass laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, S. M.; Bindra, K. S.; Narayan, B. S.; Khardekar, R. K.

    1991-02-01

    A fast cavity dumper for picosecond glass laser has been made. The optical and electrical characterization of the cavity dumper is described. An avalanche transistor Marx bank generator drives the cavity dumper. Up to 5 kV peak amplitude and 1.5 ns fall time negative polarity step pulses are generated by the Marx bank circuit. With a capacitive load like Pockels cell the pulse fall time increases to 4 ns. Optical switching times as fast as 2 ns (10%-90%) are experimentally measured. The contrast ratio of 1000 is obtained after a double pass through an amplifier. Single picosecond pulses are produced with an energy jitter of 10%.

  15. A Pass Band Performance Simulation Code of Coupled Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, X

    2004-01-01

    A simulation code of accelerating cavities named PPSC is developed by the solutions of the microwave equivalent circuit equations. PPSC can give the pass band performance of periodic or non-periodic accelerating structures, such as the dispersion frequency and the reflection factor of the cavity, the field distribution of each mode and so on. The natural parameters of the structure, such as the number of the cavities, the resonant frequencies and Q-factors of each cavity, the coupling factor between two cavities, and the locations of the couplers, can be changed easily to see the different results of the simulation. The code is written based on MS Visual Basic under MS windows. With these, a user-friendly interface is made. Some simple examples was simulated and gave reliable results.

  16. Novel High Cooperativity Photon-Magnon Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Michael; Bourhill, Jeremy; Kostylev, Nikita; G, Maxim; Creedon, Daniel

    Novel microwave cavities are presented, which couple photons and magnons in YIG spheres in a super- and ultra-strong way at around 20 mK in temperature. Few/Single photon couplings (or normal mode splitting, 2g) of more than 6 GHz at microwave frequencies are obtained. Types of cavities include multiple post reentrant cavities, which co-couple photons at different frequencies with a coupling greater that the free spectral range, as well as spherical loaded dielectric cavity resonators. In such cavities we show that the bare dielectric properties can be obtained by polarizing all magnon modes to high energy using a 7 Tesla magnet. We also show that at zero-field, collective effects of the spins significantly perturb the photon modes. Other effects like time-reversal symmetry breaking are observed.

  17. Elliptical superconducting RF cavities for FRIB energy upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Contreras, C.; Plastun, A. S.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Taylor, A.; Wei, J.; Xu, M.; Xu, T.; Zhao, Q.; Gonin, I. V.; Khabiboulline, T.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2018-04-01

    The multi-physics design of a five cell, βG = 0 . 61, 644 MHz superconducting elliptical cavity being developed for an energy upgrade in the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is presented. The FRIB energy upgrade from 200 MeV/u to 400 MeV/u for heaviest uranium ions will increase the intensities of rare isotope beams by nearly an order of magnitude. After studying three different frequencies, 1288 MHz, 805 MHz, and 644 MHz, the 644 MHz cavity was shown to provide the highest energy gain per cavity for both uranium and protons. The FRIB upgrade will include 11 cryomodules containing 5 cavities each and installed in 80-meter available space in the tunnel. The cavity development included extensive multi-physics optimization, mechanical and engineering analysis. The development of a niobium cavity is complete and two cavities are being fabricated in industry. The detailed design of the cavity sub-systems such as fundamental power coupler and dynamic tuner are currently being pursued. In the overall design of the cavity and its sub-systems we extensively applied experience gained during the development of 650 MHz low-beta cavities at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) for the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) II.

  18. Nonlinear dynamic behaviors of an optically injected vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaofeng; Pan Wei; Luo Bin; Ma Dong; Wang Yong; Li Nuohan

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with external optical injection are studied numerically. We consider a master-slave configuration where the dynamic characteristics of the slave are affected by the optical injection from the master, and we also establish the corresponding Simulink model. The period-doubling route as well as the period-halving route is observed, where the regular, double-periodic, and chaotic pulsings are found. By adjusting the injection strength properly, the laser can be controlled to work at a given state. The effects of frequency detuning on the nonlinear behaviors are also investigated in terms of the bifurcation diagrams of photon density with the frequency detuning. For weak injection case, the nonlinear dynamics shown by the laser are quite different when the value of frequency detuning varies contrarily (positive and negative direction). If the optical injection is strong enough, the slave can be locked by the master even though the frequency detuning is relatively large

  19. Open waveguide cavity using a negative index medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Shen, Linfang

    2008-12-01

    An open waveguide cavity formed by a pair of planar waveguides, in which one guiding layer is a negative index medium and the other is a positive index medium, is theoretically demonstrated. For such a waveguide cavity the resonant frequency is independent of the total length of the waveguide system. With the coupled mode theory it is shown that energy flow circulation can be established through the special coupling between the waveguides at the resonant frequency, and thus the wave fields are localized. This phenomenon is further verified numerically with the finite-difference time-domain method. The quality factor of the open waveguide cavity is also discussed.

  20. PEP-II RF cavity revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Koehler, G.; Li, D.; Hartman, N.; Folwell, N.; Hodgson, J.; Ko, K.; McCandless, B.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of numerical simulations of the PEP-II RF cavity performed after the completion of the construction phase of the project and comparisons are made to previous calculations and measured results. These analyses were performed to evaluate new calculation techniques for the HOM distribution and RF surface heating that were not available at the time of the original design. These include the use of a high frequency electromagnetic element in ANSYS and the new Omega 3P code to study wall losses, and the development of broadband time domain simulation methods in MAFIA for the HOM loading. The computed HOM spectrum is compared with cavity measurements and observed beam-induced signals. The cavity fabrication method is reviewed, with the benefit of hindsight, and simplifications are discussed

  1. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  2. Resonance spiking by periodic loss in the double-sided liquid cooling disk oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Rongzhi; She, Jiangbo; Li, Dongdong; Li, Fuli; Peng, Bo

    2017-03-01

    A double-sided liquid cooling Nd:YAG disk oscillator working at a pump repetition rate of 20 Hz is demonstrated. The output energy of 376 mJ is realized, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 12.8% and the slope efficiency of 14%. The pump pulse width is 300 µs and the laser pulse width is 260 µs. Instead of being a damped signal, the output of laser comprises undamped spikes. A periodic intra-cavity loss was found by numerical analysis, which has a frequency component near the eigen frequency of the relaxation oscillation. Resonance effect will induce amplified spikes even though the loss fluctuates in a small range. The Shark-Hartmann sensor was used to investigate the wavefront aberration induced by turbulent flow and temperature gradient. According to the wavefront and fluid mechanics analysis, it is considered that the periodic intra-cavity loss can be attributed to turbulent flow and temperature gradient.

  3. Travelling Wave Structure of an SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The RF cavities for acceleration of particles in the SPS have a travelling-wave structure. They operate at a fixed frequency of 200 MHz (h = 4620). With a quality factor of Q = 100, the bandwidth covers the small frequency swing for the acceleration of protons from as low as 10 GeV to the top energy of 450 GeV. Later on, for the acceleration of ions, with a larger frequency swing, turn-to-turn phase jumps did the trick. Two cavities, each consisting of 5 tank sections, were installed in long straight section 3. Each cavity is driven by a power amplifier of 750 kW CW (1 MW pulsed). Another 2 cavities were added later on. See also 7411033 and 7802190.

  4. Signatures of Nonlinear Cavity Optomechanics in the Weak Coupling Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børkje, K.; Nunnenkamp, A.; Teufel, J. D.; Girvin, S. M.

    2013-08-01

    We identify signatures of the intrinsic nonlinear interaction between light and mechanical motion in cavity optomechanical systems. These signatures are observable even when the cavity linewidth exceeds the optomechanical coupling rate. A strong laser drive red detuned by twice the mechanical frequency from the cavity resonance frequency makes two-phonon processes resonant, which leads to a nonlinear version of optomechanically induced transparency. This effect provides a new method of measuring the average phonon number of the mechanical oscillator. Furthermore, we show that if the strong laser drive is detuned by half the mechanical frequency, optomechanically induced transparency also occurs due to resonant two-photon processes. The cavity response to a second probe drive is in this case nonlinear in the probe power. These effects should be observable with optomechanical coupling strengths that have already been realized in experiments.

  5. Field stabilization in superconducting cavities under pulsed operating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessier, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Within the framework of Tesla linear accelerator project, superconducting cavity battery is used to accelerate electrons and positrons. These cavities require pulsed running and must reach very high accelerating gradients. Under the action of the Lorentz force, the resonance frequency shifts and leaves the band-pass width, which hinders the field from taking its maximal value inside the cavity. The setting of an auto-oscillating loop allows to bring the generator frequency under the control of the cavity frequency. A feedback system is needed to reduce the energy dispersion inside the particle packets. The effects of the mechanical vibrations that disturb the accelerating voltage phase between two impulses are also compensated by a feedback loop. This thesis describes all these phenomena and computes their effects on the energy dispersion of the beam in both cases of relativistic and non-relativistic particles. (A.C.)

  6. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  7. Materials for superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The ideal material for superconducting cavities should exhibit a high critical temperature, a high critical field, and, above all, a low surface resistance. Unfortunately, these requirements can be conflicting and a compromise has to be found. To date, most superconducting cavities for accelerators are made of niobium. The reasons for this choice are discussed. Thin films of other materials such as NbN, Nb 3 Sn, or even YBCO compounds can also be envisaged and are presently investigated in various laboratories. It is shown that their success will depend critically on the crystalline perfection of these films. (author)

  8. Status of rf development work on a ferrite tuned amplifier cavity for the TRIUMF KAON factory booster ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, R.L.; Enegren, T.

    1987-01-01

    Of the five synchrotron rings in the proposed TRIUMF KAON factory, the Booster ring to accelerate the proton beam from 440 MeV to 3 GeV has the most demanding rf requirements, primarily because of the relatively large frequency swing of 46.1 MHz to 61.1 MHz at a high repetition rate of 50 Hz. In the current reference design, the Booster lattice has twelve 3.9 m drift spaces with 2.5 m in each drift space available for installation of rf cavities to provide a required effective acceleration voltage of up to 600 kV per turn i.e. 50 kV per cavity. Design and development studies of a suitable cavity-amplifier system are in progress. For the initial reference design a system based on the one used in the Fermilab booster synchrotron has been chosen. That is, a double-gap drift-tube cavity with parallel-biased ferrite tuners and excited with a directly coupled Eimac Y567B tetrode. To meet the tuning and voltage requirements within the various mechanical and other constraints such as tube-to-gap voltage ratio, ferrite power density and available space, the reference design had to be further modified and a cold model of the cavity and tuners was constructed from copper-covered cardboard cylinders. From the results of the cold model measurements a new reference design was established and design work has begun on a full power prototype of the cavity-amplifier system

  9. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Direct Numerical Simulation of Automobile Cavity Tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, Konstantin; Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Navier Stokes equation is solved computationally by the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme for the flow and acoustic fields associated with a laminar boundary layer flow over an automobile door cavity. In this work, the flow Reynolds number is restricted to R(sub delta*) < 3400; the range of Reynolds number for which laminar flow may be maintained. This investigation focuses on two aspects of the problem, namely, the effect of boundary layer thickness on the cavity tone frequency and intensity and the effect of the size of the computation domain on the accuracy of the numerical simulation. It is found that the tone frequency decreases with an increase in boundary layer thickness. When the boundary layer is thicker than a certain critical value, depending on the flow speed, no tone is emitted by the cavity. Computationally, solutions of aeroacoustics problems are known to be sensitive to the size of the computation domain. Numerical experiments indicate that the use of a small domain could result in normal mode type acoustic oscillations in the entire computation domain leading to an increase in tone frequency and intensity. When the computation domain is expanded so that the boundaries are at least one wavelength away from the noise source, the computed tone frequency and intensity are found to be computation domain size independent.

  11. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  12. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Using a Low-Frequency Magnetic Field in the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Alex W Thomas; Karissa Graham; Frank S Prato; Julia McKay; Patricia Morley Forster; Dwight E Moulin; Sesh Chari

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to a specific pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been shown to produce analgesic (antinociceptive) effects in many organisms. In a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial, patients with either chronic generalized pain from fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic localized musculoskeletal or inflammatory pain were exposed to a PEMF (400 μT) through a portable device fitted to their head during twice-daily 40 min treatments over seven days. The effect of this PEMF on pain re...

  13. Production cavity and central optics for a light shining through a wall experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodajerdi, Reza

    2015-02-01

    The unexplained nature of dark matter and dark energy is a prominent reason for investigating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics (SM). Some extensions of the SM propose weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs). In an attempt to prove the existence of these particles, Light shining through the wall (LSW) experiments explore a very weak coupling between WISPs and photons (and viceversa). LSW experiments employ high-power lasers that provide a well defined flux of photons for the WISP-Photon conversion. The ALPS-I experiment at DESY in Hamburg was the first successful experiment with a high finesse optical resonator to enhance the laser power in a strong magnetic field in order to increase the photon to WISP conversion probability. The ALPS-II experimental concept adds a second optical cavity to also increase the reconversion probability. Both cavities are separated by a wall, amplify light at 1064 nm and share a common optical axis. Operating these two cavities inside 20 straightened HERA superconducting dipole magnets and using a transition edge sensor (TES) as a single photon detector will make the ALPS-II experiment almost three orders of magnitude more sensitive than its predecessor. Since photons, originating from reconverted WISPs in the regeneration cavity (RC) have 1064 nm wavelengths, the RC has to be locked to the production cavity (PC) with light of a different wavelength. Therefore frequency doubled PCs light will be used to lock the RC. This 532 nm light shall not arrive at the TES to prevent background noise. To achieve this, an optical attenuation system for wavelengths different from 1064 nm is required. In my thesis, the required attenuation was estimated and an optical setup was proposed and constructed and tested. It attenuates green photons by a factor of of 10 -18 and transmits 85% of the infrared photons. Furthermore the high finesse production cavity of ALPS-IIa was set up and characterized during this thesis. The PC reached

  14. Superconducting elliptical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J K

    2011-01-01

    We give a brief overview of the history, state of the art, and future for elliptical superconducting cavities. Principles of the cell shape optimization, criteria for multi-cell structures design, HOM damping schemes and other features are discussed along with examples of superconducting structures for various applications.

