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Sample records for cavity beam position

  1. Cavity beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam-based alignment and feedback systems are essential for the operation of future linear colliders and free electron lasers. A certain number of beam position monitors with a resolution in the submicron range are needed at selected locations. Most beam position monitors detect the electric or the magnetic field excited by a beam of charged particles at different locations around the beam pipe. In resonant monitors, however, the excitation of special field configurations by an off-center beam is detected. These structures offer a large signal per micron displacement. This paper is an attempt to summarize the fundamental characteristics of resonant monitors, their advantages and shortcomings. Emphasis will be on the design of cylindrical cavities, in particular on the estimation of expected signals, of resolution limits and the resulting beam distortion. This includes also a short introduction into numerical methods. Fabrication, tuning, and other practical problems will be reviewed briefly. Finally, some resonant devices used for beam position diagnostics will be discussed and listed

  2. Performance of a High Resolution Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walston, S; Boogert, S; Chung, C; Fitsos, P; Frisch, J; Gronberg, J; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Kolomensky, Y; Lyapin, A; Malton, S; May, J; McCormick, D; Meller, R; Miller, D; Orimoto, T; Ross, M; Slater, M; Smith, S; Smith, T; Terunuma, N; Thomson, M; Urakawa, J; Vogel, V; Ward, D; White, G

    2006-12-18

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than one nanometer. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 {micro}rad over a dynamic range of approximately {+-} 20 {micro}m.

  3. Performance of a High Resolution Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Joe; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Kolomensky, Yury; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David John; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /Fermilab /UC,

    2007-06-08

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than one nanometer. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 {mu}rad over a dynamic range of approximately {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  4. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM A MICROWAVE CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BALAKIN,V.; BAZHAN,A.; LUNEV,P.; SOLYAK,N.; VOGEL,V.; ZHOGOLEV,P.; LISITSYN,A.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    1999-03-29

    Future Linear Colliders have hard requirements for the beam transverse position stability in the accelerator. A beam Position Monitor (BPM) with the resolution better than 0.1 micron in the single bunch regime is needed to control the stability of the beam position along the linac. Proposed BPM is based on the measurement of the asymmetrical mode excited by single bunch in the cavity. Four stages of signal processing (space-, time-, frequency- and phase-filtering providing the required signal-to-noise ratio) are used to obtain extremely high resolution. The measurement set-up was designed by BINP and installed at ATF/BNL to test experimentally this concept. The set-up includes three two-coordinates BPM's at the frequency of 13.566 GHz, and reference intensity/phase cavity. BPM's were mounted on support table. The two-coordinates movers allow to move and align BPM's along the straight line, using the signals from the beam. The position of each monitor is controlled by the sensors with the accuracy 0.03 micron. The information from three monitors allows to exclude angle and position jitter of the beam and measure BPM resolution. In the experiments the resolution of about 0.15 micron for 0.25 nC beam intensity was obtained, that is close to the value required.

  5. PAL-XFEL cavity beam position monitor pick-up design and beam test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sojeong; Park, Young Jung; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Seung Hwan; Shin, Dong Cheol; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2016-08-01

    As an X-ray Free Electron Laser, PAL-XFEL is about to start beam commissioning. X-band cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is used in the PAL-XFEL undulator beam line. Prototypes of cavity BPM pick-up were designed and fabricated to test the RF characteristics. Also, the beam test of a cavity BPM pick-up was done in the Injector Test Facility (ITF). In the beam test, the raw signal properties of the cavity BPM pick-up were measured at a 200 pC bunch charge. According to the RF test and beam test results, the prototype cavity BPM pick-up design was confirmed to meet the requirements of the PAL-XFEL cavity BPM system.

  6. Performance of a reentrant cavity beam position monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C.; Luong, M.; Chel, S.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM, Irfu, SACM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Rouviere, N. [CNRS, IN2P3-IPN, F-91406 Orsay, (France); Baboi, N.; Mildner, N.; Nolle, D. [DESY, D-22603 Hamburg, (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The beam-based alignment and feedback systems, essential operations for the future colliders, require high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs). In the framework of the European CARE/SRF program, a reentrant cavity BPM with its associated electronics was developed by the CEA/DSM/Irfu in collaboration with DESY. The design, the fabrication, and the beam test of this monitor are detailed within this paper. This BPM is designed to be inserted in a cryo-module, work at cryogenic temperature in a clean environment. It has achieved a resolution better than 10 {mu}m and has the possibility to perform bunch to bunch measurements for the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Its other features are a small size of the rf cavity, a large aperture (78 mm), and an excellent linearity. A first prototype of a reentrant cavity BPM was installed in the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH), at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and demonstrated its operation at cryogenic temperature inside a cryo-module. The second, installed, also, in the FLASH linac to be tested with beam, measured a resolution of approximately 4 {mu}m over a dynamic range {+-} 5 mm in single bunch. (authors)

  7. Cavity Beam Position Monitor System for ATF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boogert, Stewart; /Oxford U., JAI; Boorman, Gary; /Oxford U., JAI; Swinson, Christina; /Oxford U., JAI; Ainsworth, Robert; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Molloy, Stephen; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Aryshev, Alexander; /KEK, Tsukuba; Honda, Yosuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /KEK, Tsukuba; Urakawa, Junji; /KEK, Tsukuba; Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; May, Justin; /SLAC; McCormick, Douglas; /SLAC; Nelson, Janice; /SLAC; Smith, Tonee; /SLAC; White, Glen; /SLAC; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC; Heo, Ae-young; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Eun-San; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Hyoung-Suk; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Youngim; /Kyungpook Natl. U. /University Coll. London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Fermilab /Pohang Accelerator Lab.

    2012-07-09

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) in KEK, Japan, is a prototype scaled demonstrator system for the final focus required for a future high energy lepton linear collider. The ATF2 beam-line is instrumented with a total of 38 C and S band resonant cavity beam position monitors (CBPM) with associated mixer electronics and digitizers. The current status of the BPM system is described, with a focus on operational techniques and performance. The ATF2 C-band system is performing well, with individual CBPM resolution approaching or at the design resolution of 50 nm. The changes in the CBPM calibration observed over three weeks can probably be attributed to thermal effects on the mixer electronics systems. The CW calibration tone power will be upgraded to monitor changes in the electronics gain and phase. The four S-band CBPMs are still to be investigated, the main problem associated with these cavities is a large cross coupling between the x and y ports. This combined with the large design dispersion in that degion makes the digital signal processing difficult, although various techniques exist to determine the cavity parameters and use these coupled signals for beam position determination.

  8. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, F. J.; Boogert, S. T.; Farabolini, W.; Lefevre, T.; Lunin, A.; Lyapin, A.; Søby, L.; Towler, J.; Wendt, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires beam position monitors (BPMs) with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2 /3 ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  9. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  10. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-15

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  11. An X band cavity for a high precision beam position monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, R; Naito, T; Rifkin, J; Smith, S; Smith, V

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of accelerators will require increasingly precise control of beam position. For example designs for the next linear collider require beam-position monitors (BPMs) with 200 nm resolution. The accelerator designs also place difficult requirements on accuracy and stability. To meet these requirements a cavity BPM operating at 11.424 GHz was designed. The BPM consists of two cavities: an xy-cavity tuned to the dipole mode and a phase cavity tuned to the monopole mode. The xy-cavity uses a novel coupling scheme that (in principal) has zero coupling to the monopole mode. This report will present the mechanical design, simulations, and test results of a prototype BPM. In addition BPM designs with even higher precision will be discussed.

  12. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y I; Aryshev, A; Boogert, S T; Boorman, G; Frisch, J; Heo, A; Honda, Y; Hwang, W H; Huang, J Y; Kim, E -S; Kim, S H; Lyapin, A; Naito, T; May, J; McCormick, D; Mellor, R E; Molloy, S; Nelson, J; Park, S J; Park, Y J; Ross, M; Shin, S; Swinson, C; Smith, T; Terunuma, N; Tauchi, T; Urakawa, J; White, G R

    2013-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1 m for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  13. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  14. Design of a Standing-Wave Multi-Cavity Beam-Monitor for Simultaneous Beam Position and Emittance Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high precision emittance measurement requires precise beam position at the measurement location. At present there is no existing technique, commercial or otherwise, for non-destructive pulse-to-pulse simultaneous beam position and emittance measurement. FARTECH, Inc. is currently developing a high precision cavity-based beam monitor for simultaneous beam position and emittance measurements pulse-to-pulse, without beam interception and without moving parts. The design and analysis of a multi-cavity standing wave structure for a pulse-to-pulse emittance measurement system in which the quadrupole and the dipole standing wave modes resonate at harmonics of the beam operating frequency is presented. Considering the Next Linear Collider beams, an optimized 9-cavity standing wave system is designed for simultaneous high precision beam position and emittance measurements. It operates with the π-quadrupole mode resonating at 16th harmonic of the NLC bunch frequency, and the 3 π/4 dipole mode at 12th harmonic (8.568 GHz). The 9-cavity system design indicates that the two dipoles resonate almost at the same frequency 8.583 GHz and the quadrupole at 11.427 GHz according to the scattering parameter calculations. The design can be trivially scaled so that the dipole frequency is at 8.568 GHz, and the quadrupole frequency can then be tuned during fabrication to achieve the desired 11.424 GHz. The output powers from these modes are estimated for the NLC beams. An estimated rms-beam size resolution is sub micro-meters and beam positions in sub nano-meters

  15. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Sanjari, M S; Hülsmann, P; Litvinov, Yu A; Nolden, F; Piotrowski, J; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-01-01

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate for existing limitations in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results.

  16. Preliminary beam experiment and parameter simulation for cavity beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Aiming at precise beam position measurement of next generation FEL facility, Shanghai institute of applied physics developed 5712 MHz high Q CBPM prototype. Purpose: ADC bits and data length of data acquisition system are key parameters influencing spatial resolution of CBPM. In order to find the optimized configuration parameters, dedicated beam experiments and corresponding Monte Carlo simulations were used to solve the problems. Methods: The position calibration factors of CBPM prototype have been obtained through beam based calibration experiment at the Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL facility. The dependence between system spatial resolution and ADC bits and the data length have been simulated with the measured position calibration factors by using Monte Carlo method. Results: Equipped with 14 bits or better ADCs IF sampling technique is capable to achieve submicron position resolution, which is the optimal choice for CBPM on-line data acquisition system. Applying FFT signal processing algorithm, optimal data lengths in RF and IF sampling techniques were respectively 8192 and 256 points. Conclusions: RF sampling technique is hard to accomplish precise measurement of submicron level due to limited bits of present ultra- high-speed ADC, but suitable for plug and play prototype parameter test and evaluation. (authors)

  17. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  18. Beam - cavity interaction beam loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a beam with a cavity and a generator in cyclic accelerators or storage rings is investigated. Application of Maxwell's equations together with the nonuniform boundary condition allows one to get an equivalent circuit for a beam-loaded cavity. The general equation for beam loading is obtained on the basis of the equivalent circuit, and the beam admittance is calculated. Formulas for power consumption by a beam-loaded cavity are derived, and the optimal tuning and coupling factor are analyzed. (author)

  19. Status of higher order mode beam position monitors in 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Flisgen, T; Van Rienen, U; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  20. Status of Higher Order Mode Beam Position Monitors in 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Flisgen, T; van Rienen, U; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  1. Design of a standing-wave multicell radio frequency cavity beam monitor for simultaneous position and emittance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High precision, nondisruptive emittance measurement through second moment monitoring requires precise beam position at the measurement location. We present the design and analysis of a multicavity standing wave structure for a pulse-to-pulse beam position-emittance measurement system in which the quadrupole and the dipole standing wave modes resonate at harmonics of a presumed beam bunch train frequency. As an application for the Next Linear Collider (NLC) beams, an optimized nine-cavity standing-wave structure is designed for simultaneous high precision beam position and emittance measurement. It operates with the π-phase advance quadrupole mode resonating at the 16th harmonic (11.424 GHz) of the NLC bunch frequency and the 3π/4-phase advance dipole mode at the 12th harmonic (8.568 GHz). The output powers from these modes are estimated for the NLC beams. Measurement resolution is estimated to be on the micron scale for rms beam size and on the nanometer scale for beam position

  2. Resolution study of higher-order-mode-based beam position diagnostics using custom-built electronics in strongly coupled 3.9-GHz multi-cavity accelerating module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P.; Baboi, N.; Jones, R.M.; Eddy, N.

    2012-11-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can provide remote diagnostics information of the beam position and cavity misalignment. In this paper we report on recent studies on the resolution with specially selected series of modes with custom-built electronics. This constitutes the first report of measurements of these cavities in which we obtained a resolution of 20 micron in beam offset. Details of the setup of the electronics and HOM measurements are provided.

  3. Development of an S-band cavity-type beam position monitor for a high power THz free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seon Yeong; Kim, Eun-San; Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Heo, A.; won Jang, Si; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.; Jeong, Young UK; Hee Park, Seong; Jang, Kyu-Ha

    2015-01-01

    A cavity-type beam position monitor (BPM) has been developed for a compact terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) system and ultra-short pulsed electron Linac system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Compared with other types of BPMs, the cavity-type BPM has higher sensitivity and faster response time even at low charge levels. When electron beam passes through the cavity-type BPM, it excites the dipole mode of the cavity of which amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the center of the cavity. Signals from the BPM were measured as a function of the beam offset by using an oscilloscope. The microtron accelerator for the KAERI THz FEL produces the electron beam with an energy of 6.5 MeV and pulse length of 5 μs with a micropulse of 10-20 ps at the frequency of 2.801 GHz. The macropulse beam current is 40 mA. Because the microtron provides multi-bunch system, output signal would be the superposition of each single bunch. So high output signal can be obtained from superposition of each single bunch. The designed position resolution of the cavity-type BPM in multi-bunch is submicron. Our cavity-type BPM is made of aluminum and vacuum can be maintained by indium sealing without brazing process, resulting in easy modification and cost saving. The resonance frequency of the cavity-type BPM is 2.803 GHz and the cavity-type BPM dimensions are 200 × 220 mm (length × height) with a pipe diameter of 38 mm. The measured position sensitivity was 6.19 (mV/mm)/mA and the measured isolation between the X and Y axis was -39 dB. By measuring the thermal noise of system, position resolution of the cavity-type BPM was estimated to be less than 1 μm. In this article, we present the test results of the S-band cavity-type BPM and prove the feasibility of the beam position measurement with high resolution using this device.

  4. Development of an S-band cavity-type beam position monitor for a high power THz free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cavity-type beam position monitor (BPM) has been developed for a compact terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) system and ultra-short pulsed electron Linac system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Compared with other types of BPMs, the cavity-type BPM has higher sensitivity and faster response time even at low charge levels. When electron beam passes through the cavity-type BPM, it excites the dipole mode of the cavity of which amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the center of the cavity. Signals from the BPM were measured as a function of the beam offset by using an oscilloscope. The microtron accelerator for the KAERI THz FEL produces the electron beam with an energy of 6.5 MeV and pulse length of 5 μs with a micropulse of 10-20 ps at the frequency of 2.801 GHz. The macropulse beam current is 40 mA. Because the microtron provides multi-bunch system, output signal would be the superposition of each single bunch. So high output signal can be obtained from superposition of each single bunch. The designed position resolution of the cavity-type BPM in multi-bunch is submicron. Our cavity-type BPM is made of aluminum and vacuum can be maintained by indium sealing without brazing process, resulting in easy modification and cost saving. The resonance frequency of the cavity-type BPM is 2.803 GHz and the cavity-type BPM dimensions are 200 × 220 mm (length × height) with a pipe diameter of 38 mm. The measured position sensitivity was 6.19 (mV/mm)/mA and the measured isolation between the X and Y axis was −39 dB. By measuring the thermal noise of system, position resolution of the cavity-type BPM was estimated to be less than 1 μm. In this article, we present the test results of the S-band cavity-type BPM and prove the feasibility of the beam position measurement with high resolution using this device

  5. Higher order mode spectra and the dependence of localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position in third harmonic superconducting cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    An electron beam entering an accelerating cavity excites a wakefield. This wakefield can be decomposed into a series of multi-poles or modes. The dominant component of the transverse wakefield is dipole. This report summarizes the higher order mode (HOM) signals of the third harmonic cavities of FLASH measured at various stages: transmission measurements in the single cavity test stand at Fermilab, at CMTB (Cryo- Module Test Bench) and at FLASH, and beam-excited measurements at FLASH. Modes in the first two dipole bands and the fifth dipole band have been identified using a global Lorentzian fit technique. The beam-pipe modes at approximately 4 GHz and some modes in the fifth dipole band have been observed as localized modes, while the first two dipole bands, containing some strong coupling cavity modes, propagate. This report also presents the dependence of the localized dipole modes on the transverse beam position. Linear dependence for various modes has been observed. This makes them suitable for beam position diagnostics. These modes, together with some propagating, strong coupling modes, have been considered in the design of a dedicated electronics for beam diagnostics with HOMs for the third harmonic cavities.

  6. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 μm can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 μm

  7. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M

    2014-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 micron can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 micron.

  8. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei, E-mail: pei.zhang@desy.de [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Cockcroft Institute of Science and Technology, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute of Science and Technology, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-11

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 μm can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 μm.

  9. Statistical methods for transverse beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Jones, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can be used to provide beam diagnostics. Here we focus on 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities. In particular we study dipole mode excitation and its application to beam position determinations. In order to extract beam position information, linear regression can be used. Due to a large number of sampling points in the waveforms, statistical methods are used to effectively reduce the dimension of the system, such as singular value decomposition (SVD) and k-means clustering. These are compared with the direct linear regression (DLR) on the entire waveforms. A cross-validation technique is used to study the sample independent precisions of the position predictions given by these three methods. A RMS prediction error in the beam position of approximately 50 μm can be achieved by DLR and SVD, while k-means clustering suggests 70 μm.

  10. Diode Down-mixing of HOM Coupler Signals for Beam Position Determination in 1.3-GHz- and 3.9-GHz-Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Glock, H W; Flisgen, T; Baboi, N; Zhang, P

    2011-01-01

    Beam excited signals available at the HOM coupler ports of superconducting accelerating cavities cover a wide frequency range and carry information about (amongst others) the transverse beam position. Down-mixing these signals using detector diodes is a mean to measure the time dependence of the power leaving the HOM coupler with standard and non-specific oscilloscope technology. Experiments undertaken at the accelerator modules ACC1 and ACC39 at FLASH demonstrated the possibility to extract beam position data out of low frequency signals sampled with such a setup. These experiments as part of an ongoing study are described together with mathematical details of the evaluation scheme.

  11. A study of beam position diagnostics with beam-excited dipole higher order modes using a downconverter test electronics in third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, P. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, N.; Lorbeer, B.; Wamsat, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Jones, R.M. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in accelerating cavities contain transverse beam position information. Previous studies have narrowed down three modal options for beam position diagnostics in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz cavities at FLASH. Localized modes in the beam pipes at approximately 4.1 GHz and in the fifth cavity dipole band at approximately 9 GHz were found, that can provide a local measurement of the beam position. In contrast, propagating modes in the first and second dipole bands between 4.2 and 5.5 GHz can reach a better resolution. All the options were assessed with a specially designed test electronics built by Fermilab. The aim is to de ne a mode or spectral region suitable for the HOM electronics. Two data analysis techniques are used and compared in extracting beam position information from the dipole HOMs: direct linear regression and singular value decomposition. Current experiments suggest a resolution of 50 m accuracy in predicting local beam position using modes in the fifth dipole band, and a global resolution of 20 m over the complete module. Based on these results we decided to build a HOM electronics for the second dipole band and the fifth dipole band, so that we will have both high resolution measurements for the whole module, and localized measurements for individual cavity. The prototype electronics is being built by Fermilab and planned to be tested in FLASH by the end of 2012.

  12. Beam Position Monitor Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of beam position monitors often involves challenging system design choices. Position transducers must be robust, accurate, and generate adequate position signal without unduly disturbing the beam. Electronics must be reliable and affordable, usually while meeting tough requirements on precision. accuracy, and dynamic range. These requirements may be difficult to achieve simultaneously, leading the designer into interesting opportunities for optimization or compromise. Some useful techniques and tools are shown. Both finite element analysis and analytic techniques will be used to investigate quasi-static aspects of electromagnetic fields such as the impedance of and the coupling of beam to striplines or buttons. Finite-element tools will be used to understand dynamic aspects of the electromagnetic fields of beams, such as wake-fields and transmission-line and cavity effects in vacuum-to-air feed through. Mathematical modeling of electrical signals through a processing chain will be demonstrated, in particular to illuminate areas where neither a pure time-domain nor a pure frequency-domain analysis is obviously advantageous. Emphasis will be on calculational techniques, in particular on using both time-domain and frequency domain approaches to the applicable parts of interesting problems

  13. Beam Position Monitoring at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Prochnow, J

    2003-01-01

    At the European Organisation for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, Switzerland the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) for high energy physics is studied. To achieve the envisaged high luminosity the quadrupole magnets and radio-frequency accelerating structures have to be actively aligned with micron precision and submicron resolution. This will be done using beam-based algorithms which rely on beam position information inside of quadrupoles and accelerating structures. After a general introduction to the CLIC study and the alignment algorithms, the concept of the interaction between beams and radio-frequency structures is given. In the next chapter beam measurements and simulations are described which were done to study the performance of cavity beam position monitors (BPM). A BPM design is presented which is compatible with the multi-bunch operation at CLIC and could be used to align the quadrupoles. The beam position inside the accelerating structures will be measured by using the structures thems...

  14. Tunable cavity resonator including a plurality of MEMS beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peroulis, Dimitrios; Fruehling, Adam; Small, Joshua Azariah; Liu, Xiaoguang; Irshad, Wasim; Arif, Muhammad Shoaib

    2015-10-20

    A tunable cavity resonator includes a substrate, a cap structure, and a tuning assembly. The cap structure extends from the substrate, and at least one of the substrate and the cap structure defines a resonator cavity. The tuning assembly is positioned at least partially within the resonator cavity. The tuning assembly includes a plurality of fixed-fixed MEMS beams configured for controllable movement relative to the substrate between an activated position and a deactivated position in order to tune a resonant frequency of the tunable cavity resonator.

  15. 1 nA Beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new BPM system, based on resonant cavities, has been developed for measuring the transverse position of very low-intensity electron beams delivered to Experimental Hall B at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News. VA. The system requirements called for measuring down to 1 nA with a 100 m m resolution. The actual system is much better: it can measure down to 100 pA at the 100 m m required resolution. A 100 pA beam yields about 1 electron per bunch. Each 1 nA BPM utilizes three resonant RF cavities to determine the position of the beam: one cavity sensitive to X position, a second cavity sensitive to Y position, and a third cavity which measures intensity. The position cavities operate at room temperature in a dipole type mode at 1497 MHz and contain internal field perturbing rods in an arrangement similar to that of the CEBAF rf Separator cavities. The position cavities are electron beam welded assemblies made of copper plated stainless steel. The RF output signal from each cavity is processed using a down-converter and a DSP based commercial lock-in amplifier operating at 100 kHz. The lock-in amplifiers connect to the EPICS control system via an IEEE 488 bus. System features under development include intensity and position modulation measurement capabilities. This paper provides measured performance results and an updated overview of the installed and operational 1 nA BPM system. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  16. Thermal and dynamic effects in electron beam welding cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental and analytical study of the temperature distributions along the molten metal surface in an electron beam welding cavity is described. Surface temperature distributions in cavities were measured with a narrow band infrared radiation pyrometer. The availability of the cavity temperature measurements allowed estimates to be made for the vapor pressure and surface energy forces as a function of cavity position. The results indicated a force imbalance occurred in the cavity. It is postulated that at the location of the force imbalance a liquid material projection forms periodically and moves into the path of the electron beam. The liquid in this projection is driven towards the bottom, partially filling the cavity. This action is followed by the electron beam pushing the liquid aside to form a maximum depth cavity. This process is then repeated. An analysis for predicting cavity oscillation frequency shows reasonable agreement with frequencies measured at the weld root determined from weld sections. A study of the measured temperature distributions in cavities of varying depth combined with the force imbalance observations led to an interpretation of when spiking might occur. A procedure is proposed for determining the spiking tendency for a given set of weld parameters. The results of this study permit a designer to select apriori the best set of weld parameters to achieve a weld of predictable quality

  17. Beam cavity interaction computer code for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code BCI was used to calculate the energy loss of beam bunches in two types of cavities being studied in ORNL. The merit of the proposed on-axis coupled structure for CHEER is discussed in terms of beam energy loss. A calculation for a simple structure consisting of two accelerating cells and a coupling cell is performed. The amplitude modulation of the wake field is interpreted as the excitation of the zero and π coupled-resonator modes and coupling coefficients are derived. Beam loading of a cw linear accelerator is studied by calculating the bunch energy loss and cavity energy when a cavity is excited resonantly with a series of beam bunches. Calculations of non-resonant excitation are also presented

  18. Beam induced RF cavity transient voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the transient voltage induced in a radio frequency (RF) cavity by the injection of a relativistic bunched beam into a circular accelerator. A simplified model of the beam induced voltage, using a single tone current signal, is generated and compared with the voltage induced by a more realistic model of a point-like bunched beam. The high Q limit of the bunched beam model is shown to be related simply to the simplified model. Both models are shown to induce voltages at the resonant frequency ωr of the cavity and at an integer multiple of the bunch revolution frequency (i.e. the accelerating frequency for powered cavity operation) hω0. The presence of two nearby frequencies in the cavity leads to a modulation of the carrier wave exp(jhω0t). A special emphasis is placed in this paper on studying the modulation function. These models prove useful for computing the transient voltage induced in superconducting RF cavities, which was the motivation behind this research. The modulation of the transient cavity voltage discussed in this paper is the physical basis of the recently observed and explained new kind of longitudinal rigid dipole mode which differs from the conventional Robinson mode

  19. Beam loading in magnicon deflection cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafizi, B. [ICARUS Research, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States); Gold, S.H. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Plasma Physics Div.

    1997-02-01

    The radio frequency (RF) source for the next linear collider (NLC) is required to generate a power of 1/2--1 GW per tube in a 200-ns pulse, or 100--200 J of energy in a pulse of up to a few {micro}s in duration, at a frequency of 10--20 GHz. A variety of RF sources are under investigation at the present time aimed at fulfilling the needs of the NLC. These include the X-band klystron, Gyroklystron, traveling-wave tube, harmonic convertor, chopper-driven traveling-wave tube, and magnicon. Here, analysis of the beam-deflection cavity interaction in a magnicon is presented and compared with experiment. For a driven cavity a dispersion relation is obtained wherein the interaction modifies the cold-cavity factor and the resonance frequency. In terms of a lumped-parameter equivalent circuit the interaction corresponds to a complex-values beam admittance Y{sub b} in parallel with the cavity admittance. The response of the gain cavities is modified by the same admittance. In a magnicon, Y{sub b} is a sensitive function of the solenoidal focusing magnetic field B{sub 0}, thus providing a convenient means of adjusting the cavity properties in experiments. When the relativistic gyrofrequency is twice the drive frequency, ImY{sub b} = 0 and the beam does not load the cavity. Analytical expressions of the variation of the detuning, instantaneous bandwidth (i.e., loaded quality factor) and gain with B{sub 0} are derived. Simulation results are presented to verify the linear analysis with ideal beams and to illustrate the modifications due to finite beam emittance. Results of the magnicon experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory are examined in the light of the analysis.

  20. Two cavity autoacceleration of an intense relativistic electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, P.D.; Lockner, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Two autoacceleration cavities have been used to accelerate an 11-kA electron beam from 2 MeV to approx. =2.8 MeV. The two 40-..cap omega.. cavities each accelerated the beam by approx. =400 kV with no observable interaction between the two cavities over several cavity transmit times. 6 figs.

  1. Two cavity autoacceleration of an intense relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two autoacceleration cavities have been used to accelerate an 11-kA electron beam from 2 MeV to approx. =2.8 MeV. The two 40-Ω cavities each accelerated the beam by approx. =400 kV with no observable interaction between the two cavities over several cavity transmit times. 6 figs

  2. Laser Wire and Beam Position Monitor tests

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, S T; Lyapin, A; Nevay, L; Snuverink, J

    2013-01-01

    This subtask involved two main activities; Firstly the development and subsequent usage of high resolution beam position monitors (BPM) for the International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider projects (CLIC); and secondly the development of a laser-wire (LW) transverse beam size measurement systems. This report describes the technical progress achieved at a large-scale test ILC compatible BPM system installed at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2). The ATF2 is an energy-scaled demonstration system for the final focus systems required to deliver the particle beams to collision at the ILC and CLIC. The ATF2 cavity beam position monitor system is one of the largest of its kind and rivals systems used at free electron lasers. The ATF2 cavity beam position system has achieved a position resolutionof 250 nm (with signal attuenation) and 27 nm (without attenuation). The BPM system has been used routinely for lattice diagnostics, beam based alignment and wakefield measurements. Extensive experience...

  3. Two-beam detuned-cavity electron accelerator structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress has been made in the theory, development, cavity design and optimization, beam dynamics study, beam transport design, and hardware construction for studies of a detuned two-beam electron accelerator structure.

  4. Beam commissioning of KEKB crab cavity RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEKB started the first crab crossing operation in February 2007 with two superconducting crab cavities. After four months operation dedicated for machine tuning, physics run with high-current beams resumed in October with the crab crossing. The crab cavities have been working stably for one and a half years. The crab cavity RF system, commissioning process and performance of the crab cavities with high-current beams are presented. (author)

  5. A Numerical Method for Cavity Identification in Beams on an Elastic Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An analytical solution for the natural frequencies of a beam containing a cavity on an elastic foundation is presented. Based on the analytical solution, a numerical method for identifying cavities in the foundation is developed. The position and size of the cavities are identified by minimizing an objective function, which is formulated according to the difference between the computed and measured natural frequencies of the system. The conjugate gradient algorithm is adopted for minimizing the objective function. Some numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the presented cavity determination method. The results show that the presented method can be used to identify the cavity position and size conveniently and efficiently.

  6. Cavity Alignment Using Beam Induced Higher Order Modes Signals in the TTF Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Marc; Frisch, Josef; Hacker, Kirsten E; Jones, Roger M; McCormick, Douglas; Napoly, Olivier; Paparella, Rita; Smith, Tonee; Wendt, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    Each nine cell superconducting accelerator cavity in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY* has two higher order mode (HOM) couplers that efficiently remove the HOM power.** They can also provide useful diagnostic signals. The most interesting modes are in the first 2 cavity dipole passbands. They are easy to identify and their amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the cavity axis making them excellent beam position monitors (BPM). By steering the beam through an eight-cavity cryomodule, we can use the HOM signals to estimate internal residual alignment errors and minimize wakefield related beam emittance growth. We built and commissioned a four channel heterodyne receiver and time-domain based waveform recorder system that captures information from each mode in these two bands on each beam pulse. In this paper we present an experimental study of the single-bunch generated HOM signals at the TTF linac including estimates of cavity alignment precision and HOM BPM resolution.

  7. Electrostatic beam-position monitor

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1969-01-01

    Electrostatic beam-position monitor installed in its final location (bake-out cover removed). The ISR will contain about 110 of these monitors. Their accuracy is better than 1 mm, their band width about 1 MHz.

  8. Beam self-excited rf cavity driver for a deflector or focusing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1996-09-01

    A bunched beam from and accelerator can excite and power an rf cavity which then drives either a deflecting or focusing (including nonlinear focusing) rf cavity with and amplitude related to beam current. Rf power, generated when a bunched beam loses energy to an rf field when traversing an electric field that opposes the particle`s motion, is used to drive a separate (or the same) cavity to either focus or deflect the beam. The deflected beam can be stopped by an apertures or directed to a different area of a target depending on beam current. The beam-generated rf power can drive a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) that can change the focusing properties of a beam channel as a function of beam current (space- charge force compensation or modifying the beam distribution on a target). An rf deflector can offset a beam to a downstream sextupole, effectively producing a position-dependent quadrupole field. The combination of rf deflector plus sextupole will produce a beam current dependent quadropole-focusing force. A static quadrupole magnet plus another rf deflector can place the beam back on the optic axis. This paper describes the concept, derives the appropriate equations for system analysis, and fives examples. A variation on this theme is to use the wake field generated in an rf cavity to cause growth in the beam emittance. The beam current would then be apertured by emittance defining slits.

  9. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit, also degrade the collimation cleaning efficiency, and so on. In this paper, we explore the principal feasibility of LHC crab cavities from a beam dynamics point of view. The implications of the crab cavities for the LHC optics, analytical and numerical luminosity studies, dynamic aperture, aperture and beta beating, emittance growth, beam-beam tune shift, long-range collisions, and synchrobetatron resonances, crab dispersion, and collimation efficiency will be discussed.

  10. LEDA BEAM DIAGNOSTICS INSTRUMENTATION: BEAM POSITION MONITORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) accelerates protons to an energy of 6.7-MeV and current of 100-mA operating in either a pulsed or cw mode. Of key importance to the commissioning and operations effort is the Beam Position Monitor system (BPM). The LEDA BPM system uses five micro-stripline beam position monitors processed by log ratio processing electronics with data acquisition via a series of custom TMS32OC40 Digital Signal Processing (DSP) boards. Of special interest to this paper is the operation of the system, the log ratio processing, and the system calibration technique. This paper will also cover the DSP system operations and their interaction with the main accelerator control system

  11. Beam position monitoring at CLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Prochnow, Jan Erik

    2003-01-01

    At the European Organisation for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva, Switzerland the design of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) for high energy physics is studied. To achieve the envisaged high luminosity the quadrupole magnets and radio-frequency accelerating structures have to be actively aligned with micron precision and submicron resolution. This will be done using beam-based algorithms which rely on beam position information inside of quadrupoles and accelerating structures. After a gener...

  12. Coupled beam motion in a storage ring with crab cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaobiao [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    We studied the coupled beam motion in a storage ring between the transverse and longitudinal directions introduced by crab cavities. Analytic form of the linear decoupling transformation is derived. Also, the equilibrium bunch distribution in an electron storage ring with a crab cavity is given, including contribution to the eigen-emittance induced by the crab cavity. Application to the short pulse generation scheme using crab cavities [1] is considered.

  13. Coupled beam motion in a storage ring with crab cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2015-01-01

    We studied the coupled beam motion in a storage ring between the transverse and longitudinal directions introduced by crab cavities. Analytic form of the linear decoupling transformation is derived. The equilibrium bunch distribution in an electron storage ring with a crab cavity is given, including contribution to the eigen-emittance induced by the crab cavity. Application to the short pulse generation scheme using crab cavities is considered.

  14. Coupled beam motion in a storage ring with crab cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2016-02-01

    We studied the coupled beam motion in a storage ring between the transverse and longitudinal directions introduced by crab cavities. The analytic form of the linear decoupling transformation is derived. The equilibrium bunch distribution in an electron storage ring with a crab cavity is given, including contribution to the eigenemittance induced by the crab cavity. Application to the short pulse generation scheme using crab cavities is considered.

  15. Antiproton source beam position system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TeV I Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system is designed to provide a useful diagnostic tool during the commissioning and operational phases of the antiproton source. Simply stated the design goal is to provide single turn position information for intensities of > 1x109 particles, and multi-turn (clocked orbit) information for beam intensities of > 1x107 particles, both with sub-millimeter resolution. It is anticipated that the system will be used during commissioning for establishing the first turn through the Debuncher and Accumulator, for aligning injection orbits, for providing information necessary to correct closed orbits, and for measuring various machine parameters (e.g. tunes, dispersion, aperture, chromaticity). During normal antiproton operation the system will be used to monitor the beam position throughout the accumulation process

  16. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, T. J. T.; Davis, H. A.; Fulton, R. D.; Sherwood, E. G.

    The virtual cathode, when formed in a cavity, can generate microwaves at different cavity modes depending on the geometry of the cavity. We found that the formation and the oscillation frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can be significantly influenced by cavity designs. The length of a cavity can play a role in frequency and mode selection. Our simulations showed that TM sub 012 and TM sub 033 were excited for cavity lengths of 15.0 cm and 22.5 cm, respectively. In addition to the cavity effects on reditrons, we discovered that highly modulated electron beams can be produced in reditrons. Full modulation (100 percent) of the transmitted electron beam current has been confirmed in our simulations. We further showed that incorporation of an inverse diode configuration can achieve microwave production efficiency of 26 percent.

  17. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Davis, H.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Sherwood, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    The virtual cathode, when formed in a cavity, can generate microwaves at different cavity modes depending on the geometry of the cavity. We found that the formation and the oscillation frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can be significantly influenced by cavity designs. The length of a cavity can play a role in frequency and mode selection. Our simulations showed that TM/sub 012/ and TM/sub 033/ were excited for cavity lengths of 15.0 cm and 22.5 cm, respectively. In addition to the cavity effects on reditrons, we discovered that highly modulated electron beams can be produced in reditrons. Full modulation (100/percent/) of the transmitted electron beam current has been confirmed in our simulations. We further showed that incorporation of an inverse diode configuration can achieve microwave production efficiency of 26/percent/. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Beam position correction in the Fermilab linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbit correction has long been an essential feature of circular accelerators, storage rings, multipass linacs, and linear colliders. In a drift tube linear accelerator (DTL) such as the H- Linac at Fermilab, beam position monitors (BPMs) and dipole corrector magnets can only be located in between accelerating tanks. Within a tank many drift tubes (from 20 to 60) each house a quadrupole magnet to provide strong transverse focusing of the beam. With good alignment of the drift tubes and quadrupoles and a sufficiently large diameter for the drift tubes, beam position is not typically a major concern. In the Fermilab DTL, 95% of the beam occupies only 35% of the available physical aperture (4.4 cm). The recent upgrade of the Fermilab Linac from a final energy of 200 MeV to 400 MeV has been achieved by replacing four 201.25 MHz drift tube linac tanks with seven 805 MHz side-coupled cavity modules (the high energy portion of the linac or HEL). In order to achieve this increase in energy within the existing enclosure, an accelerating gradient is required that is a factor of 3 larger than that found in the DTL. This in turn required that the physical aperture through which the beam must pass be significantly reduced. In addition, the lattice of the side-coupled structure provides significantly less transverse focusing than the DTL. Therefore in the early portion of the HEL the beam occupies over 95% of the available physical aperture (3.0 cm). In order to prevent beam loss and the creation of excess radiation, the ability to correct beam position throughout the HEL is of importance. An orbit smoothing algorithm commonly used in the correction of closed orbits of circular machines has been implemented to achieve a global least-squares minimization of beam position errors. In order to accommodate several features of this accelerator a refinement in the algorithm has been made to increase its robustness and utilize correctors of varying strengths

  19. Digital Beam Position Monitor for the Happex Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed HAPPEX experiment at CEBAF employs a three cavity monitor system for high-precision (1 mm), high-bandwidth (100 kHz) position measurements. This is performed using a cavity triplet consisting of two TM110-mode cavities (one each for X and Y planes) combined with a conventional TM-010-mode cavity for a phase and magnitude reference. Traditional systems have used the TM010 cavity output to directly down convert the BPM cavity signals to base band. The Multi-channel HAPPEX digital receiver simultaneously I/Q samples each cavity and extracts position using a CORDIC algorithm. The hardware design consists of a digital receiver daughter board and digital processor motherboard that resides in a VXI crate. The daughter board down converts 1.497 GHz signals from the TM010 cavity and X and Y signals from the TM110 cavities to 4 MHz, and extracts the quadrature digital signals. The motherboard processes this data and computes beam intensity and X-Y positions with a resolution of one mm, 100 kHz output bandwidth, and overall latency of ten microseconds. The results are available in both analog and digital format

  20. Digital beam position monitor for the HAPPEX experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed HAPPEX experiment at CEBAF employs a three cavity monitor system for high precision (1um), high bandwidth (100 kHz) position measurements. This is performed using a cavity triplet consisting of two TM110-mode cavities (one each for X and Y planes) combined with a conventional TM010-mode cavity for a phase and magnitude reference. Traditional systems have used the TM010 cavity output to directly down convert the BPM cavity signals to base band. The multi-channel HAPPEX digital receiver simultaneously I/Q samples each cavity and extracts position using a CORDIC algorithm. The hardware design consists of a RF receiver daughter board and a digital processor motherboard that resides in a VXI crate. The daughter board down converts 1.497 GHz signals from the TM010 cavity and X and Y signals from the TM110 cavities to 3 MHz and extracts the quadrature digital signals. The motherboard processes this data and computes beam intensity and X-Y positions with resolution of 1um, 100 kHz output bandwidth, and overall latency of 1us. The results are available in both the analog and digital format

  1. Effects of modulated electron beams and cavities on reditrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reditron has been shown to be an efficient, high-power, single-mode, monochromatic microwave generator in a virtual cathode configuration. The authors studied the use of premodulated electron beams and cavities in a reditron to enhance the efficiency of microwave production and electromagnetic mode selectivity, respectively. They found that electron beam current modulation of only 15% can significantly increase the generation of microwaves by the oscillating virtual cathode. Their 2-D particle-in-cell simulations show that modulation of the electron beam at the oscillating frequency of the virtual cathode in a reditron can increase the microwave power by 40%. Further, it can also provide frequency fine tuning when the electron beam is modulated at a slightly off-resonant frequency. They demonstrated in computer simulations that a 2.0 MeV electron beam can be modulated at a 15% level in a 15-cm long cavity when the appropriate cavity mode is excited

  2. Transient behaviour of a ''beam loaded'' prebuncher cavity and linac structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    They present the evaluation of the effect of the beam loading on the time response of a 3 GHz prebuncher cavity to the generator and to an input 120 deg chopped electron beam for two different cavity materials. The lumped-element representation of the cavity as a parallel RLC circuit is used which allows to compute also the sensitivity of the prebuncher voltage amplitude and phase with respect to beam current fluctuations. The analysis has been extended to the transient behaviour of a linac positioned after the prebuncher cavity. The consequences of the computation results on the application of a chopper-prebuncher system in a linac devoted to the MUH FEL experiment are discussed

  3. Transient behaviour of a ``beam loaded`` prebuncher cavity and linac structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Giovanni; Picardi, Luigi; Ronsivalle, Concetta; Vignati, Angelo [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    They present the evaluation of the effect of the beam loading on the time response of a 3 GHz prebuncher cavity to the generator and to an input 120 deg chopped electron beam for two different cavity materials. The lumped-element representation of the cavity as a parallel RLC circuit is used which allows to compute also the sensitivity of the prebuncher voltage amplitude and phase with respect to beam current fluctuations. The analysis has been extended to the transient behaviour of a linac positioned after the prebuncher cavity. The consequences of the computation results on the application of a chopper-prebuncher system in a linac devoted to the MUH FEL experiment are discussed.

  4. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Wolbers, Stephen; Barker, B; Bledsoe, S; Boes, T; Bowden, Mark; Cancelo, Gugstavo I; Dürling, G; Forster, B; Haynes, B; Hendricks, B; Kasza, T; Kutschke, Robert K; Mahlum, R; Martens, Michael A; Mengel, M; Olsen, M; Pavlicek, V; Pham, T; Piccoli, Luciano; Steimel, Jim; Treptow, K; Votava, Margaret; Webber, Robert C; West, B; Zhang, D

    2005-01-01

    The Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) readout electronics and software have been upgraded to improve measurement precision, functionality and reliability. The original system, designed and built in the early 1980s, became inadequate for current and future operations of the Tevatron. The upgraded system consists of 960 channels of new electronics to process analog signals from 240 BPMs, new front-end software, new online and controls software, and modified applications to take advantage of the improved measurements and support the new functionality. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton position measurements. Measurements using the new system are presented that demonstrate its improved resolution and overall performance.

