WorldWideScience

Sample records for cavity broad area

  1. Folded cavity angled-grating broad-area lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunsong; Zhu, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The angled-grating broad-area laser is a promising candidate for high power, high brightness diode laser source. The key point in the design is the angled gratings which can simultaneously support the unique snake-like zigzag lasing mode and eliminate the direct Fabry-Perot (FP) feedback. Unlike a conventional laser waveguide mode, the phase front of the zigzag mode periodically changes along the propagation direction. By use of the mirror symmetry of the zigzag mode, we propose and demonstrate the folded cavity angled-grating broad-area lasers. One benefit of this design is to reduce the required wafer space compared to a regular angled-grating broad-area laser, especially in a long cavity laser for high power operation. Experimental results show that the folded cavity laser exhibits good beam quality in far field with a slightly larger threshold and smaller slope efficiency due to the additional interface loss.

  2. Vector cavity solitons in broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of two-dimensional vector cavity solitons in a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) under linearly polarized optical injection when varying optical injection linear polarization direction. The polarization of the cavity soliton is not the one of the optical injection as it acquires a distinct ellipticity. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by the spin-flip VCSEL model. Our findings open the road to polarization multiplexing when using cavity solitons in broad-area lasers as pixels in information technology. PMID:26847004

  3. Cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers below threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavity solitons are stationary self-organized bright intensity peaks which form over a homogeneous background in the section of broad area radiation beams. They are generated by shining a writing/erasing laser pulse into a nonlinear optical cavity, driven by a holding beam. The ability to control their location and their motion by introducing phase or amplitude gradients in the holding beam makes them interesting as mobile pixels for all-optical processing units. We show the generation of a number of cavity solitons in broad-area vertical cavity semiconductor microresonators electrically pumped above transparency but slightly below threshold. We analyze the switching process in details. The observed spots can be written, erased, and manipulated as independent objects, as predicted by the theoretical model. An especially tailored one is used to simulate the studied phenomena and to compare our simulations to the experimental findings with good agreement

  4. Enlargement of the inversionless lasing domain by using broad-area cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate analytically and numerically the role of diffraction in the operation of a broad-area inversionless laser in a cascade three-level configuration. Through a linear stability analysis of the trivial non-lasing solution and numerical integration of the corresponding Maxwell-Schroedinger equations, we show that off-axis emission allows stationary inversionless lasing over a cavity detuning range much larger than in small-aspect-ratio cavities and in conventionally inverted three-level lasers. In addition, we investigate inversionless lasing in a self-pulsing regime in the presence of diffraction, which leads to rich spatiotemporal dynamics

  5. Enlargement of the inversionless lasing domain by using broad-area cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Mompart, J; Ahufinger, V; García-Ojalvo, J; Corbalán, R; Vilaseca, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate analytically and numerically the role of diffraction in the operation of a broad-area inversionless laser in a cascade three-level configuration. Through a linear stability analysis of the trivial non-lasing solution and numerical integration of the corresponding Maxwell-Schroedinger equations, we show that off-axis emission allows stationary inversionless lasing over a cavity detuning range much larger than in small-aspect-ratio cavities and in conventionally inverted three-level lasers. In addition, we investigate inversionless lasing in a self-pulsing regime in the presence of diffraction, which leads to rich spatiotemporal dynamics.

  6. Spectral properties of a broad-area diode laser with off-axis external-cavity feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    intensity noise spectrum of the diode laser shows that the intensity noise is increased strongly by the external-cavity feedback. External-cavity modes are excited in the external cavity even in the off-axis configuration. The peak spacing of the intensity noise spectrum shows that single roundtrip external......Spectral properties, both the optical spectrum and the intensity noise spectrum, of a broad-area diode laser with off-axis external-cavity feedback are presented. We show that the optical spectrum of the diode laser system is shifted to longer wavelengths due to the external-cavity feedback. The......-cavity modes are excited. We believe that the four-wave mixing process in the broad-area diode laser is responsible for the establishment of the external-cavity mode....

  7. Dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of a broad-area diode laser with lateral-mode-selected long-cavity feedback is studied experimentally. Different dynamics are observed when different lateral modes are selected. When the feedback mirror is aligned perfectly and high-order modes are selected, in most....... When the feedback mirror is aligned non-perfectly, pulse-package oscillation is observed, for the first time to our knowledge, in a diode laser with long-cavity feedback....... of the cases, the output of the laser shows a periodic oscillation corresponding to a single roundtrip external-cavity loop, but the dynamic behavior disappears in some case; when the zero-order lateral-mode is selected, periodic oscillation corresponding to a double roundtrip external-cavity loop is observed...

  8. In-phase output beam from broad-area diode array using Talbot cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei Zhao; Qiang Li; Weirong Guo; Bo Liu; Tiechuan Zuo

    2007-01-01

    The robust phase locking of a linear diode array consisting of 49 broad-area emitters was demonstrated.The single lobe in the far field with output power of 0.83 W was observed. The far-field divergence was reduced to 2.0 mrad. The spectral bandwidth was reduced from 1.7 to 0.13 nm.

  9. Achieving single-lobed far-field patterns of broad area laser diode with external cavity feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhong Ge(葛剑虹); Jun Chen(陈军); Andreas Hermerschmidt; H.J.Eichler

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for single transverse mode operation of high-power broad area laser diode(BAL). In the experiment, the HR mirror is used as an external cavity mirror and the grating is used as a wavelength selective component. By tiling the HR mirror and the grating, the number of transverse modes oscillating in the cavity can be limited and the spectral bandwidth of the laser diode can be reduced. A single-lobed near diffraction-limited laser beam with the beam divergence (FWHM) of 0.43°, the spectral line-width of 0.7 nm and the output power of 350 mW are obtained. With the feedback, the power density of the output laser beam is increased 6 times in comparison with the free running.

  10. Multi-cavity coupling acoustic metamaterials with low-frequency broad band gaps based on negative mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanhui; Wu, Jiu Hui; Cao, Songhua; Jing, Li

    2016-08-01

    This paper studies a novel kind of low-frequency broadband acoustic metamaterials with small size based on the mechanisms of negative mass density and multi-cavity coupling. The structure consists of a closed resonant cavity and an open resonant cavity, which can be equivalent to a homogeneous medium with effective negative mass density in a certain frequency range by using the parameter inversion method. The negative mass density makes the anti-resonance area increased, which results in broadened band gaps greatly. Owing to the multi-cavity coupling mechanism, the local resonances of the lower frequency mainly occur in the closed cavity, while the local resonances of the higher frequency mainly in the open cavity. Upon the interaction between the negative mass density and the multi-cavity coupling, there exists two broad band gaps in the range of 0-1800 Hz, i.e. the first-order band gap from 195 Hz to 660 Hz with the bandwidth of 465 Hz and the second-order band gap from 1157 Hz to 1663 Hz with the bandwidth of 506 Hz. The acoustic metamaterials with small size presented in this paper could provide a new approach to reduce the low-frequency broadband noises.

  11. V-shaped resonators for addition of broad-area laser diode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda Y.

    2012-12-25

    A system and method for addition of broad-area semiconductor laser diode arrays are described. The system can include an array of laser diodes, a V-shaped external cavity, and grating systems to provide feedback for phase-locking of the laser diode array. A V-shaped mirror used to couple the laser diode emissions along two optical paths can be a V-shaped prism mirror, a V-shaped stepped mirror or include multiple V-shaped micro-mirrors. The V-shaped external cavity can be a ring cavity. The system can include an external injection laser to further improve coherence and phase-locking.

  12. Observation of electro-activated localized structures in broad area VCSELs

    CERN Document Server

    Parravicini, J; Columbo, L; Prati, F; Rizza, C; Tissoni, G; Agranat, A J; DelRe, E

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the electro-activation of a localized optical structure in a coherently driven broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operated below threshold. Control is achieved by electro-optically steering a writing beam through a pre-programmable switch based on a photorefractive funnel waveguide.

  13. A low-temperature external cavity diode laser for broad wavelength tuning

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias, William G.; Rosenberg, Jason S.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design and characterization of a low-temperature external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system for broad wavelength tuning. The performance achieved with multiple diode models addresses the scarcity of commercial red laser diodes below 633 nm, which is a wavelength range relevant to spectroscopy of many molecules and ions. Using a combination of multiple-stage thermoelectric cooling and water cooling, the operating temperature of a laser diode is lowered to -64{\\deg}C, more than ...

  14. Spatially nondegenerate four-wave mixing in a broad area semiconductor laser: Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Blaaberg; Tromborg, Bjarne; Petersen, P. M.

    coupled equations for the field components in the cavity and a rate equation is used to describe the carrier density of the semiconductor material. The interference pattern of the four field components inside the cavity induces a periodic spatial modulation of the carrier density and thus of the complex......We present a numerical model of spatially nondegenerate four-wave mixing in a bulk broad area semiconductor laser with an external reflector and a spatial filter. The external reflector provides a feedback with an off-aixs direction of propagation. Such a configuration has experimentally been seen...

  15. Packaging and Performance of 980nm Broad Area Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High power broad area semiconductor lasers have found increasing applications in pumping of solid state laser systems and fiber amplifiers, frequency doubling, medical systems and material processing.Packaging including the assembly design, process and thermal management, has a significant impact on the optical performance and reliability of a high power broad area laser. In this paper, we introduce the package structures and assembling process of 980nm broad area lasers and report the performances including output power, thermal behavior and far fields.We will report two types of high power broad area laser assemblies.One is a microchannel liquid cooled assembly and the other is a conduction cooled CT-mount assembly. Optical powers of 15W and 10W were achieved from a 980nm broad area laser with a 120 μ m stripe width in a microchannel liquid cooled assembly and conduction cooled CT-mount assembly, respectively.Furthermore,a high power of 6.5W out of fiber was demonstrated from a pigtailed, fully packaged butterfly-type module without TEC (Thermoelectric cooler).The measurement results showed that thermal management is the key in not only improving output power, but also significantly improving beam divergence and far field distribution.The results also showed that the die attach solder can significant impact the reliability of high power broad area lasers and that indium solder is not suitable for high power laser applications due to electromigration at high current densities and high temperatures.

  16. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  17. Measurement of Broad Absorption Features Using a Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.

    2007-09-25

    We demonstrate the use of a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system for measurement of broad absorption features in the mid-infrared spectral region. The thermoelectrically cooled external cavity laser was tuned over a 65 cm-1 range centered at 8.7 microns using stepper motor control. Pulsing the laser at a high duty cycle provided 3-5 mW average output power over the tuning range, and enabled phase-sensitive detection of amplitude-modulated signals. We used the laser system to measure the absorption spectra of Freon-125 using a Herriott cell. In addition, the absorption spectrum of water in the laboratory air was measured. The measurements showed excellent agreement with reference spectra, in both wavelength and amplitude. The measured scan resolution of 0.14 cm-1 is suitable for measurement of the absorption features of complex molecules as well as simple molecules with atmospherically broadened lines. We discuss the limits to the scan resolution due to effects of spectral chirp and mode-hops during pulsed operation.

  18. Measurement of broad absorption features using a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the use of a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system for measurement of broad absorption features in the mid-infrared spectral region. The thermoelectrically cooled external cavity laser was tuned over a 65 cm -1range centered at 8.7 microns using stepper motor control. Pulsing the laser at a high duty cycle provided 2-4.5 mW average output power over the tuning range, and enabled phase-sensitive detection of amplitude-modulated signals. We used the laser system to measure the absorption spectra of Freon-125 using a Herriott cell. In addition, the absorption spectrum of water in the laboratory air was measured. The measurements showed excellent agreement with reference spectra, in both wavelength and amplitude. The measured scan resolution of 0.14 cm -1 is suitable for measurement of the absorption features of complex molecules as well as simple molecules with atmospherically broadened lines. We discuss the limits to the scan resolution due to effects of spectral chirp and mode-hops during pulsed operation.

  19. Development of Broad Range Scan Capabilities with Jet Cooled Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, Terrance J.; Chen, Ming-Wei; Miller, Terry A.

    2011-06-01

    We have developed a technique for obtaining broad scans, >100 Cm-1, for jet cooled cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) spectra. Previously the scans of the jet cooled, CRDS apparatus were limited to <10 Cm-1 due to the use of a narrow linewidth radiation source. However, by coupling our jet cooled, CRDS apparatus with a moderate resolution (≃q 0.05 Cm-1) dye laser we are able to greatly increase our rate of data acquisition thereby gaining the capability to perform broad spectral surveys of jet cooled molecules. As a test of the capabilities of the technique we have scanned the tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition of NO_3 previously reported by Deev et al. at room temperature. We believe that this will be a very useful technique to search for transitions of cold molecules whose frequencies are not well known and which later can be studied using high resolution methods. A. Deev, J. Sommar, and M. Okumura, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 224305 (2005).

  20. Improved spectral characteristics of 980 nm broad area slotted Fabry-Perot diode lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zhuo; Wang Jun; Xiong Cong; Liu Yuanyuan; Liu Suping; Ma Xiaoyu

    2012-01-01

    A novel broad area slotted Fabry-Perot diode laser is designed and fabricated.Using a new semianalytical method,we introduce effective refractive index perturbations in the form of etched slot features into a conventional 980 nm broad area Fabry-Perot cavity,and the spectral characteristics of the device are expected to be noticeably improved.A low density of slot features is formed by using standard optical lithography and inductively coupled plasma dry etching.The experimental results show that the full spectral width at half-maximum is less than 0.4 nm,meanwhile,the thermal shift of the emission spectrum is decreased from 0.26 to 0.07 nm/℃ over a temperature range of 10 to 60 ℃.The improved spectral characteristics of the device are proved to be attributed to such slotted Fabry-Perot laser structures.

  1. A comprehensive model of catastrophic optical-damage in broad-area laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, A. K.; Bertaska, R. K.; Jaspan, M. A.; Flusberg, A. M.; Swartz, S. D.; Knapczyk, M. T.; Petr, R.; Smilanski, I.; Jacob, J. H.

    2009-02-01

    The present model of formation and propagation of catastrophic optical-damage (COD), a random failure-mode in laser diodes, was formulated in 1974 and has remained substantially unchanged. We extend the model of COD phenomena, based on analytical studies involving EBIC (electron-beam induced current), STEM (scanning transmission-electron microscopy) and sophisticated optical-measurements. We have determined that a ring-cavity mode, whose presence has not been previously reported, significantly contributes to COD initiation and propagation in broad-area laser-diodes.

  2. A low-temperature external cavity diode laser for broad wavelength tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Tobias, William G; Hutzler, Nicholas R; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design and characterization of a low-temperature external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system for broad wavelength tuning. The performance achieved with multiple diode models addresses the scarcity of commercial red laser diodes below 633 nm, which is a wavelength range relevant to spectroscopy of many molecules and ions. Using a combination of multiple-stage thermoelectric cooling and water cooling, the operating temperature of a laser diode is lowered to -64{\\deg}C, more than 85{\\deg}C below the ambient temperature. The laser system integrates temperature and diffraction grating feedback tunability for coarse and fine wavelength adjustments, respectively. For two different diode models, single-mode operation was achieved with 38 mW output power at 616.8 nm and 69 mW at 622.6 nm, more than 15 nm below their ambient temperature free-running wavelengths. The ECDL design can be used for diodes of any available wavelength, allowing individual diodes to be tuned continuously over tens of nanometers ...

  3. An electron beam-heater with a broad-area plasma cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electron-beam heater with a broad-area plasma cathode was designed for thermal treatment of large surfaces in vacuum. Using the plasma electron source of broad cross-section beams instead of a hot-cathode gun generating thin scanning beams allows simultaneous heating all the surface as well as lengthening the service life and raising the reliability of the heater. A broad-area emitting plasma surface is produced in a special electrode cavity by injection into it, through a small hole, of charged particles from a reflex discharge with cold electrodes. Such a principle of design of the plasma cathode allows to obtain an electron beam of the required current density in the pressure range of 10-2 to 1 Pa. The heater can be operated with He, Ar, air and other gases. Using a multiaperture accelerating system comprising emitting and accelerating electrodes, an electron beam up to 150 mm in diameter with an energy up to 15 keV, a current up to 0.5 A, and a nonuniformity of the cross-sectional distribution of the current density not more than +- 6% on the area of 100 cm2 could be generated. The efficiency of the heater at the accelerating voltage of 11 to 13 kV equals to about 90%. (author)

  4. High-power, low-lateral divergence broad area quantum cascade lasers with a tilted front facet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a simple technique to improve the beam quality of broad area quantum cascade lasers. Moderately tilted front facets of the laser provide suppression of higher order lateral waveguide modes. A device with a width of 60 μm and a front facet angle of 17° shows a nearly diffraction limited beam profile. In addition, the peak output power and the slope efficiency of the device are increased since most of the light inside the cavity is emitted through the tilted front facet by an asymmetric light intensity distribution along the cavity

  5. A broad area electrospray generated by a piezoelectric transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramshani, Zeinab; Johnson, Michael J.; Atashbar, Massood Z.; Go, David B.

    2016-07-01

    Electrosprays are typically formed by the application of a high (kilovolt) voltage to the flow exiting a small diameter capillary, and they have been used in applications ranging from material synthesis to spray coating because of the finely controlled plume of micron-sized droplets they produce. In this work, we report a similar but distinct spray directly off the surface of a piezoelectric transformer. Using a paper wick to deliver liquid to the surface of the piezoelectric crystal, a continuous, broad area spray is generated from the wick in contact with the transformer surface, only requiring input voltages on the order of 20 Vamp. Systematic variation of critical parameters indicate that this piezoelectric transformer-generated spray is similar to a conventional electrospray, with the spray current exhibiting a non-linear dependence on the solution conductivity, but distinct, as the spray exhibits little dependence on the solution surface tension. This innovative spray could potentially lead to uniform, large area spray coverage from a single device for a wide variety of applications.

  6. Two photon absorption in high power broad area laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Michael, Christopher P.; Zheng, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Jacob, Jonah H.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in thermal management and improvements in fabrication and facet passivation enabled extracting unprecedented optical powers from laser diodes (LDs). However, even in the absence of thermal roll-over or catastrophic optical damage (COD), the maximum achievable power is limited by optical non-linear effects. Due to its non-linear nature, two-photon absorption (TPA) becomes one of the dominant factors that limit efficient extraction of laser power from LDs. In this paper, theoretical and experimental analysis of TPA in high-power broad area laser diodes (BALD) is presented. A phenomenological optical extraction model that incorporates TPA explains the reduction in optical extraction efficiency at high intensities in BALD bars with 100μm-wide emitters. The model includes two contributions associated with TPA: the straightforward absorption of laser photons and the subsequent single photon absorption by the holes and electrons generated by the TPA process. TPA is a fundamental limitation since it is inherent to the LD semiconductor material. Therefore scaling the LDs to high power requires designs that reduce the optical intensity by increasing the mode size.

  7. Recent progress of RF cavity study at Mucool Test Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonehara, Katsuya; MTA working Group

    2013-02-01

    In order to develop an RF cavity that is applicable for a muon beam cooling channel, a new facility, called Mucool Test Area (MTA) has been built at Fermilab. MTA is a unique facility whose purpose is to test RF cavities in various conditions. There are 201 and 805 MHz high power sources, a 4-Tesla solenoid magnet, a cryogenic system including a Helium liquifier, an explosion proof apparatus to operate gaseous/liquid Hydrogen, and a beam transport line to send an intense H- beam from the Fermilab Linac accelerator to the MTA hall. Recent activities at MTA will be discussed in this document.

  8. Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area

    CERN Document Server

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2012-01-01

    In order to develop an RF cavity that is applicable for a muon beam cooling channel, a new facility, called Mucool Test Area (MTA) has been built at Fermilab. MTA is a unique facility whose purpose is to test RF cavities in various conditions. There are 201 and 805 MHz high power sources, a 4-Tesla solenoid magnet, a cryogenic system including a Helium liquifier, an explosion proof apparatus to operate gaseous/liquid Hydrogen, and a beam transport line to send an intense H- beam from the Fermilab Linac accelerator to the MTA hall. Recent activities at MTA will be discussed in this document.

  9. Broad wavelength tunability from external cavity quantum-dot mode-locked laser

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitichev, D. I.; Fedorova, K. A.; Ding, Y; Alhazime, A.; Able, A.; Kaenders, W.; Krestnikov, I; Livshits, D.; Rafailov, E.U.

    2012-01-01

    Broadband wavelength tunability over 136 nm (between 1182.5 nm and 1319 nm) of picosecond pulses in passive mode-locked regime is demonstrated in a multi-section quantum-dot laser in external cavity configuration at room temperature. The maximum peak power of 870 mW with 15 ps pulse duration was achieved at 1226 nm wavelength.

  10. Enthalpy/entropy compensation effects from cavity desolvation underpin broad ligand binding selectivity for rat odorant binding protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, Katherine L; Long, Jed; Carr, Stephen; Briand, Loïc; Winzor, Donald J; Searle, Mark S; Scott, David J

    2014-04-15

    Evolution has produced proteins with exquisite ligand binding specificity, and manipulating this effect has been the basis for much of modern rational drug design. However, there are general classes of proteins with broader ligand selectivity linked to function, the origin of which is poorly understood. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) sequester volatile molecules for transportation to the olfactory receptors. Rat OBP3, which we characterize by X-ray crystallography and NMR, binds a homologous series of aliphatic γ-lactones within its aromatic-rich hydrophobic pocket with remarkably little variation in affinity but extensive enthalpy/entropy compensation effects. We show that the binding energetics are modulated by two desolvation processes with quite different thermodynamic signatures. Ligand desolvation follows the classical hydrophobic effect; however, cavity desolvation is consistent with the liberation of "high energy" water molecules back into bulk solvent with a strong, but compensated, enthalpic contribution, which together underpin the origins of broad ligand binding selectivity.

  11. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bacteria produce acids that cause decay. Tooth pain occurs after decay reaches the inside of the tooth. Dentists can detect cavities by examining the teeth and taking x-rays periodically. Good oral hygiene and regular dental care plus a healthy diet can help prevent cavities. ...

  12. Structure, stability, and spectra of lateral modes of a broad-area semiconductor laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaaberg, Søren; Petersen, Paul Michael; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the lateral modes of a broad-area semiconductor laser. The structure of the modes are classified into four categories and the modes are traced in the frequency versus pump rate diagram. It is shown how the branches of the frequency tuning curves for the differ......We present a theoretical analysis of the lateral modes of a broad-area semiconductor laser. The structure of the modes are classified into four categories and the modes are traced in the frequency versus pump rate diagram. It is shown how the branches of the frequency tuning curves...

  13. A new approach to assymmetric feedback in a segmented broad area diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2009-01-01

    We present the demonstration of a non-critical setup for asymmetric feedback in a segmented broad area diode laser. We compare the dependence of the beam quality on the position of the dispersive element for standard spectral beam combining and our new non-critical setup. We find that our new...

  14. Experimental demonstration of phase bistability in a broad area optical oscillator with injected signal

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Lorente, R; Rolán, E; Staliunas, K; de Valcárcel, G J; Silva, F

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that a broad area laser-like optical oscillator (a nondegenerate photorefractive oscillator) with structured injected signal displays two-phase patterns. The technique (G. J. de Valc\\'arcel and K. Staliunas, Phys. Rev. Lett. (105), 054101 (2010)) consists in spatially modulating the injection, so that its phase alternates periodically between two opposite values, i.e. differing by pi

  15. Intrinsic performance-limiting instabilities in two-level class-B broad-area lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, A. V.; Molevich, N. E.; Krents, A. A.; Anchikov, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is concerned with the analytical and numerical investigation of the transverse spatio-temporal instabilities in two-level broad-area lasers for the specific class-B case. We show that the two-level class-B broad-area laser tends to naturally operate in the filamentary state. This is revealed to be provided with two causes. First of them is related with the homogeneous output profile being intrinsically unstable due to the traveling-wave instability, independently from the boundary conditions. Secondly, high sensitivity to the boundaries of the pumping region was found for the commonly used top-hat-like profile leading to boundaries-induced filamentary dynamics. Spatio-temporal properties of both instability mechanisms are studied and their effects on the resulting laser dynamical behavior are analyzed.

  16. Control of lateral divergence in high-power, broad-area photonic crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Jiamin; Xing, Enbo; Wang, Lijie; Shu, Shili; Tian, Sicong; Tong, Cunzhu; Wang, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    One-dimensional photonic bandgap crystal (PBC) lasers have demonstrated ultra-low vertical divergence and record brightness; however, their future development is limited by their lateral beam quality. In this paper, a fishbone microstructure is proposed to control the lateral modes in broad-area PBC lasers. The findings reveal that the introduction of the microstructure improves the full width at half maximum of the lateral far field by 22.2% and increases the output power to a small extent. The detailed measurements show that the lateral beam parameter product decreases by 15.9%.

  17. Two-wave mixing in a broad-area semiconductor amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, M.; Jensen, S.B.; Huignard, J.P.;

    2006-01-01

    The two-wave mixing in the broad-area semiconductor amplifier was investigated, both theoretically and experimentally. In detail we investigated how the optical gain is affected by the presence of the two-wave mixing interference grating. In the experimental setup we are able to turn on and off...... the interference pattern in the semiconductor amplifier. This arrangement allows us to determine the two-wave mixing gain. The coupled-wave equations of two-wave mixing were derived based on the Maxwell’s wave equation and rate equation of the carrier density. The analytical solutions of the coupled-wave equations...

  18. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Khedri, Zahra; Diaz, Sandra; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Varki, Ajit; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV) was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF) of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV) HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health. PMID:26816272

  19. An Open Receptor-Binding Cavity of Hemagglutinin-Esterase-Fusion Glycoprotein from Newly-Identified Influenza D Virus: Basis for Its Broad Cell Tropism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses cause seasonal flu each year and pandemics or epidemic sporadically, posing a major threat to public health. Recently, a new influenza D virus (IDV was isolated from pigs and cattle. Here, we reveal that the IDV utilizes 9-O-acetylated sialic acids as its receptor for virus entry. Then, we determined the crystal structures of hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein (HEF of IDV both in its free form and in complex with the receptor and enzymatic substrate analogs. The IDV HEF shows an extremely similar structural fold as the human-infecting influenza C virus (ICV HEF. However, IDV HEF has an open receptor-binding cavity to accommodate diverse extended glycan moieties. This structural difference provides an explanation for the phenomenon that the IDV has a broad cell tropism. As IDV HEF is structurally and functionally similar to ICV HEF, our findings highlight the potential threat of the virus to public health.

  20. Broad-area search for targets in SAR imagery with context-adaptive algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tim J.; Fairchild, Scott R.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes an ATR system based on gray scale morphology which has proven very effective in performing broad area search for targets of interest. Gray scale morphology is used to extract several distinctive sets of features which combine intensity and spatial information. Results of direct comparisons with other algorithms are presented. In a series of tests which were scored independently the morphological approach has shown superior results. An automated training systems based on a combination of genetic algorithms and classification and regression trees is described. Further performance gains are expected by allowing context sensitive selection of parameter sets for the morphological processing. Context is acquired from the image using texture measures to identify the local clutter environment. The system is designed to be able to build new classifiers on the fly to match specific image to image variations.

  1. A reflex glow discharge as a plasma source for broad area electron beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors demonstrated an electron beam generation scheme in which two glow discharge electron guns are used in a reflex configuration to create a dense and cold plasma in a large volume. The thermal electrons from this plasma, created mainly by electron beam ionization, are subsequently accelerated in the gap between two grids by an externally applied electric field to produce a broad area electron beam. This electron beam current density and energy are independently controlled by the voltage applied to the glow discharge guns and by the electric field sustained between the grids respectively. They present a schematic representation of the electron gun used in the experimental demonstration of the concept reported here

  2. Rational Chebyshev spectral transform for the dynamics of broad-area laser diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manuscript details the use of the rational Chebyshev transform for describing the transverse dynamics of broad-area laser diodes and amplifiers. This spectral method can be used in combination with the delay algebraic equations approach developed in [1], which substantially reduces the computation time. The theory is presented in such a way that it encompasses the case of the Fourier spectral transform presented in [2] as a particular case. It is also extended to the consideration of index guiding with an arbitrary transverse profile. Because their domain of definition is infinite, the convergence properties of the Chebyshev rational functions allow handling the boundary conditions with higher accuracy than with the previously studied Fourier transform method. As practical examples, we solve the beam propagation problem with and without index guiding: we obtain excellent results and an improvement of the integration time between one and two orders of magnitude as compared with a fully distributed two dimensional model

  3. Improvement of the beam quality of a diode laser with two active broad-area segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Thestrup, B.; Mortensen, J.L.;

    2003-01-01

    The beam quality of a diode laser with two active segments was improved using an external cavity with collimating optics, a grating, and an output coupler. The beam quality of the output beam, which is the first-order diffractive beam from the grating, was improved by a factor of 2, and at least...... half of the freely running power of the laser was coupled out from the external cavity. The output power can be enhanced further by the feedback from the zeroth-order beam. The possibility of improving the beam quality further is discussed and a new double-external-cavity configuration is suggested....

  4. Brilliant high-power diode lasers based on broad area lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, V.; Koesters, A.; Koenig, H.; Strauss, U.

    2008-02-01

    Within the German national research project "Briolas" Osram Semiconductors and Laserline GmbH cooperated in the subproject "Brilasi" which focused mainly on Brilliant Laser Diodes for Industrial Applications. The project was finished in December 2007 and lasted more than three years. Laserline and Osram are investigating the performance of broad area diode lasers with a bar width from 1.0 to 10.0 mm in high brilliance diode laser beam sources. Within the program different fibre coupled laser sources are built up: 1. Fibre coupled diode laser beam source with a Beam Parameter Product (BBP) of 40 mmxmrad built from diode laser bars with 10 mm bar width. 2. Fibre coupled diode laser beam source with a BBP of 20 mmxmrad built from Mini-Bars with a bar width of 3.0 mm and 8 emitters. These Different solutions are characterized regarding the electro optical performance. The laser output characteristics are determined for the diode laser device as well as the complete beam source. Lifetime tests are conducted to determine the long term stability of the prototypes and the different chip material.

  5. Design, fabrication and test of Load Bearing multilayer insulation to support a broad area cooled shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, S. A.; Johnson, W. L.; Plachta, D. W.; Mills, G. L.; Buchanan, L.; Kopelove, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    Improvements in cryogenic propellant storage are needed to achieve reduced or Zero Boil Off of cryopropellants, critical for long duration missions. Techniques for reducing heat leak into cryotanks include using passive multi-layer insulation (MLI) and vapor cooled or actively cooled thermal shields. Large scale shields cannot be supported by tank structural supports without heat leak through the supports. Traditional MLI also cannot support shield structural loads, and separate shield support mechanisms add significant heat leak. Quest Thermal Group and Ball Aerospace, with NASA SBIR support, have developed a novel Load Bearing multi-layer insulation (LBMLI) capable of self-supporting thermal shields and providing high thermal performance. We report on the development of LBMLI, including design, modeling and analysis, structural testing via vibe and acoustic loading, calorimeter thermal testing, and Reduced Boil-Off (RBO) testing on NASA large scale cryotanks. LBMLI uses the strength of discrete polymer spacers to control interlayer spacing and support the external load of an actively cooled shield and external MLI. Structural testing at NASA Marshall was performed to beyond maximum launch profiles without failure. LBMLI coupons were thermally tested on calorimeters, with superior performance to traditional MLI on a per layer basis. Thermal and structural tests were performed with LBMLI supporting an actively cooled shield, and comparisons are made to the performance of traditional MLI and thermal shield supports. LBMLI provided a 51% reduction in heat leak per layer over a previously tested traditional MLI with tank standoffs, a 38% reduction in mass, and was advanced to TRL5. Active thermal control using LBMLI and a broad area cooled shield offers significant advantages in total system heat flux, mass and structural robustness for future Reduced Boil-Off and Zero Boil-Off cryogenic missions with durations over a few weeks.

  6. Large area buried nanopatterning by broad ion implantation without any mask or direct writing

    OpenAIRE

    Karmakar, Prasanta; Satpati, Biswarup

    2013-01-01

    We have introduced here a simple, single step and cost effective broad ion beam technique for preparation of nanoscale electronic, magnetic, optical and mechanical devices without the need of resist, mask, or focused electron and ion beams. In this approach, broad beam ion implantation of desired atom on a prefabricated ion beam patterned surface promotes site selective deposition by adjusting the local angle of ion implantation. We show that implantation of Fe ions on an O+ induced pre fabri...

  7. Monolithic integration of MQW wavelength tunable DBR lasers with external cavity electroabsorption modulators by selective-area MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Robert M.; Smith, Gary M.; Hughes, J. S.; Osowski, Mark L.; Jones, A. M.; Coleman, James J.

    1997-01-01

    The design and operation of multiple-quantum well (MQW) wavelength tunable distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers with nonabsorbing gratings and monolithically integrated external cavity electroabsorption modulators fabricated by selective-area metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) are presented. Uncoated devices exhibit cw threshold currents as low as 10.5 mA with slope efficiencies of 0.21 W/A from the laser facet and 0.06 W/A from the modulator facet. After the application of facet coatings, slope efficiencies from the modulator facet increase to 0.14 W/A. Wavelength tuning of 7 nm is obtained by injection current heating of the DBR section. These devices exhibit extinction ratios of 18 dB from the modulator facet at a low modulator bias of 1 V, when measured with a broad-area detector. When coupled to a singlemode fiber, these devices exhibit high extinction ratios of 40 dB at a modulator bias of 1.25 V. Photo-generated current versus optical power plots indicate that the extinction ratios are not limited by carrier build- up in the modulator quantum wells.

  8. An alternative hypothesis for sink development above salt cavities in the Detroit area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Daniel; Nieto, A.S.; Ege, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Subsidence and sink formation resulting from brining operations in the Windsor-Detroit area include the 1954 sink at the Canadian Salt Company brine field near Windsor, Ontario, and the 1971 sinks at the BASF Wyandotte Corporation brine field at Grosse Ile, Mich. Earlier investigations into both occurrences concluded that the mechanism of sink development consisted of the gradual stoping of poorly supported brine-gallery roof rock to the near surface with subsequent surface collapse. A more recent study attempted to describe the mechanism of sink development in terms of the geometry of a cylindrical chimney formed by stoping of roof rock, the height of a cavity at depth, the depth of overlying rock, and the bulking ratio of the rubble formed during stoping. Persons with extensive experience in solution mining in the Windsor-Detroit area have expressed doubt that the stoping mechanism could fully explain the development of these sinks. Further, they have proposed that the relatively shallow (300-ft-deep) Sylvania Sandstone, in this case, may be responsible for the sinks by a secondary undermining mechanism to be examined in this paper. The mechanism involves downwarping of the beds overlying the salt cavity and development of a shallower cavity in the Sylvania Sandstone by downward migration of cohesionless sand grains from the Sylvania through openings in the disturbed rock to the lower cavity. This study indicates that under natural conditions the Sylvania will not migrate, even in the presence of large underground water flows because the sandstone possesses some cohesion throughout its depth. However, further investigation has formulated a mechanism that could allow the Sylvania Sandstone to loose its cohesion in response to high horizontal stresses. These stresses could be the result of deformation that accompanies general subsidence and (or) of past geologic processes. Included in this study were experimental and analytical investigations. As determined by

  9. Near-diffraction-limited segmented broad area diode laser based on off-axis spectral beam combining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, O.B.; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Andersen, Peter E.;

    2006-01-01

    The beam quality of a 500-mu m-wide broad area diode laser with five active segments has been improved beyond the beam quality of the individual segments. The principle of this new laser system is based on off-axis feedback in combination with spectral beam combining. By using a double......-feedback scheme we are able to improve the beam quality of the laser by a factor of 23 from M-2 = 55 for the free-running diode laser to M-2 = 2.4 for the laser with feedback at a drive current of 2.2 A. The improved M-2 value is a factor of 3.4 below M-2 = 8.2 for a single free-running segment. This is the first...... time that the beam quality of a segmented broad area diode laser has been improved beyond the beam quality of the individual segments....