  15. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  16. What's a Cavity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and deeper over time. Cavities are also called dental caries (say: KARE-eez), and if you have a ... made up mostly of the germs that cause tooth decay. The bacteria in your mouth make acids and when plaque clings to your teeth, the acids can eat away at the outermost ...

  17. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  18. Seismic wave interaction with underground cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    Realization of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will require ensuring its compliance, making the CTBT a prime example of forensic seismology. Following indications of a nuclear explosion obtained on the basis of the (IMS) monitoring network further evidence needs to be sought at the location of the suspicious event. For such an On-Site Inspection (OSI) at a possible nuclear test site the treaty lists several techniques that can be carried out by the inspection team, including aftershock monitoring and the conduction of active seismic surveys. While those techniques are already well established, a third group of methods labeled as "resonance seismometry" is less well defined and needs further elaboration. A prime structural target that is expected to be present as a remnant of an underground nuclear explosion is a cavity at the location and depth the bomb was fired. Originally "resonance seismometry" referred to resonant seismic emission of the cavity within the medium that could be stimulated by an incident seismic wave of the right frequency and observed as peaks in the spectrum of seismic stations in the vicinity of the cavity. However, it is not yet clear which are the conditions for which resonant emissions of the cavity could be observed. In order to define distance-, frequency- and amplitude ranges at which resonant emissions could be observed we study the interaction of seismic waves with underground cavities. As a generic model for possible resonances we use a spherical acoustic cavity in an elastic full-space. To solve the forward problem for the full elastic wave field around acoustic spherical inclusions, we implemented an analytical solution (Korneev, 1993). This yields the possibility of generating scattering cross-sections, amplitude spectrums and synthetic seismograms for plane incident waves. Here, we focus on the questions whether or not we can expect resonant responses in the wave field scattered from the cavity. We show

  19. Trains of electron pulses generation using multi-stage cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Masaki; Mori, Michiya; Sugawara, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Yoko; Kurihara, Kazuteru; Shirasaka, Haruki; Nishiguchi, Takashi; Ando, Ritoku; Kamada, Keiichi

    2002-01-01

    Automodulation of an intense relativistic electron beam was reexamined experimentally to obtain trains of subnanosecond electron bunches. Sufficient beam modulation with frequency larger than 1 GHz was expected for the trains of subnanosecond bunches. It was obtained when a short pulse electron beam with energy of 550 keV, current of 4 kA, pulse duration of 12 ns and current rise time of 2ns was injected to a series of four coaxial cavities with the length of 75 mm. However, only a poor modulation was observed when a long pulse electron beam of 700 keV, 4 kA, 175 ns with current rise time of 20 ns was injected to the same cavities. Transmission line theory as well PIC code simulation suggested that the round trip time for the electromagnetic wave in the cavity must be longer than the rise time of the beam current to obtain the high level current modulation. Therefore, we studied experimentally how the ratio between the beam current rise time and the length of the cavity affects on the level of current modulation. Single cavity experiments were carried out with the short pulse beam. Single cavity with the length of 75, 150 or 300 mm was utilized. The round trip times for 75 and 150 mm cavities are shorter than the current rise time of 2 ns. The experiments with a 75 or 150 mm cavity resulted in suppression of the modulation amplitude. In the case of a 300 mm cavity, the high level modulation was obtained. The simulation results showed good agreements with the experimental results. We employed a series of cavities with decreasing lengths to improve the current rise time. For the short pulse beam, the high level current 1 GHz modulation was obtained when two 75 mm cavities were set at the downstream side of cavities with lengths of 300 mm and 150 mm. (author)

  20. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka?a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20?30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having p...

  1. Polarisation dynamics of a birefringent Fabry-Perot cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejlli, A.; Della Valle, F.; Zavattini, G.

    2018-02-01

    Optical Fabry-Perot cavities always show a non-degeneracy of two orthogonal polarisation states. This is due to the unavoidable birefringence of dielectric mirrors whose effects are extremely important in Fabry-Perot-based high-accuracy polarimeters: in birefringent cavities, ellipticities and rotations mix. We have developed and present here a theory of the polarisation state dynamics in a birefringent Fabry-Perot resonator, and we validate it through measurements performed with the polarimeter of the PVLAS experiment. The measurements are performed while a laser is frequency-locked to the cavity, and provide values for the phase difference between the two orthogonal polarisation components introduced by the combination of the two cavity mirrors (equivalent wave-plate) and for the finesse of the cavity. The theoretical formulas and the experimental data agree well showing that the consequences of the mirror birefringence must be taken into account in this and in any other similar experiment.

  2. Dependence of transmon qubit relaxation rate on cavity photon population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhada, S. O.; Shankar, S.; Liu, Y.; Hatridge, M.; Narla, A.; Sliwa, K. M.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    In circuit QED experiments, a qubit is dispersively coupled to a cavity such that the cavity frequency depends on the qubit state. This dispersive shift enables quantum non-demolition readout of the qubit by exciting the cavity with a microwave pulse and detecting the phase shift of the reflected signal. However, this cavity excitation has been observed in experiments to increase the qubit relaxation rate, hence demolishing the qubit state and limiting the maximum measurement strength. Here we experimentally study this effect in a transmon qubit coupled to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity. We also explore alternate qubit circuits designed to mitigate this demolition effect. Work supported by: IARPA, ARO, and NSF.

  3. Complex envelope control of pulsed accelerating fields in superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Czarski, T

    2010-01-01

    A digital control system for superconducting cavities of a linear accelerator is presented in this work. FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) based controller, managed by MATLAB, was developed to investigate a novel firmware implementation. The LLRF - Low Level Radio Frequency system for FLASH project in DESY is introduced. Essential modeling of a cavity resonator with signal and power analysis is considered as a key approach to the control methods. An electrical model is represented by the non-stationary state space equation for the complex envelope of the cavity voltage driven by the current generator and the beam loading. The electromechanical model of the superconducting cavity resonator including the Lorentz force detuning has been developed for a simulation purpose. The digital signal processing is proposed for the field vector detection. The field vector sum control is considered for multiple cavities driven by one klystron. An algebraic, complex domain model is proposed for the system analysis. The c...

  4. Millimeter-long fiber Fabry-Perot cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Konstantin; Garcia, Sebastien; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-05-02

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5 mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem.

  5. Broadband Comb-Resolved Cavity Enhanced Spectrometer with Graphene Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin; Mohr, Christian; Jiang, Jie; Fermann, Martin; Lee, Chien-Chung; Schibli, Thomas R.; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Maslowski, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Optical cavities enhance sensitivity in absorption spectroscopy. While this is commonly done with single wavelengths, broad bandwidths can be coupled into the cavity using frequency combs. The combination of cavity enhancement and broad bandwidth allows simultaneous measurement of tens of transitions with high signal-to-noise for even weak near-infrared transitions. This removes the need for time-consuming sequencing acquisition or long-term averaging, so any systematic errors from long-term drifts of the experimental setup or slow changes of sample composition are minimized. Resolving comb lines provides a high accuracy, absolute frequency axis. This is of great importance for gas metrology and data acquisition for future molecular lines databases, and can be applied to simultaneous trace-gas detection of gas mixtures. Coupling of a frequency comb into a cavity can be complex, so we introduce and demonstrate a simplification. The Pound-Drever-Hall method for locking a cavity and a frequency comb together requires a phase modulation of the laser output. We use the graphene modulator that is already in the Tm fiber laser cavity for controlling the carrier envelope offset of the frequency comb, rather than adding a lossy external modulator. The graphene modulator can operate at frequencies of over 1~ MHz, which is sufficient for controlling the laser cavity length actuator which operates below 100~kHz. We match the laser cavity length to fast variations of the enhancement cavity length. Slow variations are stabilized by comparison of the pulse repetition rate to a GPS reference. The carrier envelope offset is locked to a constant value chosen to optimize the transmitted spectrum. The transmitted pulse train is a stable frequency comb suitable for long measurements, including the acquisition of comb-resolved Fourier transform spectra with a minimum absorption coefficient of about 2×10-7 wn. For our 38 cm long enhancement cavity, the comb spacing is 394~MHz. With our

  6. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Using a Low-Frequency Magnetic Field in the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex W Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to a specific pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF has been shown to produce analgesic (antinociceptive effects in many organisms. In a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial, patients with either chronic generalized pain from fibromyalgia (FM or chronic localized musculoskeletal or inflammatory pain were exposed to a PEMF (400 μT through a portable device fitted to their head during twice-daily 40 min treatments over seven days. The effect of this PEMF on pain reduction was recorded using a visual analogue scale. A differential effect of PEMF over sham treatment was noticed in patients with FM, which approached statistical significance (P=0.06 despite low numbers (n=17; this effect was not evident in those without FM (P=0.93; n=15. PEMF may be a novel, safe and effective therapeutic tool for use in at least certain subsets of patients with chronic, nonmalignant pain. Clearly, however, a larger randomized, double-blind clinical trial with just FM patients is warranted.

  7. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using a low-frequency magnetic field in the treatment of musculoskeletal chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alex W; Graham, Karissa; Prato, Frank S; McKay, Julia; Forster, Patricia Morley; Moulin, Dwight E; Chari, Sesh

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to a specific pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been shown to produce analgesic (antinociceptive) effects in many organisms. In a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial, patients with either chronic generalized pain from fibromyalgia (FM) or chronic localized musculoskeletal or inflammatory pain were exposed to a PEMF (400 μT) through a portable device fitted to their head during twice-daily 40 min treatments over seven days. The effect of this PEMF on pain reduction was recorded using a visual analogue scale. A differential effect of PEMF over sham treatment was noticed in patients with FM, which approached statistical significance (P=0.06) despite low numbers (n=17); this effect was not evident in those without FM (P=0.93; n=15). PEMF may be a novel, safe and effective therapeutic tool for use in at least certain subsets of patients with chronic, nonmalignant pain. Clearly, however, a larger randomized, double-blind clinical trial with just FM patients is warranted. PMID:18080043

  8. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  9. Single-cavity SLED device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, B.A.

    1984-09-01

    The conventional SLED device used at SLAC requires two cavities. However, the same effect can be obtained with a single cavity; the theory and operation of the device is the same, only the hardware is changed. The single-cavity device is described here

  10. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  11. RF Characterization of Niobium Films for Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aull† , S; Doebert, S; Junginger, T; Ehiasarian, AP; Knobloch, J; Terenziani, G

    2013-01-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconductors shows a complex dependence on the external parameters such as temperature, frequency or radio-frequency (RF) field. The Quadrupole Resonator modes of 400, 800 and 1200 MHz allow measurements at actual operating frequencies of superconducting cavities. Niobium films on copper substrates have several advantages over bulk niobium cavities. HIPIMS (High-power impulse magnetron sputtering) is a promising technique to increase the quality and therefore the performance of niobium films. This contribution will introduce CERNs recently developed HIPIMS coating apparatus. Moreover, first results of niobium coated copper samples will be presented, revealing the dominant loss mechanisms.

  12. Higher order mode damping in Kaon factory RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enegren, T.; Poirier, R.; Griffin, J.; Walling, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Smythe, W.R.

    1989-05-01

    Proposed designs for Kaon factory accelerators require that the rf cavities support beam currents on the order of several amperes. The beam current has Fourier components at all multiples of the rf frequency. Empty rf buckets produce additional components at all multiples of the revolution frequency. If a Fourier component of the beam coincides with the resonant frequency of a higher order mode of the cavity, which is inevitable if the cavity has a large frequency swing, significant excitation of this mode can occur. The induced voltage may then excite coupled bunch mode instabilities. Effective means are required to damp higher order modes without significantly affecting the fundamental mode. A mode damping scheme based on coupled transmission lines has been investigated and is report

  13. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  14. High-average-power diode-end-pumped intracavity-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honea, E.C.; Ebbers, C.A.; Beach, R.J.; Speth, J.A.; Emanuel, M.S> ; Skidmore, J.A.; Payne, S.A.

    1998-02-12

    A compact diode-pumped ND:YAG laser was frequency-doubled to 0.532 {mu}m with an intracavity KTP or LBO crystal using a `V` cavity configuration. Two acousto-optic Q-switches were employed at repetition rates of 10-30 kHz. Dichroic fold and end mirrors were used to output two beams with up to 140 W of 0.532 {mu}m power using KTP and 116 W using LBO as the frequency doubling crystal. This corresponds to 66% of the maximum output power at 1.064 {mu}m obtained with an optimized output coupler reflectivity. The minimum output pulse duration varied with repetition rate from 90 to 130 ns. The multimode output beam had a smooth profile and a beam quality of M{sup 2} = 5 1.

  15. Novel deflecting cavity design for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    2011-07-25

    To prevent significant loss of the luminosity due to large crossing angle in the future ERL based Electron Ion Collider at BNL (eRHIC), there is a demand for crab cavities. In this article, we will present a novel design of the deflecting/crabbing 181 MHz superconducting RF cavity that will fulfil the requirements of eRHIC. The quarter-wave resonator structure of the new cavity possesses many advantages, such as compact size, high R{sub t}/Q, the absence of the same order mode and lower order mode, and easy higher order mode damping. We will present the properties and characteristics of the new cavity in detail. As the accelerator systems grow in complexity, developing compact and efficient deflecting cavities is of great interest. Such cavities will benefit situations where the beam line space is limited. The future linac-ring type electron-ion collider requires implementation of a crab-crossing scheme for both beams at the interaction region. The ion beam has a long bunches and high rigidity. Therefore, it requires a low frequency, large kicking angle deflector. The frequency of the deflecting mode for the current collider design is 181 MHz, and the deflecting angle is {approx}5 mrad for each beam. At such low frequency, the previous designs of the crab cavities will have very large dimensions, and also will be confronted by typical problems of damping the Lower Order Mode (LOM), the Same Order Mode (SOM), and as usual, the Higher Order Modes (HOM). In this paper we describe how one can use the concept of a quarter-wave (QW) resonator for a deflecting/crabbing cavity, and use its fundamental mode to deflect the beam. The simplicity of the cavity geometry and the large separation between its fundamental mode and the first HOM make it very attractive.