  5. Beam loading and cavity compensation for the Ground Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) will be heavily beam-loaded H- linac with tight tolerances on accelerating field parameters. The methods used in modeling the effects of beam loading in this machine are described. The response of the cavity to both beam and radio-frequency (RF) drive stimulus is derived, including the effects of cavity detuning. This derivation is not restricted to a small-signal approximation. An analytical method for synthesizing a predistortion network that decouples the amplitude and phase responses of the cavity is also outline. Simulation of performance, including beam loading, is achieved through use of a control system analysis software package. A straightforward method is presented for extrapolating this work to model large coupled structures with closely spaced parasitic modes. Results to date have enabled the RF control system designs for GTA to be optimized and have given insight into their operation. 6 refs., 10 figs

  6. Calibration of waveguide beam position monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Kamps, T

    2000-01-01

    To ensure overlap between the photon beam and electron beam at the SASE-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility, several position-sensitive diagnostics components are installed along the beamline of the FEL. For the undulator part, a new type of waveguide beam position monitors (BPMs) is designed, tested, and installed inside the beam pipe of one undulator module. This paper proposes a method to calibrate these monitors with beam-based measurements

  7. Beam-Beam Simulation of Crab Cavity White Noise for LHC Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, J; Pieloni, Tatiana; Ohmi, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    High luminosity LHC upgrade will improve the luminosity of the current LHC operation by an order of magnitude. Crab cavity as a critical component for compensating luminosity loss from large crossing angle collision and also providing luminosity leveling for the LHC upgrade is being actively pursued. In this paper, we will report on the study of potential effects of the crab cavity white noise errors on the beam luminosity lifetime based on strong-strong beam-beam simulations.

  8. Transverse beam cavity interaction. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense bunches of charged particles in accelerators excite transverse higher modes in accelerating cavities. These higher modes lead to an interaction between widely separated bunches. Such multi bunch or multi turn instabilities due to long range forces can be described by the cavity mode frequencies and field patterns. For structures of cylindrical symmetry a computer code named URMEL is described which calculates resonant modes of any azimuthal mode number m=0,1,2.. (monopole, dipole, quadrupole, etc.). The eigenfrequencies are found as linear eigenvalues of a large matrix and simple mathematical procedures guarantee that no modes are missed. The combined use of URMEL in frequency domain and of the complementary code TBCI in time domain enables a complete analysis of long range -low frequency- forces (narrow band impedances) and short range -high frequency- forces (broad band impedances). (orig.)

  9. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  10. Beam Position and Phase Monitor - Wire Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Heath A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shurter, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-10

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) deploys many cylindrical beam position and phase monitors (BPPM) throughout the linac to measure the beam central position, phase and bunched-beam current. Each monitor is calibrated and qualified prior to installation to insure it meets LANSCE requirements. The BPPM wire mapping system is used to map the BPPM electrode offset, sensitivity and higher order coefficients. This system uses a three-axis motion table to position the wire antenna structure within the cavity, simulating the beam excitation of a BPPM at a fundamental frequency of 201.25 MHz. RF signal strength is measured and recorded for the four electrodes as the antenna position is updated. An effort is underway to extend the systems service to the LANSCE facility by replacing obsolete electronic hardware and taking advantage of software enhancements. This paper describes the upgraded wire positioning system's new hardware and software capabilities including its revised antenna structure, motion control interface, RF measurement equipment and Labview software upgrades. The main purpose of the wire mapping system at LANSCE is to characterize the amplitude response versus beam central position of BPPMs before they are installed in the beam line. The wire mapping system is able to simulate a beam using a thin wire and measure the signal response as the wire position is varied within the BPPM aperture.

  11. Computing the laser beam path in optical cavities: a geometric Newton's method based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cuccato, Davide; Ortolan, Antonello; Beghi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, increasing attention has been drawn to high precision optical experiments, which push resolution and accuracy of the measured quantities beyond their current limits. This challenge requires to place optical elements (e.g. mirrors, lenses, etc.) and to steer light beams with sub-nanometer precision. Existing methods for beam direction computing in resonators, e.g. iterative ray tracing or generalized ray transfer matrices, are either computationally expensive or rely on overparametrized models of optical elements. By exploiting Fermat's principle, we develop a novel method to compute the steady-state beam configurations in resonant optical cavities formed by spherical mirrors, as a function of mirror positions and curvature radii. The proposed procedure is based on the geometric Newton method on matrix manifold, a tool with second order convergence rate that relies on a second order model of the cavity optical length. As we avoid coordinates to parametrize the beam position on mirror surfac...

  12. Beam orbit control in TESLA superconducting cavities from dipole mode measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of the electromagnetic interaction between a beam and the surrounding vacuum chamber is necessary in order to optimize the accelerator performance in terms of stored current. Many instability phenomena may occur in the machine because of the fields produced by the beam and acting back on itself. Basically, these fields, wake-fields, produce an extra voltage, affecting the longitudinal dynamics, and a transverse kick which deflects the beam. In this thesis we present the results of theoretical and experimental investigations to demonstrate the possibility of using the dipolar wake fields of the superconducting accelerating to measure the beam transverse position. After an introduction to the ILC project and to the TESLA technology, of superconducting RF cavities, we will approach the problem from an analytical point of view in chapter 2. The expression of the wake fields in a cylindrical cavity will be investigated and the electromagnetic field modes derived from Maxwell equations in an original way. Graphical solutions of a Matlab program simulating the fields due to a particle passing through a pill-box cavity along a generic path will be shown. The interaction of the beam with higher order modes (HOM) in the TESLA cavities has been studied in the past at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) in order to determine whether the modes with the highest loss factor are sufficiently damped. Starting from the results obtained before 2003, HOM signals has been better observed and examined in order to use dipole modes to find the electric center of each cavity in the first TTF accelerating module. The results presented in chapter 3 will show that by monitoring the HOM signal amplitude for two polarizations of a dipole mode, one can measure electrical center of the modes with a resolution of 50 μm. Moreover, a misalignment of the first TTF module with respect to the gun axis has been predicted using cavity dipole modes. Alternatives to this method are described in

  13. Beam current measurement and beam positioning for baby-ebm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the electron beam detection of Baby EBM. The detection is divided by two categories; beam current measurement and beam positioning under the scanning window. The beam detector system was completely fabricated and tested and the detector was able to detect the electron beam of Baby EBM. It has been found that the beam current of this EBM is 1.62 mA for energy of 0.14 MeV. A higher beam current can be obtained if a proper cooling system to the window foil is installed. (Author)

  14. Technologies and R&D for a High Resolution Cavity BPM for the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Towler, J R; Soby, L; Wendt, M; Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F J; Lyapin, A

    2013-01-01

    The Main Beam (MB) linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a beam orbit measurement system with high spatial (50 nm) and high temporal resolution (50 ns) to resolve the beam position within the 156 ns long bunch train, traveling on an energy-chirped, minimum dispersive trajectory. A 15 GHz prototype cavity BPM has been commissioned in the probe beam-line of the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility. We discuss performance and technical details of this prototype installation, including the 15 GHz analogue downconverter, the data acquisition and the control electronics and software. An R&D outlook is given for the next steps, which requires a system of 3 cavity BPMs to investigate the full resolution potential.

  15. Atomic teleportation via cavity QED and position measurements: Efficiency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumminello, M.; Ciccarello, F.

    2008-07-01

    We have recently presented a novel protocol to teleport an unknown atomic state via cavity QED and position measurements. Here, after a brief review of our scheme, we provide a quantitative study of its efficiency. This is accomplished by an explicit description of the measurement process that allows us to derive the fidelity with respect to the atomic internal state to be teleported.

  16. The Electro-Optic Beam Position Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Doherty, James

    2013-01-01

    This reports outlines the development of a new ultra-wideband electro-optic beam position monitor (EO-BPM) for use in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which utilises birefringent crystals and the Pockels effect to monitor beam position. The physical principles behind the operation of the device and tested topology, which incorporates two Lithium Tantalate crystals, is discussed.

  17. X-band crab cavities for the CLIC beam delivery system

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Abram, T; Dolgashev, V; Tantawi, S; Jones, R M

    2009-01-01

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC.

  18. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and suggest that

  19. X-Band Crab Cavities for the CLIC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Abram, T.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.

    2011-11-22

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to minimise beam loading and mode separation. The position of the crab cavity close to the final focus enhances the effect of transverse wake-fields so effective wake-field damping is required. A damped detuned structure is proposed to suppress and de-cohere the wake-field hence reducing their effect. Design considerations for the CLIC crab cavity will be discussed as well as the proposed high power testing of these structures at SLAC. Design of a crab cavity for CLIC is underway at the Cockcroft Institute in collaboration with SLAC. This effort draws on a large degree of synergy with the ILC crab cavity developed at the Cockcroft Institute and other deflecting structure development at SLAC. A study of phase and amplitude variations in the cavity suggests that the tolerances are very tight and require a 'beyond state of the art' LLRF control system. A study of cavity geometry and its effect on the cavity fields has been performed using Microwave studio. This study has suggested that for our cavity an iris radius between 4-5 mm is optimum with an iris thickness of 2-3 mm based on group velocity and peak fields. A study of the cavity wakefields show that the single bunch wakes are unlikely to be a problem but the short bunch spacing may cause the multi-bunch wakefields to be an issue. This will require some of the modes to be damped strongly so that the wake is damped significantly before any following bunch arrives. Various methods of damping have been investigated and

  20. Beam steering using quadrupoles as position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm is proposed to center the beam in the quadrupoles of a transfer line, by changing the focusing strength of a quadrupole and observing the resulting position shift on a monitor downstream. The observed position shift depends linearly on the beam position offset in the quadrupole, provided the phase advance between the quadrupole and the monitor is not a multiple of π. The same monitor may thus be used to center the beam in several places of the beam line. The centering accuracy depends on the resolution of the monitor and on the quadrupole current increment which can be set in such a way that the beam profile remains sufficiently peaked to determine its mean position

  1. Beam positioning error budget in ICF driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents the method of linear weight sum to beam positioning budget on the basis of ICF request on targeting, the approach of equal or unequal probability to allocate errors to each optical element. Based on the relationship between the motion of the optical components and beam position on target, the position error of the optical components was evaluated, which was referred to as the maximum range. Lots of ray trace were performed, the position error budget were modified by law of the normal distribution. An overview of position error budget of the components is provided

  2. Intensity-sensitive and position-resolving cavity for heavy-ion storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Sanjari, M. S.; Hülsmann, P.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Nolden, F.; Piotrowski, J.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th.; Walker, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    A heavy-ion storage ring can be adapted for use as an isochronous mass spectrometer if the ion velocity matches the transition energy of the ring. Due to the variety of stored ion species, the isochronous condition cannot be fulfilled for all the ions. In order to eliminate the measurement uncertainty stemming from the velocity spread, an intensity-sensitive and position-resolving cavity is proposed. In this paper we first briefly discuss the correction method for the anisochronism effect in the measurement with the cavity. Then we introduce a novel design, which is operated in the monopole mode and offset from the central beam orbit to one side. The geometrical parameters were optimized by analytic and numerical means in accordance with the beam dynamics of the future collector ring at FAIR. Afterwards, the electromagnetic properties of scaled prototypes were measured on a test bench. The results were in good agreement with the predictions.

  3. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T. [Photonics Integration System Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Matsutani, A. [Semiconductor and MEMS Processing Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Koyama, F. [Photonics Integration System Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259-R2-22, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-08-17

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  4. Positive solutions for nonlinear elastic beam models

    OpenAIRE

    Bendong Lou

    2001-01-01

    We give a negative answer to a conjecture of Korman on nonlinear elastic beam models. Moreover, by modifying the main conditions in the conjecture (generalizing the original ones at some points), we get positive results, that is, we obtain the existence of positive solutions for the models.

  5. HOM electronics and code to probe beam centring on 3.9 GHz cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P

    2014-01-01

    The work within sub-task 10.5.1 was aimed at developing electronics for beam position monitoring (BPM) based on Higher-Order Modes (HOM) excited by electron beams in 3.9 GHz cavities in the FLASH linac at DESY, Hamburg, defining realistic specifications and proving that these signals can be used for beam centering. A series of measurements with devices like a fast oscilloscopes and a real-time spectrum analyzer, as well as with specially designed test electronics. These measurements in conjunction with the simulations made by the other 2 sub-tasks have enabled us to find two spectra regions suitable for use as BPM: modes with strong coupling to the beam around 5.4 GHz, enabling precise monitoring (resolution of ca 20 μm rms) within the whole 4-cavity module, and localized modes at ca.9 GHz for localized measurements in each cavity (resolution of ca 50 mm rms). Various data analysis approaches have been studied. Based on the EuCARD work the HOMBPM electronics has been designed and is now being built at FNAL. ...

  6. Cavity Ringdown Technique for negative-hydrogen-ion measurement in ion source for neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cavity Ringdown Technique (CRD) is applied for negative hydrogen ion (H−) density measurement in H− source for the neutral beam injector. The CRD is one of the laser absorption techniques. Nd:YAG pulse laser was utilized for negative-hydrogen-ion photodetachment. The H− density related to extracted H− beam was successfully observed by a fixed position CRD. A two-dimensional movable CRD has been developed to measure the H− density profile. Measured profiles were consistent with expected profiles from the H− production area in pure hydrogen and cesium seeded plasmas. By applying absorption saturation in the optical cavity, negative hydrogen ion temperature was evaluated and was confirmed as being a similar value measured with other diagnostics

  7. Multi-pass, multi-bunch beam breakup for 9-cell Tesla cavities in the ERL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally, the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) needs specially designed high current superconducting RF cavities. In this paper, the threshold current of beam breakup for compact ERL facilities with 9-cell Tesla type cavities are investigated. The results show that it is feasible to adopt the 9-cell Tesla cavity for compact ERL test facilities with just a few cavities and beam current around 10 mA. (authors)

  8. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Y. P.; Assmann, R.; Barranco, J.; Tomàs, R; Weiler, T.(Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Karlsruhe, Germany); Zimmermann, F.; Calaga, R.; Morita, A.

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The longrange beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing acrossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a tr...

  9. Measuring emittance using beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Los Alamos Advanced Free Electron Laser uses a high charge (greater than InC), low emittance (normalized rams emittance less than 5π mm mrad) photoinjector driven accelerator. The high brightness achieved is due, in large part, to the rapid acceleration of the electrons to relativistic velocities. As a result, the beam does not have time to thermalize its distribution and its universe profile is, in general, non-Gaussian. This, coupled with the very high brightness, makes it difficult to measure the transverse emittance. Techniques used must be able to withstand the rigors of very intense electron beams, and not be reliant on Gaussian assumptions. Beam position monitors are ideal for this. They are not susceptible to beam damage, and it has been shown previously that they can be used to measure the transverse emittance of a beam with a Gaussian profile. However, this Gaussian restriction is not necessary and, in fact, a transverse emittance measurement using beam position monitors is independent of the beam's distribution

  10. Beam position monitoring electronics system for LEHIPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary function of beam position monitoring system (BPM) is to determine the position of the beam with respect to the centre of beam pipe. The present system is VME based and mainly consists of two VME boards one Analog and one Digital. The system has been developed for 352.21 MHz Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA). The electronic system processes the signals coming from the sensor which incorporates four button pick-ups placed orthogonally around the beam pipe. The fundamental component of the beam signal is extracted from the signals from the sensor and amplified with gain stabilized amplifiers on the analog board. Offset tone based technique has been used for the stabilization of the gain of the amplifiers against changes in temperature, power supply, etc. The filtered and amplified signals are given to the digital board for digitization and further processing. The signal processing consists of demodulation in I-Q domain followed by CORDIC which gives the signal information in the form of amplitude and phase. The stabilization of the gain is also carried out in the digital domain. The phase information can be utilized for energy gain measurements. The amplitudes give the position of the beam which is calculated online in FPGA using difference over sum method. The EPICS system has been chosen as the basic framework for command control. The hardware architecture is as per standard VME crate. (author)

  11. The AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To accelerate both protons and heavy ions, the AGS Booster requires a broadband (multi-octave) beam position monitoring system with a dynamic range spanning several orders of magnitude (2 x 1010 to 1.5 x 1013 particles per pulse). System requirements include the ability to acquire single turn trajectory and average orbit information with ± 0.1 mm resolution. The design goal of ± 0.5 mm corrected accuracy requires that the detectors have repeatable linear performance after periodic bakeout at 300 degree C. The system design and capabilities of the Booster Beam Position Monitor will be described, and initial results presented. 7 refs., 5 figs

  12. Beam position measurements of Indus-2 using X-Ray beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A staggered pair metal blade X-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) is designed, fabricated and commissioned on Indus-2 bending magnet front end. Calibration of XBPM is done by scanning the metal blades in the path of synchrotron radiation and by giving controlled electron asymmetric bump. The vertical beam position stability of the source measured during various injections and storages are reported.

  13. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D- beams in future neutral beam injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-01

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  14. Signal processing for beam position measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, L

    1997-01-01

    The spectrum of the signals generated by beam position monitors can be very large. It is the convolution product of the bunch spectrum and the transfer function of the monitor including the transmission cable. The rate of information flow is proportional to the bandwidth and the maximum amplitude rating of monitor complex. Technology is progressing at a good pace and modern acquisition capabilities are such that nearly all the information contained in the spectrum can be acquired with a reasonable resolution [1]. However, the cost of such a system is enormous and a major part of the information is superfluous. The objective of a beam position measurement system is generally restricted to trajectory measurements of a portion of the beam that is much larger than the finer details that can be observed with the bare signal generated by the position monitor. Closed orbit measurements are a simple derivation product of the trajectory and will not be considered further. The smallest beam portion that is of practical...

  15. Design and Characterization of X-Band Sheet Beam Klystron Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheet Beam Klystron (SBK) is a device employing rectangular/elliptical cross section beam. The barbell cavity for SBK has been designed providing uniform flat electric field profile across the width of the cavity. The loop coupling arrangement has also been designed using CST Microwave studio software tool and optimized for maximum return loss. The designed barbell cavity has been re-optimized after the insertion of the loop coupling to provide flat electric field profile across the width of the cavity. The cavity has also been fabricated and initial characterization has been carried out. The simulated results and the experimental results matches closely.

  16. APCAL1: Beam Position Monitor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    APCAL1 is an applications program operational on the PEP MODCOMP IV computer for the purpose of converting beam position monitor (BPM) button voltage readings to x,y coordinates. Calibration information and the BPM readings are read from the MODCOMP IV data base. Corresponding x,y coordinates are written in the data base for use by other programs. APCAL1 is normally activated by another program but can be activated by a touch panel for checkout purposes

  17. Signal Processing for Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Vismara, Giuseppe

    2000-01-01

    At the first sight the problem to determine the beam position from the ratio of the induced charges of the opposite electrodes of a beam monitor seems trivial, but up to now no unique solution has been found that fits the various demands of all particle accelerators. The purpose of this paper is to help "instrumentalists" to choose the best processing system for their particular application, depending on the machine size, the input dynamic range, the required resolution and the acquisition speed. After a general introduction and an analysis of the electrical signals to be treated (frequency and time domain), the definition of the electronic specifications will be reviewed. The tutorial will present the different families in which the processing systems can be grouped. A general description of the operating principles with relative advantages and disadvantages for the most employed processing systems is presented. Special emphasis will be put on recent technological developments based on telecommunication circ...

  18. A novel technique for tuning of co-axial cavity of multi-beam klystron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sukalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Ayan Kumar; Pal, Debashis; Kant, Deepender; Joshi, Lalit Mohan; Kumar, Bijendra; Meena, Rakesh; Rawat, Vikram

    2016-03-01

    Multi-beam Klystrons (MBKs) have gained wide acceptances in the research sector for its inherent advantages. But developing a robust tuning technique for an MBK cavity of coaxial type has still remained a challenge as these designs are very prone to suffer from asymmetric field distribution with inductive tuning of the cavity. Such asymmetry leads to inhomogeneous beam-wave interaction, an undesirable phenomenon. Described herein is a new type of coaxial cavity that has the ability to suppress the asymmetry, thereby allowing tuning of the cavity with a single tuning post.

  19. Statistical Treatment of Beam Position Monitor Data

    CERN Document Server

    Reiter, Andreas; Chorniy, Oleksandr

    2016-01-01

    We review beam position monitors adopting the perspective of an analogue-to- digital converter in a sampling data acquisition system. From a statistical treatment of independent data samples we derive basic formulae of position uncertainty for beam position monitors. Uncertainty estimates only rely on a few simple model parameters and have been calculated for two "practical" signal shapes, a square pulse and a triangular pulse. The analysis has been carried out for three approaches: the established signal integration and root-sum-square ap- proaches, and a least-square fit for the models of direct proportion and straight-line. The latter approach has not been reported in the literature so far. The straight-line fit provides the most robust estimator since it does not require baseline restoration, it is immune to signal offsets, and its standard deviation is smallest. Consequently, of the analysed estimators it promises the highest fidelity of results. The fit approach represents a simple, natural way to analy...

  20. Particle Beam Therapy for Cancer of the Skull Base, Nasal Cavity, and Paranasal Sinus

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Particle beam therapy has been rapidly developed in these several decades. Proton and carbon ion beams are most frequently used in particle beam therapy. Proton and carbon ion beam radiotherapy have physical and biological advantage to the conventional photon radiotherapy. Cancers of the skull base, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinus are rare; however these diseases can receive the benefits of particle beam radiotherapy. This paper describes the clinical review of the cancer of the skull base,...

  1. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  2. Design, fabrication, and testing of superconducting RF cavities for high average beam currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidlinger, David Joseph

    For high current applications, it is desirable for the cavity shape to have a low longitudinal loss factor and to have a high beam-breakup threshold current. This dissertation describes three different cavities designed for this purpose: a six-cell elliptical cavity for particles traveling at the speed of light, a two-cell elliptical cavity for subluminal particle speeds, and a single cell cavity which uses the TM012 mode for acceleration. SUPERFISH simulations predict the peak fields in both of the elliptical cavities will not exceed the TeSLA values by more than 10% but both will have 28.7% larger apertures. The elliptical designs assume the bunch frequency equals the accelerating mode frequency. The beam pipe radius is chosen so that the cutoff frequency is less than twice that of the accelerating mode. Hence all of the monopole and dipole higher-order modes (HOMs) that can be driven by a Fourier component of the beam have low loaded Q values. This simplifies the problem of HOM damping. The TM012 cavity is predicted to have much higher peak fields than a pi-mode elliptical cavity, but offers potential advantages from its simplified shape; it is essentially a circular waveguide with curved end plates. This basic shape results in easier fabrication and simplified tuning. Two prototype two-cell cavities were fabricated and tested at cryogenic temperatures without beam.

  3. An interactive beam position monitor system simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system simulator has been implemented to aid the development of the RHIC position monitor system. Based on the LabVIEW software package by National Instruments, this simulator allows engineers and technicians to interactively explore the parameter space of a system during the design phase. Adjustable parameters are divided into three categories: beam, pickup, and electronics. The simulator uses these parameters in simple formulas to produce results in both time-domain and frequencydomain. During the prototyping phase, these simulated results can be compared to test data acquired with the same software package. The RHIC position monitor system is presented as an example, but the software is applicable to several other systems as well

  4. High current precision long pulse electron beam position monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, S D; Fessenden, T J; Holmes, C

    2000-01-01

    Precision high current long pulse electron beam position monitoring has typically experienced problems with high Q sensors, sensors damped to the point of lack of precision, or sensors that interact substantially with any beam halo thus obscuring the desired signal. As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using transverse electromagnetic stripline kicker technology, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams for accurate beam position control (6 - 40 MeV, 1 - 4 kA, 2 μs beam pulse, sub millimeter beam position accuracy.) The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (< 20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt position measurements.

  5. Heat transfer phenomena in gas protected particle beam fusion reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of the fireball produced in particle beam fusion reactor cavities as the cavity gas near the target absorbs the X-rays and ionic debris emanating from the microexplosion is examined. Thermal response of the first wall to the radiative heat flux from the gas is examined parametrically. Criteria for the suitability of different cavity fill gases based on their ability to protect the first wall from excessive surface heating and ablation are discussed. 9 refs

  6. Design of inductively detuned RF extraction cavities for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inductively detuned traveling wave cavity for the Relativistic Klystron Two Beam Accelerator expected to extract high RF power at 11. 424 GHz for the 1 TeV Center of Mass Next Linear Collider has been designed. Longitudinal beam dynamics studies led to the following requirements on cavity design: (a) Extraction of 360 MW of RF power with RF component of the current being 1.15 kAmps at 11.424 GHz, (b) Inductively detuned traveling wave cavity with wave phase velocity equal to 4/3 the speed of light, (c) Output cavity with appropriate Qext and eigenfrequency for proper matching. Furthermore, transverse beam dynamics require low shunt impedances to avoid the beam break-up instability. We describe the design effort to meet these criteria based on frequency-domain and time-domain computations using 2D- and 3D- electromagnetic codes

  7. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  8. Design of the digitizing beam position limit detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Digitizing Beam Position Limit Detector (DBPLD) is designed to identify and react to beam missteering conditions in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The high power of the insertion devices requires these missteering conditions to result in a beam abort in less than 2 milliseconds. Commercially available beam position monitors provide a voltage proportional to beam position immediately upstream and downstream of insertion devices. The DBPLD is a custom VME board that digitizes these voltages and interrupts the heartbeat of the APS machine protection system when the beam position exceeds its trip limits

  9. Narrowband beam loading compensation in the Fermilab Main Injector accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph E. Dey; John S. Reid and James Steimel

    2001-07-12

    A narrowband beam loading compensation system was installed for the Main Injector Accelerating Cavities. This feedback operates solely on the fundamental resonant mode of the cavity. This paper describes modifications to the high level Radio Frequency system required to make the system operational. These modifications decreased the effect of steady-state beam loading by a factor of 10 and improved the reliability of paraphasing for coalescing.

  10. User's guide for New ABCI version 6.2: Azimuthal Beam Cavity Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABCI described here is a computer program which solves the Maxwell equations directly in the time domain when a Gaussian beam goes through an axi-symmetrical structure on or off axis. Many new features have been implemented in this version of ABCI, including the ''moving mesh'' and Napoly's method of calculation of wake potentials. The mesh is now generated only for the part of the structure inside a window, and moves together with the window frame. This moving mesh option drastically reduces the number of mesh points, and therefore allows calculation of wake potentials in very long structures and/or for very short bunches. In terms of Napoly's integration method, the calculation of transverse and longitudinal wake potentials in a structure such as a collimator, where parts of the cavity material come down below the beam pipe radius, can be carried out now correctly with beam pipes of short length at both ends. For the monopole wake potential, ABCI can be applied even with structures with unequal beam pipe radii. A newly installed mesh generator performs automatic circular and elliptical connections of input points just as TBCI does. In addition to the conventional method, ABCI permits the input of the structure geometry by giving the increments of coordinates from the previous positions. In this method, one can use the repetition commands to repeat input blocks when the same structure repeats many times. Plots of a cavity shape and wake potentials can be obtained in the form of a Top Drawer file. ABCI is available as a source code in the CERN IBM VM/CMS system

  11. NSLS-II RF BEAM POSITION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K.; Della Penna, A. J.; DeLong, J.; Kosciuk, B.; Mead, J.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.; Tian, Y.; Ha, K.; Portmann, G.; Sebek J.

    2011-03-28

    An internal R&D program has been undertaken at BNL to develop a sub-micron RF Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the NSLS-II 3rd generation light source that is currently under construction. The BPM R&D program started in August 2009. Successful beam tests were conducted 15 months from the start of the program. The NSLS-II RF BPM has been designed to meet all requirements for the NSLS-II Injection system and Storage Ring. Housing of the RF BPM's in +-0.1 C thermally controlled racks provide sub-micron stabilization without active correction. An active pilot-tone has been incorporated to aid long-term (8hr min) stabilization to 200nm RMS. The development of a sub-micron BPM for the NSLS-II has successfully demonstrated performance and stability. Pilot Tone calibration combiner and RF synthesizer has been implemented and algorithm development is underway. The program is currently on schedule to start production development of 60 Injection BPM's starting in the Fall of 2011. The production of {approx}250 Storage Ring BPM's will overlap the Injection schedule.

  12. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group carries out research in two broad areas: the computation of charged particle beam transport using Lie algebraic methods and advanced methods for the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Important improvements in the state of the art are believed to be possible in both of these areas. In addition, applications of these methods are made to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. The Lie algebraic method of computing and analyzing beam transport handles both linear and nonlinear beam elements. Tests show this method to be superior to the earlier matrix or numerical integration methods. It has wide application to many areas including accelerator physics, intense particle beams, ion microprobes, high resolution electron microscopy, and light optics. With regard to the area of electromagnetic fields and beam cavity interactions, work is carried out on the theory of beam breakup in single pulses. Work is also done on the analysis of the high frequency behavior of longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances, including the examination of methods which may be used to measure these impedances. Finally, work is performed on the electromagnetic analysis of coupled cavities and on the coupling of cavities to waveguides

  13. X-band crab cavities for the CLIC beam delivery system

    OpenAIRE

    Burt, Graeme; Ambattu, Praveen; Dexter, Amos; Abram, Thomas; Dolgashev, V.; Tantawi, S.; Jones, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    The CLIC machine incorporates a 20 mrad crossing angle at the IP to aid the extraction of spent beams. In order to recover the luminosity lost through the crossing angle a crab cavity is proposed to rotate the bunches prior to collision. The crab cavity is chosen to have the same frequency as the main linac (11.9942 GHz) as a compromise between size, phase stability requirements and beam loading. It is proposed to use a HE11 mode travelling wave structure as the CLIC crab cavity in order to m...

  14. Resonant cavity Vircator driven by a thermionic cathode electron beam gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, R. [Texas Instrument, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A resonant cavity Vircator (virtual cathode oscillator) driven by an electron beam emitted from a broad area thermionic cathode has been tested at Textron Defense Systems. Narrow bandwidth (1.0 MHz at the {minus}3 dB level) excitation of the TM{sub 0.23} mode of a cylindrical resonant cavity was observed at a frequency of 986 MHz with a pulse length of 1.2 {mu}s. The single cavity mode excitation is attributed to the constant voltage and current electron beam emitted form the thermionic cathode.

  15. ORNL positive ion neutral beam program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutral beam group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has constructed neutral beam generators for the ORMAK and PLT devices, is presently constructing neutral beam devices for the ISX and PDX devices, and is contemplating the construction of neutral beam systems for the advanced TNS device. These neutral beam devices stem from the pioneering work on ion sources of G. G. Kelley and O. B. Morgan. We describe the ion sources under development at this Laboratory, the beam optics exhibited by these sources, as well as some theoretical considerations, and finally the remainder of the beamline design

  16. APT Blanket Thermal Analysis of Cavity Flood Cooling with a Beam Window Break; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cavity flood system is designed to be the primary safeguard for the integrity of the blanket modules and target assemblies during loss of coolant accidents, LOCA''s. In the unlikely event that the internal flow passages in a blanket module or a target assembly dryout, decay heat in the metal structures will be dissipated to the cavity flood system through the module or assembly walls. This study supplements the two previous studies by demonstrating that the cavity flood system can adequately cool the blanket modules when the cavity vessel beam window breaks

  17. Beam-induced Electron Loading Effects in High Pressure Cavities for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Jansson, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Insepov, Z.; /Argonne

    2010-05-01

    Ionization cooling is a critical building block for the realization of a muon collider. To suppress breakdown in the presence of the external magnetic field, an idea of using an RF cavity filled with high pressure hydrogen gas is being considered for the cooling channel design. One possible problem expected in the high pressure RF cavity is, however, the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced electrons accumulated inside the cavity. To characterize this detrimental loading effect, we develop a simplified model that relates the electron density evolution and the observed pickup voltage signal in the cavity, with consideration of several key molecular processes such as the formation of the polyatomic molecules, recombination and attachment. This model is expected to be compared with the actual beam test of the cavity in the MuCool Test Area (MTA) of Fermilab.

  18. Study on the multi-pass, multi-bunch beam breakup for 9-cell TESLA cavities in ERL

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Si; Huang, Sen-Lin; Li, Yong-Ming; Feng, Li-Wen; Zhu, Feng; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Liu, Ke-Xin; Chen, Jia-Er

    2013-01-01

    Generally, Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) needs special designed high current superconducting RF cavities. In this paper, the threshold current of BBU for compact ERL facilities with 9-cell Tesla type cavities are investigated. The results show that it is feasible to adopt 9-cell Tesla cavity for compact ERL test facilities with just a few cavities and beam current around tens mA.

  19. The positioning device of beam probes for accelerator LUE-200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description of a device for the positioning of sliding beam probes which is the part of the beam diagnostic system for the LUE-200 electron linac of IREN installation is presented. The device provides remote control of input-output operation of beam probes of five diagnostic stations established in an accelerating tract and in the beam transportation channel of the accelerator

  20. High flux cold Rubidium atomic beam for strongly coupled Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity QED experiments in the regime of strong coupling. A 2 $D^+$ MOT, loaded by rubidium getters in a dry film coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate of 1.5 x $10^{10}$ atoms/sec. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a 280 $\\mu$m cavity resulting in a Rabi splitting of more than +/- 10 MHz. The presence of sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling regime, with parameters (g, $\\kappa$, $\\gamma$)/2$\\pi$ equal to (7, 3, 6)/ 2$\\pi$ MHz.

  1. Third-order moment effect of beam position measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Third-order moments of beam charge distribution cause unwanted errors in beam positions measured by a beam position monitor with two or four electrodes. These errors can be reduced or corrected by adding or subtracting third-order moment terms in difference equations of signal voltages output from electrodes. In the case of a six-electrode beam position monitor with circular cross-section which is used in SPring-8 linear accelerator errors calculated with and without correction are 24 μm and 360 μm at a simulated beam position of x = 3 mm, y = 3 mm apart form a duct center. (author)

  2. The Influence of Air Cavity on Interface Doses for Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Bum; Kwon, Young Ho; Chung, Se Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, You Hyun [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Junior College of Allied Health Sciences Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-11-15

    When a high energy photon beam is used to treat lesions located in the upper respiratory air passages or in maxillary sinus, the beams often must traverse an air cavity before it reaches the lesion. Because of this traversal of air, it is not clear that the surface layers of the lesion forming the air-tumor tissue interface will be in a state of near electronic equilibrium; if they are not, underdosing of these layers could result. Although dose corrections at large distances beyond an air cavity are accountable by attenuation differences, perturbations at air-tissue interfaces are complex to measure or calculate. This problem has been investigated for 4 MV and 10 MV X-ray beams which are becoming widely available for radiotherapy with linear accelerator. Markus chamber was used for measurement with various air cavity geometries in X-ray beams. Underdosing effects occur at both the distal and proximal air cavity interface. The magnitude depended on geometry, energy, field sizes and distance from the air-tissue interfaces. As the cavity thickness increased, the central axis dose at the distal interface decreased. Increasing field size remedied the underdosing, as did the introduction of lateral walls. Following a 20 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3} air cavity, 4 x 4 cm field there was an 11.5% and 13% underdose at the distal interface, while a 20 x 20 x 2 cm{sup 3} air cavity yield a 24% and 29% loss for the 4 MV and 10 MV beams, respectively. The losses were slightly larger for the 10 MV beams. The measurements reported here can be used to guide the development of new calculation models under non-equilibrium conditions. This situation is of clinical concern when lesions such as larynx and maxillary carcinoma beyond air cavities are irradiated.

  3. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator

  4. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  5. Beam steering via resonance detuning in coherently coupled vertical cavity laser arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherently coupled vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser arrays offer unique advantages for nonmechanical beam steering applications. We have applied dynamic coupled mode theory to show that the observed temporal phase shift between vertical-cavity surface-emitting array elements is caused by the detuning of their resonant wavelengths. Hence, a complete theoretical connection between the differential current injection into array elements and the beam steering direction has been established. It is found to be a fundamentally unique beam-steering mechanism with distinct advantages in efficiency, compactness, speed, and phase-sensitivity to current

  6. The beam optics of the Argonne Positive-Ion Injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam optics for Phase I of the Argonne Positive-Ion Injector linac system have been studied for a representative set of beams. The results of this study indicate that high charge state beams from an ECR source can be accelerated without significantly increasing the transverse or longitudinal emittance of the initial beam. It is expected that the beam quality from the PII-ATLAS system will be at least as good as presently achieved with the tandem-ATLAS system

  7. Digital feed back control for radial beam position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of wide spread large scale distributed digital control systems, there is a requirement to automate small processes like radial beam control which will not only improve the beam quality but will also add local intelligence. Hence use is made here of digital control principles for such applications. The work concerned with the radial beam control discussed in this report has been developed for ISIS at RAL. The structure of the report is hence inclined more towards the local hardware system. The general feed back loop techniques can also be implemented for other control purpose. For instance, the author has successfully tested similar techniques to minimise the RF cavity tuning error, where the improvement in performance could not be matched by the analogue loop. A description of the RF cavity tuning programme and the associated experimental results will be published as a local paper for ISIS division. (author)

  8. Development of beam position monitor for test beam of BEPC II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three stripline beam position monitors and some feed-throughs were developed to measure the position of beam non-interceptively in test beam facility. After three stripline beam position monitors were produced, calibrations of the monitors were carried out on a workbench, which has high precision and is controlled by a computer. Then two monitor's were installed at the beam line and some experiments were carried out. Four 1 mm thickness stainless steel strips are main modules of the monitor, signals induced in these strips reflect the position of the beam bunch. Calibration coefficient, system characteristic impedance and port transmission coefficient of monitor are introduced in this paper. (authors)

  9. Cavity Formation in Aluminium Irradiated with a Pulsating Beam of 225 MeV Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain; Bilde-Sørensen, Jørgen; Leffers, Torben;

    1984-01-01

    High-purity aluminium was irradiated with a pulsating beam of 225 MeV electrons to a maximum dose of 0.035 dpa with a helium generation rate of up to 17 appm/dpa. The irradiated samples contained cavities in the size range 5 to 70 nm. In a zone of up to 14 μm from the grain boundaries cavity size...

  10. Low frequency processing for PSR beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam is injected into the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) as a train of sub-nanosecond pulses at the linac frequency of 201.25 MHz. This frequency component is sensed by 20 pairs of 200 MHz stripline beam position monitors and multiplexed to an autocorrelation position processor. The analog position information is sampled, digitized and stored under the control of timing circuits. Beam position histograms from sets of monitors are displayed in the control room. Measurements show that the amplitude of the 200 MHz component is constant during the fill indicating that the strength of the most recently injected beam does not drift during the fill. This structure begins to disappear 20 to 20 turns after a particular batch of beam has been injected. The low frequency components, however, persist and might be used to measure the position of the accumulated beam. We report calculations and experimental results for some low frequency processing systems

  11. Beam Position Monitor at the PLS BTL

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sung-Chul; Han, Yeung-Jin; Tae Kim, Do; Woo Lee, Wol; Yun Huang Jung

    2005-01-01

    Electron Linac at the Pohnag Accelerator Laboratory (PAL) has been operated continuously as the full energy injector for storage ring. Linac and storage ring energy has been 2.0 GeV since Dec. 1994, and 2.5 GeV since Oct. 2002. In Aug. 2004, thirteen BPMs are newly installed at BTL(Beam Transport Line) for beam trajectory measurement and feedback. These BPMs consist of 100mm strip-line electrodes in 150mm long chamber, and 500MHz log-ratio signal processing circuits. BPM data acquisition system is developed as EPICS IOC using NI S-series data acquisition board and NI LabView 7.1. BTL BPMs will be used for optic correction and beam energy feedback for PLS beam injection. This paper describes on design, test results, installation and data acquisition system of the PLS BTL BPM.

  12. rf-induced beam dynamics in rf guns and accelerating cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Floettmann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a detailed discussion of the rf-related beam dynamics in rf guns and accelerating cavities is presented. Other rf-gun-related aspects such as space charge and cathode physics are not treated. An effective start phase is introduced in order to yield a better description for the synchronous phase, the energy gain, and the bunch compression factor in gun cavities. Energy spread and longitudinal emittance are treated in a form applicable to guns as well as to accelerating cavities....

  13. Cavity design and beam simulations for the APS rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An earlier note discussed the preliminary design of the 1-1/2 cell RF cavity for the APS RF gun. This note describes the final design, including cavity properties and simulation results from the program rf gun. The basic idea for the new design was that the successful SSRL design could be improved upon by reducing fields that had nonlinear dependence on radius. As discussed previously, this would reduce the emittance and produce tighter momentum and time distributions. In addition, it was desirable to increase the fields in the first half-cell relative to the fields in the second half-cell, in order to allow more rapid initial acceleration, which would reduce the effects of space charge. Both of these goals were accomplished in the new design

  14. Hough Transform Based Corner Detection for Laser Beam Positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In laser beam alignment in addition to detecting position, one must also determine the rotation of the beam. This is essential when a commissioning new laser beam for National Ignition Facility located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. When the beam is square, the positions of the corners with respect to one another provides an estimate of the rotation of the beam. This work demonstrates corner detection in the presence or absence of a second order non-uniform illumination caused by a spatial mask. The Hough transform coupled with illumination dependent pre-processing is used to determine the corner points. We show examples from simulated and real NIF images

  15. Hough Transform Based Corner Detection for Laser Beam Positioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awwal, A S

    2005-07-26

    In laser beam alignment in addition to detecting position, one must also determine the rotation of the beam. This is essential when a commissioning new laser beam for National Ignition Facility located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. When the beam is square, the positions of the corners with respect to one another provides an estimate of the rotation of the beam. This work demonstrates corner detection in the presence or absence of a second order non-uniform illumination caused by a spatial mask. The Hough transform coupled with illumination dependent pre-processing is used to determine the corner points. We show examples from simulated and real NIF images.

  16. Correction of beam-steering effects in low-velocity superconducting quarter-wave cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting cavities presently used for acceleration of ions in velocity range ∼0.01c to 0.3c (where c is the speed of light) are based on quarter-wave resonators. Currently there are several design proposals in nuclear physics laboratories for application of this type of cavity for acceleration of light and heavy ions. The operating frequencies of the cavities range from ∼50 to 360 MHz to satisfy various specifications. Electrodynamics studies of the field distributions in the beam-cavity interaction area indicate appreciable dipole components of both electric and magnetic fields, especially for higher-frequency cavities. The dipole fields induce beam steering, which is a strong function of rf phase and which couples the longitudinal and transverse motion. This can result in growth in the transverse emittance of the beam. In this paper, we propose two possible methods for the correction of such dynamic beam-steering effects in quarter-wave resonators. We analyze and discuss the correction methods for the particular examples of two quarter-wave resonators operating at 57.5 and 115 MHz designed for the driver linac of the Rare Isotope Accelerator facility.

  17. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  18. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  19. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems

  20. Monitoring the beam position in the SLC interaction region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stanford Linear Collider requires special Beam Position Monitors near the Interaction Point (IP) to bring the two beams (e+ and e-) into collision. These beams pass through two monitors on each side of the IP with a short time separation (about 20 and 50 ns). The mechanics of the monitors as well as the electronics will be described. In order to bring beams of several microns diameter into collision at the IP, these monitors measure beam deflection induced by the presence of the opposite beam

  1. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samadi, Nazanin, E-mail: nazanin.samadi@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Belev, George; Dallin, Les; Jong, Mark de [Canadian Light Source, 44 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chapman, Dean [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-06-25

    A system has been developed to measure the vertical position and angle of the electron beam at a single location from a synchrotron source. The system uses a monochromator tuned to the absorption edge of a contrast material and has a sensitivity comparable with other beam position monitors. The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam’s position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam’s position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered

  2. Measurement of electron beam bunch phase length by rectangular cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of a phase length of electron bunches with the help of crossed rectangular resonators with the Hsub(102) oscillation type has been made. It has been shown that the electron coordinates after the duplex resonator are described by an ellipse equation for a non-modulated beam. An influence of the initial energy spread upon the electron motion has been studied. It has been ascertained that energy modulation of the electron beam results in displacement of each electron with respect to the ellipse which is proportional to modulation energy, i.e. an error in determination of the phase length of an electron bunch is proportional to the beam energy spread. Relations have been obtained which enable to find genuine values of phases of the analyzed electrons with an accuracy up to linear multipliers

  3. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bacteria produce acids that cause decay. Tooth pain occurs after decay reaches the inside of the tooth. Dentists can detect cavities by examining the teeth and taking x-rays periodically. Good oral hygiene and regular dental care plus a healthy diet can help prevent cavities. ...