  10. Current models broadly neglect specific needs of biodiversity conservation in protected areas under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloney Kirk A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protected areas are the most common and important instrument for the conservation of biological diversity and are called for under the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity. Growing human population densities, intensified land-use, invasive species and increasing habitat fragmentation threaten ecosystems worldwide and protected areas are often the only refuge for endangered species. Climate change is posing an additional threat that may also impact ecosystems currently under protection. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to include the potential impact of climate change when designing future nature conservation strategies and implementing protected area management. This approach would go beyond reactive crisis management and, by necessity, would include anticipatory risk assessments. One avenue for doing so is being provided by simulation models that take advantage of the increase in computing capacity and performance that has occurred over the last two decades. Here we review the literature to determine the state-of-the-art in modeling terrestrial protected areas under climate change, with the aim of evaluating and detecting trends and gaps in the current approaches being employed, as well as to provide a useful overview and guidelines for future research. Results Most studies apply statistical, bioclimatic envelope models and focus primarily on plant species as compared to other taxa. Very few studies utilize a mechanistic, process-based approach and none examine biotic interactions like predation and competition. Important factors like land-use, habitat fragmentation, invasion and dispersal are rarely incorporated, restricting the informative value of the resulting predictions considerably. Conclusion The general impression that emerges is that biodiversity conservation in protected areas could benefit from the application of modern modeling approaches to a greater extent than is currently reflected in the

  11. Minimum sampling area and a biodiversity of riparian broad-leaved/Korean pine forest in Erdaobaihe forested watershed, Changbai Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Riparian zone is an important component of forested watershed. Species component, structure, and distribution pattern of plant community in riparian zone are different from those of forest far away from the riparian zone because of edge effect and influence of river, and their minimum sampling areas are also different. To study the minimum area and a biodiversity of broad-leaved/Korean pine forest in riparian zone, three 8 m × 32 m sampling belts were selected and distributed at elevation of 800 m, 900 m, and 1000 m. In the riparian broad-leaved/Korean pine forest, mean minimum sampling areas including 60%, 80%, and 90% of total species were 80 m2 (8 m×10 m), 180 m2 (12 m×15 m), and 320 m2 (16 m × 20 m) respectively; The corresponding mean minimum areas of non-riparian forest were about 260 m2, 380 m2, and 480 m2; and the former were smaller than the latter. In the riparian zone, species richness, Shannon-Weiner index and species evenness were also higher than those in non-riparian forest. On the contrary, species dominance in forest community was higher than that in riparian zone.

  12. [Measurement of the wound cavity area by means of PC based planimetry. The method and observer variations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J; Dahlin, J

    1993-03-01

    A method for wound area measurement is presented. A wound cavity was cut in a chine of pork. A thin PVC plastic film was applied closely to the entire wound cavity surface and a line was drawn close to the cutaneous border with a marker pen. The film was then placed on a system of coordinates and coordinates were determined and entered into a PC-programme which calculated the area. No significant intra-or inter-observer variation appeared on analyses of variance between five observers each of whom performed three consecutive measurements (p > 0.2). Thus, employment of the method for clinical purposes seems feasible.

  13. Broad Band Optical Properties of Large Area Monolayer CVD Molybdenum Disulfide

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; Birdwell, A. Glen; Amani, Matin; Burke, Robert A.; Ling, Xi; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Liang, Xuelei; Peng, Lianmao; Richter, Curt A.; Kong, Jing; Gundlach, David J.; Nguyen, N.V.

    2014-01-01

    Recently emerging large-area single-layer MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition has triggered great interest due to its exciting potential for applications in advanced electronic and optoelectronic devices. Unlike gapless graphene, MoS2 has an intrinsic band gap in the visible which crosses over from an indirect to a direct gap when reduced to a single atomic layer. In this article, we report a comprehensive study of fundamental optical properties of MoS2 revealed by optical spectroscopy of...

  14. 20 000 h reliable operation of 100 µm stripe width 650 nm broad area lasers at more than 1.1 W output power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability tests for highly efficient high-power 650 nm broad area diode lasers will be presented. The devices have a 5 nm thick single GaInP quantum well as an active layer, which is embedded in AlGaInP waveguide layers and n-AlInP and p-AlGaAs cladding layers. The devices with a stripe width of 100 µm and a cavity length of 1.5 mm were soldered on diamond submounts and mounted on standard C-mounts for an efficient heat removal. The test was performed at a temperature of 15 °C over a first period of 10 000 h at 1.1 W followed by a second period of 10 000 h at 1.2 W. Based on the aging test and assuming a 60% confidence level, the lower limit of the mean time to failure of 87 000 h was determined for the devices

  15. Gain-guided broad area quantum cascade lasers emitting 23.5 W peak power at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergachev, Ilia; Maulini, Richard; Bismuto, Alfredo; Blaser, Stephane; Gresch, Tobias; Muller, Antoine

    2016-08-22

    We report gain-guided broad area quantum cascade lasers at 4.55 μm. The devices were processed in a buried heterostructure configuration with a current injector section much narrower than the active region. They demonstrate 23.5 W peak power at a temperature of 20°C and duty cycle of 1%, while their far field consists of a single symmetric lobe centered on the optical axis. These experimental results are supported well by 2D numerical simulations of electric currents and optical fields in a device cross-section. PMID:27557186

  16. Improvement of the beam quality of a broad-area diode laser using double feedback from two external mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, M.; Bøgh, A.-S.; Thestrup, B.;

    2004-01-01

    In this letter, a symmetric double-feedback configuration, to improve the beam quality of broad-area diode lasers is demonstrated. With this configuration, a symmetric double-lobed far field can be obtained, and this configuration leads to good beam quality. The beam quality factor M-2 of a diode...... laser with the emitting area 1 mumx200 mum is improved by using both the asymmetric single feedback and the symmetric double feedback. M-2 values of 4.3 for the asymmetric single-feedback laser system and 3.3 for the symmetric double-feedback laser system are obtained, whereas the M-2 value...... of the freely running laser is 42. The far and the near fields are also measured and compared for the three conditions. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Nonlinear gain amplification due to two-wave mixing in a broad-area semiconductor amplifier with moving gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Huignard, J.-P.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2008-01-01

    equations of two-wave mixing are derived based on the Maxwell’s wave equation and rate equation of the carrier density. The analytical solutions of the coupled-wave equations are obtained in the condition of small signal when the total intensity is far below the saturation intensity of the amplifier......The two-wave mixing in a broad-area semiconductor amplifier with moving gratings is investigated theoretically, where a pump beam and a signal beam with different frequencies are considered, thus both a moving phase grating and a moving gain grating are induced in the amplifier. The coupled-wave...... or decrease due to the two-wave mixing. © 2008 Optical Society of America...

  18. Site specific isolated nanostructure array formation on a large area by broad ion beam without any mask and resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Prasanta; Satpati, Biswarup

    2014-06-01

    We report the formation of isolated nanostructure arrays on a large area via broad ion beam implantation without the aid of any mask or resist. Desired ions have been implanted at specific locations of the prefabricated silicon ripple or triangular structures by exploiting the variation of local ion impact angles. We have shown that the implantation of Fe ions on an O+ ions induced pre fabricated triangular shaped patterned Si surface results in a self-organized periodic array of striped magnetic nanostructures having several micron length and about 50 nm width arranged with a spacial separation of ˜200 nm. The morphology, composition, crystalline structure, and magnetic property of these nanopatterns have been analyzed using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. A geometrical model has been proposed to explain the fundamental features of such ion-induced nanopattern structures.

  19. Site specific isolated nanostructure array formation on a large area by broad ion beam without any mask and resist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the formation of isolated nanostructure arrays on a large area via broad ion beam implantation without the aid of any mask or resist. Desired ions have been implanted at specific locations of the prefabricated silicon ripple or triangular structures by exploiting the variation of local ion impact angles. We have shown that the implantation of Fe ions on an O+ ions induced pre fabricated triangular shaped patterned Si surface results in a self-organized periodic array of striped magnetic nanostructures having several micron length and about 50 nm width arranged with a spacial separation of ∼200 nm. The morphology, composition, crystalline structure, and magnetic property of these nanopatterns have been analyzed using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. A geometrical model has been proposed to explain the fundamental features of such ion-induced nanopattern structures.

  20. High pressure gas filled RF cavity beam test at the Fermilab Mucool test area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemire, Ben

    With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built. As part of the accelerator, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated within a short amount of time. Muons are generated with a huge phase space, so radio frequency cavities placed in strong magnetic fields are required to bunch, focus, and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary. To successfully operate RF cavities in strong magnetic fields, the cavity can be filled with a high pressure gas in order to mitigate breakdown. The gas has the added benefit of providing cooling for the beam. The electron-ion plasma created in the cavity by the beam absorbs energy and degrades the accelerating electric field of the cavity. As electrons account for the majority of the energy loss in the cavity, their removal in a short time is highly desirable. The addition of an electronegative dopant gas can greatly decrease the lifetime of an electron in the cavity. Measurements in pure hydrogen of the energy consumption of electrons in the cavity range in 10-18 and 10-16 joules per RF cycle per electron. When hydrogen doped with dry air is used, measurements of the power consumption indicate an energy loss range of 10-20 to 10-18 joules per RF cycle per ion, two orders of magnitude improvement over non-doped measurements. The lifetime of electrons in a mixture of hydrogen gas and dry air has been measured from < 1 ns, up to 200 ns. The results extrapolated to the parameters of a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider indicate that a high pressure gas filled RF

  1. Cavity Solitons in VCSEL Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barbay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We review advances on the experimental study of cavity solitons in VCSELs in the past decade. We emphasize on the design and fabrication of electrically or optically pumped broad-area VCSELs used for CSs formation and review different experimental configurations. Potential applications of CSs in the field of photonics are discussed, in particular the use of CSs for all-optical processing of information and for VCSELs characterization. Prospects on self-localization studies based on vertical cavity devices involving new physical mechanisms are also given.

  2. Highly efficient broad-area blue and white light-emitting diodes on bulk GaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vampola, Kenneth J.; Fellows, Natalie N.; Masui, Hisashi; Chung, Roy B.; Sato, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Junichi; Hirasawa, Hirohiko; Iza, Michael; Nakamura, Shuji [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California (United States); Brinkley, Stuart E.; Furukawa, Motoko [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California (United States); DenBaars, Steven P. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California (United States)]|[Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Highly efficient light emitting diodes (LEDs) with peak emission wavelengths of nominally 450 nm were grown, fabricated and tested. The growth was performed by metal organic chemical vapour deposition. The LEDs were grown on c-plane (0001) bulk GaN substrates and fabricated into broad-area devices with active area 0.01 cm{sup 2}. Considerations were made to improve extraction efficiency, including transparent contacts, suspended mirror-less packaging and encapsulation in a truncated pyramid optic. These factors resulted in LEDs with high peak external quantum efficiency and reduced efficiency droop. The output power and external quantum efficiency at 20 mA were 38.5 mW and 68.9%. At 100 mA, they were 170 mW and 60.9%. White LEDs were fabricated by application of a yellow phosphor to the blue LEDs. The white LED luminous flux and efficacy at 20 mA was 9.6 lm and 128 lm/W. The chromaticity coordinates and correlated colour temperature were (0.348 K, 0.378 K) and 4998 K. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Small-scale area effect on species richness and nesting occupancy of cavity-nesting bees and wasps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael D. Loyola

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale area effect on species richness and nesting occupancy of cavity-nesting bees and wasps. The research was conducted in an urban forest remnant in southeast Brazil. We tested the predictions of the following hypotheses: (1 larger areas present higher species richness of bees and wasps, (2 solitary bees and wasps occupy more nests in larger areas, (3 rare species occupy more nests in smaller areas. We sampled Aculeate bees and wasps using trap nests from February to November 2004. We placed trap nests in sampling units (SU with different size (25, 100 and 400 m² located in 6 ha of secondary mesophytic forest. One hundred and thirty-seven trap nests were occupied by seven species of bees and four species of wasps. We found an increase in wasp, but not bee species richness following increase in SU size. Hymenoptera richness (i.e. bees plus wasps was also greater in larger SU. Both the number and density of occupied nests increased with SU size. The wasp Trypoxylon lactitarse responded significantly to area size, larger SU having more occupied nests. The same pattern was exhibited by the wasp Auplopus militaris, the Megachile bee species, and the bee Anthodioctes megachiloides. Only Trypoxylon sp. was not affected by SU size. Our results show that cavity-nesting bee and wasps respond differently to the area effects. Such findings must be complemented by information on the frequency and dynamics of area colonization and nest occupancy by species of solitary Hymenoptera.

  4. Application of a process-based shallow landslide hazard model over a broad area in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Eleonora; Speranza, Gabriella; Ferretti, Maurizio; Godt, Jonathan W.; Baum, Rex L.; Marincioni, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Process-based models are widely used for rainfall-induced shallow landslide forecasting. Previous studies have successfully applied the U.S. Geological Survey’s Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability (TRIGRS) model (Baum et al. 2002) to compute infiltration-driven changes in the hillslopes’ factor of safety on small scales (i.e., tens of square kilometers). Soil data input for such models are difficult to obtain across larger regions. This work describes a novel methodology for the application of TRIGRS over broad areas with relatively uniform hydrogeological properties. The study area is a 550-km2 region in Central Italy covered by post-orogenic Quaternary sediments. Due to the lack of field data, we assigned mechanical and hydrological property values through a statistical analysis based on literature review of soils matching the local lithologies. We calibrated the model using rainfall data from 25 historical rainfall events that triggered landslides. We compared the variation of pressure head and factor of safety with the landslide occurrence to identify the best fitting input conditions. Using calibrated inputs and a soil depth model, we ran TRIGRS for the study area. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, comparing the model’s output with a shallow landslide inventory, shows that TRIGRS effectively simulated the instability conditions in the post-orogenic complex during historical rainfall scenarios. The implication of this work is that rainfall-induced landslides over large regions may be predicted by a deterministic model, even where data on geotechnical and hydraulic properties as well as temporal changes in topography or subsurface conditions are not available.

  5. Integrated exploration strategy for locating areas capable of high gas rate cavity completion in coalbed methane reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klawitter, A.L.; Hoak, T.E.; Decker, A.D.

    1995-10-01

    In 1993, the San Juan Basin accounted for approximately 605 Bcf of the 740 Bcf of all coalbed gas produced in the United States. The San Juan {open_quotes}cavitation fairway{close_quotes} in which production occurs in open-hole cavity completions, is responsible for over 60% of all U.S. coalbed methane production. Perhaps most striking is the fact that over 17,000 wells had penetrated the Fruitland formation in the San Juan Basin prior to recognition of the coalbed methan potential. To understand the dynamic cavity fairway reservoir in the San Juan Basin, an exploration rationale for coalbed methan was developed that permits a sequential reduction in total basin exploration area based on four primary exploration criteria. One of the most significant criterion is the existence of thick, thermally mature, friable coals. A second criterion is the existence of fully gas-charged coals. Evaluation of this criterion requires reservoir geochemical data to delineate zones of meteoric influx where breaching has occurred. A third criterion is the presence of adequate reservoir permeability. Natural fracturing in coals is due to cleating and tectonic processes. Because of the general relationship between coal cleating and coal rank, coal cleating intensity can be estimated by analysis of regional coal rank maps. The final criterion is determining whether natural fractures are open or closed. To make this determination, remote sensing imagery interpretation is supported by ancillary data compiled from regional tectonic studies. Application of these four criteria to the San Juan Basin in a heuristic, stepwise process resulted in an overall 94% reduction in total basin exploration area. Application of the first criterion reduced the total basin exploration area by 80%. Application of the second criterion further winnows this area by an addition 9%. Application of the third criterion reduces the exploration area to 6% of the total original exploration area.

  6. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  7. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  8. Subsurface Determination Of Cavities In Limestone Rock Area By Geoelectric Method In Tinapan Village Todanan Blora District Central Java Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Santoso

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two Dimensional of geoelectric method can be used to find out the conductive formation in the earth surface. The purpose of this research is to give the description about the geological subsurface formation, that the high resistivity value is indicate the potential area of cave and void in the limestone rocks. The dipole dipolegeoelectric method is used in this research with the path of lines is 250 m with 10 m electrode spacing. The total lines is 7 and the azimuth is from east to west. Resistivity method is started with inject the electrical current into the earth by current electrode, then potential difference will arise and measured by potential electrode. Variation value of resistance for each layer rock can calculated by divided potential defference with current value. The existence of the cavity is known by the resistivity value is more than 2500 ohm-m, while the cracks have a resistivity of 1500 to 2500 ohm-m

  9. A Novel Passive Millimeter Imager for Broad-Area Search - Final Report on Project PL09-NPMI-PD07 (PNNL-55180)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kelly, James F.; Sheen, David M.; Harris, Robert V.; Hall, Thomas E.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Knopik, Clint D.; Lechelt, Wayne M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Mendoza, Albert; Severtsen, Ronald H.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2011-12-31

    This report describes research and development efforts toward a novel passive millimeter-wave (mm-wave) electromagnetic imaging device for broad-area search. It addresses the technical challenge of detecting anomalies that occupy a small fraction of a pixel. The purpose of the imager is to pinpoint suspicious locations for cuing subsequent higher-resolution imaging. The technical basis for the approach is to exploit thermal and polarization anomalies that distinguish man-made features from natural features.

  10. Theory of mind broad and narrow: reasoning about social exchange engages ToM areas, precautionary reasoning does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermer, Elsa; Guerin, Scott A; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John; Miller, Michael B

    2006-01-01

    Baron-Cohen (1995) proposed that the theory of mind (ToM) inference system evolved to promote strategic social interaction. Social exchange--a form of co-operation for mutual benefit--involves strategic social interaction and requires ToM inferences about the contents of other individuals' mental states, especially their desires, goals, and intentions. There are behavioral and neuropsychological dissociations between reasoning about social exchange and reasoning about equivalent problems tapping other, more general content domains. It has therefore been proposed that social exchange behavior is regulated by social contract algorithms: a domain-specific inference system that is functionally specialized for reasoning about social exchange. We report an fMRI study using the Wason selection task that provides further support for this hypothesis. Precautionary rules share so many properties with social exchange rules--they are conditional, deontic, and involve subjective utilities--that most reasoning theories claim they are processed by the same neurocomputational machinery. Nevertheless, neuroimaging shows that reasoning about social exchange activates brain areas not activated by reasoning about precautionary rules, and vice versa. As predicted, neural correlates of ToM (anterior and posterior temporal cortex) were activated when subjects interpreted social exchange rules, but not precautionary rules (where ToM inferences are unnecessary). We argue that the interaction between ToM and social contract algorithms can be reciprocal: social contract algorithms requires ToM inferences, but their functional logic also allows ToM inferences to be made. By considering interactions between ToM in the narrower sense (belief-desire reasoning) and all the social inference systems that create the logic of human social interaction--ones that enable as well as use inferences about the content of mental states--a broader conception of ToM may emerge: a computational model embodying

  11. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M., E-mail: razeghi@eecs.northwestern.edu [Center for Quantum Devices, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  12. Assessing the influence of the vertical epitaxial layer design on the lateral beam quality of high-power broad area diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterfeldt, M.; Rieprich, J.; Knigge, S.; Maaßdorf, A.; Hempel, M.; Kernke, R.; Tomm, J. W.; Erbert, G.; Crump, P.

    2016-03-01

    GaAs-based high-power broad-area diode lasers deliver optical output powers Popt > 10W with efficiency > 60%. However, their application is limited due to poor in-plane beam parameter product BPPlat=0.25×Θ95%×w95% (Θ95% and w95% are emission angle and aperture, 95% power content). We present experimental investigations on λ = 9xx nm broad area lasers that aim to identify regulating factors of the BPPlat connected to the epitaxial layer design. First, we assess the thermal lens of vertical designs with varying asymmetry, using thermal camera images to determine its strength. Under study are an extreme-double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structure and a reference (i.e. more symmetric) design. The lateral thermal profiles clearly show that BPPlat increase is correlated to the bowing of the thermal lens. The latter is derived out of a quadratic temperature fit in the active region beneath the current injection of the laser device and depends on the details of the epitaxial layers. Second, we test the benefit of low modal gain factor Γg0, predicted to improve BPPlat via a suppression of filamentation. EDAS-based lasers with single quantum well (SQW) and double quantum well (DQW) active regions were compared, with 2.5x reduced Γg0, for 2.2x reduced filament gain. However, no difference is seen in measured BPPlat, giving evidence that filamentary processes are no longer a limit. In contrast, devices with lower Γg0 demonstrate an up to twofold reduced near field modulation depth, potentially enabling higher facet loads and increased device facet reliability, when operated near to the COD limit.

  13. A GIS-based methodology to quantitatively define an Adjacent Protected Area in a shallow karst cavity: the case of Altamira cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elez, J; Cuezva, S; Fernandez-Cortes, A; Garcia-Anton, E; Benavente, D; Cañaveras, J C; Sanchez-Moral, S

    2013-03-30

    Different types of land use are usually present in the areas adjacent to many shallow karst cavities. Over time, the increasing amount of potentially harmful matter and energy, of mainly anthropic origin or influence, that reaches the interior of a shallow karst cavity can modify the hypogeal ecosystem and increase the risk of damage to the Palaeolithic rock art often preserved within the cavity. This study proposes a new Protected Area status based on the geological processes that control these matter and energy fluxes into the Altamira cave karst system. Analysis of the geological characteristics of the shallow karst system shows that direct and lateral infiltration, internal water circulation, ventilation, gas exchange and transmission of vibrations are the processes that control these matter and energy fluxes into the cave. This study applies a comprehensive methodological approach based on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to establish the area of influence of each transfer process. The stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the interior of the cave were determined using 3D Laser Scanning topography combined with classical field work, data gathering, cartography and a porosity-permeability analysis of host rock samples. As a result, it was possible to determine the hydrogeological behavior of the cave. In addition, by mapping and modeling the surface parameters it was possible to identify the main features restricting hydrological behavior and hence direct and lateral infiltration into the cave. These surface parameters included the shape of the drainage network and a geomorphological and structural characterization via digital terrain models. Geological and geomorphological maps and models integrated into the GIS environment defined the areas involved in gas exchange and ventilation processes. Likewise, areas that could potentially transmit vibrations directly into the cave were identified. This study shows that it is possible to define a

  14. Variability in radial sap flux density patterns and sapwood area among seven co-occurring temperate broad-leaved tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Tobias; Horna, Viviana; Leuschner, Christoph

    2008-12-01

    Forest transpiration estimates are frequently based on xylem sap flux measurements in the outer sections of the hydro-active stem sapwood. We used Granier's constant-heating technique with heating probes at various xylem depths to analyze radial patterns of sap flux density in the sapwood of seven broad-leaved tree species differing in wood density and xylem structure. Study aims were to (1) compare radial sap flux density profiles between diffuse- and ring-porous trees and (2) analyze the relationship between hydro-active sapwood area and stem diameter. In all investigated species except the diffuse-porous beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and ring-porous ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.), sap flux density peaked at a depth of 1 to 4 cm beneath the cambium, revealing a hump-shaped curve with species-specific slopes. Beech and ash reached maximum sap flux densities immediately beneath the cambium in the youngest annual growth rings. Experiments with dyes showed that the hydro-active sapwood occupied 70 to 90% of the stem cross-sectional area in mature trees of diffuse-porous species, whereas it occupied only about 21% in ring-porous ash. Dendrochronological analyses indicated that vessels in the older sapwood may remain functional for 100 years or more in diffuse-porous species and for up to 27 years in ring-porous ash. We conclude that radial sap flux density patterns are largely dependent on tree species, which may introduce serious bias in sap-flux-derived forest transpiration estimates, if non-specific sap flux profiles are assumed.

  15. Flattop mode shaping of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser using an external-cavity aspheric mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhaohui; Leger, James

    2004-11-01

    Both square-shaped and circular-shaped flattop modes were experimentally demonstrated in extended-cavity broad-area VCSELs using aspheric feedback mirrors. These refractive aspheric mirrors were fabricated by electron-beam lithography on curved substrates. Excellent single-mode operation and improved power extraction efficiency were observed. The three-mirror structure of the VCSEL and the state-of-the-art fabrication of the aspheric mirror contribute to the superior VCSEL performance. The modal loss analysis using a rigid three-mirror-cavity simulation method is discussed. PMID:19484117

  16. Resonant cavity Vircator driven by a thermionic cathode electron beam gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, R. [Texas Instrument, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A resonant cavity Vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) driven by an electron beam emitted from a broad area thermionic cathode has been tested at Textron Defense Systems. Narrow bandwidth (1.0 MHz at the {minus}3 dB level) excitation of the TM{sub 0.23} mode of a cylindrical resonant cavity was observed at a frequency of 986 MHz with a pulse length of 1.2 {mu}s. The single cavity mode excitation is attributed to the constant voltage and current electron beam emitted form the thermionic cathode.

  17. Hydroforming of Elliptical Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    W. Singer; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area ...

  18. Two-Photon Cavity Solitons in Active Optical Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that broad-area cascade lasers with no absorbing intracavity elements support the spontaneous formation of two-dimensional bright localized structures in a dark background. These cavity solitons consist of islands of two-photon emission embedded in a background of single-photon emission. We discuss the mechanisms through which these structures are formed and interact, along with their properties and stability

  19. Cavity detection and delineation research. Part 4: Microgravimetric survey: Manatee Springs Site, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D. K.; Whitten, C. B.; Smith, F. L.

    1983-03-01

    Results of a microgravimetric survey at Manatee Springs, Levy County, Fla., are presented. The survey area was 100 by 400 ft, with 20-ft gravity station spacing, and with the long dimension of the area approximately perpendicular to the known trend of the main cavity. The main cavity is about 80 to 100 ft below the surface and has a cross section about 16 to 20 ft in height and 30 to 40 ft in width beneath the survey area. Using a density contrast of -1.3 g/cucm, the gravity anomaly is calculated to be -35 micro Gal with a width at half maximum of 205 ft. The microgravimetric survey results clearly indicate a broad negative anomaly coincident with the location and trend of the cavity system across the survey area. The anomaly magnitude and width are consistent with those calculated from the known depth and dimensions of the main cavity. In addition, a small, closed negative anomaly feature, superimposed on the broad negative feature due to the main cavity, satisfactorily delineated a small secondary cavity feature which was discovered and mapped by cave divers.

  20. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  1. Cavity magnomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  2. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to cavities. Treatment may involve: Fillings Crowns Root canals Dentists fill teeth by removing the decayed tooth ... gold, porcelain, or porcelain attached to metal. A root canal is recommended if the nerve in a tooth ...

  3. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  4. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, P.

    2015-02-01

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV /m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV /m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30 - 35 MV /m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV /m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc=30 - 35 MV /m . One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have been

  5. Development of a cavity enhanced aerosol albedometer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, W.; Xu, X.; Dong, M.; Chen, W.; X. Gu; Hu, C; Huang, Y.; Gao, X; Huang, W.; Zhang, W

    2014-01-01

    We report on the development of a cavity enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach and an integrating sphere (IS) for simultaneous in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients in the exact same sample volume. The cavity enhanced albedometer employed a blue light-emitting diode (LED) based IBBCEAS approach for the measurement of wavelength-resolv...

  6. Leaf area expansion and dry matter accumulation during establishment of broad bean and sorghum at different temperatures and soil water contents in two types of soil in mediterranean Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, José; Abreu, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Crop establishment is a major factor determining crop productivity in the field and is strongly controlled by soil temperature and soil moisture. Fast leaf expansion and dry matter accumulation during crop establishment are required for an adequate establishment. Leaf area expansion and accumulation of dry matter during the establishment of broad bean (Vicia faba L.) and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare L.) were studied at different soil temperatures and soil moisture contents in a Vertisol (Lisbo...

  7. Continuous bottom temperature measurements in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract at the Broad Creek site, 2006 - 2007 (NODC Accession 0039880)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to document bottom seawater temperature in strategic areas of the Florida Reef Tract on a continuing basis and make that information...

  8. The world's high background natural radiation areas (HBNRAs) revisited: A broad overview of the dosimetric, epidemiological and radiobiological issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The residents of the world's high background natural radiation areas (HBNRAs), such as Ramsar (in Iran), Guarapari (in Brazil), Orissa and Kerala (in India) and Yangjiang (in China) have lived in these areas for generations under extraordinary radiation fields. The failure of earlier epidemiological studies to report any substantial increase in cancer incidence in HBNRAs has raised some controversy regarding the validity of the linear no-threshold hypothesis. This paper reviews some of the most recent studies of HBNRAs with the intent of stimulating greater research interest in the dosimetric, epidemiological and radiobiological issues related to the world's HBNRAs and proposes solutions to the challenges facing HBNRA studies. This paper may serve as a useful reference for some of the harder-to-find literature. - Highlights: • Some of the challenging issues of HBNRAs have not been resolved. • A literature review of the most recent studies of HBNRAs has been conducted. • An overview of some of the challenging issues and viable solutions are presented

  9. A Scanned Perturbation Technique For Imaging Electromagnetic Standing Wave Patterns of Microwave Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gokirmak, A; Bridgewater, A; Anlage, S M; Gokirmak, Ali; Wu, Dong-Ho; Anlage, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a method to measure the electric field standing wave distributions in a microwave resonator using a scanned perturbation technique. Fast and reliable solutions to the Helmholtz equation (and to the Schrodinger equation for two dimensional systems) with arbitrarily-shaped boundaries are obtained. We use a pin perturbation to image primarily the microwave electric field amplitude, and we demonstrate the ability to image broken time-reversal symmetry standing wave patterns produced with a magnetized ferrite in the cavity. The whole cavity, including areas very close to the walls, can be imaged using this technique with high spatial resolution over a broad range of frequencies.

  10. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  11. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  12. Aerobic bacterial microflora of Broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris oral cavity and cloaca, originating from Parque Zoológico Arruda Câmara, Paraíba, Brazil Microflora bacteriana aeróbica da cavidade oral e cloaca de jacaré-de-papo-amarelo (Caiman latirostris procedentes do Zoológico de João Pessoa, PB, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.A. Silva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to isolate and identify the aerobic bacterial microflora from the oral cavity mucosa and cloaca's samples, collected from Broad-snouted caiman (Caiman latirostris, born and bred in captivity at Parque Zoológico Arruda Câmara, João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil. The most common bacteria were Staphylococcus sp. (14.74%, Corynebacterium sp. (13.68%, Escherichia coli (13.68% and Shigella sp. (11.58%, and the less common were Citrobacter sp. (1.05%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (1.05% and Salmonella sp. (1.05%.This emphasizes the importance of these microorganisms' participation in infectious processes (sepsis and injuries caused by crocodilians.O presente estudo teve como objetivo isolar e identificar a microflora bacteriana aeróbica presente na mucosa da cavidade oral e da cloaca de exemplares de jacarés-de-papo-amarelo (Caiman latirostris nascidos e criados em cativeiro no Parque Zoológico Arruda Câmara, localizado na cidade de João Pessoa - PB. As bactérias mais freqüentes foram Staphylococcus sp. (14,74%, Corynebacterium sp.(13,68%, Escherichia coli (13,68% e Shigella sp. (11,58%, e as menos prevalentes foram Citrobacter sp.(1,05%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (1,05% e Salmonella sp. (1,05%. Ressalta-se a importância da participação desses microrganismos em processos infecciosos (septicemias e em feridas provocadas por crocodilianos.

  13. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Changling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    Mechanical oscillators have been recently widely utilized to couple with optical and microwave photons in a variety of hybrid quantum systems, but they all lack the tunability. The magnetostrictive force provides an alternative mechanism to allow phonon to couple with a different type of information carrier-magnon, the collective excitation of magnetization whose frequency can be tuned by a bias magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate an intriguing hybrid system that consists of a magnonic, a mechanical, and a microwave resonator. The magnon-phonon interaction results in hallmark coherent phenomena such as magnomechanically induced transparency/absorption and magnomechanical parametric amplification. The magnetic field dependence of magnon provides our system with unprecedented tunability. Moreover, the great flexibility of our system allows us to achieve triple resonance among magnon, phonon and photon, which drastically enhances the magnomechanical interaction. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnetomechanics, opening up great opportunities in various applications, such as tunable microwave filter and amplifier, long-lifetime quantum memories, microwave-to-optics conversion.

  14. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  15. In situ characterization of strain distribution in broad-area high-power lasers under operation by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and topography using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimer, U.; Baumbach, T.; Grenzer, J.; Lübbert, D.; Mazuelas, A.; Pietsch, U.; Erbert, G.

    1999-05-01

    The strain distribution in broad-area high-power semiconductor laser diodes is investigated both before and during operation and degradation by high-resolution x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. An inhomogeneous strain distribution along the stripe and at the stripe edges is found due to the mounting and bonding of the laser device. From the current-induced thermal lattice expansion the temperature rise during operation near the active region is estimated. The radius of curvature of the laser changes during operation and a different thermal behaviour on the front and the rear facet is found. The temperature distribution along the laser stripe could be correlated with the defect distribution observed after degradation by cathodoluminescence.

  16. In situ characterization of strain distribution in broad-area high-power lasers under operation by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and topography using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimer, U.; Erbert, G. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Baumbach, T. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Dresden (Germany); Grenzer, J.; Luebbert, D.; Mazuelas, A. [ESRF Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Pietsch, U. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany)

    1999-05-21

    The strain distribution in broad-area high-power semiconductor laser diodes is investigated both before and during operation and degradation by high-resolution x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. An inhomogeneous strain distribution along the stripe and at the stripe edges is found due to the mounting and bonding of the laser device. From the current-induced thermal lattice expansion the temperature rise during operation near the active region is estimated. The radius of curvature of the laser changes during operation and a different thermal behaviour on the front and the rear facet is found. The temperature distribution along the laser stripe could be correlated with the defect distribution observed after degradation by cathodoluminescence. (author)

  17. Two-photon cavity solitons in a laser: radiative profiles, interaction and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the properties of two-photon cavity solitons that appear in a broad-area cascade laser. These vectorial solitons consist of islands of two-photon emission emerging over a background of single-photon emission. Analysis of their structural properties reveals singular features such as their short distance radiation of outgoing waves, which can be interpreted in terms of the soliton frequency profile. However, the phase of these solitons is not determined by any external factor, which influences the way in which the structures can be written and erased. We also examine ways of controlling the cavity-soliton position, and analyse the interaction between neighbouring cavity solitons. Finally, investigation of the parameter dependence of these structures shows a route from soliton-dominated to defect-mediated turbulence

  18. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  19. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Teleportation of Entangled States through Divorce of Entangled Pair Mediated by a Weak Coherent Field in a High-Q Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso B., W.; Almeida G. de, N.

    2008-07-01

    We propose a scheme to partially teleport an unknown entangled atomic state. A high-Q cavity, supporting one mode of a weak coherent state, is needed to accomplish this process. By partial teleportation we mean that teleportation will occur by changing one of the partners of the entangled state to be teleported. The entangled state to be teleported is composed by one pair of particles, we called this surprising characteristic of maintaining the entanglement, even when one of the particle of the entangled pair being teleported is changed, of divorce of entangled states.