  16. Experimental study of pulsed heating of electromagnetic cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritzkau, D.P.; Menegat, A.; Siemann, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    An experiment to study the effects of pulsed heating in electromagnetic cavities will be performed. Pulsed heating is believed to be the limiting mechanism of high acceleration gradients at short wavelengths. A cylindrical cavity operated in the TE 011 mode at a frequency of 11.424 GHz will be used. A klystron will be used to supply a peak input power of 20 MW with a pulse length of 1.5 μs. The temperature response of the cavity will be measured by a second waveguide designed to excite a TE 012 mode in the cavity with a low-power CW signal at a frequency of 17.8 GHz. The relevant theory of pulsed heating will be discussed and the results from cold-testing the structure will be presented

  17. Development and application of 3D RF cavity code MAFIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Tieta

    1992-01-01

    The design of a asymmetric RF cavity requires a code that can treat 3D structure. This paper describes the characteristics, functions and applications of the 3D RF cavity computer-aided design (CAD) program MAFIA. The 3D geometry design of non-axial symmetric RF cavity with a coupler is realized by CAD method. A kind of data input is presented that can save not only machine memory, but also the CPU time, and large programs can be run on a medium-small size machine. The numerical simulation of a L-band RF cavity is presented and the modeling results agree well with its experimental values. We have also compared electric properties of the RF cavity with variant geometry by applying 3D numerical and graphic simulations. The influence on electric and magnetic fields by adding a input coupler or HOM coupler at the side of a RF cavity is analysed. Adding a coupler to a RF cavity can cause the change of resonance frequency. A method that can compensate the variation of frequency is also presented

  18. Transformation frequency of γ irradiated plasmid DNA and the enzymatic double strand break formation by incubation in a protein extract of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Mark, F.; Ventur, Y.

    1994-01-01

    It was found that incubation of γ-irradiated or DNaseI-treated plasmid DNA in a protein extract of Escherichia coli leads to enzyme-induced formation of double strand breaks (dsb) in competition with repair of precursors of these dsb. A survival curve of the plasmid DNA (as determined by transformation of E. coli) was calculated on the basis of enzyme-induced dsb as well as those produced by irradiation assuming that they are lethal. The calculated D O value was the same as that measured directly by transformation of irradiated plasmid DNA. Two models are presented that fit the experimental survival data as a function of dose. One is based on damage formation in the plasmid DNA including enzymatic conversion of single strand damage into dsb (U-model), the other is an enzymatic repair saturation model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Author)

  19. Transformation frequency of [gamma] irradiated plasmid DNA and the enzymatic double strand break formation by incubation in a protein extract of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, D.; Mark, F.; Ventur, Y. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Strahlenchemie, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany))

    1994-01-01

    It was found that incubation of [gamma]-irradiated or DNaseI-treated plasmid DNA in a protein extract of Escherichia coli leads to enzyme-induced formation of double strand breaks (dsb) in competition with repair of precursors of these dsb. A survival curve of the plasmid DNA (as determined by transformation of E. coli) was calculated on the basis of enzyme-induced dsb as well as those produced by irradiation assuming that they are lethal. The calculated D[sub O] value was the same as that measured directly by transformation of irradiated plasmid DNA. Two models are presented that fit the experimental survival data as a function of dose. One is based on damage formation in the plasmid DNA including enzymatic conversion of single strand damage into dsb (U-model), the other is an enzymatic repair saturation model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. (Author).

  20. Squeezing-enhanced measurement sensitivity in a cavity optomechanical system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerdoncuff, Hugo; Hoff, Ulrich Busk; Harris, Glen I.

    2015-01-01

    We determine the theoretical limits to squeezing-enhanced measurement sensitivity of mechanical motion in a cavity optomechanical system. The motion of a mechanical resonator is transduced onto quadrature fluctuations of a cavity optical field and a measurement is performed on the optical field...... exiting the cavity. We compare measurement sensitivities obtained with coherent probing and quantum-enhanced probing of the mechanical motion, i.e. the coherent probe field carries vacuum states and quadrature squeezed vacuum states at sideband frequencies, respectively. We find that quantum...

  1. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  2. Design and Performance of the LCLS Cavity BPM System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Norum, W.E.; Sereno, N.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; /Argonne; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; /SLAC

    2008-01-23

    In this paper we present the design of the beam position monitor (BPM) system for the LCLS undulator, which features a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM. Each BPM has a TM{sub 010} monopole reference cavity and a TM{sub 110} dipole cavity designed to operate at a center frequency of 11.384 GHz. The signal processing electronics features a low noise single-stage three-channel heterodyne receiver that has selectable gain and a phase locking local oscillator. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  3. Design and performance of the LCLS cavity BPM system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, R.; Norum, E.; Morrison, L.; Sereno, N.; Waldschmidt, G.; Walters, D.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.; SLAC

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the design of the beam position monitor (BPM) system for the LCLS undulator, which features a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM. Each BPM has a TM{sub 010} monopole reference cavity and a TM{sub 110} dipole cavity designed to operate at a center frequency of 11.384 GHz. The signal processing electronics features a low- noise single-stage three-channel heterodyne receiver that has selectable gain and a phase locking local oscillator. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  4. Design and Performance of the LCLS Cavity BPM System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.M.; Morrison, L.H.; Norum, W.E.; Sereno, N.; Waldschmidt, G.J.; Walters, D.R.; Argonne; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the design of the beam position monitor (BPM) system for the LCLS undulator, which features a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM. Each BPM has a TM 010 monopole reference cavity and a TM 110 dipole cavity designed to operate at a center frequency of 11.384 GHz. The signal processing electronics features a low noise single-stage three-channel heterodyne receiver that has selectable gain and a phase locking local oscillator. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results

  5. Design and performance of the LCLS cavity BPM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lill, R.; Norum, E.; Morrison, L.; Sereno, N.; Waldschmidt, G.; Walters, D.; Smith, S.; Straumann, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the design of the beam position monitor (BPM) system for the LCLS undulator, which features a high-resolution X-band cavity BPM. Each BPM has a TM 010 monopole reference cavity and a TM 110 dipole cavity designed to operate at a center frequency of 11.384 GHz. The signal processing electronics features a low- noise single-stage three-channel heterodyne receiver that has selectable gain and a phase locking local oscillator. We will discuss the system specifications, design, and prototype test results.

  6. Dependence of bunch energy loss in cavities on beam velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey S. Kurennoy

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Beam energy loss in a cavity can be easily computed for a relativistic bunch using time-domain codes like MAFIA or ABCI. However, for nonrelativistic beams the problem is more complicated because of difficulties with its numerical formulation in the time domain. We calculate the cavity loss factors for a bunch in frequency domain as a function of its velocity and compare results with the relativistic case.

  7. The Design of the Orthogonal Box Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Alfred; /Fermilab

    2010-09-15

    The muon collider and/or the neutrino factory require large accelerating electric field gradients immersed in large (3 to 6 T) solenoidal magnetic fields for ionization cooling of muon beams. Our original vacuum breakdown study demonstrated a loss of achievable peak accelerating gradient in solenoidal magnetic fields by a factor 2 or greater. The Muon Collaboration has developed a theory of a method to suppress high electric field breakdown in vacuum cavities needed for a Muon collider or neutrino factory. It has been shown in our studies and by others that high gradient electric field emitted electrons (dark current) are the primary cause of breakdown. A DC magnetic field orthogonal to the RF electric accelerating field prevents dark current high field emitted electrons from traveling across the accelerating gap and then will prevent breakdown. We have decided to test this theory by building a special cavity in the shape of vacuum box. Figure 1 is a simplified view of the cavity design. The design is based on an 805 MHz WR975 waveguide cavity resonating in the TE{sub 101} mode. For the TE{sub 101} mode the resonant frequency f{sub 0} is given by the relationship f{sub 0} = c[(I/a){sup 2} + (m/b){sup 2} + (n/d){sup 2}]{sup 0.5}/2 where a and d are the lengths of the base sides and b is the height of the box in MKS units and c is the velocity of light.

  8. Renormalized phonon frequencies and electric resistivity along the c-axis in single-plane high-temperature superconductors: A double-well analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, M; Polyanski, I; Petrova, P T; Tsintsarska, S; Gochev, A

    2001-01-01

    We consider the dynamic interlayer charge transfer across apex oxygens between CuO sub 2 planes in single-layered high-T sub c superconductors. Phonon-coupled axial transfer rates are derived by means of the reaction-rate method. They lead straightforwardly to temperature dependences for the axial resistivity. Doping and temperature dependences are also derived for the renormalized frequencies of phonon modes coupled to the interlayer charge transfer. Our results are compared with experimentally observed dependences. (author)

  9. Bioengineering in the oral cavity: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalfamo L

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available L Catalfamo,1 E Belli,2 C Nava,1 E Mici,1 A Calvo,1 B D'Alessandro,1 FS De Ponte1 1Unit of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Messina, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Policlinico G Martino, Messina, Italy; 2Unit of Maxillofacial Surgery, University Rome Sapienza, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant Andrea, Rome, Italy Background: To date, there are no studies reported in the literature on the possible use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, or synthetic hyaluronic acid medications in the oral cavity. The aim of this paper is to report the use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, and synthetic hyaluronic acid medications to improve wound healing in the oral cavity by stimulating granulomatous tissue. Methods: From 2007 to 2011, 80 patients (median age 67 years suffering from oral mucosal lesions participated in this double-blind study. The patients were divided into two groups, each consisting of 40 patients. One group received conventional medications, while the other group of patients were treated with the advanced medications. Results: Advanced medications allowed re-epithelialization of the wound margin in 2–20 days, whereas patients receiving conventional medication showed a median healing duration of 45 days. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that treating oral mucosal wounds with advanced medication has an advantage with regard to wound healing time, allowing patients to have a rapid, functional, and esthetic recovery. Keywords: bioengineering, oral cavity, mucosal recovery

  10. High Power test for the first PIMS Cavity for LINAC4

    CERN Document Server

    Gerigk, F; Giguet, J M; Wegner, R

    2011-01-01

    The first cavity of the PI Mode Structure (PIMS) section of Linac4 has been high power tested at Linac4 conditions and under high average power to simulate the operating conditions of Linac4 as a high duty cycle injector for the SPL. The PIMS section consists of 12 seven cell cavities, which accelerate the Linac4 beam from 102 MeV to 160 MeV at an RF frequency of 352.2 MHz. The cell length is constant per cavity but is adapted to the particle speed from cavity to cavity.

  11. Analysis of the cool down related cavity performance of the European XFEL vertical acceptance tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenskat, Marc; Schaffran, J.

    2017-09-15

    For the European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) cavity production, the cold radio-frequency (RF) test of the cavities at 2 K after delivery from the two vendors was the mandatory acceptance test. It has been previously reported, that the cool down dynamics of a cavity across T{sub c} has a significant influence on the observed intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}, which is a measure of the losses on the inner cavity surface. A total number of 367 cool downs is used to analyze this correlation and we show that such a correlation is not observed during the European XFEL cavity production.

  12. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  13. Concept of multiple-cell cavity for axion dark matter search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Junu; Youn, SungWoo; Ahn, Saebyeok; Kim, Jihn E.; Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2018-02-01

    In cavity-based axion dark matter search experiments exploring high mass regions, multiple-cavity design is under consideration as a method to increase the detection volume within a given magnet bore. We introduce a new idea, referred to as a multiple-cell cavity, which provides various benefits including a larger detection volume, simpler experimental setup, and easier phase-matching mechanism. We present the characteristics of this concept and demonstrate the experimental feasibility with an example of a double-cell cavity.

  14. Paired modes of heterostructure cavities in photonic crystal waveguides with split band edges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmoodian, Sahand; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the modes of double heterostructure cavities where the underlying photonic crystal waveguide has been dispersion engineered to have two band-edges inside the Brillouin zone. By deriving and using a perturbative method, we show that these structures possess two modes. For unapodized...... cavities, the relative detuning of the two modes can be controlled by changing the cavity length, and for particular lengths, a resonant-like effect makes the modes degenerate. For apodized cavities no such resonances exist and the modes are always non-degenerate....

  15. Cavity plasmon polaritons in monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, O.V.; Lozovik, Yu.E.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmon polaritons in a new system, a monolayer doped graphene embedded in optical microcavity, are studied here. The dispersion law for lower and upper cavity plasmon polaritons is obtained. Peculiarities of Rabi splitting for the system are analyzed; particularly, role of Dirac-like spinor (envelope) wave functions in graphene and corresponding angle factors are considered. Typical Rabi frequencies for maximal (acceptable for Dirac-like electron spectra) Fermi energy and frequencies of polaritons near polariton gap are estimated. The plasmon polaritons in considered system can be used for high-speed information transfer in the THz region. -- Highlights: → Plasmon polaritons in a monolayer doped graphene embedded in optical microcavity, are studied here. → The dispersion law for lower and upper cavity plasmon polaritons is obtained. → Peculiarities of Rabi splitting for the system are analyzed. → Role of Dirac-like wave functions in graphene and corresponding angle factors are considered. → Typical Rabi frequencies and frequencies of polaritons near polariton gap are estimated.

  16. Fine and hyperfine structure spectra of the ultra-violet 23S → 53P transition in 4He and 3He with a frequency doubled CW ring laser, detected via associative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runge, S.; Pesnelle, A.; Perdrix, M.; Sevin, D.; Wolffer, N.; Watel, G.