  4. Beam line error analysis, position correction, and graphic processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam transport line error analysis and beam position correction code called ''EAC'' has been developed in association with a graphics and data post-processing package for TRANSPORT. Based on the linear optics design using TRANSPORT or other general optics codes, EAC independently analyzes effects of magnet misalignments, and systematic and statistical errors of magnetic fields, as well as the effects of the initial beam positions on the central trajectory and on the transverse beam emittance dilution. EAC also provides an efficient way to develop beam line trajectory correcting schemes. The post-processing package generates various types of graphics including beam line geometrical layout, plots of the Twiss parameters, and beam envelopes. It also generates an EAC input file, thus connecting EAC with general optics codes. EAC and the post-processing package are small codes that are easy to access and use. They have become useful tools for the design of transport lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

  5. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D+ magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 1010 atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  6. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Basudev [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata (India); University of Maryland, MD (United States); Scholten, Michael [University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D{sup +} magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 10{sup 10} atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  7. Higher-order-mode damper as beam-position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of this thesis a beam-position monitor was developed, which can only because of the signals from the HOM dampers of a linear-accelerator structure determine the beam position with high accuracy. For the unique determination of the beam position in the plane a procedure was developed, which uses the amplitudes and the start-phase difference between a dipole mode and a higher monopole mode. In order tocheck the suitability of the present SBLC-HOM damper as beam position monitor three-dimensional numerical field calculations in the frequency and time range and measurements on the damper cell were performed. For the measurements without beam a beam simulator was constructed, which allows computer-driven measurements with variable depositions of the simulated beam with a resolution of 1.23 μm. Because the complete 6 m long, 180-cell accelerator structure was not available for measurements and could also with the available computers not be three-dimensionally simulated simulated, a one-dimensional equivalent-circuit based model of the multi-cell was studied. The equivalent circuits with 879 concentrated components regards the detuning from cell to cell, the cell losses, the damper losses, and the beam excitation in dependence on the deposition. the measurements and simulations let a resolution of the ready beam-position monitor on the 180-cell in the order of magnitude of 1-10 μm and a relative accuracy smaller 6.2% be expected

  8. Beam Position Monitor Electronics Upgrade for Fermilab Switchyard

    CERN Document Server

    Stabile, P; Fitzgerald, J A; Liu, N; Morris, D K; Prieto, P S; Seraphin, J P

    2015-01-01

    The beam position monitor (BPM) system for Fermilab Switchyard (SY) provides the position, intensity and integrated intensity of the 53.10348 MHz RF bunched resonant extracted beam from the Main Injector over 4 seconds of spill. The total beam intensity varies from 1x10^11 to 1x10^13 protons. The spill is measured by stripline beam postion monitors and resonant circuit. The BPMs have an external resonant circuit tuned to 53.10348 MHz. The corresponding voltage signal out of the BPM has been estimated to be between -110 dBm and -80 dBm.

  9. In-situ microscopy study of nano cavity shrinkage in Si under ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of nano-cavity evolution in amorphous Si (a-Si) under ion beam irradiation. The size evolution of the nano-cavities was monitored during ion irradiation with Si or As at various temperatures between 300 and 600 K. A linear decrease of the nano-cavity diameter was found as the ion fluence increased; it was much faster than its counterpart in crystalline Si (c-Si). Here, the shrinkage rate depended on the irradiation-induced atomic displacement rate. No significant temperature dependence was observed, confirming that the irradiation-induced nano-cavity shrinkage in a-Si is essentially due to ballistic interactions, i.e., differs radically from that in c-Si. (authors)

  10. In-situ microscopy study of nano cavity shrinkage in Si under ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruault, M.O.; Fortuna, F.; Bernas, H. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse; Ridgway, M.C.; Williams, J.S. [Australian National University, Dept. of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Canberra (Australia)

    2003-07-01

    We report an in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of nano-cavity evolution in amorphous Si (a-Si) under ion beam irradiation. The size evolution of the nano-cavities was monitored during ion irradiation with Si or As at various temperatures between 300 and 600 K. A linear decrease of the nano-cavity diameter was found as the ion fluence increased; it was much faster than its counterpart in crystalline Si (c-Si). Here, the shrinkage rate depended on the irradiation-induced atomic displacement rate. No significant temperature dependence was observed, confirming that the irradiation-induced nano-cavity shrinkage in a-Si is essentially due to ballistic interactions, i.e., differs radically from that in c-Si. (authors)

  11. Study of air cavities influence in head and neck radiotherapy with 10 MV photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a study about dose distribution in the larynx region under irradiation with a 10 MV photon beam. This localization presents air cavities, that can compromise the dose at air-tissue interfaces by electronic equilibrium loss and backscattering lack. For this study, a parallel ionization chamber was used in the air cavities simulated with a perspex phantom. The influence of the air cavities in the proximal, distal and lateral interfaces was analysed. The results showed a expressive loss of dose at the air-tissue interface. For typical irradiation field and anatomic cavity, under dose values of 4% in the proximal interface, 11% in the distal interface and 7% in the lateral interface were found. Irradiation field larger than 6 X 6 cm2 were optimal in reducing the total effect of under dosing at the interface. (author). 39 refs, 23 figs, 12 tabs

  12. Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2014-10-29

    This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

  13. Beam uniformization and low frequency RF cavities in compact electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Alfonse N.

    An electron storage ring is currently under construction at Indiana University for extreme environment radiation effects experiments, x-ray production, and particle beam dynamics experiments. For an electron bunch to be successfully stored for long durations, a radio-frequency (RF) resonant structure will be used to provide an adequate RF bucket for longitudinal focusing and replenishment of energy electrons loses via synchrotron radiation. Due to beam line space limitation that are inherent to compact circular particle accelerators, a unique ferrite-loaded quarter-wave RF resonant cavity has been designed and constructed for use in the electron storage ring. The physics of particle accelerators and beams, ferrite-loaded RF resonant cavity theory, and results of the Poisson-SUPERFISH electromagnetic field simulations that were used to guide the specification and design of the RF cavity will be presented. Low-power resonant cavity characterization measurements were used to benchmark the performance of the RF cavity. High-power characterization and measurements with electron beams will be used to validate the performance of the cavity in the electron storage ring. To fulfill the requirements for radiation effect experiments, the storage ring manipulation of beams that utilizes a phase space beam dilution method have been developed for the broadening of the radiation damped electron bunch with longitudinal particle distribution uniformity. The method relies on phase modulation applied to a double RF system to generate large regions of bounded chaotic particle motion in phase space. These region are formed by a multitude of overlapping parametric resonances. Parameters of the double RF system and applied phase modulation can be adjusted to vary the degree of beam dilution. The optimal RF parameters have been found for maximal bunch broadening, uniform longitudinal particle distribution, and bounded particle diffusion. Implementation of the phase space dilution method

  14. Determination of beam intensity and position in a particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, G

    2011-01-01

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors...

  15. 21 CFR 892.5780 - Light beam patient position indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Light beam patient position indicator. 892.5780 Section 892.5780 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5780 Light beam patient...

  16. Simulations of LEIR Injection Line Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Maltseva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    In this paper sensitivity characteristics of a beam position monitor are described. Characteristics are obtained during the simulations in CST Studio, the results are compared with the calculated values. The results for a low-beta beam and with a wire are compared.

  17. Goos-Hänchen shifts of partially coherent light beams from a cavity with a four-level Raman gain medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate spatial and angular Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts (both negative and positive) in the reflected light for a partial coherent light incident on a cavity. A four-level Raman gain atomic medium is considered in a cavity. The effects of spatial coherence, beam width, and mode index of partial coherent light fields on spatial and angular GH shifts are studied. Our results reveal that a large magnitude of negative and positive GH shifts in the reflected light is achievable with the introduction of partial coherent light fields. Furthermore, the amplitude of spatial (negative and positive) GH shifts are sharply affected by the partial coherent light beam as compared to angular (negative and positive) GH shifts in the reflected light.

  18. The effect of beam intensity on the estimation bias of beam position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the signals of the beam position monitor (BPM), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is directly related to the beam intensity. Low beam intensity results in poor SNR. The random noise has a modulation effect on both the amplitude and phase of the BPM signals. Therefore, the beam position measurement has a certain random error. In the currently used BPM, time-averaging and waveform clipping are used to improve the measurement. The nonlinear signal processing results in a biased estimate of beam position. A statistical analysis was made to examine the effect of the SNR, which is determined by the beam intensity, on the estimation bias. The results of the analysis suggest that the estimation bias has a dependence not only on the beam position but also on beam intensity. Specifically, the dependence gets strong as the beam intensity decreases. This property has set a lower limit of the beam intensity range which the BPM's can handle. When the beam intensity is below that limit the estimation bias starts to vary dramatically, resulting in the BPMs failure. According to the analysis, the lowest beam intensity is that at which the SNR of the generated BPM signal is about 15 dB. The limit for NSEP BPM, for instance, is about 6Ell. The analysis may provide the BPM designers with some idea about the potential of the current BPM'S

  19. Calibration of INDUS-1 and booster beam position indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 0.45 GeV Indus-1 synchrotron radiation facility at Centre for Advanced Technology (C.A.T) Indore, has 6 beam position indicators in Booster and 4 beam position indicators in Indus-1 ring. The beam position indicators (BPI) play an important role in commissioning and operation of accelerators. The accurate determination of the offsets relative to magnetic axis and sensitivities of individual BPIs is thus needed. The bench calibration of Indus-1 and Booster beam position indicators was carried out. A fully automatic computer based calibration system has been developed for calibration of Indus-1 and Indus-2 BPIs. The calibration results of Indus-1 and Booster BPIs and calibration system used for calibration is presented in this paper. (author)

  20. Video-based beam position monitoring at CHESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revesz, Peter; Pauling, Alan; Krawczyk, Thomas; Kelly, Kevin J.

    2012-10-01

    CHESS has pioneered the development of X-ray Video Beam Position Monitors (VBPMs). Unlike traditional photoelectron beam position monitors that rely on photoelectrons generated by the fringe edges of the X-ray beam, with VBPMs we collect information from the whole cross-section of the X-ray beam. VBPMs can also give real-time shape/size information. We have developed three types of VBPMs: (1) VBPMs based on helium luminescence from the intense white X-ray beam. In this case the CCD camera is viewing the luminescence from the side. (2) VBPMs based on luminescence of a thin (~50 micron) CVD diamond sheet as the white beam passes through it. The CCD camera is placed outside the beam line vacuum and views the diamond fluorescence through a viewport. (3) Scatter-based VBPMs. In this case the white X-ray beam passes through a thin graphite filter or Be window. The scattered X-rays create an image of the beam's footprint on an X-ray sensitive fluorescent screen using a slit placed outside the beam line vacuum. For all VBPMs we use relatively inexpensive 1.3 Mega-pixel CCD cameras connected via USB to a Windows host for image acquisition and analysis. The VBPM host computers are networked and provide live images of the beam and streams of data about the beam position, profile and intensity to CHESS's signal logging system and to the CHESS operator. The operational use of VBPMs showed great advantage over the traditional BPMs by providing direct visual input for the CHESS operator. The VBPM precision in most cases is on the order of ~0.1 micron. On the down side, the data acquisition frequency (50-1000ms) is inferior to the photoelectron based BPMs. In the future with the use of more expensive fast cameras we will be able create VBPMs working in the few hundreds Hz scale.

  1. A space charge compensation model for positive DC ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we revisit and extend a formula to predict the compensation of space charge in positive DC ion beams of non-relativistic energy, as they are for example found in the injector beam lines of heavy ion accelerator facilities.The original formula was presented in 1975 by Igor Gabovich et al. and takes into account the de-compensation through Coulomb collisions of the primary beam ions and the compensating electrons. We extend its usability to arbitrary (positive) charge states of the ions and non-quasineutral beams.The resulting formula compares well with measurements using a retarding field analyzer and a multi-species generalization of it was incorporated into beam transport simulations using the particle-in-cell code WARP

  2. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Raich, Uli

    2011-10-04

    A subject of the thesis is conception, design, implementation, tests and deployment of new position measurement system of particle bunch in the CERN PS circular accelerator. The system is based on novel algorithms of particle position determination. The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN†, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)‡. The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajectory and orbit measurement system of the PS is dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam posi...

  3. A setup for measurement of beam stability and position using position sensitive detector for Indus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 450 MeV electron synchrotron radiation source Indus-1 is operational at RRCAT. A set-up has been developed to measure the relative transverse positional stability of the electron beam and its position with microns resolution using position sensitive photodiodes. The set-up has been installed at the diagnostics beam line of Indus-1. Synchrotron light from photo physics beamline was reflected out by inserting a Ni coated mirror and was focused onto a duo-lateral position sensitive photodiode by using two mirrors of 1.25 meter focal length to obtain unity magnification. The set-up consists of a duo-lateral position sensitive detector (PSD), precision processing electronics and a PC based data acquisition system. A computer program captures the processed signals on to a PC using GPIB interface and displays vertical position of the beam in real time. The paper describes the salient features of the setup developed for measurement of beam stability. (author)

  4. Development of digital beam position monitor based on software radio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital beam position monitor processor is the key part of a beam position system. A BPM processor based on software radio is much better than traditional processors in terms of the resolution and flexibility. In this paper, we report technical specifications and design considerations of the digital beam position monitor developed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The turn-by-turn electronic resolution of the processor is better than 1.5 μm, when the input power is larger than -30 dBm, and the resolution is better than 2 μm in a test in the SSRF storage ring, with the beam current of over 150 mA. (authors)

  5. Bench calibration of INDUS-2 beam position indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A third generation synchrotron radiation source of energy 2.5 GeV named INDUS-2 at Centre for Advanced Technology (C.A.T), Indore (M.P) is in the advanced stage of construction. Accurate determination and correction of beam closed orbit in INDUS-2 machine within 100 of microns is a very desirable goal. Bench based calibration of Beam Position Indicators (BPI) play a very important and useful role during initial commissioning of electron machines. To precisely measure transverse position of electron beam in the Indus-2 storage ring, 56 Beam Position Indicators (BPI) will be installed in INDUS-2 machine. Out of 56 Beam Position Indicators 40 are of individual type whereas 16 are integrated with dipole vacuum chamber. The Beam Position Indicators are required to be calibrated before they can be installed. The calibration is done to determine electrical offset with respect to defined mechanical centre, to determine displacement sensitivities as well as non linearity's of BPI. Ideally when beam passes through the geometrical center of BPI's, all electrodes should have same signal strength. However due to different capacitance of electrodes and offset and drift in electronics, the electrical centre (mechanical x, y where all electrodes shows same signal strength) differs from mechanical centre of BPI. A fully automatic calibration system has been developed to carry out the calibration of Beam Position Indicators. A calibration software has been developed which has necessary utilities to process and display calibration data and results. This paper describes the calibration results of Indus-2 BPM. (author)

  6. Beam position and phase measurements of microampere beams at the Michigan State University REA3 facility

    CERN Document Server

    Crisp, J; Durickovic, B; Kiupel, G; Krause, S; Leitner, D; Nash, S; Rodriguez, J A; Russo, T; Webber, R; Wittmer, W; Eddy, N; Briegel, C; Fellenz, B; Slimmer, D; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    A high power CW, heavy ion linac will be the driver accelerator for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) being designed at Michigan State University (MSU). The linac requires a Beam Position Monitoring (BPM) system with better than 100 micron resolution at 100 microamperes beam current. A low beam current test of the candidate technology, button pick-ups and direct digital down-conversion signal processing, was conducted in the ReA3 re-accelerated beam facility at Michigan State University. The test is described. Beam position and phase measurement results, demonstrating ~250 micron and ~1.5 degree resolution in a 45 kHz bandwidth for a 1.0 microampere beam current, are reported.

  7. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Axel

    2008-07-21

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10{sup -4} in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  8. Compensating microphonics in SRF cavities to ensure beam stability for future free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In seeded High-Gain-Harmonic-Generation free electron lasers or energy recovery linear accelerators the requirements for the bunch-to-bunch timing and energy jitter of the beam are in the femtosecond and per mill regime. This implies the ability to control the cavity radiofrequency (RF) field to an accuracy of 0.02 in phase and up to 1.10-4 in amplitude. For the planned BESSY-FEL it is envisaged to operate 144 superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities of the 2.3 GeV driver linac in continuous wave mode and at a low beam current. The cavity resonance comprises a very narrow bandwidth of the order of tens of Hertz. Such cavities have been characterized under accelerator like conditions in the HoBiCaT test facility. It was possible to measure the error sources affecting the field stability in continuous wave (CW) operation. Microphonics, the main error source for a mechanical detuning of the cavities, lead to an average fluctuation of the cavity resonance of 1-5 Hz rms. Furthermore, the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning and the helium pressure dependance of the cavity resonance have been measured. Single cavity RF control and linac bunch-to-bunch longitudinal phase space modeling containing the measured properties showed, that it is advisable to find means to minimize the microphonics detuning by mechanical tuning. Thus, several fast tuning systems have been tested for CW operation. These tuners consist of a motor driven lever for slow and coarse tuning and a piezo that is integrated into the tuner support for fast and fine tuning. Regarding the analysis of the detuning spectrum an adaptive feedforward method based on the least-mean-square filter algorithm has been developed for fast cavity tuning. A detuning compensation between a factor of two and up to a factor of seven has been achieved. Modeling the complete system including the fast tuning scheme, showed that the requirements of the BESSY-FEL are attainable. (orig.)

  9. A Position-Dependent Two-Atom Entanglement in Real-Time Cavity QED System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan-Qing; CAO Hai-Jing; SONG He-Shan

    2007-01-01

    We study a special two-atom entanglement case in assumed cavity QED experiment in which only one atom effectively exchanges a single photon with a cavity mode. We compute two-atom entanglement under position-dependent atomic resonant dipole-dipole interaction (RDDI) for large interatomic separation limit. We show that the RDDI, even that which is much smaller than the maximal atomic Rabi frequency, can induce distinct diatom entanglement. The peak entanglement reaches a maximum when RDDI strength can compare with the Rabi frequency of an atom.

  10. Study of CMOS image sensors for laser beam position detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the study made on commercial CMOS image sensors in order to determine their feasibility for light beam position reconstruction. Measurements of the intrinsic position resolution, sensor photoresponse and uniformity were done. The effect of eventual background illumination was evaluated. The precision on the spatial point reconstruction was determined from linearity measurements. First results on gamma-ray radiation tolerance are presented

  11. DTL cavity design and beam dynamics for a TAC linear proton accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, A.; Yılmaz, M.

    2012-02-01

    A 30 mA drift tube linac (DTL) accelerator has been designed using SUPERFISH code in the energy range of 3-55 MeV in the framework of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) project. Optimization criteria in cavity design are effective shunt impedance (ZTT), transit-time factor and electrical breakdown limit. In geometrical optimization we have aimed to increase the energy gain in each RF gap of the DTL cells by maximizing the effective shunt impedance (ZTT) and the transit-time factor. Beam dynamics studies of the DTL accelerator have been performed using beam dynamics simulation codes of PATH and PARMILA. The results of both codes have been compared. In the beam dynamical studies, the rms values of beam emittance have been taken into account and a low emittance growth in both x and y directions has been attempted.

  12. DTL cavity design and beam dynamics for a TAC linear proton accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 30 mA drift tube linac (DTL) accelerator has been designed using SUPERFISH code in the energy range of 3-55 MeV in the framework of the Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC) project. Optimization criteria in cavity design are effective shunt impedance (ZTT), transit-time factor and electrical breakdown limit. In geometrical optimization we have aimed to increase the energy gain in each RF gap of the DTL cells by maximizing the effective shunt impedance (ZTT) and the transit-time factor. Beam dynamics studies of the DTL accelerator have been performed using beam dynamics simulation codes of PATH and PARMILA. The results of both codes have been compared. In the beam dynamical studies, the rms values of beam emittance have been taken into account and a low emittance growth in both x and y directions has been attempted. (authors)

  13. The interaction between a beam and a superconducting cavity module: Measurements in CESR and CESR-Phase 3 goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Flynn, G.; Hartung, W.; Kirchgessner, J.; Moffat, D.; Muller, H.; Padamsee, H.; Pisharody, M.; Veshcherevich, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. of Nuclear Studies

    1996-08-01

    Plans for the next generation of electron-positron colliders (B-factories and B-factory-like machines) call for high beam currents to produce luminosities of the order of 10 (exp 33). To store these high currents in a machine, special attention must be paied to the interaction of the beam with discontinuities in the surrounding vacuum chamber. RF cavities are among the biggest perturbations in accelerator vacuum chambers and are therefore among the biggest sources of beam instabilities. Accelerating structures of new machines are being designed to have smaller impedance to reduce the beam-cavity interaction. Prototypes for the cavity, input coupler, cryostat, and higher-order mode (HOM) loads were subjected and are tested in CESR. A superconducting (SRF) cavity was installed in addition to the four five-cell normal conducting cavities. As a result, the calorimetry and RF power results agree with predictions up to their respective uncertainties. The results of wake potential sampling suggested that the wake fields of the SRF cavity will not limit the performance of CESR in bunch train operation. No beam instabilities or dangerous HOMs were encountered while sweeping the HOM frequencies using the cavity tuner or while exciting multipole HOMs by displacing the beam off axis. (G.K.)

  14. Progress on the development of APS beam position monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development status of the beam position monitoring system for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation light source now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The accelerator complex will consist of an electron linac, a positron linac, a positron accumulator ring (PAR), an injector synchrotron and a storage ring. For beam position measurement, striplines will be used on the linacs, while button-type pickups will be used on the injector synchrotron and the storage ring. A test stand with a prototype injector synchrotron beam position monitor (BPM) unit has been built, and we present the results of position calibration measurements using a wire. Comparison of the results with theoretical calculations will be presented. The current effort on similar storage ring BPM system measurements will also be discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  15. An analytical approach for beam loading compensation and excitation of maximum cavity field gradient in a coupled cavity-waveguide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelisani, M. Dayyani; Doebert, S.; Aslaninejad, M.

    2016-08-01

    The critical process of beam loading compensation in high intensity accelerators brings under control the undesired effect of the beam induced fields to the accelerating structures. A new analytical approach for optimizing standing wave accelerating structures is found which is hugely fast and agrees very well with simulations. A perturbative analysis of cavity and waveguide excitation based on the Bethe theorem and normal mode expansion is developed to compensate the beam loading effect and excite the maximum field gradient in the cavity. The method provides the optimum values for the coupling factor and the cavity detuning. While the approach is very accurate and agrees well with simulation software, it massively shortens the calculation time compared with the simulation software.

  16. Negative and positive hysteresis in double-cavity optical bistability in three-level atom

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, H Aswath

    2010-01-01

    We present novel hysteretic behaviour of a three-level ladder atomic system exhibiting double-cavity optical bistability in the mean-field limit. The two fields coupling the atomic system experience feedback via two independent, unidirectional, single mode ring cavities and exhibit cooperative phenomena, simultaneously. The system displays a range of rich dynamical features varying from normal switching to self pulsing and a period-doubling route to chaos for both the fields. We focus our attention to a new hump like feature in the bistable curve arising purely due to cavity induced inversion, which eventually leads to negative hysteresis in the bistable response. This is probably the only all-optical bistable system that exhibits positive as well as negative bistable hysteresis in different input field intensity regimes. For both the fields, the switching times, the associated critical slowing down, the self-pulsing characteristics, and the chaotic behaviour can be controlled to a fair degree, moreover, all ...

  17. Beam positioning stability analysis on large laser facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang; Liu; Zhigang; Liu; Liunian; Zheng; Hongbiao; Huang; Jianqiang; Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Beam positioning stability in a laser-driven inertial confinement fusion(ICF) facility is a vital problem that needs to be fixed. Each laser beam in the facility is transmitted in lots of optics for hundreds of meters, and then targeted in a micro-sized pellet to realize controllable fusion. Any turbulence in the environment in such long-distance propagation would affect the displacement of optics and further result in beam focusing and positioning errors. This study concluded that the errors on each of the optics contributed to the target, and it presents an efficient method of enhancing the beam stability by eliminating errors on error-sensitive optics. Optimizations of the optical system and mechanical supporting structures are also presented.

  18. Position Sensitive Detector Used to Detect Beam Profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Non-destructive diagnostic methods are very important for beam adjustments and monitors,especially when the beam intensity is less than 10~8 pps during the heavy-ion treatment of cancer.Now the diagnostic devices of HIFRL can’t satisfy the requests,so we decide to construct a detecting system of the residual-gas beam profile~([1,2]).The system uses the Position Sensitive Detector(PSD)~([3,4])based on microchannel plate(MCP)to

  19. Position-sensitive ionization detectors for ionizing beams diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing detectors for on-line non-destructive monitoring of the geometric parameters of ionizing beams have been proposed. Such a detector can be used on a beamline with a residual gas pressure of about 10-3-10-6 Torr. It measures the product of ionization of the residual gas by the beam under investigation. An electric field moves the ions through a narrow slit into an analyzer. The analyzer field transforms the energy distribution of the ions into a two-dimensional space distribution on the outer analyzer plane. An Open Image Converter Tube (ICT) with an amplifier consisting of two Micro Channel Plates (MCP) forms an image of the real beam cross-section. This image is registered by a video camera, processed and stored on a computer. The detectors were successfully tested on beams of charged particles with wide energy and intensity ranges and on synchrotron radiation beams. Codes developed give the distribution of the beam density along its cross-section, beam profiles, the position of the center of gravity and its displacement. Statistical processing increases the signal/background ratio more than 10 times, and evaluates the position of the center of gravity with an uncertainty of about 1 μm

  20. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented

  1. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyojae; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok

    2016-02-01

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  2. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyojae, E-mail: lkcom@ibs.re.kr; Jin, Hyunchang; Jang, Ji-Ho; Hong, In-Seok [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described.

  3. Prototyping of beam position monitor for medium energy beam transport section of RAON heavy ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heavy ion accelerator, RAON is going to be built by Rare Isotope Science Project in Korea. Its target is to accelerate various stable ions such as uranium, proton, and xenon from electron cyclotron resonance ion source and some rare isotopes from isotope separation on-line. The beam shaping, charge selection, and modulation should be applied to the ions from these ion sources because RAON adopts a superconducting linear accelerator structure for beam acceleration. For such treatment, low energy beam transport, radio frequency quadrupole, and medium energy beam transport (MEBT) will be installed in injector part of RAON accelerator. Recently, development of a prototype of stripline beam position monitor (BPM) to measure the position of ion beams in MEBT section is under way. In this presentation, design of stripline, electromagnetic (EM) simulation results, and RF measurement test results obtained from the prototyped BPM will be described

  4. Proton Beam Therapy for Unresectable Malignancies of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenda, Sadamoto, E-mail: szenda@east.ncc.go.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Kohno, Ryosuke; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Arahira, Satoko; Nishio, Teiji [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Tahara, Makoto [Division of Gastrointestinal Oncology and Endoscopy, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Hayashi, Ryuichi [Division of Head and Neck Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan); Kishimoto, Seiji [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Ogino, Takashi [Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The cure rate for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is low. Because irradiation with proton beams, which are characterized by their rapid fall-off at the distal end of the Bragg peak and sharp lateral penumbra, depending on energy, depth, and delivery, provide better dose distribution than X-ray irradiation, proton beam therapy (PBT) might improve treatment outcomes for conditions located in proximity to risk organs. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 39 patients in our database fulfilling the following criteria: unresectable malignant tumors of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses or skull base; N0M0 disease; and treatment with PBT (>60 GyE) from January 1999 to December 2006. Results: Median patient age was 57 years (range, 22-84 years); 22 of the patients were men and 17 were women. The most frequent primary site was the nasal cavity (n = 26, 67%). The local control rates at 6 months and 1 year were 84.6% and 77.0%, respectively. With a median active follow-up of 45.4 months, 3-year progression-free and overall survival were 49.1% and 59.3%, respectively. The most common acute toxicities were mild dermatitis (Grade 2, 33.3%), but no severe toxicity was observed (Grade 3 or greater, 0%). Five patients (12.8%) experienced Grade 3 to 5 late toxicities, and one treatment-related death was reported, caused by cerebrospinal fluid leakage Grade 5 (2.6%). Conclusion: These findings suggest that the clinical profile of PBT for unresectable malignancies of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses make it is a promising treatment option.

  5. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashutosh, E-mail: asingh.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in [Faculty of Physical Sciences, Institute of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Lucknow-Deva Road, Uttar Pradesh 225003 (India); Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Jain, P. K. [Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  6. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators

  7. A new digital beam position monitor in SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The newly developed Digital Beam Position Monitor (DBPM) system is introduced. The DBPM system differs with the conventional beam position monitor system in the use of DSP chips and the digital signal processing technology. It can be programmed on-line to select operation modes through EPICS control panel, and to measure various parameters of the third generation synchrotron radiation facility. This DBPM system can be used in the pre-injector LINAC, the transfer lines, the booster synchrotron and the storage ring. The electronic parameters of the DBPM system itself have been measured also.

  8. Design of the AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operational requirements of the AGS Booster Beam Position Monitor system necessitate the use of electronics with wide dynamic range and broad instantaneous bandwidth. Bunch synchronization is provided by a remote timing sequencer coupled to the local ring electronics via digital fiber-optic links. The Sequencer and local ring circuitry work together to provide single turn trajectory or average orbit and intensity information, integrated over 1 to 225 bunches. Test capabilities are built in for the purpose of enhancing BPM system accuracy. This paper describes the design of the Booster Beam Position Monitor electronics, and presents performance details of the front end processing, acquisition and timing circuitry

  9. Improvement of thermo-mechanical position stability of the beam position monitor in PLS-II

    CERN Document Server

    Ha, Taekyun; Kwon, Hyuckchae; Han, Hongsik; Park, Chongdo

    2016-01-01

    In the storage ring of PLS-II, we reduced mechanical displacement of electron beam position monitors (e-BPMs) that is caused by heating during e-beam storage. The orbit feedback system intends that the electron beam pass through the center of the BPM, so to provide stable photon beam into beamlines the BPM pickup itself must be stable to sub-micrometer precision. Thermal deformation of the vacuum chambers on which the BPM pickups are mounted is inevitable when the electron beam current is changed by unintended beam abort. We reduced this deformation by improving the vacuum chamber support and by enhancing the water cooling. We report the thermo-mechanical analysis and displacement measurements of BPM pickups after the improvements.

  10. Spatial profile of laser beam in antiresonant ring cavity: experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabovski, Vitaly V.; Prokhorenko, Valentin I.; Yatskiv, Dmytro Y.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents results of experimental studies of the spatial profile of the beam in lasers with an antiresonant ring. The near-field profile of the beam was measured by the pin-hole technique. In case of the active crystal placed into the ring, the beam profile was found to be Gaussian within a wide range of the pumping power. Variation of the width of the Gaussian profile is caused by the thermal lens in the active crystal. Measurements of the FWHM of the Gaussian profile demonstrated that it is proportional to the one-fourth power of the focal length of the thermal lens, as in the case of a stable cavity.

  11. Beam position monitor system of J-PARC RCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The J-PARC RCS is a 25 Hz Rapid-Cycling proton Synchrotron and its designed beam power is 1 MW. The beam position monitor (BPM) system at J-PARC RCS is described in this paper. The pre-defined diameter of the BPM detectors is larger than 250 mm, however, the system has to measure the beam position very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to have a large dynamic range. The system should work not only for the high intensity but also for low intensity, such as during beam commissioning, when the intensity is below 1% of the design intensity. There are 54 BPM detectors around the ring and most of them are placed inside steering magnets because of quite limited space. The BPM detector is an electro-static type and it has four electrodes, and a pair of electrodes gives a good linear response with a diagonal cut shape to detect the charge center precisely. The signal processing units, which are equipped with 14-bit 40 MS/s ADC and 600 MHz DSP, have been developed. They are accessed via shared memory space and controlled by EPICS. Such a processing unit is capable of recording the full 25 Hz pulse data for the so-called “COD mode” (averaged beam position calculation) and it can also store the whole waveform data for further analysis, like turn-by-turn position calculation. The resolution was estimated to be 20μm for “COD mode” and to be 0.3 mm for the turn-by-turn mode with relatively low intensity of 8×1011ppp. The position accuracy is estimated to be about 0.5 mm using a newly developed Beam Based Alignment (BBA) method.

  12. Strategies for real-time position control of a single atom in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent realizations of single-atom trapping and tracking in cavity QED open the door for feedback schemes which actively stabilize the motion of a single atom in real time. We present feedback algorithms for cooling the radial component of motion for a single atom trapped by strong coupling to single-photon fields in an optical cavity. Performance of various algorithms is studied through simulations of single-atom trajectories, with full dynamical and measurement noise included. Closed loop feedback algorithms compare favourably to open loop 'switching' analogues, demonstrating the importance of applying actual position information in real time. The high optical information rate in current experiments enables real-time tracking that approaches the standard quantum limit for broadband position measurements, suggesting that realistic active feedback schemes may reach a regime where measurement backaction appreciably alters the motional dynamics

  13. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group has been carrying out long-term research work in the general area of Dynamical Systems with a particular emphasis on applications to Accelerator Physics. This work is broadly divided into two tasks: Charged Particle Beam Transport and the Computation of Electromagnetic Fields and Beam-Cavity Interactions. Each of these tasks is described briefly. Work is devoted both to the development of new methods and the application of these methods to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. In addition to its research effort, the Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group is actively engaged in the education of students and postdoctoral research associates

  14. An X-ray method for assessing the tongue position in the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suggested modified technique for assessing the tongue position in the oral cavity is based on teleroentgenography in the lateral projection and estimation of cephalometric parameters. Theoretical rationale is given for the use of skeletal check points in the mandibular area and cervical portion of the spine and of the mandibular and spinal reference lines. Indications for the use of this method are defined and its advantages described

  15. Position-sensitive ionization detectors for ionizing beams diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiev, A N; Mikhailov, V; Rezvov, V; Yudin, L

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing detectors for on-line non-destructive monitoring of the geometric parameters of ionizing beams have been proposed. Such a detector can be used on a beamline with a residual gas pressure of about 10 sup - sup 3 -10 sup - sup 6 Torr. It measures the product of ionization of the residual gas by the beam under investigation. An electric field moves the ions through a narrow slit into an analyzer. The analyzer field transforms the energy distribution of the ions into a two-dimensional space distribution on the outer analyzer plane. An Open Image Converter Tube (ICT) with an amplifier consisting of two Micro Channel Plates (MCP) forms an image of the real beam cross-section. This image is registered by a video camera, processed and stored on a computer. The detectors were successfully tested on beams of charged particles with wide energy and intensity ranges and on synchrotron radiation beams. Codes developed give the distribution of the beam density along its cross-section, beam profiles, the position of ...

  16. A button - type beam position monitor design for TARLA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündoǧan, M. Tural; Kaya, ć.; Yavaş, Ö.

    2016-03-01

    Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory in Ankara (TARLA) facility is proposed as an IR FEL and Bremsstrahlung facility as the first facility of Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC). TARLA is essentially proposed to generate oscillator mode FEL in 3-250 microns wavelengths range, will consist of normal conducting injector system with 250 keV beam energy, two superconducting RF accelerating modules in order to accelerate the beam 15-40 MeV. The TARLA facility is expected to provide two modes, Continuous wave (CW) and pulsed mode. Longitudinal electron bunch length will be changed between 1 and 10 ps. The bunch charge will be limited by 77pC. The design of the Button-type Beam Position Monitor for TARLA IR FEL is studied to operate in 1.3 GHz. Mechanical antenna design and simulations are completed considering electron beam parameters of TARLA. Ansoft HFSS and CST Particle Studio is used to compare with results of simulations.

  17. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  18. Wavelength beam combining of a 980-nm tapered diode laser bar in an external cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup, Birgitte

    2010-04-01

    High power diode lasers are used in a large number of applications. A limiting factor for more widespread use of broad area lasers is the poor beam quality. Gain guided tapered diode lasers are ideal candidates for industrial applications that demands watt level output power with good beam quality. By adapting a bar geometry, the output power could be scaled even up to several tens of watts. Unfortunately, the high divergence which is a characteristic feature of the bar geometry could lead to a degradation of the overall beam quality of the laser bar. However, spectral beam combining is an effective solution for preserving the beam quality of the bar in the range of that of a single emitter and at the same time, enabling the power scaling. We report spectral beam combining applied to a 12 emitter tapered laser bar at 980 nm. The external cavity has been designed for a wavelength separation of 4.0 nm between the emitters. An output power of 9 W has been achieved at an operating current of 30 A. The combined beam had an M2 value (1/e2) of 5.3 along the slow axis which is comparable to that of a single tapered emitter on the laser bar. The overall beam combining efficiency was measured to be 63%. The output spectrum of the individual emitters was narrowed considerably. In the free running mode, the individual emitters displayed a broad spectrum of the order of 0.5-1.0 nm while the spectral width has been reduced to 30-100 pm in the spectral beam combining mode.

  19. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Position and Intensity Measurements (1/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  20. Characterization and modification of the interface of superconducting Nb/Cu cavities by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiofrequency superconducting Nb/Cu cavities for electron beam acceleration are studied in a collaboration between CEA and IN2P3 (CNRS). The quality of superconducting cavity is closely related to the purity of the surface material. In such an aim, carbon and oxygen contaminations at the surface and at the interface of the Nb/Cu device has been measured. Since the niobium film is deposited on copper by magnetron sputtering under argon atmosphere, argon analysis is performed using the resonance in the nuclear reaction Ar40(p,γ)41 K at the proton energy of 1102 keV. In order to simulate the energy deposition occurring during particle acceleration, Nb/Cu samples have been irradiated with a 600 keV argon beam. The element distribution evolution is then followed by RBS and NBS. Ion beam mixing effect in the case of samples with oxygen interface contamination (Nb/Nb + Ox + Cu/Cu) is shown to be enhanced

  1. IBS and expected luminosity performance for RHIC beams at top energy with 56 MHz SRF cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of RF system in RHIC is to capture injected bunches, accelerate them to the top energy, and store bunches at the top energy for many hours. The accelerating RF system operates at harmonic number h=360 of the particle revolution frequency f=78.196 kHz, which corresponds to 28.15MHz. The storage RF system accepts the shortened bunches at top energy and provides longitudinal focusing to keep these bunches short during the store time (collision mode). The storage system operates at harmonic number h=7x360=2520, which corresponds to an RF frequency of 197.05 MHz [1]. Recently, an upgrade of storage RF system with a superconducting 56 MHz cavity was proposed [2]. This upgrade will provide significant increase in the acceptance of storage RF bucket. Presently, the short bunch length for collisions is obtained via RF gymnastics with bunch rotation (called re-bucketing), because the length of 197MHz bucket of 5 nsec is too short to accommodate long bunches otherwise. However, due to bucket non-linearity and hardware complications some increase in the longitudinal emittance occurs during re-bucketing. The 56MHz cavity will produce sufficiently short bunches which would allow one to operate without re-bucketing procedure. This Note summarizes simulation of beam evolution due to Intra-beam scattering (IBS) for beam parameters expected with the 56 MHz SRF cavity upgrade. Expected luminosity improvement is shown both for Au ions at 100 GeV/nucleon and for protons at 250 GeV.

  2. IBS and expected luminosity performance for RHIC beams at top energy with 56 MHz SRF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of RF system in RHIC is to capture injected bunches, accelerate them to the top energy, and store bunches at the top energy for many hours. The accelerating RF system operates at harmonic number h=360 of the particle revolution frequency f=78.196 kHz, which corresponds to 28.15MHz. The storage RF system accepts the shortened bunches at top energy and provides longitudinal focusing to keep these bunches short during the store time (collision mode). The storage system operates at harmonic number h=7x360=2520, which corresponds to an RF frequency of 197.05 MHz (1). Recently, an upgrade of storage RF system with a superconducting 56 MHz cavity was proposed (2). This upgrade will provide significant increase in the acceptance of storage RF bucket. Presently, the short bunch length for collisions is obtained via RF gymnastics with bunch rotation (called re-bucketing), because the length of 197MHz bucket of 5 nsec is too short to accommodate long bunches otherwise. However, due to bucket non-linearity and hardware complications some increase in the longitudinal emittance occurs during re-bucketing. The 56MHz cavity will produce sufficiently short bunches which would allow one to operate without re-bucketing procedure. This Note summarizes simulation of beam evolution due to Intra-beam scattering (IBS) for beam parameters expected with the 56 MHz SRF cavity upgrade. Expected luminosity improvement is shown both for Au ions at 100 GeV/nucleon and for protons at 250 GeV

  3. Beam position dependence of a wall-current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was pointed out recently that there exists an appreciable beam position dependence in the wall-current monitor widely used in electron accelerators. Detailed study of this dependence is performed on a test bench varying the pulse width and the frequency of the input signal simulating the beam. The results of experiments show that when the pulse width becomes shorter more appreciable becomes the dependence, and it approaches to that of calculated from the method of images. A unified analysis is under way. (author)

  4. Effect of tooth position in the oral cavity for various irradiation geometries in dental ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment on the effect of tooth position in oral cavity for various irradiation geometries was performed by using a human head phantom containing 32 permanent teeth. The head phantom was connected with the upper part of Rando phantom and irradiated by 60Co gamma-rays with anteroposterior (AP), posteroanterior (PA) and right lateral (RLAT) geometries. Exposure for AP geometry was about 1290 x 10-4 C/kg (500 R) at the labial side of upper central incisors, while for PA and RLAT geometries the phantom was turned by 180 and 90 degrees, respectively, and irradiated for the same period of time as for AP geometry. Although an established trend on the whole was found, correlation between dose of tooth enamel and its location in the oral cavity was not strong at least for high energy gamma-rays from 60Co (average 1.25 MeV). (author)

  5. A beam position monitor system for electron cooler in HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficient electron cooling requires that the ion beam and electron beam are parallel and overlapped. In order to measure the positions of ion beam and electron beam simultaneously, a beam position monitor system is developed for the HIRFL-CSR electron cooler device, which probe consists of four capacitive cylinder linear-cut poles. One can get the both beam positions from the picking up signals of four poles by using Fourier transform (FFT) method. The measurement results show that the beam position monitor system is accurate. This system is suitable for investigating the relation between electron cooling processing and the angle of ion beam and electron beam. (authors)

  6. Beam Loss Position Monitor Using Cerenkov Radiation in Optical Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Körfer, M

    2005-01-01

    Single pass Free Electron Lasers SASE-FELs are developed for high brightness and short wavelength applications. The VUV-FEL at DESY will reach an average beam power of about 72 kW. To avoid particle losses in the radiation sensitive undulators a collimator system is installed. However, the proper operation of the collimator system needs to be measured with a beam loss monitor. Conventional radiation sensor systems are not suited for the VUV-FEL undulators, because the free space in the undulator gap is less than 1 mm. A Beam Loss Position Monitor (BLPM) based on Cerenkov light in optical fibers allows the monitoring of losses inside the undulator. Electrons with energies above 175 keV generate Cerenkov light during their penetration of the optical fiber. The fast response of the Cerenkov signal is detected with photomultipliers at the end of the irradiated fibers. The beam loss position along the section of interest can be determinate by exploiting the system trigger (bunch clock) of the accelerator system. T...

  7. Determination of Beam Intensity and Position in a Particle Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kasprowicz, Grzegorz

    2010-01-01

    The Proton Synchrotron accelerator (PS), installed at CERN, although commissioned in 1959, still plays a central role in the production of beams for the Antiproton Decelerator, Super Proton Synchrotron, various experimental areas and for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The PS produces beams of different types of particles, mainly protons, but also various species of ions. Almost all these particle beams pass through the PS. The quality of the beams delivered to the LHC has a direct impact on the effective luminosity, and therefore the performance of the instrumentation of the PS is of great importance. The old trajec- tory and orbit measurement system of the PS dated back to 1988 and no longer fulfilled present day requirements. It used 40 beam position monitors (BPMs) and an analogue signal processing chain to acquire the trajectory of one single particle bunch out of many, over two consecutive turns at a maximum rate of once every 5ms. The BPMs were in good condition, however the electronics was aging and ...