  20. What is the Worst Case for Cavity Decoupling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, W.

    2001-05-01

    possibility of detection. Avoiding identification of a decoupled test in the 1-10 kt range would require: careful site selection; plausible denial (e.g., a mining activity), adequate depth, high-quality rock with low gas content; concealment of the mining operation from public knowledge and remote monitoring systems; attention to containment issues (geologic faults and engineered openings to the cavity); and favorable weather conditions, given the likelihood that radioactivity from the test would eventually seep. As the decoupled yield approaches 10 kt, more elongate cavities (up to 10:1) are required in hard rock. Because suitable thick salt deposits are present in many naturally-seismic regions of proliferation concern, these areas will require special attention to ensure adequate monitoring. For yields less than ~1 kt, construction of the required cavity is not limited by the available mining technology, based on many examples of construction at depth, worldwide. With attention to selection of geologic environment, adequate depth, and stemming of the tunnel complex, the evader could be confident that the test would not promptly vent, limiting detectability by the radionuclide monitoring network. The decoupled test would not be seismically identified for broad areas of most countries. Important technical issues for decoupling in hard rock could be addressed by field experiments using conventional explosives. It is significant that evading identification of a cavity-decoupled nuclear test is not limited so much by geology and engineering technology as it is by the capabilities of regional seismic and other monitoring systems. These findings are inconsistent with the recent joint SSA/AGU statement on the verification of the CTBT.

  1. Smooth bumps in H/V curves over a broad area from single-station ambient noise recordings are meaningful and reveal the importance of Q in array processing: The Boumerdes (Algeria) case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillier, B.; Chatelain, J.-L.; Hellel, M.; Machane, D.; Mezouer, N.; Ben Salem, R.; Oubaiche, E. H.

    2005-12-01

    Single-station H/V curves from ambient noise recordings in Boumerdes (Algeria) show smooth bumps around 1 and 3 Hz. A complementary microtremor study, based on two 34 and 134-meter aperture arrays, evidences that these bumps are indeed real peaks produced by two strong VS contrasts at 37 and 118 meters depth, strongly smoothed by very high S-wave attenuation in the two sedimentary layers. These two H/V bumps, observed over a broad area, are meaningful and reveal the importance of Q in S-wave velocity modeling from microtremor array data processing. It also appears that Tertiary rocks should be, at least in some cases, taken into account, together with the Quaternary sediments, to explain single-station H/V frequency peaks, and therefore that considering only the first 30 m of soil for VS amplification evaluation, as usually recommended, sometimes leads to flaky results by artificially eliminating non-explained low-frequency peaks from the analysis.

  2. RF Cavity Design

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2014-01-01

    After a short overview of a general approach to cavity design, we sketch the derivation of waveguide modes from plane waves and of cavity fields from waveguide modes. The characteristic parameters describing cavities and their performance are defined and explained. An equivalent circuit is introduced and extended to explain beam loading and higher order modes. Finally travelling- and standing-wave multi-gap cavities are introduced using the Brillouin diagram.

  3. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  4. Dawn of Cavity Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Can-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Merging the progress of spintronics with the advancement in cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity polaritons, a new field of Cavity Spintronics is forming, which connects some of the most exciting modern physics, such as quantum information and quantum optics, with one of the oldest science on the earth, the magnetism.

  5. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  6. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  7. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  8. Temperature dependence of spontaneous switch-on and switch-off of laser cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, J.; Oppo, G.-L.; Ackemann, T.

    2016-03-01

    A systematic experimental and numerical investigation of the conditions for the spontaneous formation of laser cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback by a volume Bragg grating is reported. It is shown that the switching thresholds are controlled by a combination of frequency shifts induced by ambient temperature and Joule heating. The gain level has only a minor influence on the threshold but controls mainly the power of the solitons. At large initial detuning and high threshold gain, the first observed structure can be a high order soliton. In real devices spatial disorder in the cavity length causes a pinning of solitons and a dispersion of thresholds. The experimental observations are in good agreement with numerical simulations taking into account disorder and the coupling of gain and cavity resonance due to Joule heating. In particular, we demonstrate that the existence of the traps explain the spontaneous switch on of the solitons, but do not modify the soliton shape significantly, i.e. the observed solitons are a good approximation of the ones expected in a homogeneous system.

  9. Temperature dependence of spontaneous switch-on and switch-off of laser cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic experimental and numerical investigation of the conditions for the spontaneous formation of laser cavity solitons in broad-area vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with frequency-selective feedback by a volume Bragg grating is reported. It is shown that the switching thresholds are controlled by a combination of frequency shifts induced by ambient temperature and Joule heating. The gain level has only a minor influence on the threshold but controls mainly the power of the solitons. At large initial detuning and high threshold gain, the first observed structure can be a high order soliton. In real devices spatial disorder in the cavity length causes a pinning of solitons and a dispersion of thresholds. The experimental observations are in good agreement with numerical simulations taking into account disorder and the coupling of gain and cavity resonance due to Joule heating. In particular, we demonstrate that the existence of the traps explain the spontaneous switch on of the solitons, but do not modify the soliton shape significantly, i.e. the observed solitons are a good approximation of the ones expected in a homogeneous system. (paper)

  10. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  11. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  12. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group carries out research in two broad areas: the computation of charged particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods and advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Important improvements in the state of the art are believed to be possible in both of these areas. In addition, applications of these methods are made to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. The Lie algebraic method of computing and analyzing beam transport handles both linear and nonlinear beam elements. Tests show this method to be superior to the earlier matrix or numerical integration methods. It has wide application to many areas including accelerator physics, intense particle beams, ion microprobes, high resolution electron microscopy, and light optics. With regard to the area of electromagnetic fields and beam cavity interactions, work is carried out on the theory of beam breakup in single pulses. Work is also done on the analysis of the high frequency behavior of longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances, including the examination of methods which may be used to measure these impedances. Finally, work is performed on the electromagnetic analysis of coupled cavities and on the coupling of cavities to waveguides

  13. Detection Of Multilayer Cavities By Employing RC-DTH Air Hammer System And Cavity Auto Scanning Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongjiang; Li, Lijia; Peng, Jianming; Yin, Kun; Li, Peng; Gan, Xin; Zhao, Letao; Su, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The subterranean cavities are seriously threatened to construction and mining safety, and it's important to obtain the exact localization and dimensions of subterranean cavities for the planning of geotechnical and mining activities. Geophysical investigation is an alternative method for cavity detection, but it usually failed for the uncertainly solution of information and data obtained by Geophysical methods. Drilling is considered as the most accurate method for cavity detection. However, the conventional drilling methods can only be used for single cavity detection, and there is no effective solution for multilayer cavities detection have been reported. In this paper, a reverse circulation (RC) down-the-hole (DTH) air hammer system with a special structured drill bit is built and a cavity auto scanning laser system based on laser range finding technique was employed to confirm the localization and dimensions of the cavities. This RC-DTH air hammer system allows drilling through the upper cavities and putting the cavity auto scanning laser system into the cavity area through the central passage of the drill tools to protect the detection system from collapsing of borehole wall. The RC-DTH air hammer system was built, and field tests were conducted in Lanxian County Iron Ore District, which is located in Lv Liang city of Shan Xi province, the northwest of china. Field tests show that employing the RC-DTH air hammer system assisted by the cavity auto scanning laser system is an efficiency method to detect multilayer cavities.

  14. Wavelength beam combining of a 980-nm tapered diode laser bar in an external cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    solution for preserving the beam quality of the bar in the range of that of a single emitter and at the same time, enabling the power scaling. We report spectral beam combining applied to a 12 emitter tapered laser bar at 980 nm. The external cavity has been designed for a wavelength separation of 4.0 nm......High power diode lasers are used in a large number of applications. A limiting factor for more widespread use of broad area lasers is the poor beam quality. Gain guided tapered diode lasers are ideal candidates for industrial applications that demands watt level output power with good beam quality...

  15. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  16. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  17. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  18. Superconducting RF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Philippe

    1999-01-01

    It was 20 years ago when the research and development programme for LEP superconducting cavities was initiated. It lasted about 10 years. Today, my aim is not to tell you in great detail about the many innovations made thanks to our research, but I would like to point out some milestones in the development of superconducting cavities where Emilio's influence was particularly important.

  19. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  20. Ferrite loaded rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of a ferrite-loaded rf cavity is explained from the point of view of its operation. Then, an analysis of the automatic cavity-tuning system is presented using the transfer function; and a systematic analysis of a beam-feedback system using transfer functions is also presented. (author)

  1. Passivated niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  2. Broadly Tunable SOA-Based Active Mode-Locked Fibre Ring Laser by Forward Injection Optical Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a broadly tunable active mode-locked fibre ring laser based on a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), with forward injection optical pulses. The laser can generate pulse sequence with pulsewidth about 12ps and high output power up to 8.56dBm at 2.5 GHz stably. Incorporated with a wavelength-tunable optical bandpass filter, the pulse laser can operate with a broad wavelength tunable span up to 37nm with almost constant pulsewidth. A detailed experimental analysis is also carried out to investigate the relationship between the power of the internal cavity and the pulsewidth of the output pulse sequence. The experimental configuration of the pulse laser is very simple and easy to setup with no polarization-sensitive components. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  3. Different optical properties in different periodic slot cavity geometrical morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Shen, Meng; Du, Lan; Deng, Caisong; Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, optical properties of two-dimensional periodic annular slot cavity arrays in hexagonal close-packing on a silica substrate are theoretically characterized by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation method. By simulating reflectance spectra, electric field distribution, and charge distribution, we confirm that multiple cylindrical surface plasmon resonances can be excited in annular inclined slot cavities by linearly polarized light, in which the four reflectance dips are attributed to Fabry-Perot cavity resonances in the coaxial cavity. A coaxial waveguide mode TE11 will exist in these annular cavities, and the wavelengths of these reflectance dips are effectively tailored by changing the geometrical pattern of slot cavity and the dielectric materials filled in the cavities. These resonant wavelengths are localized in annular cavities with large electric field enhancement and dissipate gradually due to metal loss. The formation of an absorption peak can be explained from the aspect of phase matching conditions. We observed that the proposed structure can be tuned over the broad spectral range of 600-4000 nm by changing the outer and inner radii of the annular gaps, gap surface topography. Meanwhile, different lengths of the cavity may cause the shift of resonance dips. Also, we study the field enhancement at different vertical locations of the slit. In addition, dielectric materials filling in the annular gaps will result in a shift of the resonance wavelengths, which make the annular cavities good candidates for refractive index sensors. The refractive index sensitivity of annular cavities can also be tuned by the geometry size and the media around the cavity. Annular cavities with novel applications can be implied as surface enhanced Raman spectra substrates, refractive index sensors, nano-lasers, and optical trappers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178044), the Natural Science Foundation

  4. Integrating Hot and Cool Intelligences: Thinking Broadly about Broad Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Joel Schneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although results from factor-analytic studies of the broad, second-stratum abilities of human intelligence have been fairly consistent for decades, the list of broad abilities is far from complete, much less understood. We propose criteria by which the list of broad abilities could be amended and envision alternatives for how our understanding of the hot intelligences (abilities involving emotionally-salient information and cool intelligences (abilities involving perceptual processing and logical reasoning might be integrated into a coherent theoretical framework.

  5. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  6. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  7. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  8. Malignant melanoma of the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebenezer Jagadish

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral malignant melanoma is a rare disease. The common sites of its occurrence are the palate and gingiva with the maxillary arch being affected 80% of the time. Because of their presence at relatively obscure areas in the oral cavity, most of the malignant melanomas of the oral cavity are diagnosed at a late stage. These lesions are associated with poor prognosis. The dental clinician must therefore carefully examine the head, neck, and oral cavity, and any pigmented lesion that may exhibit growth potential must be biopsied. This article describes a case of malignant melanoma that was present in the oral cavity and briefly reviews the relevant literature that explains the nature of this lesion.

  9. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  10. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8202397: View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  11. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    View towards the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138.

  12. Moving Detectors in Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Obadia, N

    2007-01-01

    We consider two-level detectors, coupled to a quantum scalar field, moving inside cavities. We highlight some pathological resonant effects due to abrupt boundaries, and decide to describe the cavity by switching smoothly the interaction by a time-dependent gate-like function. Considering uniformly accelerated trajectories, we show that some specific choices of non-adiabatic switching have led to hazardous interpretations about the enhancement of the Unruh effect in cavities. More specifically, we show that the emission/absorption ratio takes arbitrary high values according to the emitted quanta properties and to the transients undergone at the entrance and the exit of the cavity, {\\it independently of the acceleration}. An explicit example is provided where we show that inertial and uniformly accelerated world-lines can even lead to the same ``pseudo-temperature''.

  13. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  14. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  15. Cavity-enhanced dual-comb spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhardt, Birgitta; Jacquet, Patrick; Jacquey, Marion; Kobayashi, Yohei; Udem, Thomas; Holzwarth, Ronald; Guelachvili, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular fingerprinting is dramatically improved when placing the absorbing sample in a high-finesse optical cavity, thanks to the large increase of the effective path-length. As demonstrated recently, when the equidistant lines from a laser frequency comb are simultaneously injected into the cavity over a large spectral range, multiple trace-gases may be identified within a few milliseconds. Analyzing efficiently the light transmitted through the cavity however still remains challenging. Here, a novel approach, cavity-enhanced frequency comb Fourier transform spectroscopy, fully overcomes this difficulty and measures ultrasensitive, broad-bandwidth, high-resolution spectra within a few tens of $\\mu$s. It could be implemented from the Terahertz to the ultraviolet regions without any need for detector arrays. We recorded, within 18 $\\mu$s, spectra of the 1.0 $\\mu$m overtone bands of ammonia spanning 20 nm with 4.5 GHz resolution and a noise-equivalent-absorption at one-second-averaging per ...

  16. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Jiang, Wei C. [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lin, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.lin@rochester.edu [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  17. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xiyuan; Jiang, Wei C; Lin, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  18. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  19. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  20. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Robert S. E.; Losh, Molly; Parlier, Morgan; Reznick, J. Steven; Piven, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The broad autism phenotype (BAP) is a set of personality and language characteristics that reflect the phenotypic expression of the genetic liability to autism, in non-autistic relatives of autistic individuals. These characteristics are milder but qualitatively similar to the defining features of autism. A new instrument designed to measure the…

  2. 201 MHz Cavity R and D for MUCOOL and MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design, fabrication, analysis and preliminary testing of the prototype 201 MHz copper cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. Cavity applications include the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as well as cooling channels for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. This cavity was developed by the US muon cooling (MUCOOL) collaboration and is being tested in the MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab. To achieve a high accelerating gradient, the cavity beam irises are terminated by a pair of curved, thin beryllium windows. Several fabrication methods developed for the cavity and windows are novel and offer significant cost savings as compared to conventional construction methods. The cavity's thermal and structural performances are simulated with an FEA model. Preliminary high power RF commissioning results will be presented

  3. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  4. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  5. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  6. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    See photo 8302397: View from the downstream end of one of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). See 7603195 and 8011289 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138. Giacomo Primadei stands on the left.

  7. Statistical electromagnetics: Complex cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2008-01-01

    A selection of the literature on the statistical description of electromagnetic fields and complex cavities is concisely reviewed. Some essential concepts, for example, the application of the central limit theorem and the maximum entropy principle, are scrutinized. Implicit assumptions, biased choic

  8. Laser cavity modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Damakoa, I.; Audounet, J.; Bouyssou, G.; Vassilieff, G.

    1993-01-01

    Two approachs of modelling nonhomogeneous cavity laser are presented. They are based on the beam propagation method which allows the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT). The resulting procedures provide selfconsistent solutions to the Maxwell and diffusion equations. Results are given to illustrate the two methods.


  9. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  10. Implosion of the small cavity and large cavity cannonball targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results of cannonball target implosion research are briefly reviewed with theoretical predictions for GEKKO XII experiments. The cannonball targets are classified into two types according to the cavity size ; small cavity and large cavity. The compression mechanisms of the two types are discussed. (author)

  11. Teleportation of Cavity Field States via Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss two schemes of teleportation of cavity field states. In the first scheme we consider cavities prepared in a coherent state and in the second scheme we consider cavities prepared in a superposition of zero and one Fock states.

  12. Broad Diphotons from Narrow States

    CERN Document Server

    An, Haipeng; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS and CMS have each reported a modest diphoton excess consistent with the decay of a broad resonance at ~ 750 GeV. We show how this signal can arise in a weakly coupled theory comprised solely of narrow width particles. In particular, if the decaying particle is produced off-shell, then the associated diphoton resonance will have a broad, adjustable width. We present simplified models which explain the diphoton excess through the three-body decay of a scalar or fermion. Our minimal ultraviolet completion is a weakly coupled and renormalizable theory of a singlet scalar plus a heavy vector-like quark and lepton. The smoking gun of this mechanism is an asymmetric diphoton peak recoiling against missing transverse energy, jets, or leptons.

  13. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  14. Seamless/bonded niobium cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2006-07-01

    Technological aspects and performance of seamless cavities produced by hydroforming are presented. Problems related to the fabrication of seamless cavities from bulk niobium are mainly solved thanks to the progress of the last years. The highest achieved accelerating gradients are comparable for both seamless and welded versions (ca. 40 MV/m) Nevertheless further development of seamless cavities is desirable in order to avoid the careful preparation of parts for welding and get reliable statistic. Fabrication of NbCu clad cavities from bimetallic tubes is an interesting option that gives new opportunity to the seamless technique. On the one hand it allows reducing the niobium costs contribution; on the other hand it increases the thermal stability of the cavity. The highest accelerating gradient achieved on seamless NbCu clad single cell cavities (ca. 40 MV/m) is comparable to the one reached on bulk Nb cavities. Fabrication of multi-cell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was recently proven.

  15. Changeability of Oral Cavity Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Surdacka, Anna; Strzyka³a, Krystyna; Rydzewska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Objectives In dentistry, the results of in vivo studies on drugs, dental fillings or prostheses are routinely evaluated based on selected oral cavity environment parameters at specific time points. Such evaluation may be confounded by ongoing changes in the oral cavity environment induced by diet, drug use, stress and other factors. The study aimed to confirm oral cavity environment changeability. Methods 24 healthy individuals aged 20–30 had their oral cavity environment prepared by having p...

  16. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-05-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities.

  17. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    1.3 GHz RF test cell capable of operating both at high pressure and in vacuum with replaceable electrodes was designed, built, and power tested in preparation for testing the frequency and geometry effects of RF breakdown at Argonne National Lab. At the time of this report this cavity is still waiting for the 1.3 GHz klystron to be available at the Wakefield Test Facility. (3) Under a contract with Los Alamos National Lab, an 805 MHz RF test cavity, known as the All-Seasons Cavity (ASC), was designed and built by Muons, Inc. to operate either at high pressure or under vacuum. The LANL project to use the (ASC) was cancelled and the testing of the cavity has been continued under the grant reported on here using the Fermilab Mucool Test Area (MTA). The ASC is a true pillbox cavity that has performed under vacuum in high external magnetic field better than any other and has demonstrated that the high required accelerating gradients for many muon cooling beam line designs are possible. (4) Under ongoing support from the Muon Acceleration Program, microscopic surface analysis and computer simulations have been used to develop models of RF breakdown that apply to both pressurized and vacuum cavities. The understanding of RF breakdown will lead to better designs of RF cavities for many applications. An increase in the operating accelerating gradient, improved reliability and shorter conditioning times can generate very significant cost savings in many accelerator projects.

  18. Broad-scale sampling of primary freshwater fish populations reveals the role of intrinsic traits, inter-basin connectivity, drainage area and latitude on shaping contemporary patterns of genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Santos, Carla; Robalo, Joana I; Pereira, Ana M; Branco, Paulo; Santos, José Maria; Ferreira, Maria Teresa; Sousa, Mónica; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Background. Worldwide predictions suggest that up to 75% of the freshwater fish species occurring in rivers with reduced discharge could be extinct by 2070 due to the combined effect of climate change and water abstraction. The Mediterranean region is considered to be a hotspot of freshwater fish diversity but also one of the regions where the effects of climate change will be more severe. Iberian cyprinids are currently highly endangered, with over 68% of the species raising some level of conservation concern. Methods. During the FISHATLAS project, the Portuguese hydrographical network was extensively covered (all the 34 river basins and 47 sub-basins) in order to contribute with valuable data on the genetic diversity distribution patterns of native cyprinid species. A total of 188 populations belonging to 16 cyprinid species of Squalius, Luciobarbus, Achondrostoma, Iberochondrostoma, Anaecypris and Pseudochondrostoma were characterized, for a total of 3,678 cytochrome b gene sequences. Results. When the genetic diversity of these populations was mapped, it highlighted differences among populations from the same species and between species with identical distribution areas. Factors shaping the contemporary patterns of genetic diversity were explored and the results revealed the role of latitude, inter-basin connectivity, migratory behaviour, species maximum size, species range and other species intrinsic traits in determining the genetic diversity of sampled populations. Contrastingly, drainage area and hydrological regime (permanent vs. temporary) seem to have no significant effect on genetic diversity. Species intrinsic traits, maximum size attained, inter-basin connectivity and latitude explained over 30% of the haplotype diversity variance and, generally, the levels of diversity were significantly higher for smaller sized species, from connected and southerly river basins. Discussion. Targeting multiple co-distributed species of primary freshwater fish allowed

  19. Access cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  20. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  1. RF superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Y

    1980-01-01

    The history and present activity in research on RF superconducting cavities in various countries are reviewed. The program of the July 1980 Karlsruhe workshop is reproduced and research activity in this field at Stanford HEPL and SLAC, Cornell, Oregon, Brookhaven, KEK (Japan), Weismann (Israel), Genoa, CERN and Karlsruhe (KfK) listed. The theoretical basis of surface resistance and intracavity magnetic field, multipacing and non-resonant electron loading are outlined. (20 refs).

  2. A broad-application microchannel-plate detector system for advanced particle or photon detection tasks large area imaging, precise multi-hit timing information and high detection rate

    CERN Document Server

    Jagutzki, O; Mergel, V; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Spielberger, L; Spillmann, U; Ullmann-Pfleger, K

    2002-01-01

    New applications for single particle and photon detection in many fields require both large area imaging performance and precise time information on each detected particle. Moreover, a very high data acquisition rate is desirable for most applications and eventually the detection and imaging of more than one particle arriving within a microsecond is required. Commercial CCD systems lack the timing information whereas other electronic microchannel plate (MCP) read-out schemes usually suffer from a low acquisition rate and complicated and sometimes costly read-out electronics. We have designed and tested a complete imaging system consisting of an MCP position readout with helical wire delay-lines, single-unit amplifier box and PC-controlled time-to-digital converter (TDC) readout. The system is very flexible and can detect and analyse position and timing information at single particle rates beyond 1 MHz. Alternatively, multi-hit events can be collected and analysed at about 20 kHz rate. We discuss the advantage...

  3. RESEARCH ON THE BROAD BAND DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY ABOUT AREA NOCUOUS GAS EXPLORER TECHNOLOGY%宽带差分吸收光谱与区域毒气探测技术的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱弘

    2011-01-01

    论述了气体的吸收光谱与区域有害气体光谱探测技术的基本原理,探讨了差分吸收光谱技术,提出了区域远程毒气快速探测的实现方法,介绍了宽光谱光束探测痕量气体入侵、多组光谱仪测试,利用差分吸收光谱法研究出毒气报警系统,并对仪器的发展趋势进行了展望.%The basic theory of gas absorption spectroscopy and long - distance nocuous gas exploration technology were dissertated. The technology of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was discussed. The actualization method of the nocuous gas detection in the long - distance area was put forward. The trace intrusion gases detection method with wide spectrum light beam, a series of optical apparatus and DOAS computing were introduced. The potential technologies and instrument in the future were prospected.

  4. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  5. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  6. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  7. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, J. Brian, E-mail: b.leen@lgrinc.com; O’Keefe, Anthony [Los Gatos Research, 67 E. Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  8. Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region (third report): spectroscopic imaging for broad-area and real-time componential analysis system against local unexpected terrorism and disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Kawashima, Natsumi; Wollherr, Dirk; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    The distributed networks for information collection of chemical components with high-mobility objects, such as drones or smartphones, will work effectively for investigations, clarifications and predictions against unexpected local terrorisms and disasters like localized torrential downpours. We proposed and reported the proposed spectroscopic line-imager for smartphones in this conference. In this paper, we will mention the wide-area spectroscopic-image construction by estimating 6 DOF (Degrees Of Freedom: parallel movements=x,y,z and rotational movements=θx, θy, θz) from line data to observe and analyze surrounding chemical-environments. Recently, smartphone movies, what were photographed by peoples happened to be there, had worked effectively to analyze what kinds of phenomenon had happened around there. But when a gas tank suddenly blew up, we did not recognize from visible-light RGB-color cameras what kinds of chemical gas components were polluting surrounding atmospheres. Conventionally Fourier spectroscopy had been well known as chemical components analysis in laboratory usages. But volatile gases should be analyzed promptly at accident sites. And because the humidity absorption in near and middle infrared lights has very high sensitivity, we will be able to detect humidity in the sky from wide field spectroscopic image. And also recently, 6-DOF sensors are easily utilized for estimation of position and attitude for UAV (Unmanned Air Vehicle) or smartphone. But for observing long-distance views, accuracies of angle measurements were not sufficient to merge line data because of leverage theory. Thus, by searching corresponding pixels between line spectroscopic images, we are trying to estimate 6-DOF in high accuracy.

  9. Uncommon opportunistic fungal infections of oral cavity: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A G Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of opportunistic oral mucosal fungal infections are due to Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus species. Mucor and Cryptococcus also have a major role in causing oral infections, whereas Geotrichum, Fusarium, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces and Penicillium marneffei are uncommon pathogens in the oral cavity. The broad spectrum of clinical presentation includes pseudo-membranes, abscesses, ulcers, pustules and extensive tissue necrosis involving bone. This review discusses various uncommon opportunistic fungal infections affecting the oral cavity including their morphology, clinical features and diagnostic methods.

  10. Dusty plasma cavities: probe-induced and natural

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, B J; Hyde, T W

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive exploration of regional dust evacuation in complex plasma crystals is presented. Voids created in 3D crystals on the International Space Station have provided a rich foundation for experiments, but cavities in dust crystals formed in ground-based experiments have not received as much attention. Inside a modified GEC RF cell, a powered vertical probe was used to clear the central area of a dust crystal, producing a cavity with high cylindrical symmetry. Cavities generated by three mechanisms are examined. First, repulsion of micrometer-sized particles by a negatively charged probe is investigated. A model of this effect developed for a DC plasma is modified and applied to explain new experimental data in RF plasma. Second, the formation of natural cavities is surveyed; a radial ion drag proposed to occur due to a curved sheath is considered in conjunction with thermophoresis and a flattened confinement potential above the center of the electrode. Finally, cavity formation unexpectedly occurs up...

  11. Millimeter-long fiber Fabry-Perot cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Konstantin; Garcia, Sebastien; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5 mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem.

  12. Millimeter-long Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Konstantin; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem.

  13. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  14. Ghost imaging with broad distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段德洋; 张路; 杜少将; 夏云杰

    2015-01-01

    We present a scheme that is able to achieve the ghost imaging with broad distance. The physical nature of our scheme is that the different wavelength beams are separated in free space by an optical media according to the slow light or dispersion principle. Meanwhile, the equality of the optical distance of the two light arms is not violated. The photon correlation is achieved by the rotating ground glass plate (RGGP) and spatial light modulator (SLM), respectively. Our work shows that a monochromic ghost image can be obtained in the case of RGGP. More importantly, the position (or distance) of the object can be ascertained by the color of the image. Thus, the imaging and ranging processes are combined as one process for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In the case of SLM, we can obtain a colored image regardless of where the object is.

  15. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  16. STANDARDIZATION OF CEBAF 12 GEV UPGRADE CAVITY TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffany Bass, G. Davis, Christiana Wilson, Mircea Stirbet

    2012-07-01

    CEBAF 12GeV upgrade project includes 80 new 7-cell cavities to form 10 cryomodules. Each cavity underwent RF qualification at 2.07K using a high power accelerating gradient test and an HOM survey in Jefferson Lab's Vertical Testing Area (VTA) before cavity string assembly. In order to ensure consistently high quality data, updated cavity testing procedures and analysis were implemented and used by a group of VTA operators. For high power tests, a cavity testing procedure was developed and used in conjunction with a LabVIEW program to collect the test data. Additionally while the cavity was at 2.07K, an HOM survey was performed using a network analyzer and a combination of Excel and Mathematica programs. Data analysis was standardized and an online logbook, Pansophy, was used for data storage and mining. The Pansophy system allowed test results to be easily summarized and searchable across all cavity tests. In this presentation, the CEBAF 12GeV upgrade cavity testing procedure, method for data analysis, and results reporting results will be discussed.

  17. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  18. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  19. Surface state photonic bandgap cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Rahachou, A. I.; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2005-01-01

    We propose and analyze a new type of a resonant high-Q cavity for lasing, sensing or filtering applications, which is based on a surface states of a finite photonic crystal. We demonstrate that such the cavity can have a Q factor comparable with that one of conventional photonic band-gap defect mode cavities. At the same time, the distinguished feature of the surface mode cavity is that it is situated directly at the surface of the photonic crystal. This might open up new possibilities for de...

  20. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  1. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  2. Ghost imaging with broad distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, De-Yang; Zhang, Lu; Du, Shao-Jiang; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present a scheme that is able to achieve the ghost imaging with broad distance. The physical nature of our scheme is that the different wavelength beams are separated in free space by an optical media according to the slow light or dispersion principle. Meanwhile, the equality of the optical distance of the two light arms is not violated. The photon correlation is achieved by the rotating ground glass plate (RGGP) and spatial light modulator (SLM), respectively. Our work shows that a monochromic ghost image can be obtained in the case of RGGP. More importantly, the position (or distance) of the object can be ascertained by the color of the image. Thus, the imaging and ranging processes are combined as one process for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In the case of SLM, we can obtain a colored image regardless of where the object is. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012, 11204156, 11304179, and 11247240), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20133705110001 and 20123705120002), the Scientific Research Foundation for Outstanding Young Scientists of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. BS2013DX034), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2012FQ024).

  3. Interaction of a vircator microwave generator with an enclosing resonant cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction between a vircator microwave generator and a resonant cavity is produced by enclosing the virtual cathode inside a right circular cylinder appended to the anode foil. Cavity diameter is chosen to simultaneously minimize the number of resonant modes and to avoid significant perturbation of the virtual cathode formation. By varying the cavity length frequencies corresponding to the TM/sub 01n/ cavity modes are tuned to resonate with the broad band oscillating virtual cathode. The RF fields stored in the resonant cavities feedback on the virtual cathode and improve the kinetic to microwave power conversion efficiency. For each cavity only a single mode is excited; non-resonant frequencies are suppressed. Measured radiation patterns show that TM/sub 011/ mode microwave power extracted radially from the cavity is 1.5 times that with no cavity, and about 4 times that from a non resonant cavity. Resonant cavities suppress non-resonant frequencies decreasing the bandwidth of the emitting radiation by a factor ≥ 5

  4. Generation of a twin beam at the cesium line and telecom wavelength by cavity phase matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y H; Xie, Z D; Ling, W; Lv, X J; Zhu, S N

    2011-08-15

    Cavity phase matching has been recently demonstrated as a phase-matching method for efficient nonlinear frequency conversion in a microcavity. Here we extend it to the Type I configuration using a sub-coherent-length optical parametric oscillator consisting of an MgO-doped lithium niobate crystal sheet. It generates a tunable single-longitudinal-mode twin beam, which covers the cesium D2 line of 852.1 nm and the extended band of optical communication. This microcavity is capable of peak output power of 58 kW with a maximum conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Broad applications in the areas of light-atom interaction, spectroscopy, optical telecommunication, and quantum optics can be expected.

  5. Green high-power tunable external-cavity GaN diode laser at 515 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    A 480 mW green tunable diode laser system is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. The laser system is based on a GaN broad-area diode laser and Littrow external-cavity feedback. The green laser system is operated in two modes by switching the polarization direction of the laser beam...... incident on the grating. When the laser beam is p-polarized, an output power of 50 mW with a tunable range of 9.2 nm is achieved. When the laser beam is s-polarized, an output power of 480 mW with a tunable range of 2.1 nm is obtained. This constitutes the highest output power from a tunable green diode...... laser system....

  6. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR

  7. 78 FR 20119 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-day... soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal... responders across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  8. 77 FR 50144 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until... across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  9. 76 FR 34087 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until.... The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the effectiveness of...

  10. A Scanning Cavity Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Mader, Matthias; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1700-fold signal enhancement compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity below 1 nm2, we show a method to improve spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for opt...

  11. Frequency Tuning for a DQW Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Leuxe, Raphael; Skaritka, John; Wu, Qiong; Xiao, Binping; Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The nominal operating frequency for the HL-LHC crab cavities is 400.79 MHz within a bandwidth of ±60kHz. Attaining the required cavity tune implies a good understanding of all the processes that influence the cavity frequency from the moment when the cavity parts are being fabricated until the cavity is installed and under operation. Different tuning options will be available for the DQW crab cavity of LHC. This paper details the different steps in the cavity fabrication and preparation that may introduce a shift in the cavity frequency and introduces the different tuning methods foreseen to bring the cavity frequency to meet the specifications.

  12. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  13. Fiber cavities for atom chips

    OpenAIRE

    Klappauf, B.G.; Horak, P.; Kazansky, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    We present experimental realizations of several micro-cavities, constructed from standard fiber optic components, which meet the theoretical criteria for single atom detection from laser-cooled samples. We discuss integration of these cavities into state-of-the-art 'atom chips'.

  14. Technical tasks in superconducting cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kenji [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    The feature of superconducting rf cavities is an extremely small surface resistance on the wall. It brings a large energy saving in the operation, even those are cooled with liquid helium. That also makes possible to operate themselves in a higher field gradient comparing to normal conducting cavities, and brings to make accelerators compact. These merits are very important for the future accelerator engineering which is planed at JAERI for the neutron material science and nuclear waste transmutation. This machine is a high intensity proton linac and uses sc cavities in the medium and high {beta} sections. In this paper, starting R and D of proton superconducting cavities, several important technical points which come from the small surface resistance of sc cavities, are present to succeed it and also differences between the medium and high - {beta} structures are discussed. (author)

  15. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  16. Cavity optomechanical spring sensing of single molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenyan; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang; Lu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Label-free bio-sensing is a critical functionality underlying a variety of health- and security-related applications. Micro-/nano-photonic devices are well suited for this purpose and have emerged as promising platforms in recent years. Here we propose and demonstrate an approach that utilizes the optical spring effect in a high-Q coherent optomechanical oscillator to dramatically enhance the sensing resolution by orders of magnitude compared with conventional approaches, allowing us to detect single bovine serum albumin proteins with a molecular weight of 66 kDa at a signal-to-noise ratio of 16.8. The unique optical spring sensing approach opens up a distinctive avenue that not only enables biomolecule sensing and recognition at individual level, but is also of great promise for broad physical sensing applications that rely on sensitive detection of optical cavity resonance shift to probe external physical parameters.