    1982-01-01

    High resolution laser spectroscopy coupled to a sensitive method of detection via mass analysis of He + 2 ions produced in He(5 3 P) + He(1 1 S) collisions, is used to obtain the fine and hyperfine spectra of the ultra-violet He 2 3 S → 5 3 P transition. A cw tunable UV radiation around 294.5 nm is generated by intracavity frequency doubling a Rhodamine 6G single mode ring dye laser using an ADA crystal. Both spectra enable fine and hyperfine structures to be determined within a few MHz. The magnetic dipole coupling constant A of the 5 3 P term of 3 He is found to be -4326 +- 9 MHz (-0.1443 +- 0.0003 cm -1 ). (orig.)

  17. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  18. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  19. Conversion frequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauteret, C.

    1987-03-01

    The experimental evidence of short wavelength for laser inertial confinement has strongly increased the interest in high efficiency harmonic conversion of powerful Nd: glass lasers. This work describes our high power harmonic conversion experiments performed using the same laser apparatus for doubling, tripling the three high power 1064 nm P102, OCTAL and PHEBUS lasers. In addition to the understanding the physics of harmonic conversion, this work includes the basic concepts allows us to improve the technique such as non colinear schemes, to extend this method to other frequencies (fourth generation) and to predict some physical limits [fr

  20. Acute effects of high-frequency microfocal vibratory stimulation on the H reflex of the soleus muscle. A double-blind study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, Enrico; Paone, Paolo; Tassorelli, Cristina; De Icco, Roberto; Moglia, Arrigo; Alvisi, Elena; Marchetta, Lucky; Fresia, Mauro; Montini, Alessandra; Calabrese, Marzia; Versiglia, Vittorio; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    This study in healthy subjects examined the effects of a system delivering focal microvibrations at high frequency (Equistasi®) on tonic vibration stimulus (TVS)-induced inhibition of the soleus muscle H reflex. Highfrequency microvibrations significantly increased the inhibitory effect of TVS on the H reflex for up to three minutes. Moreover, Equistasi® also significantly reduced alpha-motoneuron excitability, as indicated by the changes in the ratio between the maximumamplitude H reflex (Hmax reflex) and the maximumamplitude muscle response (Mmax response); this effect was due to reduction of the amplitude of the H reflex because the amplitude of muscle response remained unchanged. The present findings indicate that Equistasi® has a modulatory effect on proprioceptive reflex circuits. Therefore, Equistasi® might interfere with some mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathophysiological control of movement and of posture.

  1. Effects of TRPV1 and TRPA1 activators on the cramp threshold frequency: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Michael; Nowak, Stephanie; Leyendecker, Jannik; Mester, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Previous data indicate that a strong sensory input from orally administered TRPV1 and TRPA1 activators alleviates muscle cramps in foot muscles by reducing the α-motor neuron hyperexcitability. We investigated if TRP activators increase the cramp threshold frequency of the medial gastrocnemius. We randomly assigned 22 healthy male participants to an intervention (IG) and a control group (CG). While participants of the IG ingested a mixture of TRPV1 and TRPA1 activators, the CG received a placebo. We tested the cramp threshold frequency (CTF), the cramp intensity (EMG activity), and the perceived pain of electrically induced muscle cramps before (pre), and 15 min, 4, 8, and 24 h after either treatment. We further measured the maximal isometric force of knee extensors at pre, 4, and 24 h to assess potential side-effects on the force output. When we included all measurement time points, no group-by-time interaction was observed for the CTF. However, when only pre and 15 min values were incorporated, a significant interaction, with a slightly greater CTF increase in IG (3.1 ± 1.5) compared to the CG (2.0 ± 1.5), was observed. No significant group by time interaction was found for the cramp intensity, the perceived pain, and the maximal isometric force. Our data indicate that orally administered TRPV1 and TRPA1 activators exert a small short-term effect on the CTF, but not on the other parameters tested. Future studies need to investigate whether such small CTF increments are sufficient to prevent exercise-associated muscle cramps.

  2. Development of large grain cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Singer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DESY activities on 1.3 GHz tesla shape single cell and nine-cell large grain (LG resonators are presented; results of the past five years are covered. The R&D program explores the potential for production of elliptical superconducting cavities. The main efforts have been devoted to material investigation, development of LG disk production, cavity fabrication from this material, and a search for appropriate treatment. More than 250 LG disks are manufactured; several single cell and 11 nine-cell resonators are produced and rf tested after buffered chemical polishing and after additional electropolishing. A maximum accelerating gradient of approximately 45  MV/m for this type of cavity was achieved in two resonators. Two of the LG cavities have been installed and are currently being used in the FLASH accelerator operation. Assembly of a cryomodule, consisting of LG cavities only, is in the works. Perspectives of the LG cavity application are discussed.

  3. High frequency of the aac(6')-Ib-cr gene associated with double mutations in gyrA and parC in Escherichia coli isolates from patients with urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcão, Lisiane M; Lacava, Juliano P; Gewehr, Martina F; Real, Valéria L; Ramis, Ivy B; Ramos, Daniela F; Gonçalves, Carla V; Possuelo, Lia G; Minarini, Luciene A R; da Silva, Pedro E A; von Groll, Andrea

    2018-01-04

    The aims of this study were (1) to determine the frequency of plasmid-mediated resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQs) in Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) of nosocomial and community origin and (2) to determine the relationships between the presence of extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL), mutations in the gyrA and parC genes, and resistance to FQs. A total of 71 E. coli isolates, including 35 ESBL producers and 36 randomly selected non-ESBL-producers, were analysed. The aac(6')-Ib gene was amplified using PCR and subsequently digested with the BtsCl restriction enzyme to identify aac(6')-Ib-cr, a variant associated with FQ resistance. The detection of the qnr genes was performed using multiplex PCR. In isolates that tested positive for these genes, the gyrA and parC genes were sequenced and the modulation factor of an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) was determined on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of norfloxacin. The frequencies of qnrS, qnrB and qnrA were 4.2%, 2.8%, and 0%, respectively. The frequency of aac(6')-Ib-cr was 40.8% and this variant was associated with double mutations in gyrA and parC as well as resistance to FQs and ESBL production. Modulation of EPI activity was more frequent in resistant isolates, which had wild-type parC gene. An interplay of resistance mechanisms increased the level of resistance to FQs and the high frequency of putative plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes associate with ESBL producer reduced therapeutic options to treat UTIs in the affected population. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A high-gain and high-efficiency X-band triaxial klystron amplifier with two-stage cascaded bunching cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ju, Jinchuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang

    2017-12-01

    To achieve GW-level amplification output radiation at the X-band, a relativistic triaxial klystron amplifier with two-stage cascaded double-gap bunching cavities is investigated. The input cavity is optimized to obtain a high absorption rate of the external injection microwave. The cascaded bunching cavities are optimized to achieve a high depth of the fundamental harmonic current. A double-gap standing wave extractor is designed to improve the beam wave conversion efficiency. Two reflectors with high reflection coefficients both to the asymmetric mode and the TEM mode are employed to suppress the asymmetric mode competition and TEM mode microwave leakage. Particle-in-cell simulation results show that a high power microwave with a power of 2.53 GW and a frequency of 8.4 GHz is generated with a 690 kV, 9.3 kA electron beam excitation and a 25 kW seed microwave injection. Particularly, the achieved power conversion efficiency is about 40%, and the gain is as high as 50 dB. Meanwhile, there is insignificant self-excitation of the parasitic mode in the proposed structure by adopting the reflectors. The relative phase difference between the injected signals and the output microwaves keeps locked after the amplifier becomes saturated.

  5. Fundamental cavity impedance and longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baudrenghien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between beam dynamics and the radio frequency (rf station in circular colliders is complex and can lead to longitudinal coupled-bunch instabilities at high beam currents. The excitation of the cavity higher order modes is traditionally damped using passive devices. But the wakefield developed at the cavity fundamental frequency falls in the frequency range of the rf power system and can, in theory, be compensated by modulating the generator drive. Such a regulation is the responsibility of the low-level rf (llrf system that measures the cavity field (or beam current and generates the rf power drive. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC rf was designed for the nominal LHC parameter of 0.55 A DC beam current. At 7 TeV the synchrotron radiation damping time is 13 hours. Damping of the instability growth rates due to the cavity fundamental (400.789 MHz can only come from the synchrotron tune spread (Landau damping and will be very small (time constant in the order of 0.1 s. In this work, the ability of the present llrf compensation to prevent coupled-bunch instabilities with the planned high luminosity LHC (HiLumi LHC doubling of the beam current to 1.1 A DC is investigated. The paper conclusions are based on the measured performances of the present llrf system. Models of the rf and llrf systems were developed at the LHC start-up. Following comparisons with measurements, the system was parametrized using these models. The parametric model then provides a more realistic estimation of the instability growth rates than an ideal model of the rf blocks. With this modeling approach, the key rf settings can be varied around their set value allowing for a sensitivity analysis (growth rate sensitivity to rf and llrf parameters. Finally, preliminary measurements from the LHC at 0.44 A DC are presented to support the conclusions of this work.

  6. Effect of 0.2% Chlorhexidine Gel on Frequency of Dry Socket Following Mandibular Third Molar Surgery: A Double-Blind Clinical Trial Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baratollah Shaban

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alveolar osteitis (AO is one of the most common postoperative complications after third molar surgery. Various techniques have been used to reduce the risk of AO. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of Chlorhexidine (CHX bioadhesive gel in preventing the development of AO. Methods: Patients with bilateral impacted mandibular third molars underwent surgical extraction of both teeth. One socket was randomly received CHX gel and the contralateral socket served as the control. The outcome variable was development of AO and the CHX gel application was the predictor variable. Data were analyzed using chi-square test with the confidence interval of 95%. Results: 41 patients (27 females and 14 males with mean age of 24.15 ± 5.02 years underwent 82 surgeries. Total of 11 sockets (13.41% developed AO. The frequency of AO in CHX gel (2 cases, 4.87% side was significantly lower than control (9 cases, 21.95% side (P-value < 0.05. No side effects observed following CHX gel application. Conclusion: Application of CHX gel could be an effective approach to reduce the risk of developing AO following mandibular third molar surgery.

  7. The use of microperforated plates to attenuate cavity resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenech, Benjamin; Keith, Graeme; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    The use of microperforated plates to introduce damping in a closed cavity is examined. By placing a microperforated plate well inside the cavity instead of near a wall as traditionally done in room acoustics, high attenuation can be obtained for specific acoustic modes, compared with the lower at......'s functions. The results, which are validated experimentally, show that a microperforated plate can provide substantial attenuation of modes in a cavity. One possible application of these findings is the treatment of boiler tones in heat-exchanger cavities.......The use of microperforated plates to introduce damping in a closed cavity is examined. By placing a microperforated plate well inside the cavity instead of near a wall as traditionally done in room acoustics, high attenuation can be obtained for specific acoustic modes, compared with the lower...... attenuation that can be obtained in a broad frequency range with the conventional position of the plate. An analytical method for predicting the attenuation is presented. The method involves finding complex eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the modified cavity and makes it possible to predict Green...

  8. Momentum diffusion for coupled atom-cavity oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, K.; Maunz, P.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Puppe, T.; Schuster, I.; Rempe, G.; Vitali, D.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the momentum diffusion of free-space laser cooling has a natural correspondence in optical cavities when the internal state of the atom is treated as a harmonic oscillator. We derive a general expression for the momentum diffusion, which is valid for most configurations of interest: The atom or the cavity or both can be probed by lasers, with or without the presence of traps inducing local atomic frequency shifts. It is shown that, albeit the (possibly strong) coupling between atom and cavity, it is sufficient for deriving the momentum diffusion to consider that the atom couples to a mean cavity field, which gives a first contribution, and that the cavity mode couples to a mean atomic dipole, giving a second contribution. Both contributions have an intuitive form and present a clear symmetry. The total diffusion is the sum of these two contributions plus the diffusion originating from the fluctuations of the forces due to the coupling to the vacuum modes other than the cavity mode (the so-called spontaneous emission term). Examples are given that help to evaluate the heating rates induced by an optical cavity for experiments operating at low atomic saturation. We also point out intriguing situations where the atom is heated although it cannot scatter light

  9. MEDICI reactor cavity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Trebilcock, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MEDICI reactor cavity model is currently under development with the goal of providing a flexible, relatively realistic treatment of ex-vessel severe accident phenomena suitable for large-system codes like CONTAIN and MELCOR. The code is being developed with an emphasis on top-down design, to facilitate adaptability and multiple applications. A brief description of the overall code structure is provided. One of the key new models is then described in more detail. This is a dynamic quench model for debris beds. An example calculation using this model is presented. The question of whether it is necessary to consider the simultaneous motion of the quench front and ablation of the concrete is addressed with some scoping models

  10. Transverse Field Perturbation For PIP-II SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrutti, Paolo [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, Timergali N. [Fermilab; Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II) consists in a plan for upgrading the Fermilab proton accelerator complex to a beam power capability of at least 1 MW delivered to the neutrino production target. A room temperature section accelerates H⁻ ions to 2.1 MeV and creates the desired bunch structure for injection into the superconducting (SC) linac. Five cavity types, operating at three different frequencies 162.5, 325 and 650 MHz, provide acceleration to 800 MeV. This paper presents the studies on transverse field perturbation on particle dynamic for all the superconducting cavities in the linac. The effects studied include quadrupole defocusing for coaxial resonators, and dipole kick due to couplers for elliptical cavities. A multipole expansion has been performed for each of the cavity designs including effects up to octupole.

  11. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-01-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  12. Controllable coupling of distributed qubits within a microtoroidal cavity network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C.; Xia, Y.; Song, J.