  8. Status of the Stripline Beam Position Monitor developement for the CLIC Drive Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, A; Wendt, M; Faus-Golfe, A; Nappa, J M; Vilalte, S; Smith, S

    2013-01-01

    In collaboration with SLAC, LAPP and IFIC, a first prototype of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam and its associated readout electronics has been successfully tested in the CLIC Test Facility linac (CTF3) at CERN. In addition, a modified prototype with downstream terminated striplines is under development to improve the suppression of unwanted RF signal interference. This paper presents the results of the beam tests, and the most relevant aspects for the modified stripline BPM design and its expected improvements.

  9. Beam position monitors for the high brightness lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineering developments associated with the high brightness lattice and the projected change in machine operating parameters will inherently affect the diagnostics systems and devices installed at present in the storage ring. This is particularly true of the beam position monitoring (BPI) system. The new sixteen unit cell lattice with its higher betatron tune values and the limited space available in the redesigned machine straights for fitting standard BPI vessels forces a fundamental re-evaluation of the beam position monitor system. The design aims for the new system are based on accepting the space limitations imposed while still providing the monitor points required to give good radial and vertical closed orbit plots. The locations of BPI's in the redesigned machine straights is illustrated. A description of the new BPI assemblies and their calibration is given. The BPI's use capacitance button type pick-ups; their response is described. (U.K.)

  10. Single Pass Stripline Beam Position Monitor Design, Fabrication and Commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y.-R. E.; Wang, D.; Van Garderen, E.; McKinlay, J.

    2012-10-01

    To monitor the position of the electron beam during transport from the Booster Synchrotron to the Storage Ring at the Australian Synchrotron, a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) has been designed, fabricated and installed in-house. The design was based on an existing stripline in the Booster and modified for the transfer line with a particular emphasis on ensuring the line impedance is properly matched to the detector system. The initial bench tests of a prototype stripline showed that the fabrication of the four individual striplines in the BPM was made precisely, each with a measured standing wave ratio (SWR) of 1.8 at 500 MHz. Further optimization for impedance matching will be done for new stripline BPMs. The linearity and gain factor was measured with the detector system. The detector system that digitizes the signals is an Instrumentation Technologies Brilliance Single Pass [1]. The results show an error of 1 mm at an offset (from the electrical centre) of 10 mm when a linear gain factor is assumed and an RMS noise of ~150 um that decreases to < 10 um with increasing signal intensity. The results were under our requirements for the transport line. The commissioning results of the stripline will also be presented showing a strong signal for an electron beam with an estimated integrated charge of ~50 nC with a position stability of 28 um (horizontal) and 75 um (vertical).

  11. Single Pass Stripline Beam Position Monitor Design, Fabrication and Commissioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKinlay J.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To monitor the position of the electron beam during transport from the Booster Synchrotron to the Storage Ring at the Australian Synchrotron, a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM has been designed, fabricated and installed in-house. The design was based on an existing stripline in the Booster and modified for the transfer line with a particular emphasis on ensuring the line impedance is properly matched to the detector system. The initial bench tests of a prototype stripline showed that the fabrication of the four individual striplines in the BPM was made precisely, each with a measured standing wave ratio (SWR of 1.8 at 500 MHz. Further optimization for impedance matching will be done for new stripline BPMs. The linearity and gain factor was measured with the detector system. The detector system that digitizes the signals is an Instrumentation Technologies Brilliance Single Pass [1]. The results show an error of 1 mm at an offset (from the electrical centre of 10 mm when a linear gain factor is assumed and an RMS noise of ~150 um that decreases to < 10 um with increasing signal intensity. The results were under our requirements for the transport line. The commissioning results of the stripline will also be presented showing a strong signal for an electron beam with an estimated integrated charge of ~50 nC with a position stability of 28 um (horizontal and 75 um (vertical.

  12. Beam position monitors for SuperKEKB damping ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design work for the beam position monitor systems for SuperKEKB damping ring has been performed. The longitudinal and transverse impedance and the signal output of the button electrode with diameter of 6 mm were calculated using 3D electro-magnetic simulation of GdfidL. The estimated growth rate of the coupled-bunch instability was much smaller than the radiation damping rate. A turn-by-turn position detector using Log-Ratio method has also been designed and fabricated based on the estimated signal outputs. (author)

  13. Position sensing with standing wave detection within a passive Fabry-Perot cavity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holá, Miroslava; Hrabina, Jan; Číp, Ondřej; Oulehla, Jindřich; Lazar, Josef

    Budva: University of Montenegro, 2013. s. 148. [ALT´13. Annual International Conference on Advanced Laser Technologies /21./. 16.09.2013-20.09.2013, Budva] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP102/11/P820; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk EE2.4.31.0016; GA TA ČR TA02010711; GA TA ČR TE01020233 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : position sensing * standing wave detection * Fabry-Perot cavity Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  14. Beam Tests of a Prototype Stripline Beam Position Monitoring System for the Drive Beam of the CLIC Two-beam Module at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Benot-Morell, Alfonso; Nappa, Jean-Marc; Vilalte, Sebastien; Wendt, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with LAPP and IFIC, two units of a prototype stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the CLIC Drive Beam (DB), and its associated readout electronics have been successfully installed and tested in the Two-Beam-Module (TBM) at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. This paper gives a short overview of the BPM system and presents the performance measured under different Drive Beam configurations.

  15. Beam-centric algorithm for pretreatment patient position correction in external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In current image guided pretreatment patient position adjustment methods, image registration is used to determine alignment parameters. Since most positioning hardware lacks the full six degrees of freedom (DOF), accuracy is compromised. The authors show that such compromises are often unnecessary when one models the planned treatment beams as part of the adjustment calculation process. The authors present a flexible algorithm for determining optimal realizable adjustments for both step-and-shoot and arc delivery methods. Methods: The beam shape model is based on the polygonal intersection of each beam segment with the plane in pretreatment image volume that passes through machine isocenter perpendicular to the central axis of the beam. Under a virtual six-DOF correction, ideal positions of these polygon vertices are computed. The proposed method determines the couch, gantry, and collimator adjustments that minimize the total mismatch of all vertices over all segments with respect to their ideal positions. Using this geometric error metric as a function of the number of available DOF, the user may select the most desirable correction regime. Results: For a simulated treatment plan consisting of three equally weighted coplanar fixed beams, the authors achieve a 7% residual geometric error (with respect to the ideal correction, considered 0% error) by applying gantry rotation as well as translation and isocentric rotation of the couch. For a clinical head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy plan with seven beams and five segments per beam, the corresponding error is 6%. Correction involving only couch translation (typical clinical practice) leads to a much larger 18% mismatch. Clinically significant consequences of more accurate adjustment are apparent in the dose volume histograms of target and critical structures. Conclusions: The algorithm achieves improvements in delivery accuracy using standard delivery hardware without significantly increasing

  16. The Effect of the Electron-Beam Parameter Spread on Microwave Generation in a Three-Cavity Axial Vircator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnevich, Evgeny; Molchanov, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    The behavior of the generation efficiency and radiation spectrum of a three-cavity axial vircator versus the radius of the injected electron beam, its impedance and energy homogeneity is studied. This paper establishes that for each geometry of a three-cavity resonator, there exist the optimal (maximizing the generation efficiency) values of these parameters and determines the range within which they may vary without losing the efficiency of generation.

  17. The effect of the electron-beam parameter spread on microwave generation in a three-cavity axial vircator

    OpenAIRE

    Gurnevich, E. A.; Molchanov, P. V.

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of the generation efficiency and radiation spectrum of a three-cavity axial vircator versus the radius of the injected electron beam, its impedance and energy homogeneity is studied. This paper establishes that for each geometry of a three-cavity resonator, there exist the optimal (maximizing the generation efficiency) values of these parameters and determines the range within which they may vary without losing the efficiency of generation.

  18. Photonic crystal cavity embedded barium strontium titanate thin-film rib waveguide prepared by focused ion beam etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photonic crystal (PC) cavity embedded Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 (barium strontium titanate, or BST) rib waveguide, which functions as an optical filter at λ = 1550 nm, is designed using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The PC cavity is composed of two 5-row photonic crystal mirrors, which are formed by air holes (radii 250 nm) arranged in triangular lattice (periodicity 625 nm) in the BST matrix. Calculations suggested that the required cavity length should be 800 nm for the resonant peak to be situated at 1550 nm. Based on this design, PC cavities were fabricated on BST thin-film rib waveguides by focused ion beam etching with satisfactory results. The transmission spectra of the BST thin-film rib waveguides with PC cavities have been measured. The results agreed well with the FDTD simulation.

  19. Measurement, analysis and optimization of higher order modes of RF cavities to achieve 200mA/2.5GeV beam in Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher order modes (HOMs) of RF cavities may match with the beam spectrum and generate beam instabilities in a Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS). Optimization of HOMs to suppress these instabilities is essential for the smooth injection, ramping and storage of high beam current in a SRS such as Indus-2. Rigorous measurements and analysis were performed in Indus-2, to identify harmful HOMs at injection energy (550 MeV), during ramping and at 2.5 GeV for different values of beam current. Instabilities due to HOMs also depend upon other machine parameters such as bunch filling pattern, synchrotron tune, betatron tunes etc. These factors were considered during identification and optimization of HOMs. In Indus-2, harmful HOMs are avoided by optimizing the precision chiller temperatures and Higher Order Mode Frequency Shifter (HOMFS) positions of four RF cavities. In this paper, significant observations, theoretical analysis and experimental optimization for avoiding harmful HOMs to achieve 200 mA beam in Indus-2, are presented

  20. First Experiences of Beam Presence Detection Based on Dedicated Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Jalal, A; Gasior, M; Todd, B

    2011-01-01

    High intensity particle beam injection into the LHC is only permitted when a low intensity pilot beam is already circulating in the LHC. This requirement addresses some of the risks associated with high intensity injection, and is enforced by a so-called Beam Presence Flag (BPF) system which is part of the interlock chain between the LHC and its injector complex. For the 2010 LHC run, the detection of the presence of this pilot beam was implemented using the LHC Fast Beam Current Transformer (FBCT) system. However, the primary function of the FBCTs, that is reliable measurement of beam currents, did not allow the BPF system to satisfy all quality requirements of the LHC Machine Protection System (MPS). Safety requirements associated with high intensity injections triggered the development of a dedicated system, based on Beam Position Monitors (BPM). This system was meant to work first in parallel with the FBCT BPF system and eventually replace it. At the end of 2010 and in 2011, this new BP...

  1. Beam position pickup for antiprotons to the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    The Antiproton Project, launched for proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS (SPS collider), had a side-line for p-pbar collisions in the ISR. A new transfer line, TT6, was constructed to transport antiprotons from the 26 GeV PS to the injection line TT1 of ISR ring 2. Antiprotons were a scarce commodity. For setting up the lines, beam diagnostic devices in the antiproton path had to work reliably and precisely with just a few low-intensity pilot pules: single bunches of about 2x10**9 antiprotons every few hours. Electrostatic pickup electrodes were used to measure beam position. They could be mounted for measurement in the horizontal plane, as in this picture, or at 90 deg, for the vertical plane.

  2. A method of correcting the SUPERFISH calculated value of ZT2/Q for cavities with truncated beam tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of an accelerating cavity can be characterized by the values of ZT2/Q for each of the cavity's resonant modes. For cylindrically symmetric structures, the program SUPERFISH can be used to find the field patterns of the azimuthally - invariant (''accelerating'') modes. However, SUPERFISH is limited to lossless regions of space entirely enclosed by Dirichlet or Neumann boundaries i.e., standing-wave solutions, and so cannot correctly treat the physical case of a cavity with open beam tubes through which energy can propagate. Instead, it is necessary to truncate the beam tubes with perfect reflectors, which introduce large amplitude standing-waves in the beam tubes, and consequently large errors in the calculated accelerating voltage and ZT2/Q. In the past, these errors have been avoided by employing long tapered beam tubes. This technique requires a considerable amount of additional computer memory, and cannot be used when memory is at a premium. In this paper, the authors describe a new technique which evaluates the errors in the accelerating voltage due to the truncated beam tubes. The method requires no special geometries or time-consuming calculations, and the results are in excellent agreement with other cavity calculations

  3. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-Ω coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism

  4. Beam position monitor R&D for keV ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Naveed, S; Nosych, A; Søby,L

    2013-01-01

    Beams of cooled antiprotons at keV energies shall be provided by the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at the Facility for Low energy Antiproton and Ion Research (FLAIR) and the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility. Both storage rings put challenging demands on the beam position monitoring (BPM) system as their capacitive pick-ups should be capable of determining the beam position of beams at low intensities and low velocities, close to the noise level of state-of-the-art electronics. In this contribution we describe the design and anticipated performance of BPMs for low-energy ion beams with a focus on the ELENA orbit measurement systems. We also present the particular challenges encountered in the numerical simulation of pickup response at very low beta values. Finally, we provide an outlook on how the implementation of faster algorithms for the simulation of BPM characteristics could potentially help speed up such studies considerably.

  5. Numerical simulation of the PEP-II beam position monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurita, N.; Martin, D.; Ng, C.-K.; Smith, S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Weiland, T.

    1996-08-01

    We use MAFIA to analyze the PEP-II button-type beam position monitor (BPM). Employing proper termination of the BPM into a coaxial cable, the output signal at the BPM is determined. Thus the issues of signal sensitivity and power output can be addressed quantitatively, including all transient effects and wakefields. Besides this first quantitative analysis of a true BPM 3D structure, we find that internal resonant modes are a major source of high value narrow-band impedances. The effects of these resonances on coupled-bunch instabilities are discussed. An estimate of the power dissipation in the ceramic vacuum seal under high current operation is given. (author)

  6. Simulation of PEP-II beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors use MAFIA to analyze the PEP-II button-type beam position monitors (BPMs). Employing proper termination of the BPM into a coaxial cable, the output signal at the BPM can be determined. Thus the issues of sensitivity and power output can be addressed quantitatively, including all transient effects and wakefields. Besides this first quantitative analysis of a true BPM 3D structure, they find that internal resonant modes are a major source of high value narrow-band impedances. These are evaluated and methods are presented to suppress these parasitic resonances below the tolerable limit of multibunch instabilities

  7. Design and Focused Ion Beam Fabrication of Single Crystal Diamond Nanobeam Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Babinec, T M; Smith, K J M; Khan, M; Loncar, M

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and fabrication of nanobeam photonic crystal cavities in single crystal diamond. First, we present three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations of a high quality factor Q ~ 10^6 and small mode volume V ~ 0.5 ({\\lambda}/n)^3 device. Resonance wavelength was designed for 637nm, which corresponds to the zero-phonon line of the Nitrogen-Vacancy defect. Next, we demonstrate two focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication approaches for three-dimensional sculpting of thin diamond membranes and photonic crystal resonators from bulk crystals. These approaches include a diamond crystal "side-etching" procedure as well as an application of the TEM "lift-off" technique. Finally, we discuss certain aspects this technique that are a challenge to the development of high-Q/V resonators.

  8. Collapses of underground cavities and soil-structure interactions: influences of the position of the structure relative to the cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Caudron, Matthieu; Emeriault, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    This paper is focused on soil subsidence of small extend and amplitude caused by tunnel boring or the collapse of underground cavities, whether natural or man-made. The impact of the movements of the ground on existing structures is generally dramatic. It is therefore necessary to accurately predict these movements (settlements and horizontal extension or compression displacements). Even though it is obvious that the overall stiffness and weight of the structure influences the size and shape of the soil movement, the main features of this soil-structure interaction phenomenon are not well established. Caudron et al. (2006) developed an original small-scale physical model to take the soil-structure interaction into account. It is based on the use of the frictional Schneebeli material (assembly of small diameter rods) and a modified version including cohesion in order to reproduce a cohesive layer above a cavity. The displacements of the soil are obtained from digital images processing by particle image velocim...

  9. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  10. A unified approach to global and local beam position feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will implement both global and local beam position feedback systems to stabilize the particle and X-ray beams for the storage ring. The global feedback system uses 40 BPMs and 40 correctors per plane. Singular value decomposition (SVD) of the response matrix is used for closed orbit correction. The local feedback system uses two X-ray BPMS, two rf BPMS, and the four-magnet local bump to control the angle and displacement of the X-ray beam from a bending magnet or an insertion device. Both the global and local feedback systems are based on digital signal processing (DSP) running at 4-kHz sampling rate with a proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) control algorithm. In this paper, we will discuss resolution of the conflict among multiple local feedback systems due to local bump closure error and decoupling of the global and local feedback systems to maximize correction efficiency. In this scheme, the global feedback system absorbs the local bump closure error and the local feedback systems compensate for the effect of global feedback on the local beamlines. The required data sharing between the global and local feedback systems is done through the fiber-optically networked reflective memory

  11. Capacitive beam position monitors for the low-β beam of the Chinese ADS proton linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Wu, Jun-Xia; Zhu, Guang-Yu; Jia, Huan; Xue, Zong-Heng; Zheng, Hai; Xie, Hong-Ming; Kang, Xin-Cai; He, Yuan; Li, Lin; Denard, Jean Claude

    2016-02-01

    Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) for the low-β beam of the Chinese Accelerator Driven Subcritical system (CADS) Proton linac are of the capacitive pick-up type. They provide higher output signals than that of the inductive type. This paper will describe the design and tests of the capacitive BPM system for the low-β proton linac, including the pick-ups, the test bench and the read-out electronics. The tests done with an actual proton beam show a good agreement between the measurements and the simulations in the time domain. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405240) and “Western Light” Talents Training Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  12. Design and multipacting study of a beta=1, frequency 1050 MHz RF superconducting elliptical cavity for proton beam linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype single cell elliptical cavity of β=1 at 1050 MHz frequency has been designed for proton beam linac. Cavity shape has been optimized using two dimensional cavity tuning program 'Ellfish' of the 'Poisson Superfish' code. For various dimensions of the cavity, peak electric (Epk) and magnetic fields (Bpk), power dissipation (Ps), Quality factor (Q), effective shunt impedance (ZT2) etc were calculated and compared. Once the design parameters of the cavity has been optimised and fixed the electromagnetic field of the cavity was calculated using a finite element based code 'FEMLAB' and 3D high frequency simulation code CST Microwave studio. The results obtained from different codes are compared. The multipacting analysis of the newly designed cavity has been done using an in-house finite element based code employing leap frog method. The multipacting analysis has been done for several field levels up to 40 MV/m. The new structure is found out to be not multipacting prone for all these levels. (author)

  13. Results of beam based gain calibration for beam position monitor at J-PARC Main Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is one of the essential elements in a synchrotron facility, obtaining the circulating beam information for stabilization of the closed orbit. The accuracy of beam positions greatly affects the orbit stabilization, however, actual signal strength from a BPM depends on individuality such as 1) signal transmission for a long distance, 2) processing circuit, and 3) contact resistance at the connected parts, etc. These things cause deviations in the gain of the signal response. The gains are different from each other even in one BPM. In order to correct this relative gain deviations between electrodes, a Beam Based Gain Calibration (BBGC) method has been proposed. Development of a new method for adequate gain calibration has been an urgent issue for J-PARC Main Ring. It has been found that an analysis using Total Least Square fitting (TLS) adequately reproduces the BPM gain with sufficient accuracy. The gains obtained from the data are varied in the range of less than ±5%, and the accuracy is within ±0.6%. (author)

  14. Generation of radially and azimuthally polarized beams in Yb:YAG laser with intra-cavity lens and birefringent crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanasambandam, Manasadevi P; Senatsky, Yuri; Ueda, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-31

    We demonstrated the operation of cw diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser in radial or azimuthal polarized (RP or AP) beams using a combination of birefringent uniaxial crystal (c-cut YVO4 or α-BBO) and lens as intra-cavity elements. RP and AP doughnut modes (M2 = 2-2.5, polarization extinction ratio 50-100:1) with output power up to 60 mW were generated. Apart from doughnut modes, RP or AP ring-like off-axis oscillations and multi-ring beams with mixed RP and AP were also observed at the output of this laser scheme. Using intra-cavity short focus lenses with spherical aberrations AP or RP modes of higher orders was obtained. Mechanism of mode selection in the laser is discussed. The large variety of beams with axially symmetric polarizations from the output of the proposed laser scheme may find applications in different fields. PMID:21369005

  15. X-ray trace element analysis with positive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new trace element analysis having the advantage that many elements may be detected in a single measurement, based on positive charged particle induced X-ray florescence and on the production of X-rays by heavy ions, is described. Because of the large cross-sections for the production of discrete X-ray and the low yield of continuum radiation, positive charged particle X-ray florescence is a competitive, fast, analytic tool. In the experiment a beam of positive charged particles from an accelerator was directed toward a target. X-rays induced by the bombardment were detected by a Si(Li) detector the ouput from which was amplified and sorted in a multichannel analyzer. For rapid data handling and analysis, the multichannel analyzer or ADC unit was connected to an on-line computer. A large variety of targets prepared in collaboration with the oceanographers have been studied and spectra obtained for different particles having the same velocity are presented to show that the yield of discrete X-rays increases at least as rapidly as Z2. While protons of several MeV appear to be already competitive further advantage may be gained by heavy ions at lower energies since the continuum is reduced while the peak ''signals'' retain strength due to the Z2 dependence. (S.B.)

  16. A Novel Micro- and Nano-Scale Positioning Sensor Based on Radio Frequency Resonant Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibaliz Asua

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In many micro- and nano-scale technological applications high sensitivity displacement sensors are needed, especially in ultraprecision metrology and manufacturing. In this work a new way of sensing displacement based on radio frequency resonant cavities is presented and experimentally demonstrated using a first laboratory prototype. The principle of operation of the new transducer is summarized and tested. Furthermore, an electronic interface that can be used together with the displacement transducer is designed and proved. It has been experimentally demonstrated that very high and linear sensitivity characteristic curves, in the range of some kHz/nm; are easily obtainable using this kind of transducer when it is combined with a laboratory network analyzer. In order to replace a network analyzer and provide a more affordable, self-contained, compact solution, an electronic interface has been designed, preserving as much as possible the excellent performance of the transducer, and turning it into a true standalone positioning sensor. The results obtained using the transducer together with a first prototype of the electronic interface built with cheap discrete elements show that positioning accuracies in the micrometer range are obtainable using this cost-effective solution. Better accuracies would also be attainable but using more involved and costly electronics interfaces.

  17. ROBUST POSITIONING OF LASER BEAMS USING PROPORTIONAL INTEGRAL DERIVATIVE AND BASED OBSERVER-FEEDBACK CONTROL

    OpenAIRE

    Kwabena A. Konadu; Sun Yi; Wonchang Choi; Taher Abu-Lebdeh

    2013-01-01

    High-precision positioning of laser beams has been a great challenge in industry due to inevitable existence of noise and disturbance. The work presented in this study addresses this problem by employing two different control strategies: Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) control and state feedback control with an observer. The control strategies are intended to stabilize the position of a laser beam on a Position Sensing Device (PSD) located on a Laser Beam Stabilization (or, laser beam ...

  18. Transient counter-beam propagation in a nonlinear Fabry-Perot cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, F. P.; Moretti, G.; Franceour, R. E.

    1981-06-01

    By adapting Moretti's self-consistent numerical approach to integrating the Euler equation of compressible flow, a unified complete temporal and spatial description of superfluorescence and optical bi-stability was undertaken. (The simulation includes material initialization as well as refractive transverse and longitudinal field boundary conditions appropriate to the cylindrical laser cavity). The respecting of physical causality in Moretti's method was maintained; but by using an improved derivative estimator at both the predictor and corrector levels, the overall accuracy was improved. The physical model includes nonplanar two-way Maxwell-Bloch propagation with spontaneous sources. The problem of dynamic transverse effects as they relate to soliton collisions is addressed. The calculations are based upon an extension of Mattar's previous semi-classical model for diffraction and phase effects in self-induced transparency at thick optical absorptions. The computational algorithm relies on the use of characteristics, but is strictly a finite-difference scheme. This explicit scheme involves the simultaneous integration along the time coordinate for both forward and backward wave. However, directional derivatives must be considered to appropriately take into account the mutual influence of the two light beams without violating the laws of forbidden signals. Particular case is exercised to maintain at least a second-order accuracy using one-sided approximations to spatial derivatives. Each forward/backward field derivative will be related to its respective directional history. A numerical approach in which the discretization is not consistent with these physical facts will inevitably fail. Thus the numerical algorithm must discriminate between different domains of dependence of different physical parameters. The physical process can now be analyzed with a degree of realism not previously attainable. Significant agreement with experimental observations is reported from

  19. Transmissive x-ray beam position monitors with submicron position- and submillisecond time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Martin R.; Holldack, Karsten; Bullough, Mark; Walsh, Susanne; Wilburn, Colin; Erko, Alexei; Schäfers, Franz; Mueller, Uwe

    2008-06-01

    We present the development of fast transmissive center-of-mass x-ray beam position monitors with a large active area, based on a thinned position sensitive detector in both a duo- and a tetra-lateral variant. The detectors were tested at BESSY beamlines BL14.1, KMC-1, and KMC-2 and yielded signal currents of up to 3μA/100mA ring current at 10keV photon energy using the monochromatic focused beam of BL14.1. The active area sizes were 1×1 and 3×3mm2 for the duo-lateral and 5×5mm2 for the tetra-lateral devices, with the duo-lateral detectors currently being available in sizes from 1×1to10×10mm2 and thicknesses between 5 and 10μm. The presented detectors' thicknesses were measured to be 5 and 8μm with a corresponding transmission of up to 93% at 10keV and 15% at 2.5keV. Up to a detection bandwidth of 10kHz, the monitors provide submicron position resolution. For lower detection bandwidths, the signal-to-noise reaches values of up to 6×104 at 10Hz, corresponding to a position resolution of better than 50nm for both detector sizes. As it stands, this monitor design approach promises to be a generic solution for automation of state-of-the-art crystal monochromator beamlines.

  20. Beam position stability in INDUS-2 storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reach the high brightness objective of INDUS-2, one has to design a strong focusing optics where the beam emittance together with beam sizes at the insertion device must be very low. It is thus necessary to study the series noise sources-magnet-closed orbit distortion (COD) motion beam size and emittance variations

  1. Active vibration control of clamped beams using positive position feedback controllers with moment pair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the active vibration control of clamp beams using positive position feedback (PPF) controllers with a sensor/ moment pair actuator. The sensor/moment pair actuator which is the non-collocated configuration leads to instability of the control system when using the direct velocity feedback (DVFB) control. To alleviate the instability problem, a PPF controller is considered in this paper. A parametric study of the control system with PPF controller is first conducted to characterize the effects of the design parameters (gain and damping ratio in this paper) on the stability and performance. The gain of the controller is found to affect only the relative stability. Increasing the damping ratio of the controller slightly improves the stability condition while the performance gets worse. In addition, the higher mode tuned PPF controller affects the system response at the lower modes significantly. Based on the characteristics of PPF controllers, a multi-mode controllable SISO PPF controller is then considered and tuned to different modes (in this case, three lowest modes) numerically and experimentally. The multi-mode PPF controller can be achieved to have a high gain margin. Moreover, it reduces the vibration of the beam significantly. The vibration levels at the tuned modes are reduced by about 11 dB

  2. Determination of intensity and position of the extracted electron beam at ELSA by means of high-frequency resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron stretcher facility ELSA provides an electron beam of a few hundred pA used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons probing the nucleon structure in a detector setup. For the correct interpretation of the events registered, the persistence of the beam position over time is crucial. Its continuous monitoring has been enabled by setting up a measurement system based on resonant cavities. Position signals at a frequency of 1.5 GHz and below one aW of power can be abstracted from the beam without degrading its quality. After frequency down-conversion to a few kHz, a narrow bandwidth detection performed by lock-in amplifiers separates them from noise. A maximum sample rate of 9 Hz and a resolution of one tenth of a millimeter could be achieved. The position signals have to be normalized to the beam current which is monitored by another dedicated resonator. The measurement precision down to a few pA allows for the accelerator extraction mechanism to be controlled by a feedback loop in order to obtain the respective requested current. (orig.)

  3. Initial work on electron beam welding of 1.3 GHz single cell prototype cavity and their process validation efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RRCAT has initiated the development of 1.3 GHz (TESLA shape) Superconducting (SC) single cell cavity. In this paper we present the development effort in electron beam (EB) welding and process validation efforts done during prototype development. Niobium being expensive material, initial efforts have been made to go through the complete manufacturing cycle using dummy (aluminum) material. We will present manufacturing of rolled beam pipe with the help of dedicated precision tube rolling machine, development of welding fixtures and EB welding of prototype single cell aluminium cavity using industry support. Development of various welding parameters and weld shrinkage estimation is also described. In order to prepare qualification procedure, frequency of half-cell was measured before and after EB welding to know the frequency shift associated with weld shrinkage. We will also report the frequency simulation done using ANSYS for different stages of single cell cavity manufacturing. Further our plans to manufacture and test single cell cavity in Niobium (Nb) in association with Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi are also presented. (author)

  4. Positioning variation analysis using Cone Beam Computed Tomography volumetric images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the main treatment modalities of malignancies, either associated with other techniques or not. The successful use of radiation depends on several factors, such as the choice of treatment technique, dosimetric accuracy and geometric precision. The movement of internal organs plays a role quite significant in the calculation of setup margins, but during treatment, the most important variation is the patient’s positioning error. This study evaluated the geometric accuracy in positioning patients with anal canal, prostate, and head and neck cancer, who were treated at ICESP. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) images of 40 patients were used, totalizing 224 images. For every CBCT image, the displacement was calculated through the fusion between the images acquired before the treatment and CT images obtained in the simulation.The average deviation was 0.24±0.10 cm to the left-right direction, 0.21±0.12 cm in the anterior-posterior and 0.30±0.18 cm in the superior-inferior direction for cases of anal canal; 0.20±0.10 cm in the left-right, 0.20±0.10 cm in the anterior-posterior and 0.23±0.11 cm in superior-inferior direction for prostate treatments; and 0.11±0.07 cm in the left-right, 0.13±0.06 cm in the anterior-posterior and 0.15±0.10 cm in superior-inferior direction for the treatment of head and neck. The results found were within the predicted PTV margins used at the Institution. (author)

  5. Passive cavity laser and tilted wave laser for Bessel-like beam coherently coupled bars and stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Maximov, M. V.; Gordeev, N. Y.; Kaluzhniy, N. A.; Mintairov, S. A.; Payusov, A. S.; Shernyakov, Yu. M.; Vashanova, K. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Schmidt, N. Y.

    2015-03-01

    Ultralarge output apertures of semiconductor gain chips facilitate novel applications that require efficient feedback of the reflected laser light. Thick (10-30 μm) and ultrabroad (>1000 μm) waveguides are suitable for coherent coupling through both near-field of the neighboring stripes in a laser bar and by applying external cavities. As a result direct laser diodes may become suitable as high-power high-brightness coherent light sources. Passive cavity laser is based on the idea of placing the active media outside of the main waveguide, for example in the cladding layers attached to the waveguide, or, as in the case of the Tilted Wave Laser (TWL) in a thin waveguide coupled to the neighboring thick waveguide wherein most of the field intensity is localized in the broad waveguide. Multimode or a single vertical mode lasing is possible depending on the coupling efficiency. We demonstrate that 1060 nm GaAs/GaAlAs-based Tilted Wave Lasers (TWL) show wall-plug efficiency up to ~55% with the power concentrated in the two symmetric vertical beams having a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 2 degrees each. Bars with pitch sizes in the range of 25-400 μm are studied and coherent operation of the bars is manifested with the lateral far field lobes as narrow as 0.1° FWHM. As the near field of such lasers in the vertical direction represents a strongly modulated highly periodic pattern of intensity maxima such lasers or laser arrays generate Bessel-type beams. These beams are focusable similar to the case of Gaussian beams. However, opposite to the Gaussian beams, such beams are self-healing and quasi non-divergent. Previously Bessel beams were generated using Gaussian beams in combination with an axicon lens or a Fresnel biprism. A new approach does not involve such complexity and a novel generation of laser diodes evolves.

  6. An on-line data acquisition system of oscilloscope-embedded input/output controller for cavity BPM measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is widely used in a precise electron beam position measurement. Based on high performance oscilloscope-embedded EPICS input/output controller, we developed an on-line cavity BPM signal processing system for fast data acquisition solution when designing a cavity BPM. Also, methods for extracting the position information from cavity pickup signals and calibration algorithm are included in this solution. (authors)

  7. Power beams and their comparative positioning in advanced materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power Beam Technology covering laser, electron and plasma beams belongs to a class of novel manufacturing techniques. Availability of high power density in localized area along with flexible-controllability of the process makes them attractive for material processing applications. The use of power beams in cutting, welding and melting has been known for over five decades. However, it is only recently that the use of power beams in non-thermal and non-equilibrium processing is emerging as an area of active interest. This paper addresses some of the issues related to the underlying principles of power beams, the comparative strengths and weaknesses of the different techniques and their implementation in processing environment. (author)

  8. Calibration of an Advanced Photon Source linac beam position monitor used for positron position measurement of a beam containing both positrons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac beam position monitors can be used to monitor the position of a positron beam also containing electrons. To accomplish this task, both the signal at the bunching frequency of 2856 MHz and the signal at 2 x 2856 MHz are acquired and processed for each stripline. The positron beam position is obtained by forming a linear combination of both 2856- and 5712-MHz signals for each stripline and then performing the standard difference over sum computation. The required linear combination of the 2856- and 5712-MHz signals depends on the electrical calibration of each stripline/cable combination. In this paper, the calibration constants for both 2856-MHz and 5712-MHz signals for each stripline are determined using a pure beam of electrons. The calibration constants are obtained by measuring the 2856- and 5712-MHz stripline signals at various electron beam currents and positions. Finally, the calibration constants measured using electrons are used to determine positron beam position for the mixed beam case

  9. A bench measurement of the energy loss of a stored beam to a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rather simple electronic bench experiment is proposed for obtaining a measure of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch of an rf cavity or other vacuum-chamber structure---the so-called ''cavity radiation.'' The proposed method is analyzed in some detail. 2 refs., 4 figs

  10. A Bench Measurement of the Energy Loss of a Stored Beam to a Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, M.; Rees, John R.; /SLAC

    2005-08-08

    A rather simple electronic bench experiment is proposed for obtaining a measure of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to an rf cavity or other vacuum-chamber structure--the so-called ''cavity radiation''. The proposed method is analyzed in some detail.

  11. Development of capacitive beam position, beam current and Schottky-signal monitors for the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis novel techniques based on capacitive pickups for the determination of the beam current, the beam position and the Schottky-signal in storage rings have been developed. Beam current measurements at the heavy ion storage ring TSR with a capacitive pickup have been found in very good agreement with the theory. Using this device the accurate measurement of beam currents at the TSR far below 1 μA is now possible. This method will also be used at the Cryogenic Storage Ring (CSR) at which beam currents in the range of 1 nA-1 μA are expected. For the first time, position measurements with a resonant amplifier system for capacitive pickups have been examined at the TSR for later use of this technique in the CSR. With this method an increased signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved using a parallel inductance. A comparison with measurements using the rest gas beam profile monitor has shown very good agreement even at very low intensities. Experiments with the cryo-capable electronics for the CSR beam position monitors have shown an achievable quality factor of Q=500, resulting in the prospect of precise position measurements at the CSR even at very low beam currents. The CSR Schottky-Pickup will also be equipped with a resonant amplifier system with a comparable quality factor. An estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio suggests a detection limit of a few protons. (orig.)

  12. Beam position measurement in the CEBAF recirculating linacs by use of pseudorandom pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recirculating linear accelerator at CEBAF presents unique problems in beam position measurement. As many as five beams with different energies may be simultaneously in the linac. Modulation of the beam intensity by pseudorandom pulse sequences offers a simple, effective method for distinguishing between the individual beamlets

  13. Numerical investigation of effect of the position of the cylinder on solidification in a rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertelli, Ahmet; Günhan, Gökhan; Buyruk, Ertan

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, it is aimed to calculate the effect of ice formation on different cylinder geometries placed in a rectangular cavity filled with water. For this aim Fluent package program was used to solve the flow domain numerically and temperature distribution and ice formation depending on time were illustrated. Water temperature in the cavity and cylinder surface temperature were assumed as 4, 8 and -10 °C respectively and firstly temperature distribution, velocity vector, liquid fraction and ratio of Ai/Ac (formed ice area/cross sectional area of cylinder) were determined for cylinders with different placement in fixed volume.

  14. Superharp: A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superharp is an upgrade CEBAF wire scanner with absolute position readout from shaft encoder. As high precision absolute beam position probe (Δx ∼ 10μm), three pairs of superharps are installed at the entrance, the mid-point, and the exit of Hall C arc beamline in beam switch yard, which will be tuned in dispersive mode as energy spectrometer performing 10-3 beam energy measurement. With dual sensor system: the direct current pickup and the bremsstrahlung detection electronics, beam profile can be obtained by superharp at wide beam current range from 1 μA to 100 μA

  15. LogAmp electronics and Optical Transmission for the new SPS Beam Position Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Gonzalez, J L; Savioz, J J

    2013-01-01

    A new front-end board is under development for the CERN SPS Multi ORbit Position System (MOPOS). Based on logarithmic amplifiers, it measures the beam position over a large dynamic range of beam intensities and resolves the multi-batch structure of the SPS beams. Analogue data are digitized at 10 MS/s, packed in frames by an FPGA and on every turn sent to the readout board, via a 2.4 Gb/s optical transmission link. A first prototype has been successfully tested with several SPS beams. This paper presents an overall description of the system and its capabilities highlighted by the first beam measurements.

  16. A state variable approach to the BESSY II local beam-position-feedback system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Khan, S.; Kraemer, D. [BESSY II, Berlin (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    At the BESSY II facility, stability of the electron beam position and angle near insertion devices (IDs) is of utmost importance. Disturbances due to ground motion could result in unwanted broad-bandwidth beam-jitter which decreases the electron (and resultant photon) beam`s effective brightness. Therefore, feedback techniques must be used. Operating over a frequency range of < 1- to > 100-Hz, a local feedback system will correct these beam-trajectory errors using the four bumps around IDs. This paper reviews how the state-variable feedback approach can be applied to real-time correction of these beam position and angle errors. A frequency-domain solution showing beam jitter reduction is presented. Finally, this paper reports results of a beam-feedback test at BESSY I.

  17. A Resonant Cavity for Single-Shot Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J S; Whittum, D H; Miller, R H; Tantawi, S G; Weidemann, A W

    2002-01-01

    We present a non-invasive, resonant cavity based approach to beam emittance measurement of a shot-to-shot non-circular beam pulse of multi-bunches. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to Q_L_lambda/pi, where Q_L_lambda is the loaded Q of the resonance mode lambda, when the cavity resonant mode matches with the beam operating frequency. In particular, a Quad-cavity, with its quadrupole mode at beam operating frequency, extracts the beam quad-moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system, allow us to determine the beam emittance, i.e., the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space. One measurement alone provides the rms-beam size if the beam position is given, for instance, by nearby beam-position-monitors. This paper describes the basic design and analysis of a Quad-cavity beam monitoring system.

  18. Development of photon beam position feedback system based on two PBPMs at HLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, in order to stabilize the position and angle of the light source point, a new photon beam position feedback system based on the Photon Beam Position Monitors was developed on Hefei Light Source, and used to correct the position drift and angle variation of the light source at the same time. On introducing the feedback principle, the transfer function matrix is calibrated, indicating that the new system is workable and effective. (authors)

  19. Molecular beam epitaxial regrowth on diffraction gratings for vertical-cavity, surface-emitting laser-based integrated optoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epitaxial regrowth techniques, using molecular beam epitaxy, were optimized for the inclusion of submicron diffraction gratings within a vertically resonant structure. Various growth conditions including chemical surface preparation, growth rate, and regrown interfacial structure were studied to determine the quality of the regrown materials and structures. Characteristics such as dislocation density and growth planarity (flatness of the regrown layers) were of particular importance due to the vertical geometry and resonance requirements of the structure. Threading dislocation densities of ≅3x106 cm-2 were measured, by means of transmission electron microscopy, in the regrown structures using optimized regrowth processes. Layer thickness variations, due to growth on nonplanar surfaces (diffraction gratings), were characterized using modeling and optical reflectometry. With these results, inclusion of diffraction gratings has been demonstrated with the accurate control over layer thickness needed for use in vertically oriented devices such as vertical-cavity, surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors

  20. Multiharmonic rf feedforward system for compensation of beam loading and periodic transient effects in magnetic-alloy cavities of a proton synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Ohmori, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito; Schnase, Alexander; Nomura, Masahiro; Toda, Makoto; Shimada, Taihei; Hasegawa, Katsushi; Hara, Keigo

    2013-05-01

    Beam loading compensation is a key for acceleration of a high intensity proton beam in the main ring (MR) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Magnetic alloy loaded rf cavities with a Q value of 22 are used to achieve high accelerating voltages without a tuning bias loop. The cavity is driven by a single harmonic (h=9) rf signal while the cavity frequency response also covers the neighbor harmonics (h=8,10). Therefore the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam consists of the three harmonics, h=8,9,10. The beam loading of neighbor harmonics is the source of periodic transient effects and a possible source of coupled bunch instabilities. In the article, we analyze the wake voltage induced by the high intensity beam. We employ the rf feedforward method to compensate the beam loading of these three harmonics (h=8,9,10). The full-digital multiharmonic feedforward system was developed for the MR. We describe the system architecture and the commissioning methodology of the feedforward patterns. The commissioning of the feedforward system has been performed by using high intensity beams with 1.0×1014 proteins per pulse. The impedance seen by the beam is successfully reduced and the longitudinal oscillations due to the beam loading are reduced. By the beam loading compensation, stable high power beam operation is achieved. We also report the reduction of the momentum loss during the debunching process for the slow extraction by the feedforward.

  1. Single- and multi-beam confinement of electromagnetic waves in a photonic crystal open cavity providing rapid heating and high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogesh, N.; Yu, Quanqiang; Ouyang, Zhengbiao

    2015-06-01

    Light is the best energy source for heating substances. As an attempt to utilize light energy, we demonstrate the single- and multi-beam confinement of electromagnetic (EM) waves in an open cavity formed by one-dimensional photonic crystals for efficient heat conversion. The multilayer cavity confines electromagnetic waves at near-band-edge frequencies uniquely. We use this confinement to heat substances under normal and oblique incident radiations. We perform electromagnetic thermal co-simulation to demonstrate the functionality of rapid heating under single- and multi-beam excitations of EM waves. The cavity shows a rapid heating rate of 4 °C/s for a nominal input power of 850 W under single-beam excitation. The demonstration of multi-beam (four beams) confinement in the proposed cavity reveals ultra-high temperatures at the rate of 560 °C/s for the input electric field strength of 1000 V/m. The role of strong perturbation in heat conversion task is studied with respect to various substances. Finally, we have demonstrated the heating effect under oblique incidence of weak EM radiations so that the proposed cavity can avail the utilization of natural radiation for better green life. The proposed multilayer cavity is anticipated for laser heating, creation of plasmas and renewable energy sources.