  17. Development of a cavity enhanced aerosol albedometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of a cavity enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS approach and an integrating sphere (IS for simultaneous in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients in the exact same sample volume. The cavity enhanced albedometer employed a blue light-emitting diode (LED based IBBCEAS approach for the measurement of wavelength-resolved aerosol optical extinction over the spectral range of 445–480 nm. An integrating sphere nephelometer coupled to the IBBCEAS setup was used for the measurement of aerosol scattering. The scattering signal was measured with a single channel photomultiplier tube (PMT, providing an integrated value over a narrow bandwidth (FWHM ~ 9 nm in the spectral region of 465–474 nm. A scattering coefficient at a wavelength of 470 nm was deduced as an averaged scattering value and used for data analysis and instrumental performance comparison. Performance evaluation of the albedometer was carried out using laboratory-generated particles and ambient aerosol. The scattering and extinction measurements of monodisperse polystyrene latex (PSL spheres generated in laboratory proved excellent correlation between two channels of the albedometer. The retrieved refractive index (RI from the measured scattering and extinction efficiencies agreed well with the values reported in previously published papers. Aerosol light scattering and extinction coefficients, single scattering albedo (SSA and NO2 concentrations in an ambient sample were directly and simultaneously measured using the developed albedometer. The developed instrument was validated via an intercomparison of the measured aerosol scattering coefficient and NO2 trace concentration against a TSI 3563 integrating nephelometer and a chemiluminescence detector, respectively.

  18. Rf cavity primer for cyclic proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this note is to describe the electrical and mechanical properites of particle accelerator rf cavities in a manner which will be useful to physics and engineering graduates entering the accelerator field. The discussion will be limited to proton (or antiproton) synchrotron accelerators or storage rings operating roughly in the range of 20 to 200 MHz. The very high gradient, fixed frequency UHF or microwave devices appropriate for electron machines and the somewhat lower frequency and broader bandwidth devices required for heavy ion accelerators are discussed extensively in other papers in this series. While it is common pratice to employ field calculation programs such as SUPERFISH, URMEL, or MAFIA as design aids in the development of rf cavities, we attempt here to elucidate various of the design parameters commonly dealt with in proton machines through the use of simple standing wave coaxial resonator expressions. In so doing, we treat only standing wave structures. Although low-impedance, moderately broad pass-band travelling wave accelerating systems are used in the CERN SPS, such systems are more commonly found in linacs, and they have not been used widely in large cyclic accelerators. Two appendices providing useful supporting material regarding relativistic particle dynamics and synchrotron motion in cyclic accelerators are added to supplement the text

  19. Beam - cavity interaction beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a beam with a cavity and a generator in cyclic accelerators or storage rings is investigated. Application of Maxwell's equations together with the nonuniform boundary condition allows one to get an equivalent circuit for a beam-loaded cavity. The general equation for beam loading is obtained on the basis of the equivalent circuit, and the beam admittance is calculated. Formulas for power consumption by a beam-loaded cavity are derived, and the optimal tuning and coupling factor are analyzed. (author)

  20. Spectrum of isotopic neutron sources inside concrete wall spherical cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron spectra of 252Cf/D2O, 140LaBe, 252Cf, 238Pu18O2, 241AmB, 241AmBe, 226RaBe and 239PuBe isotopic neutron sources due to room-return have been determined for various source-to-detector distances in concrete spherical cavities of different radius. Changes in the amount of thermal neutrons (E≤0.414eV) were analyzed to estimate, for each neutron source, the coefficient that relates the neutron source strength and room surface area with the thermal neutron fluence rates. The study was carried out using Monte Carlo methods for 200, 400, 500, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1500-cm-radius spherical cavity in vacuum; cavities are 100-cm-thick concrete. Point sources were located at the center of cavity and neutron spectra were calculated at several source-to-detector distances along the cavity radius. The thermal neutron contribution was thereby evaluated. From these calculations a weighted coefficient value that relates the thermal neutron fluence with the neutron source strength and the total inner area surface of the cavity was estimated to be 3.76±0.03

  1. Proposed Cavity for Reduced Slip-Stacking Loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldred, J. [Indiana U.; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs a novel dynamical mechanism to improve the performance of slip-stacking. Slip-stacking in an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly double the proton intensity. During slip-stacking, the Recycler or the Main Injector stores two particles beams that spatially overlap but have different momenta. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused by two 53 MHz 100 kV RF cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV RF cavity, with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main RF frequencies. In simulation, we find the proposed RF cavity significantly enhances the stable bucket area and reduces slip-stacking losses under reasonable injection scenarios. We quantify and map the stability of the parameter space for any accelerator implementing slip-stacking with the addition of a harmonic RF cavity.

  2. Plasmonic coupled-cavity system for enhancement of surface plasmon localization in plasmonic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, K. J. A.; Bai, P.; Gu, M. X.; Ang, L. K.

    2012-07-01

    A plasmonic coupled-cavity system, which consists of a quarter-wave coupler cavity, a resonant Fabry-Pérot detector nanocavity, and an off-resonant reflector cavity, is used to enhance the localization of surface plasmons in a plasmonic detector. The coupler cavity is designed based on transmission line theory and wavelength scaling rules in the optical regime, while the reflector cavity is derived from off-resonant resonator structures to attenuate transmission of plasmonic waves. We observed strong coupling of the cavities in simulation results, with an 86% improvement of surface plasmon localization achieved. The plasmonic coupled-cavity system may find useful applications in areas of nanoscale photodetectors, sensors, and an assortment of plasmonic-circuit devices.

  3. Enhanced absorption of thin-film photovoltaic cells using an optical cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show via numerical simulations that the absorption and solar energy conversion efficiency of a thin-film photovoltaic (PV) cell can be significantly enhanced by embedding it into an optical cavity. A reflective hemi-ellipsoid with an aperture for sunlight placed over a tilted PV cell reflects unabsorbed photons back to the cell, allowing for multiple opportunities for absorption. Ray tracing simulations predict that with the proposed cavity a textured thin-film silicon cell can exceed the Yablonovitch (Lambertian) limit for absorption across a broad wavelength range, while the performance of the cavity-embedded planar PV cell approaches that of the cell with the surface texturing. (paper)

  4. Nanoimplantation and Purcell enhancement of single NV centers in photonic crystal cavities in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Riedrich-Möller, Janine; Meijer, Jan; Pauly, Christoph; Mücklich, Frank; Markham, Matthew; Edmonds, Andrew M; Becher, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We present the controlled creation of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers via ion implantation at the center of a photonic crystal cavity which is fabricated in an ultrapure, single crystal diamond membrane. High-resolution placement of NV centers is achieved using collimation of a 5keV-nitrogen ion beam through a pierced tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We demonstrate coupling of the implanted NV centers' broad band fluorescence to a cavity mode and observe Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission. The results are in good agreement with a master equation model for the cavity coupling.

  5. Nanoimplantation and Purcell enhancement of single nitrogen-vacancy centers in photonic crystal cavities in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedrich-Möller, Janine; Becher, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.becher@physik.uni-saarland.de [Universität des Saarlandes, Fachrichtung 7.2 (Experimentalphysik), Campus E 2.6, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Pezzagna, Sébastien; Meijer, Jan [Universität Leipzig, Institut für Experimentalphysik II, Linnéstraße 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Pauly, Christoph; Mücklich, Frank [Universität des Saarlandes, Fachrichtung 8.4 (Materialwissenschaft und Werkstofftechnik), Campus D 3.3, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Markham, Matthew; Edmonds, Andrew M. [Element Six Ltd., Global Innovation Centre, Fermi Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QR (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-01

    We present the controlled creation of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers via ion implantation at the center of a photonic crystal cavity which is fabricated in an ultrapure, single crystal diamond membrane. High-resolution placement of NV centers is achieved using collimation of a 5 keV-nitrogen ion beam through a pierced tip of an atomic force microscope. We demonstrate coupling of the implanted NV centers' broad band fluorescence to a cavity mode and observe Purcell enhancement of the spontaneous emission. The results are in good agreement with a master equation model for the cavity coupling.

  6. Atraumatic restorative treatment in atypical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Simino Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The atraumatic restorative treatment has been widely divulged among professionals in the area of Pediatric Dentistry. This restorative technique is included in the philosophy of Minimal Intervention and is considered one of the most conservative treatments, because only the layer of infected dentin caries is removed. Moreover, the atraumatic restorative treatment has been shown to be less painful than conventional approaches, and local anesthesia is rarely required. After the removal of the infected dentin, the cavities are filled with glass ionomer cement, a material that has antimicrobial capacity, good marginal sealing and constant fluorine release and recharge. In spite of the increasing number of studies about atraumatic restorative treatment, only studies related to restorations in occlusal cavities have shown scientific evidences about the technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of atraumatic restorative treatment in cavities with 3 or more surfaces involved, by means of a clinical case report of a patient with extensive dstruction in primary teeth, who was submitted to atraumatic restorative treatment, and observe the result of the treatment after one year of clinical and radiographic control.

  7. Geometry-Invariant Resonant Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Liberal, Iñigo; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modeling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of its geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected in order to operate at a specific frequency. Here, we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, i.e., resonators whose eigenfrequency is invariant with respect to geometrical deformations. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, which enable decoupling of the time and spatial field variations. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  8. Vibration insensitive optical ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Jin; Jiang Yan-Yi; Fang Su; Bi Zhi-Yi; Ma Long-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The mounting configuration of an optical ring cavity is optimized for vibration insensitivity by finite element analysis. A minimum response to vertical accelerations is found by simulations made for different supporting positions.

  9. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-01-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  10. A broad view of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F T

    2007-01-01

    In the mind of the general public, the words "arsenic" and "poison" have become almost synonymous. Yet, As is a natural metallic element found in low concentrations in virtually every part of the environment, including foods. Mining and smelting activities are closely associated with As, and the largest occurrence of As contamination in the United States is near the gold mines of northern Nevada. Inhabitants of Bangladesh and surrounding areas have been exposed to water that is naturally and heavily contaminated with As, causing what the World Health Organization has described as the worst mass poisoning in history. Although readily absorbed by humans, most inorganic As (>90%) is rapidly cleared from the blood with a half-life of 1 to 2 h, and 40 to 70% of the As intake is absorbed, metabolized, and excreted within 48 h. Arsenic does not appreciably bioaccumulate, nor does it biomagnify in the food chain. The United States has for some time purchased more As than any other country in the world, but As usage is waning, and further reductions appear likely. Arsenic is used in a wide variety of industrial applications, from computers to fireworks. All feed additives used in US poultry feeds must meet the strict requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine (Rockville, MD) before use. Although some public health investigators have identified poultry products as a potentially significant source of total As exposure for Americans, studies consistently demonstrate that <1% of samples tested are above the 0.5 ppm limit established by the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated the possibility that As in poultry litter could pollute ground waters, million of tons of litter have been applied to the land, and no link has been established between litter application and As contamination of ground water. Yet, the fact that <2% of the United States population is involved in

  11. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  12. Efficient quasi-three-level Nd:YAG laser at 946 nm pumped by a tunable external cavity tapered diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Haynes Pak Hay; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Using a tunable external cavity tapered diode laser (ECDL) pumped quasi-three-level Nd:YAG laser, a fivefold reduction in threshold and twofold increase in slope efficiency is demonstrated when compared to a traditional broad area diode laser pump source. A TEM00 power of 800 mW with 65% slope...... efficiency is obtained, the highest reported TEM00 power from any 946 nm Nd:YAG laser pumped by a single emitter diode laser pump source. A quantum efficiency of 0.85 has been estimated from experimental data using a simple quasi-three-level model. The reported value is in good agreement with published...... values, suggesting that the model is adequate. Improvement of the 946 nm laser due to the ECDL's narrow spectrum proves to be less significant when compared to its spatial quality, inferring a broad spectrum tapered diode laser pump source may be most practical. Experimental confirmation of such setup...

  13. Neutralization of low energy broad ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of a low energy broad ion beam space charge and current compensation and ion-beam plasma (IBP), which would be created in transport space of the beam. The beam had cylindrical symmetry. The continuous uniform and hole tube like ion beams are used in the experiments. Different channels of electron appearing have been investigated for cases of neutralization due to secondary γ-electrons from the target and by electrons from glow cathode-neutralizer with metal or dielectric target. Results of neutralizing electrons energy distributions function measurements are presented as well as dependences of electron temperature and self-consisted plasma potential vs. beam parameters, ambient gas pressure, neutralizer parameters. Role of the thermoelectrons and dependence of IBP parameters on neutralizer area, location and potential are discussed. Significant role in neutralization of spatial collisional processes has been revealed even in neutralization by thermocathode. On the base of the experimental results self-consistent theoretical model have been developed, which describes the behavior of intense ion beam passing through the neutral gas at low pressure within conductive walls. The collisionless approach is used which means absence of collisional relaxation of the beam. This theory is used to derive the plasma potential and electron temperature within the beam

  14. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  15. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  16. Common problems of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, J G

    1990-06-01

    The oral cavity is an area of the human body that is often given only cursory surveillance by primary care physicians. In this article, I have discussed a comprehensive approach for collecting subjective and objective data from the patient that is pertinent to oral conditions. Most common and critical problems have been reviewed in detail, focusing on their definition, epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management. This review is intended to sensitize physicians to the need to evaluate oral complaints more completely, to diagnose them more accurately, and to treat them more successfully. PMID:2196616

  17. 3D cavity detection technique and its application based on cavity auto scanning laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ling; LI Xi-bing; LI Fa-ben; ZHAO Guo-yan; QIN Yu-hui

    2008-01-01

    Ground constructions and mines are severely threatened by underground cavities especially those unsafe or inaccessible ones. Safe and precise cavity detection is vital for reasonable cavity evaluation and disposal. The conventional cavity detection methods and their limitation were analyzed. Those methods cannot form 3D model of underground cavity which is used for instructing the cavity disposal; and their precisions in detection are always greatly affected by the geological circumstance. The importance of 3D cavity detection in metal mine for safe exploitation was pointed out; and the 3D cavity laser detection method and its principle were introduced. A cavity auto scanning laser system was recommended to actualize the cavity 3D detection after comparing with the other laser detection systems. Four boreholes were chosen to verify the validity of the cavity auto scanning laser system. The results show that the cavity auto scanning laser system is very suitable for underground 3D cavity detection, especially for those inaccessible ones.

  18. Single quantum dot controls a plasmonic cavity's scattering and anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsfield, Thomas; Chang, Wei-Shun; Yang, Seung-Cheol; Ma, Tzuhsuan; Shi, Jinwei; Sun, Liuyang; Shvets, Gennady; Link, Stephan; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonic cavities represent a promising platform for controlling light-matter interaction due to their exceptionally small mode volume and high density of photonic states. Using plasmonic cavities for enhancing light's coupling to individual two-level systems, such as single semiconductor quantum dots (QD), is particularly desirable for exploring cavity quantum electrodynamic (QED) effects and using them in quantum information applications. The lack of experimental progress in this area is in part due to the difficulty of precisely placing a QD within nanometers of the plasmonic cavity. Here, we study the simplest plasmonic cavity in the form of a spherical metallic nanoparticle (MNP). By controllably positioning a semiconductor QD in the close proximity of the MNP cavity via atomic force microscope (AFM) manipulation, the scattering spectrum of the MNP is dramatically modified due to Fano interference between the classical plasmonic resonance of the MNP and the quantized exciton resonance in the QD. Moreover, our experiment demonstrates that a single two-level system can render a spherical MNP strongly anisotropic. These findings represent an important step toward realizing quantum plasmonic devices. PMID:26372957

  19. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  20. Broad Consent For Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Christine; Eckstein, Lisa; Berkman, Ben; Brock, Dan; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Greely, Hank; Hansson, Mats G.; Hull, Sara; Kim, Scott; Lo, Bernie; Pentz, Rebecca; Rodriguez, Laura; Weil, Carol; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Wendler, David

    2016-01-01

    Different types of consent are used to obtain human biospecimens for future research. This variation has resulted in confusion regarding what research is permitted, inadvertent constraints on future research, and research proceeding without consent. The NIH Clinical Center’s Department of Bioethics held a workshop to consider the ethical acceptability of addressing these concerns by using broad consent for future research on stored biospecimens. Multiple bioethics scholars, who have written on these issues, discussed the reasons for consent, the range of consent strategies, gaps in our understanding, and concluded with a proposal for broad initial consent coupled with oversight and, when feasible, ongoing provision of information to donors. The manuscript describes areas of agreement as well as areas that need more research and dialogue. Given recent proposed changes to the Common Rule, and new guidance regarding storing and sharing data and samples, this is an important and timely topic. PMID:26305750

  1. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  2. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  3. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, D E; Gorhskov, A V; Kimble, H J

    2012-01-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated "impurity" atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a "strong coupling" regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a cavity photon. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  4. Measuring Prevention More Broadly, An Empirical...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Measuring Prevention More Broadly, An Empirical Assessment of CHIPRA Core Measures Differences in CHIP design and structure, across states and over time, may limit...

  5. Radiation Transfer in the Cavity and Shell of Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, M D; Zijlstra, A A

    2012-01-01

    We develop an approximate analytical solution for the transfer of line-averaged radiation in the hydrogen recombination lines for the ionized cavity and molecular shell of a spherically symmetric planetary nebula. The scattering problem is treated as a perturbation, using a mean intensity derived from a scattering-free solution. The analytical function was fitted to Halpha and Hbeta data from the planetary nebula NGC6537. The position of the maximum in the intensity profile produced consistent values for the radius of the cavity as a fraction of the radius of the dusty nebula: 0.21 for Halpha and 0.20 for Hbeta. Recovered optical depths were broadly consistent with observed optical extinction in the nebula, but the range of fit parameters in this case is evidence for a clumpy distribution of dust.

  6. Inherent calibration of a blue LED-CE-DOAS instrument to measure iodine oxide, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, water vapour and aerosol extinction in open cavity mode

    OpenAIRE

    Thalman, R; Volkamer, R.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light-Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases and aerosol extinction with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e. does not ...

  7. Mapping plant functional types over broad mountainous regions

    OpenAIRE

    Danlu Cai; Yanning Guan; Shan Guo; Chunyan Zhang; Klaus Fraedrich

    2014-01-01

    Research on global climate change requires plant functional type (PFT) products. Although several PFT mapping procedures for remote sensing imagery are being used, none of them appears to be specifically designed to map and evaluate PFTs over broad mountainous areas which are highly relevant regions to identify and analyze the response of natural ecosystems. We present a methodology for generating soft classifications of PFTs from remotely sensed time series that are based on a hierarchical s...

  8. Techniques in molecular spectroscopy: from broad bandwidth to high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, Kevin C.

    This thesis presents a range of different experiments all seeking to extended the capabilities of molecular spectroscopy and enable new applications. The new technique of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) provides a unique combination of broad bandwidth, high resolution, and high sensitivity that can be useful for a wide range of applications. Previous demonstrations of CE-DFCS were confined to the visible or near-infrared and operated over a limited bandwidth: for many applications it is desirable to increase the spectral coverage and to extend to the mid-infrared where strong, fundamental vibrational modes of molecules occur. There are several key requirements for CE-DFCS: a frequency comb source that provides broad bandwidth and high resolution, an optical cavity for high sensitivity, and a detection system capable of multiplex detection of the comb spectrum transmitted through the cavity. We first discuss comb sources with emphasis on the coherence properties of spectral broadening in nonlinear fiber and the development of a high-power frequency comb source in the mid-infrared based on an optical-parametric oscillator (OPO). To take advantage of this new mid-infrared comb source for spectroscopy, we also discuss the development of a rapid-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS). We then discuss the first demonstration of CE-DFCS with spectrally broadened light from a highly nonlinear fiber with the application to measurements of impurities in semiconductor manufacturing gases. We also cover our efforts towards extending CE-DFCS to the mid-infrared using the mid-infrared OPO and FTS to measure ppb levels of various gases important for breath analysis and atmospheric chemistry and highlight some future applications of this system. In addition to the study of neutral molecules, broad-bandwidth and high-resolution spectra of molecular ions are useful for astrochemistry where many of the observed molecules are ionic, for studying

  9. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul;

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective open study the sterility of the uterine cavity was evaluated in 99 women admitted for hysterectomy. The indications for hysterectomy were in most cases persistent irregular vaginal bleeding and fibromyomas of the uterus. Samples for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, Chlamydia...... trachomatis, yeasts and viruses were taken preoperatively from the apex of the vagina and cervical os. Immediately after hysterectomy the uterus was opened under sterile conditions and samples obtained from the isthmus and fundus of the uterine cavity for microbiological examination. Wet smears were taken...

  10. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heremans K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  11. Nanobeam Cavities for Reconfigurable Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Deotare, Parag

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, with theoretical quality factors of \\(1.4 × 10^7\\) in silicon, operating at ~1550 nm. By detecting the cross-polarized resonantly scattered light from a normally incident laser beam, we measure a quality factor of nearly \\(7.5 × 10^5\\). We show on-chip integration of the cavities using waveguides and an inverse taper geometry based mode size converters, and also...

  12. Synchronization in an optomechanical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomi, Keren; Yuvaraj, D; Baskin, Ilya; Suchoi, Oren; Winik, Roni; Buks, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    We study self-excited oscillations (SEO) in an on-fiber optomechanical cavity. Synchronization is observed when the optical power that is injected into the cavity is periodically modulated. A theoretical analysis based on the Fokker-Planck equation evaluates the expected phase space distribution (PSD) of the self-oscillating mechanical resonator. A tomography technique is employed for extracting PSD from the measured reflected optical power. Time-resolved state tomography measurements are performed to study phase diffusion and phase locking of the SEO. The detuning region inside which synchronization occurs is experimentally determined and the results are compared with the theoretical prediction. PMID:25871175

  13. Green high-power tunable external-cavity GaN diode laser at 515  nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Mingjun; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-09-15

    A 480 mW green tunable diode laser system is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. The laser system is based on a GaN broad-area diode laser and Littrow external-cavity feedback. The green laser system is operated in two modes by switching the polarization direction of the laser beam incident on the grating. When the laser beam is p-polarized, an output power of 50 mW with a tunable range of 9.2 nm is achieved. When the laser beam is s-polarized, an output power of 480 mW with a tunable range of 2.1 nm is obtained. This constitutes the highest output power from a tunable green diode laser system. PMID:27628345

  14. Entanglement swapping between atom and cavity and generation of entangled state of cavity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ai-Xi; Deng Li

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme where entanglement swapping between atom and cavity can be realized. A-type three-level atoms interacting resonantly with cavity field are considered. By detecting atom and cavity field, it realizes entanglement swapping between atom and cavity. It uses the technique of entanglement swapping to generate an entangled state of two cavity fields by measuring on atoms. It discusses the experimental feasibility of the proposed scheme and application of entangled state of cavity fields.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON FLOW AND SEDIMENT MOVEMENT IN CAVITY CIRCULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingquan LIU

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports a flume experiment of flow and sediment movement in a cavity. The flow velocity,sediment concentration and the mechanism of hydraulic sorting in the circulation flow are discussed.The quantity and patterns of sediment deposition in the circulation area are studied as well.

  16. Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

  17. Morphology of a Hot Coronal Cavity Core as Observed by Hinode/XRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Hudson, H. S.

    2010-01-01

    We follow a coronal cavity that was observed by Hinode/XRT during the summer of 2008. This cavity has a persistent area of relatively bright X-ray emission in its center. We use multifilter data from XRT to study the thermal emission from this cavity, and find that the bright center is hotter than the surrounding cavity plasma with temperatures of about 1.6 MK. We follow the morphology of this hot feature as the cavity structure rotates over the limb during the several days between July 19 - 23 2008. We find that the hot structure at first looks fairly circular, then appears to expand and elongate, and then shrinks again to a compact circular shape. We interpret this apparent change in shape as being due to the morphology of the filament channel associated with the cavity, and the change in viewing angle as the structure rotates over the limb of the Sun.

  18. Investigation Of Breakdown Induced Surface Damage On 805 Mhz Pillbox Cavity Interior Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Jana, M R; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, K; Freemire, B; Torun, Y; Bowring, D; Flanagan, G

    2014-01-01

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with ...

  19. Experimental study on unsteady cloud cavity behaviour and induced pressure fluctuation in a convergent-divergent channel using simultaneous measurement technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To address the unsteady cavity behaviour and induced pressure fluctuation in cloud cavitating flow, cavitation images and pressure fluctuation signals are simultaneously acquired by high speed visualization system and 4 piezo-electric transducers in a convergent-divergent channel. The cavitation images are processed by using a home-developed software to obtain the time evolutions of global cavity area. Frequency analysis is conducted for both global cavity area and pressure signal. Bubble dynamics is introduced to analyze the correlation between pressure fluctuation in the downstream and global cavity behaviour. Two conclusions are achieved: First, in cloud cavitating flow, the time evolution of both the cavity behaviour and pressure fluctuation are quasi-periodic, one quasi-period can be divided into three main stages: growth of attached cavity, shedding of attached cavity, coalescence and collapse of detached cavity. Second, the dominant frequency of global cavity area and pressure fluctuation on 4 transducers are the same, it's 20Hz in this study. Third, it's found that during the stage of growth of attached cavity and growth, collapse of detached cavity, the correlation between global cavity area and induced pressure in the downstream is similar with that of a single bubble; while, such correlation is not clear when several travelling cavities exist at the same time

  20. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  1. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianHua; RUAN ShiPing

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavitation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator, which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emergence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects, of both model and prototype, on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length below aerators was suggested, which considers overall effects of the above mentioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  2. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavi-tation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator,which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emer-gence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects,of both model and prototype,on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length be-low aerators was suggested,which considers overall effects of the above men-tioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  3. Large-mode enhancement cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Henning; Holzberger, Simon; Kaster, Jan; Weitenberg, Johannes; Pervak, Volodymyr; Apolonski, Alexander; Fill, Ernst; Krausz, Ferenc; Pupeza, Ioachim

    2013-05-01

    In passive enhancement cavities the achievable power level is limited by mirror damage. Here, we address the design of robust optical resonators with large spot sizes on all mirrors, a measure that promises to mitigate this limitation by decreasing both the intensity and the thermal gradient on the mirror surfaces. We introduce a misalignment sensitivity metric to evaluate the robustness of resonator designs. We identify the standard bow-tie resonator operated close to the inner stability edge as the most robust large-mode cavity and implement this cavity with two spherical mirrors with 600 mm radius of curvature, two plane mirrors and a round trip length of 1.2 m, demonstrating a stable power enhancement of near-infrared laser light by a factor of 2000. Beam radii of 5.7 mm × 2.6 mm (sagittal × tangential 1/e(2) intensity radius) on all mirrors are obtained. We propose a simple all-reflective ellipticity compensation scheme. This will enable a significant increase of the attainable power and intensity levels in enhancement cavities. PMID:23670017

  4. Field emission in RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1996-01-01

    Electron field emission limits the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities. It is shown how and why it is an important problem. The phenomenology of field emission is then described, both in DC and RF regimes. Merits of a few plausible `remedies` to field emission are discussed. (author). 20 refs.

  5. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...

  6. A 200 MHz prebunching cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This cavity was installed in the PS ring and proved very efficient in providing a modulation on the PS beam before it is injected into the SPS machine. Moreover it allowed longitudinal instabilities studies at high intensities. Roberto Cappi stands on the left.

  7. Two-photon interference from independent cavity-coupled emitters on-a-chip

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Je-Hyung; Leavitt, Richard P; Waks, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between solid-state quantum emitters and cavities are important for a broad range of applications in quantum communication, linear optical quantum computing, nonlinear photonics, and photonic quantum simulation. These applications often require combining many devices on a single chip with identical emission wavelengths in order to generate two-photon interference, the primary mechanism for achieving effective photon-photon interactions. Such integration remains extremely challenging due to inhomogeneous broadening and fabrication errors that randomize the resonant frequencies of both the emitters and cavities. In this letter we demonstrate two-photon interference from independent cavity-coupled emitters on the same chip, providing a potential solution to this long-standing problem. We overcome spectral mismatch between different cavities due to fabrication errors by depositing and locally evaporating a thin layer of condensed nitrogen. We integrate optical heaters to tune individual dots within e...

  8. Generation of single-frequency tunable green light in a coupled ring tapered diode laser cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    in the broad wavelength range from 1049 nm to 1093 nm and the beam propagation factor is improved from M2 = 2.8 to below 1.1. The laser frequency is automatically locked to the cavity resonance frequency using optical feedback. Furthermore, we show that this adaptive external cavity approach leads to efficient......We report the realization of a tapered diode laser operated in a coupled ring cavity that significantly improves the coherence properties of the tapered laser and efficiently generates tunable light at the second harmonic frequency. The tapered diode laser is tunable with single-frequency output...... frequency doubling. More than 500 mW green output power is obtained by placing a periodically poled LiNbO3 crystal in the external cavity. The single frequency green output from the laser system is tunable in the 530 nm to 533 nm range limited by the LiNbO3 crystal. The optical to optical conversion...

  9. Chip-scale cavity optomechanics in lithium niobate

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Wei C

    2016-01-01

    We develop a chip-scale cavity optomechanical system in single-crystal lithium niobate that exhibits high optical quality factors and a large frequency-quality product as high as $3.6\\times 10^{12}$ Hz at room temperature and atmosphere. The excellent optical and mechanical properties together with the strong optomechanical coupling allow us to efficiently excite the coherent regenerative optomechanical oscillation operating at 375.8 MHz with a threshold power of 174 ${\\rm \\mu W}$ in the air. The demonstrated lithium niobate optomechanical device enables great potential for achieving electro-optic-mechanical hybrid systems for broad applications in sensing, metrology, and quantum physics.

  10. Nanobeam cavities for Reconfigurable Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deotare, Parag B.

    We investigate the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of high quality factor photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, with theoretical quality factors of 1.4 x 107 in silicon, operating at ˜ 1550 nm. By detecting the cross-polarized resonantly scattered light from a normally incident laser beam, we measure a quality factor of nearly 7.5 x 105. We show on-chip integration of the cavities using waveguides and an inverse taper geometry based mode size converters, and also demonstrate tuning of the optical resonance using thermo-optic effect. We also study coupled cavities and show that the single nanobeam cavity modes are coupled into even and odd superposition modes. Using electrostatic force and taking advantage of the highly dispersive nature of the even mode to the nanobeam separation, we demonstrate dynamically reconfigurable optical filters tunable continuously and reversibly over a 9.5 nm wavelength range. The electrostatic force, obtained by applying bias voltages directly to the nanobeams, is used to control the spacing between the nanobeams, which in turn results in tuning of the cavity resonance. The observed tuning trends were confirmed through simulations that modeled the electrostatic actuation as well as the optical resonances in our reconfigurable geometries. Finally we demonstrate reconfiguration of coupled cavities by using optical gradient force induced mechanical actuation. Propagating waveguide modes that exist over wide wavelength range are used to actuate the structures and in that way control the resonance of a localized cavity mode. Using this all-optical approach, more than 18 linewidths of tuning range is demonstrated. Using an on-chip temperature self-referencing method that we developed, we determined that 20% of the total tuning was due to optomechanical reconfiguration and the rest due to thermo-optic effects. By operating the device at frequencies higher than the thermal cut-off, we show high speed operation dominated by

  11. 33 CFR 110.27 - Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass. 110.27 Section 110.27 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.27 Lynn Harbor in Broad Sound, Mass. North...

  12. BROAD PHONEME CLASSIFICATION USING SIGNAL BASED FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deekshitha G

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Speech is the most efficient and popular means of human communication Speech is produced as a sequence of phonemes. Phoneme recognition is the first step performed by automatic speech recognition system. The state-of-the-art recognizers use mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC features derived through short time analysis, for which the recognition accuracy is limited. Instead of this, here broad phoneme classification is achieved using features derived directly from the speech at the signal level itself. Broad phoneme classes include vowels, nasals, fricatives, stops, approximants and silence. The features identified useful for broad phoneme classification are voiced/unvoiced decision, zero crossing rate (ZCR, short time energy, most dominant frequency, energy in most dominant frequency, spectral flatness measure and first three formants. Features derived from short time frames of training speech are used to train a multilayer feedforward neural network based classifier with manually marked class label as output and classification accuracy is then tested. Later this broad phoneme classifier is used for broad syllable structure prediction which is useful for applications such as automatic speech recognition and automatic language identification.

  13. Patient's perception of location, form and size in case of cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoya, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Mataki, Shiro

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the difference between the imagination of patients and the reality in regard to the location, the form and the size of the cavity in case of cavity preparation for dental restoration. Firstly, we manufactured the dummy dentition for simulated cavity preparation and the operator intra-orally prepared a cavity on the dummy dentition in subject to confirm its validity. Then, 5 operators intra-orally prepared prescribed cavities at the both sides of maxillary first molars on the dummy dentition in every one of 5 subjects with masking. We compared the location, the form and the area of these prepared cavities with those imagined by subjects, respectively. In 58% of cases, the subjects could accurately recognize the location of prepared teeth. And 34% of cases also determined the Class of cavity form. The imagined area was larger than the actual area and the difference was statistically significant (p cavity preparation and patients tended to overestimate amounts of removed tooth substance.

  14. Subsurface Cavity Detection by Using Integrated Geophysical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykaç, Sinem; Rezzan Ozerk, Zeynep; Işıkdeniz Şerifoǧlu, Betül; Bihter Demirci, Büşra; Timur, Emre; Çakir, Korhan

    2016-04-01

    Global warming experienced in recent years in Turkey has led to a severe drought around the Konya Plain in central Anatolia .As a result, excessive amount of ground water was drawn in the region for the sustainability of agricultural activities. So, five small-scale shallow depth sinkholes have occured at different times, at an average interval between 400-450 m. in the study area; Konya-Atlantı. Generally, sinkholes formation occurres among natural processes has turned into disasters caused by humans due to excessive use of groundwater. Consequently, investigations were carried out within a partnership research programme on cavity detection and ground penetration radar, microgravity and multi-frequency electromagnetic methods were jointly utilized. . Exact locations and dimensions of two possible hidden cavities were determined by using these multidisciplinary methods. Keywords: Cavity;Ground-penetrating radar;Konya;Microgravimetry;Multi-frequency electromagnetic method.

  15. Giant Broad Line Regions in Dwarf Seyferts

    CERN Document Server

    Devereux, Nick

    2015-01-01

    High angular resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has revealed a remarkable population of galaxies hosting dwarf Seyfert nuclei with an unusually large broad-line region (BLR). These objects are remarkable for two reasons. Firstly, the size of the BLR can, in some cases, rival those seen in the most luminous quasars. Secondly, the size of the BLR is not correlated with the central continuum luminosity, an observation that distinguishes them from their reverberating counterparts. Collectively, these early results suggest that non-reverberating dwarf Seyferts are a heterogeneous group and not simply scaled versions of each other. Careful inspection reveals broad H Balmer emission lines with single peaks, double peaks, and a combination of the two, suggesting that the broad emission lines are produced in kinematically distinct regions centered on the black hole (BH). Because the gravitational field strength is already known for these objects, by virtue of knowing their BH mass, ...

  16. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common treatment for all stages of lip and oral cavity cancer. Surgery may include the following: Wide local excision : Removal ... cancer may have spread from the lip and oral cavity. Plastic surgery : An operation that restores or improves the appearance ...

  17. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  18. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer » Detailed Guide » What are ... how cancers start and spread, see What Is Cancer? Oral cavity cancer, or just oral cancer, is cancer ...

  19. Optimum Cavity Radius Within a Bottle-Shaped Thermoacoustic Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Justin; Andersen, Bonnie

    2009-10-01

    Heat energy can be used to generate acoustic energy due to thermoacoustic interactions. These engines can be used to create sound waves without any moving parts, like pistons, and could be used in space to convert solar energy into electricity. This research focused on the optimization of the geometry of bottle-shaped resonators used for thermoacoustic prime movers. These resonators have the advantage of non-harmonic overtones compared with half-wave resonators. The resonators for this research were constructed of concentric cylinders consisting of a neck piece and a cavity. The dimensions were approximately 5 cm with an ID of 2 cm for the neck and 10 cm long with IDs varying from about 2 cm to 12 cm for the cavity, producing operating frequencies ranging from approximately 1.2 to 1.5 kHz, following a theoretical model. Twelve different cavity radii were tested. The optimal cavity radius of 2.06 cm had an onset time that was 27 s faster and an onset temperature difference that was lower by 12 C than the smallest cavity (a half-wave resonator). Future research will explore the quality factor and optimum stack to surface area ratio of the engines.