    2012-05-01

    We propose a scheme to control the coupling between two arbitrary atoms scattered within a quantum network composed of microtoroidal cavities linked by a ring-fibre. The atom-atom effective couplings are induced by pairing of off-resonant Raman transitions. The couplings can be arbitrarily controlled by adjusting classical fields. Compared with the previous scheme [S.B. Zheng, C.P. Yang, F. Nori, Phys. Rev. A 82, 042327 (2010)], the present scheme uses microtoroidal cavities with higher coupling efficiency than Fabry-Perot cavities. Furthermore, the scheme is not only suitable for the short-fibre limit, but also for multiple fibre modes. The added fibre modes can play a positive role, especially when the coupling rate between cavity-mode and fibre-mode is not large. In addition, a wider frequency domain of fibre modes can be used in this scheme.

  13. Effect of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Naming Abilities in Early-Stroke Aphasic Patients: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Waldowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Functional brain imaging studies with aphasia patients have shown increased cortical activation in the right hemisphere language homologues, which hypothetically may represent a maladaptive strategy that interferes with aphasia recovery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the Broca’s homologues in combination with speech/language therapy improves naming in early-stroke aphasia patients. Methods. 26 right-handed aphasic patients in the early stage (up to 12 weeks of a first-ever left hemisphere ischemic stroke were randomized to receive speech and language therapy combined with real or sham rTMS. Prior to each 45-minute therapeutic session (15 sessions, 5 days a week, 30 minutes of 1-Hz rTMS was applied. Outcome measures were obtained at baseline, immediately after 3 weeks of experimental treatment and 15 weeks; posttreatment using the Computerized Picture Naming Test. Results. Although both groups significantly improved their naming abilities after treatment, no significant differences were noted between the rTMS and sham stimulation groups. The additional analyses have revealed that the rTMS subgroup with a lesion including the anterior part of language area showed greater improvement primarily in naming reaction time 15 weeks after completion of the therapeutic treatment. Improvement was also demonstrated in functional communication abilities. Conclusions. Inhibitory rTMS of the unaffected right inferior frontal gyrus area in combination with speech and language therapy cannot be assumed as an effective method for all poststroke aphasia patients. The treatment seems to be beneficial for patients with frontal language area damage, mostly in the distant time after finishing rTMS procedure.

  14. Laser of optical fiber composed by two coupled cavities: application as optical fiber sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez S, R.A.; Kuzin, E.A.; Ibarra E, B.; May A, M.; Shlyagin, M.; Marquez B, I.

    2004-01-01

    We show an optical fiber laser sensor which consist of two cavities coupled and three fiber Bragg gratings. We used one Bragg grating (called reference) and two Bragg gratings (called sensors), which have the lower reflection wavelength. The reference grating with the two sensors grating make two cavities: first one is the internal cavity which has 4230 m of length and the another one is the external cavity which has 4277 m of length. Measuring the laser beating frequency for a resonance cavity and moving the frequency peaks when the another cavity is put in resonance, we prove that the arrangement can be used as a two points sensor for determining the difference of temperature or stress between these two points. (Author)

  15. Robust laser frequency stabilization by serrodyne modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Ralf; Vanderbruggen, Thomas; Bernon, Simon; Bertoldi, Andrea; Landragin, Arnaud; Bouyer, Philippe

    2012-03-15

    We report the relative frequency stabilization of a distributed feedback erbium-doped fiber laser on an optical cavity by serrodyne frequency shifting. A correction bandwidth of 2.3 MHz and a dynamic range of 220 MHz are achieved, which leads to a strong robustness against large disturbances up to high frequencies. We demonstrate that serrodyne frequency shifting reaches a higher correction bandwidth and lower relative frequency noise level compared to a standard acousto-optical modulator based scheme. Our results allow us to consider promising applications in the absolute frequency stabilization of lasers on optical cavities.

  16. Experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a brillouin cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yingchun; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhongxuan; Tang, Xin; Lin, Chengyou; Chen, Zhaoyang

    2017-06-01

    It has been an important research subject to find new nonlinear optical phenomena. In this paper, we report the experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a super long single-mode standard fiber with external optical feedback provided by the fiber end. The end facet reflection provides an analogous Fabry-Perot stimulated Brillouin resonator cavity. By increasing the pump power to exceed stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold, we observed light structures exhibiting extremely rich temporal-pulse characteristics that had never been reported in literature before, including supercontinuum background generation, the localization of periodic optical structure formation, fission, and compression. These optical structures are of period-doubling distribution and have different recurrence rates. What is more interesting is that we have observed sets of low frequency bipolar cycle-pulse trains that is often seen in the electrical field and hardly seen in pure optical system. Real-time specification of dynamical temporal regimes of laser operation may bring new insight into rich underlying nonlinear physics of practical fiber cavity systems. Therefore, some new nonlinear optical phenomena have been observed.

  17. Efficacy of treatment of insomnia in migraineurs with eszopiclone (Lunesta®) and its effect on total sleep time, headache frequency, and daytime functioning: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Egilius L H; McAllister, Peter J; Bilchik, Tanya R

    2015-04-01

    A review on headache and insomnia revealed that insomnia is a risk factor for increased headache frequency and headache intensity in migraineurs. The authors designed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, pilot study in which migraineurs who also had insomnia were enrolled, to test this observation. In the study, the authors treated 79 subjects with IHS-II migraine with and/or without aura and with DSM-IV primary insomnia for 6 weeks with 3 mg eszopiclone (Lunesta(®)) or placebo at bedtime. The treatment was preceded by a 2-week baseline period and followed by a 2-week run-out period. Of the 79 subjects treated, 75 were evaluable, 35 in the eszopiclone group, and 40 in the placebo group. At baseline, the groups were comparable except for sleep latency. Of the three remaining sleep variables, total sleep time, nighttime awakenings, and sleep quality, the number of nighttime awakenings during the 6-week treatment period was significantly lower in the eszopiclone group than in the placebo group (P = 0.03). Of the three daytime variables, alertness, fatigue, and functioning, this was also the case for fatigue (P = 005). The headache variables, frequency, duration, and intensity, did not show a difference from placebo during the 6-week treatment period. The study did not meet primary endpoint, that is, the difference in total sleep time during the 6-week treatment period between eszopiclone and placebo was less than 40 minutes. Therefore, it failed to answer the question as to whether insomnia is, indeed, a risk factor for increased headache frequency and headache intensity in migraineurs.

  18. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  19. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciovati, G.; Kneisel, P.; Brawley, J.; Bundy, R.; Campisi, I.; Davis, K.; Macha, K.; Machie, D.; Mammosser, J.; Morgan, S.; Sundelin, R.; Turlington, L.; Wilson, K.; Doleans, M.; Kim, S.H.; Barni, D.; Pagani, C.; Pierini, P.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, R.; Schrage, D.; Parodi, R.; Sekutowicz, J.; Ylae-Oijala, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV, operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta= 0.61 and beta= 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta= 0.61 cavities and two beta= 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta= 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the beta=0.61 cavity and the beta= 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E acc = 1 0.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10 9 at 2.1K for beta= 0.61 and E acc = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10 9 at 2.1K for beta= 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning will be done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop

  20. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  1. Fiberoptic microphone using a polymeric cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Soetanto, William; Gu, Kebin

    2011-04-01

    The fabrication and experimental investigation of a fiberoptic microphone is described. The sensing element is a silicon diaphragm with gold thin film coating that is positioned inside a silicone rubber mold at the end of a single mode optical fiber. Thus, a Fabry-Perot interferometer is formed between the inner fiber and the diaphragm. An acoustic pressure change is detected by using the developed microphone. The polymeric cavity and silicon diaphragm-based system exhibits excellent physicochemical properties with a small, simple, low cost, and lightweight design. The system is also electromagnetic interference / radio frequency interference immunity due to the use of fiberoptics.

  2. Concept and theory of clustered-cavity gyroklystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusinovich, G.S.; Guo, H.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Granatstein, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of clustered cavities was originally proposed by R. Symons for use in linear-beam klystrons operating in TM-modes. It was proven experimentally that the use of this concept allows developers to double the instantaneous bandwidth of klystrons without changing their overall dimensions or sacrificing gain and bandwidth. Recently, H. Guo suggested applying this concept to gyroklystrons operating in TE-modes. In the present paper this concept is formulated and a simple analytical theory describing qualitatively the performance of clustered-cavity gyroklystrons is developed. Results of the analysis of a simple two-stage gyroklystron indicate that the clustered-cavity concept has potential for improving the performance of gyroklystrons

  3. In situ Measurements of the SPS 200MHz Accelerating Cavity III

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Patrick; Caspers, Fritz; Vollinger, Christine; Montesinos, Eric; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The main 200MHz travelling wave RF system of the SPS consists of two 5-tank and two 4-tank cavities. This system will be modified during LS 2, and the preparation work has already started. The 5 tank 200MHz travelling wave cavity III was measured in reflection. This Internal Note presents results obtained for the matching of cavity and feeder line, by looking at both frequency and time domain data. Techniques for estimating the feeder line attenuation are also presented.

  4. Changeability of oral cavity environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka A, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. 24 healthy individuals aged 20-30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having professional hygiene procedures performed and caries lesions filled. Baseline examination and the examination two years afterwards, evaluated clinical and laboratory parameters of oral cavity environment. Caries incidence was determined based on DMFT and DMFS values, oral cavity hygiene on Plaque Index (acc. Silness & Loe) and Hygiene Index (acc. O'Leary), and the gingival status on Gingival Index (acc. Loe & Silness) and Gingival Bleeding Index (acc. Ainamo & Bay). Saliva osmolarity, pH and concentrations of Ca(2+), Pi, Na(+), Cl(-), total protein, albumins, F(-) and Sr(2+) were determined. The results confirmed ongoing changeability of the oral cavity environment. After 2 years of the study reduction in oral cavity hygiene parameters PLI and HI (P<0.1), and gingival indices as well as lower saliva concentration of Ca(2+) (P<.001), Pi (P<.06), K(+) (P<.04), Sr(2+) (P<.03), Na(+) (P<.1), against the baseline values, were observed. Total protein and albumin saliva concentrations were also significantly lower. Physiological oral cavity environment is subject to constant, individually different, changes which should be considered when analysing studies that employ oral cavity environment parameters.

  5. Double Trouble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas; Kievit, Robert; Simons, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Double Trouble highlights the career of Dutch scriptwriter and television producer Chiem van Houweninge, well-known for his long-running TV comedy series and as author of episodes for TV detective series. Double Trouble gives Van Houweninge's own views on writing and filming in television prime

  6. Conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and fast magnetosonic waves at a plasma density cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.O.

    2004-01-01

    Analytic expressions are presented for conversion of localized lower hybrid oscillations and magnetosonic waves by scattering off a small scale density cavity. The governing equations are solved in slab geometry with wave vectors perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the density gradient associated with density cavity using a scale length separation method. The theory predicts strong excitation of localized lower hybrid oscillations for a set of frequencies between the lower hybrid frequency of the ambient plasma and the minimum lower hybrid frequency inside the cavity. The theory is relevant for the lower hybrid solitary structures observed in space plasmas

  7. A tunable waveguide to cavity coupler for high power accelerator cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: krajesh@barc.gov.in [LEHIPA, Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Singh, P. [LEHIPA, Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Unnikrishnan, Divya; Kumar, Girish [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2012-02-01

    The end iris ridge waveguide couplers are used to couple power to accelerator cavities through a reduced size coupling port. However, higher electric and magnetic fields due to reduced size lead to strict requirements on dimensional tolerances during coupler fabrication process. It is shown by detailed parametric analysis that even small dimensional changes during manufacturing or operation can lead to undesired shift in design frequency and deterioration of return loss. Hence, transmitted power testing of two couplers connected back to back without an intermediate cavity cannot be carried out. Here, we propose cylindrical static tuners on impedance matching section to relax the dimensional tolerance requirements. It is also shown that an iris coupled coupler-cavity system is more tolerant towards coupler dimensional changes than a stand-alone coupler. However, same tuners can find use for tuning the coupling coefficient of coupler-cavity system. The proposed tuning scheme is expected to reduce the coupler manufacturing costs and provide an useful alternative for coupling coefficient tuning over iris machining.

  8. Rf transfer in the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A significant technical problem associated with the Coupled-Cavity Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator is the transfer of RF energy from the drive accelerator to the high-gradient accelerator. Several concepts have been advanced to solve this problem. This paper examines one possible solution in which the drive and high-gradient cavities are directly coupled to one another by means of holes in the cavity walls or coupled indirectly through a third intermediate transfer cavity. Energy cascades through the cavities on a beat frequency time scale which must be made small compared to the cavity skin time but large compared to the FEL pulse length. The transfer is complicated by the fact that each of the cavities in the system can support many resonant modes near the chosen frequency of operation. A generalized set of coupled-cavity equations has been developed to model the energy transfer between the various modes in each of the cavities. For a two cavity case transfer efficiencies in excess of 95% can be achieved. 3 refs., 2 figs

  9. Frequency-modulation transient absorption spectrum of the HCCl A 1A double-prime(0,0,0)left-arrow X 1A'(0,0,0) transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, B.; Sears, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The rotationally resolved spectrum of the HCCl A 1 A double-prime(0,0,0)left-arrow X 1 A'(0,0,0) transition between 12 230 and 12 410 cm -1 was obtained for the first time at Doppler-limited resolution using a frequency-modulation (FM) transient absorption technique. Five major subbands (K a =0 left-arrow 1, 1 left-arrow 0, 1 left-arrow 2, 2 left-arrow 1, and 2 left-arrow 3) of HC 35 Cl and one subband (K a =0 left-arrow 1) of HC 37 Cl were observed and assigned. In addition, the forbidden subband (K a =0 left-arrow 0) of HC 35 Cl was also observed. Thus far, we have assigned most (more than 70%) of the strong lines. The analysis of these subbands determines the geometry for the HCCl A(0,0,0) level: angle HCCl=134.7 degree and R C-Cl =1.623 A while R C-H is fixed at the corresponding value of CH 2 . The height of the barrier to linearity was found to be approximately 2170 cm -1 above the vibrationless level of the A state. The rotational structure of this spectrum shows irregular perturbations. Both random and J-dependent (anomalous K-type doubling) effects were observed. As in methylene, the perturbations most likely arise from Renner--Teller effect between the two singlet states in combination with spin--orbit coupling between the singlet and triplet states

  10. The numerical simulation of plasma flow in cylindrical resonant cavity of microwave plasma thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.-L.; He, H.-Q; Mao, G.-W.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave Plasma Thruster (MPT) is an electro-thermal propulsive device. MPT consists of microwave generator, gas storing and supplying system, resonant cavity and accelerative nozzle. It generates free-floating plasma brought by the microwave discharge breakdown gas in the resonant cavity, and the plasma exhausted from nozzle produces thrust. MPT has prospective application in spacecraft because of its advantages of high thrust, moderate specific impulse and high efficiency. In this paper, the numerical simulation of the coupling flow field of microwave plasma in resonant cavity under different frequencies will be discussed. The results of numerical simulation are as follows: 1) When the resonant model TM 011 was used, the higher the microwave frequency was, the smaller the size of MPT. The distribution of the electromagnetic field in small cavity, however, remain unchanged. 2) When the resonant model was used, the distribution of the temperature, the pressure and the electronic density in the resonant cavity remained unchanged under different resonant frequencies. 3) When the resonant frequency was increased with a fixed pressure distribution in a small cavity, compare to the MPT with lower frequency, the gas flow rate, the microwave power and the nozzle throat diameter of MPT all decreased. 4) The electromagnetic field in the cylindrical resonant cavity for all MPT with different frequencies was disturbed by the plasma formation. The strong disturbance happened in the region close to the plasma. (author)

  11. Experimental observations of anomalous potential drops over ion density cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, M.