  2. Construction and measurement techniques for the APS LEUTL project RF beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design, construction, and assembly procedure of 24 rf beam position monitors used in the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line and linear accelerator (linac) are described. Beam stability as well as beam positioning capabilities are essential to the LEUTL project. A design objective of the LEUTL facility is to achieve better than 1- microm resolution. The highest care was used in the mechanical fabrication and assembly of the BPM units. The latest experimental results using these BPMs are presented

  3. A state variable approach to the BESSY II local beam-position-feedback system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the BESSY II facility, stability of the electron beam position and angle near insertion devices (IDs) is of utmost importance. Disturbances due to ground motion could result in unwanted broad-bandwidth beam-jitter which decreases the electron (and resultant photon) beam's effective brightness. Therefore, feedback techniques must be used. Operating over a frequency range of 100-Hz, a local feedback system will correct these beam-trajectory errors using the four bumps around IDs. This paper reviews how the state-variable feedback approach can be applied to real-time correction of these beam position and angle errors. A frequency-domain solution showing beam jitter reduction is presented. Finally, this paper reports results of a beam-feedback test at BESSY I

  4. Advanced methods for the computation of particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Progress report, July 1993--August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Maryland Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group has been carrying out long-term research work in the general area of Dynamical Systems with a particular emphasis on applications to Accelerator Physics. This work is broadly divided into two tasks: the computation of charged particle beam transport and the computation of electromagnetic fields and beam-cavity interactions. Each of these tasks is described briefly. Work is devoted both to the development of new methods and the application of these methods to problems of current interest in accelerator physics including the theoretical performance of present and proposed high energy machines. In addition to its research effort, the Dynamical Systems and Accelerator Theory Group is actively engaged in the education of students and postdoctoral research associates. Substantial progress in research has been made during the past year. These achievements are summarized in the following report

  5. LHC Collimators with Embedded Beam Position Monitors: a New Adbanced Mechanical Design

    CERN Document Server

    Dallocchio, A; Boccard, C; Carra, F; Gasior, M; Gentini, L; Timmins, M

    2011-01-01

    The LHC collimation system, ensuring both functions of beam cleaning and machine protection, is potentially submitted to high-energy beam impacts. Currently the collimators setup is performed by monitoring beam losses generated by the collimator jaws when approaching the particle beam. This procedure is applied to all LHC collimators (almost one hundred), taking several hours, and needs to be repeated if beam settings change significantly. Furthermore, during the beam-based alignment, the LHC tertiary collimators are potentially exposed to abnormal losses entailing possible damage to their tungsten jaws. To improve the efficiency of the machine operation and better control the particle beam a new advanced design embedding Beam Position Monitors (BPM) into the movable collimator jaws has been developed. This paper describes the mechanical design of various types of future collimators with embedded BPMs. Experimental measurements performed on a simplified functional prototype installed in the CERN SPS showed th...

  6. Analytical characterization of fundamental mode in pillbox cavities with beam pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Zeng, J.

    2000-09-01

    Pillbox cavities were treated analytically using matching technique and `port approximation' approach based on expansion of the fields in terms of evanescent modes for transient and drift regions. For most cases of practical interest the simple model gives high accuracy for resonant frequency, shunt impedance, quality factor and transit-time factor. The model demonstrates agreement with computations done with the well-known 2D and 3D codes Superfish and GdfidL for cylindrical and rectangular cavities. A detailed comparison of the results is given for these two different configurations in a wide range of geometry dimensions. The model can be used for fast analysis of cavities for klystron amplifiers or accelerating structures and extended to calculate loss-factors in a frequency domain.

  7. Analytical characterization of fundamental mode in pillbox cavities with beam pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A V

    2000-01-01

    Pillbox cavities were treated analytically using matching technique and 'port approximation' approach based on expansion of the fields in terms of evanescent modes for transient and drift regions. For most cases of practical interest the simple model gives high accuracy for resonant frequency, shunt impedance, quality factor and transit-time factor. The model demonstrates agreement with computations done with the well-known 2D and 3D codes Superfish and GdfidL for cylindrical and rectangular cavities. A detailed comparison of the results is given for these two different configurations in a wide range of geometry dimensions. The model can be used for fast analysis of cavities for klystron amplifiers or accelerating structures and extended to calculate loss-factors in a frequency domain. (authors)

  8. SQUID-based beam position monitoring for proton EDM experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haciomeroglu, Selcuk

    2014-09-01

    One of the major systematic errors in the proton EDM experiment is the radial B-field, since it couples the magnetic dipole moment and causes a vertical spin precession. For a proton with EDM at the level of 10-29 e.cm, 0.22 pG of B-field and 10.5 MV/m of E-field cause same vertical spin precession. On the other hand, the radial B-field splits the counter-rotating beams depending on the vertical focusing strength in the ring The magnetic field due to this split modulated at a few kHz can be measured by a SQUID-magnetometer. This measurement requires the B-field to be kept less than 1 nT everywhere around the ring using shields of mu-metal and aluminum layers. Then, the SQUID measurements involve noise from three sources: outside the shields, the shields themselves and the beam. We study these three sources of noise using an electric circuit (mimicking the beam) inside a magnetic shielding room which consists two-layers of mu-metal and an aluminum layer.

  9. Parallel Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulations of Space-charge Dominated Beam-Cavity Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.E.; Kabel, A.C.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Ng, C.K.; Prudencio, E.E.; Schussman, G.L.; Uplenchwar, R.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel finite element (FE) particle-in-cell code Pic3P (Pic2P) for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space-charge effects. As opposed to standard space-charge dominated beam transport codes, which are based on the electrostatic approximation, Pic3P (Pic2P) includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects as it self-consistently solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations using higher-order FE methods on conformal meshes. Use of efficient, large-scale parallel processing allows for the modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next-generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun are presented.

  10. A new measurement method of electrode gains for orthogonal symmetric type beam position monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, J Y; Yang, Y L; Sun, B G; Zhou, Z R; Luo, Q; Lu, P; Xu, H L

    2014-01-01

    The new beam position monitor (BPM) system of the injector at the upgrade project of Hefei Light Source (HLS II) has 19 stripline beam position monitors. Most consist of four orthogonal symmetric stripline electrodes. The differences in electronic gain and mismachining tolerance can cause the change of the beam response of the BPM electrodes. This variation will couple the two measured horizontal positions in order to bring the measuring error. To alleviate this effect, a new technique to measure the relative response of the four electrodes has been developed. It is irrelevant to the beam charge and the related coefficient can be theoretical calculated. The effect of electrodes coupling on this technique is analyzed. The calibration data is used to fit the gain for all 19 injector beam position monitors. The results show the standard deviation of the distribution of measured gains is about 5%.

  11. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances

  12. Performance of positive ion based high power ion source of EAST neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong, E-mail: xieyh@ipp.ac.cn; Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Jiang, Caichao; Li, Jun; Liu, Zhimin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-02-15

    The positive ion based source with a hot cathode based arc chamber and a tetrode accelerator was employed for a neutral beam injector on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). Four ion sources were developed and each ion source has produced 4 MW @ 80 keV hydrogen beam on the test bed. 100 s long pulse operation with modulated beam has also been tested on the test bed. The accelerator was upgraded from circular shaped to diamond shaped in the latest two ion sources. In the latest campaign of EAST experiment, four ion sources injected more than 4 MW deuterium beam with beam energy of 60 keV into EAST.

  13. The application of heavily damped superconducting cavities to the acceleration of high current electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve the high luminosities required for a B-factory, the average currents required in the two rings are 1 ampere for the high energy ring and 2 amperes for the low energy ring. With such high currents the impedances of the rings must be very low. The reasons will be given for choosing superconducting RF cavities for this purpose and the methods used to obtain the required damping of the higher order modes will also be described. Prototype 1/3 scale and full scale superconducting cavities have been built and tested and the results of these tests are given. (Author) 5 figs., 12 refs

  14. Heavy ion beam transport through liquid lithium first wall ICF reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis addresses the critical issue of the final transport of a heavy ion beam in an inertial confinement fusion reactor. The beam must traverse the reaction chamber from the final focusing lens to the target without being disrupted. This requirement has a strong impact on the reactor design. It is essential to the development of ICF fusion reactor technology, that the restrictions placed on the reactor engineering parameters by final beam transport consideration be understood early on

  15. Change in volume of lumpectomy cavity during external-beam irradiation of the intact breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Definition of the lumpectomy cavity is an important component of irradiation of the breast. We use computed tomography (CT)-based planning and contour the lumpectomy volume on the planning CT. We obtained a second CT in the 4th or 5th week of treatment for boost planning and compared the volume change with the first planning-CT scan. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the planning-CT data for 20 patients. In the first CT, images were obtained from the mandible to 2 cm below the breast in 3-mm slices. In the second CT, for the boost, images were obtained from the top to the bottom of the clinically defined breast, in 3-mm slices. Lumpectomy cavities were contoured on both CT scans and volumes compared. Results: Sixteen of the 20 patients (80%) had more than a 20% decrease from the first to the second volume, with a corresponding 95% confidence interval. The mean decrease was 16.13 cc, with a standard deviation of 14.05. The Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.18 did not show a significant correlation between the initial volume and the percent change. Conclusions: During external breast irradiation, many patients will have significant volume reduction in the lumpectomy cavity. Because CT-based definition of the lumpectomy cavity can influence the planning of a boost technique, further study appears warranted

  16. Beam position monitoring and feedback steering system at the photon factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A version of the beam steering servo system was used to vertically position and stabilize the synchrotron radiation beam at the Photon Factory. System components included a photon beam position monitor located 12 m from the bend magnet source point, a servo controller containing frequency compensation and gain circuits, and a 3-magnet orbital bump steering system. Two types of position monitor, one an ion chamber and the other on in-vacuum device, were used in the system. Vertical beam position noise spectra obtained from these monitors showed predominant peaks occurring at 14.5 Hz, 50 Hz, and at several other frequencies in the 1 to 100 Hz range. The closed-loop system was able to reduce low frequency positional offsets (< 0.1 Hz) by a factor of 1000, and the 14.5 Hz oscillation by a factor of 6

  17. Superharp — A wire scanner with absolute position readout for beam energy measurement at CEBAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, C.; Adderley, P.; Barker, D.; Beaufait, J.; Capek, K.; Carlini, R.; Dahlberg, J.; Feldl, E.; Jordan, K.; Kross, B.; Oren, W.; Wojcik, R.; VanDyke, J.

    1995-02-01

    The CEBAF superharp is an upgraded beam wire scanner which provides absolute beam position readout using a shaft encoder. Superharps allow for high precision measurements of the beam's profile and position ( Δx ˜ 10 μm). The Hall C endstation at CEBAF will use three pairs of superharps to perform beam energy measurements with 10 -3 accuracy. The three pairs are installed at the beginning, the mid-point and the end of the Hall C arc beamline. Using superharps in conjunction with a dual sensor system: the direct current pick-up and the bremsstrahlung detectors, beam profile measurements can be obtained over a wide beam current range of 1 ˜ 200 μA.

  18. Digital beam position and phase monitor for P-LINAC for FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the planned P-LINAC for the FAIR facility, Beam Position Monitors (BPM) will be installed at 14 locations along the LINAC. The digital signal processing to derive the transverse beam position and the beam phase will be implemented by ''Libera Single Pass H''. The specification for position measurement is 0.1 mm spatial resolution and phase accuracy is 1 degree with respect to 325 MHz acceleration frequency. The results from the Libera digital signal processing were compared with the time-domain approach and the FFT analytic calculations. The first test was performed at the GSI UNILAC with a Ne4+ beam at 1.4 MeV / u. A single BPM was used to act as a ''Bunch arrival monitor'' to characterize the dependence of beam arrival time on bunch shape. The signals were sampled at 117.440 MHz with a 16-bit ADC to produce I and Q data streams. The first experimental results are reported.

  19. Micro-vibrating spatial filters-induced beam positioning stability in large laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Liu; Jianqiang Zhu; Jia Xu; Quanyuan Shan; Kun Xiao; Xuejie Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic beam propagation model of micro-vibrating spatial filters in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities is built based on the additional beam in SG-Ⅱ facility.The transfer matrix is then deduced,and the sensitivities of the beam positioning to the pellet in the target area to the vibrations of every spatial filter are analyzed,which indicates that the vibrations of spatial filters in the pre-amplify zone has less effects on beam positioning stability at the target.In addition,the vibrations of spatial filters in the main amplify zone dominates the beam positioning stability of the target,especially the vibration of the spatial filter SF7.

  20. A compact and portable X-ray beam position monitor using Medipix3

    OpenAIRE

    O. Rico-Alvarez, A. Kachatkou, J. Marchal, B. Willis, K. Sawhney, N. Tartoni and R.G. van Silfhout

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports on the design and implementation of a novel portable Xraybeam diagnostics (XBPM) device. The device is transparent to the X-ray beam and provides real-time measurements of beam position, intensity, and size. The measurement principle is based on a pinhole camera which records scattered radiation from a Kapton foil which is placed in the beam path. The use of hybrid detectors (Medipix3) that feature a virtually noiseless readout system with capability of single photon ...

  1. Development of Electronics for the ATF2 Interaction Point Region Beam Position Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngim; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Heo, Ae-young; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Eun-San; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Boogert, Stewart; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Honda, Yosuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /KEK, Tsukuba; May, Justin; /SLAC; McCormick, Douglas; /SLAC; Smith, Tonee; /SLAC

    2012-08-14

    Nanometer resolution beam position monitors have been developed to measure and control beam position stability at the interaction point region of ATF2. The position of the beam has to be measured to within a few nanometers at the interaction point. In order to achieve this performance, electronics for the low-Q IP-BPM was developed. Every component of the electronics have been simulated and checked on the bench and using the ATF2 beam. We will explain each component and define their working range. Then, we will show the performance of the electronics measured with beam signal. ATF2 is a final focus test beam line for ILC in the framework of the ATF international collaboration. The new beam line was constructed to extend the extraction line at ATF, KEK, Japan. The first goal of ATF2 is the acheiving of a 37 nm vertical beam size at focal point (IP). The second goal is to stabilize the beam at the focal point at a few nanometer level for a long period in order to ensure the high luminosity. To achieve these goals a high resolution IP-BPM is essential. In addition for feedback applications a low-Q system is desirable.

  2. CEBAF [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility] superconducting cavity rf drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEBAF rf system consists of 418 individual rf amplifier chains. Each superconducting cavity is phase locked to the master drive reference line to within 1 degree, and the cavity field gradient is regulated to within 1 part in 104 by a state-of-the-art rf control module. Precision, continuously adjustable, modulo 3600 phase shifters are used to generate the individual phase references, and a compensated rf detector is used for level feedback. The close coupled digital system enhances system accuracy, provides self-calibration, and continuously checks the system for malfunction. Calibration curves, the operating program, and system history are stored in an on board EEPROM. The rf power is generated by a 5kW, water cooled, permanent magnet focused klystron. The klystrons are clustered in groups of 8 and powered from a common supply. rf power is transmitted to the accelerator sections by semiflexible waveguide

  3. Wavelength beam combining of a 980-nm tapered diode laser bar in an external cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    4.0 nm between the emitters. An output power of 9 W has been achieved at an operating current of 30 A. The combined beam had an M2 value (1/e2) of 5.3 along the slow axis which is comparable to that of a single tapered emitter on the laser bar. The overall beam combining efficiency was measured to......High power diode lasers are used in a large number of applications. A limiting factor for more widespread use of broad area lasers is the poor beam quality. Gain guided tapered diode lasers are ideal candidates for industrial applications that demands watt level output power with good beam quality...

  4. Resonant-cavity approach to noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse emittance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a resonant-cavity approach for noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse, beam emittance measurements of noncircular multibunch beams. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to QLλ/π, where QLλ is the loaded quality factor of the resonant mode λ, when the cavity resonant mode matches the bunch frequency of a bunch-train beam pulse. In particular, a quad cavity, with its quadrupole mode (TM220 for rectangular cavities) at beam operating frequency, rotated 45 deg. with respect to the beamline, extracts the beam quadrupole moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole-moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system, determine the beam emittance, i.e., the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space, if the beam current and position at these points are known. In the presence of x-y beam coupling, ten measurements are required. One measurement alone provides the rms beam size of a large aspect ratio beam. The resolution for such a measurement of rms beam size with the rectangular quad-cavity monitor presented in this article is estimated to be on the order of 10 μm. A prototype quad cavity was fabricated and preliminary beam tests were performed at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The results were mainly limited by beam jitter and uncertainty in the beam position measurement at the cavity location. This motivated the development of a position-emittance integrated monitor [J. S. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 073302 (2005)

  5. Resonant-cavity approach to noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse emittance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J. S.; Nantista, C. D.; Miller, R. H.; Weidemann, A. W.

    2005-12-01

    We present a resonant-cavity approach for noninvasive, pulse-to-pulse, beam emittance measurements of noncircular multibunch beams. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to QLλ/π, where QLλ is the loaded quality factor of the resonant mode λ, when the cavity resonant mode matches the bunch frequency of a bunch-train beam pulse. In particular, a quad cavity, with its quadrupole mode (TM220 for rectangular cavities) at beam operating frequency, rotated 45° with respect to the beamline, extracts the beam quadrupole moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole-moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system, determine the beam emittance, i.e., the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space, if the beam current and position at these points are known. In the presence of x-y beam coupling, ten measurements are required. One measurement alone provides the rms beam size of a large aspect ratio beam. The resolution for such a measurement of rms beam size with the rectangular quad-cavity monitor presented in this article is estimated to be on the order of 10μm. A prototype quad cavity was fabricated and preliminary beam tests were performed at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The results were mainly limited by beam jitter and uncertainty in the beam position measurement at the cavity location. This motivated the development of a position-emittance integrated monitor [J. S. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 073302 (2005)].

  6. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  7. Monitoring the electron beam position at the TESLA test facility free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamps, T.

    2000-06-14

    The operation of a free electron laser working in the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission mode (SASE FEL) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned with very high precision in overlap with the photon beam. In order to ensure this overlap, one module of the SASE FEL undulator at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is equipped with a new type of waveguide beam position monitor (BPM). Four waveguides are arranged symmetrically around the beam pipe, each channel couples through a small slot to the electromagnetic beam field. The induced signal depends on the beam intensity and on the transverse beam position in terms of beam-to-slot distance. With four slot--waveguide combinations a linear position sensitive signal can be achieved, which is independent of the beam intensity. The signals transduced by the slots are transferred by ridged waveguides through an impedance matching stage into a narrowband receiver tuned to 12 GHz. The present thesis describes design, tests, and implementation of this new type of BPM. (orig.)

  8. Use of Superimposed Alternating Currents in Quadrupoles to Measure Beam Position with Respect to their Magnetic Centre

    CERN Document Server

    Marks, N

    2000-01-01

    The positional stability of the electron beam in a modern state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation source is critical, as the many experimental users require consistency in the position and dimensions of the incoming photon beams which are incident on their experimental samples. At the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), inaccuracies in the measurements of the positions of both beam position monitors and the lattice quadrupoles can be overcome by measuring the position of the electron beam with respect to the magnetic centres of the quadrupoles. This was achieved by superimposing an alternating ('ripple') current on the direct current excitation of a single lattice quadrupole and examining the resulting beam oscillations at remote positions in the storage ring. If the electron beam is then subjected to a local distortion at the position of this quadrupole, the amplitude of the beam oscillation induced by the superimposed current is minimised (nominally zero) when the beam is at the quadrupole's magnet...

  9. Beam Position Reconstruction for the g2p Experiment in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Pengjia; Allison, Trent; Badman, Toby; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Jian-ping; Cummings, Melissa; Gu, Chao; Huang, Min; Liu, Jie; Musson, John; Slifer, Karl; Sulkosky, Vincent; Ye, Yunxiu; Zhang, Jixie; Zielinski, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Beam-line equipment was upgraded for experiment E08-027 (g2p) in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Two beam position monitors (BPMs) were necessary to measure the beam position and angle at the target. A new BPM receiver was designed and built to handle the low beam currents (50-100 nA) used for this experiment. Two new super-harps were installed for calibrating the BPMs. In addition to the existing fast raster system, a slow raster system was installed. Before and during the experiment, these new devices were tested and debugged, and their performance was also evaluated. In order to achieve the required accuracy (1-2 mm in position and 1-2 mrad in angle at the target location), the data of the BPMs and harps were carefully analyzed, as well as reconstructing the beam position and angle event by event at the target location. The calculated beam position will be used in the data analysis to accurately determine the kinematics for each event.

  10. Beam position reconstruction for the g2p experiment in Hall A at Jefferson lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pengjia; Allada, Kalyan; Allison, Trent; Badman, Toby; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Jian-ping; Cummings, Melissa; Gu, Chao; Huang, Min; Liu, Jie; Musson, John; Slifer, Karl; Sulkosky, Vincent; Ye, Yunxiu; Zhang, Jixie; Zielinski, Ryan

    2016-02-01

    Beam-line equipment was upgraded for experiment E08-027 (g2p) in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Two beam position monitors (BPMs) were necessary to measure the beam position and angle at the target. A new BPM receiver was designed and built to handle the low beam currents (50-100 nA) used for this experiment. Two new super-harps were installed for calibrating the BPMs. In addition to the existing fast raster system, a slow raster system was installed. Before and during the experiment, these new devices were tested and debugged, and their performance was also evaluated. In order to achieve the required accuracy (1-2 mm in position and 1-2 mrad in angle at the target location), the data of the BPMs and harps were carefully analyzed, as well as reconstructing the beam position and angle event by event at the target location. The calculated beam position will be used in the data analysis to accurately determine the kinematics for each event.

  11. A tunnel regenerated coupled multi-active-region large optical cavity laser with a high quality beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Bi-Feng; Guo Wei-Ling; Du Xiao-Dong; Li Jian-Jun; Zou De-Shu; Shen Guang-Di

    2012-01-01

    A novel coupled multi-active-region large optical cavity structure cascaded by a tunnel junction is proposed to solve the problems of facet catastrophic optical damage (COD) and the large vertical divergence caused by the thin emitting area in conventional laser diodes.For a laser with three active regions,a slope efficiency as high as 1.49 W/A,a vertical divergence angle of 17.4°,and a threshold current density of 271 A/cm2 are achieved.By optimizing the structural parameters,the beam quality is greatly improved,and the level of the COD power increases by more than two times compared with that of the conventional laser.

  12. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  13. Button-type beam-position monitor for the ATF damping ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Button-type beam-position monitors (BPMs) were fabricated for the ATF damping ring. The BPM was designed to achieve a position resolution of less than 5 μm; fabrication of the first 40 BPMs has been completed. For this BPM, a beam test was carried out at the 80-MeV injector part of the ATF LINAC. All of the bunch signals in the multi-bunch beam were clearly observed without any discharge. A calibration of the BPMs was also performed in order to check their offset from the electrical center to the mechanical center as well as their position detection sensitivity. The result shows good uniformity in position detection. (author)

  14. Beam-beam effects under the influence of external noise

    OpenAIRE

    Ohmi, K.

    2014-01-01

    Fast external noise, which gives fluctuation into the beam orbit, is discussed in connection with beam-beam effects. Phase noise from crab cavities and detection devices (position monitor) and kicker noise from the bunch by bunch feedback system are the sources. Beam-beam collisions with fast orbit fluctuations with turn by turn or multi-turn correlations, cause emittance growth and luminosity degradation. We discuss the tolerance of the noise amplitude for LHC and HL-LHC.

  15. Importance of precise positioning for proton beam therapy in the base of skull and cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuzaki, H; Urie, M M

    1991-08-01

    Using proton beam therapy, high doses have been delivered to chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the base of skull and cervical spine. Dose inhomogeneity to the tumors has been accepted in order to maintain normal tissue tolerances, and detailed attention to patient immobilization and to precise positioning has minimized the margins necessary to ensure these dose constraints. This study examined the contribution of precise positioning to the better dose localization achieved in these treatments. Three patients whose tumors represented different anatomic geometries were studied. Treatment plans were developed which treated as much of the tumor as possible to 74 Cobalt-Gray-Equivalent (CGE) while maintaining the central brain stem and central spinal cord at less than or equal to 48 CGE, the surface of the brain stem, surface of the spinal cord, and optic structures at less than or equal to 60 CGE, and the temporal lobes at less than or equal to 5% likelihood of complication using a biophysical model of normal tissue complication probability. Two positioning accuracies were assumed: 3 mm and 10 mm. Both proton beam plans and 10 MV X ray beam plans were developed with these assumptions and dose constraints. In all cases with the same positioning uncertainties, the proton beam plans delivered more dose to a larger percentage of the tumor volume and the estimated tumor control probability was higher than with the X ray plans. However, without precise positioning both the proton plans and the X ray plans deteriorated, with a 12% to 25% decrease in estimated tumor control probability. In all but one case, the difference between protons with good positioning and poor positioning was greater than the difference between protons and X rays, both with good positioning. Hence in treating these tumors, which are in close proximity to critical normal tissues, attention to immobilization and precise positioning is essential. With good positioning, proton beam therapy permits higher

  16. Development of digital down conversion based digital beam position monitor for Indus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indus-1 is a 450 MeV synchrotron radiation source (SRS) at RRCAT Indore. For beam position measurement, four button type beam position indicators (BPls) are installed in Indus-I. A digital down conversion (DDC) algorithm based digital beam position monitor (DBPM) has been developed. Xilinx make board having Virtex-t FPGA has been used for implementation of DBPM system. The RF frequency of Indus-1 is 31.613 MHz. This DBPM processes 31.613 MHz pickup signals of beam position indicator by sampling it with 14 bit ADC at 28 MHz clock. The DDC also works at same clock of 28 MHz and generates position output. The output data rate of 10 kSPS and bandwidth of ∼ 2 kHz has been achieved by this system. System has been tested successfully in lab on calibration bench with simulated beam signals. System has also been tested in field. The design details and implementation aspects are discussed in this paper. (author)

  17. Experimental study of delayed positive feedback control for a flexible beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Recently, some researches indicate that positive feedback can benefit the control if appropriate time delay is intentionally introduced into control system. However, most work is theoretical one but few are experimental. This paper presents theoretical and experimental studies of delayed positive feedback control technique using a flexible beam as research object. The positive feedback weighting coefficient is designed by using the optimal control method. The available time delay is determined by analyzing ...

  18. Development of button-type beam position monitor for superKEKB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Button-type beam position monitors for SuperKEKB rings have been designed. The RF characteristics such as beam response, trapped modes or wake functions have been simulated using 3-D E-M codes such as GdfidL and HFSS. The estimated instability threshold from the trapped modes was much higher than the radiation damping time. The prototype units have been tested in the prototype-antechambers installed in Nikko straight section and D6 arc sections. The mechanical reliability and the beam responses are also reported. (author)

  19. Determination of intensity and position of the extracted electron beam at ELSA by means of high-frequency resonators; Bestimmung von Intensitaet und Position des extrahierten Elektronenstrahls an ELSA mittels Hochfrequenzresonatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Thorsten

    2012-06-15

    The electron stretcher facility ELSA provides an electron beam of a few hundred pA used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons probing the nucleon structure in a detector setup. For the correct interpretation of the events registered, the persistence of the beam position over time is crucial. Its continuous monitoring has been enabled by setting up a measurement system based on resonant cavities. Position signals at a frequency of 1.5 GHz and below one aW of power can be abstracted from the beam without degrading its quality. After frequency down-conversion to a few kHz, a narrow bandwidth detection performed by lock-in amplifiers separates them from noise. A maximum sample rate of 9 Hz and a resolution of one tenth of a millimeter could be achieved. The position signals have to be normalized to the beam current which is monitored by another dedicated resonator. The measurement precision down to a few pA allows for the accelerator extraction mechanism to be controlled by a feedback loop in order to obtain the respective requested current. (orig.)

  20. Software and capabilities of the beam position measurement system for Novosibirsk free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system that measures the electron beam position in the Novosibirsk high power free electron laser has been operating for 8 years and is described in this article. the main part of the system is a number of pick-up electrodes (BPM stations) installed in different parts of the vacuum chamber of the microtron-recuperator. Each BPM (Beam Position Monitoring) station has four buttons with a clear aperture diameter of about 80 mm. Signals from the plates of all BPMs are transmitted by cables outside the shielded hall to the site of location of the measurement electronics. The beam position is determined via simultaneous measurement of the amplitudes of signals induced on the buttons by the beam field. The control software for this system is a single application running on the IBM-PC computer. Communication with the CAMAC crates is realized with the help of the ISP controller, developed at Budker INP. The application can operate in several different regimes. The first regime is a serial poll of all the BPM stations for the purpose of determination of the transverse coordinates of the beam (the main operating regime). The second operation regime is a scanning throughout the delay time range of one of the BPM stations. The third and very useful regime is a poll of the waveform of the BPM button pulses with the frequency of the beam movement and a constant time delay value

  1. ROBUST POSITIONING OF LASER BEAMS USING PROPORTIONAL INTEGRAL DERIVATIVE AND BASED OBSERVER-FEEDBACK CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena A. Konadu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-precision positioning of laser beams has been a great challenge in industry due to inevitable existence of noise and disturbance. The work presented in this study addresses this problem by employing two different control strategies: Proportional Integral Derivative (PID control and state feedback control with an observer. The control strategies are intended to stabilize the position of a laser beam on a Position Sensing Device (PSD located on a Laser Beam Stabilization (or, laser beam system system. The laser beam system consists of a laser source, a Fast Steering Mirror (FSM, a PSD and a vibrating platform to generate active disturbance. The traditional PID controller is widely used in industry due to its satisfactory performance, various available tuning methods and relatively straightforward design processes. However, design of filters to obtain the derivative signal is challenging and can unexpectedly distort the dynamics of the system being controlled. As an alternative, use of an Observer-Based State Feedback (OBSF method is proposed and implemented. The state-space model of the laser beam system is utilized and an observer is applied to estimate the state of the system, since all the state variables cannot be measured directly. For observer design, eigenvalue assignment and optimal design methods are used and compared in terms of system performance. Also a comparative analysis between the PID and OBSF controllers is provided. Simulations and experimental results show that the OBSF controller rejects disturbance better and has a simpler design procedure.

  2. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y position entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM

  3. Capacitive large-range-intensity beam-position monitors at Ganil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At GANIL, to allow a permanent measurement of the ion beam position, we are designing a non-interceptive beam position monitor. After having given the technical specifications - in particular a large intensity range 60dB - this paper describes the technical choices of made after theoretical studies: - capacitive electrodes loaded by 50 Ω amplifier, - 10 KHz heterodyne to detect the 2nd harmonic of the electrode signals, - amplitude-to-phase conversion followed by a phasemeter to detect the beam position. At the end of this paper, the first results obtained with a prototype monitor are given, in particular their good accordance with the theoretical calculation and the few problems still to solve

  4. Cavity-Type BPMs For The TESLA Test Facility Free Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Waldmann, H

    2003-01-01

    For measurements of the beam position at the undulator section of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY cavity-type beam position monitors were developed, installed and brought into operation. Besides of some theoretical aspects results of in-beam measurements at the TTF are presented and pros and cons of this monitor concept are discussed.

  5. A Fast Non Intercepting Linac Electron Beam Position and Current Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen-Walther; Wille, Mads

    A non-intercepting beam monitor consisting of four detecting loops is used to determine the spatial postion and current of a pulsed beam from an electron linear accelerator. The monitor detects the magnetic field radiated by the substructure of the electron bunches created by the accelerating...... microwave. The detecting loops are interconnected two by two, by means of two coaxial hybrid junctions, the two sets positioned perpendicular to each other. By means of the two signals from the diametrically positioned detecting loops, a good spatial displacement and current monitoring sensitivity are...

  6. The positive charging effect of dielectric films irradiated by a focused electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space charge and surface potential profiles are investigated with numerical simulation for dielectric films of SiO2 positively charged by a focused electron beam. By combining the Monte Carlo method and the finite difference method, the simulation is preformed with a newly developed comprehensive two-dimensional model including electron scattering, charge transport and trapping. Results show that the space charge is distributed positively, like a semi-ellipsoid, within a high-density region of electrons and holes, but negatively outside the region due to electron diffusion along the radial and beam incident directions. Simultaneously, peak positions of the positive and negative space charge densities shift outwards or downwards with electron beam irradiation. The surface potential, along the radial direction, has a nearly flat-top around the center, abruptly decreases to negative values outside the high-density region and finally increases to zero gradually. Influences of electron beam and film parameters on the surface potential profile in the equilibrium state are also shown and analyzed. Furthermore, the variation of secondary electron signal of a large-scale integration sample positively charged in scanning electron microscopic observation is simulated and validated by experiment.

  7. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles

  8. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  9. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, H. Duran, E-mail: hdyildiz@ankara.edu.tr [Institute of Accelerator Technologies, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkey); Cakir, R. [Nanotechnology Engineering Department, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize (Turkey); Porsuk, D. [Physics Department, Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey)

    2015-06-11

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; E{sub c}=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  10. Positional relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar using cone beam computed tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the positional relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar using cone beam computed tomograph (CBCT). CBCTs from 127 subjects were analysed. A total of 134 maxillary first molars were classified according to their vertical and horizontal positional relationship to the maxillary sinus floor and measured according to the distance between the maxillary sinus floor and the maxillary first molar. Type III (The root projected laterally on the sinus cavity but its apex is outside the sinus boundaries) was dominated between 10 and 19 years and type I (The root apex was not in contact with the cortical borders of the sinus) was dominated (P<0.05) between 20 and 72 years on the vertical relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar. The maxillary sinus floor was located more at the apex (78.2%) than at the furcation (21.3%) for the palatal root. The distance from the root apex to the maxillary sinus floor confined to type I was increased according to the ages (P<0.05). Type M (The maxillary sinus floor was located between the buccal and the palatal root) was most common (72.4%) on the horizontal relationship between the maxillary sinus floor and the apex of the maxillary first molar. CBCT can provide highly qualified images for the maxillary sinus floor and the root apex of the maxillary first molar.

  11. Beam based gain calibration method for beam position monitor at J-PARC MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of the closed orbit is one of very important points for stable operations to keep a small beam loss in MR. The relative gains of the output data may drift due to unpredictable imbalance among output signals from the pickup electrodes, because the output signals must travel through separate paths, such as cables, connectors, attenuators, switches, and then are measured by detectors. In KEKB, we found noticeable errors larger than 0.1mm in the almost all BPM readings. In KEKB, A non-linear chi-square method has received practical application to calibrate these errors come from the imbalance among 4 output voltage of a BPM. However, we were not able to apply a same method as KEKB to analyze a gain of BPMs in J-PARC. W noticed linear relations among 4 outputs voltage and analyzed the imbalance by the total least-squares method. This paper introduce the new method to estimate the related gains from four output data of a BPM head. (author)

  12. A bunch-by-bunch beam position monitor based on scope embedded IOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bunch-by-bunch beam position monitor system, based on a broadband oscilloscope embedded EPICS IOC, has been developed at SSRF to study the beam instabilities driven by the wake-field effects. The horizontal and vertical beam positions of each bunch could be located independently in this system by using the original signals from the button-type pickups on the storage ring. In this article, we report the hardware and software architecture of this system. The bunch-by-bunch data of the storage ring are used to evaluate performance of the system. Dependency of the tune, and the betatron oscillation amplitude of different bunch on the corresponding bunch ID, is also detected. The system is an effective tool for machine-study of SSRF. (authors)

  13. Noninterceptive method to measure longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in a hadron linear accelerator using beam position monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishlo, A.; Aleksandrov, A.

    2013-06-01

    A new method of measuring of the rms longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in linear accelerators is presented. It is based on using sum signals from beam position monitors sensitive to the longitudinal charge distribution in the bunch. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on the superconducting section of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator. The results are compared to a direct measurement of the bunch longitudinal profiles using an interceptive bunch shape monitor in the linac warm section of the same accelerator. Limitations of the method are discussed. The method is fast and simple, and can be used to obtain the initial parameters for the longitudinal matching in linear accelerators where interceptive diagnostics are not desirable.

  14. Beam position monitoring system based on EPICS and MATLAB image processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical X-ray beam position monitoring system has been established on Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). The software for control, data acquisition and data processing is based on EPICS. It can capture and process a real time image to give the center position and spatial distribution of synchrotron radiations. The system has been used on SSRF beamlines and the experimental results show that the design specifications have been achieved. (authors)

  15. Two methods of beam position signal processing for closed orbit measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes two methods of processing lineraly detected signals of the beam position from pickup electrodes. The first method is based on the tracking self-balanced analog-digital bridge and the second one is based on the tracking ADC with varying reference. The operating features of the units realizing these methods are presented

  16. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  17. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4) to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study

  18. Preliminary comp arison of helical tomotherapy and mixed beams of unmodulated electrons and intensity modulated radiation therapy for treating superficial cancers of the parotid gland and nasal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasi Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose To investigate combining unmodulated electron beams with intensity-modulated radiation therapy to improve dose distributions for superficial head and neck cancers, and to compare mixed beam plans with helical tomotherapy. Materials and methods Mixed beam and helical tomotherapy dose plans were developed for two patients with parotid gland tumors and two patients with nasal cavity tumors. Mixed beam plans consisted of various weightings of a enface electron beam and IMRT, which was optimized after calculation of the electron dose to compensate for heterogeneity in the electron dose distribution within the target volume. Results Helical tomotherapy plans showed dose conformity and homogeneity in the target volume that was equal to or better than the mixed beam plans. Electron-only plans tended to show the lowest doses to normal tissues, but with markedly worse dose conformity and homogeneity than in the other plans. However, adding a 20% IMRT dose fraction (i.e., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to the electron plan restored target conformity and homogeneity to values comparable to helical tomotherapy plans, while maintaining lower normal tissue dose. Conclusions Mixed beam treatments offer some dosimetric advantages over IMRT or helical tomotherapy for target depths that do not exceed the useful range of the electron beam. Adding a small IMRT component (e.g., IMRT:electron weighting = 1:4 to electron beam plans markedly improved target dose homogeneity and conformity for the cases examined in this study.

  19. User's guide for ABCI Version 8.8 (azimuthal beam cavity interaction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABCI is a computer program which solves the Maxwell equations directly in the time domain when a bunched beam goes through an axi-symmetric structure on or off axis. An arbitrary charge distribution can be defined by the user (default=Gaussian). This document is meant to be a comprehensive user's guide to describe all features of ABCI version 8.8, including also all additions since the release of the guide for version 6.2. The main advances lie in its higher speed of execution, and improved capabilities of Fourier transformations. The impedance and the frequency spectrum of deposited energy can be calculated and plotted from the Fourier transforms of the wake potentials. The ''data windowing'' technique can be applied to wake potentials in order to reduce the undesirable spectral leak-age effect. A number of window functions can be chosen by the user. Numerical values of wake potentials as well as the Fourier transform results can be saved on separate files which can be used directly for other programs. In addition to these additions to the program, a criterion was derived for the numerical stability of the time iteration valid for the case where the longitudinal mesh size is larger than the radial one. If the time step is not fine enough to satisfy this criterion, a warning message will be issued and an appropriate value suggested. A second criterion was found to be required to guarantee the accuracy of the computed wake potentials for structures with (long) tapers. ABCI now also permits a structure with ''islands,'' i.e. areas detached from the main body. An option was added to plot either electric field or total current lines at subsequent time steps for the monopole (m=0) case. ABCI is available as a source code in the CERN IBM VM/CMS system

  20. User`s guide for ABCI Version 8.8 (azimuthal beam cavity interaction)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Yong Ho

    1994-02-01

    ABCI is a computer program which solves the Maxwell equations directly in the time domain when a bunched beam goes through an axi-symmetric structure on or off axis. An arbitrary charge distribution can be defined by the user (default=Gaussian). This document is meant to be a comprehensive user`s guide to describe all features of ABCI version 8.8, including also all additions since the release of the guide for version 6.2. The main advances lie in its higher speed of execution, and improved capabilities of Fourier transformations. The impedance and the frequency spectrum of deposited energy can be calculated and plotted from the Fourier transforms of the wake potentials. The ``data windowing`` technique can be applied to wake potentials in order to reduce the undesirable spectral leak-age effect. A number of window functions can be chosen by the user. Numerical values of wake potentials as well as the Fourier transform results can be saved on separate files which can be used directly for other programs. In addition to these additions to the program, a criterion was derived for the numerical stability of the time iteration valid for the case where the longitudinal mesh size is larger than the radial one. If the time step is not fine enough to satisfy this criterion, a warning message will be issued and an appropriate value suggested. A second criterion was found to be required to guarantee the accuracy of the computed wake potentials for structures with (long) tapers. ABCI now also permits a structure with ``islands,`` i.e. areas detached from the main body. An option was added to plot either electric field or total current lines at subsequent time steps for the monopole (m=0) case. ABCI is available as a source code in the CERN IBM VM/CMS system.

  1. Cavity Design, Fabrication and Commission Performance of a 750MHz, 4-rod Separator for CEBAF 4-Hall Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Cheng, Guangfeng [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Turlington, Larry T. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA; Wissmann, Mark J. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA

    2015-09-01

    A short version of the original CEBAF normal conducting 4-rod separator cavity has been developed into a 750MHz one * since the concept of simultaneous 4-hall operation for CEBAF is introduced **. This work has been advanced further based on the EM design optimization, bench measurement and by conducting RF-thermal coupled simulation using CST and ANSYS to confirm the cavity tuning and thermal performance. The cavity fabrication used matured technology like copper plating and machining. The cavity flanges, couplers, tuners and cooling channels adopted consistent/compatible hardware with the existing 500MHz cavities. The electromagnetic and thermal design simulations have greatly reduced the prototyping and bench tuning time of the first prototype. Four production cavities have reached a typical 1.94MV kick voltage or 3.0kW wall loss on each cavity after a minor multipactoring or no processing, 7.5% overhead power than the design specification.

  2. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  3. RF Cavity Design

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E

    2014-01-01

    After a short overview of a general approach to cavity design, we sketch the derivation of waveguide modes from plane waves and of cavity fields from waveguide modes. The characteristic parameters describing cavities and their performance are defined and explained. An equivalent circuit is introduced and extended to explain beam loading and higher order modes. Finally travelling- and standing-wave multi-gap cavities are introduced using the Brillouin diagram.

  4. Application of the Same Beam Interferometry Measurement in Relative Position Determination on Lunar Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Anyi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principle and observation model of the same beam interferometry measurement, observation equations of differential time delay and time delay rate for targets on lunar surface are proposed. Restriction of appointed height and digital lunar height model is introduced and a Kalman filter with restriction to determine the relative position is put forward. By data simulation, the arithmetic is then validated and evaluated, which could fleetly and accurately determine the relative position between rover and lander. Low precision of the lander's position is required in the calculation.

  5. SU-E-J-201: Position Verification in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Tantalum Clips in the Lumpectomy Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santvoort, J van; Van der Drift, M; Kuipers, J; Mast, M; Van Egmond, J; Struikmans, H [Haaglanden Medical Center, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To find out whether tantalum surgical clips can be used for online position verification in treatment of the lumpectomy cavity (LC) in breast cancer patients. Tantalum is a high density metal that could be visible on Electronic Portal Images (EPIs) and be an affordable alternative to gold markers. Clips are considered more representative for the LC position than nearby bony structures. Methods: In twelve patients the surgeon had placed 2 to 5 tantalum clips in the LC. The AP and lateral fields used for portal imaging, were adapted. In doing so, both bony structures and tantalum clips were visible on EPIs. The following analyses were performed:1. Image degradation, with respect to delineating the CTV, of the axial CT slices by artefacts because of the tantalum clips was evaluated by a radiation oncologist;2. The visibility of the tantalum clips on the EPIs was evaluated by four radiation therapists (RTTs);3. Bony anatomy and tantalum clip matches were performed on the same images independently by two observers. Results: 1. Delineation of the CTV by the radiation oncologist was not hampered by CT image artefacts because of the clips.2. The mean score for visibility of the clips on the EPIs, analysed by the four RTTs, was 5.6 on a scale of 10 (range 3.9 – 8.0).3. In total 12 patients with 16 fractions each were analysed. The differences between clip match and bone match are significant with a mean vector length of 5.2 mm (SD 1.9 mm) for the difference. Conclusion: Results of matches on tantalum clips as compared to matches on bony structures differ substantially. Therefore clip matches can result in smaller CTV to PTV margins than bone matches. Visibility of the clips on EPIs is sufficient, so they can be an alternative to gold markers.