  20. Silicon micromachined broad band light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric (Inventor); Tuma, Margaret L. (Inventor); Eastwood, Michael (Inventor); Hansler, Richard (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A micro electromechanical system (MEMS) broad band incandescent light source includes three layers: a top transmission window layer; a middle filament mount layer; and a bottom reflector layer. A tungsten filament with a spiral geometry is positioned over a hole in the middle layer. A portion of the broad band light from the heated filament is reflective off the bottom layer. Light from the filament and the reflected light of the filament are transmitted through the transmission window. The light source may operate at temperatures of 2500 K or above. The light source may be incorporated into an on board calibrator (OBC) for a spectrometer.

  1. Cavity-water interface is polar

    OpenAIRE

    Friesen, Allan D.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations of the electrostatics and dynamics of water hydration shells surrounding Kihara cavities given by a Lennard-Jones (LJ) layer at the surface of a hard-sphere cavity. The local dielectric response of the hydration layer substantially exceeds that of bulk water, with the magnitude of the dielectric constant peak in the shell increasing with the growing cavity size. The polar shell propagates into bulk water to approximately the cavity radius. The s...

  2. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  3. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. Ian Wilso seems to hold it in his hands. The storage cavities had 4 portholes, 1 each for: RF feed; tuning; connection to the accelerating cavity; vacuum pump. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the lower LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. See also 8002294, 8006510X, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  4. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan;

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  5. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  6. Coupled fiber taper extraction of 1.53 um photoluminescence from erbium doped silicon nitride photonic crystal cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Shambat, Gary; Gong, Yiyang; Lu, Jesse; Yerci, Selcuk; Li, Rui; Negro, Luca Dal; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Optical fiber tapers are used to collect photoluminescence emission at ~1.5 um from photonic crystal cavities fabricated in erbium doped silicon nitride on silicon. Photoluminescence collection via fiber taper is enhanced 2.5 times relative to free space, with a total taper collection efficiency of 53%. By varying the fiber taper offset from the cavity, a broad tuning range of coupling strength is obtained. This material system combined with fiber taper collection is promising for building on...

  7. Nanometer cavities studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positronium (Ps) is trapped in cavities in insulating solids, and the lifetime of ortho Ps is determined by the size of the cavity. The information on the properties of the cavities obtained by use of the standard slow positron beam and the 'normal' positron annihilation techniques is compared for several selected cases. (author)

  8. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  9. Broadly tunable (440-670 nm) solid-state organic laser with disposable capsules

    CERN Document Server

    Mhibik, Oussama; Siove, Alain; Forget, Sebastien; Chenais, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    An innovative concept of thin-film organic solid-state laser is proposed, with diffraction-limited output and a broad tuning range covering the visible spectrum under UV optical pumping. The laser beam is tunable over 230 nm, from 440 to 670 nm, with a 3 nm full width at half maximum typical spectral width. The structure consists of a compact fixed bulk optical cavity, a polymeric intracavity etalon for wavelength tuning, as well as five different disposable glass slides coated with a dye-doped polymer film, forming a very simple and low-cost gain medium. The use of interchangeable/disposable "gain capsules" is an alternative solution to photodegradation issues, since gain chips can be replaced without realignment of the cavity. The laser lifetime of a single chip in ambient conditions and without encapsulation was extrapolated to be around 107 pulses at a microjoule energy-per-pulse level.

  10. A compact gas single-mode radio-frequency excited laser with a hybrid unstable and waveguide cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years we have seen a steady increase in the use of transverse radio-frequency (RF) gas discharges for excitation of carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers. However, RF excitation can be realized in carbon oxide (CO) and xenon (Xe) lasers. We attempt to construct a RF laser, which can work in broad spectral range of radiation. The design of this laser is based on the use of unstable telescopic cavity with the radiation spreading both in the free space and inside the waveguide. Employed discharge structure is formed by two parallel identical electrodes 30 x 230 mm in area and allocated at 2.5 mm distance from one another, and it has a gap, which is not confined limited by side walls. This ensures convective gas exchange between the reserve and active zones. This construction allows to get a high output power of generation with lasers having small dimensions, provides an opportunity to use single-mode generation for the basic hybrid mode; the latter is a combination of the lowest mode of gap waveguide and the lowest mode of unstable cavity

  11. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  12. Time-lapse electrical resistivity investigations for imaging the grouting injection in shallow subsurface cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Park, Samgyu; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  13. Multipacting Analysis for the Half-Wave Spoke Resonator Crab Cavity for LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    A compact 400-MHz half-wave spoke resonator (HWSR) superconducting crab cavity is being developed for the LHC upgrade. The cavity shape and the LOM/HOM couplers for such a design have been optimized to meet the space and beam dynamics requirements, and satisfactory RF parameters have been obtained. As it is known that multipacting is an issue of concern in a superconducting cavity which may limit the achievable gradient. Thus it is important in the cavity RF design to eliminate the potential MP conditions to save time and cost of cavity development. In this paper, we present the multipacting analysis for the HWSR crab cavity using the Track3P code developed at SLAC, and to discuss means to mitigate potential multipacting barriers. Track3P was used to analyze potential MP in the cavity and the LOM, HOM and FPC couplers. No resonances were found in the LOM couplers and the coaxial beam pipe. Resonant trajectories were identified on various locations in cavity, HOM and FPC couplers. Most of the resonances are not at the peak SEY of Nb. Run-away resonances were identified in broader areas on the cavity end plate and in the HOM coupler. The enhancement counter for run-away resonances does not show significant MP. HOM coupler geometry will be optimized to minimize the high SEY resonance.

  14. The GREGOR Broad-Band Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Lühe, O.; Volkmer, R.; Kentischer, T. J.; Geißler, R.

    2012-11-01

    The design and characteristics of the Broad-Band Imager (BBI) of GREGOR are described. BBI covers the visible spectral range with two cameras simultaneously for a large field and with critical sampling at 390 nm, and it includes a mode for observing the pupil in a Foucault configuration. Samples of first-light observations are shown.

  15. Broad resonances and beta-decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, K.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hyldegaard, S.;

    2015-01-01

    Beta-decay into broad resonances gives a distorted lineshape in the observed energy spectrum. Part of the distortion arises from the phase space factor, but we show that the beta-decay matrix element may also contribute. Based on a schematic model for p-wave continuum neutron states it is argued...

  16. Non-reacting flow visualization of supersonic combustor based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanhui; Liang, Jianhan; Zhao, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Nano-particle planer laser scattering and particle image velocimetry technology are employed to observe the flow field of scramjet combustors based on cavity and cavity-strut flameholder. Density field and velocity distribution inside combustors are obtained. Mainstream fluid enters into cavity nearby side wall in experimental observation because side wall shock waves interact with bottom wall boundary layer. Cavity fluid is entrained into mainstream in the middle of combustor meanwhile. Flow past cavity displays obvious three dimensional characteristics in both combustors. But cavity-strut combustor displays asymmetrical flow field because of strut configuration. Mass exchange between mainstream and cavity fluid is evaluated by statistic mass flow rate into cavity. Mass flow rate near side wall is raised to 6.62 times of the value in the middle of cavity combustor while it is 5.1 times in cavity-strut combustor. Further study is needed to injection strategies and realistic flow characteristics on condition of combustion.

  17. RF cavity vacuum interlock system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.; Crawford, K.; Bundy, R.; Dylla, H. F.; Heckman, J.; Marshall, J.; Nichols, R.; Osullivan, S.; Preble, J.; Robb, J.

    1992-03-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a continuous wave (CW) 4 GeV Electron Accelerator is undergoing construction in Newport News, Virginia. When completed in 1994, the accelerator will be the largest installation of radio-frequency superconductivity. Production of cryomodules, the fundamental building block of the machine, has started. A cryomodule consists of four sets of pairs of 1497 MHz, 5 cell niobium cavities contained in separate helium vessels and mounted in a cryostat with appropriate end caps for helium supply and return. Beam vacuum of the cavities, the connecting beam piping, the waveguides, and the cryostat insulating vacuum are crucial to the performance of the machine. The design and initial experience of the vacuum systems for the first 2 1/4 cryomodules that makeup the 45 MEV injector are discussed.

  18. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Paris (France); Van Brackel, Emmanuel [Département de Physique, ENS, Paris (France); Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier [Département Mesures Physiques, ONERA, Châtillon (France); Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele [Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés, IN2P3-CNRS, Lyon (France)

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  19. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; Molendijk, John; Timko, Helga; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently configured for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power and lead to saturation. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test a new algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the cavity phase modulation that would minimize klystron forward power.

  20. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  1. LHC crab cavity final report

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G et al

    2013-01-01

    A compact 400 MHz SRF crab cavity is designed for LHC. The design has low surface fields, has no hard multipactor barriers and fits within the transverse space available on the HL-LHC. The structure has been designed to have a constant deflecting voltage across the beam-pipe aperture and this has been verified on an aluminium model. The structure includes designs for the input and lower order mode couplers.

  2. Retention proposal in complex cavities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alvarez Rodríguez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental Operatory is the main structure in which Odontology lies. It is not an easy discipline that gives enjoyable results with little effort due to the difficulties that a correct reconstruction of a destroyed dental element offers.The frequency with which pulpar injury occurs while anchoring additional retainers in complex cavities, the technical difficulties the lack of these devices cause and the need to simplify dental procedures lead this study to show the advantages to substitute additional retainers for a retainer surcus. Method: An observational descriptive study was applied to 53 patients(42% of the universe , sample which was selected by means of a simple randomized sample . From a proximal-occlusal cavity, the preparations were extended in a box-like shape towards the bucal or lingual region and the additional retainers were substituted for a surcus which was performed in the gingival wall of the preparation. Calcium Hydroxide of rapid dryness was used as a cavity cover and Policarboxilate cement as a base; then the amalgam restoration was performed. The number of restorations were studied taking into account the patient´s age and the failures due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were assessed taking into consideration the patient´s age and a one- year follow up. Results: Most of the amalgam restorations were performed in patients aged from 35 to 59 years and the relative frequencies due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were very low. Conclusion: The substitution of additional retainers for a retainer surcus in complex cavities of vital molars showed to be advantageous because it guarantees a less degree of pulpar damage and less pulpar damage.

  3. Retention proposal in complex cavities.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Alvarez Rodríguez; Eduardo M. Curbeira Hernández; Eduardo Duarte Marrero; Yisell Peláez Rivas; Aracelis Navarro Sánchez

    2003-01-01

    Background: Dental Operatory is the main structure in which Odontology lies. It is not an easy discipline that gives enjoyable results with little effort due to the difficulties that a correct reconstruction of a destroyed dental element offers.The frequency with which pulpar injury occurs while anchoring additional retainers in complex cavities, the technical difficulties the lack of these devices cause and the need to simplify dental procedures lead this study to show the advantages to subs...

  4. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing 'Air Crescent' sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma. PMID:27625451

  5. Radiographic evaluation of obesity-caused oppression of the thoracic cavity in beagles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoracic radiographs of fifteen beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity revealed that oppression of the thoracic cavity increased with increasing degree of obesity. Oppression of the thoracic cavity was evaluated based on the length, depth, width and area of the thoracic cavity. To obtain thoracic radiographs at the terminal inspiration and expiration phases, thoracic fluororadiographs were recorded with a digital video camera. Bodyweight and the depth of the back fat layer at the seventh lumbar vertebra (DB, measured by ultrasonography) were used as indicators of the degree of obesity. The length of the thoracic cavity tended to become shorter and the depth and width of the thoracic cavity tended to increase as bodyweight increased and as DB increased. On the other hand, the area of the thoracic cavity was not clearly related to bodyweight or DB. These results suggest that oppression of the thoracic cavity due to the cranial shift of the diaphragm is compensated for by increases in the depth and width of the thoracic cavity in beagles with mild-to-moderate obesity

  6. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  7. Broadband Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS – applicability and corrections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pöhler

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric trace gas measurements by cavity assisted long-path absorption spectroscopy are an emerging technology. An interesting approach is the combination of CEAS with broad band light sources, the broad-band CEAS (BB-CEAS. BB-CEAS lends itself to the application of the DOAS technique to analyse the derived absorption spectra. While the DOAS approach has enormous advantages in terms of sensitivity and specificity of the measurement, an important implication is the reduction of the light path by the trace gas absorption, since cavity losses due to absorption by gases reduce the quality (Q of the cavity. In fact, at wavelength, where the quality of the BB-CEAS cavity is dominated by the trace gas absorption (esp. at very high mirror reflectivity, the light path will vary inversely with the trace gas concentration and the strength of the band will become nearly independent of the trace gas concentration c in the cavity, rendering the CEAS Method useless for trace gas measurements. Only in the limiting case where the mirror reflectivity determines Q at all wavelength, the strength of the band as seen by the BB-CEAS instrument becomes proportional to the concentration c. We investigate these relationships in detail and present methods to correct for the cases between the two above extremes, which are of course the important ones in practice.

  8. Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2010-10-01

    The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

  9. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  10. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  11. CHECHIA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland). ELHEP Laboratory, ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). TESLA

    2005-07-01

    The initial control of the superconductive cavity has recently been performed by applying the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system in DESY Hamburg. This first experiment turned attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the cavity is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The cavity parameters identification is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  12. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Möhle, Katharina; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-01-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1 x 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (> 1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  13. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  14. Modeling of the lithium-air battery cathodes with broad pore size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Artem V.; Chertovich, Alexander V.; Itkis, Daniil M.

    2016-09-01

    Achieving theoretical promises of 1000 W h/kg specific energy for lithium-air batteries is quite challenging due to limited transport in the cathode along with electrode passivation. Transport can be enhanced in the electrodes with complex hierarchical pore architecture. Here, using computer simulations we analyze the effects of cathode pore size distribution (PSD) on capacity and discharge curve shape. Calculations considering a broad PSD revealed that even small discharge product resistivity prevents larger pores from accumulating the discharge product and thus turning them into non-clogging oxygen supply channels. Thus optimization of cathode architecture by adding of large-scale cavities enables cell capacity enhancement.

  15. Broad iron lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C S; Young, A J

    2000-01-01

    An intrinsically narrow line emitted by an accretion disk around a black hole appears broadened and skewed as a result of the Doppler effect and gravitational redshift. The fluorescent iron line in the X-ray band at 6.4-6.9keV is the strongest such line and is seen in the X-ray spectrum of many active galactic nuclei and, in particular, Seyfert galaxies. It is an important diagnostic with which to study the geometry and other properties of the accretion flow very close to the central black hole. The broad iron line indicates the presence of a standard thin accretion disk in those objects, often seen at low inclination. The broad iron line has opened up strong gravitational effects around black holes to observational study with wide-reaching consequences for both astrophysics and physics.

  16. Broad line regions in Seyfert-1 galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reproduce observed emission profiles of Seyfert galaxies, rotation in an accretion disk has been proposed. In this thesis, the profiles emitted by such an accretion disk are investigated. Detailed comparison with the observed profiles yields that a considerable fraction can be fitted with a power-law function, as predicted by the model. The author analyzes a series of high quality spectra of Seyfert galaxies, obtained with the 2.5m telescope at Las Campanas. He presents detailed analyses of two objects: Mkn335 and Akn120. In both cases, strong evidence is presented for the presence of two separate broad line zones. These zones are identified with an accretion disk and an outflowing wind. The disk contains gas with very high densities and emits predominantly the lower ionization lines. He reports on the discovery of very broad wings beneath the strong forbidden line 5007. (Auth.)

  17. Fourier evaluation of broad Moessbauer spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown by the Fourier analysis of broad Moessbauer spectra that the even part of the distribution of the dominant hyperfine interaction (hyperfine field or quadrupole splitting) can be obtained directly without using least-square fitting procedures. Also the odd part of this distribution correlated with other hyperfine parameters (e.g. isomer shift) can be directly determined. Examples for amorphous magnetic and paramagnetic iron-based alloys are presented. (author)

  18. Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Rovsing, Louise; Clokie, Samuel; Bustos, Diego M.; Rohde, Kristian; Steven L Coon; Litman, Thomas; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (Crx) encodes Crx, a transcription factor expressed selectively in retinal photoreceptors and pinealocytes, the major cell type of the pineal gland. Here, the influence of Crx on the mammalian pineal gland was studied by light and electron microscopy and by use of microarray and qRTPCR technology, thereby extending previous studies on selected genes (Furukawa et al. 1999). Deletion of Crx was not found to alter pineal morphology, but was found to broadly modulate the mouse p...

  19. A Broad View of Macroeconomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio Ocampo

    2005-01-01

    This paper recommends a broad concept of macroeconomic stability, whereby “sound macroeconomic frameworks” include not only price stability and sound fiscal policies, but also a well-functioning real economy, sustainable debt ratios and healthy public and private sector balance sheets. These multiple dimensions imply using multiple policy instruments. The paper elaborates a framework for developing countries that involves active use of counter-cyclical macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, m...

  20. Quantum state transfer between an optomechanical cavity and a diamond nuclear spin ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhi-Bo; Wang, Hong-Ling; Yan, Run-Ying

    2016-08-01

    We explore an efficient scheme for transferring quantum state between an optomechanical cavity and nuclear spins of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, where quantum information can be efficiently stored (retrieved) into (from) the nuclear spin ensemble assisted by a mechanical resonator in a dispersive regime. Our scheme works for a broad range of cavity frequencies and might have potential applications in employing the nuclear spin ensemble as a memory in quantum information processing. The feasibility of our protocol is analyzed using currently available parameters.

  1. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    CERN Document Server

    Tremaine, Scott; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few per cent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad H-beta line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [OIII] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ~30-45 degrees, consistent with simple AGN unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  2. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  3. A Feasibility Study on the Inspection System Development of Underground Cavities Using Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection efficiency using the gravimetry method is significantly low; therefore, it requires large surveying time. The magnetometry method detects the cavities by the magnitude of the magnetic field. However, the magnetometry method is problematical in urban areas due to pipes and electrical installations. GPR is the method that uses high frequency electromagnetic wave. This method is widely used for the inspection; however, the detection accuracy of sinkholes can be low in specific soil types. In this study, to verify the feasibility of the neutron source-based inspection system to detect the cavity detection, the Monte Carlo simulation was performed using neutron source. The analysis shows that the detection of the cavity with the given condition is possible when the diameter of cavity is over 100 cm. However, the detection efficiency can be enough increased if some optimization strategies for the inspection are developed. Also, it is expected that the proposed inspection method can detect the expected locations of the cavities

  4. A Feasibility Study on the Inspection System Development of Underground Cavities Using Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Che Wook; Kim, Song Hyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The detection efficiency using the gravimetry method is significantly low; therefore, it requires large surveying time. The magnetometry method detects the cavities by the magnitude of the magnetic field. However, the magnetometry method is problematical in urban areas due to pipes and electrical installations. GPR is the method that uses high frequency electromagnetic wave. This method is widely used for the inspection; however, the detection accuracy of sinkholes can be low in specific soil types. In this study, to verify the feasibility of the neutron source-based inspection system to detect the cavity detection, the Monte Carlo simulation was performed using neutron source. The analysis shows that the detection of the cavity with the given condition is possible when the diameter of cavity is over 100 cm. However, the detection efficiency can be enough increased if some optimization strategies for the inspection are developed. Also, it is expected that the proposed inspection method can detect the expected locations of the cavities.

  5. Broadband Tuning of Optomechanical Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Lee, Sunwoo; Lipson, Michal

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate broadband tuning of an optomechanical microcavity optical resonance by exploring the large optomechanical coupling of a double-wheel microcavity and its uniquely low mechanical stiffness. Using a pump laser with only 13 mW at telecom wavelengths we show tuning of the silicon nitride microcavity resonances over 32 nm. This corresponds to a tuning power efficiency of only 400 $\\mu$W/nm. By choosing a relatively low optical Q resonance ($\\approx$18,000) we prevent the cavity from reaching the regime of regenerative optomechanical oscillations. The static mechanical displacement induced by optical gradient forces is estimated to be as large as 60 nm.

  6. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  7. To Broad-Match or Not to Broad-Match : An Auctioneer's Dilemma ?

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2008-01-01

    We initiate the study of an interesting aspect of sponsored search advertising, namely the consequences of broad match-a feature where an ad of an advertiser can be mapped to a broader range of relevant queries, and not necessarily to the particular keyword(s) that ad is associated with. Starting with a very natural setting for strategies available to the advertisers, and via a careful look through algorithmic and complexity theoretic glasses, we first propose a solution concept called broad match equilibrium(BME) for the game originating from the strategic behavior of advertisers as they try to optimize their budget allocation across various keywords. Next, we consider two broad match scenarios based on factors such as information asymmetry between advertisers and the auctioneer, and the extent of auctioneer's control on the budget splitting. In the first scenario, the advertisers have the full information about broad match and relevant parameters, and can reapportion their own budgets to utilize the extra i...

  8. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, E. [Fermilab; Arkan, T. [Fermilab; Borissov, E. [Fermilab; Dhanaraj, N. [Fermilab; Hocker, A. [Fermilab; Orlov, Y. [Fermilab; Peterson, T. [Fermilab; Premo, K. [Fermilab

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  9. Primary Burkitt's Lymphoma in the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Hwan; Yu, Myeong Sang; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly aggressive small B-cell lymphoma. The treatment of choice is complex chemotherapy. As a rare tumor in the head and neck area, Burkitt's lymphoma usually involves cervical lymph nodes, and only fewer than 25% of cases involves extranodal regions. Involvement of the paranasal sinuses has been reported in only 14 cases in the past century. We describe here two patients with rare, sporadic, American type Burkitt's lymphoma involving the nasal cavity and paranasal si...

  10. Microencapsulation of silicon cavities using a pulsed excimer laser

    KAUST Repository

    Sedky, Sherif M.

    2012-06-07

    This work presents a novel low thermal-budget technique for sealing micromachined cavities in silicon. Cavities are sealed without deposition, similar to the silicon surface-migration sealing process. In contrast to the 1100°C furnace anneal required for the migration process, the proposed technique uses short excimer laser pulses (24ns), focused onto an area of 23mm 2, to locally heat the top few microns of the substrate, while the bulk substrate remains near ambient temperature. The treatment can be applied to selected regions of the substrate, without the need for special surface treatments or a controlled environment. This work investigates the effect of varying the laser pulse energy from 400 mJ cm 2to 800 mJ cm 2, the pulse rate from 1Hz to 50Hz and the pulse count from 200 to 3000 pulses on sealing microfabricated cavities in silicon. An analytical model for the effect of holes on the surface temperature distribution is derived, which shows that much higher temperatures can be achieved by increasing the hole density. A mechanism for sealing the cavities is proposed, which indicates how complete sealing is feasible. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  11. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  12. Silicon Integrated Cavity Optomechanical Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jie; Miao, Houxun; Michels, Thomas; Liu, Yuxiang; Srinivasan, Kartik; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    Cavity optomechanics enables measurements of mechanical motion at the fundamental limits of precision imposed by quantum mechanics. However, the need to align and couple devices to off-chip optical components hinders development, miniaturization and broader application of ultrahigh sensitivity chip-scale optomechanical transducers. Here we demonstrate a fully integrated and optical fiber pigtailed optomechanical transducer with a high Q silicon micro-disk cavity near-field coupled to a nanoscale cantilever. We detect the motion of the cantilever by measuring the resonant frequency shift of the whispering gallery mode of the micro-disk. The sensitivity near the standard quantum limit can be reached with sub-uW optical power. Our on-chip approach combines compactness and stability with great design flexibility: the geometry of the micro-disk and cantilever can be tailored to optimize the mechanical/optical Q factors and tune the mechanical frequency over two orders of magnitudes. Electrical transduction in addition to optical transduction was also demonstrated and both can be used to effectively cool the cantilever. Moreover, cantilevers with sharp tips overhanging the chip edge were fabricated to potentially allow the mechanical cantilever to be coupled to a wide range of off-chip systems, such as spins, DNA, nanostructures and atoms on clean surfaces.

  13. Tunable Cavity Optomechanics with Ultracold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, T P; Botter, T; Brahms, N; Ma, Z -Y; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2010-01-01

    We present an atom-chip-based realization of quantum cavity optomechanics with cold atoms localized within a Fabry-Perot cavity. Effective sub-wavelength positioning of the atomic ensemble allows for tuning the linear and quadratic optomechanical coupling parameters, varying the sensitivity to the displacement and strain of a compressible gaseous cantilever. We observe effects of such tuning on cavity optical nonlinearity and optomechanical frequency shifts, providing their first characterization in the quadratic-coupling regime.

  14. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Marty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  15. Ray splitting in paraxial optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Puentes, G; Woerdman, J P

    2003-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the ray dynamics in a paraxial optical cavity when a ray splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. We show that depending on the position of the beam splitter the optical resonator can become unstable and the ray dynamics displays a positive Lyapunov exponent.

  16. Effects of subsurface cavity expansion in clays

    OpenAIRE

    Au, SKA; Yeung, AT; Soga, K; Cheng, YM

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface cavity expansion in clay induced by compaction grouting can generate upward displacement of clay and/or increase in effective stress leading to consolidation, resulting in settlement compensation and/or shear strength enhancement respectively. However, the two potential benefits of subsurface cavity expansion may offset each other. Experiments and numerical simulations on the engineering behaviour of E-grade kaolin induced by subsurface pressure-controlled cavity expansion were con...

  17. Wavelength beam combining of a 980-nm tapered diode laser bar in an external cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup, Birgitte

    2010-04-01

    High power diode lasers are used in a large number of applications. A limiting factor for more widespread use of broad area lasers is the poor beam quality. Gain guided tapered diode lasers are ideal candidates for industrial applications that demands watt level output power with good beam quality. By adapting a bar geometry, the output power could be scaled even up to several tens of watts. Unfortunately, the high divergence which is a characteristic feature of the bar geometry could lead to a degradation of the overall beam quality of the laser bar. However, spectral beam combining is an effective solution for preserving the beam quality of the bar in the range of that of a single emitter and at the same time, enabling the power scaling. We report spectral beam combining applied to a 12 emitter tapered laser bar at 980 nm. The external cavity has been designed for a wavelength separation of 4.0 nm between the emitters. An output power of 9 W has been achieved at an operating current of 30 A. The combined beam had an M2 value (1/e2) of 5.3 along the slow axis which is comparable to that of a single tapered emitter on the laser bar. The overall beam combining efficiency was measured to be 63%. The output spectrum of the individual emitters was narrowed considerably. In the free running mode, the individual emitters displayed a broad spectrum of the order of 0.5-1.0 nm while the spectral width has been reduced to 30-100 pm in the spectral beam combining mode.

  18. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Simrock, Stefan; Brandt, Alexander; Chase, Brian; Carcagno, Ruben; Cancelo, Gustavo; Koeth, Timothy W.

    2006-12-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. FPGA-based controller, supported by Matlab system, was applied. Electrical model of a resonator was used for design of a control system. Calibration of the signal path is considered. Identification of cavity parameters has been carried out for adaptive control algorithm. Feed-forward and feedback modes were applied in operating the cavities. Required performance has been achieved; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time, while keeping reasonable level of the power consumption. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  19. Optically coupled cavities for wavelength switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical bistable device which presents hysteresis behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The system finds applications in wavelength switching, pulse reshaping and optical bistability. It is based on two optically coupled cavities named master and slave. Each cavity includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), acting as the gain medium of the laser, and two pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) which define the lasing wavelength (being different in each cavity). Finally, a variable optical coupler (VOC) is employed to couple both cavities. Experimental characterization of the system performance is made analyzing the effects of the coupling coefficient between the two cavities and the driving current in each SOA. The properties of the hysteretic bistable curve and switching can be controlled by adjusting these parameters and the loss in the cavities. By selecting the output wavelength (λ1 or λ2) with an external filter it is possible to choose either the invert or non-invert switched signal. Experiments were developed employing both optical discrete components and a photonic integrated circuit. They show that for 8 m-long cavities the maximum switching frequency is about 500 KHz, and for 4 m-long cavities a minimum rise-time about 21 ns was measured. The switching time can be reduced by shortening the cavity lengths and using photonic integrated circuits.

  20. Optimization of a lasertron double output cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Double output cavities have been used experimentally to increase the efficiency of high-power klystrons. We have used particle-in-cell simulations with the 2 + 1/2 dimensional code MASK to optimize the design of double output cavities for the lasertron under development at SLAC. We discuss design considerations for double output cavities (e.g., optimum choice of voltages and phases, efficiency, wall interception, breakdown). We describe how one calculates the cavity impedance matrix from the gap voltages and phases. Some results of the effect of varying voltage, perveance, and pulse are reported

  1. Single-mode cavity with HOMs absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new 500 MHz cavity which has a simple damped structure for the 1.5 GeV high-brilliant VUV ring. The feature of the cavity design is that higher-order modes (HOMs) propagate out from the cavity through the beam duct with a large diameter and are absorbed in resistive parts in the duct. A low power measurement on a prototype model of the cavity was carried out and the Q-values of HOMs were confirmed to strongly reduce. Thus the coupled-bunch instabilities due to HOMs are expected to be sufficiently suppressed. (author)

  2. Engineering topological materials in microwave cavity arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Brandon M; Owens, Clai; Schuster, David I; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scalable architecture for the exploration of interacting topological phases of photons in arrays of microwave cavities, using established techniques from cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. A time-reversal symmetry breaking (non-reciprocal) flux is induced by coupling the microwave cavities to ferrites, allowing for the production of a variety of topological band structures including the $\\alpha=1/4$ Hofstadter model. Effective photon-photon interactions are included by coupling the cavities to superconducting qubits, and are sufficient to produce a $\

  3. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  4. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  5. Generation of Cluster States in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-Li; YANG Li-Jia; DAI Hong-Yi

    2007-01-01

    We propose two schemes for the generation of cluster states in the context of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED).In the first scheme,we prepare multi-cavity cluster states with information encoded in the coherent states.The second scheme is to generate multi-atom cluster states,where qubits are represented by the states of cascade Rydberg atoms.Both the schemes are based on the atom-cavity interaction and the atomic spontaneous radiation can be effciently reduced since the cavity frequency is largely detuned from the atomic transition frequency.

  6. Introductory lecture on waveguides and cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture has two parts: waveguides and cavities. Basic topics are discussed which can serve as bases for the following lectures. Many of the results obtained in the first part concerning waveguides are applied in the second part in the discussion on cavity properties, since a cavity can be considered as a part of a waveguide, a cavity resonant mode being a superposition of two counter-travelling waves in the waveguide. In deriving most of the mathematical formulas, complex number representation - that is, phasor forms - are used. For the final results, however, real number representations are also provided as much as possible as an aid to a more intuitive understanding. (author)

  7. Assessing the Performance of the Laser Fluorescence Technique in Detecting Proximal Caries Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Akbari

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosing the necessity of cavity preparation and restoration in demineralized proximal areas is always considered as a challenge in restorative treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of the laser fluorescence (LF technique in detection of proximal cavities.Materials & Methods: In this clinical trial, 44 proximal surfaces in 38 dental students were evaluated. The selected patients had radiolucent proximal lesions restricted to inner half of enamel or outer third of dentine in bitewing radiographs (BW. DIAGNOdent pen (LF pen device was used to determine the presence or absence of caries cavities in suspected proximal surfaces. Orthodontic elastic separators were then placed in the contact areas to provide enough space for direct visual and tactile examination. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the laser fluorescence technique were calculated versus the reference standard. The ROC curve was drawn and the best cut-off to determine the presence or absence of proximal cavities was determined.Results: Using DIAGNOdent pen, the optimal cut-off for detecting proximal cavities was 18. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of DIAGNOdent pen for diagnosing proximal caries cavities were 100 per cent, 97.3 per cent and 97.7 per cent, respectively. Conclusion: Due to the high diagnostic accuracy of DIAGNOdent pen in detecting proximal caries cavities, it can be used as a valuable supplement in restorative treatment planning.

  8. Effective bichromatic potential for ultra-high Q-factor photonic crystal slab cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpeggiani, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.alpeggiani01@ateneopv.it; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Gerace, Dario [Department of Physics and CNISM, University of Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2015-12-28

    We introduce a confinement mechanism in photonic crystal slab cavities, which relies on the superposition of two incommensurate one-dimensional lattices in a line-defect waveguide. It is shown that the resulting photonic profile realizes an effective quasi-periodic bichromatic potential for the electromagnetic field confinement yielding extremely high quality (Q) factor nanocavities, while simultaneously keeping the mode volume close to the diffraction limit. We apply these concepts to pillar- and hole-based photonic crystal slab cavities, respectively, and a Q-factor improvement by over an order of magnitude is shown over existing designs, especially in pillar-based structures. Thanks to the generality and easy adaptation of such confinement mechanism to a broad class of cavity designs and photonic lattices, this work opens interesting routes for applications where enhanced light–matter interaction in photonic crystal structures is required.

  9. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  10. Effective bichromatic potential for ultra-high Q-factor photonic crystal slab cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a confinement mechanism in photonic crystal slab cavities, which relies on the superposition of two incommensurate one-dimensional lattices in a line-defect waveguide. It is shown that the resulting photonic profile realizes an effective quasi-periodic bichromatic potential for the electromagnetic field confinement yielding extremely high quality (Q) factor nanocavities, while simultaneously keeping the mode volume close to the diffraction limit. We apply these concepts to pillar- and hole-based photonic crystal slab cavities, respectively, and a Q-factor improvement by over an order of magnitude is shown over existing designs, especially in pillar-based structures. Thanks to the generality and easy adaptation of such confinement mechanism to a broad class of cavity designs and photonic lattices, this work opens interesting routes for applications where enhanced light–matter interaction in photonic crystal structures is required

  11. An application for the automatic phasing of quarter wave cavities at HIE ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Haastrup, Sten

    2013-01-01

    The HIE upgrade at ISOLDE will use 32 independently phased superconducting quarter wave cavities, and aims to study a large range of different radioactive species. The broad experimental programme means that the same beam species and energy are rarely studied twice, and hence the linac must be rephased for each experiment. In order to speed up this process, an automatic phasing routine has been developed which takes as input the properties of the beam and the linear accelerator as well as the desired final energy, and calculates the necessary phases and voltages on each cavity. The phasing routine has also been used to better understand the longitudinal beam dynamics and how errors and uncertainties will affect phasing of the cavities, leading to a set of tolerances for each of the different linac parameters.

  12. Prediction of multipactor in the iris region of rf deflecting mode cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    Multipactor is a major cause of field limitation in many superconducting rf cavities. Multipacting is a particular issue for deflecting mode cavities as the typical behavior is not well studied, understood, or parametrized. In this paper an approximate analytical model for the prediction of multipactor in the iris region of deflecting mode cavities is developed. This new but simple model yields a clear explanation on the broad range of rf field levels over which the multipactor can occur. The principle multipactors under investigation here are two-point multipactors associated with cyclotron motion in the cavity’s rf magnetic field. The predictions from the model are compared to numerical simulations and good agreement is obtained. The results are also compared to experimental results previously reported by KEK and are also found in good agreement.