    1991-08-01

    Experiments are reported showing the plasma potential response when a step voltage is applied over the plasma column between the two plasma sources in a triple plasma machine. The time resolution is sufficient to resolve potential variations caused essentially by the electron motion, and two independent probe methods are used to obtain this time resolution. Depending on the initial conditions two different responses were observed on the time scale of the electron motion. When the initial ion density varies along the plasma column and has a local minimum (that is, forms an ion density cavity), the applied potential drop becomes distributed over the cavity after a few electron transit times. Later the profile steepens to a double layer on the time scale of the ion motion. The width of the cavity is comparable to the length of the plasma column. When the initial density is axially uniform, most of the potential drop instead concentrates to a narrow region at the low potential end of the plasma column after a few electron transit times. On the time scale of the ion motion this potential drop begins to propagate into the plasma as a double layer. The results obtained are consistent with those from numerical simulations with similar boundary conditions. Further experiments are necessary to get conclusive insight into the voltage supporting capability of an ion density cavity. (au) (34 refs.)

  12. On the exploitation of seismic resonances for cavity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2017-04-01

    We study the interaction of a seismic wave-field with a spherical acoustic gas- or fluid-filled cavity. The intention of this study is to clarify whether seismic resonances can be expected, a characteristic feature, which may help detecting cavities in the subsurface. This is important for many applications, as in particular the detection of underground nuclear explosions which are to be prohibited by the Comprehensive-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT). On-Site Inspections (OSI) should assure possible violation of the CTBT to be convicted after detection of a suspicious event from a nuclear explosion by the international monitoring system (IMS). One primary structural target for the field team during an OSI is the detection of cavities created by underground nuclear explosions. The application of seismic resonances of the cavity for its detection has been proposed in the CTBT by mentioning "resonance seismometry" as possible technique during OSIs. In order to calculate the full seismic wave-field from an incident plane wave that interacts with the cavity, we considered an analytic formulation of the problem. The wave-field interaction consists of elastic scattering and the wave-field interaction between the acoustic and elastic media. Acoustic resonant modes, caused by internal reflections in the acoustic cavity, show up as spectral peaks in the frequency domain. The resonant peaks are in close correlation to the eigenfrequencies of the undamped system described by the particular acoustic medium bounded in a sphere with stiff walls. The filling of the cavity could thus be determined by the observation of spectral peaks from acoustic resonances. By energy transmission from the internal oscillations back into the elastic domain and intrisic attenuation, the oscillations experience damping, resulting in a frequency shift and a limitation of the resonance amplitudes. In case of a gas-filled cavity the impedance contrast is high resulting in very narrow, high-amplitude resonances

  13. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  14. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Manjón

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden.

  15. Numerical Investigation of Vertical Cavity Lasers With High-Contrast Gratings Using the Fourier Modal Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2016-01-01

    We explore the use of a modal expansion technique, Fourier modal method (FMM), for investigating the optical properties of vertical cavities employing high-contrast gratings (HCGs). Three techniques for determining the resonance frequency and quality factor (Q-factor) of a cavity mode are compared...

  16. Experimental Demonstration on Air Cavity Mode of Violin Using Holed Sheets of Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental air cavity mode (A0) of a violin was investigated from the viewpoint of its dependence on the opening area and shape by using holed sheets of paper. The dependences of the frequency response of the A0 cavity mode on the shape, opening area, and orientation of the openings were observed. It was also demonstrated that the change of…

  17. The splitring loaded RF-cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eckhard; Klein, Horst

    1984-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical work was done on the splitring loaded resonant rf-cavity. Formulae are derived for the determination of the resonance frequencies, Rp-value and shunt impedance dependent on the resonator geometry. The calculations were verified by experiments carried out by the authors as well as by measurements reported in literature. The theoretical and experimental optimizations were incorporated in a construction of a normal-conducting section laid out for a resonance frequency of 108 MHz, a particle velocity corresponding to β = v/ c = 0.057 and with an Rp-value of 14.5 MΩ producing an acceleration voltage of 1 MV. This resonator is part of a small postaccelerator, installed at the Frankfurt single-ended 7 MV CN Van de Graaff generator and has been tested with a particle beam.

  18. An RF input coupler for a superconducting single cell cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, B.; Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Mukugi, Ken; Krawczyk, F.

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposes a high intensity proton accelerator for the Neutron Science Project. A superconducting linac is a main option for the high energy part of the accelerator. Design and development work for the superconducting accelerating cavities (resonant frequency of 600 MHz) is in progress. Superconducting cavities have an advantage of very high accelerating efficiency because RF wall loss is very small and much of the RF power fed to the cavity is consumed for the beam acceleration. On the other hand, an RF input coupler for the superconducting cavity has to be matched to the beam loading. Therefore, estimation of coupling coefficient or external quality factor (Qext) of the RF input coupler is important for the design of the couplers. In this work, Qext's were calculated by the electromagnetic analysis code (MAFIA) and were compared with those by the measurements. A β (ratio of the particle velocity to the light velocity) = 0.5 single-cell cavity with either axial coupler or side coupler was used in this work. In the experiments, a model cavity made by copper is applied. Both 2- and 3-dimensional calculations were performed in the axial coupler geometry and the results were compared. The agreements between calculated and measured values are good and this method for calculation of Qext is confirmed to be proper for the design of the RF input couplers. (author)

  19. Double-Skin Facade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalyanova, Olena

    , transparent insulation and preheating operation modes of DSF cavity. The data sets include measurements of naturally induced air flow, temperature gradients, velocity profiles, climate data, etc. Two data sets were used for further empirical validation of building simulation software for DSF modelling within...... favored by companies and their employees. To bring the reduction of energy use in these buildings application of suitable tools and methods is necessary to achieve successful design solutions. Earlier work on the topic of DSF modelling was examined from various publications. As a result, the main...... to perform the simulations. To fill in the gap of lacking experimental data a range of measurements was carried out in an outdoor, double-skin façade full-scale test facility ‘The Cube'. As a result, three complete sets of experimental data were composed. These are available for external air curtain...

  20. Polarization dynamics of VCSELs in external cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, M.; Javaloyes, J.; Barland, S.; Balle, S.; Giudici, M.

    2014-05-01

    We review the dynamics of VCSELs that experience both Polarization-Selective Feedback (PSF) and Crossed- Polarization Reinjection (XPR). Different regimes of regular pulsation were found. For strong enough XPR levels, the VCSEL emission in each of its linearly-polarized components displays a square-wave modulation which regularity is greatly enhanced by small levels of PSF. Such a square-wave is in antiphase for the two polarizations, and it turns out to be stable and robust over broad intervals of current. The frequency of the square-wave is determined by the length of the XPR arm. For weak levels of PSF and XPR, the VCSEL emits a regular train of short optical pulses arising from the locking of the modes in the PSF cavity. The frequency of the pulse train is stable on short time scales, but it wanders with a characteristic time scale of hundreds of roundtrips in the PSF cavity. The experimental results are successfully explained by an extension of the Spin-Flip Model that incorporates gain saturation and the effects of PSF and XPR.

  1. Cavity-photon contribution to the effective interaction of electrons in parallel quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Sitek, Anna [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland); Abdullah, Nzar Rauf [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Science Education, School of Science, University of Sulaimani, Kurdistan Region (Iraq); Tang, Chi-Shung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, Miaoli (China); Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University (Iceland)

    2016-05-15

    A single cavity photon mode is expected to modify the Coulomb interaction of an electron system in the cavity. Here we investigate this phenomena in a parallel double quantum dot system. We explore properties of the closed system and the system after it has been opened up for electron transport. We show how results for both cases support the idea that the effective electron-electron interaction becomes more repulsive in the presence of a cavity photon field. This can be understood in terms of the cavity photons dressing the polarization terms in the effective mutual electron interaction leading to nontrivial delocalization or polarization of the charge in the double parallel dot potential. In addition, we find that the effective repulsion of the electrons can be reduced by quadrupolar collective oscillations excited by an external classical dipole electric field. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Loggerhead oral cavity morphometry study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard external morphometrics and internal oral cavity morphometrics data were collected on wild and captive reared loggerhead sea turtles in size classes ranging...

  3. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  4. High current electron beam acceleration in dielectric-filled RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration of charged particles in radio frequency (RF) cavities is a widely used mode in high energy accelerators. Advantages include very high accelerating gradients and very stable phase control. A traditional limitation for such acceleration has been their use for intense, high current beam generation. This constraint arises from the inability to store a large amount of electromagnetic energy in the cavity and from loading effects of the beam on the cavity. The authors have studied a simple modification to transcend these limitations. Following Humphries and Huang, they have conducted analytic and numerical investigations of RF accelerator cavities in which a high dielectric constant material, such as water, replaces most of the cavity volume. This raises the stored energy in a cavity of given dimensions by a factor var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 . For a water fill, var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ∼ 80, depending on the frequency. This introduction of high dielectric constant material into the cavity reduces the resonant frequencies by a factor of (var-epsilon/var-epsilon 0 ) 1/2 . This reduced operating frequency mans that existing high efficiency power supplies, at lower frequencies, can be used for an accelerator

  5. Progress on the Design of a Perpendicularly Biased 2nd Harmonic Cavity for the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrak, R. L. [Fermilab; Dey, J. E. [Fermilab; Duel, K. L. [Fermilab; Kuharik, J. C. [Fermilab; Pellico, W. A. [Fermilab; Reid, J. S. [Fermilab; Romanov, G. [Fermilab; Slabough, M. [Fermilab; Sun, D. [Fermilab; Tan, C. Y. [Fermilab; Terechkine, I. [Fermilab

    2016-10-01

    perpendicularly biased 2nd harmonic cavity is being designed and built for the Fermilab Booster. Its purpose is to flatten the bucket at injection and thus change the longitudinal beam distribution to decrease space charge effects. It can also help at extraction. The cavity frequency range is 76 – 106 MHz. The power amplifier will be built using the Y567B tetrode, which is also used for the fundamental mode cavities in the Fermilab Booster. We discuss recent progress on the cavity, the biasing solenoid design and plans for testing the tuner's garnet material

  6. Higher Order Mode (HOM) Impedance and Damping Study for the LHC Capture Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Tückmantel, Joachim; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LHC Division

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the higher order mode, HOM, damping in the LHC 200MHz ACN cavity when using four HOM couplers, simulations have been done by both 3-D frequency domain and time domain methods. These simulations have previously been used in other studies of HOM damped cavities and shown to be effective by comparing measurement and simulation results[1] [2]. Using these methods the impedance spectrum of the HOM modes in the cavity before and after damping has been obtained. From this, detailed information about the HOM coupler's contribution to HOM damping can be obtained. The distribution and magnitude of some potentially dangerous HOM modes in the ACN cavity have been found.

  7. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective open study the sterility of the uterine cavity was evaluated in 99 women admitted for hysterectomy. The indications for hysterectomy were in most cases persistent irregular vaginal bleeding and fibromyomas of the uterus. Samples for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, Chlamydia ...... which may play a causative role in endometritis. The results indicate that inflammation of the uterine cavity should be evaluated by hysteroscopic examination before hysterectomy is undertaken in patients with persistent irregular vaginal bleeding. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Mar...