  6. Systematic comparison of position and time dependent macroparticle simulations in beam dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroparticle simulation plays an important role in modern accelerator design and operation. Most linear rf accelerators have been designed based on macroparticle simulations using longitudinal position as the independent variable. In this paper, we have done a systematic comparison between using longitudinal position as the independent variable and using time as the independent variable in macroparticle simulations. We have found that, for an rms-matched beam, the maximum relative moment difference for second, fourth moments and beam maximum amplitudes between these two types of simulations is 0.25 percent in a 10 m reference transport system with physical parameters similar to the Spallation Neutron Source linac design. The maximum z-to-t transform error in the space-charge force calculation of the position dependent simulation is about 0.1 percent in such a system. This might cause a several percent error in a complete simulation of a linac with a length of hundreds of meters. Furthermore, the error may be several times larger in simulations of mismatched beams. However, if such errors are acceptable to the linac designer, then one is justified in using position dependent macroparticle simulations in this type of linac design application

  7. Two transparent optical sensors for the positioning of detectors using a reference laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed two different optical systems in order to position detectors with respect to a reference laser beam. The first system, a telescope, permits the absolute positioning of an element with respect to a reference laser beam. The resolution is of the order of 10 μm in translation and 50 μrad in rotation. It is highly transparent (-90%) permitting several elements to be aligned. A calibration procedure has also been studied and is currently being tested in order to obtain an absolute alignment information. The second system is a highly transparent (95%) two dimensional position sensor which allows the accurate positioning (below 20 μm) of several (up to ten) elements to which each sensor is attached, transversally to a laser beam used as a reference straight line. The present useful area of the first sensor is 20 x 20 mm2 and is 15 x 15 mm2 for the second. In both case it can be further increased to meet the experiment's requirement. (authors)

  8. Measurement of the mean radial position of a lead ion beam in the CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Belleman, J; González, J; Johnston, S; Schulte, E C; Thivent, E

    1996-01-01

    The intensity of the lead ion beam in the PS, nominally 4×108 charges of Pb53+ per bunch, is too low for the closed orbit measurement system. However, for successful acceleration it is sufficient to know the mean radial position (MRP). A system was thus designed for simultaneous acquisition of revolution frequency and magnetic field. The frequency measurement uses a direct digital synthesiser (DDS), phase-locked to the beam signal from a special high-sensitivity pick-up. The magnetic field is obtained from the so-called B-train. From these two values, the MRP is calculated. The precision depends on the frequency measurement and on the accuracy of the value for the magnetic field. Furthermore, exact knowledge of the transition energy is essential. This paper describes the hardware and software developed for the MRP system, and discusses the issue of calibration, with a proton beam, of the B measurement.

  9. Development of a beam position detector for an orbit feedback system in SuperKEKB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SuperKEKB, which is under construction at KEK, is an electron-positron collider aiming at 40 times larger luminosity of KEKB. Since a vertical design beam size at a collision point is as small as 50 nm in SuperKEKB, an orbit feedback system is essential for maintaining stable collision. A fast beam position detector is being developed for the orbit feedback system. Tentative target performance is a signal to noise ratio of 120dB at the input power of -3dBm and a signal bandwidth of 1 kHz. The detector consists of an analogue part to convert 509 MHz-beam-signal to 17 MHz-IF-signal and a digital part which has a ADC, two CIC decimation filters and a FIR filter. The paper describes results of laboratory measurement obtained so far and items to be improved for a final version. (author)

  10. Dynamics of the formation of ion-beam plasma in a drift space with positive potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of enhancing gas compensation of an intense ion beam under introduction of positive potential into a drift space of the latter are studied. It is ascertained that there are two specific stages of ion-beam plasma evolution. These stages manifest themselves in a two-step shape of beam current density pulses, capacitive probe signals, etc. Comparative step values depend nontrivially on the physical parameters of the system and its past history. It is also shown that instant radial distributions of slow ions turn out to be nonmonotonous with absolute maximum which drifts as pressure grows towards periphery, and probe characteristics are significantly deformed due to the presence of fast space-isotropized electrons of secondary emission. Consideration on physical mechanisms of the observed phenomena and quantitative estimations which explain qualitatively the experimental results are proposed

  11. Optical cavity and transport system for FELI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FELI (Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is aiming at FIR-, IR-, VISIBLE-, and UV-FEL (spectral range from 0.3 to 22.7μm) generation using 30-, 75-, 120-, 165-MeV beams, respectively. The linear accelerator and four undulators are installed in the ground floor and five FEL users rooms are located in the third floor, so the longest FEL transport pass is about 80m long. We will adopt hole out coupling for FIR- and IR-FEL optical cavities. The output beam is collimated by an inverted telescope and transported to the users rooms via N2 purged pipes. Achieving optical beam stability and quality are primary concerns. For keeping optical beam stability and quality, a beam axis control unit and a position monitoring system are used. These optical cavities and FEL transport systems are under construction and will be used for FIR- and IR-FEL experiments in this summer. (author)

  12. Smart x-ray beam position monitor system for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the sensitivity and reliability requirements for the x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are much higher than for earlier systems. Noise and contamination signals caused by radiation emitted from the bending magnet become a major problem. The regular XBPM calibration process can only provide signal correction for one set of conditions for the insertion devices (ID). During normal operation, parameters affecting the ID-emitted beam, such as the gap of the ID magnets and the beam current, are the variables. A new smart x-ray beam position monitor system (SBPM) has been conceived and designed for the APS. It has a built in self-learning structure with EEPROM memory that is large enough to open-quote open-quote remember close-quote close-quote a complete set of calibration data covering all the possible operating conditions. During the self-learning mode, the monitor system initializes a series of automatic scan motions with information for different ID setups and records them into the database array. During normal operation, the SBPM corrects the normalized output according to the ID setup information and the calibration database. So that, with this novel system, the SBPM is always calibrating itself with the changing ID set up conditions. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Ultra-thin optical grade scCVD diamond as X-ray beam position monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Kewin; Pomorski, Michal; Morse, John

    2014-11-01

    Results of measurements made at the SIRIUS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron for a new X-ray beam position monitor based on a super-thin single crystal of diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are presented. This detector is a quadrant electrode design processed on a 3 µm-thick membrane obtained by argon-oxygen plasma etching the central area of a CVD-grown diamond plate of 60 µm thickness. The membrane transmits more than 50% of the incident 1.3 keV energy X-ray beam. The diamond plate was of moderate purity (∼1 p.p.m. nitrogen), but the X-ray beam induced current (XBIC) measurements nevertheless showed a photo-charge collection efficiency approaching 100% for an electric field of 2 V µm(-1), corresponding to an applied bias voltage of only 6 V. XBIC mapping of the membrane showed an inhomogeneity of more than 10% across the membrane, corresponding to the measured variation in the thickness of the diamond plate before the plasma etching process. The measured XBIC signal-to-dark-current ratio of the device was greater than 10(5), and the X-ray beam position resolution of the device was better than a micrometer for a 1 kHz sampling rate. PMID:25343787

  14. A compact and portable X-ray beam position monitor using Medipix3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Alvarez, O.; Kachatkou, A.; Marchal, J.; Willis, B.; Sawhney, K.; Tartoni, N.; van Silfhout, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    The present work reports on the design and implementation of a novel portable X-ray beam diagnostics (XBPM) device. The device is transparent to the X-ray beam and provides real-time measurements of beam position, intensity, and size. The measurement principle is based on a pinhole camera which records scattered radiation from a Kapton foil which is placed in the beam path. The use of hybrid detectors (Medipix3) that feature a virtually noiseless readout system with capability of single photon detection and energy resolving power enables the diagnostics with a better resolution and higher sensitivity compared to the use of traditional indirect X-ray detection schemes. We describe the detailed system design, which consists of a vacuum compatible focal plane sensor array, a sensor conditioning and readout board and a heterogeneous data processing unit, which also acts as a network server that handles network communications with clients. The readout protocol for the Medipix3 sensor is implemented using field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic resulting in a versatile and scalable system that is capable of performing advanced functions such as data compression techniques and feature extraction. For the system performance measurements, we equipped the instrument with a single Medipix3 die, bump bonded to a Si sensor, rather than four for which it was designed. Without data compression, it is capable of acquiring magnified images and profiles of synchrotron X-ray beams at a transfer rate through Ethernet of 27 frames/s for one Medipix3 die.

  15. A compact and portable X-ray beam position monitor using Medipix3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work reports on the design and implementation of a novel portable X-ray beam diagnostics (XBPM) device. The device is transparent to the X-ray beam and provides real-time measurements of beam position, intensity, and size. The measurement principle is based on a pinhole camera which records scattered radiation from a Kapton foil which is placed in the beam path. The use of hybrid detectors (Medipix3) that feature a virtually noiseless readout system with capability of single photon detection and energy resolving power enables the diagnostics with a better resolution and higher sensitivity compared to the use of traditional indirect X-ray detection schemes. We describe the detailed system design, which consists of a vacuum compatible focal plane sensor array, a sensor conditioning and readout board and a heterogeneous data processing unit, which also acts as a network server that handles network communications with clients. The readout protocol for the Medipix3 sensor is implemented using field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic resulting in a versatile and scalable system that is capable of performing advanced functions such as data compression techniques and feature extraction. For the system performance measurements, we equipped the instrument with a single Medipix3 die, bump bonded to a Si sensor, rather than four for which it was designed. Without data compression, it is capable of acquiring magnified images and profiles of synchrotron X-ray beams at a transfer rate through Ethernet of 27 frames/s for one Medipix3 die

  16. A single-passage beam-position monitor system for the TRISTAN AR-to-MR transport lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam-position monitor (BPM) system has been installed in the transport lines between the Accumulation Ring (AR) and the Main Ring (MR) of TRISTAN. This system comprises stripline and button electrodes, detectors and charge-sensitive ADCs. The detector is a homodyne type synchronous-receiver at 70 MHz with four channels corresponding to four electrodes. Operation software automatically displays the detected beam position and its charge on a TV screen after each passage of the beam. The system is stable and is used to monitor the drift of the beam position. (author)

  17. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  18. Calibration of beam position indicators for insertion devices of Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two insertion devices (undulators named U-l and U-2) have been recently installed in Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source, a 2.5 GeV third generation electron storage ring at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. Four ultra-high vacuum compatible beam position indicators (IDBPIs) for insertion devices have been designed and developed. These IDBPIs have been installed in the long straight sections LS-2 and LS-3 of Indus-2 ring at the upstream side and downstream side of undulators for the precise monitoring of electron beam position. The IDBPIs have been calibrated on a calibration bench setup before their installation in Indus-2 ring. The calibration procedure along with the calibration results has been described in this paper

  19. Position resolution of the prototype AGATA triple-cluster detector from an in-beam experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recchia, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)], E-mail: francesco.recchia@pd.infn.it; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Gadea, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); IFIC, CSIC - University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Venturelli, R. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Beck, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Bednarczyk, P. [IFJ PAN, PL-31-342 Krakow (Poland); Buerger, A. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SPhN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Dewald, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Dimmock, M. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Duchene, G. [Laboratoire Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Eberth, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Faul, T. [Laboratoire Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS-IN2P3/ULP Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser, R. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Hauschild, K. [CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay Campus (France); Holler, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Jones, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Korten, W. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SPhN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Kroell, Th. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-06-11

    AGATA belongs to a new generation of {gamma}-ray detector arrays for nuclear spectroscopy at present in its final stage of development. The detectors of these new arrays will be based on 36-fold electronically segmented coaxial germanium diodes operated in position sensitive mode. An in-beam test of the AGATA prototype triple cluster detector was carried out with the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of such detectors and in order to measure the most sensitive parameters for their overall performance. An inverse kinematics reaction was performed, using a {sup 48}Ti beam at an energy of 100 MeV, impinging on a deuterated titanium target. The results from the analysis of the experimental data, compared with the predictions of Monte Carlo simulations, give an estimation of the position sensitivity of these detectors of about 5 mm FWHM, consistent with the specifications required.

  20. Interaction position resolution simulations and in-beam measurements of the AGATA HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederstroem, P.-A., E-mail: P-A.Soderstrom@physics.uu.s [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Recchia, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Sezione di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Nyberg, J., E-mail: Johan.Nyberg@physics.uu.s [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Al-Adili, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Atac, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Aydin, S. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Art, Aksaray University, Aksaray 68100 (Turkey); Bazzacco, D. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bednarczyk, P. [The Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Birkenbach, B. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Bortolato, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Sezione di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C. [Oliver Lodge Lab., University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Bruyneel, B. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Bucurescu, D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, RO-77125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Calore, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Colosimo, S. [Oliver Lodge Lab., University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Crespi, F.C.L. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Universita di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Dipt. di Fisica, Universita di Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-05-11

    The interaction position resolution of the segmented HPGe detectors of an AGATA triple cluster detector has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations and in an in-beam experiment. A new method based on measuring the energy resolution of Doppler-corrected {gamma}-ray spectra at two different target to detector distances is described. This gives the two-dimensional position resolution in the plane perpendicular to the direction of the emitted {gamma}-ray. The {gamma}-ray tracking was used to determine the full energy of the {gamma}-rays and the first interaction point, which is needed for the Doppler correction. Five different heavy-ion induced fusion-evaporation reactions and a reference reaction were selected for the simulations. The results of the simulations show that the method works very well and gives a systematic deviation of <1mm in the FWHM of the interaction position resolution for the {gamma}-ray energy range from 60 keV to 5 MeV. The method was tested with real data from an in-beam measurement using a {sup 30}Si beam at 64 MeV on a thin {sup 12}C target. Pulse-shape analysis of the digitized detector waveforms and {gamma}-ray tracking was performed to determine the position of the first interaction point, which was used for the Doppler corrections. Results of the dependency of the interaction position resolution on the {gamma}-ray energy and on the energy, axial location and type of the first interaction point, are presented. The FWHM of the interaction position resolution varies roughly linearly as a function of {gamma}-ray energy from 8.5 mm at 250 keV to 4 mm at 1.5 MeV, and has an approximately constant value of about 4 mm in the {gamma}-ray energy range from 1.5 to 4 MeV.

  1. Beam loading

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the radio-frequency generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, radio-frequency feedback and feedforward are described. Examples of digital radio-frequency phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  2. Positive ion portion of the LBL/LLL Neutral Beam Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positive ion portion of the Neutral Beam Development Program at the Lawrence Berkeley (LBL) and Livermore (LLL) Laboratories has two purposes: (a) to carry out general research and development in a timely way to assure that users' needs can be met in principle, and (b) to carry out specific development for users. To meet the first requirement, we have programs to develop sources capable of producing beams with high (85%) atomic fractions, long pulse lengths (10 sec to DC), and at beam energies up to 150 keV. We are also pursuing the development of on-line computer diagnostics and controls, the sophisticated high-power electronics required by neutral beam systems, and energy recovery. To meet the second requirement, we are developing prototype source modules to meet the requirements of the TMX and MFTF experiments at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the TFTR experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and the Doublet III experiment at General Atomic Co. The Lawrence Laboratories are also constructing and will demonstrate at LBL a complete prototype neutral injection system for TFTR, and are designing a similar system for Doublet III

  3. Novel probe for determining the size and position of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the size and position of a relativistic electron beam inside the wiggler magnetic field of a Free Electron Laser (FEL), we have developed a new probe which intercepts the electron beam on a high Z target and monitors the resulting bremsstrahlung radiation. The probe is designed to move along the entire three meters of the wiggler. This FEL is designed to operate in the microwave region (2 to 8 mm) and the interaction region is an oversized waveguide with a cross section 3 cm x 9.8 cm. The axial probe moves inside this waveguide. The probe stops the electron beam on a Tantalum target and the resulting x-rays are scattered in the forward direction. A scintillator behind the beam stop reacts to the x-rays and emits visible light in the region where the x-rays strike. An array of fiber optics behind the scintillator transmits the visible light to a Reticon camera system which images the visible pattern from the scintillator. Processing the optical image is done by digitizing and storing the image and/or recording the image on video tape. Resolution and performance of this probe will be discussed

  4. Development of 'position-charge-time' tagged spectrometry for ion beam microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During sample analysis in scanning mode, our PC-based data acquisition system (MPA/PCTM) is able to record eight parameter events in a list data file. The system can acquire simultaneously collected energies from up to four detectors (X and gamma ray detectors, charged particle detectors). Each event is tagged with beam position, integrated charge and a time-code. Beam scanning control is currently upgraded. Until now, beam position tagging required a double conversion (digital-analog and analog-digital) generating supplementary dead time. The new system allows direct digital transfer with high-resolution maps and large scanning rate capabilities. RISMIN, an home made software, is used to extract maps, spectra, profiles, etc. from generated list data files. This software is developed under LabVIEWTM and IMAQTM. Beyond the classical elemental mapping capabilities, the software allows any 1D or 2D multi-filtering parameter representations and filtered events list data file generation. Map processing (standard operations and image filtering) is also integrated

  5. Design of a cavity filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cavity filter was developed for the SSRF 0-mode beam feedback. The filter is used to pick up the 500 MHz signal from the storage ring beam. The Superfish was used to simulate the model of the cavity bandpass filter. The design method, parameters of the filter and results of beam measurements are described in this paper. (authors)

  6. Operational Experience with Beam Alignment and Monitoring Using Non-Destructive Beam Position Monitors in the Cyclotron Beamlines at iThemba LABS

    CERN Document Server

    Conradie, J L; Delsink, J L G; Fourie, D T; Kormany, Z; Mansfield, P T; Rohwer, P F; Sakildien, M

    2005-01-01

    At iThemba LABS proton beams, accelerated in a K=200 separated-sector cyclotron with a K=8 solid-pole injector cyclotron, are utilized for the production of radioisotopes and particle radiotherapy. Beams of heavy ions and polarized protons, pre-accelerated in a second injector cyclotron, are available for nuclear physics research. Beam position monitors have been developed for non-destructive alignment and continuous display of the beam position in the beam lines for the more intense beams used for therapy and the production of radioisotopes in cooperation* with Forschungszentrum Jülich. The monitors consist of four-section strip lines. Narrow-band super-heterodyne RF electronic equipment with automatic frequency and gain control measures the signals at the selected harmonic. A control module sequentially processes the signals and delivers calculated horizontal and vertical beam position data via a serial network to the computer control system. Eleven monitors have been installed in the transfer beam line be...

  7. Calibration of a Non-Linear Beam Position Monitor Electronics by Switching Electrode Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M

    2013-01-01

    Button electrode signals from beam position monitors embedded into new LHC collimators will be individually processed with front-end electronics based on compensated diode detectors and digitized with 24-bit audio-range ADCs. This scheme allows sub-micrometre beam orbit resolution to be achieved with simple hardware and no external timing. As the diode detectors only operate in a linear regime with large amplitude signals, offset errors of the electronics cannot be calibrated in the classical way with no input. This paper describes the algorithms developed to calibrate the offset and gain asymmetry of these nonlinear electronic channels. Presented algorithm application examples are based on measurements performed with prototype diode orbit systems installed on the CERN SPS and LHC machines.

  8. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revesz, Peter, E-mail: pr20@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States); Temnykh, Alexander B. [Cornell University, Laboratory for Elem-Particle Physics, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States); Pauling, Alan K. [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States)

    2011-09-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  9. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revesz, Peter; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Pauling, Alan K.

    2011-09-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  10. PowerSphere: A Novel Photovoltaic Cavity Converter Using Low Bandgap TPV Cells for Efficient Conversion of High Power Laser Beams to Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortabasi, Ugur; Friedman, Herbert W.

    2004-11-01

    PowerSphere is a variant of the recently developed Photovoltaic Cavity Converter (PVCC) for High Concentration Photovoltaic applications. Both systems share the benefit of photon recycling in a cavity and have therefore the potential to convert high-density radiant power to electricity at unprecedented efficiencies. Unlike PVCC that is optimized for the full content of the solar spectrum, the PowerSphere is designed to convert the monochromatic beam of a laser efficiently to electricity. The PowerSphere concept introduced here greatly benefits from recent advances in the area of high power, near-IR lasers and advanced bandgap engineering involving `tunable' III-V cells operating in the same range of the spectrum. Given this new scenario the spectral response of such cells can be perfectly tuned to the frequency of a high power laser to achieve conversion efficiencies in excess of 60%. Other key phenomena that allow achieving such high conversion rates are described in the main text of this paper. PowerSphere concept when fully developed can greatly contribute to the advancement of Laser Power Beaming technology for terrestrial, near-space and space applications. The paper explores the performance potential of Laser Power Beaming (LPB) systems using a PowerSphere as a receiver and discusses some of the critical issues that require further studies in this promising area of `Wireless Power Transmission'.

  11. Simulation of the interaction of positively charged beams and electron clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovik, Aleksandar

    2013-10-28

    The incoherent (head-tail) effect on the bunch due to the interaction with electron clouds (e-clouds) leads to a blow up of the transverse beam size in storage rings operating with positively charged beams. Even more the e-cloud effects are considered to be the main limiting factor for high current, high-brightness or high-luminosity operation of future machines. Therefore the simulation of e-cloud phenomena is a highly active field of research. The main focus in this work was set to a development of a tool for simulation of the interaction of relativistic bunches with non-relativistic parasitic charged particles. The result is the Particle-In-Cell Program MOEVE PIC Tracking which can track a 3D bunch under the influence of its own and external electromagnetic fields but first and foremost it simulates the interaction of relativistic positively charged bunches and initially static electrons. In MOEVE PIC Tracking the conducting beam pipe can be modeled with an arbitrary elliptical cross-section to achieve more accurate space charge field computations for both the bunch and the e-cloud. The simulation of the interaction between positron bunches and electron clouds in this work gave a detailed insight of the behavior of both particle species during and after the interaction. Further and ultimate goal of this work was a fast estimation of the beam stability under the influence of e-clouds in the storage ring. The standard approach to simulate the stability of a single bunch is to track the bunch particles through the linear optics of the machine by multiplying the 6D vector of each particle with the transformation matrices describing the lattice. Thereby the action of the e-cloud on the bunch is approximated by a pre-computed wake kick which is applied on one or more points in the lattice. Following the idea of K.Ohmi the wake kick was pre-computed as a two variable function of the bunch part exiting the e-cloud and the subsequent parts of a bunch which receive a

  12. Simulation of the interaction of positively charged beams and electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incoherent (head-tail) effect on the bunch due to the interaction with electron clouds (e-clouds) leads to a blow up of the transverse beam size in storage rings operating with positively charged beams. Even more the e-cloud effects are considered to be the main limiting factor for high current, high-brightness or high-luminosity operation of future machines. Therefore the simulation of e-cloud phenomena is a highly active field of research. The main focus in this work was set to a development of a tool for simulation of the interaction of relativistic bunches with non-relativistic parasitic charged particles. The result is the Particle-In-Cell Program MOEVE PIC Tracking which can track a 3D bunch under the influence of its own and external electromagnetic fields but first and foremost it simulates the interaction of relativistic positively charged bunches and initially static electrons. In MOEVE PIC Tracking the conducting beam pipe can be modeled with an arbitrary elliptical cross-section to achieve more accurate space charge field computations for both the bunch and the e-cloud. The simulation of the interaction between positron bunches and electron clouds in this work gave a detailed insight of the behavior of both particle species during and after the interaction. Further and ultimate goal of this work was a fast estimation of the beam stability under the influence of e-clouds in the storage ring. The standard approach to simulate the stability of a single bunch is to track the bunch particles through the linear optics of the machine by multiplying the 6D vector of each particle with the transformation matrices describing the lattice. Thereby the action of the e-cloud on the bunch is approximated by a pre-computed wake kick which is applied on one or more points in the lattice. Following the idea of K.Ohmi the wake kick was pre-computed as a two variable function of the bunch part exiting the e-cloud and the subsequent parts of a bunch which receive a

  13. Increasing the neutron flux at the beam tube position of the FRG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GKSS research center Geesthacht GmbH operates the MTR-type swimming pool research reactor FRG-1 (5MW) for 39 years. The FRG-1 has been converted in February 1991 from HEU (93 percent) to LEU (20 percent) in one step and at that time the core size was reduced from 49 to 26 fuel elements. Consequently the thermal neutron flux in beam tube positions could be increased by more than a factor of two. It is the strong intention of GKSS to continue the operation of the FRG-1 research reactor for at least an additional 15 years with high availability and utilization. The reactor has been operated during 1996 for more than 240 full power days. To prepare the FRG-1 for an efficient future use, a large set of nuclear calculation have been performed to reduce the core size in a second step step from the current 26 fuel elements to 12 fuel elements. To achieve this reduction the fuel loading has to be increased from 3,7 g U/cc to 4,8 g U/cc. The calculational results indicate that the increase in thermal neutron flux for the beam tube is between 50 percent and 160 percent depending on the position of the beam tube. The maximum axial integrated thermal neutron flux will be at the position of the cold neutron source increased 7.5 x 1013 to 12 X 1013 n/cm2 sec. The constructive modification for the new core facilities (gride plate with fraud and the frame for the reactor core) are finished and the application for the license is on the way. The thermohydraulic and safety calculations are on the way and will be completed autumn of 1998 to allow the application for a license for the core size reduction end of 1998. Comparing this conversion procedure with the first conversion procedure we are hopefully looking for a license in 2000. (author)

  14. A configurable electronics system for the ESS-Bilbao beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A versatile and configurable system has been developed in order to monitorize the beam position and to meet all the requirements of the future ESS-Bilbao Linac. At the same time the design has been conceived to be open and configurable so that it could eventually be used in different kinds of accelerators, independent of the charged particle, with minimal change. The design of the Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) system includes a test bench both for button-type pick-ups (PU) and striplines (SL), the electronic units and the control system. The electronic units consist of two main parts. The first part is an Analog Front-End (AFE) unit where the RF signals are filtered, conditioned and converted to base-band. The second part is a Digital Front-End (DFE) unit which is based on an FPGA board where the base-band signals are sampled in order to calculate the beam position, the amplitude and the phase. To manage the system a Multipurpose Controller (MC) developed at ESSB has been used. It includes the FPGA management, the EPICS integration and Archiver Instances. A description of the system and a comparison between the performance of both PU and SL BPM designs measured with this electronics system are fully described and discussed. -- Author-Highlights: • A versatile and configurable BPM system for the ESS-Bilbao Linac has been designed. • The design works for PU and SL detectors, both in continuous and pulsed wave modes. • Several tests at simulated beamlines at 352 MHz and 175 MHz have been performed. • The BPM system has been integrated in EPICS and Archiver

  15. A configurable electronics system for the ESS-Bilbao beam position monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muguira, L., E-mail: lmuguira@essbilbao.org [ESS-Bilbao, Edificio Rectorado, Vivero de Empresas, 48940 Leioa (Bizkaia) (Spain); Belver, D. [ESS-Bilbao, Edificio Rectorado, Vivero de Empresas, 48940 Leioa (Bizkaia) (Spain); Etxebarria, V. [University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Department of Electricity and Electronics, Science and Technology Faculty, 48940 Leioa (Bizkaia) (Spain); Varnasseri, S.; Arredondo, I.; Campo, M. del; Echevarria, P.; Garmendia, N.; Feuchtwanger, J. [ESS-Bilbao, Edificio Rectorado, Vivero de Empresas, 48940 Leioa (Bizkaia) (Spain); Jugo, J.; Portilla, J. [University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Department of Electricity and Electronics, Science and Technology Faculty, 48940 Leioa (Bizkaia) (Spain)

    2013-09-01

    A versatile and configurable system has been developed in order to monitorize the beam position and to meet all the requirements of the future ESS-Bilbao Linac. At the same time the design has been conceived to be open and configurable so that it could eventually be used in different kinds of accelerators, independent of the charged particle, with minimal change. The design of the Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) system includes a test bench both for button-type pick-ups (PU) and striplines (SL), the electronic units and the control system. The electronic units consist of two main parts. The first part is an Analog Front-End (AFE) unit where the RF signals are filtered, conditioned and converted to base-band. The second part is a Digital Front-End (DFE) unit which is based on an FPGA board where the base-band signals are sampled in order to calculate the beam position, the amplitude and the phase. To manage the system a Multipurpose Controller (MC) developed at ESSB has been used. It includes the FPGA management, the EPICS integration and Archiver Instances. A description of the system and a comparison between the performance of both PU and SL BPM designs measured with this electronics system are fully described and discussed. -- Author-Highlights: • A versatile and configurable BPM system for the ESS-Bilbao Linac has been designed. • The design works for PU and SL detectors, both in continuous and pulsed wave modes. • Several tests at simulated beamlines at 352 MHz and 175 MHz have been performed. • The BPM system has been integrated in EPICS and Archiver.

  16. Experimental demonstration of interaction region beam waist position knob for luminosity leveling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of the model-dependent control of the interaction region beam waist position (s* knob) at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The s* adjustment provides an alternative way of controlling the luminosity and is only known method to control the luminosity and reduce the pinch effect of the future eRHIC. In this paper, we will first demonstrate the effectiveness of the s* knob in luminosity controlling and its application in the future electron ion collider, eRHIC, followed by the detail experimental demonstration of such knob in RHIC.

  17. Progress of the APS high heat load X-ray beam position monitor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several novel design developments have been established for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) X-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) to improve its performance: (1) optimized geometric configuration of the monitor's sensory blades; (2) smart XBPM system with an intelligent digital signal processor, which provides a self-learning and calibration function; and (3) transmitting XBPM with prefiltering in the commissioning windows for the front end. In this write-up, the authors summarize the recent progress on the XBPM development for the APS ID front ends

  18. Progress of the APS high heat load x-ray beam position monitor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several novel design developments have been established for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) X-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) to improve its performance: - optimized geometric configuration of the monitor's sensory blades; - smart XBPM system with an intelligent digital signal processor, which provides a self-learning and calibration function; and - Transmitting XBPM with prefiltering in the commissioning windows for the front end. In this write-up, we summarize the recent progress on the XBPM development for the APS ID front ends

  19. Experimental demonstration of interaction region beam waist position knob for luminosity leveling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bai, Mei [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Advanced Simulation; Duan, Zhe [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Luo, Yun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, Aljosa [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, Guillaume [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shen, Xiaozhe [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of the model-dependent control of the interaction region beam waist position (s* knob) at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The s* adjustment provides an alternative way of controlling the luminosity and is only known method to control the luminosity and reduce the pinch effect of the future eRHIC. In this paper, we will first demonstrate the effectiveness of the s* knob in luminosity controlling and its application in the future electron ion collider, eRHIC, followed by the detail experimental demonstration of such knob in RHIC.

  20. Influence of positive ions on oscillatory processes in an electron beam with virtual cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, R. A.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Khramov, A. E.; Trubetskov, D. I.

    2006-10-01

    We numerically simulate the influence of positive ions on characteristics of the microwave oscillations in a nonrelativistic electron beam with the virtual cathode formed in a decelerating field (low-voltage vircator). A numerical scheme allowing for ionization of a residual gas by an electron flow is proposed. It is shown that the residual-gas ionization in the operating chamber of a low-voltage vircator leads to a forcing of the virtual cathode out of the transit gap and to a cutoff of microwave oscillations. The obtained numerical data are confirmed by an experimental study using a low-voltage vircator model.

  1. Beam size and position measurement based on logarithm processing algorithm in HLS II

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chaocai; Sun, Baogen; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, ZeRan; Lu, Ping; Wu, Fangfang; Wang, Jigang; Tang, Kai; Luo, Qing; Li, Hao; Zheng, Jiajun; Duan, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    A logarithm processing algorithm to measure beam transverse size and position is proposed and preliminary experimental results in Hefei Light Source II (HLS II) are given. The algorithm is based on only 4 successive channels of 16 anode channels of multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) R5900U-00-L16 which has typical rise time of 0.6 ns and effective area of 0.8x16 mm for a single anode channel. In the paper, we firstly elaborate the simulation results of the algorithm with and without chan...

  2. Generation of energetic He atom beams by a pulsed positive corona discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Shui-Yin; Lobo, Julio D.; Blumberg, Seth; Dibble, Theodore S.; Zhang, Xu; Tsao, Chun-Cheng; Okumura, Mitchio

    1997-01-01

    Time-of-flight measurements were made of neutral helium atom beams extracted from a repetitive, pulsed, positive-point corona discharge. Two strong neutral peaks, one fast and one slow, were observed, accompanied by a prompt photon peak and a fast ion peak. All peaks were correlated with the pulsing of the discharge. The two types of atoms appear to be formed by different mechanisms at different stages of the corona discharge. The fast atoms had energies of 190 eV and were formed at the onset...

  3. Determination of wafer center position during the transfer process by using the beam-breaking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wafer on a robot blade may slip due to inertia sliding during the acceleration or deceleration process. This study presents the implementation and experimental verification of a novel real-time wafer positioning system to be used during the transfer process. A system-integration computer program involving a human–machine interface (HMI) was also developed, exhibiting the following functions: (a) moving direction judgment; (b) notch-passing judgment; (c) indicating the sensor by which the notch passes; and (d) computing the wafer center in real time. The position of the wafer center is calculated based on the time-sequence of the beam-breaking signals from two optical sensors, and the geometric relations among the sensing points of the robot blade and wafer. When using eight-inch wafers, the experimental results indicated the capabilities of the proposed positioning system under various conditions, including distinct parameters regarding the moving direction, wafer displacement and notch-passing sensors. The accuracy and precision (repeatability) of the measurement in various conditions were calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the experimental results demonstrate that, after combining the novel wafer positioning system and HMI program, the proposed method can be used to compute the position of the wafer center in real time in various conditions. (paper)

  4. Determination of wafer center position during the transfer process by using the beam-breaking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Gen; Huang, Bo-Kai

    2014-09-01

    A wafer on a robot blade may slip due to inertia sliding during the acceleration or deceleration process. This study presents the implementation and experimental verification of a novel real-time wafer positioning system to be used during the transfer process. A system-integration computer program involving a human-machine interface (HMI) was also developed, exhibiting the following functions: (a) moving direction judgment; (b) notch-passing judgment; (c) indicating the sensor by which the notch passes; and (d) computing the wafer center in real time. The position of the wafer center is calculated based on the time-sequence of the beam-breaking signals from two optical sensors, and the geometric relations among the sensing points of the robot blade and wafer. When using eight-inch wafers, the experimental results indicated the capabilities of the proposed positioning system under various conditions, including distinct parameters regarding the moving direction, wafer displacement and notch-passing sensors. The accuracy and precision (repeatability) of the measurement in various conditions were calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the experimental results demonstrate that, after combining the novel wafer positioning system and HMI program, the proposed method can be used to compute the position of the wafer center in real time in various conditions.

  5. Nanoscale Soldering of Positioned Carbon Nanotubes using Highly Conductive Electron Beam Induced Gold Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Bøggild, Peter; Rasmussen, A.M.; Appel, C.C.; Brorson, M; Jacobsen, C.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for controlled positioning of carbon nanotubes followed by highly conductive contacting of the nanotubes, using electron beam assisted deposition of gold. The positioning and soldering process takes place inside an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E...... embedded in a carbon matrix. Nanoscale soldering of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) onto microelectrodes was achieved by deposition of a conducting gold line across a contact point between nanotube and electrode. The solderings were found to be mechanically stronger than the carbon nanotubes. We have......-SEM) in the presence of a source of gold-organic precursor gas. Bridges deposited between suspended microelectrodes show resistivities down to 10-4 Ωcm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the deposits reveals a dense core of gold particles surrounded by a crust of small gold nanoparticles...

  6. Ferrite loaded rf cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of a ferrite-loaded rf cavity is explained from the point of view of its operation. Then, an analysis of the automatic cavity-tuning system is presented using the transfer function; and a systematic analysis of a beam-feedback system using transfer functions is also presented. (author)

  7. Beam size and position measurement based on logarithm processing algorithm in HLS II

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Chaocai; Yang, Yongliang; Zhou, Zeran; Lu, Ping; Wu, Fangfang; Wang, Jigang; Tang, Kai; Luo, Qing; Li, Hao; Zheng, Jiajun; Duan, Qingming

    2015-01-01

    A logarithm processing algorithm to measure beam transverse size and position is proposed and preliminary experimental results in Hefei Light Source II (HLS II) are given. The algorithm is based on only 4 successive channels of 16 anode channels of multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) R5900U-00-L16 which has typical rise time of 0.6 ns and effective area of 0.8x16 mm for a single anode channel. In the paper, we firstly elaborate the simulation results of the algorithm with and without channel inconsistency. Then we calibrate the channel inconsistency and verify the algorithm using general current signal processor Libera Photon in low-speed scheme. Finally we get turn-by-turn beam size and position and calculate the vertical tune in high-speed scheme. The experimental results show that measured values fit well with simulation results after channel differences are calibrated and the fractional part of the tune in vertical direction is 0.3628 which is very close to the nominal value 0.3621.

  8. Performance of the beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance measurement and analysis of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) electronics are reported. The results indicate a BPM resolution of 0.16 μm·mA/√Hz in terms of the single-bunch current and BPM bandwidth. For the miniature insertion device (ID) BPM, the result was 0.1 μm·mA/√Hz. The improvement is due to the 3.6 times higher position sensitivity (in the vertical plane), which is partially canceled by the lower button signal by a factor of 2.3. The minimum single-bunch current required was roughly 0.03 mA. The long-term drift of the BPM electronics independent of the actual beam motion has measured at 2 μm/hr, which settled after approximately 1.5 hours. This drift can be attributed mainly to the temperature effect. Implications of the BPM resolution limit on the global and local orbit feedback systems for the APS storage ring will also be discussed. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Performance of the beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance measurement and analysis of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beam position monitor (BPM) electronics are reported. The results indicate a BPM resolution of 0.16 μm·mA/√Hz in terms of the single-bunch current and BPM bandwidth. For the miniature insertion device (ID) BPM, the result was 0.1 μm·mA/√Hz. The improvement is due to the 3.6 times higher position sensitivity (in the vertical plane), which is partially canceled by the lower button signal by a factor of 2.3. The minimum single-bunch current required was roughly 0.03 mA. The long-term drift of the BPM electronics independent of the actual beam motion was measured at 2 μm/hr, which settled after approximately 1.5 hours. This drift can be attributed mainly to the temperature effect. Implications of the BPM resolution limit on the global and local orbit feedback systems for the APS storage ring will also be discussed

  10. Positioning of self-assembled InAs quantum dots by focused ion beam implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) are envisioned as building blocks for realization of novel nanoelectronic devices, for which the site-selective growth is highly desirable. This thesis presents a successful route toward selective positioning of self-assembled InAs QDs on patterned GaAs surface by combination of in situ focused ion beam (FIB) implantation and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) technology. First, a buffer layer of GaAs was grown by MBE before a square array of holes with a pitch of 1-2 μm was fabricated by FIB implantation of Ga and In, ions respectively. Later, an in-situ annealing step followed by InAs deposition was performed. The InAs QDs were preferentially formed in the holes generated by FIB. The influence of ion dose, annealing parameters and InAs amount was investigated in this work. With optimized parameters, more than 50 % single dot occupancy per hole is achieved. Furthermore, the photoluminescence spectra from positioned QDs confirm their good optical quality. (orig.)

  11. Beam size and position measurement based on logarithm processing algorithm in HLS II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao-Cai, Cheng; Bao-Gen, Sun; Yong-Liang, Yang; Ze-Ran, Zhou; Ping, Lu; Fang-Fang, Wu; Ji-Gang, Wang; Kai, Tang; Qing, Luo; Hao, Li; Jia-Jun, Zheng; Qing-Ming, Duan

    2016-04-01

    A logarithm processing algorithm to measure beam transverse size and position is proposed and preliminary experimental results in Hefei Light Source II (HLS II) are given. The algorithm is based on only 4 successive channels of 16 anode channels of multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) R5900U-00-L16, which has typical rise time of 0.6 ns and effective area of 0.8×16 mm for a single anode channel. In the paper, we first elaborate the simulation results of the algorithm with and without channel inconsistency. Then we calibrate the channel inconsistency and verify the algorithm using a general current signal processor Libera Photon in a low-speed scheme. Finally we get turn-by-turn beam size and position and calculate the vertical tune in a high-speed scheme. The experimental results show that measured values fit well with simulation results after channel differences are calibrated, and the fractional part of the tune in vertical direction is 0.3628, which is very close to the nominal value 0.3621. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11005105, 11175173)

  12. Conceptual design of a high precision dual directional beam position monitoring system for beam crosstalk cancellation and improved output pulse shapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Relativistic Heavy Ions Collider (RHIC) would benefit from improved beam position measurements near the interaction points that see both beams, especially as the tolerances become tighter when reducing the beam sizes to obtain increased luminosity. Two limitations of the present beam position monitors (BPMs) would be mitigated if the proposed approach is successful. The small but unavoidable cross-talk between signals from bunches traveling in opposite directions when using conventional BPMs will be reduced by adopting directional BPMs. Further improvements will be achieved by cancelling residual cross-talk using pairs of such BPMs. Appropriately delayed addition and integration of the signals will also provide pulses with relatively flat maxima that will be easier to digitize by relaxing the presently very stringent timing requirements.

  13. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  14. Available calibration position of TLDs at the ICRU slab for photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adoption of the ICRU slab enables several dosimeters to be calibrated at the same time. In order to calibrate all dosimeters mounted at the ICRU slab with the same conversion coefficients, the dosimeters should be positioned at the same irradiation conditions within an agreeable variation. The irradiation conditions can be determined through a radiation quantity that includes incident and backscattered radiations. In this paper, the backscatter factor is employed to quantify the irradiation conditions. If the backscatter factor at the TLD position is the same as that of the TLD at the center of the front surface, the same conversion coefficient can be used for both TLDs because of the same irradiation conditions. In order to examine the irradiation conditions, the backscatter factors at the front surface of the ICRU slab were calculated for photon beams that are parallel and slanted at a 30 deg angle. Distribution of relative backscatter factors to that of the TLD positioned at the center were presented by contours. Consequently, deviations of backscatter factor for nine TLDs were within 3% except photon incidents around 100 keV. It is requested that available positions are refined to calibrate more dosimeters with a conversion coefficient at a time. (author)

  15. Summary of LHC MD 398: Verification of the dependence of the BCTF measurements on beam position and bunch length

    CERN Document Server

    Krupa, Michal; Gasior, Marek; Lefevre, Thibaut; Soby, Lars; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the MD was to study the dependency of bunch-by-bunch intensity measurements to beam position and bunch length variations. Large beam position offsets in IR4 and varying bunch length were introduced to compare the performance of the presently installed Fast Beam Current Transformers with the new Integrating Current Transformer and the new Wall Current Transformer. This note explains all the procedures of the LHC MD 398, which took place on 20/07/2015, and presents the obtained results.

  16. Performance of wire scanner beam profile monitors to determine the emittance and position of high power CW electron beams of the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NBS-LANL Race Track Microtron (RTM) injector produces a sub-millimeter diameter, 600 μA, 5 MeV CW electron beam. In order to steer and focus this electron beam and to measure its emittance and energy spread, a system of wire scanner beam profile monitors has been developed. Three wire scanners are mounted in a straight line with approximately one meter spacing for emittance measurements. The fourth wire scanner is positioned after a 450 bending magnet for energy spread measurements

  17. A read-out system for online monitoring of intensity and position of beam losses in electron linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In particle accelerators, beam loss position monitors (BLPM) are diagnostic systems revealing an interaction of the beam with the vacuum chamber or with other obstacles. They primarily measure the intensity of the beam loss by detecting particles from the electromagnetic shower in the proximity of the beam pipe. Through an appropriate detector configuration, this measurement also provides information about the longitudinal position of the beam loss along the beam line. This paper presents the design and performance of the BLPM system originally proposed and tested at the SPARC accelerator at Frascati National Laboratory (LNF) of INFN and, later, further developed in the framework of a collaboration with the FERMI-Elettra project at Sincrotrone Trieste. For both facilities, the monitoring of beam losses in permanent magnet undulators is of particular interest. The BLPM consists of quartz fibers stretched in parallel to the beam axis which collect the Cherenkov light generated by charged particles traversing them. Multi-pixel photon counters are used to transform the light into a proportional time dependent electric signal. The use of these simple but highly sensitive photon detectors instead of traditional photomultiplier tubes is an innovation over previous BLPM implementations. It has allowed the development of a compact and reliable read-out system at low cost. In daily use, the system provides information to machine protection and control systems for beam transport monitoring and optimization.