  13. Controlling dipole squeezing of two atoms inside a cavity via manipulating an atom outside the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Tang-Kun; Wang Ji-Suo; Feng Jian; Zhan Ming-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Considering that three two-level atoms are initially in the GHZ single state and two of the atoms are simultaneously put into a cavity initially in the coherent state, we investigate the dipole squeezing properties of the two atoms inside the cavity under the condition of resonant interaction. It is shown that dipole squeezing properties of the two atoms inside the cavity are strongly affected by rotation manipulating of the atom outside the cavity.

  14. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  15. Superconducting cavities developments efforts at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting RE cavities are the work-horse for many existing and proposed linear accelerators. Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) has initiated a comprehensive R and D program for development of Superconducting RF cavities suitable for high energy accelerator application like SNS and ADS. For the initial phase of technology demonstration several prototype 1.3 GHz single cell-cavities have been developed. The work began with development of prototype single cell cavities in aluminum and copper. This helped in development of cavity manufacturing process, proving various tooling and learning on various mechanical and RF qualification processes. The parts manufacturing was done at RRCAT and Electron beam welding was carried out at Indian industry. These cavities further served during commissioning trials for various cavity processing infrastructure being developed at RRCAT and are also a potential candidate for Niobium thin film deposition R and D. Based on the above experience, few single cell cavities were developed in fine grain niobium. The critical technology of forming and machining of niobium and the intermediate RF qualification were developed at RRCAT. The EB welding of bulk niobium cavities was carried out in collaboration with IUAC, New Delhi at their facility. As a next logical step efforts are now on for development of multicell cavities. The prototype dumbbells and end group made of aluminium, comprising of RF and HOM couplers ports have also been developed, with their LB welding done at Indian industry. In this paper we shall present the development efforts towards manufacturing of 1.3 GHz single cell cavities and their initial processing and qualification. (author)

  16. US anatomy of the great peritoneal cavity and its recesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peritoneum of the great abdominal cavity and its recesses are a blind radiographical area which can however be easily outlined by US when it contains fluid. The anatomical study of these usually virtual cavities represent the purpose of this paper. The natural contrast of the peritoneal fluid as amplified by the mechanical effect produced by an adequate amount of fluid, allows a clear visualization of the anatomy of various peritoneal structures in either upper (subphrenic, subhepatic, lesser sac, etc.) or lower (pelvic) areas. The sovramesocolic and the infracolic compartments are in comunication through the two external paracolic gutters which are the main passageways for the fluids between upper and lower compartments. In fact, peritoneal fluids are in constant movement due to different factors, such as gravity, statics, which causes the peritoneal fluids to flow into the lowest part of the peritoneal cavity, and hydrostatic pressure. Pressure differences are thought to convey fluids from various sites of the abdomen into different areas. In the lower abdomen, pressure is 3 times as much as in the upper abdomen, which causes the fluids to move into the subhepatic and subphrenic regions. The redistribution of fluids can be influenced by particular anatomical causes. The phrenicocolic ligament, e.g., is a barrier to the advancing of fluds along the left paracolic gutter, which makes the right paracolic gutter the main passageway for the fluids. This pattern explains why abscesses are more frequent in the right than in the upper left abdominal regions. Another example in the tiny Winslow opening, which does not allow inflammatory material to pass into the lesser sac in case of inflammatory processes of the great peritoneal cavity and viceversa. Moreover, pointing out fluid collections and abscesses is important, since an early diagnosis and a topografic map are essential order to plan treatment

  17. Leaky Modes of Dielectric Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud; Jakobsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of external excitation, light trapped within a dielectric medium generally decays by leaking out (and also by getting absorbed within the medium). We analyze the leaky modes of a parallel-plate slab, a solid glass sphere, and a solid glass cylinder, by examining those solutions of Maxwell's equations (for dispersive as well as non-dispersive media) which admit of a complex-valued oscillation frequency. Under certain circumstances, these leaky modes constitute a complete set into which an arbitrary distribution of the electromagnetic field residing inside a dielectric body can be expanded. We provide completeness proofs, and also present results of numerical calculations that illustrate the relationship between the leaky modes and the resonances of dielectric cavities formed by a simple parallel-plate slab, a glass sphere, and a glass cylinder.

  18. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Butterworth, A; Molendijk, J; Tuckmantel, J

    2012-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently setup for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading eects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would push the klystrons to saturation. For beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will be not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test an iterative algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the optimal phase modulation for klystron forward power considerations.

  19. A lateral cephalometric study of pharyngeal cavity in Korean adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to investigate the size of pharyngeal cavity and sexual differences between Korean adult mal e and female by introducing linear analysis of the lateral cephalogram. The radiograms were composed of 46 adult male aged 24.64 and 52 adult female aged 22.74 respectively. In order to study and measure the pharyngeal area, the following skeletal landmarks were selected: S,N,A,Ptm, B,H,H', M ,S-N, FH and CV, and the angle CV-FH was measured to provide a factor for correction of error resulting from improper he ad positioning of subjects, especially in the relative positions of A and H, while radiography. All points to be measured were projected at right angles to the Frankfort plane. For the purpose of measuring the anteroposterior dimensions of pharyngeal cavity the distances were measured in A-Ptm, A-S, S-Ptm and CV-H, and vertical measurements were made in SN-A, SN-PNS, SN-H' and M-H. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The pharyngeal cavity is broader in the vertical than in the anteroposterior diameter in both sex and the maximum sexual differences were showed in the distances between SN and H', and minimal sexual differences in the distances between S and Ptm. 2. In general, the measurements of male were larger than those of female in the anteroposterior dimensions of pharyngea l cavity, but the distances between A and S, between CV and H showed significant sexual differences when evaluated statistically. 3. All of the measurements were larger in male than in female in vertical dimensions of pharyngeal cavity, and there were statistical significances of sexual differences in all variables.

  20. High finesse optical fiber cavities: optimal alignment and robust stabilization (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Gallego, Jose; Ghosh, Sutapa; Alavi, Seyed; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications. Some of the most promising areas of application of these optical micro-resonators with high finesse and small mode volume are in the field of quantum communication and information. The resonator-enhanced light-matter interaction, for instance, provide basis for the realization of efficient optical interfaces between stationary matter-based quantum nodes and flying single-photon qubits. To date fiber Fabry-Perot cavities have been successfully applied in experiments interfacing single photons with a wide range of quantum systems, including cold atoms, ions and solid state emitters as well as quantum optomechanical experiments. Here we address some important practical questions that arise during the experimental implementation of high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: How can optimal fiber cavity alignment be achieved and how can the efficiency of coupling light from the optical fibers to the cavity mode and vice versa be characterized? How should optical fiber cavities be constructed and stabilized to fulfill their potential for miniaturization and integration into robust scientific and technological devices that can operate outside of dedicated laboratory environments in the future? The first two questions we answer with an analytic mode matching calculation that relates the alignment dependent fiber-to-cavity mode-matching efficiency to the easily measurable dip in the reflected light power at the cavity resonance. Our general analysis provides a simple recipe for the optimal alignment of fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and moreover for the first time explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes. The latter question we explore by investigating a novel, intrinsically rigid fiber cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal

  1. Probiotic activity of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in the oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Stamatova, Iva

    2010-01-01

    Yogurt consumption has been related to longevity of some populations living on the Balkans. Yogurt starter L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Str. thermophilus have been recognized as probiotics with verified beneficial health effects. The oral cavity emerges as a arget for probiotic applications. Probiotics have demonstrated promising results in controlling dental diseases and oral yeast infections. However, L. bulgaricus despite its broad availability in dairy products has not been evalua...

  2. Against a Broad Definition of "Empathy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Songhorian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will try to provide some arguments against a broad definition of “empathy”. Firstly, I will deal with attempts to define empathy as an umbrella concept. Then, I will try to point out the four main elements which contribute to the confusion that researchers in both the social and political as well as the scientific and philosophical domains face when dealing with empathy. In order to resolve this confusion, I suggest applying David Marr’s distinction to the field of empathy. Instead of providing an umbrella definition for empathy, which tries to account for all the data coming from different disciplines, I believe understanding that there are different levels of explanations and that different disciplines can contribute to each of them will provide a more detailed and less confused definition of empathy.

  3. Broad-band acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chen; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) are engineered materials, made from subwavelength structures, that exhibit useful or unusual constitutive properties. There has been intense research interest in AMMs since its first realization in 2000 by Liu et al. A number of functionalities and applications have been proposed and achieved using AMMs. Hyperbolic metamaterials are one of the most important types of metamaterials due to their extreme anisotropy and numerous possible applications, including negative refraction, backward waves, spatial filtering, and subwavelength imaging. Although the importance of acoustic hyperbolic metamaterials (AHMMs) as a tool for achieving full control of acoustic waves is substantial, the realization of a broad-band and truly hyperbolic AMM has not been reported so far. Here, we demonstrate the design and experimental characterization of a broadband AHMM that operates between 1.0 kHz and 2.5 kHz.

  4. A broad view of model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety assessment of a nuclear waste repository requires the use of models. Such models need to be validated to ensure, as much as possible, that they are a good representation of the actual processes occurring in the real system. In this paper we attempt to take a broad view by reviewing step by step the modeling process and bringing out the need to validating every step of this process. This model validation includes not only comparison of modeling results with data from selected experiments, but also evaluation of procedures for the construction of conceptual models and calculational models as well as methodologies for studying data and parameter correlation. The need for advancing basic scientific knowledge in related fields, for multiple assessment groups, and for presenting our modeling efforts in open literature to public scrutiny is also emphasized. 16 refs

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of broad line region clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Martin; Burkert, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Hydrodynamic stability has been a longstanding issue for the cloud model of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei. We argue that the clouds may be gravitationally bound to the supermassive black hole. If true, stabilisation by thermal pressure alone becomes even more difficult. We further argue that if magnetic fields should be present in such clouds at a level that could affect the stability properties, they need to be strong enough to compete with the radiation pressure on the cloud. This would imply magnetic field values of a few Gauss for a sample of Active Galactic Nuclei we draw from the literature. We then investigate the effect of several magnetic configurations on cloud stability in axi-symmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For a purely azimuthal magnetic field which provides the dominant pressure support, the cloud first gets compressed by the opposing radiative and gravitational forces. The pressure inside the cloud then increases, and it expands vertically. Kelvin-Helmholtz and colu...

  6. Scheme for Implementation of Quantum Game in Cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to implement two-player quantum game in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). During the process, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus our scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. The scheme can be realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  7. A scheme for implementing quantum game in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoShuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Liu Jian-Bin; Wang Xin-Wen; Zheng Xiao-juan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme fot implementing quantum game (QG) in cavity quantum electrodynam-ics(QED). In the scheme, the cavity is only virtually excited and thus the proposal is insensitive to the cavity fields states and cavity decay. So our proposal can be experimentally realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  8. Scheme for Implementation of Quantum Game in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Chun; CAO Shu-Ai; WU Yue-Qin; FANG Mao-Fa; LI Huai-Fan; ZHENG Xiao-Juan; ZHAO Ren; WANG Xin-Wen; LI Ze-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to implement two-player quantum game in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). During the process, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus our scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. The scheme can be realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  9. Toward Effective HIV Vaccination INDUCTION OF BINARY EPITOPE REACTIVE ANTIBODIES WITH BROAD HIV NEUTRALIZING ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir; (Texas-MED); (Viral Rickettsial)

    2009-11-23

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (VH) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity VH Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and VH FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from VH1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development.

  10. Cavity Pressure Behaviour in Micro Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C.A.; Dimov, S.S.; Scholz, S.;

    2010-01-01

    as well as with the filling of the cavity by the polymer melt. In this paper, two parameters derived from cavity pressure over time (i.e. pressure work). The influence of four µIM parameters (melt temperature, mould temperature, injection speed, aand packing pressure) on the two pressure...

  11. Superconducting accelerating four-cell cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A close view of the four-cell cavity. This was a prototype designed for LEP2 (LEP1 had warm copper cavities as accelerating elements). The first successful tests were made in December 1980 - reaching a Q = 10^6. (see photo 8012650X)

  12. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra;

    2009-01-01

    We present a principle for the temperature stabilization of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities based on optofluidics. We introduce an analytic method enabling a specific mode of a cavity to be made wavelength insensitive to changes in ambient temperature. Using this analysis, we experimentally...

  13. Continuous optical discharge in a laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivel', Yu. A.

    2016-08-01

    Optical discharge in a laser cavity is experimentally studied. A significant increase in the absorption of laser radiation (up to total absorption) is revealed. Optical schemes for initiation and maintaining of optical discharge in the cavity are proposed for technological applications of the optical discharge.

  14. Agent for roentgenocontrast examination of cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water-soluble agent, additionaly containing starch, agar, water, is suggested to increase accuracy of injured cavity diagnostics. The method for roentgenocontrast agent preparation on the base of starch-agar gel is described. Advantages of the agent suggested in comparison with those of roentgenologic cavity investigation used are shown

  15. A spherical cavity in an Einstein universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofinti, N.K.

    1980-03-01

    Suitable metric forms for the regions and a outside a sperical cavity in an Einstein universe are derived by means of perturbation. It is shown that for low proper pressure, the cavity behaves like ''negative'' Schwarzchild mass. Finally, the possibility of carrying over to the exact theory a proposed definition of the gravitational field in a matter is examined.

  16. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...

  17. Spallation neutron source RF cavity bias system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spallation Neutron Source r.f. cavity bias system is described under the topic headings: bias system, r.f. cavity, cables, d.c. bias power supply, transistor regulator and control system. Calculation of 4 core 300 mm solid aluminium cable inductance, coaxial shunt frequency response and transistor regulator computed frequency response, are discussed in appendices 1-3. (U.K.)

  18. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Kneisel, Peter; Cameiro, Tadeu

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  19. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disk on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  20. TESLA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Simrock, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The digital control of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) resonator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity in DESY-Hamburg has been driven by the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system. This experiment focused attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the resonator is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The identification of the resonator parameters is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  1. Vertical external cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, M

    2001-01-01

    Active stabilisation showed a relative locked linewidth of approx 3 kHz. Coarse tuning over 7 nm was achieved using a 3-plate birefingent filter plate while fine-tuning using cavity length change allowed tuning over 250 MHz. Vertical external cavity semiconductor lasers have emerged as an interesting technology based on current vertical cavity semiconductor laser knowledge. High power output into a single transverse mode has attracted companies requiring good fibre coupling for telecommunications systems. The structure comprises of a grown semiconductor Bragg reflector topped with a multiple quantum well gain region. This is then included in an external cavity. This device is then optically pumped to promote laser action. Theoretical modelling of AIGaAs based VECSEL structures was undertaken, showing the effect of device design on laser characteristics. A simple 3-mirror cavity was constructed to assess the static characteristics of the structure. Up to 153 mW of output power was achieved in a single transver...

  2. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  3. Aspergillosis complicating a microwave ablation cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Bandula, Steven; Brown, Jeremy; Whelan, Jeremy; Illing, Rowland

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient who following chemotherapy developed semi-invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and an aspergilloma in a lung cavity previously formed by microwave ablation (MWA). A 55-year-old woman presented with cough and shortness of breath after finishing three cycles of chemotherapy for a metastatic nerve sheath tumour. She had been treated by MWA for pulmonary metastases 2 years previously which resulted in a residual right apical lung cavity. Postchemotherapy imaging showed that this cavity had enlarged, developed a thicker wall and contained lobulated soft tissue with a crescent sign on coronal reformats. In addition, the patient's Aspergillus-specific IgG was markedly raised. Treatment with itraconazole improved the symptoms and reduced the cavity size and wall thickness. This case shows that persisting lung cavities after MWA are a potential site for semi-invasive aspergillosis and has implications for the timing of chemotherapy in patient with metastatic lung disease. PMID:27624446

  4. Cavity cooling a single charged levitated nanosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, J; Fonseca, P Z G; Mavrogordatos, T; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-03-27

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres. PMID:25860743

  5. Performance of 3-cell Seamless Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLBA; Jelezov, I. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, W. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, X. [DESY, Hamburg

    2009-11-01

    In the last several months we have surface treated and cryogenically tested three TESLA-type 3-cell cavities, which had been manufactured at DESY as seamless assemblies by hydroforming. The cavities were completed at JLab with beam tube/flange assemblies. All three cavities performed very well after they had been post-purified with titanium at 1250C for 3 hrs. The cavities, two of which consisted of an end cell and 2 center cells and one was a center cell assembly, achieved gradients of Eacc = 32 MV/m, 34 MV/m and 35 MV/m without quenches. The performance was limited by the appearance of the “Q-drop” in the absence of field emission. This contribution reports about the various measurements undertaken with these cavities.

  6. Niobium Cavity Electropolishing Modelling and Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, L M A; Forel, S; Shirra, J A

    2013-01-01

    It’s widely accepted that electropolishing (EP) is the most suitable surface finishing process to achieve high performance bulk Nb accelerating cavities. At CERN and in preparation for the processing of the 704 MHz high-beta Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cavities a new vertical electropolishing facility has been assembled and a study is on-going for the modelling of electropolishing on cavities with COMSOL® software. In a first phase, the electrochemical parameters were taken into account for a fixed process temperature and flow rate, and are presented in this poster as well as the results obtained on a real SPL single cell cavity. The procedure to acquire the data used as input for the simulation is presented. The modelling procedure adopted to optimise the cathode geometry, aimed at a uniform current density distribution in the cavity cell for the minimum working potential and total current is explained. Some preliminary results on fluid dynamics is also briefly described.

  7. A 3D Printed Superconducting Aluminium Microwave Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Creedon, Daniel L; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Tim; Tobar, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals in particular has found a number of novel applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Whilst many techniques can be used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a resonant microwave cavity 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable to the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum...

  8. Change in Species Diversity during Recovering Process of Evergreen Broad-leaved Fo rest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenYuanguang; LiuShirong; ChenFang; HeTatping; LiangHongwen

    2005-01-01

    Evergreen broad-leaved forest is one of the most important vegetation types in China. Because of the human activities, evergreen broad-leaved forest has been destroyed extensively, leading to degraded ecosystem. It is urgent to conserve and restore these natural forests in China.tn this paper, the tendency and rate of species diversity restoration of the evergreen broad-lea ved forest in Darning Mountain has been studied. The main results are as follows:(a) in subtropical mid-mountain area, species diversity in degraded evergreen broad-leaved forest can be restored. Through analyzing b diversity index of communities in different time and space, it was found that the species composition of communities tend to be the same as that in the zonal evergreen broad-leaved forest. (b) The restoration rate of evergreen broad-leaved forest was very fast. Planting Chinese fir after clear-cutting and controlled burning of the forest 178 species appeared in a 60Om2, sample area after 20 years"" natural recovering. Among these species, 58 were tree layer and the height of community reached 18m, The survey suggested that it would take only 20 years for the degraded forest to develop into community composed of light demanding broad-leaved pioneer trees and rain-tolerance broad-leaved trees, and it need another 40-80 years to reach the stage consisting of min-tulerance evergreen broad-leaved trees, (c) Species number increased quickly at the early stage (2-20 years) during vegetation recovering process toward the climax, and decreased at the min-stage (50-60 years ), then maintained a relatively stable level at the late-stage (over 150 years).

  9. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words "narrow" and especially "broad" when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy. PMID:27660623

  10. Automatic and controlled processing and the Broad Autism Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camodeca, Amy; Voelker, Sylvia

    2016-01-30

    Research related to verbal fluency in the Broad Autism Phenotype (BAP) is limited and dated, but generally suggests intact abilities in the context of weaknesses in other areas of executive function (Hughes et al., 1999; Wong et al., 2006; Delorme et al., 2007). Controlled processing, the generation of search strategies after initial, automated responses are exhausted (Spat, 2013), has yet to be investigated in the BAP, and may be evidenced in verbal fluency tasks. One hundred twenty-nine participants completed the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System Verbal Fluency test (D-KEFS; Delis et al., 2001) and the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ; Hurley et al., 2007). The BAP group (n=53) produced significantly fewer total words during the 2nd 15" interval compared to the Non-BAP (n=76) group. Partial correlations indicated similar relations between verbal fluency variables for each group. Regression analyses predicting 2nd 15" interval scores suggested differentiation between controlled and automatic processing skills in both groups. Results suggest adequate automatic processing, but slowed development of controlled processing strategies in the BAP, and provide evidence for similar underlying cognitive constructs for both groups. Controlled processing was predictive of Block Design score for Non-BAP participants, and was predictive of Pragmatic Language score on the BAPQ for BAP participants. These results are similar to past research related to strengths and weaknesses in the BAP, respectively, and suggest that controlled processing strategy use may be required in instances of weak lower-level skills. PMID:26652842

  11. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words "narrow" and especially "broad" when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy.

  12. Peculiar Broad Absorption Line Quasars found in DPOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, R J; Djorgovski, S G; Gal, R R; Mahabal, A A; Lopes, P A A; De Carvalho, R R; Odewahn, S C; Castro, S; Thompson, D; Chaffee, F; Darling, J; Desai, V; Brunner, Robert J.; Hall, Patrick B.

    2003-01-01

    With the recent release of large (i.e., > hundred million objects), well-calibrated photometric surveys, such as DPOSS, 2MASS, and SDSS, spectroscopic identification of important targets is no longer a simple issue. In order to enhance the returns from a spectroscopic survey, candidate sources are often preferentially selected to be of interest, such as brown dwarfs or high redshift quasars. This approach, while useful for targeted projects, risks missing new or unusual species. We have, as a result, taken the alternative path of spectroscopically identifying interesting sources with the sole criterion being that they are in low density areas of the g - r and r - i color-space defined by the DPOSS survey. In this paper, we present three peculiar broad absorption line quasars that were discovered during this spectroscopic survey, demonstrating the efficacy of this approach. PSS J0052+2405 is an Iron LoBAL quasar at a redshift z = 2.4512 with very broad absorption from many species. PSS J0141+3334 is a reddened...

  13. HIE-ISOLDE cavity production – results from thermal modelling of the cavity during sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Kupiainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project is in the phase of cavity production and optimization. Cavities are made of copper and sputtered niobium. We build an ANSYS model to model thermal distributions and heat flows in the cavity structure. We limited the analysis to handle the cavity during sputtering and investigated the effect of different coating power. The aim was to check how results compare to experimental data and vary boundary conditions to improve the model. With two boundary conditions (fixed room and cavity top temperatures), we observed a power loss due to fixed temperature, as expected. The temperature gradient between the bottom and top cavity did not reach the values of the experimental data. With one boundary condition (fixed temperature on sputtering chamber structure), the expected linear proportionality was observed clearly between the temperatures of the cavity and the power. The temperature gradients were also observed to increase with power. We observed an offset in the data compared to experimental dat...

  14. Pulmonary cavity due to chronic eosinophilic pneumonia associated with arsenicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, A; Saha, K; Jash, D; Bandyopadhyay, A

    2012-01-01

    In developing country like India arsenic poisoning is a major public health problem. Association of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia and chronic diarrhea with arsenicosis is rare. Also pulmonary cavity formation in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is very uncommon. A 44-year-old male patient, resident of an arsenic affected area was admitted for evaluation of chronic diarrhoea, persistent peripheral eosinophilia along with radiologically visible cavity in right upper zone. There were dermatological manifestations of arsenicosis along with presence of noncirrhotic portal fibrosis and peripheral eosinophilia. On bronchoalveolar lavage study, eosinophil comprised 40% of total cellularity making the diagnosis of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. After ruling out all possible causes of diarrhoea and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, we came to conclusion that arsenic could be implicated as causative agent.

  15. Pulmonary cavity due to chronic eosinophilic pneumonia associated with arsenicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, A; Saha, K; Jash, D; Bandyopadhyay, A

    2012-01-01

    In developing country like India arsenic poisoning is a major public health problem. Association of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia and chronic diarrhea with arsenicosis is rare. Also pulmonary cavity formation in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is very uncommon. A 44-year-old male patient, resident of an arsenic affected area was admitted for evaluation of chronic diarrhoea, persistent peripheral eosinophilia along with radiologically visible cavity in right upper zone. There were dermatological manifestations of arsenicosis along with presence of noncirrhotic portal fibrosis and peripheral eosinophilia. On bronchoalveolar lavage study, eosinophil comprised 40% of total cellularity making the diagnosis of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. After ruling out all possible causes of diarrhoea and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, we came to conclusion that arsenic could be implicated as causative agent. PMID:23279770

  16. Prototype superconducting radio-frequency cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    This niobium superconducting cavity was part of the prototype stages for an upgrade to LEP, known as LEP-2. Superconducting cavities would eventually replace the traditional copper cavities and allow beam energies of 100 GeV.

  17. Assessing Ground-Water Contamination Across Broad Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsel, D. R.

    2001-05-01

    Ground-water quality is measured at discrete locations, and often interpreted at local scales. However, regional patterns in ground-water quality can be used to: 1) Assess relations between water quality and broad patterns of human activities or geochemical variation; 2) Reduce monitoring costs by sampling more frequently in areas of highest concentration or vulnerability; 3) Prioritize locations for prevention efforts such as for nitrate reduction, to obtain maximum benefits for lower costs; and 4) Project water-quality conditions to unsampled locations based on a regional understanding or "model". Examples of methods for modeling and interpreting ground-water quality at regional scales are presented along with their utility for cost reduction and contamination prevention purposes.

  18. Modeling the TPV system optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dale R.

    1997-03-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system design requires a sophisticated system performance model. A TPV system consists of three major subsystems: photon production from combustion or nuclear heat sources; optical cavity and energy conversion (OCEC); and waste heat recuperation or rejection. This paper covers an OCEC subsystem computer model which is designed to work with the other two subsystem models. The OCEC model utilizes a one-dimensional simplification after calculation of three-dimensional configuration factors. The model requires input of seven optical parameters as a function of wavelength: emitter emission, shield (or filter) transmission; shield (or filter) absorption; photovoltaic (PV) cell reflectivity; PV cell metallization reflectivity; cell-to-cell gap reflectivity; and PV cell spectral response. Other model requirements are: fraction of PV cell plane area taken by the cell, cell metallization, and cell-to-cell gap; a good estimate of end losses and cooling system energy requirements; PV cell voltage and current coefficients as a function of temperature and intensity; and PV cell and wiring resistance losses. Use of the model allows parametric analyses under different system conditions and with different OCEC component specifications. Once parameters showing the most sensitivity to change are determined, then the component specifications relating to those parameters can be reviewed and new or modified components made which will move toward an achievable optimum subsystem design. Another part of the OCEC computer model calculates component figures of merit. This capability provides additional insight toward achieving improved subsystem performance.

  19. Photoionisation modelling of the broad line region

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthea

    2016-08-01

    Two of the most fundamental questions regarding the broad line region (BLR) are "what is its structure?" and "how is it moving?" Baldwin et al. (1995) showed that by summing over an ensemble of clouds at differing densities and distances from the ionising source we can easily and naturally produce a spectrum similar to what is observed for AGN. This approach is called the `locally optimally emitting clouds' (LOC) model. This approach can also explain the well-observed stratification of emission lines in the BLR (e.g. Clavel et al. 1991, Peterson et al. 1991, Kollatschny et al. 2001) and `breathing' of BLR with changes in the continuum luminosity (Netzer & Mor 1990, Peterson et al. 2014) and is therefore a generally accepted model of the BLR. However, LOC predictions require some assumptions to be made about the distribution of the clouds within the BLR. By comparing photoionization predictions, for a distribution of cloud properties, with observed spectra we can infer something about the structure of the BLR and distribution of clouds. I use existing reverberation mapping data to constrain the structure of the BLR by observing how individual line strengths and ratios of different lines change in high and low luminosity states. I will present my initial constraints and discuss the challenges associated with the method.

  20. Present status of superconducting cavity developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Nobuo; Kusano, Joichi; Hasegawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-11-01

    An R and D work of a superconducting (SC) cavity for the high intensity proton linac has begun at JAERI in collaboration with KEK. The RF field calculation and the structural analysis have been made to determine the cavity shape in the proton energy range between 100 and 1500 MeV. The results indicate the feasibility of a SC proton linac. A vertical test stand with clean room, water rinsing system, cavity evacuation pumping system, cryostat and data acquisition system has been installed to demonstrate the cavity performance. A single cell cavity of {beta}=0.5 has been fabricated and tested at the test stand to obtain the Q-value and the maximum surface electric field strength. The measured Q-values have been found to be high enough for our requirement while the field strength was limited to about 75% of the specification by the multipacting. We describe the preliminary design of the SC cavity, the overview of the vertical test stand and experimental results of the single cell cavity. (author)

  1. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The digital control of several superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity and ACC1 module of the VU-FEL TTF in DESY-Hamburg have both been driven by a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based system. Additionally, a single 9-cell TESLA Superconducting cavity of the FNPL Photo Injector at FERMILAB has been remotely controlled from WUT-ISE laboratory with the support of the DESY team using the same FPGA control system. These experiments focused attention on the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. An electrical model of the resonator was taken as a starting point. Calibration of the signal path is considered key in preparation for the efficient driving of a cavity. Identification of the resonator parameters has been proven to be a successful approach in achieving required performance; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time while requiring reasonable levels of power consumption. Feed-forward and feedback modes were successfully applied in operating the cavities. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  2. Optimized Multi-Ion Cavity Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Stephen; Vogt, Markus; Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) are paving the way to utilize multiple quantum emitters confined in a single optical cavity. In such systems, it is crucially important to control the quantum mechanical coupling of individual emitters to the cavity mode. In this regard, combining ion trap technologies with CQED provides a particularly promising approach due to the well-established motional control over trapped ions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate coupling of up to five trapped ions in a string to a high-finesse optical cavity. By changing the axial position and spacing of the ions in a fully deterministic manner, we systematically characterize their coupling to the cavity mode through visibility measurements of the cavity emission. In good agreement with the theoretical model, the results demonstrate that the geometrical configuration of multiple trapped ions can be manipulated to obtain optimal cavity coupling. Our system presents a new ground for exploring CQED with multiple quantum emitters, enabled by the highly controllable collective light-matter interaction.

  3. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, T.; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  4. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  5. Rapid Assessment for basal cavities on Dahomey National Wildlife Refuge: Implications for Present and Future Bat Conservation

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Survey of mature forested areas on the refuge was done to examine trees with basal cavities for bats. Though the refuge supports many large diameter trees with...

  6. FPGA based real time RF cavity simulator for superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RF cavity is one of the most important component in an accelerator, it is used for producing appropriate electromagnetic fields to accelerate the charged particles. The response of RF cavity to an input RF signal depends on the various operating conditions. Actual operating conditions of RF cavity are difficult to create in lab and also RF cavity is not easily available which limits the study and testing of RF systems that involve RF cavity. This calls for the requirement of a real time hardware model of the RF cavity which can be integrated with other RF systems for their testing in lab. This limitation is even more severe for superconducting RF cavities which need to be operated with the required cryogenics. Thus a real time hardware model of the superconducting RF cavity has been realized on FPGA. Real time RF Cavity simulator can be used to study the response of RF cavity under various operating conditions and for testing and optimization of other RF sub-systems particularly the Low Level RF feedback control systems in lab

  7. Clamshell microwave cavities having a superconductive coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Piel, Helmut (Wuppertal, DE)

    1994-01-01

    A microwave cavity including a pair of opposing clamshell halves, such halves comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, or a silver-based alloy, wherein the cavity is further characterized as exhibiting a dominant TE.sub.011 mode is provided together with an embodiment wherein the interior concave surfaces of the clamshell halves are coated with a superconductive material. In the case of copper clamshell halves, the microwave cavity has a Q-value of about 1.2.times.10.sup.5 as measured at a temperature of 10K and a frequency of 10 GHz.

  8. Coherent cavity networks with complete connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kyoseva, Elica S.; Beige, Almut; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2011-01-01

    When cavity photons couple to an optical fiber with a continuum of modes, they usually leak out within a finite amount of time. However, if the fiber is about one meter long and linked to a mirror, photons bounce back and forth within the fiber on a much faster time scale. As a result, {\\em dynamical decoupling} prevents the cavity photons from entering the fiber. In this paper we use the simultaneous dynamical decoupling of a large number of distant cavities from the fiber modes of linear op...

  9. Q degradations in superconducting niobium cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past year, several laboratories around the world have observed degradations of the Q value of superconducting niobium cavities made from high thermal conductivity niobium under certain cooldown conditions. Especially under slow cooldown or warmup to temperatures < 200 K of larger systems severe degradations have been reported. A systematic study of the influence of the cooldown speed, warmup conditions, multiple cooldowns and chemical surface treatment on cavity performance of cavities manufactured from niobium of different purity has been conducted. Possible cures such as anodic oxidation are being explored and results of these investigations are reported

  10. Piezoelectric Voltage Coupled Reentrant Cavity Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Natalia C; Floch, Jean-Michel Le; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2014-01-01

    A piezoelectric voltage coupled microwave reentrant cavity has been developed. The central cavity post is bonded to a piezoelectric actuator allowing the voltage control of small post displacements over a high dynamic range. We show that such a cavity can be implemented as a voltage tunable resonator, a transducer for exciting and measuring mechanical modes of the structure and a transducer for measuring comparative sensitivity of the piezoelectric material. Experiments were conducted at room and cryogenic temperatures with results verified using Finite Element software.

  11. LHC Crab Cavity Coupler Test Boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, James; Burt, Graeme; Calaga, Rama; Macpherson, Alick; Montesinos, Eric; Silva, Subashini; Tutte, Adam; Xiao, Binping

    2016-01-01

    The LHC double quarter wave (DQW) crab cavities have two different types of Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers in addition to a fundamental power coupler (FPC). The FPC requires conditioning, so to achieve this we have designed a radio-frequency (RF) quarter wave resonator to provide high transmission between two opposing FPCs. For the HOM couplers we must ensure that the stop-band filter is positioned at the cavity frequency and that peak transmission occurs at the same frequencies as the strongest HOMs. We have designed two test boxes which preserve the cavity spectral response in order to test the couplers.

  12. RF cavity evaluation with the code SUPERFISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code SUPERFISH calculates axisymmetric rf fields and is most applicable to re-entrant cavities of an Alvarez linac. Some sample results are shown for the first Alvarez's in NUMATRON project. On the other hand the code can also be effectivily applied to TE modes excited in an RFQ linac when the cavity is approximately considered as positioning at an infinite distance from the symmetry axis. The evaluation was made for several RFQ cavities, models I, II and a test linac named LITL, and useful results for the resonator design were obtained. (author)

  13. Cavity-Controlled Chemistry in Molecular Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Felipe; Spano, Frank C.

    2016-06-01

    The demonstration of strong and ultrastrong coupling regimes of cavity QED with polyatomic molecules has opened new routes to control chemical dynamics at the nanoscale. We show that strong resonant coupling of a cavity field with an electronic transition can effectively decouple collective electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a disordered molecular ensemble, even for molecules with high-frequency quantum vibrational modes having strong electron-vibration interactions. This type of polaron decoupling can be used to control chemical reactions. We show that the rate of electron transfer reactions in a cavity can be orders of magnitude larger than in free space for a wide class of organic molecular species.

  14. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira;

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the loss of tooth substance after cavity preparation for direct and indirect restorations and its relationship with fracture strength of the prepared teeth. Sixty sound human maxillary first premolars were assigned to 6 groups (n=10). MOD direct composite cavities......) or 1/2 (Groups III and VI) of the intercuspal distance. Teeth were weighed (digital balance accurate to 0.001 g) before and after preparation to record tooth substance mass lost during cavity preparation. The prepared teeth were submitted to occlusal loading to determine their fracture strength using...