  8. Design of 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell SRF cavity and development of single cell niobium cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, Sudeshna; Som, Sumit; Bhattacharyya, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    In India, DAE laboratories and other institutes are now actively involved in research and development activities on SRF cavities and associated technologies for the proposed high current, high energy proton linear accelerators like ISNS/IADS and also for the FERMILAB PIP-II program under Indian institutions-Fermilab collaboration (IIFC). As part of the above activities, VECC, Kolkata, has been involved in the design, analysis and development of a 650 MHz, β=0.61, 5-cell elliptical shape Superconducting RF linac cavity. RF design involves optimization of the geometry to get acceptable values of field enhancement factors (magnetic and electric), R/Q , Geometric factor, coupling factor and field flatness. This paper describes the RF design using 2-D superfish and 3-D CST Microwave studio and multipacting analysis using 2-D Multipac2.1 and 3-D CST Particle Studio. A prototype 1-cell aluminum cavity and a prototype 5-cell copper cavity have been fabricated using die-punch assembly designed for fabrication of elliptical half-cells to check the procedures for forming and to make sure the desired frequency and field flatness could be obtained. RF characterization has been carried out for both the prototypes using Vector Network Analyzer and Bead pull measurement set up.The fabrication of a single-cell niobium cavity has been carried out indigenously and with the help of Electron Beam Welding (EBW) facility at IUAC, New Delhi. CMM measurement and RF characterization of the niobium half cells and full cell cavities have been carried out. This paper describes the development and measurement of prototype cavities and single cell niobium cavity. (author)

  9. A New RF System for the CEBAF Normal Conducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Hovater, C; Hofler, A; Lahti, G; Musson, J; Plawski, T

    2004-01-01

    The CEBAF Accelerator at Jefferson Lab is a 6 GeV five pass electron accelerator consisting of two superconducting linacs joined by independent magnetic transport arcs. CEBAF also has numerous normal conducting cavities for beam conditioning in the injector and for RF extraction to the experimental halls. The RF systems that presently control these cavities are becoming expensive to maintain, therefore a replacement RF control system is now being developed. For the new RF system, cavity field control is maintained digitally using an FPGA which contains the feedback algorithm. The system incorporates digital down conversion, using quadrature under-sampling at an IF frequency of 70 MHz. The VXI bus-crate was chosen as the operating platform because of its excellent RFI/EMI properties and its compatibility with the EPICS control system. The normal conducting cavities operate at both the 1497 MHz accelerating frequency and the sub-harmonic frequency of 499 MHz. To accommodate this, the new design will use differe...

  10. Successful development of innovative fabrication technique based on laser welding, for superconducting RF cavities - results and path ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Prashant; Upadhyay, B.N.; Dwivedi, Jishnu

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities are the heart of any particle accelerator based on SCRF technology. All over the world, efforts are being made to develop a technique which can bring down the cost and time of fabrication of these cavities. The present day fabrication method of SCRF cavities uses Electron beam welding (EBW) technique. The cavities fabricated by this method turn out to be expensive and take long fabrication time. To overcome such difficulties related with EBW process, an innovative concept for fabrication of SCRF cavities based on laser welding was formulated at RRCAT. International patent application was immediately launched for this work, to protect intellectual property rights of DAE

  11. Characterisation of the light pulses of a cavity dumped dye laser pumped by a cw mode-locked and q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, P.; Heisel, F.; Martz, A.; Miehe, J.A.; Miller, R.J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency doubled pulses (of 532 nm) obtained, with the help of a KTP crystal, from those delivered by either a continuous wave mode-locked (100 MHz) or mode-locked Q-switched (0-1 KHz) Nd: YAG laser, are analyzed by means of a streak camera, operating in synchroscan or triggered mode. In the step-by-step measurements the pulse stability, concerning form and amplitude, is shown. In addition, measurements effectuated with synchronously pumped and cavity dumped dye laser (Rhodamine 6G), controlled by a Pockels cell, allows the obtention of stable and reproducible single pulses of 30 ps duration, 10 μJ energy and 500Hz frequency [fr

  12. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a device that consists of a compound intended to coat a prepared cavity of a tooth before insertion of...

  13. Design and construction of drift tube linac cavities for RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Yamada, K.; Arai, S.; Chiba, Y.; Kase, M.; Okuno, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Kamigaito, O.

    2013-09-01

    A new injector linac "RILAC2", has recently been constructed at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory. The main part of the RILAC2 is a drift tube linac that consists of three newly designed cavities. These cavities operate in continuous wave (CW) mode at a fixed frequency of 36.5 MHz. Their structure is based on a quarter-wavelength resonator because this is the smallest resonator available in this frequency range among the available structures. We adopted the direct coupling method in the construction of these cavities. A power amplifier was directly coupled to the cavity without a long transmission line to reduce the installation area and simultaneously reduce construction cost. A detailed cavity and coupler design was carried out via simulation. Our work also describes the design process using three-dimensional electromagnetic simulation software. Construction and operation tests are also shown.

  14. Entanglement for a Bimodal Cavity Field Interacting with a Two-Level Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jia; Chen Ziyu; Bu Shenping; Zhang Guofeng

    2009-01-01

    Negativity has been adopted to investigate the entanglement in a system composed of a two-level atom and a two-mode cavity field. Effects of Kerr-like medium and the number of photon inside the cavity on the entanglement are studied. Our results show that atomic initial state must be superposed, so that the two cavity field modes can be entangled. Moreover, we also conclude that the number of photon in the two cavity mode should be equal. The interaction between modes, namely, the Kerr effect, has a significant negative contribution. Note that the atom frequency and the cavity frequency have an indistinguishable effect, so a corresponding approximation has been made in this article. These results may be useful for quantum information in optics systems.

  15. Faithful state transfer between two-level systems via an actively cooled finite-temperature cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárkány, Lőrinc; Fortágh, József; Petrosyan, David

    2018-03-01

    We consider state transfer between two qubits—effective two-level systems represented by Rydberg atoms—via a common mode of a microwave cavity at finite temperature. We find that when both qubits have the same coupling strength to the cavity field, at large enough detuning from the cavity mode frequency, quantum interference between the transition paths makes the swap of the excitation between the qubits largely insensitive to the number of thermal photons in the cavity. When, however, the coupling strengths are different, the photon-number-dependent differential Stark shift of the transition frequencies precludes efficient transfer. Nevertheless, using an auxiliary cooling system to continuously extract the cavity photons, we can still achieve a high-fidelity state transfer between the qubits.

  16. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  17. Optical frequency comb for high resolution hydrogen spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoult, O.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we perform an absolute frequency measurement of the 1S-3S transition in atomic hydrogen, in order to improve the uncertainties on both the Rydberg constant and the Lamb shift L1S. In the experiment, a CW stabilized Ti:Sa laser is doubled twice in LBO (LiB 3 O 5 ) and BBO (β-BaB 2 O 4 ) crystals. The 1S-3S transition is excited by two photons at 205 nm in an optical cavity colinear with the atomic beam, at room temperature. The remaining second-order Doppler effect is compensated by a quadratic Stark effect resulting from an applied static magnetic field. An optical frequency comb is used to compare directly the Ti:Sa frequency with the microwave frequency standard. We detect fluorescence at 656 nm thanks to a CCD camera. Fitting the experimental data with our calculated line shapes leads to a value of the second-order Doppler effect in disagreement with approximative predictions for the 1S-3S frequency. We suggest the existence of stray electric fields as a possible systematic effect. The slides of the defence of the thesis have been added at the end of the document. (author)

  18. Industrialization of the nitrogen-doping preparation for SRF cavities for LCLS-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnella, D.; Aderhold, S.; Burrill, A.; Daly, E.; Davis, K.; Grassellino, A.; Grimm, C.; Khabiboulline, T.; Marhauser, F.; Melnychuk, O.; Palczewski, A.; Posen, S.; Ross, M.; Sergatskov, D.; Sukhanov, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Wilson, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art coherent X-ray source being constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. It employs 280 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities in order operate in continuous wave (CW) mode. To reduce the overall cryogenic cost of such a large accelerator, nitrogen-doping of the SRF cavities is being used. Nitrogen-doping has consistently been shown to increase the efficiency of SRF cavities operating in the 2.0 K regime and at medium fields (15-20 MV/m) in vertical cavity tests and horizontal cryomodule tests. While nitrogen-doping's efficacy for improvement of cavity performance was demonstrated at three independent labs, Fermilab, Jefferson Lab, and Cornell University, transfer of the technology to industry for LCLS-II production was not without challenges. Here we present results from the beginning of LCLS-II cavity production. We discuss qualification of the cavity vendors and the first cavities from each vendor. Finally, we demonstrate that nitrogen-doping has been successfully transferred to SRF cavity vendors, resulting in consistent production of cavities with better cryogenic efficiency than has ever been achieved for a large-scale accelerator.

  19. Stability branching induced by collective atomic recoil in an optomechanical ring cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian, Hou

    2017-02-01

    In a ring cavity filled with an atomic condensate, self-bunching of atoms due to the cavity pump mode produce an inversion that re-emits into the cavity probe mode with an exponential gain, forming atomic recoil lasing. An optomechanical ring cavity is formed when one of the reflective mirrors is mounted on a mechanical vibrating beam. In this paper, we extend studies on the stability of linear optomechanical cavities to such ring cavities with two counter-propagating cavity modes, especially when the forward propagating pump mode is taken to its weak coupling limit. We find that when the atomic recoil is in action, stable states of the mechanical mode of the mirror converge into branch cuts, where the gain produced by the recoiling strikes balance with the multiple decay sources, such as cavity leakage in the optomechanical system. This balance is obtained when the propagation delay in the dispersive atomic medium matches in a periodic pattern to the frequencies and linewidths of the cavity mode and the collective bosonic mode of the atoms. We show an input-output hysteresis cycle between the atomic mode and the cavity mode to verify the multi-valuation of the stable states after branching at the weak coupling limit.

  20. Frequency and enzymatic activity of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-positive patients at Fortaleza, Ceará Freqüência e atividade enzimática de Candida albicans isolado da cavidade oral de pacientes HIV-positivos em Fortaleza, Ceará

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everardo Albuquerque Menezes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans and other species are usually involved in opportunistic infections in patients with acquired immunological deficiency syndrome (AIDS. The virulence mechanisms by which this yeast expresses its pathogenicity include adherence patterns, ability to form pseudomycelia and production of extracellular enzymes, among others. The objective of this research was to verify the frequency of Candida and the production of proteinase and phospholipase in 52 strains of Candida albicans from the oral cavity of patients infected by HIV treated at Hospital São José, AIDS reference and training center in Fortaleza, Ceará. Samples were collected of patients, with or without oral lesions characteristic of candidosis. From 100 patients, 80% presented positivity for Candida: 65% (52 were identified as C. albicans, 27.5% (22 as C. tropicalis, 2.5% (2 as C. glabrata, 2.5% (2 as C. krusei and 2.5% (2 as C. guilliermondii. Among the strains of C. albicans isolated from the oral cavity, proteinase and phospholipase were detected in 69.2% and 73%, respectively. The results suggested that C. albicans was the most frequent species observed, with intermediate expression of proteinase and phospholipase.Candida albicans e outras espécies são usualmente envolvidas em infecções de pacientes com a síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (AIDS. Os mecanismos de virulência pelos quais a levedura expressa sua patogenicidade incluem padrões de aderência, habilidade por formar pseudomicélio, produção de enzimas extracelulares e outros. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a freqüência de Candida e a produção de proteinase e fosfolipase em 52 cepas de Candida albicans da cavidade oral de pacientes infectados pelo HIV atendidos no Hospital São José, hospital de referência e centro de treinamento em AIDS em Fortaleza, Ceará. Neste trabalho foram coletadas amostras de pacientes com ou sem lesões características de candidose. Dos cem pacientes 80

  1. Simultaneous cooling and entanglement of mechanical modes of a micromirror in an optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes, Claudiu; Vitali, David; Tombesi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Laser cooling of a mechanical mode of a resonator by the radiation pressure of a detuned optical cavity mode has been recently demonstrated by various groups in different experimental configurations. Here, we consider the effect of a second mechanical mode with a close but different resonance frequency. We show that the nearby mechanical resonance is simultaneously cooled by the cavity field, provided that the difference between the two mechanical frequencies is not too small. When this frequency difference becomes smaller than the effective mechanical damping of the secondary mode, the two cooling processes interfere destructively similarly to what happens in electromagnetically induced transparency, and cavity cooling is suppressed in the limit of identical mechanical frequencies. We show that also the entanglement properties of the steady state of the tripartite system crucially depend upon the difference between the two mechanical frequencies. If the latter is larger than the effective damping of the second mechanical mode, the state shows fully tripartite entanglement and each mechanical mode is entangled with the cavity mode. If instead, the frequency difference is smaller, the steady state is a two-mode biseparable state, inseparable only when one splits the cavity mode from the two mechanical modes. In this latter case, the entanglement of each mechanical mode with the cavity mode is extremely fragile with respect to temperature.

  2. Flow cytometry vs cytomorphology for the detection of hematologic malignancy in body cavity fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Clara; Klersy, Catherine; Scarpati, Barbara; Brando, Bruno; Volpato, Elisabetta; Bertani, Giambattista; Faleri, Maurizio; Nosari, Annamaria; Cantoni, Silvia; Ferri, Ursula; Scampini, Linda; Barba, Claudia; Lando, Giuliana; Morra, Enrica; Cairoli, Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Flow cytometry and cytomorphology results on 92 body cavity fluids [61 effusions and 31 bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF)] from hematologic malignancy were compared with retrospective clinical outcome. We observed double true positive/negative results in 67 cases (73%), and double false negative results in 2 cases (2%). Immunophenotyping accounted for true positive/negative results in 22 out of 23 mismatched cases (25%), and retained significantly higher accuracy than that of cytomorphology especially in effusions and differentiated lymphoma. In BALF analysis, immunophenotyping and cytomorphology sensitivity was 75% and 0%, respectively. Flow cytometry retains the highest accuracy in detecting neoplastic cells in body cavity fluids. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal conditions within tree cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests: potential implications for cavity users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierling, Kerri T.; Lorenz, Teresa J.; Cunningham, Patrick; Potterf, Kelsi

    2017-11-01

    Tree cavities provide critical roosting and breeding sites for multiple species, and thermal environments in these cavities are important to understand. Our objectives were to (1) describe thermal characteristics in cavities between June 3 and August 9, 2014, and (2) investigate the environmental factors that influence cavity temperatures. We placed iButtons in 84 different cavities in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in central Washington, and took hourly measurements for at least 8 days in each cavity. Temperatures above 40 °C are generally lethal to developing avian embryos, and 18% of the cavities had internal temperatures of ≥ 40 °C for at least 1 h of each day. We modeled daily maximum cavity temperature, the amplitude of daily cavity temperatures, and the difference between the mean internal cavity and mean ambient temperatures as a function of several environmental variables. These variables included canopy cover, tree diameter at cavity height, cavity volume, entrance area, the hardness of the cavity body, the hardness of the cavity sill (which is the wood below the cavity entrance which forms the barrier between the cavity and the external environment), and sill width. Ambient temperature had the largest effect size for maximum cavity temperature and amplitude. Larger trees with harder sills may provide more thermally stable cavity environments, and decayed sills were positively associated with maximum cavity temperatures. Summer temperatures are projected to increase in this region, and additional research is needed to determine how the thermal environments of cavities will influence species occupancy, breeding, and survival.