  18. Sensitivity and offset calibration for the beam position monitors at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam position monitors (BPMs) play a critically important role in commissioning and operation of accelerators. Accurate determination of the offsets relative to the magnetic axis and sensitivities of individual BPMs is thus needed. We will describe in this paper the schemes for calibrating all of the 360 BPMs for sensitivity and offset in the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring and the results. For the sensitivity calibration, a 2-dimensional map of the BPM response in the aluminum vacuum chamber is obtained theoretically, which is combined with the measured nonlinear response of the BPM electronics. A set of 2-dimensional polynomial coefficients is then obtained to approximate the result analytically. The offset calibration of the BPMs is done relative to the magnetic axis of the quadrupoles using the beam. This avoids the problem arising from various mechanical sources as well as the offset in the processing electronics. The measurement results for the resolution and long-term drift of the BPM electronics shows 0.06-μm/√Hz resolution and 2-μm/hr drift over a period of 1.5 hrs

  19. Calibration of the beam-position monitor system for the SLAC PEP-II B factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Beam-Position Monitors (BPM) for the PEP-II B Factory consist of four 1.5-cm diameter button style pickups mounted on the diagonals of the quadrupole vacuum chambers. Before installation of the vacuum chambers in the quadrupole assemblies, the electrical center of the BPMs is measured with respect to the mechanical center in a calibration test stand. In this paper the calibration test stand is described and the precision and accuracy of the calibrations are presented. After installation of the quadrupole assemblies in the PEP-II tunnel, the passive attenuation for each channel of the system is measured to preserve the accuracy of the calibration. Finally, the active electronics includes an onboard calibrator. Results for these portions of the calibration are presented

  20. Design, development and fabrication of improved beam position monitor sensor for LEHIPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prototype Beam Position Monitor (BPM) Sensor was developed for LEHIPA with an internal diameter of 65 mm, Teflon as dielectric material, vacuum compatibility of 10e-7 torr/l/s and push-fit connectors of 1GHz bandwidth. In order to meet the new requirement of 35 mm diameter and increased bandwidth of 3 GHz and to achieve better radiation hardness, an improved BPM sensor has been designed, developed and fabricated. Push-fit mechanism has been changed in mechanical design to improve the contact between the central pin of the connector and the sensor, maintaining 50Ω geometry. The simulations were carried out in CST Microwave Studio Suite. The sensor has been fabricated and tested for vacuum compatibility of the order of 10e-9 torr/l/s. The paper discusses the design and simulation results of improved BPM sensor. (author)

  1. Study on energy and position resolution of MWPC for the Beijing e/π test beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the research on the energy and position resolution of the MWPC used in the e/π Test Beam on BEPC (Beijing Electron Positron Collider), which localizes the particles of e/π by the readout method of gravity center of the induced charges on the cathode strips. The spatial resolution of about 0.24 mm and energy resolution of 17% for 5.9 keV γ photons are attained at the 3700 V anode voltage. For the 1.1 GeV electrons, the spatial resolution of 0.3 mm is obtained. The contributions of various factors to energy resolution are analysed. It is found that energy resolution is changed with the anode voltage and there exists a least energy resolution. The reasons for these are discussed. (authors)

  2. Optimization of Focal Position of Ultrasonic Beam in Measurement of Small Change in Arterial Wall Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaru; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2001-05-01

    We have previously developed a method for measurement of a small change in thickness of the arterial wall during a single cardiac cycle [H. Kanai, M. Sato, Y. Koiwa and N. Chubachi: IEEE Trans. UFFC 43 (1996) 791]. The resultant change in thickness is shown to be useful for the in vivo assessment of the regional elasticity of the arterial wall. Although the accuracy of the measurement of the change in thickness is found to be within 1 μm, it is affected by the interference of ultrasonic pulses. In this study, we simulate the propagation of ultrasonic pulses transmitted and received by a linear probe. In the simulation experiments, the ultrasonic pulses generated by a computer are reflected by a tube, which has a small change in wall thickness of 10 μm. The optimum focal position of the ultrasonic beam is determined by evaluating the root-mean-square (rms) error in the measured change in thickness.

  3. Advanced Photon Source RF Beam Position Monitor System Upgrade Design and Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lill, R; Singh, O

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring mono-pulse rf beam position monitor (BPM) system upgrade. The present rf BPM system requires a large dead time of 400 ns between the measured bunch and upstream bunch. The bunch pattern is also constrained by the required target cluster of six bunches of 7 mA minimum necessary to operate the receiver near the top end of the dynamic range. The upgrade design objectives involve resolving bunches spaced as closely as 100 ns. These design objectives require us to reduce receiver front-end losses and reflections. An improved trigger scheme that minimizes systematic errors is also required. The upgrade is in the final phases of installation and commissioning at this time. The latest experimental and commissioning data and results will be presented.

  4. Improved beam profile of a 266 nm deep ultraviolet laser employing a multi-mirror-reflected cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Houwen; Cheng, Wenyong; Wang, Junhua; Zhang, Yaguang; Wang, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Lijie

    2016-04-01

    A 266 nm deep ultraviolet (DUV) laser with a good Gaussian profile is reported employing a multi-mirror-reflected cavity. A type-I LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal is used to double the fundamental-light (1064 nm) wavelength generated by an actively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser with an intra-cavity configuration. A fourth harmonic generation (FHG) wavelength is obtained by a type-I β-BaB2O4 (BBO) crystal. The output power as high as 440 mW at 266 nm is generated under an incident power of 2.26 W at 532 nm, corresponding to the conversion efficiency of 532 nm-266 nm up to 19.5% with a repetition rate of 15 kHz and the pulse duration of 266 nm is 10.7 ns.

  5. Beam Dynamics Studies and the Design, Fabrication and Testing of Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity for High Intensity Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Arun [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-01

    The application horizon of particle accelerators has been widening significantly in recent decades. Where large accelerators have traditionally been the tools of the trade for high-energy nuclear and particle physics, applications in the last decade have grown to include large-scale accelerators like synchrotron light sources and spallation neutron sources. Applications like generation of rare isotopes, transmutation of nuclear reactor waste, sub-critical nuclear power, generation of neutrino beams etc. are next area of investigation for accelerator scientific community all over the world. Such applications require high beam power in the range of few mega-watts (MW). One such high intensity proton beam facility is proposed at Fermilab, Batavia, US, named as Project-X. Project-X facility is based on H- linear accelerator (linac), which will operate in continuous wave (CW) mode and accelerate H- ion beam with average current of 1 mA from kinetic energy of 2.5 MeV to 3 GeV to deliver 3MW beam power. One of the most challenging tasks of the Project-X facility is to have a robust design of the CW linac which can provide high quality beam to several experiments simultaneously. Hence a careful design of linac is important to achieve this objective.

  6. The Number of Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes and Pathological Tumor Depth Predicts Prognosis in Patients With Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The objective of this retrospective study was twofold: (1) to investigate prognostic factors for clinical outcomes in patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and (2) to identify specific prognostic subgroups that may help to guide treatment decisions. Methods and Materials: We examined 102 patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were followed for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. The 5-year rates of local control, neck control, distant metastasis, disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival served as main outcome measures. Results: The 5-year rates were as follows: local control (79%), neck control (64%), distant metastases (27%), disease-free survival (48%), disease-specific survival (52%), and overall survival (42%). Multivariable analysis showed that the number of pathologically positive nodes (≥4 vs. ≤3) was a significant predictor of neck control, distant metastasis, and disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates. In addition, the presence of tumor depth of ≥11 mm (vs. <11 mm) was a significant predictor of distant metastasis, disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates. The combination of the two predictors (26.5%, 27/102) was independently associated with poorer neck control (p = 0.0319), distant metastasis (p < 0.0001), and disease-free (p < 0.0001), disease-specific (p < 0.0001), and overall survival (p < 0.0001) rates. Conclusions: In patients with poorly differentiated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, the presence of at least 4 pathologically positive lymph nodes and of a pathological tumor depth ≥11 mm identifies a subset of subjects with poor clinical outcomes. Patients carrying both risk factors are suitable candidates for the development of novel therapeutic approaches.

  7. Latest Performance Results from the FONT5 Intra-train Beam Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Christian, G B; Bett, D R; Blaskovic Kraljevic, N; Burrows, P N; Davis, M R; Gerbershagen, A; Perry, C; Constance, B; Resta-Lopez, J

    2012-01-01

    A prototype Interaction Point beam-based feedback system for future electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider, has been designed and tested on the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The FONT5 intra-train feedback system aims to stabilize the beam orbit by correcting both the position and angle jitter in the vertical plane on bunch-tobunch time scales, providing micron-level stability at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system. The system comprises three stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) and two stripline kickers, custom low-latency analogue front-end BPM processors, a custom FPGA-based digital processing board with fast ADCs, and custom kickerdrive amplifiers. The latest results from beam tests at ATF2 will be presented, including the system latency and correction performance.

  8. Study of the new CSAR62 positive tone electron-beam resist at 40 keV electron energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andok, R.; Bencurova, A.; Vutova, K.; Koleva, E.; Nemec, P.; Hrkut, P.; Kostic, I.; Mladenov, G.

    2016-03-01

    One of the few "top-down" methods for nano-device fabrication is the electron-beam lithography, which allows flexible patterning of various structures with a nanoscale resolution down to less than 10 nm. Thinner, more etching durable, and more sensitive e-beam resists are required for the better control, linearity, and uniformity of critical dimensions of structures for nano-device fabrication. Within the last decade, researchers have made significant efforts to improve the resolution of the nanoscale e-beam lithography. The resist material properties are an important factor governing the resolution. Only the e-beam resist ZEP 520 of the Japanese manufacturer ZEON is characterized by relatively good properties and thus meets most users' expectations. This paper deals with the investigation and simulation of the characteristics of the new less-expensive AR-P 6200 (CSAR 62) positive e-beam resist (available since May 2013, manufactured by Allresist GmbH company).

  9. A Positional X-ray Instrumentation Test Stand For Beam-Line Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoleyczik, Jonathan; Prieskorn, Z.; Burrows, D. N.; Falcone, A.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-axis, motion controlled test stand has been built in the PSU 47 m X-ray beam-line for the purpose of testing X-ray instrumentation and mirrors using parallel rays. The test stand is capable of translation along two axes and rotation about two axes with motorized fine position control. The translation stages have a range of motion of 200 mm with a movement accuracy of ± 2.5 microns. Rotation is accomplished with a two-axis gimbal which can rotate 360° about one axis and 240° about another; movement with ± 35 arcsecond accuracy are achieved in both axes. The position and status are monitored using a LabView program. An XCalibr source with multiple target materials is used as an X-ray source and can produce multiple lines between 0.8 and 8 keV. Some sample spectra are shown from a Si-PIN diode detector. This system is well suited for testing X-ray mirror segments which are currently being developed.

  10. Relevance of head motion in dental cone-beam CT scanner images depending on patient positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of head motion on the reconstruction image quality in relation to patient positioning in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems. This study should be intended as the first step to evaluate the effect of the head movements also in more stringent conditions. Head motion was monitored using an EasyTrack-500 system in three acquisition conditions: lying down, sitting and standing. Motion was simulated on a cylinder used to calculate the modulation transfer function in order to quantify the resolution loss associated with it. In none of the three acquisition layouts, head motion could be avoided. As expected head rotation angles are found to be smaller in the lying down configuration than in the sitting and standing ones. In the latter there is a probability of 30% of cases with high excursion rotation angles which would have a clearly perceptible lower image quality. Patient positioning during CBCT scanning can significantly influence occurrence of motion. This should be taken into account when very high image resolution is required in particular in patients that for age or clinical conditions may have difficulties in staying still. (orig.)

  11. Scanning wire beam position monitor for alignment of a high brightness inverse-Compton x-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Hadmack, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    The Free-Electron Laser Laboratory at the University of Hawai`i has constructed and tested a scanning wire beam position monitor to aid the alignment and optimization of a high spectral brightness inverse-Compton scattering x-ray source. X-rays are produced by colliding the 40 MeV electron beam from a pulsed S-band linac with infrared laser pulses from a mode-locked free-electron laser driven by the same electron beam. The electron and laser beams are focused to 60 {\\mu}m diameters at the interaction point to achieve high scattering efficiency. This wire-scanner allows for high resolution measurements of the size and position of both the laser and electron beams at the interaction point to verify spatial coincidence. Time resolved measurements of secondary emission current allow us to monitor the transverse spatial evolution of the e-beam throughout the duration of a 4 {\\mu}s macro-pulse while the laser is simultaneously profiled by pyrometer measurement of the occulted infrared beam. Using this apparatus we ...

  12. A novel diamond-based beam position monitoring system for the High Radiation to Materials facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2092886; Höglund, Carina

    The High Radiation to Materials facility employs a high intensity pulsed beam imposing several challenges on the beam position monitors. Diamond has been shown to be a resilient material with its radiation hardness and mechanical strength, while it is also simple due to its wide bandgap removing the need for doping. A new type of diamond based beam position monitor has been constructed, which includes a hole in the center of the diamond where the majority of the beam is intended to pass through. This increases the longevity of the detectors as well as allowing them to be used for high intensity beams. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the performance of the detectors in the High Radiation to Materials facility for various beam parameters, involving differences in position, size, bunch intensity and bunch number. A prestudy consisting of calibration of the detectors using single incident particles is also presented. The detectors are shown to work as intended after a recalibration of the algorithm, alb...

  13. Implementation of electron beam position measurement algorithm and embedded web server using MCS-51 microcontroller for Booster Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Booster Synchrotron at RRCAT caters as Injector Machine for Indus-1 and Indus-2 with the repetition rate of 1Hz. In Booster Synchrotron, energy of electron bunches are increased from 20 MeV to 450 MeV (in ∼ 280 ms) and 550 MeV (in ∼ 340 ms ) for Indus-1 and Indus-2 respectively. An algorithm for microcontroller based beam position measurement system has been developed for the Booster Synchrotron to measure the fast changes in the beam position of electron bunches during energy ramping. In this paper, software implementation in microcontroller and its optimization to achieve beam position update rate of 1 kHz is discussed. (author)

  14. Influence of standing positions and beam projections on effective dose and eye lens dose of anaesthetists in interventional procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Y; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Vargas, C S; Schoonjans, W; Zhuo, W H

    2015-02-01

    More and more anaesthetists are getting involved in interventional radiology procedures and so it is important to know the radiation dose and to optimise protection for anaesthetists. In this study, based on Monte Carlo simulations and field measurements, both the whole-body doses and eye lens dose of anaesthetists were studied. The results showed that the radiation exposure to anaesthetists not only depends on their workload, but also largely varies with their standing positions and beam projections during interventional procedures. The simulation results showed that the effective dose to anaesthetists may vary with their standing positions and beam projections to more than a factor of 10, and the eye lens dose may vary with the standing positions and beam projections to more than a factor of 200. In general, a close position to the bed and the left lateral (LLAT) beam projection will bring a high exposure to anaesthetists. Good correlations between the eye lens dose and the doses at the neck, chest and waist over the apron were observed from the field measurements. The results indicate that adequate arrangements of anaesthesia device or other monitoring equipment in the fluoroscopy rooms are useful measures to reduce the radiation exposure to anaesthetists, and anaesthetists should be aware that they will receive the highest doses under left lateral beam projection. PMID:24795393

  15. Influence of standing positions and beam projections on effective dose and eye lens dose of anaesthetists in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More and more anaesthetists are getting involved in interventional radiology procedures and so it is important to know the radiation dose and to optimise protection for anaesthetists. In this study, based on Monte Carlo simulations and field measurements, both the whole-body doses and eye lens dose of anaesthetists were studied. The results showed that the radiation exposure to anaesthetists not only depends on their workload, but also largely varies with their standing positions and beam projections during interventional procedures. The simulation results showed that the effective dose to anaesthetists may vary with their standing positions and beam projections to more than a factor of 10, and the eye lens dose may vary with the standing positions and beam projections to more than a factor of 200. In general, a close position to the bed and the left lateral (LLAT) beam projection will bring a high exposure to anaesthetists. Good correlations between the eye lens dose and the doses at the neck, chest and waist over the apron were observed from the field measurements. The results indicate that adequate arrangements of anaesthesia device or other monitoring equipment in the fluoroscopy rooms are useful measures to reduce the radiation exposure to anaesthetists, and anaesthetists should be aware that they will receive the highest doses under left lateral beam projection. (authors)

  16. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi, E-mail: fukumitsun@yahoo.co.jp [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Okumura, Toshiyuki; Mizumoto, Masashi; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashii, Haruko; Ohkawa, Ayako; Moritake, Takashi; Tsuboi, Koji [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Tabuchi, Keiji; Wada, Tetsuro; Hara, Akira [Department of Otolaryngology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30-83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22-82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4-89.6 GyE over 30-64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  17. Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Carcinoma Treated With Proton Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients (13 men, 4 women) with unresectable carcinomas of the NCPS who underwent PBT at University of Tsukuba between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. The patients' median age was 62 years (range, 30–83 years). The tumors were located in the nasal cavity in 3 patients, the frontal sinus in 1, the ethmoid sinus in 9, and the maxillary sinus in 4. The clinical stage was Stage IVA in 5 cases, IVB in 10, and recurrent in 2. The tumors were deemed unresectable for medical reasons in 16 patients and because of refusal at a previous hospital 4 months earlier in 1 patient. All the patients received PBT irradiation dose of 22–82.5 GyE and a total of 72.4–89.6 GyE over 30–64 fractions (median 78 GyE over 36 fractions) with X-ray, with attention not exceeding the delivery of 50 GyE to the optic chiasm and brainstem. Results: The overall survival rate was 47.1% at 2 years and 15.7% at 5 years, and the local control rate was 35.0% at 2 years and 17.5% at 5 years. Invasion of the frontal or sphenoid sinus was a prognostic factor for overall survival or local control. Late toxicity of more than Grade 3 was found in 2 patients (brain necrosis in 1 and ipsilateral blindness in 1); however, no mortal adverse effects were observed. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy enabled a reduced irradiation dose to the optic chiasm and brainstem, enabling the safe treatment of unresectable carcinomas in the NCPS. Superior or posterior extension of the tumor influenced patient outcome.

  18. Generation of energetic He atom beams by a pulsed positive corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-of-flight measurements were made of neutral helium atom beams extracted from a repetitive, pulsed, positive-point corona discharge. Two strong neutral peaks, one fast and one slow, were observed, accompanied by a prompt photon peak and a fast ion peak. All peaks were correlated with the pulsing of the discharge. The two types of atoms appear to be formed by different mechanisms at different stages of the corona discharge. The fast atoms had energies of 190 eV and were formed at the onset of the pulsing, approximately 0.7 μs before the maximum of the photon peak. The slow peak, composed of electronically metastable He atoms, originated 30 50 μs after the photon pulse, and possessed a nearly thermal velocity distribution. The velocity distribution was typical of an undisturbed supersonic expansion with a stagnation temperature of 131 K and a speed ratio of 3.6. Peak intensities and velocities were measured as a function of source voltage, stagnation pressure, and skimmer voltage. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  19. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  20. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  1. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  2. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam

  3. Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  4. Formation of ultra slow position beam and upgrading of material evaluation using it

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikado, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Odaira, Toshiyuki; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yamada, Kawakatsu; Yamazaki, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Hirata, Koichi [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    The Electrotechnical Laboratory has carried out development on a technique to form and control high intensity and slow positron beam by using high energy electron beam of electron accelerator, success in generation of ultra short pulse beam of incident energy variable positron with the highest intensity in the world, development on testing techniques of positron life, spectroscopic flight time of positron annihilation excited Auger electron and so on, and their applications. The 1998 fiscal year was the last fiscal year of this researching project, and together with conducting reform of forming method of high intensity positron beam, energy analysis of ultra slow positron beam and upgrading of incident energy variable positron lifetime testing the testing technique of the positron annihilation excited Auger electron spectroscopy and positron lifetime developed by this study was applied to various samples and effectiveness of analysis and evaluation methods using the ultra slow positron beam was investigated. As a result, it was succeeded in to make high intensity of 1 eV plus/minus 0.5 eV in energy And, on the positron annihilation excited Auger electron spectroscopy, at lifetime measurement of about 40 eV short pulse beam and incident energy variable positron beam, 0.2 to 0.3 keV short pulse positron beam could be formed to realize a material evaluation method with high counting rate, low background and high resolution. (G.K.)

  5. Formation of ultra slow position beam and upgrading of material evaluation using it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electrotechnical Laboratory has carried out development on a technique to form and control high intensity and slow positron beam by using high energy electron beam of electron accelerator, success in generation of ultra short pulse beam of incident energy variable positron with the highest intensity in the world, development on testing techniques of positron life, spectroscopic flight time of positron annihilation excited Auger electron and so on, and their applications. The 1998 fiscal year was the last fiscal year of this researching project, and together with conducting reform of forming method of high intensity positron beam, energy analysis of ultra slow positron beam and upgrading of incident energy variable positron lifetime testing the testing technique of the positron annihilation excited Auger electron spectroscopy and positron lifetime developed by this study was applied to various samples and effectiveness of analysis and evaluation methods using the ultra slow positron beam was investigated. As a result, it was succeeded in to make high intensity of 1 eV plus/minus 0.5 eV in energy And, on the positron annihilation excited Auger electron spectroscopy, at lifetime measurement of about 40 eV short pulse beam and incident energy variable positron beam, 0.2 to 0.3 keV short pulse positron beam could be formed to realize a material evaluation method with high counting rate, low background and high resolution. (G.K.)

  6. Development of a High Dynamic Range Beam Position Measurement system using Logarithmic Amplifiers for the SPS at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, J L; Deplano, C; Savioz, J J

    2013-01-01

    A new Front-End electronics, based on Logarithmic Amplifiers, is currently being developed for the CERN SPS Multi Orbit POsition System (MOPOS). The aim is to resolve the multi-batch structure of the beams and cope with their large intensity range (> 70 dB). Position and intensity signals are digitized in the Front-End electronics installed in the tunnel. The data are then transmitted over a serial fibre-optic link to a VME Digital Acquisition board located in surface buildings. A first prototype, equipped with a calibration system, has been successfully tested on the SPS under different beam conditions, including single bunch, 25 ns and 50 ns bunch trains. The system architecture and the first beam measurements are reported in this paper

  7. Error analysis of linear optics measurements via turn-by-turn beam position data in circular accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Franchi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced techniques have been developed, tested and implemented in the last decades in almost all circular accelerators across the world to measure the linear optics. However, the greater availability and accuracy of beam diagnostics and the ever better correction of linear magnetic lattice imperfections (beta beating at 1% level and coupling at 0.1%) are reaching what seems to be the intrinsic accuracy and precision of different measurement techniques. This paper aims to highlight and quantify, when possible, the limitations of one standard method, the harmonic analysis of turn-by-turn beam position data. To this end, new analytic formulas for the evaluation of lattice parameters modified by focusing errors are derived. The unexpected conclusion of this study is that for the ESRF storage ring (and possibly for any third generation light source operating at ultra-low coupling and with similar diagnostics), measurement and correction of linear optics via orbit beam position data are to be preferred to the...

  8. Energy resolution methods efficiency depending on beam source position of potassium clusters in time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ş Şentürk; F Demiray; O Özsoy

    2007-09-01

    Energy resolution of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer was considered. The estimations indicate that the time-lag energy focusing method provides better resolution for the parallel case while the turnaround time is more convenient for the perpendicular position. Hence the applicability of the methods used for the energy resolution depends on beam source arrangement.

  9. MRI- Versus CT-Based Volume Delineation of Lumpectomy Cavity in Supine Position in Breast-Conserving Therapy: An Exploratory Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for lumpectomy cavity (LC) volume delineation in supine radiotherapy treatment position and to assess the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 breast cancer patients underwent a planning CT and directly afterward MRI in supine radiotherapy treatment position. Then, 4 observers (2 radiation oncologists and 2 radiologists) delineated the LC on the CT and MRI scans and assessed the cavity visualization score (CVS). The CVS, LC volume, conformity index (CI), mean shift of the center of mass (COM), with the standard deviation, were quantified for both CT and MRI. Results: The CVS showed that MRI and CT provide about equal optimal visibility of the LC. If the CVS was high, magnetic resonance imaging provided more detail of the interfaces of the LC seroma with the unaffected GBT. MRI also pictured in more detail the interfaces of axillary seromas (if present) with their surroundings and their relationship to the LC. Three observers delineated smaller, and one observer larger, LC volumes comparing the MRI- and CT-derived delineations. The mean ± standard deviation CI was 32% ± 25% for MRI and 52% ± 21% for CT. The mean ± standard deviation COM shift was 11 ± 10 mm (range 1–36) for MRI and 4 ± 3 mm (range 1–10) for CT. Conclusions: MRI does not add additional information to CT in cases in which the CVS is assessed as low. The conformity (CI) is lower for MRI than for CT, especially at a low CVS owing to greater COM shifts for MRI, probably caused by inadequate visibility of the surgical clips on magnetic resonance (MR) images. The COM shifts seriously dictate a decline in the CI more than the variability of the LC volumes does. In cases in which MRI provides additional information, MRI must be combined with the CT/surgical clip data.

  10. Smooth e-beam-deposited tin-doped indium oxide for III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser intracavity contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. T.; Cohen, D. A.; Yonkee, B. P.; Farrell, R. M.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-10-01

    We carried out a series of simulations analyzing the dependence of mirror reflectance, threshold current density, and differential efficiency on the scattering loss caused by the roughness of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) intracavity contacts for 405 nm flip-chip III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). From these results, we determined that the ITO root-mean-square (RMS) roughness should be Motivated by this requirement, we investigated the surface morphology and optoelectronic properties of electron-beam (e-beam) evaporated ITO films, as a function of substrate temperature and oxygen flow and pressure. The transparency and conductivity were seen to increase with increasing temperature. Decreasing the oxygen flow and pressure resulted in an increase in the transparency and resistivity. Neither the temperature, nor oxygen flow and pressure series on single-layer ITO films resulted in highly transparent and conductive films with <1 nm RMS roughness. To achieve <1 nm RMS roughness with good optoelectronic properties, a multi-layer ITO film was developed, utilizing a two-step temperature scheme. The optimized multi-layer ITO films had an RMS roughness of <1 nm, along with a high transparency (˜90% at 405 nm) and low resistivity (˜2 × 10-4 Ω-cm). This multi-layer ITO e-beam deposition technique is expected to prevent p-GaN plasma damage, typically observed in sputtered ITO films on p-GaN, while simultaneously reducing the threshold current density and increasing the differential efficiency of III-nitride VCSELs.

  11. Operational experience with crab cavities at KEKB

    OpenAIRE

    Funakoshi, Y.; Group, for the KEKB Commissioning

    2014-01-01

    KEKB was in operation from December 1988 to June 2010. The crab cavities were installed at KEKB in February 2007 and worked very stably until the end of KEKB operation. Operational experience of the crab cavities with beams is described.

  12. Tuning the Sensitivity of an Optical Cavity with Slow and Fast Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, H.; Toftul, A.; Schambeau, C.; Odutola, J. A.; Diels, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured mode pushing by the dispersion of a rubidium vapor in a Fabry-Perot cavity and have shown that the scale factor and sensitivity of a passive cavity can be strongly enhanced by the presence of such an anomalous dispersion medium. The enhancement is the result of the atom-cavity coupling, which provides a positive feedback to the cavity response. The cavity sensitivity can also be controlled and tuned through a pole by a second, optical pumping, beam applied transverse to the cavity. Alternatively, the sensitivity can be controlled by the introduction of a second counter-propagating input beam that interferes with the first beam, coherently increasing the cavity absorptance. We show that the pole in the sensitivity occurs when the sum of the effective group index and an additional cavity delay factor that accounts for mode reshaping goes to zero, and is an example of an exceptional point, commonly associated with coupled non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems. Additionally we show that a normal dispersion feature can decrease the cavity scale factor and can be generated through velocity selective optical pumping

  13. Prototype superconducting radio-frequency cavity for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    This niobium superconducting cavity was part of the prototype stages for an upgrade to LEP, known as LEP-2. Superconducting cavities would eventually replace the traditional copper cavities and allow beam energies of 100 GeV.

  14. Production of helium and helium-hydrogen positive ion beams for the alpha particle measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to produce diagnostic helium neutral beam for alpha particle measurement in nuclear fusion plant of deuterium-tritium reation, helium ion (He+) or helium-hydrogen ion (HeH+) beams of ∼20 keV have been considered as a primary beam. For He+ beam, it is important to produce focused high-current-density ion beam in order to pass through small apertures of alkali gas cell with an enough signal level. For HeH+ beam, conditions producing HeH+ has not been investigated in detail as yet. In order to extract these beams, focused high-current-density neutral beam system is applied. For He+ beam extraction of ∼22 kV, it is confirmed that current density of ∼86 mA/cm2 is achieved, whose value is close to necessary value in ITER. For HeH+ beam extraction in the case of ∼300 V acceleration, the production rate of HeH+ component increases with the increase of helium gas pressure ratio to hydrogen gas pressure when its value is > ∼75%. In the case of 25 kV acceleration, if 15% of total current (which includes H+, H2+, H3+, He+ and HeH+ components) is HeH+ component, current density of HeH+ is estimated as ∼13 mA/cm2, whose value is larger than necessary value in ITER. From melted traces of the target plate, it is estimated that the divergence angle is about ±0.8deg. (author)

  15. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. Results The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. Conclusion The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients. PMID:27358820

  16. Development of an optical inspection bench for the inspection of internal surfaces of 650 MHz SCRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical inspection system has been developed for inspection of internal surfaces of 650 MHz superconducting RF cavities. The cavity parts are welded either using Electron Beam or Laser Beam Welding for making a good quality of weld joints. Surface defects like pits, scratches, welding spatters etc. on the internal surface of the cavity deteriorates cavity performance. Surface quality of the cavity equator joint plays an important role in the cavity performance. To study the quality of equator surface, the inspection bench offers high resolution images with a linear resolution of 45 m/pixel at a distance of ∼200 mm. The bench comprises of two major sub-systems, optical imaging system and cavity positioning system. A digital camera and multi coloured illumination system is used to obtain high resolution images. The camera is mounted inside a long cylindrical tube. The cylindrical tube can be inserted into a SCRF cavity. The length of the cylinder is long enough to inspect five-cell 650 MHz SCRF cavity. The cavity is placed on a set of PTFE rollers, which are mounted on a trolley. The cavity can be moved linearly with the help of ball screw-servomotor mechanism. The camera along with cylindrical tube can be rotated around its axis with a stepper motor to scan the cavity's internal surface. The paper presents the details about the optical inspection bench and optical inspection results. (author)

  17. Design of planar pick-ups for beam position monitor in the bunch compressor at FLASH and XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelovski, Aleksandar; Penirschke, Andreas; Jakoby, Rolf [Institut fuer Mikrowellentechnik und Photonik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Sydlo, Cezary; Mavric, Uros; Gerth, Christopher [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    For obtaining ultra short electron bunches at the Free Electron Laser at DESY (FLASH) the beam is compressed in magnetic chicanes. During the compression process the precise knowledge of the energy of the bunches is essential for the longitudinal dynamics control. The measurement of the beam position in the chicane allows for non-destructive measurements of the energy. For that purpose, two stripline pick-ups perpendicular to the beam direction are installed in the chicane at FLASH as a part of the Beam Position Monitor. The recent upgrade in the electronics as well as the increased aperture and length of the beam pipe (for the European XFEL) requires the design of new pick-ups which will fulfill the new demands. Namely, the pick-ups should have maximum signal at 3 GHz with minimum reflections. In this talk, we will present the design of planar transmission line pick-ups for FLASH and XFEL. The planar design of the pick-ups can provide for a proper impedance matching to the subsequent electronics as well as sufficient mechanical stability along the aperture when using alumina substrate. A prototype of the pick-ups was build and installed in a non-hermetic body. The measured S parameters are compared to the simulation.

  18. Development of gas cluster ion beam surface treatments for reducing field emission and breakdown in RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, D R; Degenkolb, E; Wu, A T; Insepov, Z

    2006-11-01

    Sub-micron-scale surface roughness and contamination cause field emission that can lead to high voltage breakdown of electrodes, and these are limiting factors in the development of high gradient RF technology. We are studying various Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) treatments to smooth, clean, etch and/or chemically alter electrode surfaces to allow higher fields and accelerating gradients, and to reduce the time and cost of conditioning high voltage electrodes. For this paper, we have processed Nb, Stainless Steel, and Ti electrode materials using beams of Ar, O2, or NF3 +O2 clusters with accelerating potentials up to 35 kV. Using a Scanning Field Emission Microscope (SFEM), we have repeatedly seen a dramatic reduction in the number of field emission sites on Nb coupons treated with GCIB. Smoothing effects on Stainless steel and Ti substrates have been evaluated using AFM imaging and show that 200-nm wide polishing scratch marks are greatly attenuated. A 150-mm diameter GCIB treated stainless steel electrode has now shown virtually no DC field emission current at gradients over 20 MV/m.

  19. Generation of electron beams in cyclotron motion and its interaction with electromagnetic fields in weakly irregular cavities: a study applied to conceptual elaboration of a 35 GHz gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is presented an investigation of different phenomena that occur in the gyrotron: 1) generation and transport of helical electron beams, 2) interaction of electrons in cyclotron motion with a transverse electric mode in resonant cavities operating near cutoff and 3) electron deposition over the collector active region. An exact ballistic model, which points out the nonlinear attributes of the relativistic equation of electron cyclotron motion and that includes a complex formulation for the longitudinal electric field distribution in weakly irregular waveguides, is used. Physically realizable RF field profiles are studied with the objective of maximizing gyrotron efficiency. For this purpose, an investigation is made of the resonant properties of truncated cones cavities and a new resonator type, with a profile described in terms of a continuous function, is developed. High perpendicular efficiencies (ηperpendicularMAX=0.86) have been calculated for interaction at the fundamental 1cyclotron harmonic and for uniform external magnetic field. A maximum efficiency scaling parameter S has been introduced, by which scaling relations ηperpendicularMAX= ηperpendicularMAX (S) are applicable to a variety of field profiles. The conceptual design of a 35 GHz gyrotron gives emphasis to selection criteria of operating parameters in compliance with technical constraints and with the requirement of soft self-excited oscillations. The proposed gyrotron operates in the azimuthally symetrical mode TE021 and is able to produce, with an electronic efficiency of 40%, an output power of 100 kW, in pulses of 20 ms, with a duty factor of 0.04%. (author)

  20. Design of linear-cut beam position monitor in rapid cycling synchrotron of China spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam position monitor (BPM) is an important part of the beam measurement system. In this article, by introducing the coupling capacitance (plate-to-plate crosstalk) and the difference capacitance of two electrodes into the formula of the linear-cut BPM by difference over sum method, the reasons of the low sensitivity and the offset of the electrical center of the BPM were got. The relationship between geometry and electronics parameters by combining the formulas and the calculated results of the CST program were obtained. Finally, by considering the requirements of the CSNS-RCS and electronics, the optimized geometry and the electronics parameters of the BPM were got. (authors)

  1. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  2. Progress towards crab cavity solutions for the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; /Lancaster U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2006-06-01

    In order to achieve acceptable luminosity for ILC crossing angles greater than 2 mrad, RF deflection cavities must be used to rotate electron and position bunches leading up to the IP. A bunch that passes through a deflection cavity at a phase where the deflection averages to zero, receives a crab kick leading to a finite rotation at the IP. For a beam energy of 500 GeV and a crossing angle of 20 mrad the required crab kick is about 11.4 MV at 1.3 GHz and 3.8 MV at 3.9 GHz. Cavities are needed on both beams and are likely to be positioned about 12 m before the IP. Any RF phase error between the bunch and the cavity leads to a deflection of the bunch in addition to a rotation of the bunch. Any differential phase error between the cavities leads to differing deflections and consequential loss in luminosity. An updated analysis of system requirements and phase tolerances with respect to original calculations [1] is given. Issues on cavity and frequency choice are discussed.

  3. Ionization profilemeter of the beam position on the target of the fragment-separator COMBAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work principle of new ionization profilemeter design and results of its testing at the 30 MeV/n ion 40Ar beam are described. The beam density distribution over its cross section obtained with using this equipment is showed. The space resolution of this profilemeter design is 1 x 1 mm. The beam image obtained with using the fluorescent screen is showed for the comparison. It is fixed that the minimum value of the current of the beam, for which its profile can be measured, is 3 nA. The profile distribution is measured at two pressures of the residual gas 2 · 10-3 and 7 · 10-3 Pa. (author)

  4. Effect of horizontal fast electron beam position feedback on the performance of ESRF beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESRF is a state of the art third generation synchrotron light source optimized to produce very bright and collimated hard X-ray beams using insertion devices. Instabilities of the electron beam, resulting in source point transverse displacements, spoil these outstanding beam qualities. At the beginning of operation a fast active feedback system was installed to damp the transverse motion of the electron beam in the vertical plane. Recently it became evident that also the relatively smaller horizontal instabilities may have specific detrimental effects on the operation of particularly sensitive beamlines. The dispersive XAS beamline (ID24) was the first to benefit from the activation of a local horizontal feedback. Optimized to perform time-resolved studies and high-pressure experiments, its operation was strongly perturbed. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to identify and solve these problems, presenting the outcome of the implementation of a fast orbit feedback on this beamline

  5. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  6. Experimental Test of Data Analysis Methods from Staggered Pair X-ray Beam Position Monitors at Bending Magnet Beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different methods have been proposed to calculate the vertical position of the photon beam centroid from the four blade currents of staggered pair X-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) at bending magnet beamlines since they emerged about 15 years ago. The original difference-over-sum method introduced by Peatman and Holldack is still widely used, even though it has been proven to be rather inaccurate at large beam displacements. By systematically generating bumps in the electron orbit of the ANKA storage ring and comparing synchronized data from electron BPMs and XBPM blade currents, we have been able to show that the log-ratio method by S. F. Lin, B.G. Sun et al. is superior (meaning the characteristic being closer to linear) to the ratio method, which in turn is superior to the difference over sum method. These findings are supported by simulations of the XBPM response to changes of the beam centroid. The heuristic basis for each of the methods is investigated. The implications on using XBPM readings for orbit correction are discussed

  7. Guided access cavity preparation using cone-beam computed tomography and optical surface scans - an ex vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, J; Buchgreitz, M; Mortensen, D;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate ex vivo, the accuracy of a preparation procedure planned for teeth with pulp canal obliteration (PCO) using a guide rail concept based on a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan merged with an optical surface scan. METHODOLOGY: A total of 48 teeth were mounted in acrylic blocks....... An apical canal preparation was created to simulate remnants of an apical root canal that acted as the target for a drill path. The test blocks were surface scanned, and merged with a CBCT scan, and a guide rail was made. A pathway for the bur was created through a metal sleeve within the guide rail...... into dentine. The distance was measured between the centres of the performed drill path and the apical target by two examiners. A maximum distance of 0.7 mm was defined based on the radius of the bur (0.6 mm) and the radius of a root canal just visible on a radiograph (0.1 mm). The t-test was used for...

  8. Beam deflection into a quadrant by a positionally stationary magnetic bending system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of postionally stationary magnets is analyzed for the continuously variable deflection of a 50 MeV electron beam. The system is composed of a collection of horizontal and vertical bending magnets, quadrupoles, and a final deflection magnet that is conical in shape and capable of deflections of plus or minus 50 degrees simultaneously in both horizonal and vertical planes. Throughout the system the beam is assumed to be focused by its own magnetic self-field, the electric self-field being neutralized by background ions. The motion of the beam in the externally applied magnetic fields may then be considered as single particle motion. The system of bending magnets and quadrupoles pre-conditions the beam by introducing the proper displacements and angles at the entrance to the final deflection magnet for momentum deviations up to plus or minus one percent. The displacements and angles are determined by the chromaticity of the final deflection and are a function of the bending angles in the two planes. The total system is then doubly achromatic in both planes. The preconditioning magnets are of standard accelerator beam transport design while the conical deflection magnet is of a design fashioned from a television deflection coil scaled up by about a factor of 10 in size

  9. Errors in Measuring Transverse and Energy Jitter by Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Balandin, V; Golubeva, N

    2010-01-01

    The problem of errors, arising due to finite BPM resolution, in the difference orbit parameters, which are found as a least squares fit to the BPM data, is one of the standard and important problems of accelerator physics. Even so for the case of transversely uncoupled motion the covariance matrix of reconstruction errors can be calculated "by hand", the direct usage of obtained solution, as a tool for designing of a "good measurement system", does not look to be fairly straightforward. It seems that a better understanding of the nature of the problem is still desirable. We make a step in this direction introducing dynamic into this problem, which at the first glance seems to be static. We consider a virtual beam consisting of virtual particles obtained as a result of application of reconstruction procedure to "all possible values" of BPM reading errors. This beam propagates along the beam line according to the same rules as any real beam and has all beam dynamical characteristics, such as emittances, energy ...

  10. Development of a Millimeter-Wave Beam Position and Profile Monitor for Transmission Efficiency Improvement in an ECRH System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimozuma T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a high power Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH system, a long-distance and low-loss transmission system is required to realize effective heating of nuclear fusion-relevant plasmas. A millimeter-wave beam position and profile monitor, which can be used in a high-power, evacuated, and cooled transmission line, is proposed, designed, manufactured, and tested. The beam monitor consists of a reflector, Peltier-device array and a heat-sink. It was tested using simulated electric heater power or gyrotron output power. The data obtained from the monitor were well agreed with the heat source position and profile. The methods of data analysis and mode-content analysis of a propagating millimeter-wave in the corrugated wave-guide are proposed.

  11. Development of a Turn-by-Turn Beam Position Monitoring System for Multiple Bunch Operation of the ATF Damping Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Burrows, P N; Kraljevic, N Blaskovic; Christian, G B; Davis, M R; Perry, C; Apsimon, R J; Constance, B; Gerbershagen, A; Resta-Lopez, J

    2012-01-01

    An FPGA-based monitoring system has been developed to study multi-bunch beam instabilities in the damping ring (DR) of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The system utilises a stripline beam position monitor (BPM) and single-stage down-mixing BPM processor. The system is designed to record the horizontal and/or vertical positions of up to three bunches in the DR with c. 150ns bunch spacing, or the head bunch of up to three trains in a multi-bunch mode with a bunch spacing of 5.6 ns. The FPGA firmware and data acquisition software allow the recording of turnby-turn data. An overview of the system and performance results will be presented.

  12. CRAB Cavity in CERN SPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam collisions with a crossing angle at the interaction point are often necessary in colliders to reduce the effects of parasitic collisions which induce emittance growth and decrease beam lifetime. The crossing angle reduces the geometrical overlap of the beams and hence the luminosity. Crab cavity offer a promising way to compensate the crossing angle and to realize effective head-on collisions. Moreover, the crab crossing mitigates the synchro-betatron resonances due to the crossing angle. A crab cavity experiment in SPS is proposed as a proof of principle before deciding on a full crab-cavity implementation in the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the effects of a single crab cavity on beam dynamics in the SPS and life time.

  13. Fast Beam Investigations of Two- and Three-Body Photodissociation by Time- and Position-Coincidence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Crider, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the photodissociation dynamics of small radicals and closed-shell anions. Imaging of photofragments in time- and position-coincidence allows the determination of mass distributions, translational energy distributions [P(ET) distributions], and in the case of three-body fragmentation channels, ternary Dalitz plots depicting the momentum disposal among the fragments. These data yield information about the potential en...

  14. Evaluation of the neurovascular bundle position at the palate with cone beam computed tomography: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Hasan Guney; Ayali, Aysa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the neurovascular bundle (NVB) position with cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Methods CBCT images of 345 patients were evaluated. The distance from the neurovascular bundle to the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) was measured (DNB). The distance from mid-palatal suture to the alveolar crest was used to determine the palatal depth. Palatal junction angle (PA) was measured using the junction angle between the hard palate and alveolar cre...