  15. Cavity-controlled chemistry in molecular ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The demonstration of strong and ultrastrong coupling regimes of cavity QED with polyatomic molecules has opened new routes to control chemical dynamics at the nanoscale. We show that strong resonant coupling of a cavity field with an electronic transition can effectively decouple collective electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a disordered molecular ensemble, even for molecules with high-frequency quantum vibrational modes having strong electron-vibration interactions. This type of polaron decoupling can be used to control chemical reactions. We show that the rate of electron transfer reactions in a cavity can be orders of magnitude larger than in free space, for a wide class of organic molecular species.

  16. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...... threshold for lasing as function of cavity-mirror reflectance, laser dye concentration and cavity length. The laser device is characterized using the laser dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol. Lasing is observed, and the influence of dye concentration is investigated....

  17. Shallow Cavities in Multiple-Planet Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Duffell, Paul C.; Dong, Ruobing

    2014-01-01

    Large cavities are often observed in protoplanetary disks, which might suggest the presence of planets opening gaps in the disk. Multiple planets are necessary to produce a wide cavity in the gas. However, multiple planets may also be a burden to the carving out of very deep gaps. When additional planets are added to the system, the time-dependent perturbations from these additional satellites can stir up gas in the gap, suppressing cavity opening. In this study, we perform two-dimensional nu...

  18. Turbulent heat transfer for impinging jet flowing inside a cylindrical hot cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halouane Yacine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Convective heat transfer from an isothermal hot cylindrical cavity due to a turbulent round jet impingement is investigated numerically. Three-dimensional turbulent flow is considered in this work. The Reynolds stress second order turbulence model with wall standard treatment is used for the turbulence predictions the problem parameters are the jet exit Reynolds number, ranging from 2x104 to 105and the normalized impinging distance to the cavity bottom and the jet exit Lf, ranging from 4 to 35. The computed flow patterns and isotherms for various combinations of these parameters are analyzed in order to understand the effect of the cavity confinement on the heat transfer phenomena. The flow in the cavity is divided into three parts, the area of free jet, and the area of the jet interaction with the reverse flow and the semi-quiescent flow in the region of the cavity bottom. The distribution of the local and mean Nusselt numbers along the cavity walls for above combinations of the flow parameters are detailed. Results are compared against to corresponding cases for impinging jet on a plate for the case of the bottom wall. The analysis reveals that the average Nusselt number increases considerably with the jet exit Reynolds number. Finally, it was found that the average Nusselt number at the stagnation point could be correlated by a relationship in the form Nu=f(Lf,Re.

  19. Ultimate Cavity Dynamics of Hydrophobic Spheres Impacting on Free Water Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Mansoor, Mohammad M.

    2012-12-01

    Cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research owing to its practical relevance in naval, military, industrial, sports and biological applications. The cavity formed by an impacting hydrophobic sphere normally seals at two places, one below (deep seal) and the other above the water surface (surface seal). For Froude numbers , the air flow into the resulting cavity is strong enough to suck the splash crown above the surface and disrupt the cavity dynamics before it deep seals. In this research work we eliminate surface seals by means of a novel practice of using cone splash-guards and examine the undisturbed transient cavity dynamics by impact of hydrophobic spheres for Froude numbers ranging . This enabled the measurement of extremely accurate pinch-off heights, pinch-off times, radial cavity collapse rates, and jet speeds in an extended range of Froude numbers compared to the previous work of Duclaux et al. (2007). Results in the extended regime were in remarkable agreement with the theoretical prediction of scaled pinch-off depth, and experimentally derived pinch-off time for . Furthermore, we investigated the influence of confinement on cavity formation by varying the cross-sectional area of the tank of liquid. In conjunction with surface seal elimination we observed the formation of multiple pinch-off points where a maximum of four deep seals were obtained in a sequential order for the Froude number range investigated. The presence of an elongated cavity beneath the first pinch-off point 5 resulted in evident "kinks" primarily related to the greatly diminished air pressure at the necking region caused by supersonic air flows (Gekle et al. 2010). Such flows passing through second pinch-offs were also found to choke the cavities beneath the first pinch- off depths causing radial expansion and hence disappearance of downward jets.

  20. Broad spectrum anthelmintic potential of Cassia plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suman Kundu; Saptarshi Roy; Larisha Mawkhleing Lyndem

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro anthelmintic efficacy of Cassia alata (C. alata), Cassia(C. angustifolia) and Cassia occidentalis (C. occidentalis). angustifolia Methods: Crude ethanol extract from leaves of the three plants were prepared in rotary evaporator and different concentrations (10, 20 and 40 mg/mL) of leaf extracts were used for treatment on different representatives of helminthes (Heterakis gallinarum, Raillietina tetragona and Catatropis sp.) from domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus). Loss of motility and death were monitored frequently.Results: C. alata showed early paralysis in all worms treated followed by C. angustifolia. C. occidentalis in combination with C. alata together caused early paralysis in all treated worms than the combination of C. alata with C. angustfolia. While Heterakis gallinarum in control survived for (81.33±2.07) h, treated worms lost their motility at (5.71±0.10) h, (6.60±0.86) h and (13.95±0.43) h with C. angustifolia, C. alata and C. occidentalis respectively at a concentration of 40 mg/mL which showed better efficacy than albendazole. Catatropis sp. survival period was (26.49±1.38) h in control, but with plant treatment, it lost its motility in just (0.57±0.08) h, (1.00±0.12) h and (1.47±0.40) h at 40 mg/mL concentration of C. alata, C. angustifolia and C. occidentalis respectively.Raillietina tetragona on the other hand became paralysed at (1.68±0.27) h, (2.95±0.29) h and (4.13±0.31) h with above concentrations treated with three plants respectively, however in control it survived up to (81.93±4.71) h.Conclusions:This present study indicated broad spectrum vermifugal activity of all plants tested.

  1. Validation, automatic generation and use of broad phonetic transcriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bael, Cristophe Patrick Jan Van

    2007-01-01

    Broad phonetic transcriptions represent the pronunciation of words as strings of characters from specifically designed symbol sets. In everyday life, broad phonetic transcriptions are often used as aids to pronounce (foreign) words. In addition, broad phonetic transcriptions are often used for lingu

  2. Fiber-coupled photonic crystal nanocavity for reconfigurable formation of coupled cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Ooka, Yuta; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2016-03-01

    High Q optical cavities are employed to realize a coupled cavity system with which to achieve optical signal processing. Photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities are particularly attractive because they are suitable for integration. However, they usually suffer from low coupling efficiency with optical fiber and poor resonant wavelength controllability. We recently demonstrated cavity mode formation by placing a tapered nanofiber close to a two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide. The cavity mode couples directly with the nanofiber, which results in a coupling efficiency of 39% with a high Q of over half a million. The cavity is formed due to the modulation of the effective refractive index, which is caused by bringing a nanofiber close to the silicon slab. Precise tuning of the resonant wavelength becomes possible by changing the contact area of the nanofiber. In this study, we demonstrate the coupling and de-coupling of coupled PhC nanocavities formed by a nanofiber placed on a PhC waveguide. The wavelength shift of one of the cavities (mode A) is more sensitive than that of the other cavity (mode B) to a change in the nanofiber contact area. By using this difference, we can tune the resonant wavelength of mode A (Q = 4.6×105) to that of mode B (Q = 6.0×105). Then, a clear anti-crossing with a mode splitting of g/2π = 0.94 GHz is observed, which is the result of the coupling of the two modes. A reconfigurable coupled cavity system was demonstrated.

  3. Runoff erosion in Portugal: A broad overview

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    Soils are generally a scarce natural resource in Portugal as far as productivity is concerned (CNROA, 1983; Agroconsultores e Coba, 1991; Agroconsultores e Geometral, 1995). In fact, the major part of the territory is potentially not suitable for agriculture, corresponding to areas with misuse and over-exploitation of the soil resource in cropland, and to typical marginal land cover by forests and shrubs. The soils with moderate and high suitability are under agricultural use, more or less in...

  4. Striped-double cavity fabry-perot interferometers using both glass and air cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, S; Steinmetz, L

    1998-07-08

    We have used piezo-driven Fabry-Perot interferometers in the past far many continuous velocity-time measurements of fast moving surfaces. In order to avoid the annoying drift of some of these devices, we have developed and used inexpensive, solid glass, striped etalons with lengths up to 64 mm. Usable apertures are 35 mm by 80 mm with a finess of 25. A roundabout technique was devised for double cavity operation. We built a passive thermal housing for temperature stability, with tilt and height adjustments. We have also developed and used our first fixed etalon air-spaced cavity with a rotatable glass double- cavity insert. The rotation allows the referee cavity fractional order to be adjusted separately from that of the main cavity. It needs very little thermal protection, and eliminates the need for a roundabout scheme for double cavity operation, but is more costly than the solid glass version I

  5. Coupled Photonic Crystal Cavity Array Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Martin

    This thesis describes the design, fabrication and characterization of photonic crystal slab lasers. The main focus is on coupled photonic crystal cavity lasers which are examined in great detail. The cavity type which is mainly explored consists of a defect formed by a single missing hole...... are identified such as the size and material for the carrier wafer in the III-V etch and the importance of removing all remains of the e-beam lithography mask after the etch of the hard mask. Detailed simulations are shown for a simple system with two coupled cavities in different coupling directions....... The results are in good agreement with standard coupled mode theory. Also a novel type of photonic crystal structure is proposed called lambda shifted cavity which is a twodimensional photonic crystal laser analog of a VCSEL laser. Detailed measurements of the coupled modes in the photonic crystals...

  6. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  7. Nb3Sn for Radio Frequency Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godeke, A.

    2006-12-18

    In this article, the suitability of Nb3Sn to improve theperformance of superconducting Radio-Frequency (RF)cavities is discussed.The use of Nb3Sn in RF cavitiesis recognized as an enabling technology toretain a veryhigh cavity quality factor (Q0) at 4.2 K and tosignificantly improve the cavity accelerating efficiency per unitlength(Eacc). This potential arises through the fundamental properties ofNb3Sn. The properties that are extensively characterized in theliterature are, however, mainly related to improvements in currentcarrying capacity (Jc) in the vortex state. Much less is available forthe Meissner state, which is of key importance to cavities. Relevantdata, available for the Meissner state is summarized, and it is shown howthis already validates the use of Nb3Sn. In addition, missing knowledgeis highlighted and suggestions are given for further Meissner statespecific research.

  8. Plasma Treatment of Niobium SRF Cavity Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Upadhyay, M. Raskovic, L. Vuskovic, S. Popovic, A.-M. Valente-Feliciano, L. Phillips

    2010-05-01

    Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate non- superconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region of the SRF cavity surface and to remove mechanically damaged surface layer improving surface roughness. We have demonstrated on flat samples that plasma etching in Ar / Cl2 of bulk Nb is a viable alternative surface preparation technique to BCP and EP methods, with comparable etching rates. The geometry of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb defines the use of asymmetric RF discharge configuration for plasma etching. In a specially designed single cell cavity with sample holders, discharge parameters are combined with etched surface diagnostics to obtain optimum combination of etching rates, roughness and homogeneity in a variety of discharge types, conditions, and sequences. The optimized experimental conditions will ultimately be applied to single cell SRF cavities.

  9. Photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report about the fabrication and analysis of high Q photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky-contacts. The structures are based on GaAs n-i membranes with an InGaAs quantum well in the i-region and nanostructured low ohmic metal top-gates. They are designed for photocurrent readout within the cavity and fast electric manipulations. The cavity structures are characterized by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy under resonant excitation. We find strong cavity resonances in the photocurrent spectra and surprisingly high Q-factors up to 6500. Temperature dependent photocurrent measurements in the region between 4.5 K and 310 K show an exponential enhancement of the photocurrent signal and an external quantum efficiency up to 0.26

  10. Working on an LHC superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The delicate superconducting equipment for CERN’s LHC collider has to be assembled in ultra-clean conditions to safeguard performance. Here we see the power supply being installed on one of the superconducting cavities.

  11. On Catastrophe and Cavitation for Spherical Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MingJIN; KefuHUANG; 等

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with catastrophe of a spherical cavity and cavitation of a spherical cavity for Hooke material with 1/2 Poisson's ratio.A nonlinear problem.which is the Cauchy traction problem,is solved analytically.The governing equations are written on the deformed region or on the present configuration.And the conditions are described on moving boundary.A closed form solution is found.Furthermore,a bifurcation solution in closed form is given from the trivial homogeneous solution of a solid sphere.The results indicate that there is a tangent bifurcation on the displacement-load curve for a sphere with a cavity.On the tangent bifurcation point,the cavity grows up suddenly,which is a kind of catastrophe,And there is a pitchfork bifurcation on the displacement-load curve for a solid sphere.On the pitchfork bifurcation point.there is a cavitation in the solid sphere.

  12. LEP superconducting cavities go into storage

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities from the LEP-2 phase (1996-2000) are put into storage in the tunnel that once housed the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR), the world’s first proton collider, located at CERN.

  13. Photon filters in a microwave cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Larson, J

    2003-01-01

    In an earlier paper we have concluded that time-dependent parameters in atom-mode interaction can be utilized to modify the quantum field in a cavity. When an atom shoots through the cavity field, it is expected to experience a trigonometric time dependence of its coupling constant. We investigate the possibilities this offers to modify the field. As a point of comparison we use the solvable Rosen-Zener model, which has parameter dependencies roughly similar to the ones expected in a real cavity. We do confirm that by repeatedly sending atoms through the cavity, we can obtain filters on the photon states. Highly non-classical states can be obtained. We find that the Rosen-Zener model is more sensitive to the detuning than the case of a trigonometric coupling.

  14. Reducing the convective losses of cavity receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Robert; Grobbel, Johannes; Stadler, Hannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Convective losses reduce the efficiency of cavity receivers used in solar power towers especially under windy conditions. Therefore, measures should be taken to reduce these losses. In this paper two different measures are analyzed: an air curtain and a partial window which covers one third of the aperture opening. The cavity without modifications and the usage of a partial window were analyzed in a cryogenic wind tunnel at -173°C. The cryogenic environment allows transforming the results from the small model cavity to a large scale receiver with Gr≈3.9.1010. The cavity with the two modifications in the wind tunnel environment was analyzed with a CFD model as well. By comparing the numerical and experimental results the model was validated. Both modifications are capable of reducing the convection losses. In the best case a reduction of about 50 % was achieved.

  15. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  16. Wakefield damping for the CLIC crab cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P K; Dexter, A C; Carter, R G; Khan, V; Jones, R M; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  17. WAKEFIELD DAMPING FOR THE CLIC CRAB CAVITY

    CERN Document Server

    Ambattu, P; Dexter, A; Carter, R; Khan, V; Jones, R; Dolgashev, V

    2009-01-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  18. Broad-Spectrum Solution-Processed Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Alexander Halley

    High global demand for energy coupled with dwindling fossil fuel supply has driven the development of sustainable energy sources such as solar photovoltaics. Emerging solar technologies aim for low-cost, solution-processable materials which would allow wide deployment. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are such a materials system which exhibits the ability to absorb across the entire solar spectrum, including in the infrared where many technologies cannot harvest photons. However, due to their nanocrystalline nature, CQDs are susceptible to surface-associated electronic traps which greatly inhibit performance. In this thesis, surface engineering of CQDs is presented through a combined ligand approach which improves the passivation of surface trap states. A metal halide treatment is found to passivate quantum dot surfaces in solution, while bifunctional organic ligands produce a dense film in solid state. This approach reduced midgap trap states fivefold compared with conventional passivation strategies and led to solar cells with a record certified 7.0% power conversion efficiency. The effect of this process on the electronic structure is studied through photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that while the halide provides deep trap passivation, the nature of the metal cation on the CQD surface affects the density of band tail states. This effect is explored further through a wide survey of materials, and it is found that the coordination ability of the metal cation is responsible for the suppression of shallow traps. With this understanding of CQD surface passivation, broad spectral usage is then explored through a study of visible-absorbing organolead halide perovskite materials as well as narrow-bandgap CQD solar cells. Control over growth conditions and modification of electrode interfaces resulted in efficient perovskite devices with effective usages of visible photons. For infrared-absorbing CQDs, it is found that, in addition to providing surface trap

  19. Collapse of Non-Axisymmetric Cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Enriquez, Oscar R.; Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Schmidt, Laura; Versluis, Michel; van der Meer, Devaraj; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    A round disk with a harmonic disturbance impacts on a water surface and creates a non-axisymmetric cavity which collapses under the influence of hydrostatic pressure. We use disks deformed with mode m=2 to m=6. For all mode numbers we find clear evidence for a phase inversion of the cavity wall during the collapse. We present a fluid dynamics video showing high speed imaging of different modes, pointing out the characteristic features during collapse.

  20. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  1. Electrically Pumped Vertical-Cavity Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the design of electrically pumped vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (eVCAs) for use in a mode-locked external-cavity laser has been developed, investigated and analysed. Four different eVCAs, one top-emitting and three bottom emitting structures, have been designed...... and discussed. The thesis concludes with recommendations for further work towards the realisation of compact electrically pumped mode-locked vertical externalcavity surface emitting lasers....

  2. The comet Halley diamagnetic cavity boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, T. E.; Lindgren, C. J.; Puhl, P.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetometer onboard the Giotto spacecraft observed a diamagnetic cavity surrounding the nucleus of comet Halley. A narrow transition layer with enhanced plasma density is formed at this shock-like boundary as a flux of cometary ions flowing into it from within the cavity is removed by electron-ion recombination. We examine the structure of this layer using both a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical model and a one- dimensional hybrid code.

  3. LHC Crab Cavity Progress and Outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R

    2013-01-01

    Three novel superconducting RF crab cavity designs proposed for the LHC luminosity upgrade have rapidly progressed. First Niobium prototypes are reaching close to the design performance and beyond. The highlights of the RF test results from the prototypes along with design modifications for initial beam tests in the SPS are presented. The status of the cryomodule development, integration into the SPS and the beam tests in view of validating the crab cavity system for LHC upgrade are addressed.

  4. Cavity QED with Multiple Hyperfine Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Birnbaum, K M; Kimble, H J

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the weak-driving transmission of a linearly polarized cavity mode strongly coupled to the D2 transition of a single Cesium atom. Results are relevant to future experiments with microtoroid cavities, where the single-photon Rabi frequency g exceeds the excited-state hyperfine splittings, and photonic bandgap resonators, where g is greater than both the excited- and ground-state splitting.

  5. Cavity QED on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. Using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  6. Cavity quantum electrodynamics on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Sadgrove, Mark; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. By using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  7. The emission properties of an atom inside a cavity when manipulating the atoms outside the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen; YE Liu; XIONG Kuang-wei; ZHANG Jin

    2003-01-01

    Considering three two-level atoms initially in the GHZ state, then one atom of them is put into an initially empty cavity and made resonant interaction. It is shown that the emission properties of the atom inside the cavity can be affected only when both of the atoms outside the cavity have been manipulated. This conclusion can also be generalized to n two-level atoms.

  8. CFD Modeling of Melt Spreading on the Reactor Cavity Floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Wan Sik; Bang, Kwang Hyun [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young Jo; Lee, Jae Gon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    In the very unlikely event of a severe reactor accident involving core melt and reactor pressure vessel failure, it is important to provide an accident management strategy that would allow the molten core material to cool down, resolidify and bring the core debris to a stable coolable state for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). One approach to achieve a stable coolable state is to quench the core melt after its relocation from the reactor pressure vessel into the reactor cavity. This approach typically requires a large cavity floor area on which a large amount of core melt spreads well and forms a shallow melt thickness for small thermal resistance across the melt pool. Spreading of high temperature (approx3000 K), low superheat (approx200 K) core melt over a wide cavity floor has been a key question to the success of the ex-vessel core coolability and it has brought a number of experimental work (CORINE, ECOKATS, VULCANO) and analytical work (CORFLOW, MELTSPREAD, THEMA). These computational models are currently able to predict well the spreading of stimulant materials but yet have shown a limitation for prototypic core melt of UO{sub 2}+ZrO{sub 2} mixture. A computational model for the melt spreading requires a multiphase treatment of liquid melt, solidified melt, and air. Also solidification and thermal radiation physics should be included. The present work uses ANSYS-CFX code to simulate core melt spreading on the reactor cavity. The CFX code is a general-purpose multiphase code and the present work is focused on exploring the code's capability to model melt spreading problem in a step by step approach

  9. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  10. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238U72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  11. Beam induced RF cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency (RF) cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ωr of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω0. The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(jhω0t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting RF cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kind of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  12. Flux expulsion variation in SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, S; Romanenko, A; Melnychuk, O; Sergatskov, D A; Martinello, M; Checchin, M; Crawford, A C

    2015-01-01

    Treating a cavity with nitrogen doping significantly increases $Q_0$ at medium fields, reducing cryogenic costs for high duty factor linear accelerators such as LCLS II. N-doping also makes cavities more sensitive to increased residual resistance due to trapped magnetic flux, making it critical to either have extremely effective magnetic shielding, or to prevent flux from being trapped in the cavity during cooldown. In this paper, we report on results of a study of flux expulsion. We discuss possible ways in which flux can be pinned in the inner surface, outer surface, or bulk of a cavity, and we present experimental results studying these mechanisms. We show that grain structure appears to play a key role and that a cavity that expelled flux poorly changed to expelling flux well after a high temperature furnace treatment. We further show that after furnace treatment, this cavity exhibited a significant improvement in quality factor when cooled in an external magnetic field. We conclude with implications for ...

  13. Cavity Mode Frequencies and Large Optomechanical Coupling in Two-Membrane Cavity Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, J; Malossi, N; Vitali, D

    2015-01-01

    We study the cavity mode frequencies of a Fabry-Perot cavity containing two vibrating dielectric membranes and the corresponding optomechanical coupling. Due to optical interference, extremely large optomechanical coupling of the membrane relative motion is achieved when the two membranes are placed very close to a resonance of the inner cavity formed by the two membranes, and in the limit of highly reflective membranes. The upper bound of the coupling strength is given by the optomechanical coupling associated with the much shorter inner cavity, consistently with the analysis of A. Xuereb et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 223601 (2012).

  14. Numerical investigation of effect of the position of the cylinder on solidification in a rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertelli, Ahmet; Günhan, Gökhan; Buyruk, Ertan

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, it is aimed to calculate the effect of ice formation on different cylinder geometries placed in a rectangular cavity filled with water. For this aim Fluent package program was used to solve the flow domain numerically and temperature distribution and ice formation depending on time were illustrated. Water temperature in the cavity and cylinder surface temperature were assumed as 4, 8 and -10 °C respectively and firstly temperature distribution, velocity vector, liquid fraction and ratio of Ai/Ac (formed ice area/cross sectional area of cylinder) were determined for cylinders with different placement in fixed volume.

  15. Detection of cavity migration risks using radar interferometric time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, L.; Hanssen, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    The upward migration of near-surface underground cavities can pose a major hazard for people and infrastructure. Being the major cause of sudden collapse-sinkholes, or causing a sudden lack of support of building foundations, a migrating cavity can cause the collapse of buildings, water defense systems, drainage of water bodies, or transport infrastructure. Cavity migration can occur naturally, e.g. in karst-massifs, but could also be caused by anthropogenic activities such as mining. The chief difficulty in the assessment of sinkhole risk is the lack of prior knowledge on the location of the cavity. Although in situ measurements such as gravimetry, seismic or EM-surveying or GPR are in principle able to detect an underground void, it is generally not economically possible to use these techniques over vast areas. Moreover, the risk of casualties is highest for urbanized areas, in which it is difficult to get close enough to perform these measurements. The second problem is that there is usually no data available prior to the collapse, to understand whether there is for example precursory motion, and how far ahead in time critical levels can be detected. Here we report on the catastrophic collapse of the foundation of an underground parking garage in Heerlen, the Netherlands. In December 2011, some pillars supporting the roof of the garage and the shopping mall above it suddenly subsided more than one meter. This caused the near collapse of a part of the shopping mall, the immediate evacuation of the building, and the decision of the authorities to eliminate the building. In the analysis of the event, several hypotheses were formulated on the driving mechanisms, such as subsurface water flows and karst. However, as the region was subject to coal mining in the last century, alternative hypotheses were cavity migration due to the mining, or rebound of the surface due to mine water. Our study jointly exploits the data archives of four imaging radar satellites, ERS-1

  16. On cavity flow permeability testing of a sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, P A; Selvadurai, A P S

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory experiment designed to measure the bulk permeability of a cuboidal sample of sandstone measuring approximately 450 mm(2) in plan area and 508 mm in height. The relatively large dimensions of the sandstone specimen allow the determination of the permeability of the material by creating a central cavity that can be pressurized to maintain a constant flow rate. The paper describes the experimental details and the test procedure, and discusses the computational and analytic approaches that have been used to interpret the test results.

  17. IMRT in oral cavity cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Except for early T1,2 N0 stages, the prognosis for patients with oral cavity cancer (OCC) is reported to be worse than for carcinoma in other sites of the head and neck (HNC). The aim of this work was to assess disease outcome in OCC following IMRT. Between January 2002 and January 2007, 346 HNC patients have been treated with curative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Zurich. Fifty eight of these (16%) were referred for postoperative (28) or definitive (30) radiation therapy of OCC. 40 of the 58 OCC patients (69%) presented with locally advanced T3/4 or recurred lesions. Doses between 60 and 70 Gy were applied, combined with simultaneous cisplatin based chemotherapy in 78%. Outcome analyses were performed using Kaplan Meier curves. In addition, comparisons were performed between this IMRT OCC cohort and historic in-house cohorts of 33 conventionally irradiated (3DCRT) and 30 surgery only patients treated over the last 10 years. OCC patients treated with postoperative IMRT showed the highest local control (LC) rate of all assessed treatment sequence subgroups (92% LC at 2 years). Historic postoperative 3DCRT patients and patients treated with surgery alone reached LC rates of ~70–80%. Definitively irradiated patients revealed poorest LC rates with ~30 and 40% following 3DCRT and IMRT, respectively. T1 stage resulted in an expectedly significantly higher LC rate (95%, n = 19, p < 0.05) than T2-4 and recurred stages (LC ~50–60%, n = 102). Analyses according to the diagnosis revealed significantly lower LC in OCC following definitive IMRT than that in pharyngeal tumors treated with definitive IMRT in the same time period (43% vs 82% at 2 years, p < 0.0001), while the LC rate of OCC following postoperative IMRT was as high as in pharyngeal tumors treated with postoperative IMRT (>90% at 2 years). Postoperative IMRT of OCC resulted in the highest local control rate of the assessed treatment

  18. Teleportation of a Weak Coherent Cavity Field State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Wesley B.; Qiang, Wen-Chao; Avelar, Ardiley T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we propose a scheme to teleport a weak coherent cavity field state. The scheme relies on the resonant atom-field interaction inside a high-Q cavity. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is assumed much smaller than one, hence the field decay inside the cavity can be effectively suppressed.

  19. Cavity polaritons in an organic single-crystalline rubrene microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Nagai, Hikaru; Amano, Masamitsu; Bando, Kazuki; Kondo, Hisao

    2014-06-01

    We fabricated a single-crystalline rubrene microcavity using a simple solution technique and observed cavity polaritons in the microcavity at room temperature (RT). Large Rabi splitting energies were obtained from dispersion of the cavity polaritons. Furthermore, photoluminescence from the cavity polaritons was observed at RT. The findings will be of importance for the application of cavity polaritons.

  20. Compound parabolic concentrator with cavity for tubular absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland

    1983-01-01

    A compond parabolic concentrator with a V-shaped cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity redirects all energy entering between the receiver and the cavity structure onto the receiver, if the optical receiver is emplaced a distance from the cavity not greater than 0.27 r (where r is the radius of the receiver).

  1. Teleportation of atomic states with a weak coherent cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the teleportation of an unknown atomic state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with a coherent cavity field. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is much smaller than one and thus the cavity decay can be effectively suppressed. Another adwntage of the scheme is that only one cavity is required.

  2. Scheme for implementing quantum secret sharing via cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhi-Hua; Lin Xiu-Min

    2005-01-01

    An experimentally feasible scheme for implementing quantum secret sharing via cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) is proposed. The scheme requires the large detuning of the cavity field from the atomic transition, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavity is greatly loosened.

  3. Control of ring lasers by means of coupled cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abitan, Haim; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Skettrup, Torben;

    2000-01-01

    Summary form only. Coupling of optical cavities offers a means of controlling the properties of one cavity (e.g. a laser) by making adjustments to another, external cavity. In this contribution we consider a unidirectional ring laser (bow-tie laser) coupled to an external ring cavity. Using...

  4. Soliton laser: A computational two-cavity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, P.; If, F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth;

    1987-01-01

    An improved computational two-cavity model of the soliton laser proposed and designed by Mollenauer and Stolen [Opt. Lett. 9, 13 (1984)] is obtained through refinements of (i) the laser cavity model, (ii) the pulse propagation in the fiber cavity, and (iii) the coupling between the two cavities. As...

  5. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M.; Navitski, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  6. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M. [INFN Milano–LASA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Navitski, A. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Pagani, C. [INFN Milano–LASA, Segrate, MI (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, Milano (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  7. Recultivation of the cavity of the closed open pit Bor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilić Jasmina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper ore is one of the most important raw materials for industrial production. Increasing demands have been increasing its extraction generally. Shallow deposits with higher copper grade are mostly exhausted and the open pits become deeper, also the amount of overburden and the problems of its disposal are increased. In some cases large quantities of overburden can solve the problem of recultivation of degraded areas. This is the case of recultivation of degraded areas on the location of the closed open pit Bor. Here, the overburden from another open pit, Veliki Krivelj, is disposed into the cavity of the open pit Bor. In this way the overburden is disposed without further area degradation and the cavity is primarily, technically recultivated. When the filling process is finished, waste depot will have a flat top at the level K+450 [2], which is above the neighboring terrain, and the slopes height will vary. This problem was not especially considered up to date, so the experiences in this field are humble. This paper intends to be the basis for further research.

  8. Efficient Characterization of Protein Cavities within Molecular Simulation Trajectories: trj_cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramo, Teresa; East, Alexandra; Garzón, Diana; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Bond, Peter J

    2014-05-13

    Protein cavities and tunnels are critical in determining phenomena such as ligand binding, molecular transport, and enzyme catalysis. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable the exploration of the flexibility and conformational plasticity of protein cavities, extending the information available from static experimental structures relevant to, for example, drug design. Here, we present a new tool (trj_cavity) implemented within the GROMACS ( www.gromacs.org ) framework for the rapid identification and characterization of cavities detected within MD trajectories. trj_cavity is optimized for usability and computational efficiency and is applicable to the time-dependent analysis of any cavity topology, and optional specialized descriptors can be used to characterize, for example, protein channels. Its novel grid-based algorithm performs an efficient neighbor search whose calculation time is linear with system size, and a comparison of performance with other widely used cavity analysis programs reveals an orders-of-magnitude improvement in the computational cost. To demonstrate its potential for revealing novel mechanistic insights, trj_cavity has been used to analyze long-time scale simulation trajectories for three diverse protein cavity systems. This has helped to reveal, respectively, the lipid binding mechanism in the deep hydrophobic cavity of a soluble mite-allergen protein, Der p 2; a means for shuttling carbohydrates between the surface-exposed substrate-binding and catalytic pockets of a multidomain, membrane-proximal pullulanase, PulA; and the structural basis for selectivity in the transmembrane pore of a voltage-gated sodium channel (NavMs), embedded within a lipid bilayer environment. trj_cavity is available for download under an open-source license ( http://sourceforge.net/projects/trjcavity ). A simplified, GROMACS-independent version may also be compiled. PMID:26580540

  9. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  10. Transient evolution of eigenmodes in dynamic cavities and time-varying media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradoni, Gabriele; Arnaut, Luk R.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the perturbation of natural eigenmodes of dynamic cavities with boundaries moving at quasi-static speeds relative to the wave velocity. For an arbitrarily shaped source-free cavity, the amplitude of the irrotational mode is modeled as a damped harmonic oscillator with time-varying eigenfrequency, i.e., a parametric oscillator. It is found that the effect of the pure Doppler shift of the resonance frequencies of the eigenmodes is small at nonrelativistic speeds. However, it is known that any spectrum of eigenenergies that is perturbed by a space- and/or time-fluctuating medium can develop frequency shifts of arbitrary magnitude. By using a linear dynamic (time-dependent) shift for the cavity broad resonances, we find that Doppler-like large shifts result in a mere frequency modulation of the total (resultant) field amplitude, while nonuniform red or blue shift can create a hybrid amplitude and frequency modulation. Interestingly, the combined action of red and blue shifts of uniform magnitude can also create a hybrid modulation. If the angle between modal wave vector and stirrer speed is accounted for in the static (time-independent) shift, the resulting red and blue shifts lead to irregular hybrid modulations. This can occur even for regular perturbations in regular cavities. In addition, owing to the stochastic nature of mode-stirred cavities, the effect of random Doppler-like shifts is also investigated, leading to a Fokker-Planck equation whose diffusion coefficient shows quadratic dependence on the mode amplitude. Thus, the analysis of random perturbations offers an effective framework for observed instantaneous Doppler effects in closed electromagnetic environments. The mathematical framework obtained in terms of stochastic differential equations is useful to predict the nonstationary response of dynamic cavities with complicated or unknown boundary geometry.

  11. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy: A sensitive technique for high-resolution broadband molecular detection

    CERN Document Server

    Khodabakhsh, Amir; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS) is a recently developed technique that utilizes phase modulation to obtain immunity to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity modes and yields high absorption sensitivity over a broad spectral range. We describe the principles of the technique and discuss possible comb-cavity matching solutions. We present a theoretical description of NICE-OFCS signals detected with a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), and validate the model by comparing it to experimental CO2 spectra around 1575 nm. Our system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency equal to a multiple of the cavity free spectral range (FSR). The NICE-OFCS signal is detected by a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We demonstrate a simple method of passive locking of the modulation frequency to the cavity FSR that significantly improves the long term stability of the system, a...

  12. A new method for sealing composite resin contraction gaps in lined cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torstenson, B; Brännström, M; Mattsson, B

    1985-03-01

    Composite resin restorations are often applied in cavities where cervical margins are left unetched, resulting in poorer adaptation in this area. Recent experiments have indicated the possibility of impregnating with resin the gap caused by polymerization contraction. Cavities were prepared in vitro and in vivo. A thin liner was applied inside and outside the cavity. Except for the cervical wall, enamel margins were bevelled and acid-etched, and the cavities restored with Concise Enamel Bond and Composite. In another series, cavities with unetched enamel were restored. Since the liner was placed outside the cavity margins, excess material could be removed without blockage of the air-filled gap. Enamel Bond with a fluorescent additive was applied to various margins. Ground sections were prepared, and the penetration of this resin into the gap was examined with a microscope. In most teeth, the resin penetrated from 0.5 to 2 mm from the cervical margins. Similar penetration was seen from unetched margins, except for the occlusal one. No penetration was seen at acid-etched margins. By impregnating gaps with low-viscous resin after the filling has cured, one can obtain an improved seal at unetched margins.

  13. Surface analyses of electropolished niobium samples for superconducting radio frequency cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities is sometimes limited by contaminations present on the cavity surface. In the recent years extensive research has been done to enhance the cavity performance by applying improved surface treatments such as mechanical grinding, electropolishing (EP), chemical polishing, tumbling, etc., followed by various rinsing methods such as ultrasonic pure water rinse, alcoholic rinse, high pressure water rinse, hydrogen per oxide rinse, etc. Although good cavity performance has been obtained lately by various post-EP cleaning methods, the detailed nature about the surface contaminants is still not fully characterized. Further efforts in this area are desired. Prior x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of EPed niobium samples treated with fresh EP acid, demonstrated that the surfaces were covered mainly with the niobium oxide (Nb2O5) along with carbon, in addition a small quantity of sulfur and fluorine were also found in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. In this article, the authors present the analyses of surface contaminations for a series of EPed niobium samples located at various positions of a single cell niobium cavity followed by ultrapure water rinsing as well as our endeavor to understand the aging effect of EP acid solution in terms of contaminations presence at the inner surface of the cavity with the help of surface analytical tools such as XPS, SIMS, and scanning electron microscope at KEK.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF BREAKDOWN INDUCED SURFACE DAMAGE ON 805 MHZ PILLBOX CAVITY INTERIOR SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Torun, Y.; Bowring, D.; Flanagan, G.