  4. Impact of Lorentz forces on a Spoke cavity with β 0.15 and on a Spiral-2 cavity with β 0.12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassot, H.

    2007-01-01

    Mono-spoke superconducting cavities have been proposed for the acceleration of radioactive ion beams. The interaction of the electromagnetic field with the surface electrical current generates Lorentz forces that operate on the intern wall of the cavity, the distribution of these forces is highly non-linear and varying. The stability of a superconducting cavity is directly linked to the frequency variation due to Lorentz forces and as a consequence the optimized design of a cavity must take into account these forces. In order to optimize the design of a cavity, 3 complementary software have been developed: Catia, a computer-aided-design software, Soprano for electromagnetic modeling and Cast3m for mechanical modeling. Preliminary results show a good agreement between predicted values and experimental data. (A.C.)

  5. Instabilities in passive dispersion oscillating fiber ring cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Biancalana, Fabio; Trillo, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the development of instabilities in passive ring cavities with stepwise longitudinal variation of the dispersion. We derive an extended version of the Lugiato-Lefever equation that permits to model dispersion oscillating cavities and we demonstrate that this equation is valid well beyond the mean field approximation. We review the theory of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instability in inhomogeneous fiber cavities. We report the experimental demonstration of the generation of stable Turing and Faraday temporal patterns in the same device, which can be controlled by changing the detuning and/or the input power. Moreover, we experimentally record the round-trip-to-round-trip dynamics of the spectrum, which shows that Turing and Faraday instabilities not only differ by their characteristic frequency but also by their dynamical behavior. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  6. Origin and reduction of wakefields in photonic crystal accelerator cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A. Bauer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystal (PhC defect cavities that support an accelerating mode tend to trap unwanted higher-order modes (HOMs corresponding to zero-group-velocity PhC lattice modes at frequencies near the top of bandgaps. The effect is explained quite generally by photonic band and perturbation theoretical arguments. Transverse wakefields resulting from this effect are observed (via simulation in a 12 GHz hybrid dielectric PhC accelerating cavity based on a triangular lattice of sapphire rods. These wakefields are, on average, an order of magnitude higher than those in the 12 GHz waveguide-damped Compact Linear Collider copper cavities. The avoidance of translational symmetry (and, thus, the bandgap concept can dramatically improve HOM damping in PhC-based structures.

  7. Beam Fields in an Integrated Cavity, Coupler and Window Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2010-02-10

    In a multi-bunch high current storage ring, beam generated fields couple strongly into the RF cavity coupler structure when beam arrival times are in resonance with cavity fields. In this study the integrated effect of beam fields over several thousand RF periods is simulated for the complete cavity, coupler, window and waveguide system of the PEP-II B-factory storage ring collider. We show that the beam generated fields at frequencies corresponding to several bunch spacings for this case gives rise to high field strength near the ceramic window which could limit the performance of future high current storage rings such as PEP-X or Super B-factories.

  8. Tensile tests of niobium material for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.; Dhanaraj, N.; Cooley, L.; Hicks, D.; Hahn, E.; Burk, D.; Muranyi, W.; Foley, N.; Edwards, H.; Harms, E.; Champion, M.; /Fermilab /Michigan State U.

    2009-06-01

    Mechanical tests of cavity-grade niobium samples were conducted to provide engineering information for the certification of 3rd-harmonic superconducting radio-frequency cavities and cryomodules. Large changes of mechanical properties occur throughout the cavity fabrication process due to the cold work introduced by forming, the heating introduced by electron beam welding, and the recovery of cold work during the anneal used to degas hydrogen after chemical processing. Data is provided here to show the different properties at various stages of fabrication, including both weld regions and samples from the bulk niobium far away from the weld. Measurements of RRR were used to assure that any contamination during annealing was negligible.

  9. Magnesium Diboride thin Films, multilayers, and coatings for SRF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Xiaoxing [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-17

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities currently use low-temperature superconductor niobium, and the Nb SRF cavities have approached the performance levels predicted theoretically. Compared to Nb, MgB2 becomes superconducting at a much higher temperature and promises a better RF performance in terms of higher quality factor Q and higher acceleration capability. An MgB2 SRF technology can significantly reduce the operating costs of particle accelerators when these potentials are realized. This project aimed to advance the development of an MgB2 SRF technology. It had two main objectives: (1) materials issues of MgB2 thin films and multilayers related to their applications in SRF cavities; and (2) coating single-cell cavities for testing at RF frequencies. The key technical thrust of the project is the deposition of high quality clean MgB2 films and coatings by the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) technique, which was developed in my group. We have achieved technical progress in each of the two areas. For the first objective, we have confirmed that MgB2 thin film coatings can be used to effectively enhance the vortex penetration field of an SRF cavity. A vortex is a normal region in the shape of spaghetti that threads through a superconductor. Its existence is due to an applied magnetic field that is greater than a so-called lower critical field, Hc1. Once a vortex enters the superconductor, its movement leads to loss. This has been shown to be the reason for an SRF cavity to break down. Thus, enhancing the magnetic field for a vortex to enter the superconductor that forms the SRF cavity has be a goal of intense research. To this end, Gurevich proposed that a coating of thin superconductor layer can impede the vortex entrance. In this project, we have done two important experiment to test this concept. One, we showed that the enhancement of Hc1 can be

  10. Single frequency semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Zujie; Chen, Gaoting; Qu, Ronghui

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the single frequency semiconductor laser, which is widely used in many vital advanced technologies, such as the laser cooling of atoms and atomic clock, high-precision measurements and spectroscopy, coherent optical communications, and advanced optical sensors. It presents both the fundamentals and characteristics of semiconductor lasers, including basic F-P structure and monolithic integrated structures; interprets laser noises and their measurements; and explains mechanisms and technologies relating to the main aspects of single frequency lasers, including external cavity lasers, frequency stabilization technologies, frequency sweeping, optical phase locked loops, and so on. It paints a clear, physical picture of related technologies and reviews new developments in the field as well. It will be a useful reference to graduate students, researchers, and engineers in the field.

  11. Improved-Delayed-Detached-Eddy Simulation of cavity-induced transition in hypersonic boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Lianghua; Xiao, Zhixiang; Duan, Zhiwei; Fu, Song

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work is about hypersonic cavity-induced transition with IDDES approach. • The length-to-width-to-depth ratio of the cavity is 19.9:3.57:1 at AoA −10° and −15°. • Flow remains laminar at −10°, transition occurs at −15° and cavity changed from open to close type. • Streamwise vortices, impingement shock, traveling shocks and exit shock are observed. • Breakdown of these vortices triggering rapid flow transition. - Abstract: Hypersonic flow transition from laminar to turbulent due to the surface irregularities, like local cavities, can greatly affect the surface heating and skin friction. In this work, the hypersonic flows over a three-dimensional rectangular cavity with length-to-width-to-depth ratio, L:W:D, of 19.9:3.57:1 at two angles of attack (AoA) were numerically studied with Improved-Delayed-Detached-Eddy Simulation (IDDES) method to highlight the mechanism of transition triggered by the cavity. The present approach was firstly applied to the transonic flow over M219 rectangular cavity. The results, including the fluctuating pressure and frequency, agreed with experiment well. In the hypersonic case at Mach number about 9.6 the cavity is seen as “open” at AoA of −10° but “closed” at AoA of −15° unconventional to the two-dimensional cavity case where the flow always exhibits closed cavity feature when the length-to-depth ratio L/D is larger than 14. For the open cavity flow, the shear layer is basically steady and the flow maintains laminar. For the closed cavity case, the external flow goes into the cavity and impinges on the bottom floor. High intensity streamwise vortices, impingement shock and exit shock are observed causing breakdown of these vortices triggering rapid flow transition

  12. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  13. Effect of low temperature baking on niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Kneisel; Ganapati Myneni; William Lanford; Gianluigi Ciovati

    2003-09-01

    A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor and a recovery from the so-called ''Q-drop'' without field emission at high field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37K-280K and resonant frequency shift between 6K-9.3K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity using a modified version of the computer code originally written by J. Halbritter [1] . Small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation were analyzed with respect to their hydrogen content with a Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models. This paper describes the results from these experiments and comments on the existing models to explain the effect of baking on the performance of niobium RF cavities.

  14. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, J.; Gibson, S. E.

    2009-01-01

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 R sun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 R sun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  15. Mechanical optimization of superconducting cavities in continuous wave operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Posen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several planned accelerator facilities call for hundreds of elliptical cavities operating cw with low effective beam loading, and therefore require cavities that have been mechanically optimized to operate at high Q_{L} by minimizing df/dp, the sensitivity to microphonics detuning from fluctuations in helium pressure. Without such an optimization, the facilities would suffer either power costs driven up by millions of dollars or an extremely high per-cavity trip rate. ANSYS simulations used to predict df/dp are presented as well as a model that illustrates factors that contribute to this parameter in elliptical cavities. For the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL main linac cavity, df/dp is found to range from 2.5 to 17.4  Hz/mbar, depending on the radius of the stiffening rings, with minimal df/dp for very small or very large radii. For the Cornell ERL injector cavity, simulations predict a df/dp of 124  Hz/mbar, which fits well within the range of measurements performed with the injector cryomodule. Several methods for reducing df/dp are proposed, including decreasing the diameter of the tuner bellows and increasing the stiffness of the enddishes and the tuner. Using measurements from a Tesla Test Facility cavity as the baseline, if both of these measures were implemented and the stiffening rings were optimized, simulations indicate that df/dp would be reduced from ∼30  Hz/mbar to just 2.9  Hz/mbar, and the power required to maintain the accelerating field would be reduced by an order of magnitude. Finally, other consequences of optimizing the stiffening ring radius are investigated. It is found that stiffening rings larger than 70% of the iris-equator distance make the cavity impossible to tune. Small rings, on the other hand, leave the cavity susceptible to plastic deformation during handling and have lower frequency mechanical resonances, which is undesirable for active compensation of microphonics. Additional simulations

  16. VERY HIGH RESOLUTION RF CAVITY BPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Marc C

    2003-05-27

    Linear collider (LC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements are expected to be a few nanometers[1]. It is important to show that the related tolerances can be achieved, with an electron beam if possible. Using recently developed component stabilization technology, very high-resolution beam position monitors (BPM's), and the ultra-low emittance beam at the KEK ATF, we plan to demonstrate the required stabilization. Our first step is to develop high-resolution RF cavity beam position monitors, using either C or X band frequencies. A C-band cavity BPM with a resolution of 25 nm has been reported in tests at FFTB [2]. By correcting for the effects of non-axial trajectories and using both position and angle BPM movers, we expect to be able to demonstrate a resolution of 2 to 3 nm over a dynamic range of {+-} 20 {micro}m. We report on the progress of the tests here.

  17. Status of superconducting RF cavity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    For several reasons, a brief historical review seems appropriate at this time. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the first acceleration of beam with a superconducting cavity will occur shortly [1,2,3]. Also, the scope of accelerator applications of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) devices has, within the last few months, begun to increase rapidly [4] - to the point that it seems likely that early expectations for this technology will largely be fulfilled. Since the object is to accelerate beam, a simple one parameter measure of the technology is the total of how much beam has been accelerated. Figure 1 shows the total accumulated voltage in tests and/or operation of superconducting accelerating cavities with beam, up to the time indicated, as reported in the open literature [4-35]. This parameter has been divided into two terms: first, the subtotal for electron accelerating velocity-of-light structures, and second the subtotal for low-velocity, ion accelerating structures. To restate: each of these terms represents as a function of time an integrated, accumulative total voltage produced by SRF hardware and demonstrated with beam. 56 refs., 4 figs

  18. Effects of surface damage on rf cavity operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hassanein

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a model of damage in rf cavities and show how this damage can limit cavity operation. We first present a review of mechanisms that may or may not affect the ultimate fields that can be obtained in rf cavities, assuming that mechanical stress explains the triggers of rf breakdown events. We present a method of quantifying the surface damage caused by breakdown events in terms of the spectrum of field enhancement factors, β, for asperities on the surface. We then model an equilibrium that can develop between damage and conditioning effects, and show how this equilibrium can determine cavity performance and show experimental evidence for this mechanism. We define three functions that quantify damage, and explain how the parameters that determine performance can be factored out and measured. We then show how this model can quantitatively explain the dependence of cavity performance on material, frequency, pulse length, gas, power supply, and other factors. The examples given in this paper are derived from a variety of incomplete data sets, so we outline an experimental program that should improve these predictions, provide mechanisms for comparing data from different facilities, and fill in many gaps in the existing data.

  19. Optimizing SRF Gun Cavity Profiles in a Genetic Algorithm Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofler, Alicia; Evtushenko, Pavel; Marhauser, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Automation of DC photoinjector designs using a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization is an accepted practice in accelerator physics. Allowing the gun cavity field profile shape to be varied can extend the utility of this optimization methodology to superconducting and normal conducting radio frequency (SRF/RF) gun based injectors. Finding optimal field and cavity geometry configurations can provide guidance for cavity design choices and verify existing designs. We have considered two approaches for varying the electric field profile. The first is to determine the optimal field profile shape that should be used independent of the cavity geometry, and the other is to vary the geometry of the gun cavity structure to produce an optimal field profile. The first method can provide a theoretical optimal and can illuminate where possible gains can be made in field shaping. The second method can produce more realistically achievable designs that can be compared to existing designs. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation for these two methods for generating field profiles for SRF/RF guns in a GA based injector optimization scheme and provide preliminary results.

  20. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.