  15. Prognostic value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma with pathologically positive neck lymph node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative neck lymph node (LN) assessment with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients with pathologically positive LN. In total, 47 OSCC patients with pathologically positive LN were retrospectively reviewed with preoperative 18F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. All patients underwent surgical resection, neck dissection and postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy between March 2002 and October 2010. Histologic correlation was performed for findings of 18F-FDG PET and CT/MRI. Thirty-six (76.6%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed with neck LN metastasis by 18F-FDG PET and 32 (68.1%) of 47 cases were correctly diagnosed by CT/MRI. Follow-up ranged from 20 to 114 months (median, 56 months). Clinically negative nodal status evaluated by 18F-FDG PET or CT/MRI revealed a trend toward better clinical outcomes in terms of overall survival, disease-free survival, local recurrence-free survival, regional nodal recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates even though the trends were not statistically significant. However, there was no impact of neck node standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on clinical outcomes. Notably, SUVmax showed significant correlation with tumor size in LN (p 2 = 0.62). PET and CT/MRI status of LN also had significant correlation with the size of intranodal tumor deposit (p 2 = 0.37 and p 2 = 0.48, respectively). 18F-FDG PET and CT/MRI at the neck LNs might improve risk stratification in OSCC patients with pathologically positive neck LN in this study, even without significant prognostic value of SUVmax.

  16. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  17. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  18. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of LHC beam position monitor bodies and their supports

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of LHC beam position monitor bodies and their supports. Following a market survey carried out among 84 firms in eighteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2841/LHC/LHC) was sent on 2 March 2001 to six firms in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders from five firms in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with CECOM (IT), the lowest bidder, for the supply of 900 beam position monitor bodies and their supports for a total amount of 3 461 683 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 1 January 2003, with an option for up to 20% additional beam position monitor bodies and their supports, for an additional amount of 692 337 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 1 January 2003, bringing the total amount to 4 154 020 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 1 January 2003. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract val...

  19. Whole breast radiotherapy in prone and supine position: is there a place for multi-beam IMRT?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulliez, Thomas; Speleers, Bruno; Madani, Indira; De Gersem, Werner; Veldeman, Liv; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early stage breast cancer patients are long-term survivors and finding techniques that may lower acute and late radiotherapy-induced toxicity is crucial. We compared dosimetry of wedged tangential fields (W-TF), tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (TF-IMRT) and multi-beam IMRT (MB-IMRT) in prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Methods: MB-IMRT, TF-IMRT and W-TF treatment plans in prone and supine positions were generated for 18 unselected ...

  20. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  1. Laser cavity modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Damakoa, I.; Audounet, J.; Bouyssou, G.; Vassilieff, G.

    1993-01-01

    Two approachs of modelling nonhomogeneous cavity laser are presented. They are based on the beam propagation method which allows the use of fast Fourier transform (FFT). The resulting procedures provide selfconsistent solutions to the Maxwell and diffusion equations. Results are given to illustrate the two methods.


  2. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  3. Superconducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic properties of superconducting cavities for electron accelerators are discussed with special emphasis on the following topics: technical motivation for the use of superconducting cavities; surface impedance; the critical field of superconductors; anomalous losses; materials other than niobium; technological achievements for accelerating cavities. (author)

  4. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  5. Beam Test Results of High Q CBPM prototype for SXFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Luyang; Lai, Longwei; Yuan, Renxian

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at high precision beam position measurement of micron or sub-micron for Shanghai Soft X-ray free electron laser (SXFEL) facility which is being built in site of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics has developed a high Q cavity beam position monitor (CBPM) that the resonant frequency is 4.7 GHz and relevant BPM electronics include dedicated RF front-end and home-made digital BPM (DBPM) also has been done. The cavity design, cold test, system architecture and the beam test with three adjacent pickups has been performed in Shanghai Deep ultraviolet free electron laser(SDUV-FEL) facility are included. The beam experiment results show that the physical design of our CBPM is consistent with the expectations basically and the beam position resolution can fulfill the resolution requirements for the SXFEL project if we optimize the beam conditions.

  6. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  7. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Mandibular Condylar Position in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction and in Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Paknahad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem. The clinical significance of condyle-fossa relationships in the temporomandibular joint is a matter of controversy. Different studies have evaluated whether the position of the condyle is a predictor of the presence of temporomandibular disorder. Purpose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the condylar position according to gender in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD and healthy controls using cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods. CBCT of sixty temporomandibular joints in thirty patients with TMD and sixty joints of thirty subjects without TMJ disorder was evaluated in this study. The condylar position was assessed on the CBCT images. The data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Results. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the condylar position between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Posterior condylar position was more frequently observed in women and anterior condylar position was more prevalent in men in the symptomatic group. However, no significant differences in condylar position were found in asymptomatic subjects according to gender. Conclusion. This study showed no apparent association between condylar positioning and clinical findings in TMD patients.

  8. Stress relaxation in dual ion beam sputtered Nb2O5 and SiO2 thin films: application in a Fabry-Pérot filter array with 3D nanoimprinted cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Anayat; Wilke, Hans; Memon, Imran; Shen, Yannan; Nguyen, Duc Toan; Woidt, Carsten; Hillmer, Hartmut

    2015-05-01

    Miniaturized spectrometers can be implemented using Fabry-Pérot (FP) filter arrays. Such filters are defined by two parallel mirrors with a resonance cavity in between. For high optical quality, ion beam sputtered distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), with alternating high and low refractive index material pairs, can be used as the FP mirrors; while 3D nanoimprint technology provides an efficient way of implementing multiple organic FP cavities of different heights in a single step. However, the high residual stress in ion beam sputtered films results in poor adhesion between the DBR films and the organic polymer cavities, causing debonding of the DBR. Therefore, the residual stress of the ion beam sputtered films forming the DBRs must be reduced. Niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) are used as the DBR materials in this work due to their high index contrast, resulting in high reflectivity for only a few alternating pairs. Stress relaxation in ion beam sputtered Nb2O5 and SiO2 films is achieved in this work by deposition under simultaneous high energy ion bombardment (oxygen and argon gas mixture) from a second ion source. Using this technique, the film density and hence compressive film stress for both Nb2O5 and SiO2 films is reduced without introducing any additional optical absorption in the films. FP filter arrays fabricated with stress reduced Nb2O5 and SiO2 as DBR films exhibit high optical and mechanical performance, with good adhesion between the films and the polymer cavity.

  9. Stress relaxation in dual ion beam sputtered Nb2O5 and SiO2 thin films: application in a Fabry–Pérot filter array with 3D nanoimprinted cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniaturized spectrometers can be implemented using Fabry–Pérot (FP) filter arrays. Such filters are defined by two parallel mirrors with a resonance cavity in between. For high optical quality, ion beam sputtered distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), with alternating high and low refractive index material pairs, can be used as the FP mirrors; while 3D nanoimprint technology provides an efficient way of implementing multiple organic FP cavities of different heights in a single step. However, the high residual stress in ion beam sputtered films results in poor adhesion between the DBR films and the organic polymer cavities, causing debonding of the DBR. Therefore, the residual stress of the ion beam sputtered films forming the DBRs must be reduced. Niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) are used as the DBR materials in this work due to their high index contrast, resulting in high reflectivity for only a few alternating pairs. Stress relaxation in ion beam sputtered Nb2O5 and SiO2 films is achieved in this work by deposition under simultaneous high energy ion bombardment (oxygen and argon gas mixture) from a second ion source. Using this technique, the film density and hence compressive film stress for both Nb2O5 and SiO2 films is reduced without introducing any additional optical absorption in the films. FP filter arrays fabricated with stress reduced Nb2O5 and SiO2 as DBR films exhibit high optical and mechanical performance, with good adhesion between the films and the polymer cavity. (paper)

  10. Aperture Restriction Localisation in the LHC Arcs using an RF Mole and the LHC Beam Position Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Albertone, J; Boccard, C; Bogey, T; Borowiec, P; Calvo, E; Caspers, Friedhelm; Gasior, M; González, J L; Jenninger, B; Jensen, L K; Jones, O R; Kroyer, T; Weisz, S

    2008-01-01

    Ensuring that the two 27km beam pipes of the LHC do not contain aperture restrictions is of utmost importance. Most of the ring is composed of continuous cryostats, so any intervention to remove aperture restrictions when the machine is at its operating temperature of 1.9K will require a substantial amount of time. On warming-up the first cooled sector, several of the sliding contacts which provide electrical continuity for the beam image current between successive sections of the vacuum chamber were found to have buckled into the beam pipe. This led to a search for a technique to verify the integrity of a complete LHC arc (~3km) before any subsequent cool-down. In this paper the successful results from using a polycarbonate ball fitted with a 40MHz RF transmitter are presented. Propulsion of the ball is achieved by sucking filtered air through the entire arc, while its progress is traced every 54m via the LHC beam position measurement system which is auto-triggered by the RF transmitter on passage of the bal...

  11. Mechanical design, development, and installation of ultra high vacuum compatible beam position indicators for insertion devices in Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, two insertion devices (undulators) have been installed in long straight sections LS-2 and LS-3 of Indus-2. For precise monitoring of electron beam position at the entry and exit of these insertion devices, 17 mm vertical low gap type ultra high vacuum (UHV) compatible insertion device beam position indicators (IDBPls) have been designed, developed, and installed by Beam Diagnostics Section. The water cooled RF shielded bellows have also been designed, developed, and integrated in IDBPI assembly by Ultra High Vacuum Technology Section. The IDBPI has 17 mm (V) x 81 mm (H) internal race track profile aperture same as of vacuum chamber of insertion device. It incorporates four numbers of electrode subassemblies directly welded (by TIG) to its vacuum chamber. The button diameter is 9 mm. The horizontal separation between buttons is 12 mm. The IDBPI assemblies have been installed in Indus-2 ring and are in operation since Jan 2015. The mechanical design, development procedure and initial results have been described in this paper

  12. Influences of size and position of defects on the fatigue life of electron beam welded-aluminum alloy joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Li; ZHAO Haiyan; CAI Zhipeng; CUI Xiaofang

    2007-01-01

    Defects such as pores influence the fatigue life of electron beam-welded aluminum alloy joints. In this paper,the influences of pore size and position on the fatigue life of aluminum overlap joint are studied. A finite element model (FEM), combined with experimental data, is established to evaluate the fatigue life of overlap joints. By employing this FE model, the effects of pore size and position on fatigue lives of overlap joints are investigated and discussed. From the present study, when pore position is closer to the weld bead tip or the faying surface, the fatigue life decreases. Also, there is a critical size for the pore; when the pore size is larger than the critical value, the fatigue strength decreases sharply.

  13. Nanometer cavities studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positronium (Ps) is trapped in cavities in insulating solids, and the lifetime of ortho Ps is determined by the size of the cavity. The information on the properties of the cavities obtained by use of the standard slow positron beam and the 'normal' positron annihilation techniques is compared for several selected cases. (author)

  14. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  15. Experimental validation of the dual positive and negative ion beam acceleration in the plasma propulsion with electronegative gases thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PEGASES (Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative Gases) thruster is a gridded ion thruster, where both positive and negative ions are accelerated to generate thrust. In this way, additional downstream neutralization by electrons is redundant. To achieve this, the thruster accelerates alternately positive and negative ions from an ion-ion plasma where the electron density is three orders of magnitude lower than the ion densities. This paper presents a first experimental study of the alternate acceleration in PEGASES, where SF6 is used as the working gas. Various electrostatic probes are used to investigate the source plasma potential and the energy, composition, and current of the extracted beams. We show here that the plasma potential control in such system is key parameter defining success of ion extraction and is sensitive to both parasitic electron current paths in the source region and deposition of sulphur containing dielectric films on the grids. In addition, large oscillations in the ion-ion plasma potential are found in the negative ion extraction phase. The oscillation occurs when the primary plasma approaches the grounded parts of the main core via sub-millimetres technological inputs. By controlling and suppressing the various undesired effects, we achieve perfect ion-ion plasma potential control with stable oscillation-free operation in the range of the available acceleration voltages (±350 V). The measured positive and negative ion currents in the beam are about 10 mA for each component at RF power of 100 W and non-optimized extraction system. Two different energy analyzers with and without magnetic electron suppression system are used to measure and compare the negative and positive ion and electron fluxes formed by the thruster. It is found that at alternate ion-ion extraction the positive and negative ion energy peaks are similar in areas and symmetrical in position with +/− ion energy corresponding to the amplitude of the applied

  16. SU-E-T-467: Definition of the Proper Tolerances for Beam-Position Accuracy and Beam Width for Quality Assurance in Active Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To estimate the correlation between different dosimetric indices and the clinical outcome, which was recorded at different time points after the treatment, regarding the structure of salivary glands in head and neck cancer radiotherapy. Methods: 218 salivary glands from patients with head and neck tumours treated at IPOCFG from 2007 to 2013 were included in this study. The follow up of those patients consisted on weekly medical visits during the treatment that take about seven weeks. After that the patients had consults every three months. Treatment complications were graded using the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. The response of the salivary glands (both parotids, oral cavity and both submandibular glands) was analyzed for six time periods: 7th week, 3rd, 7th, 12th, 18th and 24th months after the start of the radiotherapy. The total dose distributions, converted to a fractionation scheme of 2Gy fractional doses, were used to calculate the DVHs and dose-response plots of salivary glands. Results: The small differences obtained between the mean DVHs showed that patients should be grouped into: with complications (G1+G2) and without complications (G0). The mean dose/2Gy was 22.2±13.2 Gy (G0) and 33.2±8.0 Gy (G1+G2) for the 7th week, 31.9±9.6 Gy (G0) and 34.6±6.8 Gy (G1+G2) for the 12th month and, 32.9±9.3 Gy (G0) and 37.2±8.5 Gy (G1+G2) for the 24th month. The dose-response plots for the 7th week and 24th month were similar to the dose-response curves published in the literature. Conclusion: In some cases, there were not major differences between the mean DVHs of the groups with and without complications in the salivary glands, when comparing them at different time periods. More radiobiological analysis should thus be made to estimate the clinical impact of those differences

  17. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  18. Design studies of SSC coupled cavity linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SSC coupled cavity linac (CCL) will be a side coupled structure operating at 1284 MHz to accelerate a nominal 25 mA H- beam from 70 MeV to 600 MeV. The authors present results of both cavity design and beam dynamics studies. Each accelerating cavity is optimized by SUPERFISH; coupled cavity characteristics in the region of low-, mid- and high-energies are checked by MAFIA-3D. MAFIA-3D was also used to design the bridge coupler systems. The beam dynamics and error analysis are simulated by CCLDYN and CCLTRACE. Possible future upgrade of the CCL to 1 GeV is also discussed

  19. Klystron beam bunching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description of electron-beam bunching phenomena in klystrons is presented. Beam harmonic current is defined, both space-charge and ballistic bunching are analyzed, Ramo's theorem is used to describe how a bunched beam drives a cavity, and a general cavity model including external coupling is provided. (author)

  20. The LACARA Vacuum Laser Accelerator Experiment: Beam Positioning and Alignment in a Strong Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LACARA (laser cyclotron auto-resonance accelerator) is a vacuum laser accelerator of electrons that is under construction at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is expected that the experiment will be assembled by September 2006; this paper presents progress towards this goal. According to numerical studies, as an electron bunch moves along the LACARA solenoidal magnetic field (∼5.2 T, length ∼1 m), it will be accelerated from 50 to ∼75 MeV by interacting with a 0.8 TW Gaussian-mode circularly polarized optical pulse provided by the ATF CO2 10.6μm laser system. The LACARA laser transport optics must handle 10 J and be capable of forming a Gaussian beam inside the solenoid with a 1.4 mm waist and a Rayleigh range of 60 cm. The electron optics must transport a bunch having input emittance of 0.015 mm-mrad and 100 μm waist through the magnet. Precision alignment between the electron beam and the solenoid magnetic axis is required, and a method to achieve this is described in detail. Emittance- filtering may be necessary to yield an accelerated bunch having a narrow (∼1%) energy-spread

  1. Simultaneous linear optics and coupling correction for storage rings with turn-by-turn beam position monitor data

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to simultaneously correct linear optics errors and linear coupling for storage rings using turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. The independent component analysis (ICA) method is used to isolate the betatron normal modes from the measured TbT BPM data. The betatron amplitudes and phase advances of the projections of the normal modes on the horizontal and vertical planes are then extracted, which, combined with dispersion measurement, are used to fit the lattice model. The fitting results are used for lattice correction. The method has been successfully demonstrated on the NSLS-II storage ring.

  2. Studies of the behavior of a reactor neutron beam at the sample position of a diffractometer using silicon monochromators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, F. U.; Ahsan, M. H.; Khan, Aysha A.; Kamal, I.; Awal, M. A.; Ahmad, A. A. Z.

    1992-02-01

    A computer program TISTA has been developed for calculation of different aspects of designing a double axis neutron spectrometer at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The mathematical algorithms used in this program are based on the formalisms used by Fischer, Sabine and Bacon. Angle and energy resolutions and flux density as functions of neutron wave length, beam collimation, crystal asymmetry and deviation from zero-Bragg-angle position for different silicon crystal planes (111, 220, 311) have been calculated.

  3. Metal-carbonyl organometallic polymers, PFpP, as resists for high-resolution positive and negative electron beam lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Cao, K; Wang, X S; Cui, B

    2015-12-25

    Metal-containing resists for electron beam lithography (EBL) are attracting attention owing to their high dry etching resistance and possibility for directly patterning metal-containing nanostructures. The newly developed organometallic metal carbonyl polymers, PFpP, can function as EBL resists with strong etching resistance. One significant feature of the PFpP resist is its high resolution. Line arrays with line-widths as narrow as 17 nm have been created. The resist can also be used in positive tone. PMID:26481609

  4. RF device for precision location of the beam-position detectors in the Energy Saver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task is to measure the center line of the beam detector with respect to the magnetic centerline with a precision of +-0.2 mm; the measurement must be made on 250 magnets (they come in 6 lengths, from 25'' to 99'') by a technician. Optical, mechanical, and electrical techniques for carrying out this procedure were considered. An RF device operating at 53 MHZ was adopted for the following reasons: (a) it provides complete electrical checkout of the hardware at operating frequency, including the bidirectional operation of the pickup, (b) no mechanical contact with the strip lines is required, and (c) the demands of production measurements and maintenance of calibration are better matched to the skills of an average technician. We describe the conceptual design, fabrication, and performance of this device

  5. Positional change of the condylar heads after wearing complete denture on dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in the position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa by a CBCT after wearing complete denture (CD). CBCT of 34 temporomandibular joints were taken from 9 male and 8 female patients with CB MercurayTM (Hitachi, Japan) before and after wearing a CD for rehabilitation. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated with Vimplant2.0TM (CyberMed, Korea) on the central parasagittal view and curved panoramic coronal view of the condylar head. A statistical evaluation was done with SPSS. The range of anteroposterior positional rate (AP) of condylar head within articular fossa was -16-5 and -10-12 respectively on the right and left sides. Before wearing CD, the AP rate showed discrepancy between right and left sides (p<0.05). After wearing CD, both condyles showed a tendency to decrease in posterior condylar position (right side; p<0.05). The average discrepancy between right and left side in mediolateral positional rate (MD) was 15.5 and 4.5 respectively before and after wearing CD. The improvement was observed in mediolateral relationship of both condylar heads after wearing CD (p<0.01). Before wearing CD, the average horizontal angle of long axis of condylar head was 79.6 ± 2.7 .deg. C and 80.1 ± 5.7 .deg. C respectively on the right and left sides. After wearing CD, both condyles were rotated in the same direction in average on axial plane. We observed with CBCT the significant clinical evidence in case of positional change of mandibular condyle after wearing complete denture.

  6. Large Size High Performance Transparent Amorphous Silicon Sensors for Laser Beam Position Detection and Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Kohler, C.; Lutz, B.; Schubert, M. B.

    2006-09-04

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparente amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30 x 30 mm2) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20 mA/W), an intinsic position resolution better than 3 m, a spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 m, deflection angles smaller than 10 rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition, multipoint alignment monitoring, using up to five sensors lined along a light path of about 5 meters, can be achieved with a resolution better than 20m. (Author)

  7. Large Size High Performance Transparent Amorphous Silicon Sensors for Laser Beam Position Detection and Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparente amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30 x 30 mm2) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20 mA/W), an intinsic position resolution better than 3 m, a spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 m, deflection angles smaller than 10 rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition, multipoint alignment monitoring, using up to five sensors lined along a light path of about 5 meters, can be achieved with a resolution better than 20m. (Author)

  8. HOM dampers for KEKB crab cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEKB accelerator is a high luminosity electron positron collider with high beam currents. Two crab cavities were installed in the KEKB ring in January 2007 and the crab crossing operation was started. The ferrite HOM dampers of the crab cavity successfully absorbed HOM powers more than 10 kW and enabled the cavity operation with high beam currents. KEKB recently achieved the world record of the luminosity of 21 nb-1s-1. The HOM dampers contributed to stable operations of the crab cavity at high beam currents. We will present HOM dampers for the crab cavity, absorbed HOM powers in the HOM dampers during high beam current operations and an addition of SiC HOM damper for higher beam current operations. (author)

  9. Correlation between hyoid bone position and airway dimensions in Chinese adolescents by cone beam computed tomography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y-Y

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between upper airway dimensions and hyoid bone position in Chinese adolescents based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. CBCT images from a total of 254 study subjects were included. The upper airway and hyoid bone parameters were measured by Materialism's interactive medical image control system (MIMICS) v.16.01 (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The airway dimensions were evaluated in terms of volume, cross-sectional area (CSA), mean CSA, length, anteroposterior dimension of the cross-section (AP), lateral dimension of the cross-section (LAT), and LAT/AP ratio. The hyoid bone position was evaluated using eight linear parameters and two angular parameters. Facial characteristics were evaluated using three linear parameters and three angular parameters. Most hyoid bone position parameters (especially the distance between the hyoid bone and hard palate) were significantly associated with most airway dimension parameters. Significant correlations were also observed between the different facial characteristic parameters and hyoid bone position parameters. Most airway dimension parameters showed significant correlations with linear facial parameters, but they displayed significant correlations with only a few angular facial parameters. These findings provide an understanding of the static relationship between the hyoid bone position and airway dimensions, which may serve as a reference for surgeons before orthodontic or orthognathic surgery. PMID:26949129

  10. Correction of patient positioning errors based on in-line cone beam CTs: clinical implementation and first experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häring Peter

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT for setup correction in radiotherapy. Patients and methods For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI, was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. Results and discussion Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point

  11. Correction of patient positioning errors based on in-line cone beam CTs: clinical implementation and first experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT) for setup correction in radiotherapy. For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients) were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI), was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK) algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point correction was carried out in 4 cases. The additional workload of the described

  12. Performance of photon position monitors and stability of undulator beams at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Position monitors are implemented in three undulator beamlines at the ALS. Their performance has been studied carefully on one of these lines and is reviewed. The monitors work as expected and show the ALS to be an exceptionally stable source of synchrotron radiation

  13. Positioning accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography in combination with a HexaPOD robot treatment table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To scrutinize the positioning accuracy and reproducibility of a commercial hexapod robot treatment table (HRTT) in combination with a commercial cone-beam computed tomography system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods and Materials: The mechanical stability of the X-ray volume imaging (XVI) system was tested in terms of reproducibility and with a focus on the moveable parts, i.e., the influence of kV panel and the source arm on the reproducibility and accuracy of both bone and gray value registration using a head-and-neck phantom. In consecutive measurements the accuracy of the HRTT for translational, rotational, and a combination of translational and rotational corrections was investigated. The operational range of the HRTT was also determined and analyzed. Results: The system performance of the XVI system alone was very stable with mean translational and rotational errors of below 0.2 mm and below 0.2o, respectively. The mean positioning accuracy of the HRTT in combination with the XVI system summarized over all measurements was below 0.3 mm and below 0.3o for translational and rotational corrections, respectively. The gray value match was more accurate than the bone match. Conclusion: The XVI image acquisition and registration procedure were highly reproducible. Both translational and rotational positioning errors can be corrected very precisely with the HRTT. The HRTT is therefore well suited to complement cone-beam computed tomography to take full advantage of position correction in six degrees of freedom for IGRT. The combination of XVI and the HRTT has the potential to improve the accuracy of high-precision treatments

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of vacuum button feedthroughs for the LHC beam position monitors

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 4250 button feedthroughs for the LHC beam position monitors. Following a market survey carried out among 42 firms in fourteen Member States and two firms in the USA and a price enquiry for qualifying prototypes sent to five firms and a consortium comprising two firms in the Member States and to two firms in the USA (DO-17399/SL/LHC) a call for tenders (IT-2530/SL/LHC) was sent on 21 February 2000 to two firms in the USA. By the closing date, CERN had received two tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm CERAMASEAL (USA), the lowest bidder, for the supply of 4250 button feedthroughs for the LHC beam position monitors for a total amount of 897 524 USD (1 468 222 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, with an option for the supply of up to 500 additional button feedthroughs, for a total amount of 105 590 USD (172 730 Swiss francs), not subject to revision, bringing the total amount to a maxi...

  15. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of feedthrough assemblies for the LHC beam position monitors

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of feedthrough assemblies for the LHC beam position monitors. Following a market survey carried out among 61 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2846/SL/LHC) was sent on 29 May 2001 to one firm in one Member State. By the closing date, CERN had received a tender from that firm. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with HUBER & SUHNER (CH), the only bidder, for the supply of 1 000 feedthrough assemblies for the LHC beam position monitors for a total amount of 637 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision, with an option for up to 10% additional feedthrough assemblies, for an additional amount of 63 700 Swiss francs, not subject to revision, bringing the total amount to 700 700 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CH - 100%.

  16. Observation of positional relation between mandibular third molars and the mandibular canal on limited cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the preoperative use of limited cone beam computed tomography (CT) with a dental CT scanner for the assessment of mandibular third molars before extraction. Cone beam CT provides 42.7-mm-high and 30-mm-wide rectangular solid images, with a resolution of less than 0.2 mm. The positional relationship between the mandibular third molars and the mandibular canal was examined by dental CT. Sixty-eight lower third molars of 62 patients whose teeth were superimposed on the mandibular canal on periapical or panoramic radiographs were studied. Dental CT scans clearly demonstrated the positional relationship between the mandibular canal and the teeth. The mandibular canal was located buccally to the roots of 16 teeth, lingually to the roots of 27 teeth, inferiorly to the roots of 23 teeth, and between the roots of 2 teeth. The presence of bone between the mandibular canal and the teeth was not noted in 7 of 16 buccal cases, 24 of 27 lingual cases, and 10 of 23 inferior cases on dental CT scans, suggesting that the canal was in contact with the teeth. Fifty-nine of the 68 mandibular third molars were surgically removed, and postoperative transient hypoesthesia occurred in 4 patients. Dental CT scans showed no bone between the mandibular canal and the teeth in all 4 patients. Hypoesthesia was not related to the bucco-lingual location of the mandibular canal or to the extent of bone loss between the canal and the teeth. However, hypoesthesia did not occur in patients with bone between the mandibular canal and the teeth. Thus, information on the distance between the canal and teeth on dental CT scans was useful for predicting the risk of inferior alveolar nerve damage. Because of its high resolution and low radiation dose, cone beam CT was useful for examination before mandibular third molar surgery. (author)

  17. Non-planar four-mirror optical cavity for high intensity gamma ray flux production by pulsed laser beam Compton scattering off GeV-electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Bonis, J; Cizeron, R; Cohen, M; Cormier, E; Cornebise, P; Delerue, N; Flaminio, R; Jehanno, D; Labaye, F; Lacroix, M; Marie, R; Mercier, B; Peinaud, Y; Pinard, L; Prevost, C; Soskov, V; Variola, A; Zomer, F

    2011-01-01

    As part of the R&D toward the production of high flux of polarised Gamma-rays we have designed and built a non-planar four-mirror optical cavity with a high finesse and operated it at a particle accelerator. We report on the main challenges of such cavity, such as the design of a suitable laser based on fiber technology, the mechanical difficulties of having a high tunability and a high mechanical stability in an accelerator environment and the active stabilization of such cavity by implementing a double feedback loop in a FPGA.

  18. Modeling positioning uncertainties of prostate cancer external beam radiation therapy using pre-treatment data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of treatment plan data and image guidance (IG) on positioning uncertainty during prostate cancer (PCa) radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Body mass index (BMI), planning target volume (PTV), bladder volume (BV), and rectal cross section area (RCS) were collected for 267 consecutive PCa patients undergoing daily IGRT. Radiographic isocenter corrections to intra-prostatic fiducials for 12,490 treatment fractions were used to derive random (RE) and systematic (SE) inter-fraction uncertainties for the cardinal axes. These data were used to simulate RE and SE for weekly IG and Action Level (AL)-IG treatment protocols. Results: SE and RE were 2–5 and 3–4 mm in the cardinal axes, respectively, during simulation of no IG. Without IG, positive correlations (p < 0.01) were noted for (1) anterior-posterior RE vs. RCS and BV and (2) cranio–caudal RE vs. RCS, BV and BMI. The RE increase was 3 mm for the highest quartile of RCS, BV and BMI. Daily IGRT eliminated this relationship. 3D IG corrections of 1 cm or more occured in 27% of treatment fractions and in 97% of patients. Conclusion: PCa patients with elevated pre-treatment BV, RCS and BMI have increased inter-fractionation positioning uncertainty and appear the primary candidates for daily IGRT

  19. Superconducting versus normal conducting cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Podlech, Holger

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important issues of high-power hadron linacs is the choice of technology with respect to superconducting or room-temperature operation. The favour for a specific technology depends on several parameters such as the beam energy, beam current, beam power and duty factor. This contribution gives an overview of the comparison between superconducting and normal conducting cavities. This includes basic radiofrequency (RF) parameters, design criteria, limitations, required RF and plu...

  20. Control of coupling in 1D photonic crystal coupled-cavity nano-wire structures via hole diameter and position variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, A. R. Md; De La Rue, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    We have successfully demonstrated close experimental control of the resonance splitting/free spectral range of a coupled micro-cavity one-dimensional photonic crystal/photonic wire device structure based on silicon-on-insulator. Clear splitting of the resonances, with FSR values ranging from 8 nm to 48 nm, was obtained through the use of different hole arrangements within the middle section of the device structures, between the coupled cavities. The results show good agreement with calculations obtained using a finite-difference time-domain simulation approach.

  1. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM And SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  2. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM and SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations

  3. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM and SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; /Lancaster U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-06-23

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  4. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM And SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; /Lancaster U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  5. Metal micro-detectors: development of 'transparent' position sensitive detector for beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal Micro-strip Detector (MMD) represents a novel position sensitive detector for wide range of applications. The main advantages of MMD are low thickness, high radiation resistance and high spatial resolution. MMD production technology includes some stages: micro-strip layout made by photo-lithography on silicon wafer, plasma-chemistry etching of the silicon wafer in the operating window, micro-cabling connection to the readout electronics and DAQ. Commercially available read-out systems (VASCM3 microchip preamplifier, Time Pix readout chip, Gotthard, X-DAS) have been studied for use with MMD. Characterization studies of the MMD are presented in details.

  6. Design, development, and performance of an adapter for simulation of ocular melanoma patients in supine position for proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient assembly adapter system for ocular melanoma patient simulation was developed and its performance evaluated. The aim for the construction of the apparatus was to simulate the patients in supine position using a commercial x-ray simulator. The apparatus consists of a base plate, head immobilization holder, patient assembly system that includes fixation light and collimator system. The reproducibility of the repeated fixation was initially tested with a head phantom. Simulation and verification films were studied for seven consecutive patients treated with proton beam therapy. Patient's simulation was performed in a supine position using a dental fixation bite block and a thermoplastic head mask immobilization device with a patient adapter system. Two orthogonal x rays were used to obtain the x, y, and z coordinates of sutured tantalum rings for treatment planning with the EYEPLAN software. The verification films were obtained in treatment position with the fixation light along the central axis of the eye. The results indicate good agreement within 0.5 mm deviations. The results of this investigation showed that the same planning accuracy could be achieved by performing simulation using the adapter described above with a patient in the supine position as that obtained by performing simulation with the patient in the seated, treatment position. The adapter can also be attached to the head of the chair for simulating in the seated position using a fixed x-ray unit. This has three advantages: (1) this will save radiation therapists time; (2) it eliminates the need for arranging access to the treatment room, thus avoiding potential conflicts in treatment room usage; and (3) it allows the use of a commercial simulator

  7. Design, development, and performance of an adapter for simulation of ocular melanoma patients in supine position for proton beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daftari, I.; Phillips, T. L.

    2003-06-01

    A patient assembly adapter system for ocular melanoma patient simulation was developed and its performance evaluated. The aim for the construction of the apparatus was to simulate the patients in supine position using a commercial x-ray simulator. The apparatus consists of a base plate, head immobilization holder, patient assembly system that includes fixation light and collimator system. The reproducibility of the repeated fixation was initially tested with a head phantom. Simulation and verification films were studied for seven consecutive patients treated with proton beam therapy. Patient's simulation was performed in a supine position using a dental fixation bite block and a thermoplastic head mask immobilization device with a patient adapter system. Two orthogonal x rays were used to obtain the x, y, and z coordinates of sutured tantalum rings for treatment planning with the EYEPLAN software. The verification films were obtained in treatment position with the fixation light along the central axis of the eye. The results indicate good agreement within 0.5 mm deviations. The results of this investigation showed that the same planning accuracy could be achieved by performing simulation using the adapter described above with a patient in the supine position as that obtained by performing simulation with the patient in the seated, treatment position. The adapter can also be attached to the head of the chair for simulating in the seated position using a fixed x-ray unit. This has three advantages: (1) this will save radiation therapists time; (2) it eliminates the need for arranging access to the treatment room, thus avoiding potential conflicts in treatment room usage; and (3) it allows the use of a commercial simulator.

  8. The Influence of Tuners and Temperature on the Higher Order Mode Spectrum for 1.3 GHz SCRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ainsworth, R; Zhang, P; Grecki, M; Baboi, N; Wamsat, T; Eddy, N

    2013-01-01

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) are of concern for superconducting cavities as they can drive instabilities and so are usually damped and monitored. With special dedicated electronics, HOMs can provide information on the position on the beam. It has been proposed that piezo tuners used to keep the cavities operating at 1.3 GHz could alter the HOM spectrum altering the calibration constants used to read out the beam position affecting long term stability of the system. Also, of interest is how the cavity reacts to the slow tuner. Detuning and the retuning the cavity may alter the HOM spectrum. This is of particular interest for future machines not planning to use dedicated HOM damping as the tuning procedure may shift the frequency of HOMs onto dangerous resonances. The effect of temperature on the HOM spectrum is also investigated. An investigation of these effects has been performed at FLASH and the results are presented.

  9. Development of EPICS based beam-line experimental control employing motor controller for precision positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Synchrotron Radiation Source the beamline experiments are carried out in radiation prone environment, inside the hutch, which demands to conduct experiments remotely. These experiments involves instrument control and data acquisition from various devices. Another factor which attributes to system complexity is precise positioning of sample and placement of detectors. A large number of stepper motors are engaged for achieving the required precision positioning. This work is a result of development of Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) based control system to interface a stepper motor controller developed indigenously by Laser Electronics Support Division of RRCAT. EPICS is an internationally accepted open source software environment which follows toolkit approach and standard model paradigm. The operator interface for the control system software was implemented using CSS BOY. The system was successfully tested for Ethernet based remote access. The developed control software comprises of an OPI and alarm handler (EPICS ALH). Both OPI and ALH are linked with PV's defined in database files. The development process resulted into a set of EPICS based commands for controlling stepper motor. These commands are independent of operator interface, i.e. stepper motor can be controlled by using these set of commands directly on EPICS prompt. This command set is illustrated in the above table. EPICS Alarm Handler was also tested independently by running these commands on EPIC prompt. If not using ALH, operator can read the alarm status of a PV using 'SEVR' and 'STAT' attributes. (author)

  10. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, H., E-mail: hahnh@bnl.gov [Collider–Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Calaga, R. [Collider–Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); European Organization for Nuclear Research, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 117943 (United States); Xu, Wencan [Collider–Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-01-11

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥10{sup 6} were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S{sub 21} transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the results for HOMs in the first two dipole bands, the un-damped modes in the first quadrupole band, and the identification of several high-Q modes beyond.

  11. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  12. Beam Test Results of High Q CBPM prototype for SXFEL

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jian; Leng, Yongbin; Yu, Luyang; Lai, Longwei; Yuan, Renxian

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at high precision beam position measurement of micron or sub-micron for Shanghai Soft X-ray free electron laser (SXFEL) facility which is being built in site of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics has developed a high Q cavity beam position monitor (CBPM) that the resonant frequency is 4.7 GHz and relevant BPM electronics include dedicated RF front-end and home-made digital BPM (DBPM) also has been done. The cavity design, cold test...

  13. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to cavities. Treatment may involve: Fillings Crowns Root canals Dentists fill teeth by removing the decayed tooth ... gold, porcelain, or porcelain attached to metal. A root canal is recommended if the nerve in a tooth ...

  14. Using cone-beam computed tomography to evaluate the impact of bladder filling status on target position in prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to assess bladder filling status and its impact on target position during daily intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in prostate cancer patients. Patients and methods: 23 patients with prostate cancer undergoing image-guided IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) were included. On-board CBCT images were acquired daily and an endorectal balloon was placed daily. All patients were instructed to have a full bladder. The interfraction changes in bladder dimensions in left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions were measured from CBCT images. Distances from the uppermost part of prostate to pubic bone (PP) and from the uppermost part of prostate to treatment isocenter (PI) were measured to determine changes in target position. Standard deviation (SD) in all fractions of each patient was used to compare the variations between patients. Bladder dimension change ratio and Z-score were used to normalize data between patients. Results: a total of 867 CBCT images were evaluated. The average LR, AP, and SI bladder dimensions were 7.8 ± 1.5 cm, 6.7 ± 1.4 cm, and 5.6 ± 1.7 cm, respectively. The average LR, AP, and SI bladder dimension change ratios were 0.88 ± 0.17, 0.90 ± 0.15, and 0.86 ± 0.32, respectively. The SD was significantly greater in SI dimension than in LR (p < 0.001) and AP (p < 0.001) dimensions. The interfraction changes in the three bladder dimensions were significantly larger than those of target position, and did not correlate with target position changes. Conclusion: though they were not negligible, changes in bladder filling status did not have a significant impact on target position. (orig.)

  15. Performance of a grazing incidence spectrometer system employing a position sensitive microchannel plate detector for beam-foil measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1-meter grazing incidence spectrometer was adapted for in-beam experiments with the cyclotron this year. This instrument makes it possible to extend studies of radiation resulting from heavy-ion collisions into the extreme ultraviolet region. The inherent inefficiency of the grazing incidence spectrometer and the weakness of the beam-foil light source in this wavelength region makes it prudent to explore ways of improving the data collection efficiency. Recent reports of the employment of a position sensitive microchannel plate in a grazing incidence spectrometer and of the resulting improvement in detection efficiency by one to two orders of magnitude motivated the work described in this report. A Galileo 3508 chevron microchannel plate (MCP) with a resistive anode encoder (RAE) was first evaluated in a test configuration prior to mounting it on the grazing incidence spectrometer. In these tests, the MCP was mounted on a moveable frame located 5.6 inches above a (Manson) soft x-ray source. An adjustable slit was placed 0.35 inches in front of the MCP to restrict the illumination of the plate to a finite slice. The MCP could be moved across the slit by means of a micrometer drive. In this way, the linearity and response of the plate could be checked

  16. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients: Surgical Clips as Surrogate for Breast Excision Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the use of surgical clips as a surrogate for localization of the excision cavity and to quantify the stability of the clips' positions during the course of external beam radiotherapy for breast cancer patients, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one breast cancer patients with surgical clips placed in the breast excision cavity were treated in a supine position with 28 daily fractions. CBCT scans were regularly acquired for a setup correction protocol. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were registered to the planning CT scans, using gray-value registration of the excision cavity region and chamfer matching of the clips. Subsequently, residual setup errors (systematic [Σ] and random [σ]) of the excision cavity were estimated relative to the clips' registration. Finally, the stability of the clips' positions were quantified as the movement of each separate clip according to the center of gravity of the excision cavity. Results: When clips were used for online setup corrections, the residual errors of the excision cavity were Σleft-right = 1.2, σleft-right = 1.0; Σcranial-caudal = 1.3, σcranial-caudal = 1.2; and Σanterior-posterior = 0.7, σanterior-posterior = 0.9 mm. Furthermore, the average distance (over all patients) between the clips and centers of gravity of the excision cavities was 18.8 mm (on the planning CT) and was reduced to 17.4 mm (measured on the last CBCT scan). Conclusion: Clips move in the direction of the center of gravity of the excision cavity, on average, 1.4 mm. The clips are good surrogates for locating the excision cavity and providing small residual errors.

  17. Construction of cavity fabrication facility in KEK (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In developing superconducting cavities for accelerator which are major components of the International Linear Collider (ILC), electron beam welding (EBW) is absolutely necessary because Nb material is used for cavities. The technology of EBW influences the cavity performance that is cavity accelerator gradient. Because of EBW in the equator part of cavities and large amount of process is needed for cavity manufacturing process. In KEK we constructed the cavity fabrication facility which is a pilot plant for the superconducting cavity processing technology. As of March in 2010, clean room was completed and the major equipment, the EBW and CP treatment equipment, have been installed in the clean room in April, 2011. (author)

  18. Crab cavities for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the high-luminosity LHC upgrade program (HL-LHC), the installation of crab cavities (CC) is essential to compensate the geometric luminosity loss due to the crossing angle and for luminosity leveling. One of the major challenges is the compatibility with machine protection in the regime of >500 MJ stored beam energy. Especially in a failure case (e.g. a CC quench or sparking in the coupler), the voltage and/or phase of a CC can change significantly with a fast time-constant of the order of a LHC-turn. This can lead to large, global betatron oscillations of the beam. The status of the LHC crab cavity upgrade program is presented and the influence of crab cavities on the beam dynamics is discussed. Necessary countermeasures to limit the impact of CC failures to an acceptable level are specified and operational scenarios that are compatible with machine protection considerations are proposed.

  19. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, Astrid van der, E-mail: a.vanderhorst@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wognum, Silvia; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Jong, Rianne de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Fockens, Paul [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online

  20. Interfractional Position Variation of Pancreatic Tumors Quantified Using Intratumoral Fiducial Markers and Daily Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify interfractional pancreatic position variation using fiducial markers visible on daily cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In addition, we analyzed possible migration of the markers to investigate their suitability for tumor localization. Methods and Materials: For 13 pancreatic cancer patients with implanted Visicoil markers, CBCT scans were obtained before 17 to 25 fractions (300 CBCTs in total). Image registration with the reference CT was used to determine the displacement of the 2 to 3 markers relative to bony anatomy and to each other. We analyzed the distance between marker pairs as a function of time to identify marker registration error (SD of linear fit residuals) and possible marker migration. For each patient, we determined the mean displacement of markers relative to the reference CT (systematic position error) and the spread in displacements (random position error). From this, we calculated the group systematic error, Σ, and group random error, σ. Results: Marker pair distances showed slight trends with time (range, −0.14 to 0.14 mm/day), possibly due to tissue deformation, but no shifts that would indicate marker migration. The mean SD of the fit residuals was 0.8 mm. We found large interfractional position variations, with for 116 of 300 (39%) fractions a 3-dimensional vector displacement of >10 mm. The spread in displacement varied significantly (P<.01) between patients, from a vector range of 9.1 mm to one of 24.6 mm. For the patient group, Σ was 3.8, 6.6, and 3.5 mm; and σ was 3.6, 4.7 and 2.5 mm, in left–right, superior–inferior, and anterior–posterior directions, respectively. Conclusions: We found large systematic displacements of the fiducial markers relative to bony anatomy, in addition to wide distributions of displacement. These results for interfractional position variation confirm the potential benefit of using fiducial markers rather than bony anatomy for daily online