    2013-09-25

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with the dark current calculated from the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

  15. Nonprobabilistic teleportation of field state via cavity QED

    OpenAIRE

    De Carvalho, Carlos Renato; Guerra, Emerson S.; Jalbert, Ginette; Garreau, Jean Claude

    2007-01-01

    International audience In this article we discuss a teleportation scheme of coherent states of cavity field. The experimental realization proposed makes use of cavity quatum electrodynamics involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with micromaser and Ramsey cavities. In our scheme the Ramsey cavities and the atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to teleport the state from a micromaser cavity to another. We show that, even if the correct atomic detection fails in the first trials,...

  16. Availability of tree cavities in a sal forest of Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Bhusal P; Czeszczewik D; Walankiewicz W; Churski M; Baral R; Lamichhane BR; Mikusinski G

    2016-01-01

    Tree cavities are important structural elements of forest ecosystem that host numerous birds, mammals and other cavity-dependent organisms. Pattern of cavity distribution in temperate and boreal forests are relatively well studied, yet little is known about cavities in tropical and subtropical forests. We compared cavity availability in relation to tree condition (living tree and snag), tree species and DBH class between two different sites in a subtropical deciduous sal forest in Nepal: the ...

  17. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsburg, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SR...

  18. Cavity control system: optimization methods for single cavity driving and envelope detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Simrock, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The paper is an introduction to the optimization methods of the linear accelerator cavity control system. Three distinct time periods of cavity operation are considered; filling with the EM field energy, field stabilization, and field decay. These periods represent completely different states and behavior of the cavity. The cavity could be operated by several different methods in each work phase: During the filling -- feedback and feed-forward alone, feedback and feed-forward together, self-tuning; During the flattop -- feed-forward and feedback alone or together, During the decay -- detuning and quality factor may be measured. The optimization is understood as a choice of the most efficient way of the cavity control during each period. The control may be done in terms of minimum power consumption from the klystron during whole work cycle and efficient field stabilization in the cavity, during flattop period. The introductory analysis of the cavity operational modes in three mentioned periods is presented in this paper. Additionally the alternative more precise algorithm of the cavity voltage envelope detection is proposed.

  19. Time resolved super continuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for multicomponent gas detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we present a variation of the technique CRDS (Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy) to obtain simultaneously a multicomponent absorption spectrum in a broad visible range. This new approach uses the Supercontinuum (SC) spectrum (resulting from irradiation of nonlinear media by femtosecond lasers, or simply generated by compact sources) as a light source to illuminate the cavity. In this context it is described the features of the modules assembling a MC-SC-CRDS (Multicomponent Supercontinuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy): a set of high reflectivity mirrors, the resonant cavity and the detection system. Some problems related to the multimode excitation, stray light, effective use of the dynamic range of the detector, the poor resolution of the instrument to resolve narrow absorption lines are issued. We present the absorption spectra of H2O (polyads 4υ, 4υ + δ) and O2 (spin-forbidden b-X branch) measured simultaneously by this technique in the visible range and a comparison with the absorption lines based on HITRAN database is made to demonstrate the functionality of this method. (author)

  20. Influence of a tilted cavity on quantum-dot optoelectronic active devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum-dot laser diodes (QD-LDs) with a Fabry-Perot cavity and quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs) with 70 tilted cavity were fabricated. The influence of a tilted cavity on optoelectronic active devices was also investigated. For the QD-LD, high performance was observed at room temperature. The threshold current was below 30 mA and the slope efficiency was 0.36 W/A. In contrast, the threshold current of the QD-SOA approached 1000 mA, which indicated that low facet reflectivity was obtained due to the tilted cavity design. A much more inverted carrier population was found in the QD-SOA active region at high operating current, thus offering a large optical gain and preserving the advantages of quantum dots in optical amplification and processing applications. Due to the inhomogeneity and excited state transition of quantum dots, the full width at half maximum of the electroluminescence spectrum of the QD-SOA was 81.6 nm at the injection current of 120 mA, which was ideal for broad bandwidth application in a wavelength division multiplexing system. In addition, there was more than one lasing peak in the lasing spectra of both devices and the separation of these peak positions was 6-8 nm, which is approximately equal to the homogeneous broadening of quantum dots.

  1. Disposal of low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes in rock cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guidebook summarizes the factors to be considered and the activities to be undertaken in the overall planning and development of a disposal system for solid or solidified low- and intermediate-level wastes in rock cavities. Aspects related to repository site selection, design, construction, operation, shutdown, surveillance, regulation and safety assessment are discussed here in general terms. They will be covered in greater technical detail in a separate document. This report considers the emplacement of wastes in categories II, III, IV and V, as defined in Table 3.1, in different kinds of cavities located at various depths from just below the surface to deep continental rock. The choice of the type of cavity and its depth and of the disposal site itself is related to the radiological protection requirements for the wastes concerned. The repositories considered include natural caves and abandoned mines as well as specially excavated cavities in various geological formations. Consideration is also given to hydrogeological, environmental and societal factors. The guidelines given in the report are made sufficiently general to cover a broad variety of different circumstances. Consequently, the practical application of these guidelines needs a case-by-case consideration which takes into account the local conditions, e.g. natural circumstances, the characteristics of the wastes and national and international regulations and practices

  2. Transferring of a Two-Mode Entangled State Between Two Cavities via Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tao; NI Zhi-Xiang; YE Liu

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for transferring of a two-mode entanglement of zero- or one-photon entangled states between two cavities via atom-cavity field resonant interaction.In our proposal,in order to transfer the entangled state,we only need two identical two-level atoms and a two-mode cavity for receiving the teleported state.This scheme does not require Bell-state measurement and performing any transformations to reconstruct the initial state.And the transfer can occur with 100% success probability in a simple manner.And a network for transferring of a two-mode entangled state between cavities is suggested.This scheme can also be extended to transfer N-mode entangled state of cavity.

  3. Cavity nano-optomechanics: a nanomechanical system in a high finesse optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Stapfner, Sebastian; Hunger, David; Paulitschke, Philipp; Reichel, Jakob; Karrai, Khaled; Weig, Eva M; 10.1117/12.705901

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical oscillators with light has seen a recent surge of interest, as recent reviews report.[1, 2] This coupling is enhanced when confining light in an optical cavity where the mechanical oscillator is integrated as back- mirror or movable wall. At the nano-scale, the optomechanical coupling increases further thanks to a smaller optomechanical interaction volume and reduced mass of the mechanical oscillator. In view of realizing such cavity nano- optomechanics experiments, a scheme was proposed where a sub-wavelength sized nanomechanical oscillator is coupled to a high finesse optical microcavity.[3] Here we present such an experiment involving a single nanomechanical rod precisely positioned into the confined mode of a miniature Fabry-P\\'erot cavity.[4] We describe the employed stabilized cavity set-up and related finesse measurements. We proceed characterizing the nanorod vibration properties using ultrasonic piezo-actuation methods. Using the optical cavity as a transducer of nanomechan...

  4. Cavity-enhanced laser cooling of solid-state materials in a standing-wave cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhua Jia; Biao Zhong; Jianping Yin

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new method to cool the Yba+-doped ZBLANP glass in a standing-wave cavity. There are two advantages of this cavity-enhanced technique: the pumping power is greatly enhanced and the absorption of the cooling material is greatly increased. We introduce the basic principle of the cavity-enhanced laser cooling and discuss the cooling effect of a solid-state material in a cavity. From the theoretical study, it is found that the laser cooling effect is strongly dependent on the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors, the length of the solid material, the surface scattering of the material, and so on. Some optimal parameters for efficient laser cooling are obtained.

  5. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  6. A spherical cavity model for quadrupolar dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Iglika M; Slavchov, Radomir I; Ivanov, Tzanko; Mosbach, Sebastian

    2016-03-21

    The dielectric properties of a fluid composed of molecules possessing both dipole and quadrupole moments are studied based on a model of the Onsager type (molecule in the centre of a spherical cavity). The dielectric permittivity ε and the macroscopic quadrupole polarizability αQ of the fluid are related to the basic molecular characteristics (molecular dipole, polarizability, quadrupole, quadrupolarizability). The effect of αQ is to increase the reaction field, to bring forth reaction field gradient, to decrease the cavity field, and to bring forth cavity field gradient. The effects from the quadrupole terms are significant in the case of small cavity size in a non-polar liquid. The quadrupoles in the medium are shown to have a small but measurable effect on the dielectric permittivity of several liquids (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, CO2, CS2, C6H6, H2O, CH3OH). The theory is used to calculate the macroscopic quadrupolarizabilities of these fluids as functions of pressure and temperature. The cavity radii are also determined for these liquids, and it is shown that they are functions of density only. This extension of Onsager's theory will be important for non-polar solutions (fuel, crude oil, liquid CO2), especially at increased pressures. PMID:27004882

  7. Spindle cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D DeLacure

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Spindle cell carcinoma (SpCC is a unique variant of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. SpCC confined to the nasal cavity is extremely rare, with only one case having been previously reported. We present a case report of nasal cavity SpCC and review the literature on this rare entity. A 29-year-old male presented with intermittent epistaxis from the left nasal cavity. On physical examination, the patient had an ulcerated mass in the left nasal vestibule and a biopsy showed a proliferation of spindle and epitheliod cells. The patient underwent wide local excision of the mass via a lateral alotomy approach and reconstruction with a composite conchal bowl skin and cartilage graft. Histologically, the mass had dyplastic squamous epithelium and spindle-shaped cells admixed with epitheliod cells. Immunohistochemistry was only positive for pancytokeratin AE1/AE3 and vimentin. Six months after surgery, the patient continues to have no evidence of disease. On literature review, only one previous case of SpCC confined to the nasal cavity was identified. We present a rare case of nasal cavity SpCC. No definite treatment protocol exists for this unique entity, but we believe that this tumor should primarily be treated with aggressive, wide local excision. Adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy have also been used anecdotally.

  8. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  9. Unifying Brillouin scattering and cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laer, Raphaël; Baets, Roel; Van Thourhout, Dries

    2016-05-01

    So far, Brillouin scattering and cavity optomechanics have been mostly disconnected branches of research, although both deal with photon-phonon coupling. This begs for the development of a broader theory that contains both fields. Here, we derive the dynamics of optomechanical cavities from that of Brillouin-active waveguides. This explicit transition elucidates the link between phenomena such as Brillouin amplification and electromagnetically induced transparency. It proves that effects familiar from cavity optomechanics all have traveling-wave partners, but not vice versa. We reveal a close connection between two parameters of central importance in these fields: the Brillouin gain coefficient and the zero-point optomechanical coupling rate. This enables comparisons between systems as diverse as ultracold atom clouds, plasmonic Raman cavities, and nanoscale silicon waveguides. In addition, back-of-the-envelope calculations show that unobserved effects, such as photon-assisted amplification of traveling phonons, are now accessible in existing systems. Finally, we formulate both circuit- and cavity-oriented optomechanics in terms of vacuum coupling rates, cooperativities, and gain coefficients, thus reflecting the similarities in the underlying physics.

  10. DISCHARGING MASTOID CAVITY: A CLINICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A discharging mastoid cavity is a frustrating condition for both patient and surgeon and can occur after a canal wall down mastoidectomy operation . AIMS: To determine the percentage of patients having a discharging mastoid cavity and to establish the aetiological factors responsible for it . SETTING: Academic tertiary care referral institution . DESIGN: Prospective study MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and sixty nine patie nts with chronic suppurative otitis media with cholesteatoma who underwent a canal wall down mastoidectomy were included in the study . These patients were regularly followed up to detect the occurrence of discharging mastoid cavity . RESULTS: Forty one ( 24 . 26% patients had a discharging mastoid cavity after a mean follow up of 4 . 2 years . The main causes were tympanic membrane perforation with exposed middle ear mucosa and open eustachian tube in thirty two patients ( 78 . 04% , followed by meatal stenosis in twenty five patients ( 60 . 97% and high facial ridge in twenty patients ( 48 . 78% . CONCLUSIONS: Tympanic membrane perforation with exposure of middle ear mucosa , meatal stenosis and a high facial ridge are important causes for a discharging mastoid cavity .

  11. Large-area single-mode photonic bandgap vcsels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Gregersen, N.; Bischoff, S.;

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate that the photonic bandgap effect can be used to control the modes of large area vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. We obtain more than 20 dB side mode suppression ratios in a 10-micron area device.......We demonstrate that the photonic bandgap effect can be used to control the modes of large area vertical cavity surface emitting lasers. We obtain more than 20 dB side mode suppression ratios in a 10-micron area device....

  12. Ponderomotive light squeezing with atomic cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Daniel W C; Brahms, Nathan; Purdy, Thomas P; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2011-01-01

    Accessing distinctly quantum aspects of the interaction between light and the position of a mechanical object has been an outstanding challenge to cavity-optomechanical systems. Only cold-atom implementations of cavity optomechanics have indicated effects of the quantum fluctuations in the optical radiation pressure force. Here we use such a system, in which quantum photon-number fluctuations significantly drive the center of mass of an atomic ensemble inside a Fabry-Perot cavity. We show that the optomechanical response both amplifies and ponderomotively squeezes the quantum light field. We also demonstrate that classical optical fluctuations can be attenuated by 26 dB or amplified by 20 dB with a weak input pump power of < 40 pW, and characterize the optomechanical amplifier's frequency-dependent gain and phase response in both the amplitude and phase-modulation quadratures.

  13. Dynamically Reconfigurable Photonic Crystal Nanobeam Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Ian W; McCutcheon, Murray W; Loncar, Marko

    2009-01-01

    Wavelength-scale, high Q-factor photonic crystal cavities have emerged as a platform of choice for on-chip manipulation of optical signals, with applications ranging from low-power optical signal processing and cavity quantum electrodynamics, to biochemical sensing. Many of these applications, however, are limited by the fabrication tolerances and the inability to precisely control the resonant wavelength of fabricated structures. Various techniques for post-fabrication wavelength trimming and dynamical wavelength control -- using, for example, thermal effects, free carrier injection, low temperature gas condensation, and immersion in fluids -- have been explored. However, these methods are often limited by small tuning ranges, high power consumption, or the inability to tune continuously or reversibly. In this letter, by combining nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) and nanophotonics, we demonstrate reconfigurable photonic crystal nanobeam cavities that can be continuously and dynamically tuned using elec...

  14. CEBAF cavity fabrication - a successful technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W) has successfully completed an R.F. accelerator technology transfer with Cornell University for CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. With this transfer of technology, B ampersand W has commercially fabricated four niobium LE-5 R.F. cavities, 12 niobium spool pieces, and 12 niobium adaptors for CEBAF. The fourth niobium cavity was warm tuned to specification at the B ampersand W test facility. The industrialization of the accelerator technology benefits the scientific community because industry can provide large scale production resources, including standardized procedures, processes, and specifications, to assist in the construction of accelerator/collider projects. B ampersand W has taken laboratory technology and developed standardized industrial procedures and processes for the fabrication of the CEBAF/Cornell R.F. cavity. B ampersand W's industrialization of accelerator technology is discussed herein. 5 refs., 1 fig

  15. Observing spin optodynamical analog of cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Justin; Kohler, Jonathan; Spethmann, Nicolas; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Cavity Optomechanics has been realized in many diverse systems and led to many interesting results such as ponderomotive squeezing of light, beyond-SQL measurement sensitivity, and squeezing of mechanical oscillators. Optical cavities also allow sensitive measurements of the spin of an atomic ensemble. It has been proposed to utilize this sensitivity to realize an analog of optomechanics by measuring the precession of small excitations of a spin-oscillator around a transverse magnetic field. I will present our recent work in which we realize optomechanical analogs in our system such as cavity-assisted cooling and amplification and optical spring shifts. In addition, the presence of a high-energy `ground state' of the spin oscillator allows the realization of an effective negative mass oscillator which is demonstrated by an inverted sideband asymmetry. In our ongoing work we attempt to realize coherent quantum noise cancelation by coupling spin oscillation with mechanical oscillation.

  16. Cryogenic system for TRISTAN superconducting RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting RF cavities will be installed in TRISTAN at KEK to upgrade the electron-positron beam energy to 33 GeV x 33 GeV. Two 5-cell cavities are coupled together, enclosed in a cryostat, and cooled by liquid helium pool boiling. The cryogenic system for the cavities is described and a system flow diagram constructed. Heat loads are estimated and component specifications are given. The capacity of the helium refrigerator is 4 kW at 4.4 K with liquid nitrogen precooling and two expansion turbines. The system is designed to be upgraded to 6.5 kW with added expansion turbines and compressors and the elimination of liquid nitrogen

  17. Enhancements to cavity quantum electrodynamics system

    CERN Document Server

    Cimmarusti, A D; Norris, D G; Orozco, L A

    2011-01-01

    We show the planned upgrade of a cavity QED experimental apparatus. The system consists of an optical cavity and an ensemble of ultracold $^{85}$Rb atoms coupled to its mode. We propose enhancements to both. First, we document the building process for a new cavity, with a planned finesse of $\\sim$20000. We address problems of maintaining mirror integrity during mounting and improving vibration isolation. Second, we propose improvements to the cold atom source in order to achieve better optical pumping and control over the flux of atoms. We consider a 2-D optical molasses for atomic beam deflection, and show computer simulation results for evaluating the design. We also examine the possibility of all-optical atomic beam focusing, but find that it requires unreasonable experimental parameters.

  18. Coaxial cavity vircator with enhanced efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G. Z.; Shao, H.; Yang, Z. F.; Song, Z. M.; Chen, C. H.; Sun, J.; Zhang, Y. P.

    2008-04-01

    A vircator with a coaxial cavity has the potential to increase the beam-microwave conversion efficiency. According to the E-field distribution pattern of the modes in the anode cavity of a coaxial vircator, the resonant frequency band of the injected electron beam and the lowest two operating modes are derived. The main frequency of the virtual cathode is also deduced. The optimal operating frequency and high-efficiency designing method of a coaxial cavity vircator is discussed. An experimental setup is designed and built to test the high-power microwave (HPM) generation mechanism described by theoretical analysis as well as increase the power efficiency. HPM frequency obtained in the experiment is in good agreement with the analysis. The power and energy efficiencies obtained in the experiment are, respectively, 8.7% and 6.8% with 50 ns pulse width. Frequency and phase stable HPM radiation is observed as well as pulse shortening is evidently depressed.

  19. Field Stabilization of Alvarez-Type Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Xiaonan; Mickat, Sascha; Seibel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Alvarez-type cavities are commonly used to reliably accelerate high quality hadron beams. Optimization of their longitudinal field homogeneity is usually accomplished by post-couplers, i.e. additional rods being integrated into the cavity. This paper instead proposes to use the stems that keep the drift tubes for that purpose. As their individual azimuthal orientations do not change the cavity's undisturbed operational mode, they comprise a set of free parameters that can be used to modify higher mode field patterns. The latter have significant impact on the robustness of the operational mode w.r.t. eventual perturbations. Several optimized stem configurations are presented and benchmarked against each other. The path to obtain these configurations is paved analytically and worked out in detail through simulations. It is shown that the method provides for flat field distributions and very low field tilt sensitivities without insertion of post-couplers.

  20. Cavity lining after excavating caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Göstemeyer, Gerd; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: After removal of dentin caries lesions, cavity lining has been advocated. Non-clinical data support this approach, but clinical data are sparse and ambiguous. We aimed at evaluating the benefits and harms of cavity lining using meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis. DATA: We...... included randomized clinical trials comparing restorations without versus with cavity lining for treating primary caries lesions. Only trials reporting failure (defined as need to re-retreat) after ≥1 year follow-up were included. Trial selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were conducted....... STUDY SELECTION: From 128 studies, three randomized trials (89/130 patients or teeth), all treating primary teeth, were included. The trials had high risk of bias. All trials compared no lining versus calcium hydroxide lining after selective caries removal followed by adhesive restoration. Follow...

  1. Nitrogen doping study in ingot niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, Peter [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Thermal diffusion of nitrogen in niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities at temperature ~800 °C has resulted in the increase in quality factor with a low-field Q-rise extending to Bp > 90 mT. However, the maximum accelerating gradient of these doped cavities often deteriorates below the values achieved by standard treatments prior to doping. Here, we present the results of the measurements on ingot niobium cavities doped with nitrogen at 800 °C. The rf measurements were carried out after the successive electropolishing to remove small amount of material from the inner surface layer. The result showed higher breakdown field with lower quality factor as material removal increases.

  2. Broadband cross polarization converter using plasmon hybridizations in a ring/disk cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongyu; Li, Jianxing; Zhang, Anxue; Wang, Jiafu; Xu, Zhuo

    2014-08-25

    In this paper, we report on the design, fabrication and subsequent investigation of a broad band cross polarization converter based on a C2-symmetric ring/disk cavity. Different plasmon hybridization modes are excited in the ring/disk cavity and enable the polarization manipulations. The designed cross polarization converter can convert the x or y polarized incident wave to its cross polarized wave in the frequency range from 9.65 to 14.16 GHz with a bandwidth of ~38% of the central wavelength and an efficiency higher than 80%. At 9.25 GHz and 14.35 GHz, the x (y) polarized incident wave is converted to a left (right) handed and right (left) handed circularly polarized wave, respectively. PMID:25321298

  3. Impact of forming, welding, and electropolishing on pitting and the surface finish of SRF cavity niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, L.D.; Burk, D.; Cooper, C.; Dhanaraj, N.; Foley, M.; Ford, D.; Gould, K.; Hicks, D.; Novitski, R.; Romanenko, A.; Schuessler, R.; /Fermilab

    2010-07-01

    A broad range of coupon electropolishing experiments are described to ascertain the mechanism(s) by which large defects are formed near superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity welds. Cold-worked vs. annealed metal, the presence of a weld, and several variations of electropolishing (EP) parameters were considered. Pitting is strongly promoted by cold work and agitation of the EP solution. Welding also promotes pitting, but less so compared with the other factors above. Temperature increase during EP did not strongly affect glossiness or pitting, but the reduced viscosity made the electrolyte more susceptible to agitation. The experiments suggest that several factors that are rather benign alone are combined by the cavity forming, welding, and processing sequence to promote the formation of defects such as pits. Process changes to mitigate these risks are discussed.

  4. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a broad computational accelerator physics initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.R. Cary; P. Spentzouris; J. Amundson; L. McInnes; M. Borland; B. Mustapha; B. Norris; P. Ostroumov; Y. Wang; W. Fischer; A. Fedotov; I. Ben-Zvi; R. Ryne; E. Esarey; C. Geddes; J. Qiang; E. Ng; S. Li; C. Ng; R. Lee; L. Merminga; H. Wang; D.L. Bruhwiler; D. Dechow; P. Mullowney; P. Messmer; C. Nieter; S. Ovtchinnikov; K. Paul; P. Stoltz; D. Wade-Stein; W.B. Mori; V. Decyk; C.K. Huang; W. Lu; M. Tzoufras; F. Tsung; M. Zhou; G.R. Werner; T. Antonsen; T. Katsouleas

    2007-06-01

    Accelerators are the largest and most costly scientific instruments of the Department of Energy, with uses across a broad range of science, including colliders for particle physics and nuclear science and light sources and neutron sources for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, is a broad, four-office (HEP, NP, BES, ASCR) effort to develop computational tools for the prediction and performance enhancement of accelerators. The tools being developed can be used to predict the dynamics of beams in the presence of optical elements and space charge forces, the calculation of electromagnetic modes and wake fields of cavities, the cooling induced by comoving beams, and the acceleration of beams by intense fields in plasmas generated by beams or lasers. In SciDAC-1, the computational tools had multiple successes in predicting the dynamics of beams and beam generation. In SciDAC-2 these tools will be petascale enabled to allow the inclusion of an unprecedented level of physics for detailed prediction.

  5. COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation, a Broad Computational Accelerator Physics Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, J.R.; /Tech-X, Boulder /Colorado U.; Spentzouris, P.; Amundson, J.; /Fermilab; McInnes, L.; Borland, M.; Mustapha, B.; Norris, B.; Ostroumov, P.; Wang, Y.; /Argonne; Fischer, W.; Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; /Brookhaven; Ryne, R.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.; Qiang, J.; Ng, E.; Li, S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Ng, C.; Lee, R.; /SLAC; Merminga, L.; /Jefferson Lab /Tech-X, Boulder /UCLA /Colorado U. /Maryland U. /Southern California U.

    2007-11-09

    Accelerators are the largest and most costly scientific instruments of the Department of Energy, with uses across a broad range of science, including colliders for particle physics and nuclear science and light sources and neutron sources for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, is a broad, four-office (HEP, NP, BES, ASCR) effort to develop computational tools for the prediction and performance enhancement of accelerators. The tools being developed can be used to predict the dynamics of beams in the presence of optical elements and space charge forces, the calculation of electromagnetic modes and wake fields of cavities, the cooling induced by comoving beams, and the acceleration of beams by intense fields in plasmas generated by beams or lasers. In SciDAC-1, the computational tools had multiple successes in predicting the dynamics of beams and beam generation. In SciDAC-2 these tools will be petascale enabled to allow the inclusion of an unprecedented level of physics for detailed prediction.

  6. More Is Better: Selecting for Broad Host Range Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexa; Ward, Samantha; Hyman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. In this perspective, we discuss several aspects of a characteristic feature of bacteriophages, their host range. Each phage has its own particular host range, the range of bacteria that it can infect. While some phages can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, other phages can infect many species or even bacteria from different genera. Different methods for determining host range may give different results, reflecting the multiple mechanisms bacteria have to resist phage infection and reflecting the different steps of infection each method depends on. This makes defining host range difficult. Another difficulty in describing host range arises from the inconsistent use of the words “narrow” and especially “broad” when describing the breadth of the host range. Nearly all bacteriophages have been isolated using a single host strain of bacteria. While this procedure is fairly standard, it may more likely produce narrow rather than broad host range phage. Our results and those of others suggest that using multiple host strains during isolation can more reliably produce broader host range phages. This challenges the common belief that most bacteriophages have a narrow host range. We highlight the implications of this for several areas that are affected by host range including horizontal gene transfer and phage therapy. PMID:27660623

  7. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  8. Seismic wave interaction with underground cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    Realization of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will require ensuring its compliance, making the CTBT a prime example of forensic seismology. Following indications of a nuclear explosion obtained on the basis of the (IMS) monitoring network further evidence needs to be sought at the location of the suspicious event. For such an On-Site Inspection (OSI) at a possible nuclear test site the treaty lists several techniques that can be carried out by the inspection team, including aftershock monitoring and the conduction of active seismic surveys. While those techniques are already well established, a third group of methods labeled as "resonance seismometry" is less well defined and needs further elaboration. A prime structural target that is expected to be present as a remnant of an underground nuclear explosion is a cavity at the location and depth the bomb was fired. Originally "resonance seismometry" referred to resonant seismic emission of the cavity within the medium that could be stimulated by an incident seismic wave of the right frequency and observed as peaks in the spectrum of seismic stations in the vicinity of the cavity. However, it is not yet clear which are the conditions for which resonant emissions of the cavity could be observed. In order to define distance-, frequency- and amplitude ranges at which resonant emissions could be observed we study the interaction of seismic waves with underground cavities. As a generic model for possible resonances we use a spherical acoustic cavity in an elastic full-space. To solve the forward problem for the full elastic wave field around acoustic spherical inclusions, we implemented an analytical solution (Korneev, 1993). This yields the possibility of generating scattering cross-sections, amplitude spectrums and synthetic seismograms for plane incident waves. Here, we focus on the questions whether or not we can expect resonant responses in the wave field scattered from the cavity. We show

  9. Electrostatically tunable optomechanical "zipper" cavity laser

    CERN Document Server

    Perahia, Raviv; Meenehan, Sean; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    A tunable nanoscale "zipper" laser cavity, formed from two doubly clamped photonic crystal nanobeams, is demonstrated. Pulsed, room temperature, optically pumped lasing action at a wavelength of 1.3 micron is observed for cavities formed in a thin membrane containing InAsP/GaInAsP quantum-wells. Metal electrodes are deposited on the ends of the nanobeams to allow for micro-electro-mechanical actuation. Electrostatic tuning and modulation of the laser wavelength is demonstrated at a rate of 0.25nm/V^2 and a frequency as high as 6.7MHz, respectively.

  10. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  11. Coherent acoustic excitation of cavity polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; de Lima, M. M.; Hey, R.;

    and highly nonlinear optical response.Our sample consists of epitaxially grown GaAs/AlGaAs QWs located at the anti-node ofa high Q lambda cavity, which is resonant with the QW excitonic transition3. The SAWfield, which is excited by an interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric GaAs samplesurface......, modulates the refractive index and displaces the material causing a harmonicmodulation of the PBG structure1. This periodic modulation of the cavity-exciton systemleads to in-plane mini-Brillouin zone (MBZ) formation. The very high vacuum-Rabisplitting of our sample enables us to clearly resolve...

  12. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. Because of the Einstein principle of equivalence (EEP), one can find a local coordinate system (a local freely falling frame), in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate, . Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to unambiguously decide whether atomic clocks based on quantum transitions of atoms, ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of a cavity. To resolve this ambiguity we have to analyse the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its electromagnetic modes in an expanding universe by employing the full machinery of the Maxwell equations irrespectively of the underlying theory of gravity. We proceed in this way and found out that the size of the cavity and the electromagnetic frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal (unphysical) coordinates as the universe expands in accordance with the Hubble law. We set up the oscillation equation for the resonant electromagnetic modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect mutual cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by space transformation to local coordinates and the time counted by the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that if general relativity is correct and the local expansion of space is isotropic there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a

  13. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  14. Transformation optics for cavity array metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, James Q; Su, Chun-Hsu; Greentree, Andrew D

    2013-03-11

    Cavity array metamaterials (CAMs), composed of optical microcavities in a lattice coupled via tight-binding interactions, represent a novel architecture for engineering metamaterials. Since the size of the CAMs' constituent elements are commensurate with the operating wavelength of the device, it cannot directly utilise classical transformation optics in the same way as traditional metamaterials. By directly transforming the internal geometry of the system, and locally tuning the permittivity between cavities, we provide an alternative framework suitable for tight-binding implementations of metamaterials. We develop a CAM-based cloak as the case study.

  15. Fundamental Research in Superconducting RF Cavity Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg Hoffstaetter

    2012-11-13

    This is a 3-year SRF R&D proposal with two main goals: 1) to benefit near term high gradient SRF applications by understanding the causes of quench at high fields in present-day niobium cavities 2) to open the long-range prospects for SRF applications by experimentally verifying the recent exciting theoretical predication for new cavity materials such as Nb3Sn and MgB2. These predictions shwo that ultimately gradients of 100Mv/m to 200MV/m may become possible as material imperfections are overcome.

  16. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  17. Cavity-induced quantum cooperative phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastina, F.; Falcone, G.; Francica, F.; Liberti, G.; Piperno, F.; Maniscalco, S.

    2010-09-01

    Two kinds of cooperative effects are discussed for two-level atoms (qubits) interacting with an electromagnetic resonator, both of them concerning Dicke super-radiance. The first is a static, critical phenomenon: the so-called super-radiant phase transition, occurring when a large number of qubits are coupled to a single cavity mode giving rise to a quantum phase transition for a critical value of the interaction strength. The second is a dynamic phenomenon, producing (among other effects) the generation and/or preservation of entanglement between qubits even in the presence of cavity losses.

  18. Cavity-induced quantum cooperative phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of cooperative effects are discussed for two-level atoms (qubits) interacting with an electromagnetic resonator, both of them concerning Dicke super-radiance. The first is a static, critical phenomenon: the so-called super-radiant phase transition, occurring when a large number of qubits are coupled to a single cavity mode giving rise to a quantum phase transition for a critical value of the interaction strength. The second is a dynamic phenomenon, producing (among other effects) the generation and/or preservation of entanglement between qubits even in the presence of cavity losses.

  19. Coupled Geomechanical Simulations of UCG Cavity Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J P; Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y

    2009-07-13

    This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project to develop predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (both natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). In this paper we will focus upon the development of coupled geomechanical capabilities for simulating the evolution of the UCG cavity using discrete element methodologies. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) has unique advantages for facilitating the prediction of the mechanical response of fractured rock masses, such as cleated coal seams. In contrast with continuum approaches, the interfaces within the coal can be explicitly included and combinations of both elastic and plastic anisotropic response are simulated directly. Additionally, the DEM facilitates estimation of changes in hydraulic properties by providing estimates of changes in cleat aperture. Simulation of cavity evolution involves a range of coupled processes and the mechanical response of the host coal and adjoining rockmass plays a role in every stage of UCG operations. For example, cavity collapse during the burn has significant effect upon the rate of the burn itself. In the vicinity of the cavity, collapse and fracturing may result in enhanced hydraulic conductivity of the rock matrix in the coal and caprock above the burn chamber. Even far from the cavity, stresses due to subsidence may be sufficient to induce new fractures linking previously isolated aquifers. These mechanical processes are key in understanding the risk of unacceptable subsidence and the potential for groundwater contamination. These mechanical processes are inherently non-linear, involving significant inelastic response, especially in the region closest to the cavity. In addition, the response of the rock mass involves both continuum and discrete mechanical behavior. We have recently coupled the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) and NUFT (Non

  20. Radionuclide Partitioning in an Underground Nuclear Test Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, T P; Hu, Q; Zhao, P; Conrado, C L; Dickerson, R; Eaton, G F; Kersting, A B; Moran, J E; Nimz, G; Powell, B A; Ramon, E C; Ryerson, F J; Williams, R W; Wooddy, P T; Zavarin, M

    2009-01-09

    In 2004, a borehole was drilled into the 1983 Chancellor underground nuclear test cavity to investigate the distribution of radionuclides within the cavity. Sidewall core samples were collected from a range of depths within the re-entry hole and two sidetrack holes. Upon completion of drilling, casing was installed and a submersible pump was used to collect groundwater samples. Test debris and groundwater samples were analyzed for a variety of radionuclides including the fission products {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 155}Eu, the activation products {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu, and the actinides U, Pu, and Am. In addition, the physical and bulk chemical properties of the test debris were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Microprobe measurements. Analytical results were used to evaluate the partitioning of radionuclides between the melt glass, rubble, and groundwater phases in the Chancellor test cavity. Three comparative approaches were used to calculate partitioning values, though each method could not be applied to every nuclide. These approaches are based on: (1) the average Area 19 inventory from Bowen et al. (2001); (2) melt glass, rubble, and groundwater mass estimates from Zhao et al. (2008); and (3) fission product mass yield data from England and Rider (1994). The U and Pu analyses of the test debris are classified and partitioning estimates for these elements were calculated directly from the classified Miller et al. (2002) inventory for the Chancellor test. The partitioning results from this study were compared to partitioning data that were previously published by the IAEA (1998). Predictions of radionuclide distributions from the two studies are in agreement for a majority of the nuclides under consideration. Substantial differences were noted in the partitioning values for {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 129}I, and uranium. These differences are attributable to two factors